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Sample records for ccd dr mikrokalzifikationen

  1. Measurements of STI 941 from the Palomar Observatory Sky Surveys, Gaia DR1, and New CCD Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kent; Priest, Allen

    2018-01-01

    We report and compare seven new measurements of position angle and separation of the double star WDS 20023+6515 (STI 941) from images obtained from the Palomar Observatory Sky Surveys POSS I (1953) and POSS II (1991, 1994), calculated from position data provided by Gaia DR1, and from analysis of new CCD images. Trends in separation and position angle change are difficult to determine due to the possible inaccuracy of the earliest measurements. There is no indication of an elliptical orbit. Analysis of the proper motions sug-gests that STI 941 can be classed a Similar Proper Motion pair. Analysis of parallax is inconclusive due to high parallax error.

  2. Precise CCD positions of Himalia using Gaia DR1 in 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, H. W.; Peng, Q. Y.; Wang, N.

    2017-05-01

    In order to obtain high-precision CCD positions of Himalia, the sixth Jovian satellite, a total of 598 CCD observations have been obtained during the years 2015-2016. The observations were made by using the 2.4 and 1 m telescopes administered by Yunnan Observatories over 27 nights. Several factors that would influence the positional precision of Himalia were analysed, including the reference star catalogue used, the geometric distortion and the phase effect. By taking advantage of its unprecedented positional precision, the recently released catalogue Gaia Data Release 1 was chosen to match reference stars in the CCD frames of both Himalia and open clusters, which were observed for deriving the geometric distortion. The latest version of sofa library was used to calculate the positions of reference stars. The theoretical positions of Himalia were retrieved from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Horizons System that includes the satellite ephemeris JUP300, while the positions of Jupiter were based on the planetary ephemeris DE431. Our results showed that the means of observed minus computed (O - C) residuals are 0.071 and -0.001 arcsec in right ascension and declination, respectively. Their standard deviations are estimated at about 0.03 arcsec in each direction.

  3. Detection of interstellar CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, F.; Boulanger, F.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Gerin, M.; Bogey, M.

    1985-01-01

    The first detection of interstellar CCD has been obtained in the N = 3-2, J = 7/2-5/2 line at 216.3732 GHz towards the Kleinman-Low nebula. An abundance ratio CCD/CCH of 0.045 is found, indicating in this molecule a deuterium enhancement similar to that found for HNC, but an order of magnitude higher than for HCN. Negative results towards DR 21(OH), NGC 2264, L 134N, TM Cl, Rho OphB2, and IRC 10216 rule out a stronger D enhancement for CCD than for other deuterated molecules in these sources. Predictions of currently developed ion-molecule reaction schemes are consistent with the CCD line detected and the negative results.

  4. CCD Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Roger R.

    1983-01-01

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation eminating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other.

  5. Advanced CCD camera developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condor, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  6. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  7. Testing fully depleted CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  8. CCD Camera Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheim, Bob; Argyle, R. W.

    One night late in 1918, astronomer William Milburn, observing the region of Cassiopeia from Reverend T.H.E.C. Espin's observatory in Tow Law (England), discovered a hitherto unrecorded double star (Wright 1993). He reported it to Rev. Espin, who measured the pair using his 24-in. reflector: the fainter star was 6.0 arcsec from the primary, at position angle 162.4 ^{circ } (i.e. the fainter star was south-by-southeast from the primary) (Espin 1919). Some time later, it was recognized that the astrograph of the Vatican Observatory had taken an image of the same star-field a dozen years earlier, in late 1906. At that earlier epoch, the fainter star had been separated from the brighter one by only 4.8 arcsec, at position angle 186.2 ^{circ } (i.e. almost due south). Were these stars a binary pair, or were they just two unrelated stars sailing past each other? Some additional measurements might have begun to answer this question. If the secondary star was following a curved path, that would be a clue of orbital motion; if it followed a straight-line path, that would be a clue that these are just two stars passing in the night. Unfortunately, nobody took the trouble to re-examine this pair for almost a century, until the 2MASS astrometric/photometric survey recorded it in late 1998. After almost another decade, this amateur astronomer took some CCD images of the field in 2007, and added another data point on the star's trajectory, as shown in Fig. 15.1.

  9. CCD camera for an autoguider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, William V.

    1991-06-01

    The requirements of a charge coupled device (CCD) autoguider camera and the specifications of a camera that we propose to build to meet those requirements will be discussed. The design goals of both the package and the electronics will be considered.

  10. CCD Corner-Turning Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    devices and exhibits the characteristic 1-(0 + t/r )l transient with T- CL/ gmo -18 ns, where gmo Is the device transconductence at t - 0+. Figure 63(b...Diamon, A. M. Mohsen, and T. C. McGill, "Charge Transfer In Buried Channel CCD’s," ISSCC Philadelphia, Digest of Tech. Papers, 146 (1974). 14. See

  11. The OCA CCD Camera Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    multi CCD arrays for wide field telescopes with an array of 8x8 1K CCDs in use at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile . The same group is also involved...Verify key EPROM -292H VIH . VIH Program security bitl 1 29AH . VPP Program security’ bit 2 *. .298H -Vpp Verify security bits - 9HVIH ViI NOTE: 1...Pulsed from V.. to VIL and returned to VIH . EPROM PROGRAMMING AND VERIFICATION ..t= 21’C to-+27 ’rC:-VCC= 5V ±10%VS3 = OV. SYMBOL I .-- PARAMETER MIN MAX

  12. CCD research. [design, fabrication, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassaway, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental problems encountered in designing, fabricating, and applying CCD's are reviewed. Investigations are described and results and conclusions are given for the following: (1) the development of design analyses employing computer aided techniques and their application to the design of a grapped structure; (2) the role of CCD's in applications to electronic functions, in particular, signal processing; (3) extending the CCD to silicon films on sapphire (SOS); and (4) all aluminum transfer structure with low noise input-output circuits. Related work on CCD imaging devices is summarized.

  13. CCD-based vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Damerell, C J S

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, CCD-based vertex detectors have been used to construct some of the most precise 'tracking microscopes' in particle physics. They were initially used by the ACCMOR collaboration for fixed target experiments in CERN, where they enabled the lifetimes of some of the shortest-lived charm particles to be measured precisely. The migration to collider experiments was accomplished in the SLD experiment, where the original 120 Mpixel detector was later upgraded to one with 307 Mpixels. This detector was used in a range of physics studies which exceeded the capability of the LEP detectors, including the most precise limit to date on the Bs mixing parameter. This success, and the high background hit densities that will inevitably be encountered at the future TeV-scale linear collider, have established the need for a silicon pixel-based vertex detector at this machine. The technical options have now been broadened to include a wide range of possible silicon imaging technologies as well as CCDs (mon...

  14. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccot, Sila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  15. Cryostat and CCD for MEGARA at GTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Domínguez, E.; Ferrusca, D.; Tulloch, S.; Velázquez, M.; Carrasco, E.; Gallego, J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Sánchez, F. M.; Vílchez Medina, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is the new integral field unit (IFU) and multi-object spectrograph (MOS) instrument for the GTC. The spectrograph subsystems include the pseudo-slit, the shutter, the collimator with a focusing mechanism, pupil elements on a volume phase holographic grating (VPH) wheel and the camera joined to the cryostat through the last lens, with a CCD detector inside. In this paper we describe the full preliminary design of the cryostat which will harbor the CCD detector for the spectrograph. The selected cryogenic device is an LN2 open-cycle cryostat which has been designed by the "Astronomical Instrumentation Lab for Millimeter Wavelengths" at INAOE. A complete description of the cryostat main body and CCD head is presented as well as all the vacuum and temperature sub-systems to operate it. The CCD is surrounded by a radiation shield to improve its performance and is placed in a custom made mechanical mounting which will allow physical adjustments for alignment with the spectrograph camera. The 4k x 4k pixel CCD231 is our selection for the cryogenically cooled detector of MEGARA. The characteristics of this CCD, the internal cryostat cabling and CCD controller hardware are discussed. Finally, static structural finite element modeling and thermal analysis results are shown to validate the cryostat model.

  16. Development of CCD controller for scientific application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. S.; Pathan, F. M.; Shah, U. V., Prof; Makwana, D. H., Prof; Anandarao, B. G., Prof

    2010-02-01

    Photoelectric equipment has wide applications such as spectroscopy, temperature measurement in infrared region and in astronomical research etc. A photoelectric transducer converts radiant energy into electrical energy. There are two types of photoelectric transducers namely photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and charged couple device (CCD) are used to convert radiant energy into electrical signal. Now the entire modern instruments use CCD technology. We have designed and developed a CCD camera controller using camera chip CD47-10 of Marconi which has 1K × 1K pixel for space application only.

  17. CCD OBSERVATIONS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Charged Coupled Device (CCD) cameras from ESO were used by groups to observe the outburst of comet Halley using a variety of telescopes and chip sets.

  18. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  19. Drømmejobbet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2012-01-01

    Medarbejdere vil i fremtiden også kunne arbejde, mens de sover. Virksomheder tilbyder snart deres ansatte interne kurser i ‘lucid dreaming’. Disse giver mulighed for, at man i sine drømme bliver bevidst om, at man drømmer og således kan manipulere dem. Det skal nu udnyttes. Management...

  20. Dr. Dampe - Doctor Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, John

    2009-01-01

    On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings......On Dr.phil. J.J.Dampe's fight for democracy in the first part of the 19th century in Denmark and his dramatic writings...

  1. Dr. Daniel Carter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  2. Visit of Dr. Stoltenberg

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1966-01-01

    During a visit of Dr. Stoltenberg, Minister for Scientific Research of the Federal Republic of Germany (centre), Professor Paul explains a point, whilst standing by are (left to right) Dr. Schulte-Meermann, Chairman of the Finance Committee, professor Weisskopf, former Director-General, and professor Gregory Director-General.

  3. Obituary: Dr Dimitri Tassiopoulos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-22

    Jun 22, 2017 ... closely together with Prof. Phaswana-Mafuya, managed to bring the journal under the Taylor & Francis Online stable with Routledge. Press. SAHARAJ's impact factor has risen during his leadership. Dr Tassiopoulos also managed the SAHARA Conference. Dr Tassiopoulos was involved in collaborating in ...

  4. Galande, Dr Sanjeev

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: General Biology. Galande, Dr Sanjeev Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 20 September 1967. Specialization: Epigenetics, Chromatin Biology, Gene Regulation, Genomics and Proteomics Address: Centre for Excellence in Epigenetics, Indian Institute of Science Education, & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, ...

  5. The DR-2 project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølgaard, Povl Lebeck

    2003-01-01

    DR-2 was a 5 MW tank type, water moderated and cooled research reactor, which was operated at the Risø National Laboratory from 1959 to 1975. After the close-down in1975 the DR-2 has been kept in safe enclosure until now. The aim of the DR-2 projectreported here was to characterize the present...... their activity had been measured. The activity of the radiation shield of the reactor was measured in three different ways: By drilling two cored holes through the shield, by thermo-luminescence dosimeter measurements in vertical tubes in theconcrete shield and by measurements through an open beam hole...

  6. Protein diffraction experiments with Atlas CCD detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; Kovaľ, Tomáš; Dušek, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 64, Suppl. - abstracts (2008), C192 ISSN 0108-7673. [Congress of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr) /21./. 23.08.2008-31.08.2008, Osaka] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : x-ray data collection * CCD detectors * protein crystallography applications Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  7. Gopinath, Dr Chinnakonda Subramanian

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinath, Dr Chinnakonda Subramanian Ph.D. (IIT, Madras). Date of birth: 4 June 1964. Specialization: Water Splitting, Materials Science, Surface Science, Heterogeneous Catalysis, Spectroscopy Address: Senior Principal Scientist, Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact:

  8. Deshpande, Dr A A

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Period: 1989–1993. Deshpande, Dr A A . Date of birth: 23 January 1958. Specialization: Observational Radio Astronomy Address during Associateship: Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar P.O, Bangalore 560 080.

  9. Nair, Dr Gopalan Vijayakumaran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nair, Dr Gopalan Vijayakumaran Ph.D. (Banaras and British Columbia). Date of birth: 5 October 1941. Specialization: Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Heterocyclic Chemistry , Organocatalysis Address: Honorary Scientist, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science &, Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala

  10. Thiagarajan, Dr Pazhamaneri Subramaniam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1995 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Thiagarajan, Dr Pazhamaneri Subramaniam Ph.D. (Rice), FNASc. Date of birth: 9 November 1948. Specialization: Distributed Probabilistic Systems, Hybrid Systems and Computational Systems Biology Address: Laboratory of System Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, ...

  11. Nadkarni, Dr Vikas Madhusudan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1993 Section: Engineering & Technology. Nadkarni, Dr Vikas Madhusudan Ph.D. (Delaware). Date of birth: 6 December 1947. Specialization: Polymer Science & Engineering, Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Address: Managing Director, Techcellence Consultancy Services, Pvt. Ltd., 5, Pushkaraj, ...

  12. Balasubramanian, Dr Kalpattu Kuppusamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Chemistry. Balasubramanian, Dr Kalpattu Kuppusamy Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 5 September 1939. Specialization: Molecular Rearrangements, Carbohydrate Chemistry, Organic Electrophotochemistry, Synthetic Organic Chemistry and Heterocyclic Chemistry Address: No.

  13. Mistry, Dr Kekshushroo Bamanshaw

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. (Delhi). Date of birth: 13 January 1936. Specialization: Soil Science, Fertilizers and Agrochemicals Address: 52, Sunshine, Dr Rajaballi Patel Lane, Mumbai 400 026, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2351 7387, (022) 2351 0564

  14. Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on the career of Theodor Seuss Geisel and suggests activities to celebrate his birthday. Lists selected children's books by Dr. Seuss, selected Seuss videos, Web sites, biographical resources, and biographical videos. (LRW)

  15. Jayaraman, Dr Narayanaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2011 Section: Chemistry. Jayaraman, Dr Narayanaswamy Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur). Date of birth: 25 May 1964. Specialization: Carbohydrate Chemistry, Dendrimer Chemistry, Synthetic Organic Chemistry Address: Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  16. Davis, Dr Trupapur Antony

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1979 Section: Plant Sciences. Davis, Dr Trupapur Antony Ph.D. (ISI). Date of birth: 9 February 1923. Date of death: 10 November 1989. Specialization: Plant Physiology. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  17. Design of a multifunction astronomical CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dalei; Wen, Desheng; Xue, Jianru; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Yan; Jiang, Baotan; Xi, Jiangbo

    2015-07-01

    To satisfy the requirement of the astronomical observation, a novel timing sequence of frame transfer CCD is proposed. The multiple functions such as the adjustments of work pattern, exposure time and frame frequency are achieved. There are four work patterns: normal, standby, zero exposure and test. The adjustment of exposure time can set multiple exposure time according to the astronomical observation. The fame frequency can be adjusted when dark target is imaged and the maximum exposure time cannot satisfy the requirement. On the design of the video processing, offset correction and adjustment of multiple gains are proposed. Offset correction is used for eliminating the fixed pattern noise of CCD. Three gains pattern can improve the signal to noise ratio of astronomical observation. Finally, the images in different situations are collected and the system readout noise is calculated. The calculation results show that the designs in this paper are practicable.

  18. A self triggered intensified CCD (STIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Y.; Laniece, P.; Bendali, M.; Gaillard, J. M.; Leblanc, M.; Mastrippolito, R.; Tricoire, H.; Valentin, L.

    1991-12-01

    We are developing a new device based on the results reported previously of the successful coincidence detection of β - particles with a high spatial resolution. The novelty of the device consists in triggering and intensified CCD, i.e. a CCD coupled to an image intensifier (II), by an electrical signal collected from the II itself. This is a suitable procedure for detecting low light and rare events with high efficiency and high resolution. The trigger pulse is obtained from the secondary electrons produced by multiplication in a double microchannel plate (MCP) and collected on the aluminized layer protecting the phosphor screen in the II. Triggering efficiencies up to 80% have already been achieved.

  19. Amritkar, Dr Ravindra Eknath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amritkar, Dr Ravindra Eknath Ph.D. (Bangalore), FNASc. Date of birth: 19 August 1951. Specialization: Nonlinear Phenomena, Chaos and Statistical Physics Address: Visiting Professor, Institute of Infrastructure, Technology, Research, and Management (IITRAM), Near Khokhara Circle, Ahmedabad 380 026, Gujarat Contact ...

  20. Anil, Dr Arga Chandrashekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2015 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Anil, Dr Arga Chandrashekar Ph.D. (Karnatak). Date of birth: 23 January 1959. Specialization: Biological Oceanography, Marine Ecology, Marine Biology Address: Chief Scientist, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula 403 004, ...

  1. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1945 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Chandrasekaran, Dr Chidambara Ph.D. (London) 1962-64. Date of birth: 30 October 1911. Date of death: 4 January 2000. Specialization: Statistics, Public Health and Demography Address: 'Sri Kripa', 79/3, Benson Cross Road, Bengaluru ...

  2. Basu, Dr Sandip Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: General Biology. Basu, Dr Sandip Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 1995-97. Date of birth: 1 January 1944. Specialization: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology and Microbial Genetics Address: FD-426, Sector 3, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 106, W.B.. Contact:

  3. Shivanna, Dr Kundaranahalli Ramalingaiah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1985 Section: Plant Sciences. Shivanna, Dr Kundaranahalli Ramalingaiah Ph.D. (Delhi), FNA, FNAAS, FNASc. Date of birth: 30 June 1940. Specialization: Pollen Biology, Reproductive Ecology and Conservation Biology Address: Odekar Farms, Nandihalli, via Thovinakere, Tumkur 572 138, Karnataka Contact:

  4. Sengupta, Dr Sagar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2017 Section: General Biology. Sengupta, Dr Sagar Ph.D. (IISc), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 23 June 1968. Specialization: Cancer Biology, Cell Signalling, Mytochondrial Biology Address: National Institute of Immunology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2670 3786

  5. Sharma, Dr Ram Swaroop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1989 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Sharma, Dr Ram Swaroop Ph.D. (Basel), FNA. Date of birth: 10 July 1937. Specialization: Metamorphic Petrology, Mineralogy and Precambrian Geology Address: 70/36, Pratapnagar, Sector 7, Sanganer (RHB), Jaipur 302 033, Rajasthan

  6. Godwal, Dr Budhiram Kulanand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Godwal, Dr Budhiram Kulanand Ph.D. (Bombay), FNASc. Date of birth: 8 February 1946. Specialization: Planetary Sciences, High Pressure Physics, Electron States and Dense Plasma Physics Address: 28, Creekview Co-operative Housing Society, Plot No. 33, Sector 9A, Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 703, Maharashtra Contact:

  7. Brahmayya Sastry, Dr Podila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1978 Section: Medicine. Brahmayya Sastry, Dr Podila Ph.D. (McGill). Date of birth: 24 May 1913. Date of death: 28 May 1993. Specialization: Physiology, Neurophysiology and Placental Physiology Last known address: Sitaramanilayam, Plot No. 9, Doctors Co-Operative Housing Colony, Waltair, Visakhapatnam ...

  8. Gangal, Dr Sudha Gajanan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gangal, Dr Sudha Gajanan Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA Council Service: 1995-97. Date of birth: 25 August 1934. Specialization: Cancer & Basic Immunology, Cell Biology and Genetic Diseases Address: 4, Mahavishnu Apartments, Dahanukar Colony A, Kothrud, Pune 411 029, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (020) 2538 4382, ...

  9. Shetye, Dr Satish Ramnath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1992 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Shetye, Dr Satish Ramnath Ph.D. (Washington), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 1998-2003. Date of birth: 25 October 1950. Specialization: Physical Oceanography Address: Yashoda, C-14/162, Tonca, Caranzalem, Panaji 403 002, Goa

  10. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2007 Section: Physics. Gupta, Dr Pradeep Kumar Ph.D. (Heriot Watt University), FNASc. Date of birth: 16 August 1954. Specialization: Lasers, Biomedical Applications of Lasers, Nonlinear Optics, Laser Materials Address: Visiting Professor, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, ...

  11. Jena, Dr Prafulla Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jena, Dr Prafulla Kumar Ph.D. (Utkal). Date of birth: 27 December 1931. Specialization: Extractive Metallurgy, Mineral Processing, Environmental Engineering and Materials Processing Address: Chairman, Institute of Advance Technology and Environmental Studies, 80A-831A Lewis Road, Bhubaneswar 751 002, Orissa

  12. Krishnan, Dr Raghavan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specialization: Monsoon & Climate Dynamics, Atmosphere-Ocean-Land System, Monsoon Hydrological Cycle Address: Acting Director, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 4301. Residence: (020) 2589 8886. Mobile: 98817 37976

  13. Kulkarni, Dr Mohan Gopalkrishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: Engineering & Technology. Kulkarni, Dr Mohan Gopalkrishna Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE. Date of birth: 14 November 1950. Specialization: Polymer Science & Engineering, Intellectual Property Address: Emeritus Scientist, Unit for R&D of Information Products, Tapovan, NCL Campus, Pashan Road, Pune ...

  14. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Physics. Bhawalkar, Dr Dilip Devidas Ph.D. (Southampton), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 16 October 1940. Specialization: Lasers and laser Instrumentation Address: 26, Paramanu Nagar, Indore 452 013, M.P.. Contact: Office: (0731) 232 2707. Residence: (0731) 232 0031. Mobile: 93032 ...

  15. Authikesavalu, Dr Munisamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1948 Section: Medicine. Authikesavalu, Dr Munisamy MBBS (Madras), MS (Minneapolis), FRCS. Date of birth: 16 August 1906. Date of death: 22 September 1973. Specialization: Experimental Surgery, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology Address: 5-C, Lavelle Cross Road, Bengaluru ...

  16. Amarjit Singh, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarjit Singh, Dr Ph.D. (Harvard). Date of birth: 19 November 1924. Specialization: Millimeter Wave Tubes, Microwave Tubes and Microwave Electronics Address: 12, Auburn Court, Vernon Hills, IL 60061, USA Contact: Residence: (+1-847) 247 9260. Email: amarjitsingh@ieee.org. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  17. Agnihothrudu, Dr Vengala

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agnihothrudu, Dr Vengala Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 15 May 1930. Date of death: 5 April 1999. Specialization: Microbiology, Plant Pathology, Agrochemicals, Plantation Crops and Environmental Hygiene Last known address: 18/1, First Cross, First Main, Jayamahal Extension, Bengaluru 560 016. YouTube; Twitter ...

  18. David, Dr Joy Caesarina

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1982 Section: Medicine. David, Dr Joy Caesarina M.B.B.S., M.S. (Madras). Date of birth: 3 May 1927. Date of death: 20 April 2004. Specialization: Neuropharmacology Last known address: 292, 4th Main, 1st Block, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  19. Arankalle, Dr Vidya Avinash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Medicine. Arankalle, Dr Vidya Avinash Ph.D. (Bombay), FNA. Date of birth: 2 February 1952. Specialization: Virology, Molecular Biology, Vaccine, Hepatitis Viruses, Emerging-Reemerging Viruses Address: IRSHA, Bharati Vidyapeeth University, Katraj, Pune 411 043, Maharashtra Contact:

  20. Chattopadhyay, Dr Dhrubajyoti

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2004 Section: General Biology. Chattopadhyay, Dr Dhrubajyoti Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNASc. Date of birth: 11 May 1954. Specialization: Enzyme Biotechnology, Transcription, Molecular Virology and Oxidative Stress Response Address: Vice Chancellor, Amity University, New Town, Kolkata 700 135, W.B.

  1. Datta, Dr Alok Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: General Biology. Datta, Dr Alok Kumar Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA. Date of birth: 10 November 1946. Specialization: Nucleic Acid Enzymology, Protein Chemistry, Parasitology and Recombinant DNA Technology Address: INSA Senior Scientist, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja SC Mullick Road, ...

  2. Chaudhuri, Dr Swetaprovo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 2016–2019. Chaudhuri, Dr Swetaprovo Ph.D. (Connecticut). Date of birth: 1 September 1983. Specialization: Propulsion,Turbulent Combustion, Energy Address: Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact:

  3. Arunachalam, Dr Vallampadugai Srinivasaraghavan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1979 Section: Engineering & Technology. Arunachalam, Dr Vallampadugai Srinivasaraghavan Ph.D. (Wales), F.R.Engg. (UK), FNA, FNASc, FNAE, D.Engg. (h.c.), D.Litt. (h.c.) Council Service: 1983-85. Date of birth: 10 November 1935. Specialization: Materials Science & Engineering, Energy Technologies, ...

  4. Mohan, Dr Viswanathan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ph.D. (Madras), FNASc, FNA, FRCP (London, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Ireland), FTWAS. Date of birth: 10 April 1954. Specialization: Diabetes and its Complications, Epidemiology, Genomic Studies Address: Dr Mohan's Diabetes Specialities Centre, No. 6B, Conran Smith Road, Gopalapuram, Chennai 600 086, T.N.. Contact:

  5. Gore, Dr Anil Purushottam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1997 Section: Animal Sciences. Gore, Dr Anil Purushottam Ph.D. (Kentucky). Date of birth: 10 August 1947. Specialization: Analysis of Clinical Trials, Non-parametric Inference and Statistical Ecology Address: Bakul, 40, Empress Garden Society, Sopan Baug, Pune 411 001, Maharashtra Contact:

  6. Gurjar, Dr Mukund Keshao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gurjar, Dr Mukund Keshao Ph.D. (Nagpur and London), FNASc. Date of birth: 28 August 1952. Specialization: Carbohydrate Chemistry and Synthetic Organic Chemistry Address: Director, R&D, Emcure Pharmaceuticals Limited, P2, ITBT Park Phase II, Hinjwadi, Pune 411 057, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 3982 1350, ...

  7. Bhisey, Dr Rajani Avinash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1996 Section: Medicine. Bhisey, Dr Rajani Avinash Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA. Date of birth: 20 January 1941. Specialization: Environmental Carcinogenesis and Molecular Epidemiology of Cancer, Occupational Hazards

  8. Mishra, Dr Gyan Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2005 Section: General Biology. Mishra, Dr Gyan Chandra Ph.D. (Udaipur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 15 August 1947. Specialization: Immunology and Cell Biology Address: NASI Senior Scientist, National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS Complex, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact:

  9. Khanna, Dr Navin Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: Medicine. Khanna, Dr Navin Chandra Ph.D. (AIIMS), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 April 1956. Specialization: Dengue Subunit Vaccine, Dengue Botanical Drug, Recombinant Proteins of Medical Use Address: International Centre for Genetic Engineering, and Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi ...

  10. Mahalakshmi, Dr Radhakrishnan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahalakshmi, Dr Radhakrishnan Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 8 April 1980. Specialization: Membrane Protein Biophysics, Protein Folding, Spectroscopy Address during Associateship: MBL, Dept. of Biological Sci., Indian Institute of Science Edn. &, Research, Bhauri, Bhopal 462 066, M.P.. Contact: Office: (0755) 669 2562

  11. Dasgupta, Dr Somnath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dasgupta, Dr Somnath Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 13 October 1951. Specialization: Metamorphic Petrology, Geochemistry and Precambrian Geology Address: Chair Professor, Department of Geography, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, Jamia Nagar, New Delhi 110 025, U.T.

  12. Sharma, Dr Surendra Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Medicine. Sharma, Dr Surendra Kumar Ph.D. (AIIMS), MD (PGIMER, Chandigarh), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 22 February 1951. Specialization: Environmental Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine, Pulmonary & Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Address: B-5/3, B Block, Sector 13, RK ...

  13. Mukerji, Dr Mitali

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2014 Section: Medicine. Mukerji, Dr Mitali Ph.D. (IISc). Date of birth: 13 November 1967. Specialization: Functional Genomics, Population Genomics, Ayurgenomics Address: Sr Principal Scientist, Genomics & Molecualr Medicine, Institute of Genomics & Integrative Biology, Sukhdev Vihar, Mathura Road, New Delhi ...

  14. Ramaiah, Dr Danaboyina

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2010 Section: Chemistry. Ramaiah, Dr Danaboyina Ph.D. (IIT, Kanpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 4 June 1958. Specialization: Bio-organic Chemistry, Photobiology, Biophysical Chemistry, Organic Photochemistry Address: Director, North East Institute of Science & Technology, Jorhat 785 006, Assam

  15. Venkateswara Rao, Dr Gundabathula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2003 Section: Engineering & Technology. Venkateswara Rao, Dr Gundabathula Ph.D. (IISc), FNAE. Date of birth: 9 November 1944. Specialization: Finite Element Methods, Structural Analysis (Linear & Nonlinear) and Smart Structures Address: No. 502, Reliance Mariam Villa, Street No. 6, Plot No.

  16. Ramachandran, Dr Sundaresan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ramachandran, Dr Sundaresan D.Sc. (MIT). Date of birth: 17 August 1930. Specialization: Alloy & Stainless Steel Making and Process Metallurgical Design & Development Address: 'Vidya Theertha Kripa', No. 1, Siva Sundar Avenue, Thiruvanmiyur, Chennai 600 041, T.N.

  17. Sirsat, Dr Satyavati Motiram

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sirsat, Dr Satyavati Motiram Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 7 October 1925. Date of death: 10 July 2010. Specialization: Medical Research (Cancer) & Ultrastructural Pathology and Hospice Care of the Dying Last known address: Bhagirathi Sadan, 17th Road, Khar, Mumbai 400 052. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  18. Paranjape, Dr Aseem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Profile. Period: 2015–2018. Paranjape, Dr Aseem Ph.D. (TIFR). Date of birth: 26 January 1983. Specialization: Cosmology, Large Scale Structure, Gravitation Address: Inter-University Centre for, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2560 4100, 2560 4224

  19. Pal, Dr Gaya Prasad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Section: Medicine. Pal, Dr Gaya Prasad M.B.B.S. and M.S. (Indore), D.Sc. (S. Gujarat), FNASc, FAMS. Date of birth: 7 June 1950. Specialization: Human Anatomy, Clinical Anatomy and Biomechanics of Spine Address: FASI Director, Modern Institute of Medical Sciences, Kanadia, Near Bypass ...

  20. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Sangita

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2013 Section: Medicine. Mukhopadhyay, Dr Sangita Ph.D. (Utkal), FNASc. Date of birth: 1 January 1966. Specialization: Immunology, Cell Signalling, Communicable Diseases Address: Group Leader, Molecular Cell Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting & Diagnostics, Nampally, Hyderabad 500 001, A.P.. Contact ...

  1. Nayak, Dr Tapan Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nayak, Dr Tapan Kumar Ph.D. (Michigan State), FNASc. Date of birth: 18 June 1958. Specialization: Nuclear & High Energy Physics Experiment, QCD Phase Transition & Quark, Gluon Plasma, Phases of Nuclear Matter Address: Head, EHEP Division, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064, ...

  2. Jameel, Dr Shahid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jameel, Dr Shahid Ph.D. (Washington State Univ.), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 8 August 1957. Specialization: Molecular Biology and Molecular Virology Address: Chief Executive Officer, The Wellcome Trust/DBT India Alliance, 8-2-684/3/K/19, Kaushik Society, Road NO. 12, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, A.P.. Contact:

  3. Chopra, Dr Ishwar Chander

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1962 Section: Medicine. Chopra, Dr Ishwar Chander M.R.C.S.. Date of birth: 8 January 1911. Date of death: 18 October 1996. Specialization: Pharmacology, Toxicology and Indian Medicinal Plants Last known address: C-116, Defence Colony, New Delhi 110 024. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  4. Chakraborty, Dr Subhra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chakraborty, Dr Subhra Ph.D. (JNU). Date of birth: 25 September 1964. Specialization: Nutritional & Stress Genomics, Plant proteomics, Molecular Biology, Biotechnology Address: Staff Scientist VII, National Institute of Plant Genome Research, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, U.T.. Contact: Office: (011) 2673 5186

  5. Babu, Dr Cherukuri Raghavendra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1990 Section: Plant Sciences. Babu, Dr Cherukuri Raghavendra D.Phil. (Calcutta). Date of birth: 30 June 1940. Specialization: Biosystematics, Ecology and Population Genetics Address: Professor Emeritus, CEMDE, School of Environmental Studies, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 007, U.T.. Contact:

  6. Nair, Dr Gopinath Balakrish

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nair, Dr Gopinath Balakrish Ph.D. (Annamalai), FNA, FNASc, FTWAS. Date of birth: 5 January 1954. Specialization: Clinical Microbiology, Molecular Epidemiology, Diarrhoeal Diseases Address: Ag. Regional Adviser, World Health Organisation, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Indraprastha Estate, New Delhi 110 002, U.T.. Contact:

  7. Sethunathan, Dr Nambrattil

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1986 Section: Plant Sciences. Sethunathan, Dr Nambrattil Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNAAS, FNASc. Date of birth: 2 June 1937. Specialization: Environmental Microbiology Address: Flat No. 103, Ushodaya Apartments, Sri Venkateswara Officers' Colony, Ramakrishnapuram, Secunderabad 500 056, A.P.

  8. Ranade, Dr Vivek Vinayak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranade, Dr Vivek Vinayak Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE Council Service: 2016. Date of birth: 15 October 1963. Specialization: Multiphase Flows & Reactors, Computational Flow Modelling, Process Intensification Address: School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, ...

  9. Bhattacharyya, Dr Suvendra Nath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2017 Section: General Biology. Bhattacharyya, Dr Suvendra Nath Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 4 October 1975. Specialization: Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, RNA Biology Address: Molecular & Human Genetics Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4, Raja SC Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032, ...

  10. Chandrasekharan, Dr Komaravolu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1959 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Chandrasekharan, Dr Komaravolu Ph.D. (Madras), FNA. Date of birth: 21 November 1920. Date of death: 13 April 2017. Specialization: Analysis and Theory of Numbers Last known address: Professor Emertius, Eidg. Technische Hochschule, Mathematik, ETH Zentrum, 8092 ...

  11. Mandal, Dr Asit Baran

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandal, Dr Asit Baran Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FRSC. Date of birth: 13 January 1952. Specialization: Electrochemistry, Thermodynamics, Ionic Liquids, Biophysical Chemistry, Organised Self-Assemblies and Nanomaterials Address: Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja SC Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 ...

  12. Bhakuni, Dr Vinod

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhakuni, Dr Vinod Ph.D. (Lucknow), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 May 1962. Date of death: 15 July 2011. Specialization: Protein Folding and Molecular Biophysics Last known address: Division of Molecular & Structural Biology, Central Drug Research Institute, P.B. No. 173, Lucknow 226 001. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  13. Das, Dr Amitava

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: Chemistry. Das, Dr Amitava Ph.D. (Jadavpur), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 December 1959. Specialization: Molecular Reactions, Supramolecular Chemistry, Assembly Photo-included Processes Address: Director, Central Salt & Marine Chemicals Research Institute, GB Marg, Bhavnagar 364 002, ...

  14. Gangal, Dr Sharad Vishwanath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gangal, Dr Sharad Vishwanath Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNASc. Date of birth: 2 May 1937. Specialization: Allergy, Immunology and Biochemistry Address: Lakshmi Niwas, Opp. Santoshi Mata Temple (B Cabin), Sane Guruji Path, Naupada, Thane 400 602, Maharashtra Contact: Residence: (022) 2537 6961. Mobile: 93249 24307

  15. Brahm Prakash, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1972 Section: Engineering & Technology. Brahm Prakash, Dr Ph.D. (Panjab), FNA 1974-76. Date of birth: 21 August 1912. Date of death: 3 January 1984. Specialization: Metallurgy. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog ...

  16. Chakraborti, Dr Pradip K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2010 Section: General Biology. Chakraborti, Dr Pradip K Ph.D. (Visva Bharati), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 7 November 1956. Specialization: Biochemistry and Molecular Microbiology, Prokaryotic Signal Transduction. Address: Chief Scientist, Institute of Microbial Technology, Sector 39A, Chandigarh 160 036, U.T.

  17. Rao, Dr Pendyala Balarama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1996 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Rao, Dr Pendyala Balarama Ph.D. (Andhra). Date of birth: 15 February 1938. Specialization: Space Physics, Radiowave Propagation and Radar Systems Address: Member, ADCOS-DOS, National Remote Sensing Centre, Bldg No. 10, Balanagar, Hyderabad 500 037, A.P.

  18. Mishra, Dr Rakesh K

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mishra, Dr Rakesh K Ph.D. (Allahabad), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 14 April 1961. Specialization: Genomics, Chromatin, Epigenetics Address: Director, Centre for Cellular & Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500 007, A.P.. Contact: Office: (040) 2719 2600. Residence: (040) 2720 6400. Mobile: 94419 02188

  19. Varadarajan, Dr Srinivasan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1972 Section: Chemistry. Varadarajan, Dr Srinivasan Ph.D. (Delhi and Cantab), D.Sc. (h.c.), D.Litt. (h.c.), FNA, FNAE, FTWAS Council Service:1974-88; Vice-President: 1977-79; President: 1980-82. Date of birth: 31 March 1928. Specialization: Organic & Biological Chemistry, Molecular Biology, Engineering Design ...

  20. Gharda, Dr Keki Hormusji

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1976 Section: Chemistry. Gharda, Dr Keki Hormusji Ph.D. (Michigan). Date of birth: 25 September 1929. Specialization: Process Design of Organic Chemical Plants Address: Chairman and Managing Director, Gharda Chemical Limited, Jer Mansion, W.P. Warde Road, Off Turner Road, Bandra, Mumbai 400 050, ...

  1. Jana, Dr Subhra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Profile. Period: 2015–2018. Jana, Dr Subhra Ph.D. (IIT, Kharagpur). Date of birth: 22 March 1981. Specialization: Catalysis, Spectroscopy, Experimental Materials Science Address: Dept. of CBM Sciences, SN Bose Natl. Centre for, Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 106, W.B.. Contact:

  2. Ghosh, Dr Amit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2000 Section: Medicine. Ghosh, Dr Amit Ph.D. (Calcutta), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 24 November 1944. Specialization: Molecular Biology of V.cholerae and Recombinant DNA Technology Address: National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, JICA Building, CIT Scheme XM, Beliaghata, Kolkata ...

  3. Santhanam, Dr Vaidyanathaswamy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1974 Section: Plant Sciences. Santhanam, Dr Vaidyanathaswamy Ph.D. (Madras). Date of birth: 31 July 1925. Specialization: Plant Breeding & Genetics, Research Management and Cotton Development Address: 'Shri Abhirami', 107, Venkataswamy Road West, R S Puram Post, Coimbatore 641 002, T.N.. Contact:

  4. Rai, Dr Shyam Sundar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Date of birth: 16 March 1954. Specialization: Geophysics, Data Analysis & Modelling Deep Earth Exploration Address: Chair, Earth & Climate Science, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharasdhtra Contact: Office: (020) 2590 8255. Mobile: 98903 22705

  5. Purnachandra Rao, Dr Venigalla

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purnachandra Rao, Dr Venigalla Ph.D. (Andhra), FNA. Date of birth: 10 October 1955. Specialization: Marine Geology, Authigenic Minerals and Palaeoclimate, Palaeo-sea-levels. Address: Emeritus Scientist, Department of Civil Engineering, Vignan's University, Vadlamudi 522 213, A.P.. Contact: Office: (0863) 234 4761

  6. Ganguly, Dr Chaitanyamoy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1994 Section: Engineering & Technology. Ganguly, Dr Chaitanyamoy Ph.D. (Calcutta), FNA, FNAE, FNASc. Date of birth: 31 December 1946. Specialization: Fuel Cycle, Advanced Ceramics, Powder Metallurgy and Uranium, Thorium & Plutonium Fuels Address: Caladia 703, The Botanika, Kondapur, ...

  7. Asundi, Dr Moodalagiri Kushalrao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asundi, Dr Moodalagiri Kushalrao Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 1 May 1930. Date of death: 1 December 2003. Specialization: Physical Metallurgy and Structural & Mechanical Properties of Materials Last known address: Consulting Metallurgist, No. 44, 'VIBHA', Ramakrishna Paramahamsa Marg, Bandra East, Mumbai 400 ...

  8. Adyalkar, Dr Pandurang Ganpatrao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Adyalkar, Dr Pandurang Ganpatrao Ph.D. (Nagpur), FNASc. Date of birth: 3 December 1927. Date of death: 13 November 2007. Specialization: Geology, Hydrogeology, Seismology and Mining & Environment Last known address: Millennium Shopping Mall, ...

  9. Nageswara Rao, Dr Gullapalli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nageswara Rao, Dr Gullapalli M.D. (Opthal.) (AIIMS), FAMS, FACS, FRCS, FNASc. Date of birth: 1 September 1945. Specialization: Cornea, Community Eye Health and Eye Care Policy & Planning Address: Distinguished Chair of Eye Health, LV Prasad Eye Institute, LV Prasad Marg, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500 034, A.P.

  10. Bhakuni, Dr Dewan Singh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1983 Section: Chemistry. Bhakuni, Dr Dewan Singh Ph.D. and D.Sc. (London), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 30 December 1930. Specialization: Natural Products, Bio-organic, Biosynthesis, Nucleosides and Medicinal Chemistry Address: C-132, Nirala Nagar, Lucknow 226 020, U.P.

  11. Anand, Dr Nitya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1974 Section: Chemistry. Anand, Dr Nitya Ph.D. (Mumbai and Cantab), FNA, FNASc. Council Service: 1980-82. Date of birth: 1 January 1925. Specialization: Medicinal Chemistry Address: Lumbini, B-62, Nirala Nagar, Lucknow 226 020, U.P.. Contact: Residence: (0522) 278 8587, (0522) 404 3229

  12. Kumar, Dr Praveen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Period: 2016–2019. Kumar, Dr Praveen Ph.D. (Uni. South Calif.) Date of birth: 14 September 1982. Specialization: Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Electromigration, Microelectronic packages. Address: Dept. of Materials Engg., Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560 012, Karnataka Contact: Office: (080) 2293 3369

  13. Bapat, Dr Sharmila Avadhut

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2015 Section: Medicine. Bapat, Dr Sharmila Avadhut Ph.D. (Pune), FNASc. Date of birth: 20 November 1965. Specialization: Cancer Biology & Stem Cells Address: National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS Complex, University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007, Maharashtra Contact: Office: (020) 2570 8089

  14. Chitnis, Dr Chetan Eknath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: Medicine. Chitnis, Dr Chetan Eknath Ph.D. (UC, Berkeley), FNA. Date of birth: 3 April 1961. Specialization: Molecular Parasitology, Vaccine Development for Malaria and Molecular & Cell Biology Address: Head, Malaria Parasite Biology & Vaccine, Institut Pasteur, 28, ...

  15. Gahalaut, Dr Vineet Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2018 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Gahalaut, Dr Vineet Kumar Ph.D. (Roorkee). Date of birth: 26 September 1966. Specialization: Seismology, Tectonic Geodesy, Geodynamics Address: National Centre for Seismology, Ministry of Earth Sciences, IMD Complex, Lodi Road, New Delhi 110 003, U.T.. Contact:

  16. Agrewala, Dr Javed Naim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agrewala, Dr Javed Naim Ph.D. (Agra), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 14 May 1961. Specialization: Immunology, Vaccine, Drug Discovery Address: Chief Scientist, Immunology Laboratory, Institute of Microbial Technology, Sector 39A, Chandigarh 160 036, U.T.. Contact: Office: (0172) 666 5261. Residence: (0172) 666 5514

  17. Chandy, Dr Jacob

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1961 Section: Medicine. Chandy, Dr Jacob MBBS (Madras), FRCS (c) Council Service: 1962-70. Date of birth: 23 January 1910. Date of death: 23 June 2007. Specialization: Neurology, Neurosurgery and Medical Education Address: Paarra, Matteethra, Kottayam 686 004.

  18. Thakur, Dr Vikram Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1991 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Thakur, Dr Vikram Chandra Ph.D. (London). Date of birth: 15 January 1940. Specialization: Structural Geology, Tectonics of Himalayan Geology and Active Tectonics Address: 9/12 (Lane 9), Ashirwad Eclave, Dehra Dun 248 001, Uttarakhand Contact:

  19. Dastidar, Dr Pranab Rebatiranjan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Engineering & Technology. Dastidar, Dr Pranab Rebatiranjan B.E., Ph.D. (Manchester). Date of birth: 10 July 1933. Specialization: Electronics, Controls and Nuclear Power Address: F-3, Rajkunj Co-op. Housing Society, Wadhavli, Chembur, Mumbai 400 074., Maharashtra Contact:

  20. Chandrashekar, Dr Tavarekere Kalliah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2000 Section: Chemistry. Chandrashekar, Dr Tavarekere Kalliah Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS Council Service: 2013-15. Date of birth: 1 January 1956. Specialization: Bio-inorganic Chemistry, Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis Address: Senior Professor, School of Chemical Sciences, ...

  1. Grover, Dr Arun Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1997 Section: Physics. Grover, Dr Arun Kumar Ph.D.(Mumbai), FNASc. Council Service: 2016-. Date of birth: 12 December 1951. Specialization: Magnetism & Superconductivity, Vortex State Studies in Superconductors, Strongly Correlated Systems Address: Vice Chancellor, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 014 ...

  2. Budhani, Dr Ramesh Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Budhani, Dr Ramesh Chandra Ph.D. (IIT, Delhi), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 3 February 1955. Specialization: Renewable Energy, Nanoscale Systems, Experimental Condensed Matter Physics, Superconductivity and Magnetism Address: Department of Physics, Lasers & Photonics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 ...

  3. Anil Kumar, Dr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Section: Chemistry. Anil Kumar, Dr Ph.D. (Pune), FNASc, FNA. Date of birth: 31 December 1955. Specialization: Chemical Thermodynamics, Physical Organic Chemistry and ... Office: (020) 2590 2278. Residence: (020) 2588 8712. Mobile: 98220 74509. Fax: (020) 2590 2636

  4. Vrati, Dr Sudhanshu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vrati, Dr Sudhanshu Ph.D. (ANU, Canberra), FNASc. Date of birth: 19 March 1960. Specialization: Molecular Virology, Vaccinology and Biotechnology Address: Executive Director, Regional Centre for Biotechnology, NCR Biotech Science Cluster, III Mailstone, Fairadabad-Gurgaon Expressway, Faridabad 121 001, Haryana

  5. Majumdar, Dr Subeer Suhash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Section: Animal Sciences. Majumdar, Dr Subeer Suhash Ph.D. (nagpur), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 21 May 1961. Specialization: Animal Biotechnology, Transgenic Animals, Endocrinology Address: Director, National Institute of Animal Biotechnology, Gopan Pally, Hyderabad 500 046, A.P.

  6. Anguli, Dr Vazhapat Chinnaswami

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1962 Section: Medicine. Anguli, Dr Vazhapat Chinnaswami M.D. (Madras), FRCP. Date of birth: 25 October 1919. Date of death: 22 July 2000. Specialization: Neuropathology, Experimental Pathology and Oncopathology Last known address: T36/2, 14, First Avenue, Besant Nagar, Chennai 600 090.

  7. Watve, Dr Milind Gajanan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ph.D. (IISc), FNA. Date of birth: 12 December 1957. Specialization: Wildlife Ecology & Animal Cognition, Evolutionary Biology, Computational Biology and Microbial Diversity Address: Professor, Biology, Indian Institute of Science Education & Research, Dr Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411 008, Maharashtra Contact:

  8. Ramadas, Dr Trivandrum Ramakrishnan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1998 Section: Mathematical Sciences. Ramadas, Dr Trivandrum Ramakrishnan Ph.D. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 30 March 1955. Specialization: Geometry and Mathematical Physics Address: Professor, Chennai Mathematical Institute, H-1, SIPCOT IT Park, Siruseri, Kelambakkam, Chennai 603 103

  9. Abrol, Dr Yash Pal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abrol, Dr Yash Pal Ph.D. (Chicago), FNA, FNASc, FNAAS. Date of birth: 23 December 1935. Specialization: Agriculture: Crop Physiology, Environmental Sciences Address: Chief Patron, Society for Conservation of Nature, Room No. F4, A Block, NASC Complex, Dev Prakash Shastry Marg, P.O. Pusa, New Delhi 110 012, ...

  10. Dey, Dr Gautam Kumar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2008 Section: Engineering & Technology. Dey, Dr Gautam Kumar Ph.D. (BHU), FNAE. Date of birth: 8 June 1957. Specialization: Phase Transformations in Metals & Alloys, Electron Microscopy and Metallic Glasses & Nanocrystalline Materials Address: Head, Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research ...

  11. Salunke, Dr Dinakar Mashnu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2001 Section: General Biology. Salunke, Dr Dinakar Mashnu Ph.D. (IISc), FNASc, FNA, FTWAS. Date of birth: 1 July 1955. Specialization: Structural Biology, Macromolecular Crystallography and Immunology Address: Director, International Centre for Genetic Engineering, & Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf ...

  12. Enumerating Photography from Spot Meter to CCD

    OpenAIRE

    Cubitt, Sean; Palmer, Daniel; Walkling, Les

    2015-01-01

    The transition from analogue to digital photography was not accomplished in a single step. It required a number of feeder technologies which enabled and structured the nature of digital photography. Among those traced in this article, the most important is the genesis of the raster grid, which is now hard-wired into the design of the most widely employed photographic chip, the charge-coupled device (CCD). In tracing this history from origins in half-tone printing, the authors argue that quali...

  13. The Dark Energy Survey CCD imager design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cease, H.; DePoy, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Guarino, V.; Kuk, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schultz, K.; Schmitt, R.L.; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Argonne

    2008-06-01

    The Dark Energy Survey is planning to use a 3 sq. deg. camera that houses a {approx} 0.5m diameter focal plane of 62 2kx4k CCDs. The camera vessel including the optical window cell, focal plate, focal plate mounts, cooling system and thermal controls is described. As part of the development of the mechanical and cooling design, a full scale prototype camera vessel has been constructed and is now being used for multi-CCD readout tests. Results from this prototype camera are described.

  14. CCD developed for scientific application by Hamamatsu

    CERN Document Server

    Miyaguchi, K; Dezaki, J; Yamamoto, K

    1999-01-01

    We have developed CCDs for scientific applications that feature a low readout noise of less than 5 e-rms and low dark current of 10-25 pA/cm sup 2 at room temperature. CCDs with these characteristics will prove extremely useful in applications such as spectroscopic measurement and dental radiography. In addition, a large-area CCD of 2kx4k pixels and 15 mu m square pixel size has recently been completed for optical use in astronomical observations. Applications to X-ray astronomy require the most challenging device performance in terms of deep depletion, high CTE, and focal plane size, among others. An abuttable X-ray CCD, having 1024x1024 pixels and 24 mu m square pixel size, is to be installed in an international space station (ISS). We are now striving to achieve the lowest usable cooling temperature by means of a built-in TEC with limited power consumption. Details on the development status are described in this report. We would also like to present our future plans for a large active area and deep depleti...

  15. CCD Camera Detection of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John R

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and precise quantification of the infectivity of HIV is important for molecular virologic studies, as well as for measuring the activities of antiviral drugs and neutralizing antibodies. An indicator cell line, a CCD camera, and image-analysis software are used to quantify HIV infectivity. The cells of the P4R5 line, which express the receptors for HIV infection as well as β-galactosidase under the control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, are infected with HIV and then incubated 2 days later with X-gal to stain the infected cells blue. Digital images of monolayers of the infected cells are captured using a high resolution CCD video camera and a macro video zoom lens. A software program is developed to process the images and to count the blue-stained foci of infection. The described method allows for the rapid quantification of the infected cells over a wide range of viral inocula with reproducibility, accuracy and at relatively low cost.

  16. New Design Concept for Universal CCD Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonyong Han

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the CCDs are widely used in astronomical observations either in direct imaging use or spectroscopic mode. However according to the recent technical advances, new large format CCDs are rapidly developed which have better performances with higher quantum efficiency and sensitivity. In many cases, some microprocessors have been adopted to deal with necessary digital logic for a CCD imaging system. This could often lack the flexibility of a system for a user to upgrade with new devices, especially of it is a commercial product. A new design concept has been explored which could provide the opportunity to deal with any format of devices from ant manufactures effectively for astronomical purposes. Recently available PLD (Programmable Logic Devices technology makes it possible to develop such digital circuit design, which can be integrated into a single component, instead of using microprocessors. The design concept could dramatically increase the efficiency and flexibility of a CCD imaging system, particularly when new or large format devices are available and to upgrade the performance of a system. Some variable system control parameters can be selected by a user with a wider range of choice. The software can support such functional requirements very conveniently. This approach can be applied not only to astronomical purpose, but also to some related fields, such as remote sensing and industrial applications.

  17. Southern Clusters for Standardizing CCD Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, T. T.

    2017-06-01

    Standardizing photometric measurements typically involves undertaking all-sky photometry. This can be laborious and time-consuming and, for CCD photometry, particularly challenging. Transforming photometry to a standard system is, however, a crucial step when routinely measuring variable stars, as it allows photoelectric measurements from different observers to be combined. For observers in the northern hemisphere, standardized UBVRI values of stars in open clusters such as M67 and NGC 7790 have been established, greatly facilitating quick and accurate transformation of CCD measurements. Recently the AAVSO added the cluster NGC 3532 for southern hemisphere observers to similarly standardize their photometry. The availability of NGC 3532 standards was announced on the AAVSO Variable Star Observing, Photometry forum on 27 October 2016. Published photometry, along with some new measurements by the author, provide a means of checking these NGC 3532 standards which were determined through the AAVSO's Bright Star Monitor (BSM) program (see: https://www.aavso.org/aavsonet-epoch-photometry-database). New measurements of selected stars in the open clusters M25 and NGC 6067 are also included.

  18. DR og musikken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    1991-01-01

    Musikken i radioen er et af de mange underbelyste temaer inden for me- dieforskningen i Danmark. Forfatteren til den følgende artikel har gennem nogle år arbejdet som musik-medarbejder i Danmarks Radio - med base i Østjyllands Radio. I artiklen fokuserer han på produktionsaspektet. Hvilke funktio...... rejses spørgsmålet om musikkens rolle i DR som aktiverende eller registrerende i forhold til det musikliv, som findes uden for institutionen....

  19. Dr. Faustus: Theist or Atheist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Shah Mohammad Sanaul; Fathema, Fawzia; Hakim, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Faustus is the greatest but the most controversial of Marlowe's plays. Among the causes of controversy, whether Dr. Faustus is an atheist or theist deserves utmost attention. This paper is intended to deal with the issue. Though at various stages of the development of the action, Dr. Faustus abjures Trinity, resorts to necromancy, becomes…

  20. Dr Math at your service

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available in the fraction you have Pupil: 1 ova 15 Dr Math: so do the actual division what is one divided by 15 Pupil: is 15 Dr Math: no use a calcluator Pupil: 0,06 Dr Math: well it is 0,0666666 recurring right? Pupil: yes it is Dr Math...: now for a percentage, move the decimal 2 points to the right so it is 6.666% recurring then round to 6.67% MXit: drmath.sa Google Chat: dr.math.rsa (at) gmail.com More Info: http://drmath.meraka.csir.co.za/drmath Photographs...

  1. Astrometrica: Astrometric data reduction of CCD images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    Astrometrica is an interactive software tool for scientific grade astrometric data reduction of CCD images. The current version of the software is for the Windows 32bit operating system family. Astrometrica reads FITS (8, 16 and 32 bit integer files) and SBIG image files. The size of the images is limited only by available memory. It also offers automatic image calibration (Dark Frame and Flat Field correction), automatic reference star identification, automatic moving object detection and identification, and access to new-generation star catalogs (PPMXL, UCAC 3 and CMC-14), in addition to online help and other features. Astrometrica is shareware, available for use for a limited period of time (100 days) for free; special arrangements can be made for educational projects.

  2. Programmable Clock Waveform Generation for CCD Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.; Marin, J.

    2006-07-01

    Charge transfer efficiency in CCDs is closely related to the clock waveform. In this paper, an experimental framework to explore different FPGA based clock waveform generator designs is described. Two alternative design approaches for controlling the rise/fall edge times and pulse width of the CCD clock signal have been implemented: level-control and time-control. Both approaches provide similar characteristics regarding the edge linearity and noise. Nevertheless, dissimilarities have been found with respect to the area and frequency range of application. Thus, while the time-control approach consumes less area, the level control approach provides a wider range of clock frequencies since it does not suffer capacitor discharge effect. (Author) 8 refs.

  3. Gaia DR1 documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, F.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Arenou, F.; Comoretto, G.; Eyer, L.; Farras Casas, M.; Hambly, N.; Hobbs, D.; Salgado, J.; Utrilla Molina, E.; Vogt, S.; van Leeuwen, M.; Abreu, A.; Altmann, M.; Andrei, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Brown, A. G. A.; Busonero, D.; Busso, G.; Butkevich, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castañeda, J.; Charnas, J.; Cheek, N.; Clementini, G.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Angeli, F.; De Ridder, J.; Evans, D.; Fabricius, C.; Findeisen, K.; Fleitas, J. M.; Gracia, G.; Guerra, R.; Guy, L.; Helmi, A.; Hernandez, J.; Holl, B.; Hutton, A.; Klioner, S.; Lammers, U.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Messineo, R.; Michalik, D.; Mignard, F.; Montegriffo, P.; Mora, A.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Pancino, E.; Panem, C.; Portell, J.; Rimoldini, L.; Riva, A.; Robin, A.; Siddiqui, H.; Smart, R.; Sordo, R.; Soria, S.; Turon, C.; Vallenari, A.; Voss, H.

    2017-12-01

    We present the first Gaia data release, Gaia DR1, consisting of astrometry and photometry for over 1 billion sources brighter than magnitude 20.7 in the white-light photometric band G of Gaia. The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) processed the raw measurements collected with the Gaia instruments during the first 14 months of the mission, and turned these into an astrometric and photometric catalogue. Gaia DR1 consists of three parts: an astrometric data set which contains the positions, parallaxes, and mean proper motions for about 2 million of the brightest stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues (the primary astrometric data set) and the positions for an additional 1.1 billion sources (the secondary astrometric data set). The primary set forms the realisation of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). The second part of Gaia DR1 is the photometric data set, which contains the mean G-band magnitudes for all sources. The third part consists of the G-band light curves and the characteristics of 3000 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars observed at high cadence around the south ecliptic pole. The positions and proper motions in the astrometric data set are given in a reference frame that is aligned with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to better than 0.1 mas at epoch J2015.0, and non-rotating with respect to the ICRF to within 0.03 mas yr^-1. For the primary astrometric data set, the typical standard error for the positions and parallaxes is about 0.3 mas, while for the proper motions the typical standard error is about 1 mas yr^-1. Whereas it has been suggested in Gaia Collaboration et al. (2016a) that a systematic component of ∼0.3 mas should be 'added' (in quadrature) to the parallax uncertainties, Brown (2017) clarifies that reported parallax standard errors already include local systematics as a result of the calibration of the TGAS parallax uncertainties by comparison to Hipparcos parallaxes. For the subset of

  4. Low-noise video amplifiers for imaging CCD's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scinicariello, F.

    1976-01-01

    Various techniques were developed which enable the CCD (charge coupled device) imaging array user to obtain optimum performance from the device. A CCD video channel was described, and detector-preamplifier interface requirements were examined. A noise model for the system was discussed at length and laboratory data presented and compared to predicted results.

  5. About DR UMa or the CRTS transient CSS110402:135906+554432

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampens, Patricia,; Van Cauteren, Paul

    2017-03-01

    We report differential photometric measurements, both unfiltered (filter clear, C) and filtered (filter V), obtained at the Humain station of the Royal Observatory of Belgium (longitude = 5.254, latitude = +50.192, elevation = 280 m) of the CRTS transient CSS110402:135906+554432 (Drake et al. 2009, ApJ 696, 870), which is also identified as DR UMa. The instrumentation is a 16-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope equipped with a Moravian G2-3200 CCD camera.

  6. Doctors and Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Dartmouth College renamed its medical school, founded in 1797, the Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine. Using the renaming of the medical school of Dartmouth College as a foil, I offer in this article a vision of what it might mean to align Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, with doctors by examining Geisel's You're Only Old Once! A Book for Obsolete Children. In this article, I derive four critiques of modern medicine from the book and offer four strategies as to how these critiques could be explored in medical education. If You're Only Old Once! is read as a pathography, I argue that it can be used as a resource for medical education.

  7. High-resolution CCD imagers using area-array CCD's for sensing spectral components of an optical line image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elabd, Hammam (Inventor); Kosonocky, Walter F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    CCD imagers with a novel replicated-line-imager architecture are abutted to form an extended line sensor. The sensor is preceded by optics having a slit aperture and having an optical beam splitter or astigmatic lens for projecting multiple line images through an optical color-discriminating stripe filter to the CCD imagers. A very high resolution camera suitable for use in a satellite, for example, is thus provided. The replicated-line architecture of the imager comprises an area-array CCD, successive rows of which are illuminated by replications of the same line segment, as transmitted by respective color filter stripes. The charge packets formed by accumulation of photoresponsive charge in the area-array CCD are read out row by row. Each successive row of charge packets is then converted from parallel to serial format in a CCD line register and its amplitude sensed to generate a line of output signal.

  8. Radiation events in astronomical CCD images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.R.; McDonald, R.J.; Hurley, D.L.; Holland, S.E.; Groom, D.E.; Brown, W.E.; Gilmore, D.K.; Stover, R.J.; Wei, M.

    2001-12-18

    The remarkable sensitivity of depleted silicon to ionizing radiation is a nuisance to astronomers. ''Cosmic rays'' degrade images because of struck pixels, leading to modified observing strategies and the development of algorithms to remove the unwanted artifacts. In the new-generation CCD's with thick sensitive regions, cosmic-ray muons make recognizable straight tracks and there is enhanced sensitivity to ambient gamma radiation via Compton-scattered electrons (''worms''). Beta emitters inside the dewar, for example high-potassium glasses such as BK7, also produce worm-like tracks. The cosmic-ray muon rate is irreducible and increases with altitude. The gamma rays are mostly by-products of the U and Th decay chains; these elements always appear as traces in concrete and other materials. The Compton recoil event rate can be reduced significantly by the choice of materials in the environment and dewar and by careful shielding. Telescope domes appear to be significantly cleaner than basement laboratories and Coude spectrograph rooms. Radiation sources inside the dewar can be eliminated by judicious choice of materials. Cosmogenic activation during high-altitude flights does not appear to be a problem. Our conclusions are supported by tests at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory low-level counting facilities in Berkeley and at Oroville, California (180 m underground).

  9. Linearity measurement for image-intensified CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhuan; Zhang, Liwei; Yan, Feng; Gu, Yongqiang; Wan, Liying

    2010-10-01

    To the characteristic of the ultraviolet CCD (UV ICCD), technique of the linearity measurement of the UV ICCD camera is studied based on the theory of radiometry. Approach of linearity measurement is discussed, and a kind of measurement system of the UV ICCD has been developed based on the method of neutral density filter. It is very important that the transmittance of the filter is independent of the wavelength in the method of neutral density filter. Black metal screen mesh with different transmittance is used in our system, and calibration of the filters' transmittance in different working positions has been done. Meanwhile, to assure the uniform of the received radiation on the target of the detector at any test points, an integrating sphere is placed behind the neutral filter to balance light. The whole measurement system mainly consists of a deuterium lamp with high stabilization, the attenuation film with transmission, integrating sphere, optical guide and electro-shift platform. Auto control is realized via special software during the test. With this instrument, the linearity of the UV ICCD was measured. Experimental results show that the nonlinearity of the UV ICCD under fixed-gain is less than 2% and the uncertainty of measurement system is less than 4%.

  10. CCD charge collection efficiency and the photon transfer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, J.; Klaasen, K.; Elliott, T.

    1985-01-01

    The charge-coupled device (CCD) has shown unprecendented performance as a photon detector in the areas of spectral response, charge transfer, and readout noise. Recent experience indicates, however, that the full potential for the CCD's charge collection efficiency (CCE) lies well beyond that which is realized in currently available devices. A definition of CCE performance is presented and a standard test tool (the photon transfer technique) for measuring and optimizing this important CCD parameter is introduced. CCE characteristics for different types of CCDs are compared; the primary limitations in achieving high CCE performance are discussed, and the prospects for future improvement are outlined.

  11. Enzymatic study on AtCCD4 and AtCCD7 and their potential to form acyclic regulatory metabolites

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2016-09-29

    The Arabidopsis carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (AtCCD4) is a negative regulator of the carotenoid content of seeds and has recently been suggested as a candidate for the generation of retrograde signals that are thought to derive from the cleavage of poly-cis-configured carotene desaturation intermediates. In this work, we investigated the activity of AtCCD4 in vitro and used dynamic modeling to determine its substrate preference. Our results document strict regional specificity for cleavage at the C9–C10 double bond in carotenoids and apocarotenoids, with preference for carotenoid substrates and an obstructing effect on hydroxyl functions, and demonstrate the specificity for all-trans-configured carotenes and xanthophylls. AtCCD4 cleaved substrates with at least one ionone ring and did not convert acyclic carotene desaturation intermediates, independent of their isomeric states. These results do not support a direct involvement of AtCCD4 in generating the supposed regulatory metabolites. In contrast, the strigolactone biosynthetic enzyme AtCCD7 converted 9-cis-configured acyclic carotenes, such as 9-cis-ζ-carotene, 9\\'-cis-neurosporene, and 9-cis-lycopene, yielding 9-cis-configured products and indicating that AtCCD7, rather than AtCCD4, is the candidate for forming acyclic retrograde signals.

  12. From Mxit to Dr Math

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, Laurie Butgereit, a researcher at the CSIR Meraka Institute, started to use Mxit as a communication channel to tutor her son in mathematics. Her son and a number of his friends logged in, and Dr Math was born. At the inception of Dr Math...

  13. Teaching Peace with Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Rosemarie; Podesta, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Educators seeking novel ways to instill conflict-resolution skills in young children should consider Dr. Seuss, whose books provide a synthesis of fantasy and reality that works for teaching values endemic to peace education. This paper discusses how students can learn peace and educators can teach peace using Dr. Seuss books, examining steps to…

  14. UV-sensitive scientific CCD image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnevsky, Grigory I.; Kossov, Vladimir G.; Iblyaminova, A. F.; Lazovsky, Leonid Y.; Vydrevitch, Michail G.

    1997-06-01

    An investigation of probe laser irradiation interaction with substances containing in an environment has long since become a recognized technique for contamination detection and identification. For this purpose, a near and midrange-IR laser irradiation is traditionally used. However, as many works presented on last ecology monitoring conferences show, in addition to traditional systems, rapidly growing are systems with laser irradiation from near-UV range (250 - 500 nm). Use of CCD imagers is one of the prerequisites for this allowing the development of a multi-channel computer-based spectral research system. To identify and analyze contaminating impurities on an environment, such methods as laser fluorescence analysis, UV absorption and differential spectroscopy, Raman scattering are commonly used. These methods are used to identify a large number of impurities (petrol, toluene, Xylene isomers, SO2, acetone, methanol), to detect and identify food pathogens in real time, to measure a concentration of NH3, SO2 and NO in combustion outbursts, to detect oil products in a water, to analyze contaminations in ground waters, to define ozone distribution in the atmosphere profile, to monitor various chemical processes including radioactive materials manufacturing, heterogeneous catalytic reactions, polymers production etc. Multi-element image sensor with enhanced UV sensitivity, low optical non-uniformity, low intrinsic noise and high dynamic range is a key element of all above systems. Thus, so called Virtual Phase (VP) CCDs possessing all these features, seems promising for ecology monitoring spectral measuring systems. Presently, a family of VP CCDs with different architecture and number of pixels is developed and being manufactured. All CCDs from this family are supported with a precise slow-scan digital image acquisition system that can be used in various image processing systems in astronomy, biology, medicine, ecology etc. An image is displayed directly on a PC

  15. Target Image Matching Algorithm Based on Binocular CCD Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed target image in a subpixel level matching algorithm for binocular CCD ranging, which is based on the principle of binocular CCD ranging. In the paper, firstly, we introduced the ranging principle of the binocular ranging system and deduced a binocular parallax formula. Secondly, we deduced the algorithm which was named improved cross-correlation matching algorithm and cubic surface fitting algorithm for target images matched, and it could achieve a subpixel level matching for binocular CCD ranging images. Lastly, through experiment we have analyzed and verified the actual CCD ranging images, then analyzed the errors of the experimental results and corrected the formula of calculating system errors. Experimental results showed that the actual measurement accuracy of a target within 3 km was higher than 0.52%, which meet the accuracy requirements of the high precision binocular ranging.

  16. EARTH BASED CCD OBSERVATIONS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set presents images of 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup obtained by various observers at several ground-based observatories using CCD instruments. These data have not...

  17. Micrometer and CCD measurements of double stars (Series 51

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available 36 micrometric measurements of 20 double or multiple systems carried out with the Zeiss 65/1055 cm Refractor of Belgrade Observatory are communicated. Also 35 CCD measurements of 15 double or multiple systems are included.

  18. Correlation and image compression for limited-bandwidth CCD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Douglas G.

    2005-07-01

    As radars move to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with limited-bandwidth data downlinks, the amount of data stored and transmitted with each image becomes more significant. This document gives the results of a study to determine the effect of lossy compression in the image magnitude and phase on Coherent Change Detection (CCD). We examine 44 lossy compression types, plus lossless zlib compression, and test each compression method with over 600 CCD image pairs. We also derive theoretical predictions for the correlation for most of these compression schemes, which compare favorably with the experimental results. We recommend image transmission formats for limited-bandwidth programs having various requirements for CCD, including programs which cannot allow performance degradation and those which have stricter bandwidth requirements at the expense of CCD performance.

  19. Collection and processing data for high quality CCD images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-03-01

    Coherent Change Detection (CCD) with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is a technique whereby very subtle temporal changes can be discerned in a target scene. However, optimal performance requires carefully matching data collection geometries and adjusting the processing to compensate for imprecision in the collection geometries. Tolerances in the precision of the data collection are discussed, and anecdotal advice is presented for optimum CCD performance. Processing considerations are also discussed.

  20. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180 with Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  1. Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Dr Stanislaw Huskowski, Mayor of Wroclaw, Poland visiting the ATLAS magnet assembly hall, building 180. From l to r: Mr Carlo Lamprecht, State Councillor, Dr Stanislaw Huskowski and Dr Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson

  2. How Dr. Pierce Promoted Himself

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This article is about Dr. Raymond V Pierce who owned St. Vincent Island before it became a refuge. The doctor painted advertisements for his famous “Woman’s Tonic”...

  3. Visual enhancement of laparoscopic nephrectomies using the 3-CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Kansal, Neil S.; Dhanani, Nadeem; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Kirk, Allan D.; Pinto, Peter A.; Elster, Eric A.; Huffman, Scott W.; Levin, Ira W.

    2006-02-01

    Many surgical techniques are currently shifting from the more conventional, open approach towards minimally invasive laparoscopic procedures. Laparoscopy results in smaller incisions, potentially leading to less postoperative pain and more rapid recoveries . One key disadvantage of laparoscopic surgery is the loss of three-dimensional assessment of organs and tissue perfusion. Advances in laparoscopic technology include high-definition monitors for improved visualization and upgraded single charge coupled device (CCD) detectors to 3-CCD cameras, to provide a larger, more sensitive color palette to increase the perception of detail. In this discussion, we further advance existing laparoscopic technology to create greater enhancement of images obtained during radical and partial nephrectomies in which the assessment of tissue perfusion is crucial but limited with current 3-CCD cameras. By separating the signals received by each CCD in the 3-CCD camera and by introducing a straight forward algorithm, rapid differentiation of renal vessels and perfusion is accomplished and could be performed real time. The newly acquired images are overlaid onto conventional images for reference and comparison. This affords the surgeon the ability to accurately detect changes in tissue oxygenation despite inherent limitations of the visible light image. Such additional capability should impact procedures in which visual assessment of organ vitality is critical.

  4. Design, analysis, and testing of a CCD array mounting structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, John A.; O'Neill, Mark B.

    1991-12-01

    A method has been developed for mounting charge-coupled device (CCD) arrays in an optical telescope so as to minimize thermal defocusing errors. The mounting arrangement was developed for a six-inch aperture, visible band, off-axis reimaging telescope attached to an experimental satellite. The mounting arrangement consists of two pieces: a fiberglass frame which holds the actively cooled CCD package and provides thermal isolation from the telescope body; and a titanium flexure, which acts to minimize structural distortions caused by the difference in thermal expansion properties of the CCD array and the telescope body. This paper describes the design, analysis, and testing of this CCD array mounting arrangement. A detailed finite-element model of the CCD array and the mount was developed and used to predict thermally-induced defocus and gravity sag deformations, as well as natural frequencies. Experimental tests to verify the computer model results were performed using holographic interferometry. Vibration tests were also performed to verify the natural frequencies as well as structural integrity during launch. A comparison of the computer model predictions and the holographic interferometric measurements of thermally-induced defocussing indicates agreement to within 15 to 20%. Both the experimental and computer results indicate that the mounting structure provides focus stability over the operational temperature range of the telescope with sufficient structural integrity to survive the anticipated spacecraft launch loads.

  5. CCD Astrophotography High-Quality Imaging from the Suburbs

    CERN Document Server

    Stuart, Adam

    2006-01-01

    This is a reference book for amateur astronomers who have become interested in CCD imaging. Those glorious astronomical images found in astronomy magazines might seem out of reach to newcomers to CCD imaging, but this is not the case. Great pictures are attainable with modest equipment. Adam Stuart’s many beautiful images, reproduced in this book, attest to the quality of – initially – a beginner’s efforts. Chilled-chip astronomical CCD-cameras and software are also wonderful tools for cutting through seemingly impenetrable light-pollution. CCD Astrophotography from the Suburbs describes one man’s successful approach to the problem of getting high-quality astronomical images under some of the most light-polluted conditions. Here is a complete and thoroughly tested program that will help every CCD-beginner to work towards digital imaging of the highest quality. It is equally useful to astronomers who have perfect observing conditions, as to those who have to observe from light-polluted city skies.

  6. Purification and crystallization of Vibrio fischeri CcdB and its complexes with fragments of gyrase and CcdA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jonge, Natalie, E-mail: ndejonge@vub.ac.be; Buts, Lieven; Vangelooven, Joris [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, VIB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Mine, Natacha; Van Melderen, Laurence [Laboratoire de Génétique des Procaryotes, Institut de Biologie et de Médecine, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Gosselies (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, VIB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-04-01

    A CcdB homologue from V. fischeri was overexpressed in E. coli and purified. The free protein was crystallized, as were its complexes with fragments of E. coli and V. fischeri gyrase and with the F-plasmid CcdA C-terminal domain. The ccd toxin–antitoxin module from the Escherichia coli F plasmid has a homologue on the Vibrio fischeri integron. The homologue of the toxin (CcdB{sub Vfi}) was crystallized in two different crystal forms. The first form belongs to space group I23 or I2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameter a = 84.5 Å, and diffracts to 1.5 Å resolution. The second crystal form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.5, b = 43.6, c = 37.5 Å, β = 110.0°, and diffracts to 1.7 Å resolution. The complex of CcdB{sub Vfi} with the GyrA14{sub Vfi} fragment of V. fischeri gyrase crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.5, b = 94.6, c = 58.1 Å, and diffracts to 2.2 Å resolution. The corresponding mixed complex with E. coli GyrA14{sub Ec} crystallizes in space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 130.1, b = 90.8, c = 58.1 Å, β = 102.6°, and diffracts to 1.95 Å. Finally, a complex between CcdB{sub Vfi} and part of the F-plasmid antitoxin CcdA{sub F} crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 62.6, c = 82.0 Å, and diffracts to 1.9 Å resolution.

  7. Thinned back-illuminated CCD for x-ray microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Ilse, Werner; Wilhein, Thomas; Guttmann, Peter

    1993-07-01

    X-ray microscopy requires image detectors for soft x-rays (2.4 nm to 4.5 nm wavelength) with high detective quantum efficiency for a low radiation dosage applied to the sample. A thinned backside illuminated CCD has been attached to the Gottingen x-ray microscope, which is installed at the BESSY electron storage ring in Berlin. The CCD was a commercially available device with 1024 by 1024 pixels (each 24 micrometers square) without the anti-reflecting coating, which is applied to the standard device. First experiments performed at the primarily used x- ray wavelength of 2.4 nm show a considerable reduction of exposure time compared to the previously used photographic emulsion. This greatly reduces the radiation dose applied to the sample specimen. There was no degradation in performance of the CCD detected after one week of operation.

  8. Noise analysis for CCD-based ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John J; Hodgkinson, Jane; Saffell, John R; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-09-20

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of the noise behavior of two CCD spectrometers in common use, an AvaSpec-3648 CCD UV spectrometer and an Ocean Optics S2000 Vis spectrometer. Light sources used include a deuterium UV/Vis lamp and UV and visible LEDs. Common noise phenomena include source fluctuation noise, photoresponse nonuniformity, dark current noise, fixed pattern noise, and read noise. These were identified and characterized by varying light source, spectrometer settings, or temperature. A number of noise-limiting techniques are proposed, demonstrating a best-case spectroscopic noise equivalent absorbance of 3.5×10(-4)  AU for the AvaSpec-3648 and 5.6×10(-4)  AU for the Ocean Optics S2000 over a 30 s integration period. These techniques can be used on other CCD spectrometers to optimize performance.

  9. DepAstroCCD an original astrometric tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović I.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A complex software for preparation and treatment of astro photographic plates and double-star observations recorded with CCD cameras is developed. The preparation interface contains a catalogue base for the choice of observation objects and an interface for bringing into accordance the telescope and CCD camera performance with the assumptions of the postprocessor interface. The processing is based on the original development of image gradient removing software and classical FFT method and autocorrelation. The software has been tested on several theoretical and real images of double stars.

  10. Technology validation of the PLATO CCD at ESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prod'homme, Thibaut; Verhoeve, Peter; Beaufort, Thierry; Duvet, Ludovic; Lemmel, Frederic; Smit, Hans; Blommaert, Sander; Oosterbroek, Tim; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Visser, Ivo; Heijnen, Jerko; Butler, Bart

    2016-07-01

    PLATO { PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars { is the third medium-class mission to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. Due for launch in 2025, the payload makes use of a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) the e2v CCD270 operated at 4 MHz. The manufacture of such large device in large quantity constitutes an unprecedented effort. To de-risk the PLATO CCD procurement and aid the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation team is characterizing the electro-optical performance of a number of PLATO devices before and after proton irradiation.

  11. ESA's CCD test bench for the PLATO mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort, Thierry; Duvet, Ludovic; Bloemmaert, Sander; Lemmel, Frederic; Prod'homme, Thibaut; Verhoeve, Peter; Smit, Hans; Butler, Bart; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Heijnen, Jerko; Visser, Ivo

    2016-08-01

    PLATO { PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars { is the third medium-class mission to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. Due for launch in 2025, the payload makes use of a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs), the e2v CCD270 operated at 4 MHz and at -70 C. To de-risk the PLATO CCD qualification programme initiated in 2014 and support the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation section from the Future Missions Office has developed a dedicated test bench.

  12. Digital Printing Quality Detection and Analysis Technology Based on CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Zheng, Liping

    2017-12-01

    With the help of CCD digital printing quality detection and analysis technology, it can carry out rapid evaluation and objective detection of printing quality, and can play a certain control effect on printing quality. It can be said CDD digital printing quality testing and analysis of the rational application of technology, its digital printing and printing materials for a variety of printing equipments to improve the quality of a very positive role. In this paper, we do an in-depth study and discussion based on the CCD digital print quality testing and analysis technology.

  13. Diabetic retinopathy (DR: everybody's business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yorston

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is on the increase worldwide, due mainly to the rise in the number of people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common because:* People are living longer, and diabetes is more prevalent in older people.* As people increasingly migrate to urban areas, exercise less, eat more, and eat less healthy food, more people are becoming obese – a primary cause of type 2 diabetes.Diabetes increases the risk of a range of eye diseases, including cataract, but the main cause of blindness associated with diabetes is diabetic retinopathy (DR. DR usually develops between ten and twenty years after the onset of diabetes, and develops faster when diabetes is undiagnosed and untreated.People with DR whose sight is at risk can be treated, most commonly with laser, to prevent visual impairment and blindness. Sadly, there is no treatment that can restore vision that has already been lost.

  14. Tribute to Dr Jacques Rogge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourgois, Jan G; Dumortier, Jasmien; Callewaert, Margot

    2017-01-01

    'A tribute to Dr J. Rogge' aims to systematically review muscle activity and muscle fatigue during sustained submaximal quasi-isometric knee extension exercise (hiking) related to Olympic dinghy sailing as a tribute to Dr Rogge's merits in the world of sports. Dr Jacques Rogge is not only the for...... muscle. Since maximal strength is an important determinant of neuromuscular fatigue during hiking, combined strength and endurance training should be incorporated in the training program of dinghy sailors.......% predicted by a higher maximal isometric quadriceps strength. Although useful in exercise testing, prediction of hiking endurance capacity based on the changes in surface EMG in thigh and trunk muscles during a hiking maintenance task is not reliable. This could probably be explained by the varying exercise...

  15. Dr. von Braun With Management Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is shown in this photograph, which was probably taken in the early 1960s, with members of his management team. Pictured from left to right are, Werner Kuers, Director of the Manufacturing Engineering Division; Dr. Walter Haeussermarn, Director of the Astrionics Division; Dr. William Mrazek, Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Division; Dr. von Braun; Dieter Grau, Director of the Quality Assurance Division; Dr. Oswald Lange, Director of the Saturn Systems Office; and Erich Neubert , Associate Deputy Director for Research and Development.

  16. Astrometric CCD Observations of Three Double Stars Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nand, Angela

    2017-04-01

    CCD astrometric observations of three double star groups from the Orion constellation were made. Position angles and separations of corresponding pairs were obtained from the data acquired and compared to previous observations listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog. Present data agrees with previous observational data.

  17. CCD Measurements of WDS 13510+6819 STTA127

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaben, Faisal; Vasilenko, Dmitrii; Ganbold, Gunbold; McClanahan, Stuart; Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady

    2017-07-01

    WDS 13510+6819, a three-star star system, discoverer code STTA 127, is imaged using CCD cameras for astrometric measurements in comparison to historic data contained in the Washington Double Star Catalog. The historical data outlines measurements between the A-B and the B-C components and the 2016 measurements support the trend outlined in the WDS Historical File.

  18. Developments in X-ray and astronomical CCD imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, J A; Kosicki, B B; Reich, R K

    1999-01-01

    There have been many recent developments in the attributes and capabilities of silicon-based CCD detectors for use in space and ground-based astronomy. The imagers used as X-ray detectors require very low noise and excellent quantum efficiency over the energy range of 200-10000 eV. This is achieved using a combination of front and back-illuminated imagers fabricated on a 5000 OMEGA-cm resistivity material. A requirement for ground-based imagers is very good sensitivity between 350 and 1000 nm, as well as low noise and a high degree of spatial uniformity. We will describe the fabrication and performance of these imagers. Special features integrated into the CCD pixel architecture have increased the capability of the imagers. A fast electronic shutter has been developed for a wavefront sensor in an adaptive optics system. An orthogonal transfer CCD has been designed to compensate for the image motion relative to the CCD focal plane. Also, an antiblooming drain process has been developed so bright sources do not...

  19. A GRAPH READER USING A CCD IMAGE SENSOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... 3. Data Processing. The microcontroller, the CCD sensor, the stepper motor and the rest of the system are interfaced to the PC where data processing and overall control are done. A software program in. QUICKBASIC is used to process the pixels. First the 1024 pixels of an image line are received from the.

  20. Storage and compression design of high speed CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xichang; Zhai, LinPei

    2009-05-01

    In current field of CCD measurement, large area and high resolution CCD is used to obtain big measurement image, so that, speed and capacity of CCD requires high performance of later storage and process system. The paper discusses how to use SCSI hard disk to construct storage system and use DSPs and FPGA to realize image compression. As for storage subsystem, Because CCD is divided into multiplex output, SCSI array is used in RAID0 way. The storage system is com posed of high speed buffer, DM A controller, control M CU, SCSI protocol controller and SCSI hard disk. As for compression subsystem, according to requirement of communication and monitor system, the output is fixed resolution image and analog PA L signal. The compression means is JPEG 2000 standard, in which, 9/7 wavelets in lifting format is used. 2 DSPs and FPGA are used to com pose parallel compression system. The system is com posed of FPGA pre-processing module, DSP compression module, video decoder module, data buffer module and communication module. Firstly, discrete wavelet transform and quantization is realized in FPGA. Secondly, entropy coding and stream adaption is realized in DSPs. Last, analog PA L signal is output by Video decoder. Data buffer is realized in synchronous dual-port RAM and state of subsystem is transfer to controller. Through subjective and objective evaluation, the storage and compression system satisfies the requirement of system.

  1. Diagnostics of the CCD using the mesh experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunemi, H; Mori, K; Yoshita, K; Miyata, E

    1999-01-01

    We present here the results of a mesh experiment with which we can measure the shape of a charge cloud generated by the photoabsorption of X-rays inside a charge-coupled device (CCD). The mesh used is made of gold of 13-mu m thickness, and has many holes of 1.4 mu m diameter spaced 48 mu m apart. The CCD used has 12 mu m square pixels. A new criterion with which we can determine the precise alignment in the experiment is introduced to eliminate uncertainties. We measured the charge cloud size at three X-ray energies: Al-K (1.5 keV), Mo-L (2.3 keV) and Ti-K (4.5 keV). The shapes can be well represented not by a point-symmetric Gaussian function, but by an axial symmetric Gaussian function with sigma of 0.7-1.5 mu m. The charge cloud size depends weakly on the mean absorption length in silicon. We find that the charge cloud size can be well explained by a simple model inside the CCD. We discuss that the knowledge of the charge cloud size will enable us to improve the position resolution of the CCD.

  2. A luminescence imaging system based on a CCD camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Markey, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    described here has a maximum spatial resolution of 17 mu m; though this may be varied under software control to alter the signal-to-noise ratio. The camera has been mounted on a Riso automated TL/OSL reader, and both the reader and the CCD are under computer control. In the near u.v and blue part...

  3. DR. MIKA MAJALE MEMORIAL LECTURE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tuberculosis and polio. The first indigenous orthopaedic surgeon was. Dr. Mika Majale. ... but was posted to Kisii then Mombasa where he spent all his orthopaedic life. The other orthopaedic surgeons were in .... dissertations done by some of the post graduate students are excellent, but they are simply left in the hard cover.

  4. Anand Kumar, Dr Trichnopoly Chelvaraj

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1981 Section: Animal Sciences. Anand Kumar, Dr Trichnopoly Chelvaraj Ph.D. (Rajasthan), D.Sc. (Mumbai). Date of birth: 18 June 1936. Date of death: 26 January 2010. Specialization: Human Reproduction Last known address: Chairman, Hope Infertility Clinic & Research Foundation, 33/1, Aga Abbas Ali Road, ...

  5. Anandavardhanan, Dr U.K.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship; Associateship. Associate Profile. Period: 2007–2010. Anandavardhanan, Dr U.K.. Date of birth: 25 May 1976. Address during Associateship: Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai, Mumbai - 400 076. Contact: Email: anand@math.iitb.ac.in. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog ...

  6. Dr. John Marburger visits DESY

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Dr. John Marburger, Director of the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, visited the research center DESY in Hamburg. The American physicist wanted to inform himself about the status of the TESLA X-ray laser and the TESLA linear collider as well as the international collaboration at DESY (1/2 page).

  7. Shastry, Dr Sishta Venkata Seetharama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Plant Sciences. Shastry, Dr Sishta Venkata Seetharama Ph.D. (Wisconsin), FNA. Date of birth: 4 November 1928. Specialization: Cytogenetics, Taxonomy, Plant Breeding and Rice Development Address: 'Ashoka', 204, Gautami Apartments, Barkatpura, Hyderabad 500 027, A.P.

  8. Beig, Dr Gufran-Ullah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Section: Earth & Planetary Sciences. Beig, Dr Gufran-Ullah Ph.D. Ahmedabad. Date of birth: 24 May 1961. Specialization: Atmospheric Sciences, Global Change & Atmospheric Environment, Urban Air Pollution & Chemical-Climate Change, 2-D & 3-D Atmospheric Chemical Transport Modelling

  9. Ali, Dr Moizuddin Abdul Salim

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1975 Section: Animal Sciences. Ali, Dr Moizuddin Abdul Salim D.Sc. (Andhra), D.Sc. (h.c.), FNA. Date of birth: 12 November 1896. Date of death: 20 June 1987. Specialization: Ecology, Zoogeography, Nature Conservation, Ornithology Last known address: No. 46, Pali Hill, Bombay 400 050.

  10. Murty, Dr Thutupalli Gopala Krishna

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2002 Section: Engineering & Technology. Murty, Dr Thutupalli Gopala Krishna Ph.D. (Adelaide). Date of birth: 11 February 1944. Specialization: Optical Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Electro-Optical Instrumentation and Atmospheric Science Technologies Address: 848, 8th B Main, 17th Cross, ISRO Layout, ...

  11. In Memoriam Dr. M. Jacobs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, C.

    1983-01-01

    Dr. Marius Jacobs, a senior staff member of the Rijksherbarium, died suddenly on 28 April 1983, following a heart attack some days earlier. He was only 53 years old and his death came as a great shock, not only to his colleagues at our institute. Jacobs was a many-sided man with interests in many

  12. Rao, Dr Kanury Venkata Subba

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rao, Dr Kanury Venkata Subba Ph.D. (Baroda), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 27 September 1958. Specialization: Synthetic Peptides, Cell Signalling, Biology of Tuberculosis Infection, Systems Biology Address: Head, DDRC, Translational Health Science & Technbology Institute, NCR Biotech, Science Cluster, Faridabad 121 ...

  13. Raghava, Dr Gajendra Pal Singh

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raghava, Dr Gajendra Pal Singh Ph.D. (Chandigarh), FNASc. Date of birth: 25 May 1963. Specialization: Bioinformatics, Cancer Genomics, Immunoinformatics, Drug Design, Subunit Vaccine Design Address: Head, Centre for Computational Biology, Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology, Okhla, Phase 3, New ...

  14. Gold detector: modular CCD area detector for macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naday, Istvan; Ross, Stephan W.; Kanyo, Miklos; Westbrook, Mary L.; Westbrook, Edwin M.; Phillips, Walter C.; Stanton, Martin J.; O'Mara, Daniel M.

    1995-04-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a modular CCD area detector system for macromolecular crystallography at synchrotron x-ray sources, code-named the `gold' detector system. The sensitive area of the detector is 150 mm X 150 mm, with 3,072 X 3,072 pixel sampling, resulting in roughly a 50 micrometers pixel raster. The x-ray image formed on the face of the detector is converted to visible light by a thin phosphor layer. This image is transferred optically to nine CCD sensors by nine square fiberoptic tapers (one for each CCD), arranged in a 3 X 3 array. Each taper demagnifies the image by a factor of approximately 2. Each CCD has a 1,024 X 1,024 pixel raster and is read out through two independent data channels. After each x-ray exposure period the x-ray shutter is closed and the electronic image is digitized (16-bit) and read out in 1.8s. Alteratively, the image may be binned 2 X 2 during readout, resulting in a 1,536 X 1,536 raster of 100 micrometers pixels; this image can be read out in 0.4s. The CCD sensors are operated at -40 degree(s)C to reduce electronic noise. The detector is operated under full computer control: all operational parameters (readout rates, CCD temperature, etc.) can be adjusted from the console. The image data (18 MByte/image) are transferred via a fast VME system to a control processor and ultimately to disk storage. During April 1994 we carried out a complete set of measurements at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) for a full characterization of the gold detector. Characterization includes quantitative evaluation of the instrument's conversion gain (signal level/x-ray photon); detective quantum efficiency (DQE); point-spread function; sensitivity as a function of x-ray energy; geometrical distortion of images; spatial uniformity; read noise; and dark image and dark image noise. Characterization parameters derived from these measurements show that this detector will be extraordinarily valuable for macromolecular

  15. Sproglige drømmerier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farø, Ken Joensen

    2015-01-01

    blev tidligere brugt i Danmarks Radio som pausesignal, afspillet på en spilledåse. Ak ja, det var dengang. Gå ind på nettet og lyt til den, hvis du ikke kender melodien. Det er national kulturarv. Mange bevingede ord indeholder en form af ”drøm(me)”, fx Martin Luther Kings ”I have a Dream”. Eller...

  16. The interaction of DNA gyrase with the bacterial toxin CcdB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Howells, A J; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    CcdB is a bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase. Analysis of the interaction of CcdB with gyrase reveals two distinct complexes. An initial complex (alpha) is formed by direct interaction between GyrA and CcdB; this complex can be detected by affinity column and gel-shift analysis, and has...

  17. Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director Past Issues / ... for NIH and for science in this country." "Dr. Collins is one of our generation's great scientific ...

  18. Optimization of polarimetry sensitivity for X-ray CCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashida, K. E-mail: hayasida@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Hashimoto, Y.; Ohtani, M

    1999-10-21

    X-ray polarimetry with CCD has been performed using a polarized X-ray beam from an electron impact X-ray source. The standard data reduction method employing double-pixel events yields the modulation factor M of 0.14 at 27 keV and 0.24 at 43 keV for the 12 {mu}m pixel size CCD chip. We develop a new data reduction method, in which multi-pixel events are employed, and which approximates the charge spread as an oval shape. We optimize the reduction parameters, so that we improve the P{sub min} (minimum detectable polarization degree) by factor of three from the value obtained through the usual double-pixel event method.

  19. Optimization of polarimetry sensitivity for X-ray CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashida, K; Tsunemi, H; Hashimoto, Y; Ohtani, M

    1999-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry with CCD has been performed using a polarized X-ray beam from an electron impact X-ray source. The standard data reduction method employing double-pixel events yields the modulation factor M of 0.14 at 27 keV and 0.24 at 43 keV for the 12 mu m pixel size CCD chip. We develop a new data reduction method, in which multi-pixel events are employed, and which approximates the charge spread as an oval shape. We optimize the reduction parameters, so that we improve the P sub m sub i sub n (minimum detectable polarization degree) by factor of three from the value obtained through the usual double-pixel event method.

  20. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Zgórz, Marika [Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Słoneczna 36, 60-286 Poznań (Poland); Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander, E-mail: chrisk@amu.edu.pl [Copernicus Astronomical Centre, ul. Bartycka 18, PL 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  1. Stroboscope Based Synchronization of Full Frame CCD Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The key obstacle to the use of consumer cameras in computer vision and computer graphics applications is the lack of synchronization hardware. We present a stroboscope based synchronization approach for the charge-coupled device (CCD consumer cameras. The synchronization is realized by first aligning the frames from different video sequences based on the smear dots of the stroboscope, and then matching the sequences using a hidden Markov model. Compared with current synchronized capture equipment, the proposed approach greatly reduces the cost by using inexpensive CCD cameras and one stroboscope. The results show that our method could reach a high accuracy much better than the frame-level synchronization of traditional software methods.

  2. Series of CCD cameras for low-light-level applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Michal L.; Weaver, Daniel W.; Ambrose, Tom P.; Hirpara, Dan; Gallagher, Susan; Hall, Andrew M.; Bone, Gregg

    1996-03-01

    We describe a series of five CCD cameras designed by Gordian for low light-level applications. The first device is a low-cost non-imaging astronomical autoguiding tracker based on the Texas Instruments TC255 CCD chip and an MC6811 microcontroller. Mounting off-axis, it provides standardized tracking-motor signals for any telescope with a dual-axis drive corrector, automatically compensating for the mechanical peculiarities of the drive, set- up factors, and pointing errors. The tracker can guide to +/- 1 arcsec on an 8th magnitude star when used with an 8' aperture, f/10 telescope. The basic autoguider design has been extended to produce self-contained 8-bit and 16-bit imaging cameras with autoguiding functionality. Images are buffered in PSRAM, then relayed to a host PC via an RS-232 serial connection. The addition of regulated thermoelectric cooling reduces CCD thermal noise and alleviates dark current saturation. Gordian has also designed two high-resolution cameras based on the Kodak KAF-0400 and KAF-1600 CCDs. The cameras produce 16-bit images with 768 X 512 pixels or 1536 X 1024 pixels, respectively. Pixel size is 9 micrometers square. The camera head contains the CCD, thermoelectric cooling mechanism, analog electronics, and a custom-designed electromechanical shutter based on FlexinolTM actuator wire. A separate base unit houses a Motorola 68306 microprocessor and associated electronics for telescope control and on-board image processing. A stepper-motor based filter wheel can be attached directly to the camera head. The camera communicates with a personal computer via SCSI or serial connection. Software for the host PC provides additional control options, data storage, and image processing capability.

  3. Design, development, and performance of the STEREO SECCHI CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltham, Nick; Eyles, Chris

    2007-09-01

    We report the design, development and performance of the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) CCD camera electronics on NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). STEREO consists of two nearly identical space-based observatories; one ahead of Earth in its orbit, the other trailing behind to provide the first-ever stereoscopic (3D) measurements to study the Sun and the nature of its coronal mass ejections. The SECCHI instrument suite consists of five telescopes that will observe the solar corona, and inner heliosphere all the way from the surface of the Sun to the orbit of the Earth, and beyond. Each telescope contains a large-format science-grade CCD; two within the Heliospheric Imager (HI) instrument, and three in a separate instrument package (SCIP) consisting of two coronagraphs and an EUV imager. The CCDs are operated from two Camera Electronics Boxes. Constraints on the size, mass, and power available for the camera electronics required the development of a miniaturised solution employing digital and mixed-signal ASICs, FPGAs, and compact surface-mount construction. Operating more than one CCD from a single box also provides economy on the number of DC-DC converters and interface electronics required. We describe the requirements for the overall design and implementation, and in particular the design and performance of the camera's space-saving mixed-signal CCD video processing ASIC. The performance of the camera is reviewed together with sample images obtained since the STEREO mission was successfully launched on October 25 2006 from Cape Canaveral.

  4. CCD readout of GEM-based neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, F A F; Fetal, S T G; Fraga, M; Guérard, B; Manzini, G; Margato, L M S; Oed, A; Policarpo, Armando; Vuure, T V

    2002-01-01

    We report on the optical readout of the gas electron multiplier (GEM) operated with a gaseous mixture suitable for the detection of thermal neutrons: sup 3 He-CF sub 4. A CCD system operating in the 400-1000 nm band was used to collect the light. Spectroscopic data on the visible and NIR scintillation of He-CF sub 4 are presented. Images of the tracks of the proton and triton recorded with a triple GEM detector are also shown.

  5. Multiband CCD Photometry of CY Aquarii Using the AAVSOnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowall, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    delta Scuti stars are a class of short-period pulsating variable stars that include CY Aquarii. Multiband CCD photometry was performed on that star using instruments in Massachusetts, New Mexico, and Australia from the AAVSO's global robotic telescope network. Rapid cadence, multi-hour time series yielded high precision light curves and 21 new maxima. Data analyses revealed a pulsation pattern consistent with the existing model that describes the origin of SXPHE stars.

  6. A CCD Photometric Study of Close Binary V445 Cep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Dong Oh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present new BVR CCD photometric light curves for the close binary star V445 Cep. A new photometric solution and absolute physical dimensions of the system were derived by applying the Wilson-Devinney program to our observed light curves and radial velocity curves published by Pych et al. The evolutional status of V445 Cep was found to coincide with those of the general low mass ratio contact binary systems.

  7. Design of a CCD Camera for Space Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-05

    demonstration of the SensorSat satellite to scan the geosynchronous- orbit belt from low Earth orbit . This mission is technology pathfinder follow-on for the...the geo belt from an equatorial orbit . This is done with a novel approach via microsatellite of only 120 Kg. The satellite will scan the belt...electronics design for observing satellites in the geo belt. The paper discusses the design overview, tactics for tuning operation of a CCD, and

  8. Ortho projection and drawing for archeological artifacts using CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Chikatsu, Hirofumi; Miyatsuka, Yoshito

    1995-09-01

    In the compilation of archival records for archeological artifacts, true orthographic drawings of these artifacts have to be drawn by the archeologists themselves or part-timer, expending a great deal of time, labor, and skills. This paper describes the real time orthographic drawing system using a CCD camera. Finally, it demonstrates real time orthographic drawing results for Jomon pottery by using this system instead of the manual method which requires 3-4 hours.

  9. Gaia and VLT astrometry of faint stars: Precision of Gaia DR1 positions and updated VLT parallaxes of ultracool dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazorenko, P. F.; Sahlmann, J.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We compared positions of the Gaia first data release (DR1) secondary data set at its faint limit with CCD positions of stars in 20 fields observed with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) FORS2. We aim at an independent verification of the DR1 astrometric precision taking advantage of the FORS2 position uncertainties which are smaller than one milli-arcsecond (mas). Methods: In the fields that we observed with FORS2, we projected the Gaia DR1 positions into the CCD plane, performed a polynomial fit between the two sets of matching stars, and carried out statistical analyses of the residuals in positions. Results: The residual root mean square (rms) roughly matches the expectations given by the Gaia DR1 uncertainties, where we identified three regimes in terms of Gaia DR1 precision: for G ≃ 17-20 stars we found that the formal DR1 position uncertainties of stars with DR1 precisions in the range of 0.5-5 mas are underestimated by 63 ± 5%, whereas the DR1 uncertainties of stars in the range 7-10 mas are overestimated by a factor of two. For the best-measured and generally brighter G ≃ 16-18 stars with DR1 positional uncertainties of mas, we detected 0.44 ± 0.13 mas excess noise in the residual rms, whose origin could be in both FORS2 and Gaia DR1. By adopting Gaia DR1 as the absolute reference frame, we refined the pixel scale determination of FORS2,leading to minor updates to the parallaxes of 20 ultracool dwarfs that we published previously. We also updated the FORS2 absolute parallax of the Luhman 16 binary brown dwarf system to 501.42 ± 0.11 mas. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 086.C-0680, 087.C-0567, 088.C-0679, 089.C-0397, and 090.C-0786.

  10. Analysis of Dark Current in BRITE Nanostellite CCD Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Popowicz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The BRightest Target Explorer (BRITE is the pioneering nanosatellite mission dedicated for photometric observations of the brightest stars in the sky. The BRITE charge coupled device (CCD sensors are poorly shielded against extensive flux of energetic particles which constantly induce defects in the silicon lattice. In this paper we investigate the temporal evolution of the generation of the dark current in the BRITE CCDs over almost four years after launch. Utilizing several steps of image processing and employing normalization of the results, it was possible to obtain useful information about the progress of thermal activity in the sensors. The outcomes show a clear and consistent linear increase of induced damage despite the fact that only about 0.14% of CCD pixels were probed. By performing the analysis of temperature dependencies of the dark current, we identified the observed defects as phosphorus-vacancy (PV pairs, which are common in proton irradiated CCD matrices. Moreover, the Meyer-Neldel empirical rule was confirmed in our dark current data, yielding E M N = 24.8 meV for proton-induced PV defects.

  11. A Bridge Deflection Monitoring System Based on CCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For long-term monitoring of the midspan deflection of Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction on 309 national roads in Zibo city, this paper proposes Zhang’s calibration-based DIC deflection monitoring method. CCD cameras are used to track the change of targets’ position, Zhang’s calibration algorithm is introduced to acquire the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of CCD cameras, and the DIC method is combined with Zhang’s calibration algorithm to measure bridge deflection. The comparative test between Zhang’s calibration and scale calibration is conducted in lab, and experimental results indicate that the proposed method has higher precision. According to the deflection monitoring scheme, the deflection monitoring software for Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction is developed by MATLAB, and a 4-channel CCD deflection monitoring system for Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction is integrated in this paper. This deflection monitoring system includes functions such as image preview, simultaneous collection, camera calibration, deflection display, and data storage. In situ deflection curves show a consistent trend; this suggests that the proposed method is reliable and is suitable for the long-term monitoring of bridge deflection.

  12. FOREWORD: Dr Trevor J Hicks Dr Trevor J Hicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Darren

    2009-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has been assembled to recognize the valuable contribution of Dr Trevor J Hicks to the field of neutron scattering and magnetism. Trevor began his study of magnetism as a PhD student at Monash University in Melbourne in the early 1960s, working with Professor Jack Smith. From the very beginning magnetism in alloys, and disordered systems in general, became a key aspect of his career. After a postdoctoral position at Harwell working with Dr Graeme Low Trevor returned to Australia and took up a position with Monash. He soon became a key figure in developing the capability for neutron scattering using the HIFAR reactor at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, now the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO. The instrumentation was always developed to further his studies of magnetism. The development of polarization analysis measurements of diffuse magnetic scattering, first using iron filters and then his own design of supermirror benders for beam polarization, took place through the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s. Throughout this time, Trevor mentored a series of PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom have contributed to this issue (and, indeed, guest edited it). As befits a scientist and university academic for whom teaching has always been important, Trevor has not only created a strong body of significant research, he has also made a major contribution to preparing several generations of neutron scattering scientists, and this issue reflects that. When I approached Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter with a proposal for an issue in honour of Trevor, the response was immediate and positive. It is with great pleasure that I present the result of that proposal. The great diversity of the content, all centred on neutron scattering and magnetism, reflects the breadth of Trevor's own career and of the scientists with whom he has interacted. Finally, I would like to make some

  13. C.C.D. Readout Of A Picosecond Streak Camera With An Intensified C.C.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonier, M.; Richard, J. C.; Cavailler, C.; Mens, A.; Raze, G.

    1985-02-01

    This paper deals with a digital streak camera readout device. The device consists in a low light level television camera made of a solid state C.C.D. array coupled to an image intensifier associated to a video-digitizer coupled to a micro-computer system. The streak camera images are picked-up as a video signal, digitized and stored. This system allows the fast recording and the automatic processing of the data provided by the streak tube. Starting from the output screen of the streak camera, the constitutive elements are : - A fiber optic taper (A.O. Scientific Instruments) set in contact with the fiber optic output window of the streak tube achieves the image demagnification ; - A double proximity focused image intensifier (RTC - XX1410 SP) achieves the bright-ness amplification without any distortion ; - A second fiber optic taper achieves the dimensional matching between intensifier output and C.C.D. sensitive area ;

  14. Optical and dark characterization of the PLATO CCD at ESA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeve, Peter; Prod'homme, Thibaut; Oosterbroek, Tim; Duvet, Ludovic; Beaufort, Thierry; Blommaert, Sander; Butler, Bart; Heijnen, Jerko; Lemmel, Frederic; van der Luijt, Cornelis; Smit, Hans; Visser, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    PLATO - PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars - is the third medium-class mission (M3) to be selected in the European Space Agency (ESA) Science and Robotic Exploration Cosmic Vision programme. It is due for launch in 2025 with the main objective to find and study terrestrial planets in the habitable zone around solar-like stars. The payload consists of >20 cameras; with each camera comprising 4 Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs), a large number of flight model devices procured by ESA shall ultimately be integrated on the spacecraft. The CCD270 - specially designed and manufactured by e2v for the PLATO mission - is a large format (8 cm x 8 cm) back-illuminated device operating at 4 MHz pixel rate and coming in two variants: full frame and frame transfer. In order to de-risk the PLATO CCD procurement and aid the mission definition process, ESA's Payload Technology Validation section is currently validating the PLATO CCD270. This validation consists in demonstrating that the device achieves its specified electrooptical performance in the relevant environment: operated at 4 MHz, at cold and before and after proton irradiation. As part of this validation, CCD270 devices have been characterized in the dark as well as optically with respect to performance parameters directly relevant for the photometric application of the CCDs. Dark tests comprise the measurement of gain sensitivity to bias voltages, charge injection tests, and measurement of hot and variable pixels after irradiation. In addition, the results of measurements of Quantum Efficiency for a range of angles of incidence, intra- pixel response (non-)uniformity, and response to spot illumination, before and after proton irradiation. In particular, the effect of radiation induced degradation of the charge transfer efficiency on the measured charge in a star-like spot has been studied as a function of signal level and of position on the pixel grid, Also, the effect of various levels of background light on the

  15. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-09-01

    In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  16. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  17. Interview with Dr. Damian Milton

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Dr Damian Milton is one of the pre-eminent thinkers and presenters in the autism field in the UK and is gaining an increasing reputation internationally. He is a member of the scientific and advisory committee of Research Autism and is Head of Autism Knowledge and Expertise at the National Autistic Society. Damian is also a researcher for London South Bank University. He has worked on a number of projects for the Autism Education Trust, as well as autistic-led ventures such as the Theorising ...

  18. Rotational spectra of vibrationally excited CCH and CCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, T C; Gottlieb, C A; Thaddeus, P

    2007-09-21

    The millimeter-wave rotational spectra of the lowest bending and stretching vibrational levels of CCH and CCD were observed in a low pressure discharge through acetylene and helium. The rotational, centrifugal distortion, and fine structure constants were determined for the (02(0)0) and (02(2)0) bending states, the (100) and (001) stretching levels, and the (011) combination level of CCH. The same pure bending and stretching levels, and the (110) combination level were observed in CCD. Apparent anomalies in the spectroscopic constants in the bending states were shown to be due to l-type resonances. Hyperfine constants, which in CCH are sensitive to the degree of admixture of the A 2Pi excited electronic state, were determined in the excited vibrational levels of both isotopic species. Theoretical Fermi contact and dipole-dipole hyperfine constants calculated by Peric et al. [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 150, 70 (1991)] were found to be in excellent agreement with the measured constants. In CCD, new rotational lines tentatively assigned to the (100) level largely on the basis of the observed hyperfine structure support the assignment of the C-H stretching fundamental (nu1) by Stephens et al. [J. Mol. Struct. 190, 41 (1988)]. Rotational lines in the excited vibrational levels of CCH are fairly intense in our discharge source because the vibrational excitation temperatures of the bending vibrational levels and the (110) and (011) combination levels are only about 100 K higher than the gas kinetic temperature, unlike the higher frequency stretching vibrations, where the excitation temperatures are five to ten times higher.

  19. Is Flat fielding Safe for Precision CCD Astronomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Michael; Davis, Christopher P.; Roodman, Aaron

    2017-08-01

    The ambitious goals of precision cosmology with wide-field optical surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) demand precision CCD astronomy as their foundation. This in turn requires an understanding of previously uncharacterized sources of systematic error in CCD sensors, many of which manifest themselves as static effective variations in pixel area. Such variation renders a critical assumption behind the traditional procedure of flat fielding—that a sensor’s pixels comprise a uniform grid—invalid. In this work, we present a method to infer a curl-free model of a sensor’s underlying pixel grid from flat-field images, incorporating the superposition of all electrostatic sensor effects—both known and unknown—present in flat-field data. We use these pixel grid models to estimate the overall impact of sensor systematics on photometry, astrometry, and PSF shape measurements in a representative sensor from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) and a prototype LSST sensor. Applying the method to DECam data recovers known significant sensor effects for which corrections are currently being developed within DES. For an LSST prototype CCD with pixel-response non-uniformity (PRNU) of 0.4%, we find the impact of “improper” flat fielding on these observables is negligible in nominal .7″ seeing conditions. These errors scale linearly with the PRNU, so for future LSST production sensors, which may have larger PRNU, our method provides a way to assess whether pixel-level calibration beyond flat fielding will be required.

  20. Apical dominance in saffron and the involvement of the branching enzymes CCD7 and CCD8 in the control of bud sprouting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In saffron (Crocus sativus), new corms develop at the base of every shoot developed from the maternal corm, a globular underground storage stem. Since the degree of bud sprouts influences the number and size of new corms, and strigolactones (SLs) suppress growth of pre-formed axillary bud, it was considered appropriate to investigate SL involvement in physiology and molecular biology in saffron. We focused on two of the genes within the SL pathway, CCD7 and CCD8, encoding carotenoid cleavage enzymes required for the production of SLs. Results The CsCCD7 and CsCCD8 genes are the first ones isolated and characterized from a non-grass monocotyledonous plant. CsCCD7 and CsCCD8 expression showed some overlapping, although they were not identical. CsCCD8 was highly expressed in quiescent axillary buds and decapitation dramatically reduced its expression levels, suggesting its involvement in the suppression of axillary bud outgrowth. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed also the involvement of auxin, cytokinin and jasmonic acid on the sprouting of axillary buds from corms in which the apical bud was removed. In addition, CsCCD8 expression, but not CsCCD7, was higher in the newly developed vascular tissue of axillary buds compared to the vascular tissue of the apical bud. Conclusions We showed that production and transport of auxin in saffron corms could act synergistically with SLs to arrest the outgrowth of the axillary buds, similar to the control of above-ground shoot branching. In addition, jasmonic acid seems to play a prominent role in bud dormancy in saffron. While cytokinins from roots promote bud outgrowth. In addition the expression results of CsCCD8 suggest that SLs could positively regulate procambial activity and the development of new vascular tissues connecting leaves with the mother corm. PMID:24947472

  1. Accurate wavelength calibration method for compact CCD spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y C; Huang, C; Xia, G; Jin, S Q; Lu, H B

    2017-04-01

    Wavelength calibration is an important step in charge-coupled device (CCD) spectrometers. In this paper, an accurate calibration method is proposed. A model of a line profile spectrum is built at the beginning, followed by noise reduction, bandwidth correction, and automatic peak-seeking treatment. Experimental tests are conducted on the USB4000 spectrometer with a mercury-argon calibration light source. Compared with the traditional method, the results show that this wavelength calibration procedure obtains higher accuracy and the deviations are within 0.1 nm.

  2. A Lossy Method for Compressing Raw CCD Images

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Alan M.

    2002-01-01

    Se presenta un método para comprimir las imágenes en bruto de dispositivos como los CCD. El método es muy sencillo: cuantizaciòn con pérdida y luego compresión sin pérdida con herramientas de uso general como gzip o bzip2. Se convierten los archivos comprimidos a archivos de FITS descomprimiéndolos con gunzip o bunzip2, lo cual es una ventaja importante en la distribución de datos comprimidos. El grado de cuantizaciòn se elige para eliminar los bits de bajo orden, los cuales...

  3. Dr House, TV, and reality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapostolle, Frédéric; Montois, Sylvie; Alhéritière, Armelle; De Stefano, Carla; Le Toumelin, Philippe; Adnet, Frédéric

    2013-02-01

    Medical practice in the media is usually far from reality. Thus, the viewer may be led astray. The world-famous fictional Dr House has to face a difficult diagnosis every week. His practice does not seem to reflect reality. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnosis strategy involved in this television program. An observer has previewed the 2011 season. The episode running time, the patient's age and sex, the list of all investigations and interventions, the final diagnosis, and the patient's outcome were collected. Number and proportion of French viewers for each episode were recorded. We analyzed 18 episodes. The median running time was 42.5 (42.1-43.2) minutes. Main patient characters were 12 men (66%) and 6 women (33%); the average age was 31 (22-38) years. There were 225 investigations or interventions reported, averaging 14 (9-15) per episode, representing one examination every 3.1 (2.9-4.8) minutes. The most frequently prescribed investigations were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 13; 72%), blood sample (11; 61%), and biopsy (10; 56%). The most frequent interventions were surgery, anti-infectious treatments, and steroid treatments (9 each; 50%). Two patients (11%) died. The median number of spectators was 8.4 (8.1-8.7) million, corresponding to 33% (33%-34%) of the French national audience. The population and the examination strategies used by Dr House were unrealistic. Because of this distortion, patients may not understand, nor accept the delay, the investigation choices, the intervention costs, risks, nor failures of a daily medical practice. Physicians should be aware of this "information bias." Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  5. In Memoriam: Dr. Frank John Fenner

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-22

    This podcast reflects on one of the greatest pioneers in virology, Dr. Frank John Fenner. Dr. Frederick Murphy, a member of EID's editorial board and the Institute of Medicine, and professor of Pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, shares professional and personal stories of Dr. Frank Fenner.  Created: 4/22/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/26/2011.

  6. Fundamental performance differences of CMOS and CCD imagers: part V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Pinter, Jeff

    2013-02-01

    Previous papers delivered over the last decade have documented developmental progress made on large pixel scientific CMOS imagers that match or surpass CCD performance. New data and discussions presented in this paper include: 1) a new buried channel CCD fabricated on a CMOS process line, 2) new data products generated by high performance custom scientific CMOS 4T/5T/6T PPD pixel imagers, 3) ultimate CTE and speed limits for large pixel CMOS imagers, 4) fabrication and test results of a flight 4k x 4k CMOS imager for NRL's SoloHi Solar Orbiter Mission, 5) a progress report on ultra large stitched Mk x Nk CMOS imager, 6) data generated by on-chip sub-electron CDS signal chain circuitry used in our imagers, 7) CMOS and CMOSCCD proton and electron radiation damage data for dose levels up to 10 Mrd, 8) discussions and data for a new class of PMOS pixel CMOS imagers and 9) future CMOS development work planned.

  7. CCD Astrometry of Selected Compact Extragalactic Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, P.; Velichko, F.; Filonenko, V.; Myznikov, A.; Sergeev, V.

    The 64 optical positions relative to the Catalog of Astrometric Standards (USNO-A2.0) and 9 optical positions relative to the Extragalactic Reference Link Catalog (de Vegt at al., 2001) had been obtained for the optical counterparts of 50 northern compact extragalactic radio sources (CERS). These positions were determined at the Kharkov Astronomical Observatory with use the CCD-camera ST-6 of the 0.7-m telescope AZT-8. More than 325 CCD-images of field 10.5' × 8' with optical counterparts of selected CERS had been obtained during 1997-2001. Positions of reference stars (from 6 to 12 stars for each CERS) were obtained from USNO-A2.0 catalogue, Extragalactic Reference Link Catalog and Nikolayev AMC catalogue (Pinigin & Shulga, 1999). The mean internal formal errors of the optical positions of these CERS are 100 mas in right ascension and 70 mas in declination. A comparison with VLBI radio positions for these sources is presented. The mean differences between radio and optical positions from our observations are not significantly differing from zero on the 0.05 significance level. The optical data which we obtained is potentially useful to possibly improve the current link of the Hipparcos reference frame to the ICRS. References de Vegt, C., Hindsley, R., Zacharias, N., Winter, L. 2001, AJ, 2815 Pinigin, G.I., Shulga A.V., 1999, Proc. JOURNESS 1999 & IX. Lohrmann-Kolloquium, Dresden (Germany), 64

  8. Precise CCD positions of Phoebe in 2011-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Q. Y.; Wang, N.; Vienne, A.; Zhang, Q. F.; Li, Z.; Meng, X. H.

    2015-05-01

    346 new CCD observations during the years 2011-2014 have been reduced to derive the precise positions of Phoebe, the ninth satellite of Saturn. The observations were made by the 2.4 m telescope at Yunnan Observatory over nine nights. Due to the use of a focal-reducer on the telescope, its significant geometric distortion is solved for and removed for each CCD field of view. The positions of Phoebe are measured with respect to the stars in UCAC2 catalogue. The theoretical position of Phoebe was retrieved from the Institute de Méchanique Céleste et de Calcul des Éphémérides ephemeris which includes the latest theory PH12 by Desmars et al., while the position of Saturn was obtained from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory ephemeris DE431. Our results show that the mean O-Cs (observed minus computed) are -0.02 and -0.07 arcsec in right ascension and declination, respectively. The dispersions of our observations are estimated at about 0.04 arcsec in each direction.

  9. Tractability gains in symmetry-adapted perturbation theory including coupled double excitations: CCD+ST(CCD) dispersion with natural orbital truncations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Robert M.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Sherrill, C. David

    2013-11-01

    This work focuses on efficient and accurate treatment of the intermolecular dispersion interaction using the CCD+ST(CCD) dispersion approach formulated by Williams et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 103, 4586 (1995)]. We apply natural orbital truncation techniques to the solution of the monomer coupled-cluster double (CCD) equations, yielding substantial accelerations in this computationally demanding portion of the SAPT2+(CCD), SAPT2+(3)(CCD), and SAPT2+3(CCD) analyses. It is shown that the wholly rate-limiting dimer-basis particle-particle ladder term can be computed in a reduced natural virtual space which is essentially the same size as the monomer-basis virtual space, with an error on the order of a few thousandths of 1 kcal mol-1. Coupled with our existing natural orbital techniques for the perturbative triple excitation contributions [E. G. Hohenstein and C. D. Sherrill, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 104107 (2010)], this technique provides speedups of greater than an order of magnitude for the evaluation of the complete SAPT2+3(CCD) decomposition, with a total error of a few hundredths of 1 kcal mol-1. The combined approach yields tractability gains of almost 2× in the system size, allowing for SAPT2+3(CCD)/aug-cc-pVTZ analysis to be performed for systems such as adenine-thymine for the first time. Natural orbital based SAPT2+3(CCD)/aug-cc-pVTZ results are presented for stacked and hydrogen-bonded configurations of uracil dimer and the adenine-thymine dimer.

  10. dr. andries albertus odendaal snr., evangeliedraer in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sy tesis wat na Nederland gepos word nie. Deur middel van 'n vriend is by Dr. Bergema navraag gedoen hieroor. Dit blyk dat Dr. Bergema ewe ontsteld was omdat A.A. nie reageer op sy briewe en aanbevelings nie. Dringende navraag by die plaaslike poskantoor en hulle ondersoek het aan die lig gebring dat die.

  11. Dr Andrea Granelli, Vice President, Telecom Italia

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 06: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (second from right) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi , F. Gagliardi and G. Cavallari. Photo 15: Dr Andrea Granelli, Chief Executive Officer, Telecom Italia Lab (left) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with (from left to right) M. Cecchi and G. Cavallari.

  12. Dr. Zakir Husain on Education and Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Radha Gayathri, Ch.

    2017-01-01

    Dr. Zakir Husain is known as a self-less nationalist leader and also as an educationist "par excellence." Taking a cue from his educational ideas like the "Nai Talim," this article brings into focus his views on the medium-conundrum. Dr. Husain was very clear about the role of Indian languages and the relevance of mother…

  13. Interview with Dr. Claudio Rama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Rama

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Trayendo un breve curriculum vitae del Prof. Dr. Claudio Rama, destacaremos su formación académica, su trayectoria académico-profesional y su producción bibliográfica. Nuestro entrevistado se graduó en Economía por la Universidad Central de Venezuela en 1982. En 2003 concluyó el máster en Administración Educacional en la Universidad José María Vargas, Venezuela. Terminó el Doctorado en Ciencias de la Educación en la Universidad Nacional Experimental Simón Rodríguez, Venezuela en 2006 y el Doctorado en Derecho, en la Universidad de Buenos Aires, en 2009. Claudio Rama hizo pos-doctorado: en el Centro de Postgrados de la Universidad Nacional Experimental Simón Rodríguez, en 2009-2010; en el Programa de Posgrado de la Faculdade de Educação da UNICAMP, en 2009-2010; en el Programa de Posgrado de la Universidade Federal Fluminense, en 2011-2012; y en el Programa de Postdoctorado de la Facultad de Derecho, de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, en 2013-2015. Nuestro entrevistado recibió también el título de Doctor “honoris causa” de cuatro universidades peruanas.

  14. DOUBLE STARS IN THE USNO CCD ASTROGRAPHIC CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartkopf, William I.; Mason, Brian D.; Finch, Charlie T.; Zacharias, Norbert; Wycoff, Gary L.; Hsu, Danley, E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: bdm@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: finch@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: nz@usno.navy.mil [US Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The newly completed Fourth USNO CCD Astrographic Catalog (UCAC4) has proven to be a rich source of double star astrometry and photometry. Following initial comparisons of UCAC4 results against those obtained by speckle interferometry, the UCAC4 catalog was matched against known double stars in the Washington Double Star Catalog in order to provide additional differential astrometry and photometry for these pairs. Matches to 58,131 pairs yielded 61,895 astrometric and 68,935 photometric measurements. Finally, a search for possible new common proper motion (CPM) pairs was made using new UCAC4 proper motion data; this resulted in 4755 new potential CPM doubles (and an additional 27,718 astrometric and photometric measures from UCAC and other sources)

  15. CCD-based optical CT scanning of highly attenuating phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Nowais, Shamsa [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Doran, Simon J [CRUK Clinical MR Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Simon.Doran@icr.ac.uk

    2009-05-01

    The introduction of optical computed tomography (optical-CT) offers economic and easy to use 3-D optical readout for gel dosimeters. However, previous authors have noted some challenges regarding the accuracy of such imaging techniques at high values of optical density. In this paper, we take a closer look at the 'cupping' artefact evident in both light-scattering polymer systems and highly light absorbing phantoms using our CCD-based optical scanner. In addition, a technique is implemented whereby the maximum measurable optical absorbance is extended to correct for any errors that may have occurred in the estimated value of the dark current or ambient light reaching the detector. The results indicate that for absorbance values up to 2.0, the optical scanner results have good accuracy, whereas this is not the case at high absorbance values for reasons yet to be explained.

  16. Contribution of the Chromosomal ccdAB Operon to Bacterial Drug Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kritika; Tripathi, Arti; Sahu, Alishan; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2017-10-01

    One of the first identified and best-studied toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems in Escherichia coli is the F-plasmid-based CcdAB system. This system is involved in plasmid maintenance through postsegregational killing. More recently, ccdAB homologs have been found on the chromosome, including in pathogenic strains of E. coli and other bacteria. However, the functional role of chromosomal ccdAB genes, if any, has remained unclear. We show that both the native ccd operon of the E. coli O157 strain (ccdO157) and the ccd operon from the F plasmid (ccdF), when inserted on the E. coli chromosome, lead to protection from cell death under multiple antibiotic stress conditions through formation of persisters, with the O157 operon showing higher protection. While the plasmid-encoded CcdB toxin is a potent gyrase inhibitor and leads to bacterial cell death even under fully repressed conditions, the chromosomally encoded toxin leads to growth inhibition, except at high expression levels, where some cell death is seen. This was further confirmed by transiently activating the chromosomal ccd operon through overexpression of an active-site inactive mutant of F-plasmid-encoded CcdB. Both the ccdF and ccdO157 operons may share common mechanisms for activation under stress conditions, eventually leading to multidrug-tolerant persister cells. This study clearly demonstrates an important role for chromosomal ccd systems in bacterial persistence.IMPORTANCE A large number of free-living and pathogenic bacteria are known to harbor multiple toxin-antitoxin systems, on plasmids as well as on chromosomes. The F-plasmid CcdAB system has been extensively studied and is known to be involved in plasmid maintenance. However, little is known about the function of its chromosomal counterpart, found in several pathogenic E. coli strains. We show that the native chromosomal ccd operon of the E. coli O157 strain is involved in drug tolerance and confers protection from cell death under multiple antibiotic

  17. Association between HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens and unexplained repeated miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Ring, Mette; Rosgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    Few, mostly small, studies have investigated the distribution of HLA class II antigens among women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Although some studies have reported statistically significant associations between this syndrome and certain HLA-DR antigens--especially the -DR1 and -DR3...... antigens--other studies have been unable to demonstrate such associations. For the present meta-analysis, 18 cross-sectional or case-control studies (published or unpublished) reporting on frequencies of HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens among Caucasian women with unexplained repeated miscarriage were identified...

  18. Association between HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens and unexplained repeated miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, O B; Ring, Mette; Rosgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    Few, mostly small, studies have investigated the distribution of HLA class II antigens among women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Although some studies have reported statistically significant associations between this syndrome and certain HLA-DR antigens--especially the -DR1 and -DR3...... antigens--other studies have been unable to demonstrate such associations. For the present meta-analysis, 18 cross-sectional or case-control studies (published or unpublished) reporting on frequencies of HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens among Caucasian women with unexplained repeated miscarriage were identified...... and because patients with only two miscarriages were included in many studies; this is defined as repeated miscarriage. The odds ratios of repeated miscarriage for the HLA-DR1 and -DR3 antigens were calculated for the individual studies and subsequently the pooled odds ratios for the studies were calculated...

  19. Letter to Dr. Felix Bronner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Dear Dr. Bronner: I have been reading in The Physiologist the letters from senior physiologists for many years with great interest. It is impressive that many of the respondents are still pursuing scientific endeavours in their 70's and some even in their 80's. The interesting task is to ponder the relative causative proportions of heredity and environment responsible. One wonders whether knowing something about physiology engenders longer and more productive lives? I suspect so because of the accompanying self-discipline. But another factor would seem to be the pervasive joy of working in this profession. I have been fortunate to be able to acquire the joy of physiology during my graduate studies at Illinois, and to have been able to carry it over here at NASA, Ames Research Center for the past 40 years. A truly academic style research environment at a federal research center is rare. The trick to a joyous research career is to overcome those ever-present slings and arrows of outrageous fortune with dignity whenever possible. To that end I have found solace and guidance in reading the history of warfare and its leaders, especially Sun Tsu's The Art of War and Clauswitz's On War. I became eligible for retirement in 1993, but to insure domestic tranquility and also the joy of pursuing my research hobby have continued working in the laboratory on human research. It is troubling to see that funding for individual scientists conducting human research is declining rapidly, along with their new ideas; perhaps the old ones are more comfortable. Hopefully I can provide a similar response when I'm 80! Thanks for your interest. Sincerely, John Greenleaf

  20. Substrate promiscuity of RdCCD1, a carotenoid cleavage oxygenase from Rosa damascena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fong-Chin; Horváth, Györgyi; Molnár, Péter; Turcsi, Erika; Deli, József; Schrader, Jens; Sandmann, Gerhard; Schmidt, Holger; Schwab, Wilfried

    2009-03-01

    Several of the key flavor compounds in rose essential oil are C(13)-norisoprenoids, such as beta-damascenone, beta-damascone, and beta-ionone which are derived from carotenoid degradation. To search for genes putatively responsible for the cleavage of carotenoids, cloning of carotenoid cleavage (di-)oxygenase (CCD) genes from Rosa damascena was carried out by a degenerate primer approach and yielded a full-length cDNA (RdCCD1). The RdCCD1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and recombinant protein was assayed for its cleavage activity with a multitude of carotenoid substrates. The RdCCD1 protein was able to cleave a variety of carotenoids at the 9-10 and 9'-10' positions to produce a C(14) dialdehyde and two C(13) products, which vary depending on the carotenoid substrates. RdCCD1 could also cleave lycopene at the 5-6 and 5'-6' positions to produce 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one. Expression of RdCCD1 was studied by real-time PCR in different tissues of rose. The RdCCD1 transcript was present predominantly in rose flower, where high levels of volatile C(13)-norisoprenoids are produced. Thus, the accumulation of C(13)-norisoprenoids in rose flower is correlated to the expression of RdCCD1.

  1. System for Digital 1D-Image Processing with 1024 Pixel CCD Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Misun

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The conception of system for digital 1D-images processing with digital CCD camera is presented. The system is created from these three basic parts: the digital CCD camera with linear image sensor CCD L133C, 8-bit interface and a personal computer. The scanning digital CCD camera generated a video signals, which are processed in the analog signal processor. The output signal is continually converted to 8-bit data words in A/D converter. This data words maybe transfer over a bus driver to the operation memory of personal computer, by setting one of the three work regimes of digital CCD camera. Some application possibilities and basic technical parameters of this system are given.

  2. Study on enhancing dynamic range of CCD imaging based on digital micro-mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wang

    2009-05-01

    DMD used as SLM modulation area array CCD design is proposed in the paper. It can Solve a problem in exposing high-contrast scenes by ordinary CCD camera, with images appearing over-exposure or under exposure, bringing a loss of the details of the photo. The method adoptes a forecast imaging scene, CCD is purposely designed by way of more exposure regions and exposure times. Through modulation function of DMD micro-mirror, CCD is exposed with sub-region and time-sharing, at the same time a purposely designed structure of image data enhances the area CCD dynamic range. Experiments shows: This method not only improves visible quality of an image and clear details in the backlighting or highlight, but also enhances the dynamic range of image data. The high-quality image and high dynamic range data are real-time captured, the "fused" software is no longer required.

  3. High-Voltage Clock Driver for Photon-Counting CCD Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses the CCD97 from e2v technologies as it is being evaluated at Goddard Space Flight Center's Detector Characterization Laboratory (DCL) for possible use in ultra-low background noise space astronomy applications, such as Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C). The CCD97 includes a photoncounting mode where the equivalent output noise is less than one electron. Use of this mode requires a clock signal at a voltage level greater than the level achievable by the existing CCD (charge-coupled-device) electronics. A high-voltage waveform generator has been developed in code 660/601 to support the CCD97 evaluation. The unit generates required clock waveforms at voltage levels from -20 to +50 V. It deals with standard and arbitrary waveforms and supports pixel rates from 50 to 500 kHz. The system is designed to interface with existing Leach CCD electronics.

  4. An Interview with Dr. Walter Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the English version of Social Medicine we are publishing the first of several pamphlets loaned to us by the US Health Activism History Collection. To introduce this collection we travelled to Philadelphia on June 18, 2008 to interview Dr. Walter J. Lear. Dr Lear, born in 1923, is the person responsible for the collection. In a wide-ranging interview in his home Dr. Lear discussed his personal background, the origins and purpose of the collection, the impact of the McCarthy period on the US health left, as well as his vision for the future.

  5. But Dr. Meisels Is Not Convinced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisels, Samuel J.

    1987-01-01

    Commenting on the Gesell Institute's response to his original article concerning the Gesell assessments, Dr. Meisels continues to maintain that the Gesell readiness tests lack sufficient proof of validity. (BB)

  6. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  7. Raghavarao, Dr Karumanchi Srisaila Mallikarjuna S

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 2014 Section: Engineering & Technology. Raghavarao, Dr Karumanchi Srisaila Mallikarjuna S Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNAE, FNAAS. Specialization: Food Engineering, Biotechnology Address: Chief Scientist, Department of Food Engineering, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore 570 020, Karnataka

  8. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  9. Autoguiding and Defocus Experiments for CCD Differential Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    A number of smaller observatories utilize relatively low-cost, off-the-shelf telescopes and CCD cameras to obtain differential photometric measurements of variable stars. Obtaining the best-possible differential photometric precision, as evidenced by the standard deviations of the comparison-check differentials, is often a vital goal. This series of experiments is investigating, for two different Meade LX-200 telescopes (each equipped with an SBIG ST-7XE camera), the relationship between: (1) autoguiding precision and differential photometric precision, and (2) focus precision and differential photometric precision. The effects of purposefully introducing both autoguiding "errors" (i.e. small telescope movements) and image defocus on differential photometric precision are being evaluated. Telescope time is being provided by the Orion and Dark Ridge Observatories. I acknowledge the assistance of Russell Genet (Orion Observatory), Thomas Smith (Dark Ridge Observatory), and John Mottmann (California Polytechnic State University), as well as the financial support by the Department of Physics, California Polytechnic State University for conference and travel expenses.

  10. NIR spectrophotometric system based on a conventional CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Meritxell; Pujol, Jaume; Arjona, Montserrat

    2003-05-01

    The near infrared spectral region (NIR) is useful in many applications. These include agriculture, the food and chemical industry, and textile and medical applications. In this region, spectral reflectance measurements are currently made with conventional spectrophotometers. These instruments are expensive since they use a diffraction grating to obtain monochromatic light. In this work, we present a multispectral imaging based technique for obtaining the reflectance spectra of samples in the NIR region (800 - 1000 nm), using a small number of measurements taken through different channels of a conventional CCD camera. We used methods based on the Wiener estimation, non-linear methods and principal component analysis (PCA) to reconstruct the spectral reflectance. We also analyzed, by numerical simulation, the number and shape of the filters that need to be used in order to obtain good spectral reconstructions. We obtained the reflectance spectra of a set of 30 spectral curves using a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 6 filters under the influence of two different halogen lamps with color temperatures Tc1 = 2852K and Tc2 = 3371K. The results obtained show that using between three and five filters with a large spectral bandwidth (FWHM = 60 nm), the reconstructed spectral reflectance of the samples was very similar to that of the original spectrum. The small amount of errors in the spectral reconstruction shows the potential of this method for reconstructing spectral reflectances in the NIR range.

  11. CCD Parallaxes for 309 Late-type Dwarfs and Subdwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahn, Conard C.; Harris, Hugh C.; Subasavage, John P.; Ables, Harold D.; Guetter, Harry H.; Harris, Fred H.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Monet, Alice B.; Monet, David G.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Stone, Ronald C.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Walker, Richard L.; Tilleman, Trudy M. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 W. Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86005-8521 (United States); Canzian, Blaise J. [L-3 Communications/Brashear, 615 Epsilon Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15238-2807 (United States); Henden, Arne H. [AAVSO, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Leggett, S. K. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Levine, Stephen E., E-mail: jsubasavage@nofs.navy.mil [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-4499 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    New, updated, and/or revised CCD parallaxes determined with the Strand Astrometric Reflector at the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station are presented. Included are results for 309 late-type dwarf and subdwarf stars observed over the 30+ years that the program operated. For 124 of the stars, parallax determinations from other investigators have already appeared in the literature and we compare the different results. Also included here are new or updated VI photometry on the Johnson–Kron-Cousins system for all but a few of the faintest targets. Together with 2MASS JHK{sub s} near-infrared photometry, a sample of absolute magnitude versus color and color versus color diagrams are constructed. Because large proper motion was a prime criterion for targeting the stars, the majority turn out to be either M-type subdwarfs or late M-type dwarfs. The sample also includes 50 dwarf or subdwarf L-type stars, and four T dwarfs. Possible halo subdwarfs are identified in the sample based on tangential velocity, subluminosity, and spectral type. Residuals from the solutions for parallax and proper motion for several stars show evidence of astrometric perturbations.

  12. Machine vision: recent advances in CCD video camera technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Richard A.; Hamilton, Ronald J.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes four state-of-the-art digital video cameras, which provide advanced features that benefit computer image enhancement, manipulation, and analysis. These cameras were designed to reduce the complexity of imaging systems while increasing the accuracy, dynamic range, and detail enhancement of product inspections. Two cameras utilize progressive scan CCD sensors enabling the capture of high- resolution image of moving objects without the need for strobe lights or mechanical shutters. The second progressive scan camera has an unusually high resolution of 1280 by 1024 and a choice of serial or parallel digital interface for data and control. The other two cameras incorporate digital signal processing (DSP) technology for improved dynamic range, more accurate determination of color, white balance stability, and enhanced contrast of part features against the background. Successful applications and future product development trends are discussed. A brief description of analog and digital image capture devices will address the most common questions regarding interface requirements within a typical machine vision system overview.

  13. An Intensive CCD Photometry Campaign to Observe DW Ursae Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David; Gaensicke, Boris

    2009-05-01

    We report on a coordinated observing campaign in April and May 2008 to study the eclipsing dwarf nova DW Ursae Majoris. This belongs to the group of SW Sex stars, nova-like variables containing accretion disks which exhibit superhumps in their light curves suggesting that their accretion disks are elliptical and precessing on time scales of a few days due to tidal interactions with the companion star. It has been suggested that the changing geometry will cause the depth of eclipses to be modulated on the accretion disk precession period. The aim of this campaign was to provide for the first time sufficient continuous photometric coverage of an eclipsing super-humper to test this hypothesis. 26 experienced amateur CCD photometrists in 7 countries participated in the project and altogether made almost 55,000 magnitude measurements over a 4 week period, keeping DW UMa under observation for more than 50% of the time. The results provide direct measurements of the orbital, super-hump and disk precession periods, confirming unambiguously that the superhump signal is a beat between the orbital and precession periods. They also reveal modulation not only of the eclipse depth but also of the eclipse time of minimum and width on the accretion disk precession period. The project is a good example of cooperation between the amateur and professional communities to address an open research issue.

  14. CCD TV focal plane guider development and comparison to SIRTF applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, David M.

    1989-01-01

    It is expected that the SIRTF payload will use a CCD TV focal plane fine guidance sensor to provide acquisition of sources and tracking stability of the telescope. Work has been done to develop CCD TV cameras and guiders at Lick Observatory for several years and have produced state of the art CCD TV systems for internal use. NASA decided to provide additional support so that the limits of this technology could be established and a comparison between SIRTF requirements and practical systems could be put on a more quantitative basis. The results of work carried out at Lick Observatory which was designed to characterize present CCD autoguiding technology and relate it to SIRTF applications is presented. Two different design types of CCD cameras were constructed using virtual phase and burred channel CCD sensors. A simple autoguider was built and used on the KAO, Mt. Lemon and Mt. Hamilton telescopes. A video image processing system was also constructed in order to characterize the performance of the auto guider and CCD cameras.

  15. Mosaic CCD method: A new technique for observing dynamics of cometary magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, T.; Takeuchi, H.; Kozuba, Y.; Okamura, S.; Konno, I.; Hamabe, M.; Aoki, T.; Minami, S.; Isobe, S.

    1992-12-01

    On April 29, 1990, the plasma tail of Comet Austin was observed with a CCD camera on the 105-cm Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory of the University of Tokyo. The area of the CCD used in this observation is only about 1 sq cm. When this CCD is used on the 105-cm Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory, the area corresponds to a narrow square view of 12 ft x 12 ft. By comparison with the photograph of Comet Austin taken by Numazawa (personal communication) on the same night, we see that only a small part of the plasma tail can be photographed at one time with the CCD. However, by shifting the view on the CCD after each exposure, we succeeded in imaging the entire length of the cometary magnetosphere of 1.6 x 106 km. This new technique is called 'the mosaic CCD method'. In order to study the dynamics of cometary plasma tails, seven frames of the comet from the head to the tail region were twice imaged with the mosaic CCD method and two sets of images were obtained. Six microstructures, including arcade structures, were identified in both the images. Sketches of the plasma tail including microstructures are included.

  16. Modulation of TRAIL resistance in colon carcinoma cells: Different contributions of DR4 and DR5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Elisabeth GE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background rhTRAIL is a therapeutic agent, derived from the TRAIL cytokine, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells by activating the membrane death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5. Here, we investigated each receptor's contribution to rhTRAIL sensitivity and rhTRAIL resistance. We assessed whether agonistic DR4 or DR5 antibodies could be used to circumvent rhTRAIL resistance, alone or in combination with various chemotherapies. Methods Our study was performed in an isogenic model comprised of the SW948 human colon carcinoma cell line and its rhTRAIL resistant sub-line SW948-TR. Effects of rhTRAIL and agonistic DR4/DR5 antibodies on cell viability were measured using MTT assays and identification of morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, after acridine orange staining. Sensitivity to the different death receptor ligands was stimulated using pretreatment with the cytokine IFN-gamma and the proteasome inhibitor MG-132. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the changes in rhTRAIL sensitivity, alterations in expression levels of targets of interest were measured by Western blot analysis. Co-immunoprecipitation was used to determine the composition of the death-inducing signalling complex at the cell membrane. Results SW948 cells were sensitive to all three of the DR-targeting agents tested, although the agonistic DR5 antibody induced only weak caspase 8 cleavage and limited apoptosis. Surprisingly, agonistic DR4 and DR5 antibodies induced equivalent DISC formation and caspase 8 cleavage at the level of their individual receptors, suggesting impairment of further caspase 8 processing upon DR5 stimulation. SW948-TR cells were cross-resistant to all DR-targeting agents as a result of decreased caspase 8 expression levels. Caspase 8 protein expression was restored by MG-132 and IFN-gamma pretreatment, which also re-established sensitivity to rhTRAIL and agonistic DR4 antibody in SW948-TR. Surprisingly, MG-132 but not IFN

  17. The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase CCD2 catalysing the synthesis of crocetin in spring crocuses and saffron is a plastidial enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrazem, Oussama; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Berman, Judit; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The apocarotenoid crocetin and its glycosylated derivatives, crocins, confer the red colour to saffron. Crocetin biosynthesis in saffron is catalysed by the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase CCD2 (AIG94929). No homologues have been identified in other plant species due to the very limited presence of crocetin and its derivatives in the plant kingdom. Spring Crocus species with yellow flowers accumulate crocins in the stigma and tepals. Four carotenoid CCDs, namely CaCCD1, CaCCD2 and CaCCD4a/b and CaCCD4c were first cloned and characterized. CaCCD2 was localized in plastids, and a longer CCD2 version, CsCCD2L, was also localized in this compartment. The activity of CaCCD2 was assessed in Escherichia coli and in a stable rice gene function characterization system, demonstrating the production of crocetin in both systems. The expression of all isolated CCDs was evaluated in stigma and tepals at three key developmental stages in relation with apocarotenoid accumulation. CaCCD2 expression parallels crocin accumulation, but C14 apocarotenoids most likely are associated to the CaCCD1 activity in Crocus ancyrensis flowers. The specific CCD2 localization and its membrane interaction will contribute to the development of a better understanding of the mechanism of crocetin biosynthesis and regulation in the chromoplast. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Structural basis of LaDR5, a novel agonistic anti-death receptor 5 (DR5 monoclonal antibody, to inhibit DR5/TRAIL complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Chunxia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a member of the TNF superfamily, TRAIL could induce human tumor cell apoptosis through its cognate death receptors DR4 or DR5, which can induce formation of the death inducing signaling complex (DISC and activation of the membrane proximal caspases (caspase-8 or caspase-10 and mitochondrial pathway. Some monoclonal antibodies against DR4 or DR5 have been reported to have anti-tumor activity. Results In this study, we reported a novel mouse anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody, named as LaDR5, which could compete with TRAIL to bind DR5 and induce the apoptosis of Jurkat cells in the absence of second cross-linking in vitro. Using computer-guided molecular modeling method, the 3-D structure of LaDR5 Fv fragment was constructed. According to the crystal structure of DR5, the 3-D complex structure of DR5 and LaDR5 was modeled using molecular docking method. Based on distance geometry method and intermolecular hydrogen bonding analysis, the key functional domain in DR5 was predicted and the DR5 mutants were designed. And then, three mutants of DR5 was expressed in prokaryotic system and purified by affinity chromatograph to determine the epitope of DR5 identified by LaDR5, which was consistent with the theoretical results of computer-aided analysis. Conclusions Our results demonstrated the specific epitope located in DR5 that plays a crucial role in antibody binding and even antineoplastic bioactivity. Meanwhile, revealed structural features of DR5 may be important to design or screen novel drugs agonist DR5.

  19. Fibromyalgia in patients with chronic CCD and CMD - A retrospective study of 555 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losert-Bruggner, Brigitte; Hülse, Manfred; Hülse, Roland

    2017-06-05

    Craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD) and craniocervical dysfunction (CCD) are clearly defined musculoskeletal pain syndromes. Relationships with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) have not yet been investigated. The aim of the present study is to establish possible relationships between FMS and CMD/ CCD. In a retrospective study, 555 patients with CCD and CMD were investigated with respect to the diagnostic criteria of FMS. In addition to otolaryngologic and dental examination, an instrumental functional analysis for the diagnosis of CMD/CCD was performed. Three hundred fifty-one (63%) of the 555 patients evaluated met the diagnostic criteria for FMS. Seventy-two percent of the patients had a widespread pain index of at least 7 and a severity scale score of at least 5. Twenty-nine percent had a widespread pain index of 3-6 and a severity scale score of at least 9. Using myocentric bite splint therapy and therapy with oral orthesis in combination with neuromuscular relaxation measures, a good to very good improvement of physical symptoms was seen in 84% of CMD-FMS patients, and an improvement of the symptoms in the jaw was achieved in 77% of cases. The substantial proportion of CMD and CCD patients who meet the criteria for FMS emphasizes the complexity of the two diseases. It must be assumed that FMS is a crucial factor for the formation of CMD and CCD. Conversely, CMD/ CCD could also be responsible for diverse clinical pictures of the FMS. FMS patients with synchronous CCD/CMD benefit from an interdisciplinary CMD/CCD treatment.

  20. RI: CCD-FO Assembly for Spectroscopic Characterization of Flame Synthesis Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    involving thermite reactions with nano-Al. Specifically, the CCD-FO component of 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 15-02-2012 13...for nano-energetic applications involving thermite reactions with nano-Al. Specifically, the CCD-FO component of the detector is used as part of a...energetic applications involving thermite reactions with nano-Al. Specifically, the CCD-FO component of the detector is used as part of a laser-based

  1. Discriminação de variedades de citros em imagens CCD/CBERS-2 Discrimination of citrus varieties using CCD/CBERS-2 satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieda Del'Arco Sanches

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve o objetivo de avaliar as imagens CCD/CBERS-2 quanto à possibilidade de discriminarem variedades de citros. A área de estudo localiza-se em Itirapina (SP e, para este estudo, foram utilizadas imagens CCD de três datas (30/05/2004, 16/08/2004 e 11/09/2004. Um modelo que integra os elementos componentes da cena citrícola sensoriada é proposto com o objetivo de explicar a variabilidade das respostas das parcelas de citros em imagens orbitais do tipo CCD/CBERS-2. Foram feitas classificações pelos algoritmos Isoseg e Maxver e, de acordo com o índice kappa, concluiu-se que é possível obterem-se exatidões qualificadas como muito boas, sendo que as melhores classificações foram conseguidas com imagens da estação seca.This paper was aimed at evaluating the possibility of discriminating citrus varieties in CCD imageries from CBERS-2 satellite ("China-Brazil Earth Resouces Satellite". The study area is located in Itirapina, São Paulo State. For this study, three CCD images from 2004 were acquired (May 30, August 16, and September 11. In order to acquire a better understanding and for explaining the variability of the spectral behavior of the citrus areas in orbital images (like as the CCD/CBERS-2 images a model that integrates the elements of the citrus scene is proposed and discussed. The images were classified by Isoseg and MaxVer classifiers. According to kappa index, it was possible to obtain classifications qualified as 'very good'. The best results were obtained with the images from the dry season.

  2. Photographic and CCD Sky Patrols with Small Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Peter

    Since the twenties of the last century Sonneberg Observatory runs in each clear night a photographic Sky Patrol with a system of small telescopes (55/250 mm) reaching 14m in the blue and 13m in the yellow-red. In addition, a so-called Field Patrol is run with 2 astrographs (400/2000 mm) and a Schmidt camera (500/700/1720 mm) covering 80 selected fields along or near the Milky Way. From these instruments an archive of alomost 300,000 photographic plates arose, documenting the history of the starry night over more than 75 years. Currently much effort is made to take over this photographic sky patrol by a system of electronic detectors. Owing to the fact, that wide-field systems need either large CCDs or arrays of CCDs in order to cover the whole field of view, the technical availability of large detectors was one of the central problems in past. We now invent the use of a PHILIPS 4K×7K chip in wide-field astronomy for Whole-Sky Patrol. Although the chip has a quantum efficiency of only about 30 %, its big size (12μm pixel size) of 48×84 mm offers, for the first time, the replacement of large photographic plates by a single CCD chip. We report our first experiences with this chip when using it with a super wide-angle objective for whole-sky imaging each minute down to ca. 10m for investigating different targets (variable stars, meteors, GRB counterparts, etc.) and first trial to use the large-size chip with other small telescopes (400 to 600 mm diameter) at Sonneberg Observatory.

  3. Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Blogindlæg om Machiavelliske følelser i HBO tv-serien Game of Thrones: "Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones"......Blogindlæg om Machiavelliske følelser i HBO tv-serien Game of Thrones: "Dræb, dræb, dræb! Nej ... liiiige et øjeblik: De machiavelliske følelser i Game of Thrones"...

  4. Modulation of TRAIL resistance in colon carcinoma cells : Different contributions of DR4 and DR5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geelen, Caroline M. M.; Pennarun, Bodvael; Le, Phuong T. K.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Background: rhTRAIL is a therapeutic agent, derived from the TRAIL cytokine, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells by activating the membrane death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). Here, we investigated each receptor's contribution to rhTRAIL sensitivity and rhTRAIL resistance. We assessed whether

  5. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr. David Syz (left) with Professor Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes.Photo 02: Dr. David Syz signing the VIP visitors' book, with Prof. Roger Cashmore.Photo 03: Dr. David Syz signing the VIP visitors' book.Photo 04: Handshake between Dr. David Syz (left) and Prof. Roger Cashmore.

  6. arXiv Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-26

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068  e- rms/pixel. This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while ...

  7. MMT OBSERVATORY 6.5M CCD47 RAW DATA OBSERVATIONS OF LCROSS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive contains raw observations of the 2009-10-09 impact of the LCROSS spacecraft on the moon by the CCD47 camera on the MMT Observatory 6.5m telescope. The...

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 6811 CCD UBVRI photometry (Yontan+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yontan, T.; Bilir, S.; Bostanc, Z. F.; Ak, T.; Karaali, S.; Guver, T.; Ak, S.; Duran, S.; Paunzen, E.

    2015-09-01

    CCD UBVRI observations of NGC 6811 were carried out on 18th July 2012 using the 1m Ritchey-Chretien telescope (T100) located at the TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) in Bakirlitepe, Antalya/Turkey. (1 data file).

  9. Researchers develop CCD image sensor with 20ns per row parallel readout time

    CERN Multimedia

    Bush, S

    2004-01-01

    "Scientists at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Oxfordshire have developed what they claim is the fastest CCD (charge-coupled device) image sensor, with a readout time which is 20ns per row" (1/2 page)

  10. A Tribute to Dr. Willy Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Vansteenkiste

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Willy Lens, born on December 10th, 1943, passed away on August 29th, 2014. With his passing, the motivation community has lost a seminal member, a mentor, and a friend. Dr. Lens – a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and Founding Fellow of the American Educational Research Association – made fundamental contributions to the study of motivation both through his own work and through his caring and thoughtful mentorship of a large community of scholars. With this tribute, we want to honor Dr. Willy Lens’ significance to psychology and education as well as his positive influence, both personally and professionally, on the lives of dozens of scholars. With his contagious enthusiasm and caring mentorship, Willy was an example for our academic community and with this tribute we express our gratitude for the privilege to have collaborated with him.

  11. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and bee age impact honey bee pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Traynor, Kirsten S; Andree, Michael; Lichtenberg, Elinor M; Chen, Yanping; Saegerman, Claude; Cox-Foster, Diana L

    2017-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies continue to experience high annual losses that remain poorly explained. Numerous interacting factors have been linked to colony declines. Understanding the pathways linking pathophysiology with symptoms is an important step in understanding the mechanisms of disease. In this study we examined the specific pathologies associated with honey bees collected from colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and compared these with bees collected from apparently healthy colonies. We identified a set of pathological physical characteristics that occurred at different rates in CCD diagnosed colonies prior to their collapse: rectum distension, Malpighian tubule iridescence, fecal matter consistency, rectal enteroliths (hard concretions), and venom sac color. The multiple differences in rectum symptomology in bees from CCD apiaries and colonies suggest effected bees had trouble regulating water. To ensure that pathologies we found associated with CCD were indeed pathologies and not due to normal changes in physical appearances that occur as an adult bee ages (CCD colonies are assumed to be composed mostly of young bees), we documented the changes in bees of different ages taken from healthy colonies. We found that young bees had much greater incidences of white nodules than older cohorts. Prevalent in newly-emerged bees, these white nodules or cellular encapsulations indicate an active immune response. Comparing the two sets of characteristics, we determined a subset of pathologies that reliably predict CCD status rather than bee age (fecal matter consistency, rectal distension size, rectal enteroliths and Malpighian tubule iridescence) and that may serve as biomarkers for colony health. In addition, these pathologies suggest that CCD bees are experiencing disrupted excretory physiology. Our identification of these symptoms is an important first step in understanding the physiological pathways that underlie CCD and factors

  12. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and bee age impact honey bee pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Kirsten S.; Andree, Michael; Lichtenberg, Elinor M.; Chen, Yanping; Saegerman, Claude; Cox-Foster, Diana L.

    2017-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies continue to experience high annual losses that remain poorly explained. Numerous interacting factors have been linked to colony declines. Understanding the pathways linking pathophysiology with symptoms is an important step in understanding the mechanisms of disease. In this study we examined the specific pathologies associated with honey bees collected from colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and compared these with bees collected from apparently healthy colonies. We identified a set of pathological physical characteristics that occurred at different rates in CCD diagnosed colonies prior to their collapse: rectum distension, Malpighian tubule iridescence, fecal matter consistency, rectal enteroliths (hard concretions), and venom sac color. The multiple differences in rectum symptomology in bees from CCD apiaries and colonies suggest effected bees had trouble regulating water. To ensure that pathologies we found associated with CCD were indeed pathologies and not due to normal changes in physical appearances that occur as an adult bee ages (CCD colonies are assumed to be composed mostly of young bees), we documented the changes in bees of different ages taken from healthy colonies. We found that young bees had much greater incidences of white nodules than older cohorts. Prevalent in newly-emerged bees, these white nodules or cellular encapsulations indicate an active immune response. Comparing the two sets of characteristics, we determined a subset of pathologies that reliably predict CCD status rather than bee age (fecal matter consistency, rectal distension size, rectal enteroliths and Malpighian tubule iridescence) and that may serve as biomarkers for colony health. In addition, these pathologies suggest that CCD bees are experiencing disrupted excretory physiology. Our identification of these symptoms is an important first step in understanding the physiological pathways that underlie CCD and factors

  13. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD and bee age impact honey bee pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis vanEngelsdorp

    Full Text Available Honey bee (Apis mellifera colonies continue to experience high annual losses that remain poorly explained. Numerous interacting factors have been linked to colony declines. Understanding the pathways linking pathophysiology with symptoms is an important step in understanding the mechanisms of disease. In this study we examined the specific pathologies associated with honey bees collected from colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD and compared these with bees collected from apparently healthy colonies. We identified a set of pathological physical characteristics that occurred at different rates in CCD diagnosed colonies prior to their collapse: rectum distension, Malpighian tubule iridescence, fecal matter consistency, rectal enteroliths (hard concretions, and venom sac color. The multiple differences in rectum symptomology in bees from CCD apiaries and colonies suggest effected bees had trouble regulating water. To ensure that pathologies we found associated with CCD were indeed pathologies and not due to normal changes in physical appearances that occur as an adult bee ages (CCD colonies are assumed to be composed mostly of young bees, we documented the changes in bees of different ages taken from healthy colonies. We found that young bees had much greater incidences of white nodules than older cohorts. Prevalent in newly-emerged bees, these white nodules or cellular encapsulations indicate an active immune response. Comparing the two sets of characteristics, we determined a subset of pathologies that reliably predict CCD status rather than bee age (fecal matter consistency, rectal distension size, rectal enteroliths and Malpighian tubule iridescence and that may serve as biomarkers for colony health. In addition, these pathologies suggest that CCD bees are experiencing disrupted excretory physiology. Our identification of these symptoms is an important first step in understanding the physiological pathways that underlie CCD and

  14. Preliminary examination of a CCD camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate for neutron imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Masahito; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2004-08-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate (FOP) was examined for neutron imaging. The FOP coupling and the lens coupling in terms of efficient optical coupling with a CCD, and 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) and Gd 2O 2S(Tb) in terms of light emission efficiency and spatial resolution were discussed. The spatial resolution for each imaging system was obtained as edge spread functions or observations of modulation transfer function charts.

  15. Practical performance evaluation of a 10k × 10k CCD for electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bammes, Benjamin E; Rochat, Ryan H; Jakana, Joanita; Chiu, Wah

    2011-09-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) images are commonly collected using either charge-coupled devices (CCD) or photographic film. Both film and the current generation of 16 megapixel (4k × 4k) CCD cameras have yielded high-resolution structures. Yet, despite the many advantages of CCD cameras, more than two times as many structures of biological macromolecules have been published in recent years using photographic film. The continued preference to film, especially for subnanometer-resolution structures, may be partially influenced by the finer sampling and larger effective specimen imaging area offered by film. Large format digital cameras may finally allow them to overtake film as the preferred detector for cryo-EM. We have evaluated a 111-megapixel (10k × 10k) CCD camera with a 9 μm pixel size. The spectral signal-to-noise ratios of low dose images of carbon film indicate that this detector is capable of providing signal up to at least 2/5 Nyquist frequency potentially retrievable for 3D reconstructions of biological specimens, resulting in more than double the effective specimen imaging area of existing 4k × 4k CCD cameras. We verified our estimates using frozen-hydrated ε15 bacteriophage as a biological test specimen with previously determined structure, yielding a ∼7 Å resolution single particle reconstruction from only 80 CCD frames. Finally, we explored the limits of current CCD technology by comparing the performance of this detector to various CCD cameras used for recording data yielding subnanometer resolution cryo-EM structures submitted to the electron microscopy data bank (http://www.emdatabank.org/). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. JAstroCam - A New Tool for Data Gathering with CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budyn, M.; Zola, S.; Wojcik, K.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new acquisition program for observations with CCD. The code is written in the JAVA language, currently supports Photometrics S300, SBIG, APOGEE and Andor CCDs. New hardware support can be extended by adding plugins for either a new type of CCD or a filter wheel. The software is capable of performing an on-line reduction of frames coming in real time either on non-processed or reduced for bias/dark/flat frames.

  17. Biography of Dr. Simao Nascimento de Sousa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.^red.

    International 32 (2006) 148 www.elsevier.com/locate/envint The International workshop on marine pollution and ecotoxicology (2004) was organized to felicitate our colleague Dr. Sima˜o Nascimento de Sousa, Deputy Director, NIO who superannuated on 29th February..., 2004. Dr. de Sousa was born on the 26th of February, 1944 at Corlim, Ilhas, Goa. He graduated with BSc (Hons.) in 1969 and MSc with Physical Chemistry in 1971 from the University of Bombay (Mumbai), India. He began his career with studies in the Mandovi...

  18. A Design and Development of Multi-Purpose CCD Camera System with Thermoelectric Cooling: Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Oh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a software which we developed for the multi-purpose CCD camera. This software can be used on the all 3 types of CCD - KAF-0401E (768×512, KAF-1602E (15367times;1024, KAF-3200E (2184×1472 made in KODAK Co.. For the efficient CCD camera control, the software is operated with two independent processes of the CCD control program and the temperature/shutter operation program. This software is designed to fully automatic operation as well as manually operation under LINUX system, and is controled by LINUX user signal procedure. We plan to use this software for all sky survey system and also night sky monitoring and sky observation. As our results, the read-out time of each CCD are about 15sec, 64sec, 134sec for KAF-0401E, KAF-1602E, KAF-3200E., because these time are limited by the data transmission speed of parallel port. For larger format CCD, the data transmission is required more high speed. we are considering this control software to one using USB port for high speed data transmission.

  19. Prasada Rao, Dr Turaga Sundara Rama

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1994 Section: Engineering & Technology. Prasada Rao, Dr Turaga Sundara Rama Ph.D. (Andhra), FNAE. Date of birth: 20 January 1939. Specialization: Petroleum Refining and Heterogeneous Catalysis Address: SFS Flat No. 600, DDA/HIG Flats, Sector 13, Phase 2, Pocket B, Dwaraka, New Delhi 110 045, U.T.

  20. The Contributions of Dr. Alfred Gysi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Rodney D; Engelmeier, Robert L

    2016-11-24

    This article is a historical overview of Dr. Alfred Gysi's contributions to the profession in the areas of denture tooth and articulator design. His understanding of occlusion and mandibular movement resulted in denture tooth designs and occlusal concepts still in widespread use. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. The Years of Dr. Robert Eugene Marshak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Luke W.

    I am honored and privileged to make a brief statement in memory of Dr. Marshak's distinguished achievement in science, his kindness and great humanity. I will concentrate on the part of his career at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University …

  2. Prof Dr.Farida Habib Shah

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ranjeetha

    Women in Leadership Roles in Science. dR h Pl i th L k Pi li ... Employment – job entry. M i th l dd. • Moving up the ladder. • Decision making committees. • Leadership Positions. • Women in Technopreneurship- corporate level .... Organize more training programmes for communication and presentation skills for their ...

  3. Dr Tedros Adhanom: New WHO Director General

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-08-03

    Aug 3, 2017 ... five other candidates to the post. His accomplishments both in Ethiopia and the global stage catapult him to this remarkable success. ... Dr Tedros is a change agent, and a reformist in the health sector. His election as the Director General of WHO brings along a lot of expectations for a better health agenda ...

  4. In Memoriam- Prof. Dr. Andries Willem Lategan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Ligthelm

    1965-03-01

    Full Text Available Hierdie Curriculum Vitae sou voorgelees gewees het met die inougurele rede van wyle prof. dr. A. W. Lategan met die aanvaarding van 'n ereprofessoraat aan die P.U. vir C.H.O. op 29 Oktober 1965. Prof. Lategan is op 23 Oktober 1965 oor- lcde. Sy inougurele rede verskyn as ’n bylaag in hierdie uit- gawe.

  5. Stop words for “Dr Math”

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available “Dr Math” is a facility where primary and secondary school pupils can use MXit on their cell phones to get help with their mathematics homework. Pupils use an abbreviated “MXit lingo” leaving out most vowels and substituting various numerals...

  6. The great neurosis of Dr. Joseph Gerard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Rouillon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The Great Neurosis, of Dr. Joseph Gerard, was published in 1889 in Paris. The book, intended for the general public, shows the different varieties of neuroses through picturesque and instructive examples. Its scientific and medical value is poor, but provides us with the various meanings of the word 'neurosis' in the late nineteenth century. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Confessions of a Dr Math tutor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics look different on a small 3-inch screen of an inexpensive cell phone when compared to a 3-meter whiteboard in a mathematics classroom. Dr Math uses cell phone or mobile data "chat" technologies to assist primary and secondary school...

  8. Intelligent real-time CCD data processing system based on variable frame rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-ting

    2009-07-01

    In order to meet the need of image shooting with CCD in unmanned aerial vehicles, a real-time high resolution CCD data processing system based on variable frame rate is designed. The system is consisted of three modules: CCD control module, data processing module and data display module. In the CCD control module, real-time flight parameters (e.g. flight height, velocity and longitude) should be received from GPS through UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter) and according to the corresponding flight parameters, the variable frame rate is calculated. Based on the calculated variable frame rate, CCD external synchronization control impulse signal is generated in the control of FPGA and then CCD data is read out. In the data processing module, data segmentation is designed to extract ROI (region of interest), whose resolution is equal to valid data resolution of HDTV standard conforming to SMPTE (1080i). On one hand, Ping-pong SRAM storage controller is designed in FPGA to real-time store ROI data. On the other hand, according to the need of intelligent observing, changeable window position is designed, and a flexible area of interest is obtained. In the real-time display module, a special video encoder is used to accomplish data format conversion. Data after storage is packeted to HDTV format by creating corresponding format information in FPGA. Through inner register configuration, high definition video analog signal is implemented. The entire system has been implemented in FPGA and validated. It has been used in various real-time CCD data processing situations.

  9. Development and evaluation of a CCD-based digital imaging system for mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccaro, Michele F.; Toker, Emre

    1993-05-01

    We have developed a CCD-based, high performance, filmless imaging system for stereotactic biopsy procedures in mammography. The CCD camera is based on a 1024 X 1024 pixel format, full-frame, scientific grade, front-illuminated, MPP mode CCD, directly coupled to an X-ray intensifying screen via a 2:1 fiber optic reducer. The CCD is cooled to -10 degree(s)C, and is digitized in slow-scan, correlated double sampling mode at 500 Kpixels/second with 12-bit contrast resolution. X-ray images acquired with the system are processed and displayed on a high resolution monitor within 20 seconds of exposure. System design and specifications will be described, and evaluation of physical performance characteristics will be discussed. The system has been used in over 100 stereotactic breast biopsy procedures to date, and has been shown to significantly improve the speed and accuracy of the biopsy procedure, due to the near real-time acquisition and display of x-ray images. Initial results also indicate that the fiber optic coupled CCD-based imaging system provides superior detectability of low contrast breast lesions and microcalcifications at lower patient dose, as compared to conventional film-screen detectors.

  10. Decommissioning of DR 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt

    2006-01-15

    The report describes the decommissioning activities carried out at the 2kW homogeneous reactor DR 1 at Risoe National Laboratory. The decommissioning work took place from summer 2004 until late autumn 2005. The components with the highest activity, the core vessel the recombiner and the piping and valves connected to these, were dismantled first by Danish Decommissioning's own technicians. Demolition of the control rod house and the biological shield as well as the removal of the floor in the reactor hall was carried out by an external demolition contractor. The building was emptied and left for other use. Clearance measurements of the building showed that radionuclide concentrations were everywhere below the clearance limit set by the Danish nuclear regulatory authorities. Furthermore, measurements on the surrounding area showed that there was no contamination that could be attributed to the operation and decommissioning of DR 1. (au)

  11. Prof dr FJ van Zyl as sendingteoloog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J.C. vanWyk

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Prof Dr FJ van Zyl as mission theologian In this article, the theology of mission of Prof dr FJ van Zyl is being explored. This is done by way of his lectures in the Science of Mission at the University of Pretoria during 1960-1978 and also from articles in the magazines of the Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk dating back approximately forty years. It is found that almost none of his dictions is outdated. The radical cataclysm in the theology of mission, especially after 1961, he sharply detected and exposed. His theology of mission is built on a very broad theological base which can be described as theology of the Word. To him mission is proclamation.

  12. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asche, G

    1996-05-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history.

  13. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    OpenAIRE

    Asche, G

    1996-01-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history.

  14. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  15. Dr. William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland (left) with R. Cashmore. Photos 02, 03: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland signing the CERN guest book with R. Cashmore.

  16. Dr. Ziya Kirkali: Managing BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Prostate Enlargement Dr. Ziya Kirkali: Managing BPH Past Issues / Winter 2017 ... Articles Treating the Problem Prostate / Understanding Prostate Enlargement / Dr. Ziya Kirkali: Managing BPH Winter 2017 Issue: Volume ...

  17. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 6: Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, L.; Rimoldini, L.; Guy, L.; Holl, B.; Clementini, G.; Cuypers, J.; Mowlavi, N.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; De Ridder, J.; Charnas, J.; Nienartowicz, K.

    2017-12-01

    This chapter describes the photometric variability processing of the Gaia DR1 data. Coordination Unit 7 is responsible for the variability analysis of over a billion celestial sources. In particular the definition, design, development, validation and provision of a software package for the data processing of photometrically variable objects. Data Processing Centre Geneva (DPCG) responsibilities cover all issues related to the computational part of the CU7 analysis. These span: hardware provisioning, including selection, deployment and optimisation of suitable hardware, choosing and developing software architecture, defining data and scientific workflows as well as operational activities such as configuration management, data import, time series reconstruction, storage and processing handling, visualisation and data export. CU7/DPCG is also responsible for interaction with other DPCs and CUs, software and programming training for the CU7 members, scientific software quality control and management of software and data lifecycle. Details about the specific data treatment steps of the Gaia DR1 data products are found in Eyer et al. (2017) and are not repeated here. The variability content of the Gaia DR1 focusses on a subsample of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars around the South ecliptic pole, showcasing the performance of the Gaia photometry with respect to variable objects.

  18. Dr. Norman Bethune as a surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, I B

    1996-02-01

    Dr. Norman Bethune's recognition as a Canadian of renown resulted from his devoted work in China during the late 1930s. He had received a general surgical training, but his personal illness with tuberculosis led him to specialize in thoracic surgery. A surgical program at McGill University under Dr. Edward Archibald, a pioneer thoracic surgeon, was initially successful, but by the mid-1930s Bethune was rejected by McGill and Dr. Archibald. He became chief of thoracic surgery at the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur outside Montreal. H developed thoracic surgical instruments and wrote numerous scientific papers. The outbreak of civil war in Spain in 1937 attracted Bethune to oppose what he viewed as fascist aggression. He went to Spain, where he established the value of mobile blood banking. On his return to Canada in 1937 he became aware of the escalating war between China and Japan. He joined the Chinese communist forces in northern China and spent 18 months doing Herculean mobile war surgery, while improving the state of medical services in primitive, depressing conditions. He died in 1939 at the age of 49 years of septicemia as a result of accidental laceration of his finger during surgery. The Chinese have venerated Norman Bethune and stimulated his memorialization in Canada. His surgical record can be viewed as mixed in quality, but overall his performance remains impressive for its achievement.

  19. Quantum efficiency modeling for a thick back-illuminated astronomical CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, D. E.; Haque, S.; Holland, S. E.; Kolbe, W. F.

    2017-08-01

    The quantum efficiency and reflectivity of thick, back-illuminated CCD's being fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for astronomical applications are modeled and compared with experiments. The treatment differs from standard thin-film optics in that (a) absorption is permitted in any film, (b) the 200-500 μm thick silicon substrate is considered as a thin film in order to observe the fringing behavior at long wavelengths, and (c) by using approximate boundary conditions, absorption in the surface films is separated from absorption in the substrate. For quantum efficiency measurements, the CCD's are normally operated as CCD's, usually at T =-140 ° C, and at higher temperatures, as photodiodes. They are mounted on mechanical substrates. Reflectivity is measured on air-backed wafer samples at room temperature. The agreement between model expectation and quantum efficiency measurement is in general satisfactory.

  20. High-aperture monochromator-reflectometer and its usefulness for CCD calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakov, Eugene A.; Shcherbakov, Alexander V.; Pertsov, Andrei A.; Polkovnikov, Vladimir N.; Pestov, Alexey E.; Pariev, Dmitry E.; Chkhalo, Nikolai I.

    2017-05-01

    We present a laboratory high-aperture monochromator-reflectometer employing laser-plasma radiation source and three replaceable Schwarzschild objectives for a certain range of applications in the soft X-ray spectral waveband. Three sets of X-ray multilayer mirrors for the Schwarzschild objectives enable operation of the reflectometer at the wavelengths of 135, 171 and 304 Å, while a goniometer with three degrees of freedom allows different measurement modes. We have used the facility for a laboratory CCD calibration at the wavelengths specified. Combined with the results of the CCD sensitivity measurements conducted in the VUV spectral waveband, the total outcome provides a more comprehensive understanding of the CCD effectivity in a wide spectral range.

  1. Investigation of the radiation performance of CCD sensors in a vertex detector application

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanov, K D; Miyamoto, A; Sugimoto, Y; Tamura, N; Takahashi, S; Abe, K; Nagamine, T; Aso, T

    1999-01-01

    The radiation performance of a Hamamatsu S5466 and an EEV CCD02-06 silicon CCD sensors, working in a Multi-Pinned Phase (MPP) mode has been evaluated, in view of their possible use in the vertex detector of a future linear collider. We have examined the influence of the electron irradiation from a beta-source with fluencies up to 4.3x10 sup 1 sup 2 e sup - /cm sup 2 on the parameters of the CCD sensors such as dark current, dark current spikes, drive pulse voltages and charge transfer inefficiency (CTI). The changes of the parameters of the devices resulting from the irradiation are reported and discussed.

  2. Magneto-optic Kerr effect CCD imaging with polarization modulation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Nakayama

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE imaging system with a charge-coupled-device (CCD camera by using the rotating compensator technique. We chose optimal conditions of the rotation frequency of the compensator with stable rotation along with a CCD camera frame rate that allowed precise control of the exposure timing in order to link with the angle of the compensator. Precise timing management of the CCD exposure enables us to carry out repeated experiments, which greatly improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the longitudinal MOKE signal. We applied the technique to the material characterization of the Ni81 Fe19 thin film and its microstructure, and succeeded in evaluating the spatial variation of the complex magneto-optic constant Q of the sample. Because of its attractive advantages such as high-speed and compactness, the present method provides a novel platform for investigating the domain structures in various magnetic materials.

  3. Magneto-optic Kerr effect CCD imaging with polarization modulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Satoru; Okano, Makoto; Nozaki, Yukio; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2017-05-01

    We have developed a magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) imaging system with a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera by using the rotating compensator technique. We chose optimal conditions of the rotation frequency of the compensator with stable rotation along with a CCD camera frame rate that allowed precise control of the exposure timing in order to link with the angle of the compensator. Precise timing management of the CCD exposure enables us to carry out repeated experiments, which greatly improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the longitudinal MOKE signal. We applied the technique to the material characterization of the Ni81 Fe19 thin film and its microstructure, and succeeded in evaluating the spatial variation of the complex magneto-optic constant Q of the sample. Because of its attractive advantages such as high-speed and compactness, the present method provides a novel platform for investigating the domain structures in various magnetic materials.

  4. Retrieval of absorption and backscattering coefficients from HJ-1A/CCD imagery in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Quan, Wenting; Yao, Guoqing; Cui, Tingwei

    2013-03-11

    A simple semi-analytical model (SAB) was developed for computing a(560) and b(b)(550) from HJ-1A/CCD images. By comparison with field measurements, the SAB model produces 5.3-23.5% uncertainty for a(560) and b(b)(550) retrievals. The a(560) and b(b)(550) are also retrieved from satellite images. The match-up analysis results indicate that a(560) and b(b)(550) may be derived from the HJ-1A/CCD images with respective uncertainties of 29.84 and 21.35%. These findings imply that, provided that an atmospheric correction scheme for the green bands is available, the extensive database of HJ-1A/CCD imagery may be used for the quantitative monitoring of optical properties in coastal waters.

  5. HLA-DR expression and disease activity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Elling, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1986-01-01

    -DR antigens on rectal epithelial cells of patients with UC could not be predicted from the clinical, rectoscopic, or histologic findings. HLA-DR expression is normally restricted to immunocompetent cells. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on epithelial cells may be a consequence of immunological reactions...

  6. Volumetric Diffuse Optical Tomography for Small Animals Using a CCD-Camera-Based Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Jing Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D volumetric diffuse optical tomography for small animal imaging by using a CCD-camera-based imaging system with a newly developed depth compensation algorithm (DCA. Our computer simulations and laboratory phantom studies have demonstrated that the combination of a CCD camera and DCA can significantly improve the accuracy in depth localization and lead to reconstruction of 3D volumetric images. This approach may present great interests for noninvasive 3D localization of an anomaly hidden in tissue, such as a tumor or a stroke lesion, for preclinical small animal models.

  7. PROCESSING METHOD EFFECT ON SUN DIAMETER MEASUREMENT WITH CCD SOLAR ASTROLABE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafer, Djelloul [Unite de Recherche Appliquee en Energies Renouvelables, BP 88, Ghardaiea (Algeria); Irbah, Abdenour, E-mail: djdjafer@gmail.com, E-mail: abdenour.irbah@latmos.ipsl.fr [Laboratoire Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales (LATMOS), CNRS UMR8190, Universite Paris VI, Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines INSU, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2012-05-01

    Photometric Sun diameter measurement is based on the calculation of the inflection point of the solar limb. In ground measurement, this point is located at a position on the solar limb where the signal-to-noise ratio is very high, which necessitates the appropriate filtering techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving its position. In this paper, we compare the filtering method currently in use to process the CCD solar astrolabe data, the FFTD method widely used, with a different method that we propose. Using the acquired data from the CCD astrolabe at Calern, France during 1997, we can obtain a mean difference of 130 mas in the measured radii.

  8. Processing Method Effect on Sun Diameter Measurement with CCD Solar Astrolabe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djafer, Djelloul; Irbah, Abdenour

    2012-05-01

    Photometric Sun diameter measurement is based on the calculation of the inflection point of the solar limb. In ground measurement, this point is located at a position on the solar limb where the signal-to-noise ratio is very high, which necessitates the appropriate filtering techniques to eliminate the noise while preserving its position. In this paper, we compare the filtering method currently in use to process the CCD solar astrolabe data, the FFTD method widely used, with a different method that we propose. Using the acquired data from the CCD astrolabe at Calern, France during 1997, we can obtain a mean difference of 130 mas in the measured radii.

  9. Preliminary examination of a CCD camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate for neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Masahito E-mail: matsu3@popsvr.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2004-08-21

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a scintillator coated fiber optic plate (FOP) was examined for neutron imaging. The FOP coupling and the lens coupling in terms of efficient optical coupling with a CCD, and {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S(Tb) in terms of light emission efficiency and spatial resolution were discussed. The spatial resolution for each imaging system was obtained as edge spread functions or observations of modulation transfer function charts.

  10. Construction of a photochemical reactor combining a CCD spectrophotometer and a LED radiation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombár, Melinda; Józsa, Éva; Braun, Mihály; Ősz, Katalin

    2012-10-01

    An inexpensive photoreactor using LED light sources and a fibre-optic CCD spectrophotometer as a detector was built by designing a special cell holder for standard 1.000 cm cuvettes. The use of this device was demonstrated by studying the aqueous photochemical reaction of 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone. The developed method combines the highly quantitative data collection of CCD spectrophotometers with the possibility of illuminating the sample independently of the detecting light beam, which is a substantial improvement of the method using diode array spectrophotometers as photoreactors.

  11. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland, toured the assembly hall of the ATLAS experiment on a recent visit to CERN.Photos 01, 02: Dr. Peter Jenni, spokesperson for the ATLAS experiment (second from left), explains to Dr. David Syz (fourth from left) and accompanying visitors the process of integration of a 26-metre-long coil of the barrel toroid magnet system into its coil casing.Photo 03: Dr. Peter Jenni (extreme right) with Dr. David Syz (front row, fourth from right) behind a stack of 26-metre-long 'racetrack' coils awaiting integration into their coil casings.

  12. Boodskap van Professor Dr. J. Waterink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Waterink

    1955-03-01

    Full Text Available Boodskap van Professor Dr. J. Waterinkter gelegendheid van die verlening aan hem van de graad Doctor Educationis, honoris causa, door de Universiteit voor Christelijk Hoger Onderwijs te Potchefstroom op Zaterdag, 26 Maart 1955, en op die dag voorgelezen door de heer Jan van den Berg, Buitengewoon en Gevolmachtigd Ambassadeur van Hare Mi iesteit de Koningin der Nederlanden. Mijnheer, de Kanselier, Mijnheer de Voorzitter van de Raad, Mijnheer deVice-Kanselier en Rector, overige Heren ambtsdragers, en gij alien,die herwaarts kwaanit ter gelegenheid van deze Gradendag,zeer geachte en zeer gewenste toehoorders.

  13. CCD Astrometric Measurements and Historical Data Summary of WDS 12182-4251

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Anushree; Boyce, Grady

    2018-01-01

    Precise astrometric coordinates, separation, and position angle of proposed binary system WDS 12182-4251 (DAM 1244) were determined from CCD (charge-coupled device) imaging analysis. The measurements acquired largely align with previously collected data available through databases such as the Washington Double Star (WDS) Catalog. Additionally, the historical data and other information available on this system have been gathered and examined.

  14. Applications in radiation therapy of a scintillating screen viewed by a CCD camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, J.M.; Boon, S.N.; van Luijk, P.

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dosimetry system has been designed for position-sensitive dose-measurement applications in modem radiation therapy. The system consists of a scintillating screen (Gd2O2S:Tb), observed by a low-noise CCD camera with a long integration time. The system allows reliable and

  15. Subpixel translation of MEMS measured by discrete fourier transform analysis of CCD images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamahata, C.; Sarajlic, Edin; Stranczl, M.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Gijs, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a straightforward method for measuring in-plane linear displacements of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with subnanometer resolution. The technique is based on Fourier transform analysis of a video recorded with a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera attached to an optical microscope

  16. A graph reader using a CCD image sensor | Seeti | Nigerian Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Physics. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 20, No 1 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. A graph reader using a CCD image sensor. ML Seeti. Abstract. No Abstract.

  17. Bifunctional lacZ alpha-ccdB genes for selective cloning of PCR products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabant, P; Drèze, P L; Van Reeth, T; Szpirer, J; Szpirer, C

    1997-11-01

    The use of PCR-amplified DNA-fragments is a classical approach to generate recombinant DNA. To facilitate the cloning of PCR products, we have constructed two new pKIL vectors that allow selection of recombinants. The multiple cloning sites (MCS) of these plasmids contain two adjacent Aspel sites and a unique HindII site. Cleavage of these vectors with Aspel produce linearized molecules with a single thymidine nucleotide at the 3' ends allowing TA cloning of Taq-amplified fragments. On the other hand, cleavage with HindII can be used for the cloning of blunt-ended PCR products generated by other DNA polymerases. The LacZ alpha-CcdB fusion protein produced by these plasmids has retained both the CcdB killer activity and the ability to alpha-complement the truncated LacZ delta M15. This bifunctionality allowed us to show that small PCR products (< 1000 bp) that do not disrupt lacZ alpha efficiently do inactivate CcdB, which demonstrates that the CcdB-based selection is well adapted for cloning of PCR products, especially for small size fragments.

  18. On the use of CCD area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenter, P; Catalano, J G; Park, C; Zhang, Z

    2006-07-01

    The use and application of charge coupled device (CCD) area detectors for high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity is discussed. Direct comparison of high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity data measured with CCD area detectors and traditional X-ray scintillator ('point') detectors demonstrates that the use of CCD detectors leads to a substantial (approximately 30-fold) reduction in data acquisition rates because of the elimination of the need to scan the sample to distinguish signal from background. The angular resolution with a CCD detector is also improved by a factor of approximately 3. The ability to probe the large dynamic range inherent to high-resolution X-ray reflectivity data in the specular reflection geometry was demonstrated with measurements of the orthoclase (001)- and alpha-Al2O3 (012)-water interfaces, with measured reflectivity signals varying by a factor of approximately 10(6) without the use of any beam attenuators. Statistical errors in the reflectivity signal are also derived and directly compared with the repeatability of the measurements.

  19. Single-Electron and Single-Photon Sensitivity with a Silicon Skipper CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Sofo-Haro, Miguel; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-01

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068 e- rms /pixel . This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while future astronomical applications may include direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets.

  20. Construction of a shortwave near-infrared spectrofluorometer with diode laser source and CCD detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silzel, John W.; Obremski, Robert J.

    1993-05-01

    Spectrofluorometers employing xenon arc lamp excitation and photomultiplier tube detectors afford sensitivity over the UV/VIS spectral region for which these instruments were designed, but suffer sensitivity limitations in the short-wave near infrared (NIR) region (800 - 1000 nm) because of their limited source energy and low detector quantum efficiency. To achieve high sensitivity in the NIR region, a 30 mW diode laser source, an imaging spectrograph, and a cryogenically cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) have been combined in a spectrofluorometer specifically designed for use in the NIR region. The diode laser source incorporates integral source filters, optics, and a beam trap, and utilizes a vertical beam geometry which provides an illuminated volume oriented conveniently for the imaging of fluorescence emissions on the entrance slit of the spectrograph. Data is presented which demonstrates that the temporal and spectral stability of the source is equal or superior to that of an arc lamp for solution-phase fluorometry. In addition to spectral information, the CCD detector provides spatial resolution of fluorescence emissions along the vertical path of the excitation beam. An absolute photometric calibration of the CCD detector, and measurement of its read noise, fixed pattern noise, and linear dynamic range is performed using the photon transfer technique of Janesick, et al. Improvement in the instrument performance by more than six decades is demonstrated by measured LOD of NIR dyes using a commercial SLM 4800 instrument and the new diode laser/CCD arrangement. Origin of the present detection limits is discussed.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 6819 CCD UBV photometry (Ak+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, T.; Bostanci, Z. F.; Yontan, T.; Bilir, S.; Guver, T.; Ak, S.; Urgup, H.; Paunzen, E.

    2016-11-01

    CCD UBVRI images of the open cluster NGC 6819 and standard stars selected from Landolt (2009, Cat. J/AJ/137/4186) were acquired on 2015 May 18 using a 1-m Ritchey-Chretien telescope (T100) located at the TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) in Bakirlitepe, Antalya/Turkey. (1 data file).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC 225 CCD UBV photometry (Bilir+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilir, S.; Bostanci, Z. F.; Yontan, T.; Guver, T.; Bakis, V.; Ak, T.; Ak, S.; Paunzen, E.; Eker, Z.

    2016-11-01

    CCD UBVRI images of the open cluster NGC 225 and standard stars selected from Landolt (2009, Cat. J/AJ/137/4186) were acquired on 2012 July 18 using a 1-m Ritchey-Chretien telescope (T100) located at the TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) in Bakirlitepe, Antalya/Turkey. (1 data file).

  3. 3D morphology reconstruction using linear array CCD binocular stereo vision imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yu; Wang, Jinjiang

    2018-01-01

    Binocular vision imaging system, which has a small field of view, cannot reconstruct the 3-D shape of the dynamic object. We found a linear array CCD binocular vision imaging system, which uses different calibration and reconstruct methods. On the basis of the binocular vision imaging system, the linear array CCD binocular vision imaging systems which has a wider field of view can reconstruct the 3-D morphology of objects in continuous motion, and the results are accurate. This research mainly introduces the composition and principle of linear array CCD binocular vision imaging system, including the calibration, capture, matching and reconstruction of the imaging system. The system consists of two linear array cameras which were placed in special arrangements and a horizontal moving platform that can pick up objects. The internal and external parameters of the camera are obtained by calibrating in advance. And then using the camera to capture images of moving objects, the results are then matched and 3-D reconstructed. The linear array CCD binocular vision imaging systems can accurately measure the 3-D appearance of moving objects, this essay is of great significance to measure the 3-D morphology of moving objects.

  4. Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffenberg, Javier [Fermilab; Sofo-Haro, Miguel [Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche; Drlica-Wagner, Alex [Fermilab; Essig, Rouven [YITP, Stony Brook; Guardincerri, Yann [Fermilab; Holland, Steve [LBL, Berkeley; Volansky, Tomer [Tel Aviv U.; Yu, Tien-Tien [CERN

    2017-05-31

    We have developed a non-destructive readout system that uses a floating-gate amplifier on a thick, fully depleted charge coupled device (CCD) to achieve ultra-low readout noise of 0.068 e- rms/pix. This is the first time that discrete sub-electron readout noise has been achieved reproducibly over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This allows the precise counting of the number of electrons in each pixel, ranging from pixels with 0 electrons to more than 1500 electrons. The resulting CCD detector is thus an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while astronomical applications include future direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets.

  5. A toolkit for the characterization of CCD cameras for transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulovic, M.; Rieger, B.; Van Vliet, L.J.; Koster, A.J.; Ravelli, R.B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are nowadays commonly utilized in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for applications in life sciences. Direct access to digitized images has revolutionized the use of electron microscopy, sparking developments such as automated collection of tomographic data, focal

  6. A comparative study on the observation of spontaneous nystagmus with Frenzel glasses and an infrared CCD camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Shunkichi; Fukumoto, Akiko; Aoyagi, Mio; Koizumi, Yasuo; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Yagi, Toshiaki

    2004-02-01

    To compare the usefulness of a CCD camera with infrared illumination (IR-CCD camera) over Frenzel glasses (F Glasses) for the observation of spontaneous nystagmus, the incidence and direction of nystagmus, and the frequency, amplitude and slow phase of spontaneous nystagmus. One hundred vertiginous patients, fifty-three females and forty-seven males participated in this study. Before undergoing routine neurotological examination, their eye movements were recorded by electronystagmogram (ENG) in conjunction with observations of eye movements under F glasses and through an IR-CCD camera. The data was collected from patients who exhibited spontaneous nystagmus either under F glasses or the IR-CCD camera. Thirty-three patients showed spontaneous nystagmus under F glasses. On the other hand, under the IR-CCD camera, all patients examined exhibited spontaneous nystagmus. The frequency of nystagmus was not significantly different between these two systems. However, the amplitude and slow phase velocity exhibited significantly larger values under the IR-CCD camera in patients with spontaneous nystagmus both under the IR-CCD camera and F glasses. From these observations and evidence, the IR-CCD camera can be recommended as a more useful system and powerful tool for neurotological examination than F glasses.

  7. A configurable distributed high-performance computing framework for satellite's TDI-CCD imaging simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bo; Mao, Bingjing; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2010-11-01

    This paper renders a configurable distributed high performance computing(HPC) framework for TDI-CCD imaging simulation. It uses strategy pattern to adapt multi-algorithms. Thus, this framework help to decrease the simulation time with low expense. Imaging simulation for TDI-CCD mounted on satellite contains four processes: 1) atmosphere leads degradation, 2) optical system leads degradation, 3) electronic system of TDI-CCD leads degradation and re-sampling process, 4) data integration. Process 1) to 3) utilize diversity data-intensity algorithms such as FFT, convolution and LaGrange Interpol etc., which requires powerful CPU. Even uses Intel Xeon X5550 processor, regular series process method takes more than 30 hours for a simulation whose result image size is 1500 * 1462. With literature study, there isn't any mature distributing HPC framework in this field. Here we developed a distribute computing framework for TDI-CCD imaging simulation, which is based on WCF[1], uses Client/Server (C/S) layer and invokes the free CPU resources in LAN. The server pushes the process 1) to 3) tasks to those free computing capacity. Ultimately we rendered the HPC in low cost. In the computing experiment with 4 symmetric nodes and 1 server , this framework reduced about 74% simulation time. Adding more asymmetric nodes to the computing network, the time decreased namely. In conclusion, this framework could provide unlimited computation capacity in condition that the network and task management server are affordable. And this is the brand new HPC solution for TDI-CCD imaging simulation and similar applications.

  8. Development of a CCD-based pyrometer for surface temperature measurement of casting billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Lang, Xianli; Hu, Zhenwei; Shu, Shuangbao

    2017-06-01

    In order to achieve high accuracy and good stability of temperature measurement results, an online vision-based temperature field measurement system for continuous casting billets is developed instead of the conventional single-point radiation pyrometer in this paper. This system is a hybrid temperature measurement system which consists of a monochrome array CCD camera with high resolution and a single spot colorimetric thermometer simultaneously. In this system, a narrow-band spectrum radiation temperature measurement model is established for the optical CCD-based pyrometer system, and the non-uniformity of the temperature field measurement due to the inter-element sensitivity deviations of the CCD-array detector and photometric distortion caused by the vignetting in the optical system is analyzed in detail and compensated. Furthermore, in order to eliminate the temperature fluctuation caused by the stripped iron oxide scale on billets, a temperature field reconstruction approach, which took full advantage of the high resolution characteristic of CCD and the distribution character of the surface temperature field of billets, is introduced in this system. Meanwhile, based on the narrow band spectral thermometry theory, the spot temperature measured by the colorimetric thermometer is used to correct the temperature field measured by the CCD camera on-line so as to reduce the temperature measurement error caused by the inconclusive absolute emissivity of different grades of steel and the interference of industrial dust. Currently, the system has been successfully applied and verified in some continuous casting production lines. Industrial trials indicate that the system could effectively eliminate false temperature variation caused by striped iron oxide scale and provide information about changes of processing parameters in the continuous casting production line in real time.

  9. [A quickly atmospheric correction method for HJ-1 CCD with deep blue algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Ting; Wang, Hong-Mei; Li, Qing; Zhao, Shao-Hua; Li, Shen-Shen; Chen, Liang-Fu

    2014-03-01

    In the present, for the characteristic of HJ-1 CCD camera, after receiving aerosol optical depth (AOD) from deep blue algorithm which was developed by Hsu et al. assisted by MODerate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance database, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) correction with Kernel-Driven Model, and the calculation of viewing geometry with auxiliary data, a new atmospheric correction method of HJ-1 CCD was developed which can be used over vegetation, soil and so on. And, when the CCD data is processed to correct atmospheric influence, with look up table (LUT) and bilinear interpolation, atmospheric correction of HJ-1 CCD is completed quickly by grid calculation of atmospheric parameters and matrix operations of interface define language (IDL). The experiment over China North Plain on July 3rd, 2012 shows that by our method, the atmospheric influence was corrected well and quickly (one CCD image of 1 GB can be corrected in eight minutes), and the reflectance after correction over vegetation and soil was close to the spectrum of vegetation and soil. The comparison with MODIS reflectance product shows that for the advantage of high resolution, the corrected reflectance image of HJ-1 is finer than that of MODIS, and the correlation coefficient of the reflectance over typical surface is greater than 0.9. Error analysis shows that the recognition error of aerosol type leads to 0. 05 absolute error of surface reflectance in near infrared band, which is larger than that in visual bands, and the 0. 02 error of reflectance database leads to 0.01 absolute error of surface reflectance of atmospheric correction in green and red bands.

  10. Silvaco ATLAS model of ESA's Gaia satellite e2v CCD91-72 pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabroke, George; Holland, Andrew; Burt, David; Robbins, Mark

    2010-07-01

    The Gaia satellite is a high-precision astrometry, photometry and spectroscopic ESA cornerstone mission, currently scheduled for launch in 2012. Its primary science drivers are the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will achieve its unprecedented accuracy requirements with detailed calibration and correction for CCD radiation damage and CCD geometric distortion. In this paper, the third of the series, we present our 3D Silvaco ATLAS model of the Gaia e2v CCD91-72 pixel. We publish e2v's design model predictions for the capacities of one of Gaia's pixel features, the supplementary buried channel (SBC), for the first time. Kohley et al. (2009) measured the SBC capacities of a Gaia CCD to be an order of magnitude smaller than e2v's design. We have found the SBC doping widths that yield these measured SBC capacities. The widths are systematically 2 μm offset to the nominal widths. These offsets appear to be uncalibrated systematic offsets in e2v photolithography, which could either be due to systematic stitch alignment offsets or lateral ABD shield doping diffusion. The range of SBC capacities were used to derive the worst-case random stitch error between two pixel features within a stitch block to be +/-0.25 μm, which cannot explain the systematic offsets. It is beyond the scope of our pixel model to provide the manufacturing reason for the range of SBC capacities, so it does not allow us to predict how representative the tested CCD is. This open question has implications for Gaia's radiation damage and geometric calibration models.

  11. Dr. Seuss Is on the Loose! Planning Month-Long Activities Using Dr. Seuss Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuten-Puckett, Katharyn

    This paper contains activities for classes and small groups using 24 Dr. Seuss stories. The rhymes and illustrations can spark creative writing and inspire imaginative bulletin board displays. The ideas and activities presented are useful with most elementary grades by making adjustments for student abilities. Many of the titles contain political…

  12. Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

  13. VIP Visit Her Excellency Dr Dalia Grybauskaite

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Her Excellency Dr Dalia Grybauskaite President Republic of Lithuania. Wednesday 20 January 2016. General introduction to CERN’s activities by CERN Director-General F. Gianotti. CERN Director-General introduces CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson K. Borras and CMS Lithuanians A. Rinkevicius with V. Rapsevicius. Met by J. Shiers, IT Department Data Preservation Project Leader, and walk to 1st floor Data Centre Visit Point. CERN Data Centre Visit Point, 1st floor, building 513. View the robotic arms of the CERN IT data centre automated libraries (J. Shiers) CERN Computer Centre, building 513, level -1. Physics hands-on and virtual visit with a High School class in Lithuania (S. Schmeling) CERN S’cool Lab, building 143. Meeting with the Lithuanian community at CERN. Signature of the Guest Book with CERN Director-General witnessed by the Lithuanian community at CERN. Family photograph with the Lithuanian community at CERN.

  14. Dr. Solco Tromp and the Tromp Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J. Scott; Rietveld, Wop J.

    2017-09-01

    The Tromp Award is the highest honor awarded by the International Society of Biometeorology (ISB). The award acknowledges outstanding research in biometeorology by a scientist under the age of 35 and was established in conjunction with the Tromp Foundation and the ISB. In honor of the 60th anniversary of the ISB, this article will provide a brief summary of the life of Dr. Solco Tromp and of the six awardees of the Tromp Award since the inaugural issuance of the award in 1999. The Tromp Award was established in part to recognize and support the efforts of young biometeorological professionals. As the brief summary of the awardees and a few of their selected subsequent publications have shown, the ISB and the Tromp Award has proven effective at identifying and supporting promising young scientists.

  15. Decommissioning of DR 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strufe, N.

    2009-02-15

    This report describes the work of dismantling and demolishing reactor DR 2, the waste volumes generated, the health physical conditions and the clearance procedures used for removed elements and waste. Since the ultimate goal for the decommissioning project was not clearance of the building, but downgrading the radiological classification of the building with a view to converting it to further nuclear use, this report documents how the lower classification was achieved and the known occurrence of remaining activity. The report emphasises some of the deliberations made and describes the lessons learned through this decommissioning project. The report also intends to contribute towards the technical basis and experience basis for further decommissioning of the nuclear facilities in Denmark. (au)

  16. [Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, S; Susić, V; Sokić, D; Lević, Z

    1996-01-01

    With this brief review we honor the memory of the great French doctor Jean Baptiste Edouard Gélineau. Dr. Gélineau was born on December 23, 1828 at Blaye, Gironde, close to the Bordeaux region. His name is connected with the first clinical description of the disease for which he, both by the right of the primacy as well as ad valorem of his first two names, coined the name "narcolepsy". He was the first to notice the intrinsically evanescent symptoms of narcolepsy, such as excessive daytime somnolence, imperative sleep habits and cataplexy or "astasia" as he called it, and incorporate them into a single clinical syndrome. In 1881 Gélineau discussed Kaffe's case of "maladie du sommeil" as a proof of the existence of the new disease described a year before. As a good clinical observer Gélineau noticed the close relation of emotional engagement and astasia. His attitude was that narcolepsy was a nosologic entity, a disease sui generis, but admitted that it could appear purely as a symptom only. This was in discordance with the views in England where (in 1928) Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson repudiated such convictions; in 1930 Lhermitte still shared the same opinion. Gélineau differentiated narcolepsy from epilepsy with the elegance of clinical reasoning. Overall, Gélineau described three elements of the narcoleptic pentade. Sleep paralyses were first described by Mitchell in 1876, and were first attributed to narcolepsy by Wilson in 1928; in 1930 Lhermitte first described hypnapompic, and Daniels, in 1934, hypnagogic sleep paralysis. Hypnagogic hallucinations were described by Maury in 1848 and subsequently by de Saint Denis in 1867. In twenties they were thoroughly studiesed during the epidemic encephalitis and after the Big War in 1922 by Levy. The life story of Dr. Gélineau covers multivarious activities. As a young student of the Rochefort Navy Medical School he took part in the fight against colera which deluged the city of La Rochelle. In 1849 he

  17. [An Improved DDV Method to Retrieve AOT for HJ CCD Image in Typical Mountainous Areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-qiang; Li, Ai-nong; Bian, Jin-hu; Huang, Cheng-quan

    2015-06-01

    Domestic HJ CCD imaging applications in environment and disaster monitoring and prediction has great potential. But, HJ CCD image lack of Mid-Nir band can not directly retrieve Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) by the traditional Dark Dense Vegetation (DDV) method, and the mountain AOT changes in space-time dramatically affected by the mountain environment, which reduces the accuracy of atmospheric correction. Based on wide distribution of mountainous dark dense forest, the red band histogram threshold method was introduced to identify the mountainous DDV pixels. Subsequently, the AOT of DDV pixels were retrieved by lookup table constructed by 6S radiative transfer model with assumption of constant ratio between surface reflectance in red and blue bands, and then were interpolated to whole image. MODIS aerosol product and the retrieved AOT by the proposed algorithm had very good consistency in spatial distribution, and HJ CCD image was more suitable for the remote sensing monitoring of aerosol in mountain areas, which had higher spatial resolution. Their fitting curve of scatterplot was y = 0.828 6x-0.01 and R2 was 0.984 3 respectively. Which indicate the improved DDV method can effectively retrieve AOT, and its precision can satisfy the atmospheric correction and terrain radiation correction for Hj CCD image in mountainous areas. The improvement of traditional DDV method can effectively solve the insufficient information problem of the HJ CCD image which have only visible light and near infrared band, when solving radiative transfer equation. Meanwhile, the improved method fully considered the influence of mountainous terrain environment. It lays a solid foundation for the HJ CCD image atmospheric correction in the mountainous areas, and offers the possibility for its automated processing. In addition, the red band histogram threshold method was better than NDVI method to identify mountain DDV pixels. And, the lookup table and ratio between surface reflectance

  18. Development of low-noise CCD drive electronics for the world space observatory ultraviolet spectrograph subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Mike; Clapp, Matthew; King, James; Morse, Tom; Mihalcea, Ionut; Waltham, Nick; Hayes-Thakore, Chris

    2016-07-01

    World Space Observatory Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) is a major Russian-led international collaboration to develop a large space-borne 1.7 m Ritchey-Chrétien telescope and instrumentation to study the universe at ultraviolet wavelengths between 115 nm and 320 nm, exceeding the current capabilities of ground-based instruments. The WSO Ultraviolet Spectrograph subsystem (WUVS) is led by the Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences and consists of two high resolution spectrographs covering the Far-UV range of 115-176 nm and the Near-UV range of 174-310 nm, and a long-slit spectrograph covering the wavelength range of 115-305 nm. The custom-designed CCD sensors and cryostat assemblies are being provided by e2v technologies (UK). STFC RAL Space is providing the Camera Electronics Boxes (CEBs) which house the CCD drive electronics for each of the three WUVS channels. This paper presents the results of the detailed characterisation of the WUVS CCD drive electronics. The electronics include a novel high-performance video channel design that utilises Digital Correlated Double Sampling (DCDS) to enable low-noise readout of the CCD at a range of pixel frequencies, including a baseline requirement of less than 3 electrons rms readout noise for the combined CCD and electronics system at a readout rate of 50 kpixels/s. These results illustrate the performance of this new video architecture as part of a wider electronics sub-system that is designed for use in the space environment. In addition to the DCDS video channels, the CEB provides all the bias voltages and clocking waveforms required to operate the CCD and the system is fully programmable via a primary and redundant SpaceWire interface. The development of the CEB electronics design has undergone critical design review and the results presented were obtained using the engineering-grade electronics box. A variety of parameters and tests are included ranging from general system metrics, such as the power and mass

  19. The hard X-ray response of the XIS-CCD for Astro-E: qualification of the X-ray CCD detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nishiuchi, M; Awaki, H; Tsuru, T; Sakano, M; Hamaguchi, K; Murakami, H; Tsunemi, H; Hayashida, K; Kitamoto, S; Miyata, E; Dotani, T; Ozaki, M; Bautz, M; Doty, J; Kissel, S; Foster, R; Ricker, G

    1999-01-01

    We report on the hard X-ray response of the CCD detector for the X-ray imaging spectrometer (XIS), to be launched on the next Japanese X-ray Astronomical Satellite, ASTRO-E, in February 2000. XIS is prepared by an international team, comprised of MIT (USA), ISAS, Osaka University and Kyoto University (JAPAN). We have evaluated the X-ray response of the XIS in its high-energy band (1.5-10 keV). Data from the fluorescent line emission of Al, Cl, Ti, Ni, Fe, Zn, Se were used to construct the response function of the CCD detectors. Details of the response function - including the energy-scale, linearity, energy resolution, quantum efficiency -, are given as a function of incident X-ray energy. We find that the tail component of high-energy photopeaks are produced by events with incomplete charge collection. We also conclude that the size of the charge clouds can be estimated using the shapes of the tail components.

  20. Application of a finite size of the charge cloud shape generated by an X-ray photon inside the CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunemi, H; Miyata, E

    2002-01-01

    A mesh experiment enables us to specify the X-ray landing position on a charge-coupled device (CCD) with subpixel resolution. By this experiment, we find that the final charge cloud shape generated by Ti-K X-ray photons (4.5 keV) in the CCD is about 1.5x1.1 mu m sup 2 (standard deviation). An X-ray photon photoabsorbed in the CCD generates a number of electrons, forming an X-ray event. It becomes up to a 4-pixel-split event since the pixel size of the CCD used (12 mu m square pixel) is bigger than the charge cloud size. Using the mesh experiment, we can determine the X-ray landing position on the CCD. In this way, we can compare the estimated X-ray landing position with the actual landing position on the CCD. Employing the charge cloud shape, we can improve the position resolution of the X-ray CCD by referring to the X-ray event pattern. We find that the position accuracy of our method is about 1.0 mu m. We discuss our method, comparing it with the charge centroid method.

  1. HLA-DR expression and disease activity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Elling, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1986-01-01

    In 12 patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC) the rectal epithelial cells were analyzed for HLA-DR antigens by an immunohistochemical technique. The clinical, rectoscopic, and histologic stages were also determined. The investigations were carried out at the beginning of the study and 2 weeks......-DR antigens on rectal epithelial cells of patients with UC could not be predicted from the clinical, rectoscopic, or histologic findings. HLA-DR expression is normally restricted to immunocompetent cells. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on epithelial cells may be a consequence of immunological reactions...

  2. Brayton Isotope Power System. Phase I. (Ground demonstration system) Configuration Control Document (CCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-15

    The configuration control document (CCD) defines the BIPS-GDS configuration. The GDS configuration is similar to a conceptual flight system design, referred to as the BIPS-FS, which is discussed in App. I. The BIPS is being developed by ERDA as a 500 to 2000 W(e), 7-y life, space power system utilizing a closed Brayton cycle gas turbine engine to convert thermal energy (from an isotope heat source) to electrical energy at a net efficiency exceeding 25 percent. The CCD relates to Phase I of an ERDA Program to qualify a dynamic system for launch in the early 1980's. Phase I is a 35-month effort to provide an FS conceptual design and GDS design, fabrication, and test. The baseline is a 7-year life, 450-pound, 4800 W(t), 1300 W(e) system which will use two multihundred watt (MHW) isotope heat sources being developed.

  3. Continuity of Care Document (CCD) Enables Delivery of Medication Histories to the Primary Care Clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonaitis, Linas; Belsito, Anne; Cravens, Gary; Shen, Changyu; Overhage, J. Marc

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of the Enhanced Medication History (EMH) project is to provide medication histories to ambulatory primary care practices in the Indiana Network for Patient Care. Methods: Medications were aggregated from three different sources of pharmacy data (Medicaid, SureScripts, and the county health system of Indianapolis). Dispensing events were assembled into the Continuity of Care Document (CCD), and presented to clinicians as RxNorm Clinical Drugs. Results: The EMH project completed 46 weeks of operation in a community health center in Indianapolis. Medication Histories were generated for 10498 office visits for 4449 distinct patients. Seven (of nine) attending physicians responded to a written survey and found the Medication Histories useful (3.9±0.4 on a scale of 1 to 5). Conclusion: Implementation of the EMH project demonstrated the successful use (as well as the challenging aspects) of the CCD and the RxNorm terminology in the outpatient clinical setting. PMID:21347078

  4. BVRI Standardization of the CCD Photometric System of Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hae Jeong

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of 792 CCD images of V523 Cas were obtained on four nights of Jan. 2003 with the BVRI CCD photometric system attached to a 61cm reflector of Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory (SOAO. The 17 standard stars in the images were used to establish transformation relations between our BVRI system and the standard Johnson-Cousins BVRI system. We derived the tentative equations of transformation between two photometric systems as follows; V = v-0.0689(B-V+0.0063 B-V = 1.3197(b-v-0.1733 V-R = 0.9210(v-r-0.1309 R-I = 0.8892(r-i-0.1055. Using these equations standard V magnitudes and their color indexes (B-V, V-R, R-I for 57 stars in the field of the image were determined.

  5. BVR Standardization of the CCD Photometric System of Chungbuk National University Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hae Jeong

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BVR observations for 52 standard stars were performed using the 1-m reflecter with 2K CCD System of Chungbuk National University Observatory(CBNUO in 2008. We obtained 1,322 CCD images to establish a correlation between our bvr system and the standard Johnson-Cousins BVR system. We derived the tentative equations of transformation between then as follows; V = v-0.0303(B-V+0.0466 B-V = 1.3475(b-v-0.0251 V-R = 1.0641(v-r-0.0125 Using these equations the magnitudes in V, B-V, and V-R for 197 stars were obtained.

  6. 800 x 800 charge-coupled device /CCD/ camera for the Galileo Jupiter Orbiter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, M. C.; Klaasen, K. P.; Snyder, L. M.; Wang, P. K.

    1979-01-01

    During January 1982 the NASA space transportation system will launch a Galileo spacecraft composed of an orbiting bus and an atmospheric entry probe to arrive at the planet Jupiter in July 1985. A prime element of the orbiter's scientific instrument payload will be a new generation slow-scan planetary imaging system based on a newly developed 800 x 800 charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensor. Following Jupiter orbit insertion, the single, narrow-angle, CCD camera, designated the Solid State Imaging (SSI) Subsystem, will operate for 20 months as the orbiter makes repeated encounters with Jupiter and its Galilean Satellites. During this period the SSI will acquire 40,000 images of Jupiter's atmosphere and the surfaces of the Galilean Satellites. This paper describes the SSI, its operational modes, and science objectives.

  7. Employing the Technology of Virtual Observatory as the Fundamental Framework for the CCD Photometry Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škoda, P.; Hroch, F.; Nádvorník, J.; Mikhailova, D.

    2014-05-01

    The project of Ondřejov Southern Photometry Survey (OSPS) is an attempt to exploit the wealth of temporal information contained in multi-colour CCD photometry obtained with 1.54m Danish telescope at La Silla in remote observing mode by several groups of Czech astronomers working on different scientific programs and various primary targets. The OSPS realizes the idea of an automatic extraction of multi-colour light curves from every celestial object identified in the frame, thus giving access to 99% of data normally disposed by the PI's, who usually measure only few targets in every CCD frame. The Virtual Observatory (VO) technology is exploited here as an integral part of previewing, data reduction, bookkeeping, method of analysis and publishing.

  8. UPYZVS CCD-photometry for the IC 4665 open cluster sky area (Andrushivka AO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruk, V.; Bartashiute, S.; Butenko, G.; Gerashchenko, O.; Ivashchenko, Yu.; Kovalchuk, G.; Lokot', V.; Perekhod, A.; Samoylov, V.

    2007-09-01

    CCD observations of four sky area in the IC 4665 open cluster were made to examine the Zeiss-600 telescope photometric system (the Andrushivka AO, Ukraine) with the aim of the Vilnius system implementation. Magnitudes and coordinates of stars up to V=15.m6 were determinate for 23'.5x23'.5 overlapping fields. Equatorial coordinates of stars were obtained in the USNO-A2.0 catalog system. The CCD frame processing method is describe. It is based on a new technique for flat field elumination with the MIDAS/ROMAFOT software (the LINUX shell). The rms error of single determination of magnitude for the stars up to V=13m is ±0m.02/0m.03 for 60 s exposure. The photometric system of the telescope the UPYZVS Vilnius system is determined; the reduction accuracy is 0m.02/0m.10.

  9. Puesta en marcha de un microdensitómetro automático basado en CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, J. H.; Bustos Fierro, I. H.

    We present the commisioning of a CCD-based microdensitometer intended to perform astrometric measurements of photographic plates. The work done consisted in the installation of a CCD camera, the modification of the motion system, the construction of a new illumination device, the adaptation of the electronics, and the development of software. The instrument is intended to be used for the astrometric measurement mainly of plates of the Astrographic Catalog and Carte du Ciel collections from Córdoba Observatory. In this phase of the project we counted with the collaboration of the Instituto Provincial de Enseñanza Media No 59, 25 de Mayo, Cruz Alta (Province of Córdoba). The origin and importance of such collaboration is commented.

  10. [Atmospheric correction method for HJ-1 CCD imagery over waters based on radiative transfer model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Gu, Xing-Fa; Li, Zheng-Qiang; Li, Li; Chen, Xing-Feng

    2011-10-01

    Atmospheric correction is a bottleneck in quantitative application of Chinese satellites HJ-1 data to remote sensing of water color. According to the characteristics of CCD sensors, the present paper made use of air-water coupled radiative transfer model to work out the look-up table (LUT) of atmospheric corrected parameters, and thereafter developed pixel-by-pixel atmospheric correction method over waters accomplishing the water-leaving remote sensing reflectance with accessorial meteorological input. The paper validates the HJ-1 CCD retrievals with MODIS and in-situ results. It was found that the accuracy in blue and green bands is good. However, the accuracy in red or NIR bands is much worse than blue or green ones. It was also demonstrated that the aerosol model is a sensitive factor to the atmospheric correction accuracy.

  11. Comparison of a CCD and an APS for soft X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Graeme; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Clark, A.; Dhesi, S. S.; Maneuski, D.; Marchal, J.; Steadman, P.; Tartoni, N.; Turchetta, R.

    2011-12-01

    We compare a new CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) to a Princeton Instruments PIXIS-XO: 2048B Charge Coupled Device (CCD) with soft X-rays tested in a synchrotron beam line at the Diamond Light Source (DLS). Despite CCDs being established in the field of scientific imaging, APS are an innovative technology that offers advantages over CCDs. These include faster readout, higher operational temperature, in-pixel electronics for advanced image processing and reduced manufacturing cost. The APS employed was the Vanilla sensor designed by the MI3 collaboration and funded by an RCUK Basic technology grant. This sensor has 520 x 520 square pixels, of size 25 μm on each side. The sensor can operate at a full frame readout of up to 20 Hz. The sensor had been back-thinned, to the epitaxial layer. This was the first time that a back-thinned APS had been demonstrated at a beam line at DLS. In the synchrotron experiment soft X-rays with an energy of approximately 708 eV were used to produce a diffraction pattern from a permalloy sample. The pattern was imaged at a range of integration times with both sensors. The CCD had to be operated at a temperature of -55°C whereas the Vanilla was operated over a temperature range from 20°C to -10°C. We show that the APS detector can operate with frame rates up to two hundred times faster than the CCD, without excessive degradation of image quality. The signal to noise of the APS is shown to be the same as that of the CCD at identical integration times and the response is shown to be linear, with no charge blooming effects. The experiment has allowed a direct comparison of back thinned APS and CCDs in a real soft x-ray synchrotron experiment.

  12. Collony Collapse Disorder (CCD). A review of the possible Factors and Agents involved

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa del Alba, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Póster Colony collapse disorder is a complex phenomenon that affects managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies, whose main trait is a rapid loss of adult worker bees. Adult worker bees are responsible of the majority of the hive tasks, so their absence means shortly after the collapse and dead of the colony. CCD has been reported mainly from USA, but also from Europe.

  13. Data Reduction and Control Software for Meteor Observing Stations Based on CCD Video Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiedo, J. M.; Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M.; Lyytinen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN) is performing a continuous monitoring of meteor activity over Spain and neighbouring countries. The huge amount of data obtained by the 25 video observing stations that this network is currently operating made it necessary to develop new software packages to accomplish some tasks, such as data reduction and remote operation of autonomous systems based on high-sensitivity CCD video devices. The main characteristics of this software are described here.

  14. Smear correction of highly variable, frame-transfer CCD images with application to polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Francisco A; Feller, Alex; Nagaraju, Krishnappa

    2015-07-01

    Image smear, produced by the shutterless operation of frame-transfer CCD detectors, can be detrimental for many imaging applications. Existing algorithms used to numerically remove smear do not contemplate cases where intensity levels change considerably between consecutive frame exposures. In this report, we reformulate the smearing model to include specific variations of the sensor illumination. The corresponding desmearing expression and its noise properties are also presented and demonstrated in the context of fast imaging polarimetry.

  15. Versatile ultrafast pump-probe imaging with high sensitivity CCD camera

    OpenAIRE

    Pezeril, Thomas; Klieber, Christoph; Temnov, Vasily; Huntzinger, Jean-Roch; Anane, Abdelmadjid

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A powerful imaging technique based on femtosecond time-resolved measurements with a high dynamic range, commercial CCD camera is presented. Ultrafast phenomena induced by a femtosecond laser pump are visualized through the lock-in type acquisition of images recorded by a femtosecond laser probe. This technique allows time-resolved measurements of laser excited phenomena at multiple probe wavelengths (spectrometer mode) or conventional imaging of the sample surface (ima...

  16. CCD measurements of double and multiple stars at NAO Rozhen. III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Z.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the 2-m telescope of the Bulgarian National Astronomical Observatory at Rozhen, observations of 55 multiple stars were carried out during one night, December 16/17. 2006. This is the third series of CCD measurements of double and multiple stars carried out at Rozhen. In the paper we present the results for the position angle and separation for 49 multiple stars (67 pairs which could be measured. .

  17. CCD measurements of double and multiple stars at NAO Rozhen. IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Zorica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the 2 m telescope of the Bulgarian National Astronomical Observatory at Rozhen observations of 30 double or multiple stars were carried out during two half nights on July 20 and 21, 2009. This is the fourth series of measurements of CCD frames of double and multiple stars obtained at Rozhen. In this paper we present the results for the position angle and separation for 23 double and 5 multiple stars (35 pairs which could have been measured.

  18. CCD Measurements of Double and Multiple Stars at NAO Rozhen. IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boeva, S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the 2 m telescope of the Bulgarian National Astronomical Observatory at Rozhen observations of 30 double or multiple stars were carried out during two half nights on July 20and 21, 2009. This is the fourth series of measurements of CCD frames of double and multiple stars obtained at Rozhen. In this paper we present the results for the position angle and separation for 23 double and 5 multiple stars (35 pairs which could have been measured.

  19. Miniature CCD X-Ray Imaging Camera Technology Final Report CRADA No. TC-773-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conder, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mummolo, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of the project was to develop a compact, large active area, high spatial resolution, high dynamic range, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating X-rays. The camera head and controller needed to be capable of operation within a vacuum environment and small enough to be fielded within the small vacuum target chambers at LLNL.

  20. A toolkit for the characterization of CCD cameras for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulovic, M; Rieger, B; van Vliet, L J; Koster, A J; Ravelli, R B G

    2010-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are nowadays commonly utilized in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for applications in life sciences. Direct access to digitized images has revolutionized the use of electron microscopy, sparking developments such as automated collection of tomographic data, focal series, random conical tilt pairs and ultralarge single-particle data sets. Nevertheless, for ultrahigh-resolution work photographic plates are often still preferred. In the ideal case, the quality of the recorded image of a vitrified biological sample would solely be determined by the counting statistics of the limited electron dose the sample can withstand before beam-induced alterations dominate. Unfortunately, the image is degraded by the non-ideal point-spread function of the detector, as a result of a scintillator coupled by fibre optics to a CCD, and the addition of several inherent noise components. Different detector manufacturers provide different types of figures of merit when advertising the quality of their detector. It is hard for most laboratories to verify whether all of the anticipated specifications are met. In this report, a set of algorithms is presented to characterize on-axis slow-scan large-area CCD-based TEM detectors. These tools have been added to a publicly available image-processing toolbox for MATLAB. Three in-house CCD cameras were carefully characterized, yielding, among others, statistics for hot and bad pixels, the modulation transfer function, the conversion factor, the effective gain and the detective quantum efficiency. These statistics will aid data-collection strategy programs and provide prior information for quantitative imaging. The relative performance of the characterized detectors is discussed and a comparison is made with similar detectors that are used in the field of X-ray crystallography.

  1. A faint-object grism spectrograph with multiple slits and CCD detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, John C.; Huchra, John P.; Latham, David W.

    1986-01-01

    A high-efficiency spectrograph for research on faint astronomical objects has been successfully built and is in regular use on the Multiple-Mirror Telescope (MMT). It is equipped with a motorized multi-slit mechanism to allow simultaneous observations of several objects. The combination of high throughput, multiple object capability, and low-noise CCD detector has allowed routine work to be extended to objects of V magnitude 23 and fainter.

  2. 3D measurement for archeological artifact using CCD camera and line laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Hatano, Katsuhiro; Chikatsu, Hirofumi

    1997-07-01

    In the compilation of archival records for archeological artifacts, true ortho-graphic drawings of these artifacts have to be drawn by the archaeologists themselves or part- timers, taking a great deal of time, labor and skill. For saving the labor, the authors have developed ortho projection system using CCD camera. 3D measurement system using ortho projection system are described in this paper. Finally, it demonstrates wireframe model for jomon-pottery by using this system.

  3. Modelling electron distributions within ESA's Gaia satellite CCD pixels to mitigate radiation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabroke, G. M.; Holland, A. D.; Burt, D.; Robbins, M. S.

    2009-08-01

    The Gaia satellite is a high-precision astrometry, photometry and spectroscopic ESA cornerstone mission, currently scheduled for launch in 2012. Its primary science drivers are the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will achieve its unprecedented positional accuracy requirements with detailed calibration and correction for radiation damage. At L2, protons cause displacement damage in the silicon of CCDs. The resulting traps capture and emit electrons from passing charge packets in the CCD pixel, distorting the image PSF and biasing its centroid. Microscopic models of Gaia's CCDs are being developed to simulate this effect. The key to calculating the probability of an electron being captured by a trap is the 3D electron density within each CCD pixel. However, this has not been physically modelled for the Gaia CCD pixels. In Seabroke, Holland & Cropper (2008), the first paper of this series, we motivated the need for such specialised 3D device modelling and outlined how its future results will fit into Gaia's overall radiation calibration strategy. In this paper, the second of the series, we present our first results using Silvaco's physics-based, engineering software: the ATLAS device simulation framework. Inputting a doping profile, pixel geometry and materials into ATLAS and comparing the results to other simulations reveals that ATLAS has a free parameter, fixed oxide charge, that needs to be calibrated. ATLAS is successfully benchmarked against other simulations and measurements of a test device, identifying how to use it to model Gaia pixels and highlighting the affect of different doping approximations.

  4. Dynamic Mapping of Rice Growth Parameters Using HJ-1 CCD Time Series Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The high temporal resolution (4-day charge-coupled device (CCD cameras onboard small environment and disaster monitoring and forecasting satellites (HJ-1A/B with 30 m spatial resolution and large swath (700 km have substantially increased the availability of regional clear sky optical remote sensing data. For the application of dynamic mapping of rice growth parameters, leaf area index (LAI and aboveground biomass (AGB were considered as plant growth indicators. The HJ-1 CCD-derived vegetation indices (VIs showed robust relationships with rice growth parameters. Cumulative VIs showed strong performance for the estimation of total dry AGB. The cross-validation coefficient of determination ( R C V 2 was increased by using two machine learning methods, i.e., a back propagation neural network (BPNN and a support vector machine (SVM compared with traditional regression equations of LAI retrieval. The LAI inversion accuracy was further improved by dividing the rice growth period into before and after heading stages. This study demonstrated that continuous rice growth monitoring over time and space at field level can be implemented effectively with HJ-1 CCD 10-day composite data using a combination of proper VIs and regression models.

  5. Atmospheric correction of HJ-1 CCD imagery over turbid lake waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minwei; Tang, Junwu; Dong, Qing; Duan, Hongtao; Shen, Qian

    2014-04-07

    We have presented an atmospheric correction algorithm for HJ-1 CCD imagery over Lakes Taihu and Chaohu with highly turbid waters. The Rayleigh scattering radiance (Lr) is calculated using the hyperspectral Lr with a wavelength interval 1nm. The hyperspectral Lr is interpolated from Lr in the central wavelengths of MODIS bands, which are converted from the band response-averaged Lr calculated using the Rayleigh look up tables (LUTs) in SeaDAS6.1. The scattering radiance due to aerosol (La) is interpolated from La at MODIS band 869nm, which is derived from MODIS imagery using a shortwave infrared atmospheric correction scheme. The accuracy of the atmospheric correction algorithm is firstly evaluated by comparing the CCD measured remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) with MODIS measurements, which are validated by the in situ data. The CCD measured Rrs is further validated by the in situ data for a total of 30 observation stations within ± 1h time window of satellite overpass and field measurements. The validation shows the mean relative errors about 0.341, 0.259, 0.293 and 0.803 at blue, green, red and near infrared bands.

  6. Cooling System for a Frame-Store PN-CCD Detector for Low Background Application

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, H; Santos Silva, P; Kuster, M; Lang, P

    2012-01-01

    The astroparticle physics experiment CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) aims to detect hypothetical axions or axion-like particles produced in the Sun by the Primakoff process. A Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prototype superconducting dipole magnet provides a 9 T transverse magnetic field for the conversion of axions into detectable X-ray photons. These photons are detected with an X-ray telescope and a novel type of frame-store CCD detector built from radio-pure materials, installed in the optics focal plane. A novel type of cooling system has been designed and built based on krypton-filled cryogenic heat pipes, made out of oxygen-free radiopure copper, and a Stirling cryocooler as cold source. The heat pipes provide an efficient thermal coupling between the cryocooler and the CCD which is kept at stable temperatures between 150 and 230 K within an accuracy of 0.1 K. A graded-Z radiation shield, also serving as a gas cold-trap operated at 120 K, is implemented to reduce the surface contamination of the CCD wind...

  7. Heat dissipation schemes in QCLs monitored by CCD thermoreflectance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierscinski, Kamil; Pierścińska, Dorota; Morawiec, Magdalena; Gutowski, Piotr; Karbownik, Piotr; Serebrennikova, Olga; Bugajski, Maciej

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we present the development of the instrumentation for accurate evaluation of the thermal characteristics of quantum cascade lasers based on CCD thermoreflectance (CCD TR). This method allows rapid thermal characterization of QCLs, as the registration of high-resolution map of the whole device facet lasts only several seconds. The capabilities of the CCD TR are used to study temperature dissipation schemes in different designs of QCLs. We report on the investigation of thermal performance of QCLs developed at the Institute of Electron Technology, with an emphasis on the influence of different material system, processing technology and device designs. We investigate and compare AlInAs/InGaAs/InP QCLs (lattice matched and strain compensated) of different architectures, i.e., double trench and buried heterostructure (BH) in terms of thermal management. Experimental results are in very good agreement with numerical predictions of heat dissipation in various device constructions. Numerical model is based on FEM model solved by commercial software package. The model assumes anisotropic thermal conductivity in the AR layers as well as the temperature dependence of thermal conductivities of all materials in the project. We have observed experimentally improvement of thermal properties of devices based on InP materials, especially for buried heterostructure type. The use of buried heterostructure enhanced the lateral heat dissipation from the active region of QCLs. The BH structure and epilayer-down bonding help dissipate the heat generated from active core of the QCL.

  8. Functional Expression of Aquaporin-2 Tagged with Photoconvertible Fluorescent Protein in mpkCCD Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay-Pong Yip

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vasopressin induced trafficking of aquaporin-2 (AQP2 containing vesicles has been studied in kidney cell lines using conventional fluorescent proteins as tags. However, trafficking of fluorescent tagged AQP2, which resembles the vectorial translocation of native AQP2 from cytoplasm to apical membrane has not been demonstrated at real time. Using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein tag on AQP2 might allow the simultaneous tracking of two separate populations of AQP2 vesicle after subcellular local photoconversion. Methods: A spacer was used to link a photoconvertible fluorescent protein (mEos2 to the amino-terminus of AQP2. The DNA constructs were expressed in mpkCCD cells. The trafficking of chimeric protein was visualized with high speed confocal microscopy in 4 dimensions. Results: Chimeric AQP2 expressed in mpkCCD cell conferred osmotic water permeability to the cells. Subcellular photoconversion with a 405 nm laser pulse converted green chimeras to red chimeras locally. Forskolin stimulation triggered chimeric AQP2 to translocate from acidic organelles to apical plasma membrane. By serendipity, the rate of apical accumulation was found to increase when mEos2 was tagged to the carboxyl-terminus in at least one of the AQP2 molecules within the tetramer. Conclusion: Functional photoconvertible chimeric AQP2 was successfully expressed in mpkCCD cells, in which forskolin induced apical trafficking and accumulation of chimeric AQP2. The proof-of-concept to monitor two populations of AQP2 vesicle simultaneously was demonstrated.

  9. Evaluation of diagnostic ability of CCD digital radiography in the detection of incipient dental caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do [Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the diagnostic ability of a CCD-based digital system (CDX-2000HQ) in the detection of incipient dental caries. 93 extracted human teeth with sound proximal surfaces and interproximal artificial cavities were radiographed using 4 imaging methods. Automatically processed No.2 Insight film (Eastman Kodak Co., U.S.A.) was used for conventional radiography, scanned images of conventional radiograms for indirect digital radiography were used. For the direct digital radiography, the CDX-2000HQ CCD system (Biomedisys Co. Korea) was used. The subtraction images were made from two direct digital images by Sunny program in the CDX-2000HQ system. Two radiologists and three endodontists examined the presence of lesions using a five-point confidence scale and compared the diagnostic ability by ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) analysis and one way ANOVA test. The mean ROC areas of conventional radiography, indirect digital radiography, direct digital radiography, and digital subtraction radiography were 0.9093, 0.9102, 0.9184, and 0.9056, respectively. The diagnostic ability of direct digital radiography was better than the other imaging modalities, but there were no statistical differences among these imaging modalities (p>0.05). These results indicate that new CCD-based digital systems (CDX-2000HQ) have the potential to serve as an alternative to conventional radiography in the detection of incipient dental caries.

  10. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moniz, Ernest [U.S. Energy Secretary

    2014-02-03

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  11. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  12. Dr Murray's case of ligation of the abdominal aorta - Somerset ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reference provided by Dr Rob was to a brief description entitled 'Dr Murray's case of ligature of the abdominal aona', which had appeared in the Annals of che Royal College of Surgeons of England in 1984.2 The original description of this operation is to be found in both the first (1839) and second editions (1850) of ...

  13. Dr. E. Kits van Waveren (1906—1995)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bas, C.

    1996-01-01

    With the death on 3 September 1995 of Dr. E. Kits van Waveren, the Dutch mycologists lost one of their most prominent, internationally known amateurs, a specialist on the taxonomy of the genus Psathyrella and an ardent collector. Dr. Kits van Waveren, honorary staff member of the Rijksherbarium at

  14. Dr. Praveen Chaudhari named director of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Brookhaven Science Associates announced today the selection of Dr. Praveen Chaudhari as Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Chaudhari, who will begin his new duties on April 1, joins Brookhaven Lab after 36 years of distinguished service at IBM as a scientist and senior manager of research" (1 page).

  15. Dr. Albert Carr--Science Educator 1930-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The very first issue of "Educational Perspectives" was published in October of 1962. Dr. Albert Carr wrote one of the inaugural essays on the topic of current developments in science education, and he went on to write several other articles for the journal. This article shares why Dr. Albert Carr's colleagues remember him for his…

  16. Reexamining the Writings of Dr. Seuss To Promote Character Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dave F.; Varady, Joe

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of children's literature by Dr. Seuss in the middle school classroom to help students explore issues of their character and social development, adult expectations, and changes in their personal environment. Discusses themes addressed in selected Dr. Seuss books, and how these can be used as thematic units for classroom…

  17. Cramer-Rao lower bound optimization of an EM-CCD-based scintillation gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korevaar, Marc A N; Goorden, Marlies C; Beekman, Freek J

    2013-04-21

    Scintillation gamma cameras based on low-noise electron multiplication (EM-)CCDs can reach high spatial resolutions. For further improvement of these gamma cameras, more insight is needed into how various parameters that characterize these devices influence their performance. Here, we use the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) to investigate the sensitivity of the energy and spatial resolution of an EM-CCD-based gamma camera to several parameters. The gamma camera setup consists of a 3 mm thick CsI(Tl) scintillator optically coupled by a fiber optic plate to the E2V CCD97 EM-CCD. For this setup, the position and energy of incoming gamma photons are determined with a maximum-likelihood detection algorithm. To serve as the basis for the CRLB calculations, accurate models for the depth-dependent scintillation light distribution are derived and combined with a previously validated statistical response model for the EM-CCD. The sensitivity of the lower bounds for energy and spatial resolution to the EM gain and the depth-of-interaction (DOI) are calculated and compared to experimentally obtained values. Furthermore, calculations of the influence of the number of detected optical photons and noise sources in the image area on the energy and spatial resolution are presented. Trends predicted by CRLB calculations agree with experiments, although experimental values for spatial and energy resolution are typically a factor of 1.5 above the calculated lower bounds. Calculations and experiments both show that an intermediate EM gain setting results in the best possible spatial or energy resolution and that the spatial resolution of the gamma camera degrades rapidly as a function of the DOI. Furthermore, calculations suggest that a large improvement in gamma camera performance is achieved by an increase in the number of detected photons or a reduction of noise in the image area. A large noise reduction, as is possible with a new generation of EM-CCD electronics, may improve the

  18. Ultrahigh-resolution CT and DR scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBianca, Frank A.; Gupta, Vivek; Zou, Ping; Jordan, Lawrence M.; Laughter, Joseph S.; Zeman, Herbert D.; Sebes, Jeno I.

    1999-05-01

    A new technique called Variable-Resolution X-ray (VRX) detection that dramatically increases the spatial resolution in computed tomography (CT) and digital radiography (DR) is presented. The technique is based on a principle called 'projective compression' that allows the resolution element of a CT detector to scale with the subject or field size. For very large (40 - 50 cm) field sizes, resolution exceeding 2 cy/mm is possible and for very small fields, microscopy is attainable with resolution exceeding 100 cy/mm. Several effects that could limit the performance of VRX detectors are considered. Experimental measurements on a 16-channel, CdWO4 scintillator + photodiode test array yield a limiting MTF of 64 cy/mm (8(mu) ) in the highest-resolution configuration reported. Preliminary CT images have been made of small anatomical specimens and small animals using a storage phosphor screen in the VRX mode. Measured detector resolution of the CT projection data exceeds 20 cy/mm (less than 25 (mu) ); however, the final, reconstructed CT images produced thus far exhibit 10 cy/mm (50 (mu) ) resolution because of non-flatness of the storage phosphor plates, focal spot effects and the use of a rudimentary CT reconstruction algorithm. A 576-channel solid-state detector is being fabricated that is expected to achieve CT image resolution in excess of that of the 26-channel test array.

  19. Dr. Otto "Tiger" Freer: inventor and innovator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Every neurosurgeon develops his or her own standard approach to common intracranial pathologies in terms of the order in which different stages are performed and which instruments are used to perform individual tasks. The majority of the basic steps in performing a craniotomy are learned through repetition and practice during residency training. Significant amounts of energy are devoted to mastering technical skills and developing an operative rhythm. What often receives little attention is the historical origin of the instruments that make the work possible. The Freer elevator represents a particularly interesting example. To people unfamiliar with the accomplishments of turn-of-the-century laryngologist Otto "Tiger" Freer, it can be assumed that the name of the instrument in one's hand is simply named for what it can do, that is, to "free" the nasal mucosa from the bony and cartilaginous septum during the transsphenoidal approach. The technique this master surgeon spent his life and career perfecting is now repeated almost daily by skull base neurosurgeons approaching pathologies from the inferior frontal lobe to the foramen magnum. In reviewing his life and work, the authors of this paper discovered an interesting creative process that led to the design of the eponymous instrument. Additionally, they discovered important advances toward the development of the transnasal approach and in our understanding of the anterior skull base. They present a historical perspective on the life and accomplishments of Dr. Freer and the ubiquitous surgical instrument that he invented and popularized.

  20. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 3: Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, D.; Lindegren, L.; Bastian, U.; Klioner, S.; Hernandez, J.; Lammers, U.; Bombrun, A.; Mignard, F.; Altmann, M.; Andrei, A.; Davidson, M.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.

    2017-12-01

    This chapter presents the models and processing steps used for Gaia's core solution, namely, the Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS). The inputs to this solution rely heavily on the basic observables (or astrometric elementaries) which have been pre-processed and discussed in Chapter 2, the results of which have been published in Fabricius et al. (2016). The models consist of reference systems and time scales; assumed linear stellar motion and relativistic light deflection; in addition to fundamental constants and the transformation of coordinate systems. Higher level inputs such as: planetary and solar system ephemeris; Gaia tracking and orbit information; initial quasar catalogues and BAM data are all needed for the processing described here. The astrometric calibration models are outlined followed by the details processing steps which give AGIS its name. The final Section 3.5 represents a basic quality assessment and validation of the scientific results which has also been published in detail in Lindegren et al. (2016). However, the validation of the science products was not restricted to just this, a more independent catalogue consolidation and validation of the science results for Gaia DR1 was also performed and are documented in Chapter 7 and have been published in Arenou et al. (2017).

  1. A Tribute to Prof Dr Da Ruan

    CERN Document Server

    Kerre, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    This volume is a tribute to Professor Dr Da Ruan, who passed away suddenly on July 31, 2011, aged 50. The flood of emails that spread throughout the fuzzy logic research community with the tragic news was testimony to the respect and liking felt for this remarkable man. Da was a hardworking , highly productive scientist who, during his short life, published 35 books and more than 250 research papers in highly ranked journals and conference proceedings. He established two successful conferences, FLINS and ISKE, as well as the international journal, JCIS. This book is a collection of contributions from 88 of Da's academic friends from 47 institutes, presented in 60 chapters and over 70 pictures. A Foreword by Lotfi Zadeh begins Da's story. Section 1 provides an overview of Da's funeral on August 6, 2011. Part II outlines Da’s scientific life, his education, scientific career, publications and keynote talks. Part III presents testimonials by Da's colleagues of academic activities, including guest professorship...

  2. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as Spiritual Leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pierce

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s spiritual leadership through his “I Have a Dream” speech. The paper explores the three characteristics of spiritual leadership as posed by Fry’s (2003 spiritual leadership theory: vision, hope/faith and altruistic love. The research draws upon these characteristics through qualitative content analysis of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech to illustrate Dr. King’s leadership as that of a spiritual leader. The research advances the spiritual leadership theory by establishing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as a spiritual leader. Through the illustration of Dr. King’s spiritual leadership, the characteristics of a spiritual leader are given tangible understanding.

  3. A multiple CCD X-ray detector and its first operation with synchrotron radiation X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, M; Kumasaka, T; Sato, K; Toyokawa, H; Aries, I F; Jerram, P A; Ueki, T

    1999-01-01

    A 4x4 array structure of 16 identical CCD X-ray detector modules, called the multiple CCD X-ray detector system (MCCDX), was submitted to its first synchrotron radiation experiment at the protein crystallography station of the RIKEN beamline (BL45XU) at the SPring-8 facility. An X-ray diffraction pattern of cholesterol powder was specifically taken in order to investigate the overall system performance.

  4. 78 FR 29781 - Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J. Charbeneau; In the Matter of Detroit Edison Company (Fermi Nuclear...

  5. High time resolution CCD camera with X-ray image intensifier for SPring-8 BL40XU

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, T; Yagi, N

    2003-01-01

    SPring-8 BL40XU is designed to use high flux X-ray for small angle X-ray scattering and multi purpose. The flux at the experimental hutch is about 1 x 10 sup 1 sup 5 photons/sec at 12.4 KeV, which is larger 2 approx 3 figures than other beamlines at SPring-8. To utilize the high flux X-ray efficiently, new high-speed detector is needed. Therefore, a high frame rate CCD camera C7770 (Hamamatsu) and a new 6-inch X-ray image intensifier V5445P (Hamamatsu) were developed for BL40XU. The CCD camera has three CCD chips to increase the readout speed. Three identical images are created by a prism system in the CCD camera and projected onto the three chips. The pixel number of the CCD is 640 x 480 and the frame rate is 291 frames/sec. Reduction of the number of horizontal lines leads to a faster frame rate up to a few thousands. The combination of the CCD and with an X-ray shutter also leads to faster discrete data acquisition. (author)

  6. A comparison of film and 3 digital imaging systems for natural dental caries detection: CCD, CMOS, PSP and film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Won Jeong [Dankook University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of occlusal and proximal caries detection using CCD, CMOS, PSP and film system. 32 occlusal and 30 proximal tooth surfaces were radiographed under standardized conditions using 3 digital systems; CCD (CDX-2000HQ, Biomedysis Co., Seoul, Korea), CMOS (Schick, Schick Inc., Long Island, USA), PSP (Digora FMX, Orion Co./Soredex, Helsinki, Finland) and 1 film system (Kodak Insight, Eastman Kodak, Rochester, USA). 5 observers examined the radiographs for occlusal and proximal caries using a 5-point confidence scale. The presence of caries was validated histologically and radiographically. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated using ROC curve areas (AZ). Analysis using ROC curves revealed the area under each curve which indicated a diagnostic accuracy. For occlusal caries, Kodak Insight film had an Az of 0.765, CCD one of 0.730, CMOS one of 0.742 and PSP one of 0.735. For proximal caries, Kodak Insight film had an Az of 0.833, CCD one of 0.832, CMOS one of 0.828 and PSP one of 0.868. No statistically significant difference was noted between any of the imaging modalities. CCD, CMOS, PSP and film performed equally well in the detection of occlusal and proximal dental caries. CCD, CMOS and PSP-based digital images provided a level of diagnostic performance comparable to Kodak Insight film.

  7. Ob osemdesetletnici zaslužnega rednega prof. dr., dr. h. c. Mirka Paka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Rebernik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Slavljenca dr. Mirka Paka, ki je 12. novembra 2016 dopolnil osemdeset let, širši geografski javnosti verjetno ni potrebno podrobno predstavljati. S svojim pedagoškim, znanstveno-raziskovalnim, strokovnim in društvenim delovanjem se je uveljavil kot eden vodilnih slovenskih urbanih, socialnih in regionalnih geografov. Odlikuje se z izjemno bogato bibliografijo in mednarodno znanstveno-raziskovalno dejavnostjo. Njegov znanstveni opus obsega več kot 150 znanstvenih razprav, predvsem s področja urbane, socialne in regionalne geografije.

  8. [Dr. Halfdan Mahler's speech in Guatemala].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, H

    1989-12-01

    A major focus of Dr. Mahler throughout his life has been the war against female discrimination and to reduce the extreme inequalities between men and women. The Latin American Region of IPPF selected the participation of women as its goal for the decade of the 90's. It is known that fertility is inversely related to female education and occupation, and that the poorest homes worldwide are those headed by poor and illiterate women. The number of female-headed households is increasing and in Barbados, Dominica, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama and Uruguay these have increased by 31% Married women often find that their husbands are the main obstacles to family planning services. Violence against women takes many forms including physical abuse, adolescent pregnancy, psychological and economic stress, the "machismo" syndrome, and having unwanted pregnancies. Latin America and the Caribbean pregnancy and illegal abortion account for the high mortality rates among those 15-19. Men must face the consequences of the socioeconomic conditions that they have created for women. For example if FPP were designed to really reflect a women's perspective such programs would have reached the goals of success. He recommends that IPPF's goal for the Year 2000 will be to have 9 women to each man in Committees of 10. He suggests that changes towards women must begin with the men themselves so that policies and programs reflect these new attitudes. If society wants a less aggressive and materialistic world, then the role of women must be raised so that her contribution can be felt worldwide.

  9. Dr. Steve Thompson, Chief Executive, The Royal Society of New Zealand

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    L. to r.: Dr Austin Ball, Deputy Technical Coordinator, CMS experiment; Dr Roland Horisberger, Paul Scherrer Institute and CERN, CMS experiment; Dr Steve Thompson, Chief Executive, The Royal Society of New Zealand; Dr Michel Della Negra, Spokesman, CMS experiment and Dr Alick Macpherson, Paul Scherrer Institute and CERN, CMS experiment, in the CMS Silicon Tracker assembly hall.

  10. Interview with Dr Ghassan K Abou-Alfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Alfa, G K

    2016-11-01

    Ghassan K Abou-Alfa joined the Gastrointestinal Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College in New York back in 2001. Dr Abou-Alfa specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. Dr Abou-Alfa received his medical degree from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, and completed his post-doctoral training at Yale University School of Medicine. His research is dedicated to finding novel therapies and improving the effectiveness of the current therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, while continuing to understand the basic mechanisms of the diseases and its therapy. Dr Abou-Alfa has invested several years in helping develop multi-tyrosine kinases and more immune-modulator therapies. Dr Abou-Alfa has many publications in the field. He led on many occasions international teams of investigators. Dr Abou-Alfa serves as the chair of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Task Force for Hepatobiliary Cancers and the chair of the AIDS Malignancy Consortium (AMC) Non-AIDS Defining Malignancies (NADC) Liver/GI Task Force. Dr Abou-Alfa also co-chairs the hepatobiliary cancers subgroup of the Alliance cooperative group, and is a cadre member of both the gastrointestinal cancers and pharmacogenomics and population pharmacology committees. Dr Abou-Alfa who has lectured worldwide on the subject on gastrointestinal malignancies, is also a strong advocate for raising awareness and support for improving the outcome of patients with this disease, and enhancing oncologic education worldwide.

  11. On-Line High Dose-Rate Gamma Ray Irradiation Test of the CCD/CMOS Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, test results of gamma ray irradiation to CCD/CMOS cameras are described. From the CAMS (containment atmospheric monitoring system) data of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant station, we found out that the gamma ray dose-rate when the hydrogen explosion occurred in nuclear reactors 1{approx}3 is about 160 Gy/h. If assumed that the emergency response robot for the management of severe accident of the nuclear power plant has been sent into the reactor area to grasp the inside situation of reactor building and to take precautionary measures against releasing radioactive materials, the CCD/CMOS cameras, which are loaded with the robot, serve as eye of the emergency response robot. In the case of the Japanese Quince robot system, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras are used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. In the preceding assumptions, a major problem which arises when dealing with CCD/CMOS cameras in the severe accident situations of the nuclear power plant is the presence of high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. In the case of the DBA (design basis accident) situations of the nuclear power plant, in order to use a CCD/CMOS camera as an ad-hoc monitoring unit in the vicinity of high radioactivity structures and components of the nuclear reactor area, a robust survivability of this camera in such intense gamma-radiation fields therefore should be verified. The CCD/CMOS cameras of various types were gamma irradiated at a

  12. INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve visiting Athena experiment.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 1: R. Landua showing ATHENA to INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve. Photo 2: Visiting ATHENA are Prof. H. Bokemeyer Head of Physics at INTAS, Rolf Landus Spokesman, INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve and D.O. Williams. Photo 3: Visiting ATHENA are Prof. H. Bokemeyer Head of Physics at INTAS, Rolf Landua Spokesman, INTAS Secretary General Dr. J. Sinnaeve and D.O. Williams. INTAS is an independent International Association formed by the European Community, European Union´s Member States and like minded countries acting to preserve and promote the valuable scientific potential of the NIS partner countries through East-West Scientific co-operation.

  13. Antibodies and Derivatives Targeting DR4 and DR5 for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Dubuisson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Developing therapeutics that induce apoptosis in cancer cells has become an increasingly attractive approach for the past 30 years. The discovery of tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily members and more specifically TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, the only cytokine of the family capable of eradicating selectively cancer cells, led to the development of numerous TRAIL derivatives targeting death receptor 4 (DR4 and death receptor 5 (DR5 for cancer therapy. With a few exceptions, preliminary attempts to use recombinant TRAIL, agonistic antibodies, or derivatives to target TRAIL agonist receptors in the clinic have been fairly disappointing. Nonetheless, a tremendous effort, worldwide, is being put into the development of novel strategic options to target TRAIL receptors. Antibodies and derivatives allow for the design of novel and efficient agonists. We summarize and discuss here the advantages and drawbacks of the soar of TRAIL therapeutics, from the first developments to the next generation of agonistic products, with a particular insight on new concepts.

  14. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2012-05-07

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  15. Comparing simulations and test data of a radiation damaged CCD for the Euclid mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottfelt, Jesper; Hall, David; Gow, Jason; Murray, Neil; Holland, Andrew; Prod'homme, Thibaut

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage effects from the harsh radiative environment outside the Earth's atmosphere can be a cause for concern for most space missions. With the science goals becoming ever more demanding, the requirements on the precision of the instruments on board these missions also increases, and it is therefore important to investigate how the radiation induced damage affects the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) that most of these instruments rely on. The primary goal of the Euclid mission is to study the nature of dark matter and dark energy using weak lensing and baryonic acoustic oscillation techniques. The weak lensing technique depends on very precise shape measurements of distant galaxies obtained by a large CCD array. It is anticipated that over the 6 year nominal lifetime of mission, the CCDs will be degraded to an extent that these measurements will not be possible unless the radiation damage effects are corrected. We have therefore created a Monte Carlo model that simulates the physical processes taking place when transferring signal through a radiation damaged CCD. The software is based on Shockley-Read-Hall theory, and is made to mimic the physical properties in the CCD as close as possible. The code runs on a single electrode level and takes charge cloud size and density, three dimensional trap position, and multi-level clocking into account. A key element of the model is that it takes device specific simulations of electron density as a direct input, thereby avoiding to make any analytical assumptions about the size and density of the charge cloud. This paper illustrates how test data and simulated data can be compared in order to further our understanding of the positions and properties of the individual radiation-induced traps.

  16. Development of large-area CCD-based x-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokric, M.; Allinson, Nigel M.; Jorden, Anthony R.; Cox, Matthew P.; Marshall, Andrew R.; Long, P. G.; Moon, Kevin; Jerram, Paul; Pool, Peter J.; Nave, Colin; Derbyshire, Gareth E.; Helliwell, John R.

    1999-10-01

    The design and development of an area CCD-based X-ray detector system, using the first CCD imagers specially designed for macromolecular crystallography, is presented. The system is intended to produce the highest quality data for physically small crystals at synchrotron sources through the use of large CCDs--that is approaching wafer scale. This work is part of a large research and development program for advanced X-ray sensor technology, funded by industry and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council in the UK. The detector has been optimized by increasing its efficiency at low X-ray energies for conventional laboratory sources, and offers fast readout and high dynamic range needed for efficient measurements at synchrotron sources. The detector consists of CCDs optically coupled to a X-ray sensitive phosphor via skewed fiber-optic studs. The individual three- sides buttable CCD consists of 2048 X 1536 27 micrometers square pixels (55.3 X 41.5 mm). The pixel size has been optimized to match diffraction spot profiling needs and the high dynamic range required for such applications. The multiple amplifier outputs possess switched responsivity to maximize the trade-off between signal handling capabilities and linearity. The readout noise is 5 electrons rms at a 1 MHz pixel rate at the high responsivity setting. A prototype detector system comprising two close-butted cooled CCDs is being developed. This system employs a high-efficiency scintillator with very low point spread function, skewed optical-fiber studs (instead of the more usual demagnifying tapers) to maximize the system's detective quantum efficiency and minimize optical distortions. Full system specifications and a novel crystallographic data processing are presented.

  17. CCD Photometry of Field RR Lyrae Stars. I. Period Changes of SV ERI and XX and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Myung Joo

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available CCD time series photometry was performed for two Oosterhoff type II± field RR Lyrae stars, SV Eri and XX And, to construct light curves in B and V bands. The maximum light times from our observations were combined with those in the literature to construct phase shift diagrams, from which we determined the period change rates β. We obtained large positive period change rates for these stars, which are expected from current evolutionary models if these stars are evolving rapidly from blue to red toward the end of core helium burning phase.

  18. The research of digital circuit system for high accuracy CCD of portable Raman spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yu; Cui, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiuda; Yan, Huimin

    2013-08-01

    The Raman spectrum technology is widely used for it can identify various types of molecular structure and material. The portable Raman spectrometer has become a hot direction of the spectrometer development nowadays for its convenience in handheld operation and real-time detection which is superior to traditional Raman spectrometer with heavy weight and bulky size. But there is still a gap for its measurement sensitivity between portable and traditional devices. However, portable Raman Spectrometer with Shell-Isolated Nanoparticle-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SHINERS) technology can enhance the Raman signal significantly by several orders of magnitude, giving consideration in both measurement sensitivity and mobility. This paper proposed a design and implementation of driver and digital circuit for high accuracy CCD sensor, which is core part of portable spectrometer. The main target of the whole design is to reduce the dark current generation rate and increase signal sensitivity during the long integration time, and in the weak signal environment. In this case, we use back-thinned CCD image sensor from Hamamatsu Corporation with high sensitivity, low noise and large dynamic range. In order to maximize this CCD sensor's performance and minimize the whole size of the device simultaneously to achieve the project indicators, we delicately designed a peripheral circuit for the CCD sensor. The design is mainly composed with multi-voltage circuit, sequential generation circuit, driving circuit and A/D transition parts. As the most important power supply circuit, the multi-voltage circuits with 12 independent voltages are designed with reference power supply IC and set to specified voltage value by the amplifier making up the low-pass filter, which allows the user to obtain a highly stable and accurate voltage with low noise. What's more, to make our design easy to debug, CPLD is selected to generate sequential signal. The A/D converter chip consists of a correlated

  19. Determining the Spectral Resolution of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Raman Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.

    2012-01-01

    A new method based on dispersion equations is described to express the spectral resolution of an applied charge-coupled device (CCD) Czerny-Turner Raman instrument entirely by means of one equation and principal factors determined by the actual setup. The factors involved are usual quantities...... widths is also provided. A final finding was that the known significant changes in spectral resolution along the Raman shift axis make static recording and synchronous (extended) scanning modes differ significantly with respect to their resolution properties; this feature has been often overlooked...

  20. CCD measurements of double and multiple stars at NAO Rozhen: II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the 2-m telescope of the Bulgarian National Astronomical Observatory at Rozhen observations of twenty multiple stars were carried out during one whole night - October 30/31, and, also, during the first half of the next one - October 31. 2005. This is the second series of CCD measurements of double and multiple stars done at Rozhen. In the paper we present the results for the position angle and separation for eleven multiple stars (35 pairs which could have been measured.

  1. A CCD Photometric Study and Search for Pulsations in RZ Dra and EG Cep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazhouhesh, R.; Liakos, A.; Niarchos, P.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents CCD observations of the Algol-type eclipsing binaries RZ Dra and EG Cep. The light curves have been analyzed with the PHOEBE software and Wilson-Devinney code (2003 version). A detailed photometric analysis, based on these observations, is presented for both binarity and pulsation. The results indicate semidetached systems where the secondary component fills its Roche lobe. After the subtraction of the theoretical light curve, a frequency analysis was performed in order to check for pulsations of the primary component of each system. Moreover, a period analysis was performed for each case in order to search for additional components around the eclipsing pairs.

  2. The overlapping plates method applied to CCD observations of 243 Ida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, W. M., Jr.; Yeomans, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The overlapping plates method has been applied to crossing-point Charge Coupled Device (CCD) observations of minor planet 243 Ida to produce absolute position measurements precise to better than 0.1 sec and differential position measurements precise to better than 0.06 sec. Although these observations numbered only 17 out of the 520 that produced the final ground-based Ida ephemeris for the Galileo spacecraft flyby, their inclusion decreased Ida's downtrack error from 78 to 60 km and its out-of-plane error from 58 to 44 km.

  3. CCD photometry in the Vilnius photometric systems. II. Analysis of a region in Lyra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smriglio, F.; Dasgupta, A.K. (Rome Univ. (IT). Ist. Astronomico); Nandy, K. (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK)); Boyle, R.P. (Vatican Observatory, Rome (IT)); Straizys, V.; Janulis, R. (AN Litovskoj SSR, Vilnius (SU). Inst. Fiziki)

    1991-04-01

    Two-dimensional classification of 216 stars down to 17 mag based on their seven color photoelectric and CCD photometry in the Vilnius system is presented. Except for normal stars, several subdwarfs, metal-deficient giants, and stars of other peculiarities are suspected. Interstellar extinction is determined for normal stars in two areas north and south of globular cluster M56, as well as for a 1 square degree area around M56. The mean value of A{sub v} outside the galactic dust layer is {similar to} 0.75 mag.

  4. Measurement of charge of heavy ions in emulsion using a CCD camera

    CERN Document Server

    Kudzia, D; Dabrowska, A; Deines-Jones, P; Holynski, R; Olszewski, A; Nilsen, B S; Sen-Gupta, K; Szarska, M; Trzupek, A; Waddington, C J; Wefel, J P; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H; Wolter, W; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K

    1999-01-01

    A system has been developed for semi-automated determination of the charges of heavy ions recorded in nuclear emulsions. The profiles of various heavy ion tracks in emulsion, both accelerator beam ions and fragments of heavy projectiles, were obtained with a CCD camera mounted on a microscope. The dependence of track profiles on illumination, emulsion grain size and density, background in emulsion, and track geometry was analyzed. Charges of the fragments of heavy projectiles were estimated independently by the delta ray counting method. A calibration of both width and height of track profiles against ion charges was made with ions of known charges ranging from helium to gold nuclei. (author)

  5. Measurement of charge of heavy ions in emulsion using a CCD camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudzia, D.; Cherry, M.L.; Dabrowska, A.; Deines-Jones, P.; Holynski, R.; Olszewski, A.; Nilsen, B.S.; Sengupta, K.; Szarska, M.; Trzupek, A.; Waddington, C.J.; Wefel, J.P.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H. E-mail: henryk.wilczynski@ifj.edu.pl; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K

    1999-07-11

    A system has been developed for semi-automated determination of the charges of heavy ions recorded in nuclear emulsions. The profiles of various heavy ion tracks in emulsion, both accelerator beam ions and fragments of heavy projectiles, were obtained with a CCD camera mounted on a microscope. The dependence of track profiles on illumination, emulsion grain size and density, background in emulsion, and track geometry was analyzed. Charges of the fragments of heavy projectiles were estimated independently by the delta ray counting method. A calibration of both width and height of track profiles against ion charges was made with ions of known charges ranging from helium to gold nuclei. (author)

  6. Exploration of multidimensional interactive classroom teaching for CCD principle and application course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinghu; Tan, Ailing; Zhang, Baojun; Fu, Guangwei; Bi, Weihong

    2017-08-01

    The CCD principle and application course is professional and comprehensive. It involves many subject contents. The course content includes eight aspects. In order to complete the teaching tasks within a limited time, improve the classroom teaching quality and prompt students master the course content faster and better, so the multidimensional interactive classroom teaching is proposed. In the teaching practice, the interactive relationship between the frontier science, scientific research project, living example and classroom content is researched detailedly. Finally, it has been proved practically that the proposed multidimensional interactive classroom teaching can achieved good teaching effect.

  7. For Dr. Nancy Snyderman's Parents, Staying Close to Family Is Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Senior Living For Dr. Nancy Snyderman's Parents, Staying Close to Family Is ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Dr. Nancy Snyderman helped her parents, Joy and Dr. ...

  8. High Blood Cholesterol Q&A Dr. Michael Lauer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Cholesterol High Blood Cholesterol Q&A with Dr. Michael Lauer Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of ... Recently, he discussed progress on high cholesterol research. Dr. Michael Lauer and his wife, Dr. Robin Avery, ...

  9. D&R Siding Co., LLC Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    D&R Siding Co., LLC (the Company) is located in Shelbyville, Tennessee. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Fayetteville, Tennessee.

  10. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  11. Dr Abraham Pais, 82, physicist and science historian dies

    CERN Multimedia

    Glanz, J

    2000-01-01

    Obituary of Dr. Pais who died of heart failure in Copenhagen. He helped build the conceptual foundations of particle physics and then became a science historian, writing a critically acclaimed biography of Einstein (1 pg).

  12. Glaucoma: Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop Past ... nerves are pale and cupped—signs of advanced glaucoma. Yet the patient wasn't aware of any ...

  13. [Career and work of Dr. Jiro Tsuboi, a hygienist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, H

    1992-09-01

    The author recorded the career and work of Dr. Jiro Tsuboi, a hygienist and the first dean of the medical school, Kyoto Imperial University. He was born in 1862 as a son of Dr. Tameharu Tsuboi, a famous medical educator. After graduation from Tokyo University Medical School, he entered the Department of Hygienics of his mother school. In 1890, he went to Germany, and studied under Dr. Max von Pettenkofer at Ludwig Maximillians University in Munich. He also learned tuberculin therapy for tuberculosis from Dr. Robert Koch in Berlin. After he returned to Japan, he worked as a hygienist for various social needs, including serving as a committee member for mineral pollution at Ashio copper mine. In 1899, he was appointed Dean of the medical school, Kyoto Imperial University. Though he exerted himself for the school, he died at the age of 41 in 1903. His scientific contribution comprises both hygienics and bacteriology. Because of his early death, his attainment remained limited.

  14. Dr. Omalu Talks Childhood, Concussions, and CTE | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Bennet Omalu, the famed forensic pathologist who discovered Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), recently spoke at NCI at Frederick about his upbringing as well as the trials he faced while working to educate the NFL about CTE.

  15. Portrait of Dr. Von Braun with Walt Disney, 1954.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1954-01-01

    Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn project, also worked with Disney studios as a technical director in making three films about Space Exploration for television. Disney's tour of Marshall in 1965 was Von Braun's hope for a renewed public interest in the future of the Space Program at NASA.

  16. Rent ubehandlet grundvand - kan vi bevare drømmen?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Vi drømmer om at drikke rent ubehandlet grundvand, et sundt naturprodukt uden menneskelig indgriben. Men kan drømmen opretholdes i vores komplicerede samfund, hvor alt skal være effektivt, og hvor der ikke må være kalkpletter på glasset? Jeg har arbejdet for rent drikkevand i mere end 30 år. Det...

  17. Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Dr. David Syz, State Secretary for Economic Affairs, Switzerland is seen here (seventh from right) visiting the assembly hall for the ATLAS experiment during his recent visit to CERN. To his right is Dr. Peter Jenni (blue shirt), spokesperson for the ATLAS Collaboration. The horizontal metal cylinder behind the group is one of the eight vacuum vessels for the superconducting coils of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet system.

  18. The research contributions of Dr. Paul Van Deusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Lynch; Francis A. Roesch; John Paul McTague; Jeffrey H. Gove; Gregory A. Reams; Aaron R. Weiskittel

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Paul Van Deusen’s recent passing concluded a rich 30+-year research career dedicated to development and implementation of quantitative methods for forestry and natural resources. Since the early part of his career as a biometrician with the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station in the 1980s-1990s and continuing with his later employment at NCASI, Dr. Van...

  19. Dr-FtsA, an actin homologue in Deinococcus radiodurans differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ functions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S

    2014-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes homologues of divisome proteins including FtsZ and FtsA. FtsZ of this bacterium (Dr-FtsZ) has been recently characterized. In this paper, we study FtsA of D. radiodurans (Dr-FtsA) and its involvement in regulation of FtsZ function. Recombinant Dr-FtsA showed neither ATPase nor GTPase activity and its polymerization was ATP dependent. Interestingly, we observed that Dr-FtsA, when compared with E. coli FtsA (Ec-FtsA), has lower affinity for both Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. Also, Dr-FtsA showed differential effects on GTPase activity and sedimentation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. For instance, Dr-FtsA stimulated GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ while GTPase activity of Ec-FtsZ was reduced in the presence of Dr-FtsA. Stimulation of GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ by Dr-FtsA resulted in depolymerization of Dr-FtsZ. Dr-FtsA effects on GTPase activity and polymerization/depolymerisation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ did not change significantly in the presence of ATP. Recombinant E. coli expressing Dr-FtsA showed cell division inhibition in spite of in trans expression of Dr-FtsZ in these cells. These results suggested that Dr-FtsA, although it lacks ATPase activity, is still functional and differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ function in vitro.

  20. Dr-FtsA, an actin homologue in Deinococcus radiodurans differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ functions in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruti Modi

    Full Text Available The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes homologues of divisome proteins including FtsZ and FtsA. FtsZ of this bacterium (Dr-FtsZ has been recently characterized. In this paper, we study FtsA of D. radiodurans (Dr-FtsA and its involvement in regulation of FtsZ function. Recombinant Dr-FtsA showed neither ATPase nor GTPase activity and its polymerization was ATP dependent. Interestingly, we observed that Dr-FtsA, when compared with E. coli FtsA (Ec-FtsA, has lower affinity for both Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. Also, Dr-FtsA showed differential effects on GTPase activity and sedimentation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. For instance, Dr-FtsA stimulated GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ while GTPase activity of Ec-FtsZ was reduced in the presence of Dr-FtsA. Stimulation of GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ by Dr-FtsA resulted in depolymerization of Dr-FtsZ. Dr-FtsA effects on GTPase activity and polymerization/depolymerisation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ did not change significantly in the presence of ATP. Recombinant E. coli expressing Dr-FtsA showed cell division inhibition in spite of in trans expression of Dr-FtsZ in these cells. These results suggested that Dr-FtsA, although it lacks ATPase activity, is still functional and differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ function in vitro.

  1. The Missing Manuscript of Dr. Jose Delgado's Radio Controlled Bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzullo, Timothy C

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscience systems level courses teach: 1) the role of neuroanatomical structures of the brain for perception, movement, and cognition; 2) methods to manipulate and study the brain including lesions, electrophysiological recordings, microstimulation, optogenetics, and pharmacology; 3) proper interpretation of behavioral data to deduce brain circuit operation; and 4) the similarities, differences, and ethics of animal models and their relation to human physiology. These four topics come together quite dramatically in Dr. Jose Delgado's 1960s famous experiments on the neural correlates of aggression in which he stopped bulls in mid-charge by electrically stimulating basal ganglia and thalamic structures. Technical documentation on these experiments is famously difficult to find. Here I translate and discuss a Spanish language article written by Dr. Delgado in 1981 for an encyclopedia on bull fighting published in Madrid. Here Dr. Delgado appears to give the most complete explanation of his experiments on microstimulation of bovine brains. Dr. Delgado's motivations, methods, and his interpretation of the bull experiments are summarized, as well as some accompanying information from his 1970 English language book: "Physical Control of the Mind." This review of Dr. Delgado's written work on the bull experiments can provide a resource to educators and students who desire to learn more about and interpret the attention-calling experiments that Dr. Delgado did on a ranch in Andalucía over 50 years ago.

  2. Development of photoelectric balanced car based on the linear CCD sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The smart car is designed based on Freescale’s MC9S12XS128 and a linear CCD camera. The linear CCD collects the road information and sends it to MCU through the operational amplifier. The PID control algorithm, the proportional–integral–derivative control algorithm, is adopted synthetically to control the smart car. First, the smart car’s inclination and angular velocity are detect through the accelerometers and gyro sensors, then the PD control algorithm, the proportional–derivative control algorithm, is employed to make the smart car have the ability of two-wheeled self-balancing. Second, the speed of wheel obtained by the encoder is fed back to the MCU by way of pulse signal, then the PI control algorithm, the proportional–integral control algorithm, is employed to make the speed of smart car reach the set point in the shortest possible time and stabilize at the set point. Finally, the PD control algorithm is used to regulate the smart car’s turning angle to make the smart car respond quickly while the smart car is passing the curve path. The smart car can realize the self-balancing control of two wheels and track automatically the black and while lines to march.

  3. A comparison of EMCCD, CCD and emerging technologies optimized for low light spectroscopy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Antoinette

    2006-02-01

    Electron multiplying CCDs have revolutionized the world of low light imaging by bringing improved detection limits along with high readout rates; however, it remains to be seen whether they offer any benefits to the world of spectroscopy. Here we review the performance of current CCD and EMCCD detectors and compare their performance for low light level spectroscopy applications. In particular, we look at the detection limits of both technologies for real applications and examine all the parameters that affect these limits in a practical situation. We compare sensitivities, dark signal, noise factors and readout noise with the latter two as the ultimate limitations for detection. We also look at emerging new technology for low light spectroscopy applications which optimizes the parameters discussed without the disadvantages of the current technologies. Theoretical signal to noise data comparing conventional CCD and EMCCD technologies is presented and discussed. Experimental signal to noise comparisons are made for Raman spectra obtained using both conventional and electron multiplying CCDs in conjunction with a confocal Raman microscope. It is concluded that traditional CCDs have a superior detection limit and equal sensitivity to that of EMCCDs and are far superior for high quality quantitative data measurements.

  4. Improving quantum efficiency and spectral resolution of a CCD through direct manipulation of the depletion region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig; Ambrosi, Richard M.; Abbey, Tony; Godet, Olivier; O'Brien, R.; Turner, M. J. L.; Holland, Andrew; Pool, Peter J.; Burt, David; Vernon, David

    2008-07-01

    Future generations of X-ray astronomy instruments will require position sensitive detectors in the form of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) for X-ray spectroscopy and imaging with the ability to probe the X-ray universe with greater efficiency. This will require the development of CCDs with structures that will improve their quantum efficiency over the current state of the art. The quantum efficiency improvements would have to span a broad energy range (0.2 keV to >15 keV). These devices will also have to be designed to withstand the harsh radiation environments associated with orbits that extend beyond the Earth's magnetosphere. This study outlines the most recent work carried out at the University of Leicester focused on improving the quantum efficiency of an X-ray sensitive CCD through direct manipulation of the device depletion region. It is also shown that increased spectral resolution is achieved using this method due to a decrease in the number of multi-pixel events. A Monte Carlo and analytical models of the CCD have been developed and used to determine the depletion depths achieved through variation of the device substrate voltage, Vss. The models are also used to investigate multi-pixel event distributions and quantum efficiency as a function of depletion depth.

  5. First observations from a CCD all-sky spectrograph at Barentsburg (Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Chernouss

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A digital CCD all-sky spectrograph was made by the Polar Geophysical Institute (PGI to support IPY activity in auroral research. The device was tested at the Barentsburg observatory of PGI during the winter season of 2005–2006. The spectrograph is based on a cooled CCD and a transmission grating. The main features of this spectrograph are: a wide field of view (~180°, a wide spectral range (380–740 nm, a spectral resolution of 0.6 nm, a background level of about 100 R at 1-min exposure time. Several thousand spectra of nightglow and aurora were recorded during the observation season. It was possible to register both the strong auroral emissions, as well as weak ones. Spectra of aurora, including nitrogen and oxygen molecular and atomic emissions, as well as OH emissions of the nightglow are shown. A comparison has been conducted of auroral spectra obtained by the film all-sky spectral camera C-180-S at Spitsbergen during IGY, with spectra obtained at Barentsburg during the last winter season. The relationship between the red (630.0 nm and green (557.7 nm auroral emissions shows that the green emission is dominant near the minimum of the solar cycle activity (2005–2006. The opposite situation is observed during 1958–1959, with a maximum solar cycle activity.

  6. The X-ray mirror telescope and the pn-CCD detector of CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Kuster, M; Englhauser, J; Franz, J; Friedrich, P; Hartmann, R; Kang, D; Kotthaus, R; Lutz, Gerhard; Moralez, J; Serber, W; Strüder, L

    2004-01-01

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope - CAST - uses a prototype 9 Tesla LHC superconducting dipole magnet to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar particle, the axion, which was proposed by theory in the 1980s to solve the strong CP problem and which could be a dark matter candidate. In CAST a strong magnetic field is used to convert the solar axions to detectable photons via inverse Primakoff effect. The resulting X-rays are thermally distributed in the energy range of 1-7 keV and can be observed with conventional X-ray detectors. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector originally developed for XMM-Newton combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. The combination of a focusing X-ray optics and a state of the art pn-CCD detector which combines high quantum efficiency, good spacial and energy resolution, and low background improves the sensitivity of the CAST experiment such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constrai...

  7. Proton radiation damage assessment of a CCD for use in a Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J. P. D.; Mason, J.; Leese, M.; Hathi, B.; Patel, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the radiation environment and radiation damage analysis performed for the Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery (NOMAD) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVIS) channel launched onboard the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) in 2016. The aim of the instrument is to map the temporal and spatial variation of trace gases such as ozone and dust/cloud aerosols in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument consists of a set of two miniature telescope viewing optics which allow for selective input onto the optical bench, where an e2v technologies CCD30-11 will be used as the detector. A Geometry Description Markup Language model of the spacecraft and instrument box was created and through the use of ESA's SPace ENVironment Information System (SPENVIS) an estimate of the 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence was made at a number of radiation sensitive regions within NOMAD, including that of the CCD30-11 which is the focus of this paper. The end of life 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence at the charge coupled device was estimated to be 4.7 × 109 protons.cm-2 three devices were irradiated at different levels up a 10 MeV equivalent fluence of 9.4 × 109 protons.cm-2. The dark current, charge transfer inefficiency, charge storage, and cosmetic quality of the devices was investigated pre- and post-irradiation, determining that the devices will continue to provide excellent science throughout the mission.

  8. Multi-spectral CCD camera system for ocean water color and seacoast observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Chen, Shiping; Wu, Yanlin; Huang, Qiaolin; Jin, Weiqi

    2001-10-01

    One of the earth observing instruments on HY-1 Satellite which will be launched in 2001, the multi-spectral CCD camera system, is developed by Beijing Institute of Space Mechanics & Electricity (BISME), Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST). In 798 km orbit, the system can provide images with 250 m ground resolution and a swath of 500 km. It is mainly used for coast zone dynamic mapping and oceanic watercolor monitoring, which include the pollution of offshore and coast zone, plant cover, watercolor, ice, terrain underwater, suspended sediment, mudflat, soil and vapor gross. The multi- spectral camera system is composed of four monocolor CCD cameras, which are line array-based, 'push-broom' scanning cameras, and responding for four spectral bands. The camera system adapts view field registration; that is, each camera scans the same region at the same moment. Each of them contains optics, focal plane assembly, electrical circuit, installation structure, calibration system, thermal control and so on. The primary features on the camera system are: (1) Offset of the central wavelength is better than 5 nm; (2) Degree of polarization is less than 0.5%; (3) Signal-to-noise ratio is about 1000; (4) Dynamic range is better than 2000:1; (5) Registration precision is better than 0.3 pixel; (6) Quantization value is 12 bit.

  9. EVALUATION OF RATIONAL FUNCTION MODEL FOR GEOMETRIC MODELING OF CHANG'E-1 CCD IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rational Function Model (RFM is a generic geometric model that has been widely used in geometric processing of high-resolution earth-observation satellite images, due to its generality and excellent capability of fitting complex rigorous sensor models. In this paper, the feasibility and precision of RFM for geometric modeling of China's Chang'E-1 (CE-1 lunar orbiter images is presented. The RFM parameters of forward-, nadir- and backward-looking CE-1 images are generated though least squares solution using virtual control points derived from the rigorous sensor model. The precision of the RFM is evaluated by comparing with the rigorous sensor model in both image space and object space. Experimental results using nine images from three orbits show that RFM can precisely fit the rigorous sensor model of CE-1 CCD images with a RMS residual error of 1/100 pixel level in image space and less than 5 meters in object space. This indicates that it is feasible to use RFM to describe the imaging geometry of CE-1 CCD images and spacecraft position and orientation. RFM will enable planetary data centers to have an option to supply RFM parameters of orbital images while keeping the original orbit trajectory data confidential.

  10. [Atmospheric correction of HJ-1 CCD data for water imagery based on dark object model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Guo; Ma, Wei-Chun; Gu, Wan-Hua; Huai, Hong-Yan

    2011-08-01

    The CCD multi-band data of HJ-1A has great potential in inland water quality monitoring, but the precision of atmospheric correction is a premise and necessary procedure for its application. In this paper, a method based on dark pixel for water-leaving radiance retrieving is proposed. Beside the Rayleigh scattering, the aerosol scattering is important to atmospheric correction, the water quality of inland lakes always are case II water and the value of water leaving radiance is not zero. So the synchronous MODIS shortwave infrared data was used to obtain the aerosol parameters, and in virtue of the characteristic that aerosol scattering is relative stabilized in 560 nm, the water-leaving radiance for each visible and near infrared band were retrieved and normalized, accordingly the remotely sensed reflectance of water was computed. The results show that the atmospheric correction method based on the imagery itself is more effective for the retrieval of water parameters for HJ-1A CCD data.

  11. [Retrieval and validation of the surface reflectance using HJ-1-CCD data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shen-Shen; Chen, Liang-Fu; Tao, Jin-Hua; Han, Dong; Wang, Zhong-Ting; He, Bao-Hua

    2011-02-01

    The potentiality of the retrieval of surface reflectance using CCD camera aboard HJ-1A/B satellite was studied. It is very difficult to use dark targets in atmospheric correction due to the lack of near infrared band. The alternative normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the red/blue reflectance ratio are detected from the spectral experiment in Beijing and the Pearl River Delta. Ground-based spectral data including grass, dense vegetation, water body, soil, residential roof and bright building etc. were used to validate the surface reflectance in Beijing, and the relative error in red, blue band is under 38.7% and 37.2% respectively. Uncertainties of the surface reflectance retrievals were analyzed. The comparison of MODIS surface reflectance product showed that there is a good agreement in the dense targets, and the correlation coefficient (R2) in red, blue band is as high as 0.809 4 and 0.723 9 respectively. HJ-1-CCD data can effectively reduce pixel-mixed impact on the cement roof and bright buildings, and the inversion accuracy is higher than MODIS products.

  12. Design of Frame-transferred Surface Array CCD Imaging System for Dark Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-heng; Yan, Yi-hua

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize the requirement of low-noise observations of dark objects in deep-space explorations, the design method for a simple and stable space camera imaging system is proposed in this paper. Based on the back-illuminated frame-transferred surface array CCD (CCD47-20AIMO) produced by the British E2V company, the circuitry design is given for the every part of the system. In which the applications of the correlated double-sampling analog-digital converter (AD) and the synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM) can effectively suppress the correlated noise in the image signal. In addition, a drive control method favorable to the adjustment of exposure time is proposed, in the light-sensing stage it provides the exposure time with an independent and adjustable time delay to make the imaging system satisfy the requirement of long exposure time setting. The imaging system adopts the Cyclone III-series EP3C25Q240C8 field programable gate array produced by the Altera company as the kernel control device, and the drives are programmed in modules according to the function of the every device, in favor of transplantation. The simulative and experimental results indicate that the drive circuitry works normally, and that the system design can satisfy the preset requirement.

  13. Applications in radiation therapy of a scintillating screen viewed by a CCD camera

    CERN Document Server

    Schippers, J M; Luijk, P V

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dosimetry system has been designed for position-sensitive dose-measurement applications in modern radiation therapy. The system consists of a scintillating screen (Gd sub 2 O sub 2 S : Tb), observed by a low-noise CCD camera with a long integration time. The system allows reliable and accurate simultaneous 2D imaging of therapeutic dose distributions in the scintillator with sub millimeter spatial resolution. This system has been applied successfully at different applications in radiation therapy. Results of dose measurements in a treatment modality using a scanning proton beam are reported. It is shown that a quick and reliable measurement can be done. The screen+CCD system has proven to perform accurate dosimetry in applications where beams with a small (1-5 mm) diameter are used and where absolute dosimetry by means of standard ionization chambers is not possible due to their relatively large size. For the routine measurements of the alignment of therapeutic beams with respect to the...

  14. Contrast reduction in digital images due to x-ray induced damage to a TV camera's CCD image receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkalides, D

    1999-04-01

    The CCD image receptor in a monochrome TV camera was irradiated in the dark with a single-phase 80 kVp narrow beam carrying an additional 0.5 mm Al filter. It was found that the CCD responded to the x-rays with a transient signal which would reach a maximum value at about 70 mR per image frame. The signal's contrast would reach a maximum of about 7%, but was detectable at much lower exposure rates. Continuous irradiation of the CCD image receptor created a 'lesion' at the point of incidence that remained after the x-ray beam was switched off. This signal seemed to be due to permanent damage to the CCD and could be detected after a cumulative exposure of less than 20 R. It was shown that such damage could be created much more effectively if the TV camera was switched off rather than on and the maximum contrast was achieved with about 75 R and 220 R respectively. The maximum contrast achieved was about 8%. Further increase in the cumulative exposure of a particular location on the CCD image receptor was not investigated but it seemed reasonable that much higher contrast values could be reached if irradiation was continued. The latter damage described here was found to persist for at least several weeks and hence it will probably prevent any normal use of the TV camera in the future.

  15. cGMP-activating peptides do not regulate electrogenic electrolyte transport in principal cells of rat CCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlatter, E; Cermak, R; Forssmann, W G; Hirsch, J R; Kleta, R; Kuhn, M; Sun, D; Schafer, J A

    1996-12-01

    K+ channels in the basolateral membrane of rat cortical collecting duct (CCD) are regulated by a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (J. Hirsch and E. Schlatter. Pfluegers Arch. 429: 338-344, 1995). Conflicting data exist on the effects of cGMP-activating agonists on Na+ transport in these cells. Thus we tested members of the family of peptides that increase intracellular cGMP [cardiodilatin/atrial natriuretic peptide (CDD/ANP), brain natriuretic peptide, C-type natriuretic peptide, urodilatin, guanylin, and uroguanylin], as well as bradykinin +/- CDD/ANP on membrane voltages (Vm) of principal cells of isolated rat CCD using the slow whole cell patch-clamp technique (E. Schlatter, U. Fröbe, and R. Greger. Pfluegers Arch. 421: 381-387, 1992). None of the agonists tested changed Vm significantly. There was also no effect of dibutyryl guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (DBcGMP) on AVP-dependent lumen-to-bath Na+ flux, transepithelial voltage, or osmotic water permeability in isolated perfused rat CCD. Finally, CDD/ANP increased intracellular cGMP only in glomeruli but not in CCD. Thus the findings provide no evidence for control of electrogenic electrolyte transport by these natriuretic peptides in principal cells of rat CCD, and the agonist that physiologically regulates the cGMP-dependent K+ channels remains to be identified.

  16. [Sexuality education on the Internet : From Dr. Sommer to Dr. Google].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Nicola

    2017-07-24

    Female and male adolescents in Germany are increasingly using the Internet to find information about sexuality and sexual health. This review paper summarizes what we know about the status quo of online sexuality education in Germany.Based on a systematic literature review including 40 papers from international, peer-reviewed journals spanning 2010-2017, this paper first describes different aspects of the sexuality-related online search behavior of adolescents: its prevalence, predictors, topics and contexts. One main finding is the fact that adolescents use a computer or smartphone to type their sexuality-related questions into the search engine Google or the search engine of the video platform YouTube.Based on 54 online searches, this paper subsequently presents the kind of sexuality-related online content adolescents find if they ask "Dr. Google" for sexual advice; a collection of 1236 authentic sexuality-related questions of adolescents was used for this analysis. It turned out that online sexuality education offered by leading professional organizations like the BZgA ("Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung") or pro familia was nearly invisible, while numerous other providers of online sex education consistently appeared in the top Google search results. Among them were the "Dr. Sommer" team of the youth magazine Bravo; online healthcare and advice portals; online forums; the online encyclopedia Wikipedia and, above all, sex education channels on YouTube. In this paper, the latter are presented in more detail for the first time.The third part of the paper addresses the quality of online sexual education over four main areas of quality evaluation. The presentation of the status quo ends with some recommendations both for future research and for sexuality education in practice.

  17. Volume celebrating the 60th birthday of Professor Dr. Franz Fie; Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler zum 60. Geburtstag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beheng, K.D. [ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report was compiled in honor of Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler on the occasion of his 60th birthday on 7 January 1998. Its contributions deal with mesoscale modelling, the propagation of air pollutants, measurements of precipitation using radar, and prediction models. (orig./KW) [Deutsch] Dieser Bericht wurde aus Anlass des 60. Geburtstags von Herrn Prof. Dr. Franz Fiedler am 7. Januar 1998 zusammengestellt. Die Beitraege behandeln mesoskalige Modellierung, Ausbreitung von Luftschadstoffen, Niederschlagsmessung mit Radar und Vorhersagemodelle. (orig.)

  18. Improvement in the light sensitivity of the ultrahigh-speed high-sensitivity CCD with a microlens array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, T.,; Yonai, J.; Kitamura, K.; Arai, T.; Kurita, T.; Tanioka, K.; Maruyama, H.; Etoh, T. Goji; Kitagawa, S.; Hatade, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takeuchi, H.; Iida, K.

    2008-02-01

    We are advancing the development of ultrahigh-speed, high-sensitivity CCDs for broadcast use that are capable of capturing smooth slow-motion videos in vivid colors even where lighting is limited, such as at professional baseball games played at night. We have already developed a 300,000 pixel, ultrahigh-speed CCD, and a single CCD color camera that has been used for sports broadcasts and science programs using this CCD. However, there are cases where even higher sensitivity is required, such as when using a telephoto lens during a baseball broadcast or a high-magnification microscope during science programs. This paper provides a summary of our experimental development aimed at further increasing the sensitivity of CCDs using the light-collecting effects of a microlens array.

  19. Realization of the Vilnius photometric system for CCD-observations of selected sky areas at the Andrushivka Astronomical Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruk, V.; Butenko, G.; Gerashchenko, O.; Ivashchenko, Yu.; Kovalchuk, G.; Lokot', V.; Samoylov, V.

    2005-06-01

    We describe a set of glass UPXYZVS filters of the Vilnius photometric system of the Andrushivka Astronomical Observatory in Zhytomyr Region (Ukraine) [7]. They are installed at the Zeiss-600 Cassegrain reflector together with the 15-bit 1024×1024 CCD-camera S1C-017. The response curves of instrumental photometric systems are presented and a comparison of them with a standard system are analysed. Test observations in the Vilnius system of the star cluster IC 4665 with the Andrushivka filters were carried out in May--June 2003. The MIDAS/ROMAFOT and ASTROIMAGE software is adapted for digital processing of CCD-images of stellar fields. Comprehensive ground-based observations are being planned to design a catalogue of primary UPXYZVS CCD-standards in selected areas of the sky where are with radio sources, globular and open clusters, etc.

  20. Realization of Vilnius UPXYZVS photometric system for AltaU42 CCD camera at the MAO NAS of Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vid'Machenko, A. P.; Andruk, V. M.; Samoylov, V. S.; Delets, O. S.; Nevodovsky, P. V.; Ivashchenko, Yu. M.; Kovalchuk, G. U.

    2005-06-01

    The description of two-inch glass filters of the Vilnius UPXYZVS photometric system, which are made at the Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine for AltaU42 CCD camera with format of 2048×2048 pixels, is presented in the paper. Reaction curves of instrumental system are shown. Estimations of minimal star's magnitudes for each filter's band in comparison with the visual V one are obtained. New software for automation of CCD frames processing is developed in program shell of LINUX/MIDAS/ROMAFOT. It is planned to carry out observations with the purpose to create the catalogue of primary UPXYZVS CCD standards in selected field of the sky for some radio-sources, globular and open clusters, etc. Numerical estimations of astrometric and photometric accuracy are obtained.

  1. A method of immediate detection of objects with a near-zero apparent motion in series of CCD-frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanevych, V. E.; Khlamov, S. V.; Vavilova, I. B.; Briukhovetskyi, A. B.; Pohorelov, A. V.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Kudak, V. I.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Dikov, E. N.; Melnik, R. G.; Vlasenko, V. P.; Reichart, D. E.

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with a computational method for detection of the solar system minor bodies (SSOs), whose inter-frame shifts in series of CCD-frames during the observation are commensurate with the errors in measuring their positions. These objects have velocities of apparent motion between CCD-frames not exceeding three rms errors (3σ) of measurements of their positions. About 15% of objects have a near-zero apparent motion in CCD-frames, including the objects beyond the Jupiter's orbit as well as the asteroids heading straight to the Earth. The proposed method for detection of the object's near-zero apparent motion in series of CCD-frames is based on the Fisher f-criterion instead of using the traditional decision rules that are based on the maximum likelihood criterion. We analyzed the quality indicators of detection of the object's near-zero apparent motion applying statistical and in situ modeling techniques in terms of the conditional probability of the true detection of objects with a near-zero apparent motion. The efficiency of method being implemented as a plugin for the Collection Light Technology (CoLiTec) software for automated asteroids and comets detection has been demonstrated. Among the objects discovered with this plugin, there was the sungrazing comet C/2012 S1 (ISON). Within 26 min of the observation, the comet's image has been moved by three pixels in a series of four CCD-frames (the velocity of its apparent motion at the moment of discovery was equal to 0.8 pixels per CCD-frame; the image size on the frame was about five pixels). Next verification in observations of asteroids with a near-zero apparent motion conducted with small telescopes has confirmed an efficiency of the method even in bad conditions (strong backlight from the full Moon). So, we recommend applying the proposed method for series of observations with four or more frames.

  2. Optical system design of multi-spectral and large format color CCD aerial photogrammetric camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yixian; Sun, Tianxiang; Gao, Xiaodong; Liang, Wei

    2007-12-01

    Multi-spectrum and high spatial resolution is the vital problem for optical design of aerial photogrammetric camera all the time. It is difficult to obtain an outstanding optical system with high modulation transfer function (MTF) as a result of wide band. At the same time, for acquiring high qualified image, chromatic distortion in optical system must be expected to be controlled below 0.5 pixels; it is a trouble thing because of wide field and multi-spectrum. In this paper, MTF and band of the system are analyzed. A Russar type photogrammetric objective is chosen as the basic optical structure. A novel optical system is presented to solve the problem. The new optical photogrammetric system, which consists of panchromatic optical system and chromatic optical system, is designed. The panchromatic optical system, which can obtain panchromatic image, makes up of a 9k×9k large format CCD and high-accuracy photographic objective len, its focal length is 69.83mm, field angle is 60°×60°, the size of CCD pixels is 8.75um×8.75um, spectral scope is from 0.43um to 0.74um, modulation transfer function is all above 0.4 in whole field when spatial frequency is at 60lp/mm, distortion is less than 0.007%. In a chromatic optical system, three 2k×2k array CCDs combine individually three same photographic objectives, the high resolution chromatic image is acquired by the synthesis of red, green, blue image data information delivered by three CCD sensors. For the chromatic system, their focal length is 24.83mm and they have the same spectral range of 0.39um to 0.74um. A difference is that they are coated in different film on their protect glass. The pixel number is 2048 × 2048; its MTF exceeds 0.4 in full field when spatial frequency is 30lp/mm. The advantages of digital aerial photogrammetric camera comparison with traditional film camera are described. It is considered that the two development trends on digital aerial photogrammetric camera are high-spectral resolution and

  3. Multiple-wavelength double random phase encoding with CCD-plane sparse-phase multiplexing for optical information verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen

    2015-12-20

    A novel method is proposed by using multiple-wavelength double random phase encoding (MW-DRPE) with CCD-plane sparse-phase multiplexing for optical information verification. Two different strategies are applied to conduct sparse-phase multiplexing in the CCD plane. The results demonstrate that large capacity can be achieved for optical multiple-image verification. The proposed optical verification strategy is implemented based on optical encoding, and the keys generated by optical encryption can further guarantee the safety of the designed optical multiple-image verification system. The proposed method provides a novel alternative for DRPE-based optical information verification.

  4. Optical manifestations of mass outflows from young stars - At atlas of CCD images of Herbig-Haro objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, K. M.; Strom, S. E.; Wenz, M.; Wolff, S. C.; Morgan, J.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide deep CCD images suitable for tracing the shock-excited and scattered-light components characterizing extended Herbig-Haro complexes. Tabular data include astrometric positions for all stars, shock-excited emission knots, prominent scattered-light patches, as well as an identification for all H-alpha emission objects within the CCD images. It is concluded that: (1) optical outflows are not always accompanied by molecular flows, (2) optical outflows show a higher degree of collimation than their molecular counterparts, and (3) the Herbig-Haro phenomenon is not restricted to low-mass young stellar objects.

  5. Type 1 Diabetes in the Spanish Population: additional factors to Class II HLA-DR3 and -DR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibarra José M

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Histocompatibility Complex is the main genetic contributor to susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D; genome-wide scans have consistently mapped increased predisposition to this region. The highest disease risk has been associated with HLA-DR3 and HLA-DR4. In particular, the DR3-positive ancestral haplotype 18.2 was reported as highly diabetogenic. We aimed to corroborate whether this haplotype increases the susceptibility conferred by the DQ2-DR3 alleles in a Mediterranean population. We also searched for additional susceptibility factors to the classic DQ2-DR3 and DQ8-DR4. Results Genetic MHC markers were analysed in a case-control study with 302 T1D patients and 529 ethnically matched controls. DR3-TNFa1b5 carrier rate was significantly higher in DR3-positive heterozygous T1D patients than in DR3-positive heterozygous controls (p = 0.0019; odds ratio OR [95% confidence interval CI] = 2.26 [1.3–3.93]. This data was confirmed analysing the allelic frequency, which includes the information corresponding to the DR3-homozygous individuals (p = 0.001; OR = 2.09 and by using the Arlequin software to check the DR3-positive haplotypes (p = 0.004;OR = 1.93. The present results provide strong evidence of a second susceptibility region in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 in the Spanish population. Moreover, we searched for T1D susceptibility factors in addition to the MHC classical ones, within the DR2-DQ6/DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 negative population. Several genetic markers in both MHC class II (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 [p = 0.007;OR = 2.81], DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202 [p = 0.03; OR = 2.35] and III (TNFa2b1 [p = 0.01 OR = 2.74], BAT-2*2 [p = 0.004; OR = 3.19] were found. These different alleles associated with T1D were not independent and we observed linkage disequilibrium among them leading us to describe two new risk haplotypes (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501-TNFa2b1 and DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202- BAT-2*2. Finally, we studied a T1D susceptibility

  6. Evaluasi Integritas Sistem Struktur Jembatan Dr. Ir. Soekarno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ady Wijayanto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge is the long span bridge which to be the Manado city landmark. To calculate the Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge’s feasibility, integrated evaluation need to know the bridge physical condition reliability. The purpose of this analysis is for reviewing and evaluating the entire Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge integrity. Every structure has natural frequency characteristic, which describes the structure strength, stiffness and integrity. The vibration record data sources are dynamic loading test and accelerometer sensor records. Perception and comfortable level the bridge users evaluated by the vibration record data. Perception and comfortable level the bridge users evaluated by the vibration record data. The accelerometer sensors records on X, Y, and Z directions. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT analysis carries out to exchange time domain to frequency domain. The frequency domain graphics filtered by ISO 2631-1 formula. Perception and comfortable level the Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge users are still in the comfort condition, so this bridge is proper to pass through the vehicles. Based on the Weibull Distribution, Dr. Ir. Soekarno Bridge has service life until 100 years as long as the plan service life.

  7. CCD Photometry of Six Asteroids from the Universidad de Monterry Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Pedro V.

    2008-09-01

    CCD photometry of six asteroids was obtained at the Universidad de Monterrey Observatory during January and February 2008. The resulting synodic rotation periods and amplitudes are as follows: 1292 Luce, 6.9541 ± 0.0002 h, 0.20 ± 0.01 mag; 1303 Luthera, 5.878 ± 0.003 h, 0.08 ± 0.01 mag; 1900 Katyusha, 9.4999 ± 0.0001 h, 0.72 ± 0.02 mag, 2807 Karl Marx, 8.842 ± 0.001 h, 0.40 ± 0.05 mag; 3409 Abramov, 7.791 ± 0.002 h, 0.55 ± 0.02 mag; and 9117 Aude, 2.8156 ± 0.0001 h, 0.20 ± 0.01 mag.

  8. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  9. CCD Astrometric Measurements of Double Stars BAL 746, BPM 342, KU 92, and STF 897

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Schuyler

    2017-07-01

    Double stars WDS 06589-0106 (BAL 746), WDS 06579+1430 (BPM 342), WDS 07006+0921 (KU 92), and WDS 06224+2640 (STF 897) were measured as part of a science fair project for the 2016 Greater San Diego Science and Engineering Fair. The goal was to measure the separation and position angles of stars by using a telescope with a charge-coupled device (CCD) on the iTelescope network. Five images were taken of each of the stars. These images were plate solved with Visual PinPoint and measured using Aladin Sky Atlas. Measurements for all five doubles compare well to the more recent values in the Washington Double Star Catalog.

  10. Advanced CCD imager technology for use from 1 to 10,000 A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twichell, J. C.; Burke, B. E.; Reich, R. K.; Mcgonagle, W. H.; Huang, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    A low-noise, high-sensitivity charge-coupled-device (CCD) technology for imaging applications extending from the soft X-ray (1 A) to the near-infrared (10,000 A) regimes was developed together with a fabrication technology for making back-illuminated versions of these devices with quantum efficiencies as high as 90 percent from 5000 to 7000 A. The efforts have focused on two devices, a 64 x 64 pixel back-illuminated imager with two output ports that operates at 2000 frames per second with 23 electrons read noise, and a larger device, with 420 x 420 pixel format, designed for lower frame rates with noise as low as 1.5 electrons and used at visible, UV, and X-ray wavelengths. Applications to plasma diagnostics include Thomson scattering and high-frame-rate imaging in the visible, as well as X-ray imaging and bolometry.

  11. Observaciones CCD de los cúmulos abiertos Melotte 105, Ruprecht~75 y Pismis 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, J.; Lapasset, E.

    Se presentan los resultados preliminares de observaciones CCD en cinco colores (UBVRI) de campos de ~2,5' de radio centrados en los cúmulos abiertos Melotte 105, Ruprecht 75 y Pismis 7. Los datos fueron adquiridos en abril de 1996 con el telescopio de 60 cm de la Universidad de Toronto en Las Campanas (Chile), y el detector PM512 en su modo directo. Se muestran los diagramas color-magnitud y color-color preliminares de los cúmulos. Mediante criterios fotométricos se hace una selección de los posibles miembros. También se determinan enrojecimientos, distancias y edades de los cúmulos.

  12. Charge-coupled device /CCD/ visible light sensor for the Teal Ruby Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, A.

    The Teal Ruby Experiment (TRE), employing a Space-Shuttle-launched infrared telescope, will mark a major milestone in the application of mosaic infrared detectors in space. However, it is generally recognized that supplemental overview imagery acquired in the visible portion of the spectrum is necessary to assist in accurately interpreting the data generated by the infrared focal plane. For this purpose, the TRE will be equipped with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) Visible Light Sensor (VLS) that will yield the cloud and ground truth data needed to assist in pointing and scene verification. The optical format of the VLS is designed to overlay the TRE footprint on the earth from a distance of 1000 nautical miles. The VLS is designed, built and will be qualified to meet the environmental and reliability requirements for an on-orbit mission in excess of one year. The TRE/VLS is tentatively scheduled for launch in mid 1983.

  13. Signal-to-noise considerations for sky-subtracted CCD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Michael V.

    1991-01-01

    The standard equation for calculating the uncertainty of photometry obtained from CCDs does not correctly consider the random errors, or 'noise', introduced into observations by procedures used in reducing the data. This paper presents a thorough derivation of the theoretical error equation that considers the contributions from all internal noise sources in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of a sky-subtracted image. A simplified version used for estimating the internal errors from empirical data is also derived. The propagation of noise through the data-reduction process is illustrated through a series of equations for the change in S/N that results from a variety of different operations performed on a CCD frame. Comparing these effects with the results expected for an observation made with an ideal detector suggests a number of ways to improve the precision of photometry through the practices employed in obtaining and reducing the observations.

  14. A compact CCD-monitored atomic force microscope with optical vision and improved performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyue, Liu; Haijun, Zhang; Dongxian, Zhang

    2013-09-01

    A novel CCD-monitored atomic force microscope (AFM) with optical vision and improved performances has been developed. Compact optical paths are specifically devised for both tip-sample microscopic monitoring and cantilever's deflection detecting with minimized volume and optimal light-amplifying ratio. The ingeniously designed AFM probe with such optical paths enables quick and safe tip-sample approaching, convenient and effective tip-sample positioning, and high quality image scanning. An image stitching method is also developed to build a wider-range AFM image under monitoring. Experiments show that this AFM system can offer real-time optical vision for tip-sample monitoring with wide visual field and/or high lateral optical resolution by simply switching the objective; meanwhile, it has the elegant performances of nanometer resolution, high stability, and high scan speed. Furthermore, it is capable of conducting wider-range image measurement while keeping nanometer resolution. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. CCD Video Observation of Microgravity Crystallization of Lysozyme and Correlation with Accelerometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, E. H.; Boggon, T. J.; Helliwell, J. R.; Moskowitz, M. E.; Nadarajah, A.

    1997-01-01

    Lysozyme has been crystallized using the ESA Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility onboard the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter during the IML-2 mission. CCD video monitoring was used to follow the crystallization process and evaluate the growth rate. During the mission some tetragonal crystals were observed moving over distances of up to 200 micrometers. This was correlated with microgravity disturbances caused by firings of vernier jets on the Orbiter. Growth-rate measurement of a stationary crystal (which had nucleated on the growth reactor wall) showed spurts and lulls correlated with an onboard activity; astronaut exercise. The stepped growth rates may be responsible for the residual mosaic block structure seen in crystal mosaicity and topography measurements.

  16. Soft X-ray response of a CCD with a grating spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Shouho, M; Katayama, H; Kohmura, T; Tsunemi, H; Kitamoto, S; Hayashida, K; Miyata, E; Hashimotodani, K; Yoshita, K; Koyama, K; Ricker, G; Bautz, M W; Foster, R; Kissel, S

    1999-01-01

    We calibrate the X-ray imaging spectrometers, which are CCD cameras installed on the ASTRO-E satellite, by using dispersed continuous soft X-rays from a grating spectrometer. We obtained the signal-pulse height and energy-resolution as a function of X-ray energies continuously. However, the wings of the line spread function of the grating distorts the center of the signal-pulse height derived by a simple analysis. An estimation of this distortion is presented. We also describe two methods of extracting the pure signal-pulse-height distribution from the data using the spectrometer. A brief description of the low-energy tail is presented.

  17. Quantum efficiency of the CCD camera (XIS) for the ASTRO-E mission

    CERN Document Server

    Katayama, H; Kohmura, T; Katayama, K; Yoshita, K; Tsunemi, H; Kitamoto, S; Hayashida, K; Miyata, E; Hashimotodani, K; Koyama, K; Ricker, G; Bautz, M W; Foster, R; Kissel, S

    1999-01-01

    We measured the optical and the X-ray transmission of the optical blocking filters for the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XISs) which are the X-ray CCD cameras of the ASTRO-E satellite. We conclude that the oxidation of the aluminum reduces the optical transmission down to approx 60-70% of the theoretical value of the aluminum. We achieved optical transmission below 5x10 sup - sup 5 in the range from 4000 to 9500 A by using aluminum thickness of 1200 A, while the theoretical calculation requires 800 A. The measurement of absolute quantum efficiency of XIS is also performed at several particular energies. We confirmed 20% quantum efficiency at 0.5 keV for the XIS engineering model (XIS EM).

  18. Design of a fast multi-hit position sensitive detector based on a CCD camera

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, L; Da Costa, G; Deconihout, B

    2002-01-01

    A new position sensitive detector has been designed for time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It combines a double micro-channel plate stage with a phosphor screen, the conductive coating of which is divided into an array of strip-like-shaped anodes. Time-of-flight signals are measured on the strip array with a 0.5 ns resolution, while a CCD camera records light-spots generated by ion impacts on the phosphor screen. With this particular imaging device, it is possible to accurately assign time-of-flight to positions recorded by the camera. This paper describes the main features of this new position sensitive detector and results obtained with a three-dimensional atom probe are presented.

  19. A GPRS Based Monitoring and Management System for Classification Results of Image by CCD Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Kun Guo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Data acquisition plays an important role in the field of modern industry. In many cases, remote data should be transferred to monitor center which is far away from the manufacturing field. This paper presents a remote transmission system for the classification results of images which are got by a CCD sensor. The utilization of web application framework gives this system the advantage of minimum research work on the monitor center. A GPRS DTU treated as an information transmitting terminal was used to transmit a custom format of the classified images. In the system, The Users can use the browser anywhere to log on the website of the system so as to view and manage the experimental stations, sensors and users’ information of the system. The results shows that the system can transmit and management the figures classified by Support Vector Machines (SVM. The figures those use other classified method will be tested in the future.

  20. Multivalent DR5 peptides activate the TRAIL death pathway and exert tumoricidal activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavet, V.; Beyrath, J.D.; Pardin, C.; Morizot, A.; Lechner, M.C.; Briand, J.P.; Wendland, M.; Maison, W.; Fournel, S.; Micheau, O.; Guichard, G.; Gronemeyer, H.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are exploring anticancer approaches based on signaling by TRAIL, a ligand for the cell death receptors DR4 and DR5. In this study, we report on the selective apoptotic effects of multivalent DR5 binding peptides (TRAIL(mim/DR5)) on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Surface

  1. Professor Bakytzhan Abdiraiym Rector of the L. Gumilov Eurasian National University, Astana, Kazakhstan accompanied by Prof. Kairat Kuterbekov, Dr Bekzat Prmantayeva, Dr Kuralay Maksut with the Director-General, Dr Tadeusz Kurtyka, Adviser for Non-Member States, Mrs Julia Andreeva, Department of Information Technologies and Dr Nikolai Zimine, ATLAS Collaboration, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Professor Bakytzhan Abdiraiym Rector of the L. Gumilov Eurasian National University, Astana, Kazakhstan accompanied by Prof. Kairat Kuterbekov, Dr Bekzat Prmantayeva, Dr Kuralay Maksut with the Director-General, Dr Tadeusz Kurtyka, Adviser for Non-Member States, Mrs Julia Andreeva, Department of Information Technologies and Dr Nikolai Zimine, ATLAS Collaboration, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna

  2. On-ground and in-orbit characterisation plan for the PLATO CCD normal cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J. P. D.; Walton, D.; Smith, A.; Hailey, M.; Curry, P.; Kennedy, T.

    2017-11-01

    PLAnetary Transits and Ocillations (PLATO) is the third European Space Agency (ESA) medium class mission in ESA's cosmic vision programme due for launch in 2026. PLATO will carry out high precision un-interrupted photometric monitoring in the visible band of large samples of bright solar-type stars. The primary mission goal is to detect and characterise terrestrial exoplanets and their systems with emphasis on planets orbiting in the habitable zone, this will be achieved using light curves to detect planetary transits. PLATO uses a novel multi- instrument concept consisting of 26 small wide field cameras The 26 cameras are made up of a telescope optical unit, four Teledyne e2v CCD270s mounted on a focal plane array and connected to a set of Front End Electronics (FEE) which provide CCD control and readout. There are 2 fast cameras with high read-out cadence (2.5 s) for magnitude ~ 4–8 stars, being developed by the German Aerospace Centre and 24 normal (N) cameras with a cadence of 25 s to monitor stars with a magnitude greater than 8. The N-FEEs are being developed at University College London's Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) and will be characterised along with the associated CCDs. The CCDs and N-FEEs will undergo rigorous on-ground characterisation and the performance of the CCDs will continue to be monitored in-orbit. This paper discusses the initial development of the experimental arrangement, test procedures and current status of the N-FEE. The parameters explored will include gain, quantum efficiency, pixel response non-uniformity, dark current and Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI). The current in-orbit characterisation plan is also discussed which will enable the performance of the CCDs and their associated N-FEE to be monitored during the mission, this will include measurements of CTI giving an indication of the impact of radiation damage in the CCDs.

  3. Direct measurement and calibration of the Kepler CCD Pixel Response Function for improved photometry and astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninkov, Zoran

    Stellar images taken with telescopes and detectors in space are usually undersampled, and to correct for this, an accurate pixel response function is required. The standard approach for HST and KEPLER has been to measure the telescope PSF combined ("convolved") with the actual pixel response function, super-sampled by taking into account dithered or offset observed images of many stars (Lauer [1999]). This combined response function has been called the "PRF" (Bryson et al. [2011]). However, using such results has not allowed astrometry from KEPLER to reach its full potential (Monet et al. [2010], [2014]). Given the precision of KEPLER photometry, it should be feasible to use a pre-determined detector pixel response function (PRF) and an optical point spread function (PSF) as separable quantities to more accurately correct photometry and astrometry for undersampling. Wavelength (i.e. stellar color) and instrumental temperature should be affecting each of these differently. Discussion of the PRF in the "KEPLER Instrument Handbook" is limited to an ad-hoc extension of earlier measurements on a quite different CCD. It is known that the KEPLER PSF typically has a sharp spike in the middle, and the main bulk of the PSF is still small enough to be undersampled, so that any substructure in the pixel may interact significantly with the optical PSF. Both the PSF and PRF are probably asymmetric. We propose to measure the PRF for an example of the CCD sensors used on KEPLER at sufficient sampling resolution to allow significant improvement of KEPLER photometry and astrometry, in particular allowing PSF fitting techniques to be used on the data archive.

  4. A 14-bit 40-MHz analog front end for CCD application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingyu, Wang; Zhangming, Zhu; Shubin, Liu

    2016-06-01

    A 14-bit, 40-MHz analog front end (AFE) for CCD scanners is analyzed and designed. The proposed system incorporates a digitally controlled wideband variable gain amplifier (VGA) with nearly 42 dB gain range, a correlated double sampler (CDS) with programmable gain functionality, a 14-bit analog-to-digital converter and a programmable timing core. To achieve the maximum dynamic range, the VGA proposed here can linearly amplify the input signal in a gain range from -1.08 to 41.06 dB in 6.02 dB step with a constant bandwidth. A novel CDS takes image information out of noise, and further amplifies the signal accurately in a gain range from 0 to 18 dB in 0.035 dB step. A 14-bit ADC is adopted to quantify the analog signal with optimization in power and linearity. An internal timing core can provide flexible timing for CCD arrays, CDS and ADC. The proposed AFE was fabricated in SMIC 0.18 μm CMOS process. The whole circuit occupied an active area of 2.8 × 4.8 mm2 and consumed 360 mW. When the frequency of input signal is 6.069 MHz, and the sampling frequency is 40 MHz, the signal to noise and distortion (SNDR) is 70.3 dB, the effective number of bits is 11.39 bit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61234002, 61322405, 61306044, 61376033), the National High-Tech Program of China (No. 2013AA014103), and the Opening Project of Science and Technology on Reliability Physics and Application Technology of Electronic Component Laboratory (No. ZHD201302).

  5. Picosecond Raman spectroscopy with a fast intensified CCD camera for depth analysis of diffusely scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariese, Freek; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Kerssens, Marleen M; Buijs, Joost B; Gooijer, Cees

    2009-06-01

    A spectroscopic depth profiling approach is demonstrated for layers of non-transparent, diffusely scattering materials. The technique is based on the temporal discrimination between Raman photons emitted from the surface and Raman photons originating from a deeper layer. Excitation was carried out with a frequency-doubled, 3 ps Ti:sapphire laser system (398 nm; 76 MHz repetition rate). Time-resolved detection was carried out with an intensified CCD camera that can be gated with a 250 ps gate width. The performance of the system was assessed using 1 mm and 2 mm pathlength cuvettes with powdered PMMA and trans-stilbene (TS) crystals, respectively, or solid white polymer blocks: Arnite (polyethylene terephthalate), Delrin (polyoxymethylene), polythene (polyethylene) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene). These samples were pressed together in different configurations and Raman photons were collected in backscatter mode in order to study the time difference in such media corresponding with several mm of extra net photon migration distance. We also studied the lateral contrast between two different second layers. The results demonstrate that by means of a picosecond laser system and the time discrimination of a gated intensified CCD camera, molecular spectroscopic information can be obtained through a turbid surface layer. In the case of the PMMA/TS two-layer system, time-resolved detection with a 400 ps delay improved the relative intensity of the Raman bands of the second layer with a factor of 124 in comparison with the spectrum recorded with a 100 ps delay (which is more selective for the first layer) and with a factor of 14 in comparison with a non-gated setup. Possible applications will be discussed, as well as advantages/disadvantages over other Raman techniques for diffusely scattering media.

  6. An adaptive threshold method for improving astrometry of space debris CCD images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rong-yu; Zhao, Chang-yin

    2014-06-01

    Optical survey is a main technique for observing space debris, and precisely measuring the positions of space debris is of great importance. Due to several factors, e.g. the angle object normal to the observer, the shape as well as the attitude of the object, the variations of observed characteristics for low earth orbital space debris are distinct. When we look at optical CCD images of observed objects, the size and brightness are varying, hence it’s difficult to decide the threshold during centroid measurement and precise astrometry. Traditionally the threshold is given empirically and constantly in data reduction, and obviously it’s not suitable for data reduction of space debris. Here we offer a solution to provide the threshold. Our method assumes that the PSF (point spread function) is Gaussian and estimates the signal flux by a directly two-dimensional Gaussian fit, then a cubic spline interpolation is performed to divide each initial pixel into several sub-pixels, at last the threshold is determined by the estimation of signal flux and the sub-pixels above threshold are separated to estimate the centroid. A trail observation of the fast spinning satellite Ajisai is made and the CCD frames are obtained to test our algorithm. The calibration precision of various threshold is obtained through the comparison between the observed equatorial position and the reference one, the latter are obtained from the precise ephemeris of the satellite. The results indicate that our method reduces the total errors of measurements, it works effectively in improving the centering precision of space debris images.

  7. In-flight absolute calibration of the CBERS-2 CCD sensor data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio J. Ponzoni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the first images of the sensors on board of CBERS-2 (China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite satellite were made available by the National Institute for Space Research (INPE, users have asked information about the conversion of image digital numbers to physical data (radiance or reflectance. This paper describes the main steps that were carried out to calculate the in-flight absolute calibration coefficients for CBERS-2 CCD level 2 (radiometric and geometric correction images considering the reflectance-based method. Remarks about the preliminary evaluation of these coefficients application are also presented.Desde o início da distribuição de imagens dos sensores do satélite CBERS-2 (China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite por parte do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE, a comunidade de usuários solicitava informação sobre a conversão dos números digitais em valores físicos (radiância ou reflectância. Este artigo descreve os principais passos adotados no cálculo dos coeficientes de calibração absoluta para as imagens disponibilizadas no nível 2 de correção (correções radiométrica e geométrica da câmera CBERS-2 CCD, considerando o método baseado na reflectância de uma superfície de referência. São apresentados também alguns resultados da avaliação preliminar da aplicação desses coeficientes na conversão mencionada.

  8. Tun Dr. Mahathir’s Leadership Communication: The Confucian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah Joyce Lynn-Sze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have provided valuable insights into the impact of culture on the concept of leadership communication. However, only a few studies that focused on exploring and understanding the values of Confucianism and its impact on the Chinese culture, especially in Malaysia. Thus, this study is among the first study to examine the leadership communication from the perspective of Confucianism towards the leadership of Dr. Mahathir from the perspective of the Chinese community in Malaysia. This study aims to assess the role of Confucian values in Dr. Mahathir’s leadership communication. This study interviewed 15 Chinese leaders. The findings reveal that three main Confucian values are relevant to Dr. Mahathir’s leadership communication. The Confucian values are Zhi (wisdom, Xin (trust and Xiao (filial piety. This study provides a new perspective on leadership communication from the context of cultural diversity in Malaysia which emphasizes on Confucian values.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope STIS Observations of GRB 000301C: CCD Imaging and Near-Ultraviolet MAMA Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smette, A.; Fruchter, A.S.; Gull, Th.R.; Sahu, K.C.; Petro, L.; Ferguson, H.; Rhoads, J.; Lindler, D.J.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    We present Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of the optical transient (OT) counterpart of the gamma-ray burster GRB 000301C obtained 5 days after the burst, on 2000 March 6. CCD clear-aperture imaging reveals a R~=21.50+/-0.15 source with no apparent host galaxy. An 8000 s, 1150

  10. Hubble Space Telescope STIS observations of GRB 000301C: CCD imaging and near-ultraviolet MAMA spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smette, A.; Fruchter, A.S.; Gull, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    We present Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of the optical transient (OT) counterpart of the c-ray burster GRB 000301C obtained 5 days after the burst, on 2000 March 6. CCD clear-aperture imaging reveals a R similar or equal to 21.50 +/- 0.15 source with no apparent host galaxy. ...

  11. A Fully Integrated 0.055% INL X-ray CCD Readout ASIC with Incremental Delta Sigma {text{ADC}}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanchao; Cao, Xiaofei; Yu, Qian; Yi, Ting; Lu, Bo; Chen, Yong; Hong, Zhiliang

    2016-06-01

    A fully integrated 100 kHz X-ray charge coupled device (CCD) readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) employing delta sigma (ΔΣ) digitization is presented. To achieve high linearity with small chip size and low power consumption, the correlated double sampling (CDS) is realized by the ΣΔ ADC instead of the analog front end (AFE) as in conventional CCD readout circuits. Besides, the proposed decimation filter features simple structure and eases the integration. The chip is fabricated in 0.35 μm CMOS technology and the measured integral nonlinearity (INL) throughout the input dynamic range of ASIC is 0.055% with 35.1 ±; 0.3 μV input referred noise. A CCD detection system is built and tested with the sensitivity of CCD being 4 μVe-. The integration test results show that the readout noise is 11.8 e- at 100 kHz readout pixel rate and the achieved energy spectrum resolution is 168 eV ±; 4.7 eV (Full Width at Half Maximum: FWHM) at 5.9 keV.

  12. Development of three-wavelength CCD image pyrometer used for the temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhi; Bai, Haicheng [State Key Laboratory of Synthetical Automation for Process Industries, School of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2014-02-15

    This paper develops an imaging based three-color pyrometer for the monitoring of temperature distribution in a continuous casting billet. A novel optical device, together with an embedded electronic system, is designed to sequentially collect a dark image and three thermal images with specified wavelengths on a same monochromatic charge-coupled-device (CCD). The three thermal images provide the basis for the determination of target temperature, while the dark image is used to online eliminate the dark noise of CCD with a differential method. This image pyrometer is not only independent of target emissivity but also overcomes the dissimilarity of measuring accuracy between the micro-sensors of CCD resulted from the non-uniformity of pixels’ intensity response and the vignetting of optical system. Furthermore, a precise two-color temperature field measuring model on the CCD pyrometer is established, based on which a self-adaptive light-integration mechanism is presented. Compared with the traditional fixed light-integration method, the measuring range of the pyrometer is greatly extended and its sensitivity in low temperature segment is improved. The test results in a steel factory demonstrate that the pyrometer is capable of meeting the requirement of surface temperature measurements about casting billets. Reliability and accuracy of measurement results are also discussed herein.

  13. Image Quality of Digital Direct Flat-Panel Mammography Versus an Indirect Small-Field CCD Technique Using a High-Contrast Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Barbara Krug

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the detection of microcalcifications on mammograms of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired by a direct digital flat-panel detector mammography system (FPM versus a stereotactic breast biopsy system utilizing CCD (charge-coupled device technology with either a 1024 or 512 acquisition matrix (1024 CCD and 512 CCD. Materials and Methods. Randomly distributed silica beads (diameter 100–1400 m and anthropomorphic scatter bodies were applied to 48 transparent films. The test specimens were radiographed on a direct digital FPM and by the indirect 1024 CCD and 512 CCD techniques. Four radiologists rated the monitor-displayed images independently of each other in random order. Results. The rate of correct positive readings for the “number of detectable microcalcifications” for silica beads of 100–199 m in diameter was 54.2%, 50.0% and 45.8% by FPM, 1024 CCD and 512 CCD, respectively. The inter-rater variability was most pronounced for silica beads of 100–199 m in diameter. The greatest agreement with the gold standard was observed for beads >400 m in diameter across all methods. Conclusion. Stereotactic spot images taken by 1024 matrix CCD technique are diagnostically equivalent to direct digital flat-panel mammograms for visualizing simulated microcalcifications >400 m in diameter.

  14. Image quality of digital direct flat-panel mammography versus an indirect small-field CCD technique using a high-contrast phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Stützer, Hartmut; Frommolt, Peter; Boecker, Julia; Bovenschulte, Henning; Sendler, Volker; Lackner, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    To compare the detection of microcalcifications on mammograms of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired by a direct digital flat-panel detector mammography system (FPM) versus a stereotactic breast biopsy system utilizing CCD (charge-coupled device) technology with either a 1024 or 512 acquisition matrix (1024 CCD and 512 CCD). Randomly distributed silica beads (diameter 100-1400 μm) and anthropomorphic scatter bodies were applied to 48 transparent films. The test specimens were radiographed on a direct digital FPM and by the indirect 1024 CCD and 512 CCD techniques. Four radiologists rated the monitor-displayed images independently of each other in random order. The rate of correct positive readings for the "number of detectable microcalcifications" for silica beads of 100-199 μm in diameter was 54.2%, 50.0% and 45.8% by FPM, 1024 CCD and 512 CCD, respectively. The inter-rater variability was most pronounced for silica beads of 100-199 μm in diameter. The greatest agreement with the gold standard was observed for beads >400 μm in diameter across all methods. Stereotactic spot images taken by 1024 matrix CCD technique are diagnostically equivalent to direct digital flat-panel mammograms for visualizing simulated microcalcifications >400 μm in diameter.

  15. Characterization of OfWRKY3, a transcription factor that positively regulates the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase gene OfCCD4 in Osmanthus fragrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuanji; Wu, Miao; Cao, Liya; Yuan, Wangjun; Dong, Meifang; Wang, Xiaohui; Chen, Weicai; Shang, Fude

    2016-07-01

    The sweet osmanthus carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (OfCCD4) cleaves carotenoids such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin to yield β-ionone. OfCCD4 is a member of the CCD gene family, and its promoter contains a W-box palindrome with two reversely oriented TGAC repeats, which are the proposed binding sites of WRKY transcription factors. We isolated three WRKY cDNAs from the petal of Osmanthus fragrans. One of them, OfWRKY3, encodes a protein containing two WRKY domains and two zinc finger motifs. OfWRKY3 and OfCCD4 had nearly identical expression profile in petals of 'Dangui' and 'Yingui' at different flowering stages and showed similar expression patterns in petals treated by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and abscisic acid. Activation of OfCCD4pro:GUS by OfWRKY3 was detected in coinfiltrated tobacco leaves and very weak GUS activity was detected in control tissues, indicating that OfWRKY3 can interact with the OfCCD4 promoter. Yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that OfWRKY3 was able to bind to the W-box palindrome motif present in the OfCCD4 promoter. These results suggest that OfWRKY3 is a positive regulator of the OfCCD4 gene, and might partly account for the biosynthesis of β-ionone in sweet osmanthus.

  16. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soman, M.R., E-mail: m.r.soman@open.ac.uk [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Hall, D.J.; Tutt, J.H.; Murray, N.J.; Holland, A.D. [e2v centre for electronic imaging, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-12-11

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 µm from the current 24 µm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV–1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 µm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  17. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 μm from the current 24 μm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV-1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 μm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  18. [Reproduction of the anatomy (offset, CCD, leg length) with a modern short stem hip design--a radiological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, J; Grasselli, C; Kothny, P C; Litzkow, D; Hennecke, T

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse different parameters before and after implantation of a modern short-stem hip design. In this prospective radiological study 250 consecutive hips with degenerative hip osteoarthritis were included (246 patients). The patients were operated by five different surgeons at 4 different hospitals and a metadiaphysial fixed short-stem prothesis (Mini Hip, Corin) was used. Standardised X-rays were performed with the same technique pre- and postoperatively in all patients. Different anatomic parameters of the hip were documented by using the pre- and postoperative Xrays (ofset, CCD angle, length of leg). All measurements were performed by an independent examiner. The 246 patients included 129 females and 117 males. The average age of the patients was 59.7 years (range: 27-82 years). The offset only changed by + 0.28 cm (SD: 0.45 cm) after surgery. We could document only a small decrease of -0.51° (SD: 4.10°) of the CCD angle. The length of the leg increased on average by + 0.09 cm (SD: 0.34 cm). We found no difference between the measurements of female and male patients. Conspicuous was also the increasing use of small protheses (size 2) for hips with a small CCD angle and the increasing implantation of large protheses (size 9) in hips with a high CCD angle. Our results showed that we could reconstruct the individual geometry of the hip quite well by using the metadiaphysial short-stem prothesis. The tendency of an increasing CCD angle and a decrease of the offset seems not to be existent with the design of this kind of short-stem prothesis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Establishment and Optimization of Rigorous Geometric Model of Push-broom Camera Using TDI CCD Arranged in an Alternating Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENG Weican

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Push-broom cameras using TDI CCD arranged in an alternating pattern are widely carried by typical high-resolution optical satellites in order to obtain high space resolution and enough strip width. For this kind of cameras, several TDI CCD are arranged in an alternating pattern in two lines on the focal plane and push-broom imaging mode is always adopted. Imaging principle and characteristic of this kind of camera is introduced. Exterior parameters of TDI CCD are modeled together based on their same values in any instant of time and an integrated geometric model is finally established. Error compensation methods are designed to remove exterior error and interior error based on this integrated geometric model. A series of tests are designed to verify models and methods proposed in this paper using original image of TH-1 Satellite HR Camera whose detectors are divided into 8 modules arranged in an alternating pattern. As the results, the imaging geometry of this kind of camera can be rigorously described by this integral geometrical model. The positioning accuracy can be obviously improved by our exterior error compensation method, however, different residual error would be remained for different TDI CCD. The positioning accuracy will not be obviously improved while systematic errors of different TDI CCD can be effectively removed by the interior error compensation method. 2 m positioning accuracy in X, Y and Z directions can be achieved and different systematic errors can be removed when both exterior and interior error were compensated. The same accuracy can be achieved in the other scenes when the calculated inner distortion parameters are adopted.

  20. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  1. Dr Jacob van der Land, marine biologist extraordinary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, van A.C.

    2001-01-01

    This contribution is an attempt to sketch the life and works of Dr Jacob van der Land, curator of worms and chief marine biologist of the National Museum of Natural History, on the occasion of his official retirement. Born in 1935, Jacob van der Land read biology at Leiden University (1958-1964),

  2. 2250-IJBCS-Article-Dr Mahbou Somo Toukam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    154, February 2015. ISSN 1997-342X ..... Cette information est capitale. L'igname se reproduisant essentiellement par des tubercules, la ... Foundation) pour l'aide financière et en particulier son Président Dr Paul. KAMMOGNE FOKAM et son ...

  3. DR. H. BERKHOF, en VertfacAtiny, Holland Uitgevers maatschappij ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    DR. H. BERKHOF, en VertfacAtiny, Holland Uitgevers maatschappij Amsterdam, 1948, 194 bis., prys 12/6. Die vererende versoek om bogenoemde boek in hierdie kolomme te bespreek het my in nie geringe verleentheid gebring nie, want om die waarheid te sê, kan ek feitlik niks as goeds daarvan getuig nie, met ander ...

  4. Page 1 DIAMAGNETISM OF COPPER. BY DR. S. RAMACHANDRA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1935-08-20

    DIAMAGNETISM OF COPPER. BY DR. S. RAMACHANDRA RAO,. Aananalai University. Received August 20, 1935. 1. Introduction. IN a recent paper, the author has reviewed at Some length the present position of our knowledge regarding the magnetic properties of colloidal particles of metals. A few general conclusions ...

  5. Shepard Award Winners, Part 1: Dr. Stephen Thacker

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-22

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Stephen Thacker, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/22/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/22/2009.

  6. Highlight: Dr David Butler-Jones on fighting pandemics | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    10 févr. 2015 ... Dr David Butler-Jones, professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Manitoba and former Chief Medical Health Officer of Canada, delivered a lecture on lessons learned from the 2009 flu pandemic in Canada. He also commented on India's draft National Health Policy 2015 at the India ...

  7. Researcher Profile: An Interview With Dr. Rebecca J. Travnichek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J. Travnichek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Dr. Rebecca Travnichek is a Family Financial Education Specialist with University of Missouri Extension. Dr. Travnichek currently serves as the Annual Conference Program Chair. She is also very active in the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education, where she serves on the Board of Directors. Dr. Travnichek has participated in leadership development programs at the state and national levels. She was involved in the initial proposal development of the Financial Security for All Community of Practice with eXtension and continues to be involved through several roles. She is active in the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences at the national and state levels, serving in multiple leadership roles. For the past three years, Dr. Travnichek has also served as the Editor of the Journal of the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences. She represents the type of person who makes the Financial Therapy Association a dynamic organization linking practitioners and academicians.

  8. Shepard Award Winners, Part 3: Dr. Larissa Roux

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-09-22

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Larissa Roux, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 9/22/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 9/22/2009.

  9. Shepard Award Winners, Part 2: Dr. Tracie Williams

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-07-29

    This podcast highlights the accomplishments of Dr. Tracie Williams, recipient of the prestigious 2009 CDC Charles C. Shepard Award.  Created: 7/29/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/29/2009.

  10. The Effects of Dr. Oz on Health Behaviors and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Elizabeth; Dickes, Lori A.; Davis, Amanda; Zarandy, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Consumption of social media has quickly evolved into a primary source of health information for many consumers. This seems to be particularly true for individuals seeking to modify chronic health conditions like weight loss, obesity, and obesity-related diseases. Purpose: This study explores whether watching Dr. Oz weight loss episodes…

  11. Improving College Students English Learning with Dr. Eye Android Mid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju Yin; Che, Pei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates college students' English language learning through use of Dr. Eye Android handheld mobile Internet device (MID). Compared to related studies, students' English learning using MIDs has not been evaluated and fully understood in the field of higher education. Quantitatively, the researchers used TOEIC pretest and posttest to…

  12. Oxygen and Metastasis: A Conversation with Dr. Nick Restifo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Nick Restifo, a senior investigator in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, discusses his recently published study finding that Oxygen, a molecule necessary for life, paradoxically aids cancer metastasis to the lung by impairing cancer-killing immune cells.

  13. Unlikely reformer: Dr Henry Calvert Barnett (1832-1897).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyr, Philippa

    2017-10-01

    To provide a brief biography of Western Australian colonial lunacy superintendent Dr Henry Calvert Barnett. A range of primary sources were consulted. Barnett was a complex man: a caring and forward-thinking practitioner who had a colourful and turbulent private life. Barnett's contribution to mental health service development in Western Australia was genuine and worthwhile, and should be recognised.

  14. Dr. Y. Zverev, Physiology Department, College of Medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 78 No. 1 January 2001. VENTILATORY CAPACITY INDICES IN MALAWIAN CHILDREN. Y. Zverev, MD, PhD, and M. Gondwe, BSc, Physiology Department, College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Private Bag 360, Chichiri, Blantyre 3, Malawi. Request for reprints to: Dr. Y. Zverev, ...

  15. You CAN Teach a Sneetch! Peace Education with Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Irma K.

    This lesson plan, for grades 4 to 6 and up, incorporates the Dr. Seuss story about Sneetches to teach children about sources of prejudice. The lesson also can be used to incorporate writing in the social studies. Six writing prompts are included. (EH)

  16. Another Use for Dr. Seuss: Reading for Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Janice J.; Baker, Pamela Hudson

    2012-01-01

    Time is limited. Teachers often struggle to address the diverse needs of learners in their classrooms, especially when faced with academic and social skills concerns. Finding effective ways to teach social skills in the context of academic instruction makes sense. Books by Dr. Seuss provide a variety of high-interest stories that can be used to…

  17. Gifted Kids, Social Issues, and the Works of Dr. Seuss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granada, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Gifted students often share a sense of justice and a concern for the welfare of mankind and the planet. This humanitarian feeling may sometimes be overlooked, given today's academic focus. The author has taken an in-depth look at the works of Theodor Geisel, popularly known as Dr. Seuss, and moved beyond his whimsical illustrations and wordplay to…

  18. Go, Class, Go: Using Dr. Seuss in Early Reading Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allman, Tamby

    2004-01-01

    As more and more reading programs make the move from the basal reading series to authentic text, teachers are asking the same question: How do I choose appropriate books for my class? Teachers of students who are deaf or hard of hearing are no exception. In this article, the author describes her use of Dr. Seuss books in early reading instruction.

  19. Obituary Dr A. W. Kloos (1880—1952)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooststroom, van S.J.

    1952-01-01

    At the end of the previous number of “Blumea” could just be inserted the death notice of one of the honorary collaborators of the Rijksherbarium, Dr Ir A. W. Kloos, who passed away in his home at Dordrecht on June 3rd, 1952. A more detailed obituary may follow here. Abraham Willem Kloos was born at

  20. Dr. Vernon W. Hughes, 81, authority on the subatomic

    CERN Multimedia

    Lavietes, S

    2002-01-01

    "Dr. Vernon W. Hughes, a Yale physicist whose investigation of particles called muons poked holes in standard subatomic theory and provided evidence for the existence of previously undetected matter, died at Yale-New Haven Hospital last Tuesday" (1/2 page).