WorldWideScience

Sample records for ccd cameras exposed

  1. Modeling of the over-exposed pixel area of CCD cameras caused by laser dazzling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, Koen W.; Schleijpen, Ric H. M. A.

    2014-10-01

    A simple model has been developed and implemented in Matlab code, predicting the over-exposed pixel area of cameras caused by laser dazzling. Inputs of this model are the laser irradiance on the front optics of the camera, the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the used optics, the integration time of the camera, and camera sensor specifications like pixel size, quantum efficiency and full well capacity. Effects of the read-out circuit of the camera are not incorporated. The model was evaluated with laser dazzle experiments on CCD cameras using a 532 nm CW laser dazzler and shows good agreement. For relatively low laser irradiance the model predicts the over-exposed laser spot area quite accurately and shows the cube root dependency of spot diameter on laser irradiance, caused by the PSF as demonstrated before for IR cameras. For higher laser power levels the laser induced spot diameter increases more rapidly than predicted, which probably can be attributed to scatter effects in the camera. Some first attempts to model scatter contributions, using a simple scatter power function f(θ), show good resemblance with experiments. Using this model, a tool is available which can assess the performance of observation sensor systems while being subjected to laser countermeasures.

  2. Advanced CCD camera developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condor, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  3. Modelling of the over-exposed pixel area of CCD cameras caused by laser dazzling

    OpenAIRE

    Benoist, K.W.; Schleijpen, R.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    A simple model has been developed and implemented in Matlab code, predicting the over-exposed pixel area of cameras caused by laser dazzling. Inputs of this model are the laser irradiance on the front optics of the camera, the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the used optics, the integration time of the camera, and camera sensor specifications like pixel size, quantum efficiency and full well capacity. Effects of the read-out circuit of the camera are not incorporated. The model was evaluated w...

  4. Modelling of the over-exposed pixel area of CCD cameras caused by laser dazzling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benoist, K.W.; Schleijpen, R.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    A simple model has been developed and implemented in Matlab code, predicting the over-exposed pixel area of cameras caused by laser dazzling. Inputs of this model are the laser irradiance on the front optics of the camera, the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the used optics, the integration time of

  5. CCD TV camera, TM1300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Mitsuo; Endou, Yukio; Nakayama, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    Development has been made of a black-and-white TV camera TM 1300 using an interline-transfer CCD, which excels in performance frame-transfer CCDs marketed since 1980: it has a greater number of horizontal picture elements and far smaller input power (less than 2 W at 9 V), uses hybrid ICs for the CCD driver unit to reduce the size of the camera, has no picture distortion, no burn-in; in addition, it has peripheral equipment, such as the camera housing and the pan and till head miniaturized as well. It is also expected to be widened in application to industrial TV. (author)

  6. High-speed CCD camera at NAOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhaowang; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yangbin

    2006-06-01

    A high speed CCD camera has been completed at the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC). A Kodak CCD was used in the camera. Two output ports are used to read out CCD data and total speed achieved 60M pixels per second. The Kodak KAI-4021 image sensor is a high-performance 2Kx2K-pixel interline transfer device. The 7.4μ square pixels with micro lenses provide high sensitivity and the large full well capacity results in high dynamic range. The inter-line transfer structure provides high quality image and enables electronic shuttering for precise exposure control. The electronic shutter provides a method of precisely controlling the image exposure time without any mechanical components. The camera is controlled by a NIOS II family of embedded processors, which is Altera's second-generation soft-core embedded processor for FPGAs. The powerful embedded processors make the camera with splendid features to satisfy continuously appearing new observational requirements. This camera is very flexible and is easy to implement new special functions. Since FPGA and other peripheral logic signals are triggered by a single master clock, the whole system is perfectly synchronized. By using this technique the camera cuts off the noise dramatically.

  7. Testing of a Commercial CCD Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsee, Taran

    2000-01-01

    The results are presented of the examination and testing of a commercial CCD camera designed for use by amateur astronomers and university astronomy laboratory courses. The characteristics of the CCD chip are presented in graphical and tabular form. Individual and averaged bias frames are discussed. Dark frames were taken and counts are presented as a function of time. Flat field and other images were used to identify and locate bad pixel columns as well as pixels which vary significantly from the mean pixel sensitivity.

  8. CCD Camera Detection of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John R

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and precise quantification of the infectivity of HIV is important for molecular virologic studies, as well as for measuring the activities of antiviral drugs and neutralizing antibodies. An indicator cell line, a CCD camera, and image-analysis software are used to quantify HIV infectivity. The cells of the P4R5 line, which express the receptors for HIV infection as well as β-galactosidase under the control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, are infected with HIV and then incubated 2 days later with X-gal to stain the infected cells blue. Digital images of monolayers of the infected cells are captured using a high resolution CCD video camera and a macro video zoom lens. A software program is developed to process the images and to count the blue-stained foci of infection. The described method allows for the rapid quantification of the infected cells over a wide range of viral inocula with reproducibility, accuracy and at relatively low cost.

  9. CCD characterization for a range of color cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, P.J.; Groen, F.C.A.; Schutte, K.

    2005-01-01

    CCD cameras are widely used for remote sensing and image processing applications. However, most cameras are produced to create nice images, not to do accurate measurements. Post processing operations such as gamma adjustment and automatic gain control are incorporated in the camera. When a (CCD)

  10. Mid-IR image acquisition using a standard CCD camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Sørensen, Knud Palmelund; Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Direct image acquisition in the 3-5 µm range is realized using a standard CCD camera and a wavelength up-converter unit. The converter unit transfers the image information to the NIR range were state-of-the-art cameras exist.......Direct image acquisition in the 3-5 µm range is realized using a standard CCD camera and a wavelength up-converter unit. The converter unit transfers the image information to the NIR range were state-of-the-art cameras exist....

  11. CCD Color Camera Characterization for Image Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, P.J.; Groen, F.C.A.; Schutte, K.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we will analyze a range of different types of cameras for its use in measurements. We verify a general model of a charged coupled device camera using experiments. This model includes gain and offset, additive and multiplicative noise, and gamma correction. It is shown that for

  12. Design of a multifunction astronomical CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dalei; Wen, Desheng; Xue, Jianru; Chen, Zhi; Wen, Yan; Jiang, Baotan; Xi, Jiangbo

    2015-07-01

    To satisfy the requirement of the astronomical observation, a novel timing sequence of frame transfer CCD is proposed. The multiple functions such as the adjustments of work pattern, exposure time and frame frequency are achieved. There are four work patterns: normal, standby, zero exposure and test. The adjustment of exposure time can set multiple exposure time according to the astronomical observation. The fame frequency can be adjusted when dark target is imaged and the maximum exposure time cannot satisfy the requirement. On the design of the video processing, offset correction and adjustment of multiple gains are proposed. Offset correction is used for eliminating the fixed pattern noise of CCD. Three gains pattern can improve the signal to noise ratio of astronomical observation. Finally, the images in different situations are collected and the system readout noise is calculated. The calculation results show that the designs in this paper are practicable.

  13. CCD emulator design for LSST camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.; O'Connor, P.; Fried, J.; Kuczewski, J.

    2016-07-01

    As part of the LSST project, a comprehensive CCD emulator that operates three CCDs simultaneously has been developed for testing multichannel readout electronics. Based on an Altera Cyclone V FPGA for timing and control, the emulator generates 48 channels of simulated video waveform in response to appropriate sequencing of parallel and serial clocks. Two 256Mb serial memory chips are adopted for storage of arbitrary grayscale images. The arbitrary image or fixed pattern image can be generated from the emulator in triple as three real CCDs perform, for qualifying and testing the LSST 3-stripe Science Raft Electronics Board (REB) simultaneously. Using the method of comparator threshold scanning, all 24 parallel clocks and 24 serial clocks from the REB are qualified for sequence, duration and level before the video signal is generated. In addition, 66 channels of input bias and voltages are sampled through the multi-channel ADC to verify that correct values are applied to the CCD. In addition, either a Gigabit Ethernet connector or USB bus can be used to control and read back from the emulator board. A user-friendly PC software package has been developed for controlling and communicating with the emulator.

  14. High quality neutron radiography imaging using cooled CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hisao

    1993-01-01

    An electronic imaging technique using cooled charge-coupled-device camera (C-CCD) was applied to neutron radiography. The camera was examined for linearities of signal outputs and its dynamic ranges about the number of photons generated in a converter by an incident neutron beam. It is expected that the camera can be applied to high quality NR imaging especially to tomographic imaging for static objects. When the C-CCD camera is applied to get tomogram on the basis of its excellent characteristics, the results will be discussed about the quality of the image through a dynamic range of CT value which is defined in this paper, and a guide of dimensional limitation which can reasonably reconstruct tomograms. (author)

  15. Application Of CCD Camera And Computer In Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wensheng

    1989-01-01

    In this article we have theoretically and experimentally dicussed how scanning interference fringes are automatically recorded with a ccd camera and a computer. This new measure technique can be used to any length measurement by interferomtry. As a practical example, we have automatically in real-time measured the shrinking of 2- components adhesive in a hardening process.

  16. The development of high-speed 100 fps CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffberg, M.; Laird, R.; Lenkzsus, F.; Liu, C.; Rodricks, B.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high-speed CCD digital camera system. The system has been designed to use CCDs from various manufacturers with minimal modifications. The first camera built on this design utilizes a Thomson 512 x 512 pixel CCD as its sensor, which is read out from two parallel outputs at a speed of 15 MHz/pixel/output. The data undergo correlated double sampling after which it is digitized into 12 bits. The throughput of the system translates into 60 MB/second, which is either stored directly in a PC or transferred to a custom-designed VXI module. The PC data acquisition version of the camera can collect sustained data in real time that is limited to the memory installed in the PC. The VXI version of the camera, also controlled by a PC, stores 512 MB of real-time data before it must be read out to the PC disk storage. The uncooled CCD can be used either with lenses for visible light imaging or with a phosphor screen for X-ray imaging. This camera has been tested with a phosphor screen coupled to a fiber-optic face plate for high-resolution, high-speed X-ray imaging. The camera is controlled through a custom event-driven user-friendly Windows package. The pixel clock speed can be changed from 1 to 15 MHz. The noise was measured to be 1.05 bits at a 13.3 MHz pixel clock. This paper will describe the electronics, software, and characterizations that have been performed using both visible and X-ray photons. (orig.)

  17. Neutral-beam performance analysis using a CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.N.; Allen, S.L.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed an optical diagnostic system suitable for characterizing the performance of energetic neutral beams. An absolutely calibrated CCD video camera is used to view the neutral beam as it passes through a relatively high pressure (10 -5 Torr) region outside the neutralizer: collisional excitation of the fast deuterium atoms produces H/sub proportional to/ emission (lambda = 6561A) that is proportional to the local atomic current density, independent of the species mix of accelerated ions over the energy range 5 to 20 keV. Digital processing of the video signal provides profile and aiming information for beam optimization. 6 refs., 3 figs

  18. MISR Level 1A CCD Science data, all cameras V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MISR Level 1A camera charge-coupled device (CCD) Science Instrument Data are the primary archive of the MISR instrument. The MISR CCD Science Instrument Data...

  19. A High Resolution TDI CCD Camera forMicrosatellite (HRCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yuncai; Zheng, You; Dong, Ying; Li, Tao; Yu, Shijie

    In resent years it is a important development direction in the commercial remote sensing field to obtain (1-5)m high ground resolution from space using microsatellite. Thanks to progress of new technologies, new materials and new detectors it is possible to develop 1m ground resolution space imaging system with weight less than 20kg. Based on many years works on optical system design a project of very high resolution TDI CCD camera using in space was proposed by the authors of this paper. The performance parameters and optical lay-out of the HRCM was presented. A compact optical design and results analysis for the system was given in the paper also. and small fold mirror to take a line field of view usable for TDI CCD and short outer size. The length along the largest size direction is about 1/4 of the focal length. And two 4096X96(grades) line TDI CCD will be used as the focal plane detector. The special optical parts are fixed near before the final image for getting the ground pixel resolution higher than the Nyquist resolution of the detector using the sub-pixel technique which will be explained in the paper. In the system optical SiC will be used as the mirror material, the C-C composite material will be used as the material of the mechanical structure framework. The circle frame of the primary and secondary mirrors will use one time turning on a machine tool in order to assuring concentric request for alignment of the system. In general the HRCM have the performance parameters with 2.5m focal length, 20 FOV, 1/11relative aperture, (0.4-0.8) micrometer spectral range, 10 micron pixel size of TDI CCD, weight less than 20kg, 1m ground pixel resolution at flying orbit 500km high. Design and analysis of the HRCM put up in the paper indicate that HRCM have many advantages to use it in space. Keywords High resolution TDI CCD Sub-pixel imaging Light-weighted optical system SiC mirror

  20. Design and Development of Multi-Purpose CCD Camera System with Thermoelectric Cooling: Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-W. Kang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We designed and developed a multi-purpose CCD camera system for three kinds of CCDs; KAF-0401E(768×512, KAF-1602E(1536×1024, KAF-3200E(2184×1472 made by KODAK Co.. The system supports fast USB port as well as parallel port for data I/O and control signal. The packing is based on two stage circuit boards for size reduction and contains built-in filter wheel. Basic hardware components include clock pattern circuit, A/D conversion circuit, CCD data flow control circuit, and CCD temperature control unit. The CCD temperature can be controlled with accuracy of approximately 0.4° C in the max. range of temperature, Δ 33° C. This CCD camera system has with readout noise 6 e^{-}, and system gain 5 e^{-}/ADU. A total of 10 CCD camera systems were produced and our tests show that all of them show passable performance.

  1. C.C.D. Readout Of A Picosecond Streak Camera With An Intensified C.C.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonier, M.; Richard, J. C.; Cavailler, C.; Mens, A.; Raze, G.

    1985-02-01

    This paper deals with a digital streak camera readout device. The device consists in a low light level television camera made of a solid state C.C.D. array coupled to an image intensifier associated to a video-digitizer coupled to a micro-computer system. The streak camera images are picked-up as a video signal, digitized and stored. This system allows the fast recording and the automatic processing of the data provided by the streak tube. Starting from the output screen of the streak camera, the constitutive elements are : - A fiber optic taper (A.O. Scientific Instruments) set in contact with the fiber optic output window of the streak tube achieves the image demagnification ; - A double proximity focused image intensifier (RTC - XX1410 SP) achieves the bright-ness amplification without any distortion ; - A second fiber optic taper achieves the dimensional matching between intensifier output and C.C.D. sensitive area ;

  2. A luminescence imaging system based on a CCD camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Markey, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    of the spectrum, the CCD system is less sensitive than the standard bi-alkali photocathode photomultipliers that are commonly used. However, the CCD has a peak performance between 500 and 900 nm. and is more sensitive than the photomultiplier tube over this range. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  3. Design of a CCD Camera for Space Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-05

    Analog to Digital Converter (A/D) a reference above ground. When the actual pixel voltage is clocked through, the reset level is subtracted and the bias...low leakage to minimize input current errors. Figure 5 CDS Block Diagram 5. CCD DRIVE CIRCUIT The CCD requires image clocks to move the collected...the image clocks . The 4427 is a single ended driver which requires level translating. In this design analog switches convert the 3.3 V digital

  4. Opinion rating of comparison photographs of television pictures from CCD cameras under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reading, V.M.; Dumbreck, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the development of a general method of testing the effects of gamma radiation on CCD television cameras, this is a report of an experimental study on the optimisation of still photographic representation of video pictures recorded before and during camera irradiation. (author)

  5. Development of a Portable 3CCD Camera System for Multispectral Imaging of Biological Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hoyoung; Park, Soo Hyun; Noh, Sang Ha; Lim, Jongguk; Kim, Moon S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the need for imaging devices capable of multispectral imaging beyond the visible region, to allow for quality and safety evaluations of agricultural commodities. Conventional multispectral imaging devices lack flexibility in spectral waveband selectivity for such applications. In this paper, a recently developed portable 3CCD camera with significant improvements over existing imaging devices is presented. A beam-splitter prism assembly for 3CCD was designed to ac...

  6. High performance CCD camera system for digitalisation of 2D DIGE gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijkstra, Annemieke; Trautwein, Kathleen; Roesler, Stefan; Feenders, Christoph; Danzer, Daniel; Riemenschneider, Udo; Blasius, Bernd; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    An essential step in 2D DIGE-based analysis of differential proteome profiles is the accurate and sensitive digitalisation of 2D DIGE gels. The performance progress of commercially available charge-coupled device (CCD) camera-based systems combined with light emitting diodes (LED) opens up a new possibility for this type of digitalisation. Here, we assessed the performance of a CCD camera system (Intas Advanced 2D Imager) as alternative to a traditionally employed, high-end laser scanner system (Typhoon 9400) for digitalisation of differential protein profiles from three different environmental bacteria. Overall, the performance of the CCD camera system was comparable to the laser scanner, as evident from very similar protein abundance changes (irrespective of spot position and volume), as well as from linear range and limit of detection. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A method for measuring modulation transfer function of CCD device in remote camera with grating pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuheng; Chen, Xinhua; Shen, Weimin

    2008-03-01

    The remote camera that is developed by us is the exclusive functional load of a micro-satellite. Modulation transfer function (MTF) is a direct and accurate parameter to evaluate the system performance of a remote camera, and the MTF of a camera is jointly decided by the MTF of camera lens and its CCD device. The MTF of the camera lens can be tested directly with commercial optical system testing instrument, but it is indispensable to measure the MTF of the CCD device accurately before setting up the whole camera to evaluate the performance of the whole camera in advance. Compared with other existed MTF measuring methods, this method using grating pattern requires less equipment and simpler arithmetic. Only one complete scan of the grating pattern and later data processing and interpolation are needed to get the continuous MTF curves of the whole camera and its CCD device. High-precision optical system testing instrument guarantees the precision of this indirect measuring method. This indirect method to measure MTF is of reference use for the method of testing MTF of electronic device and for gaining MTF indirectly from corresponding CTF.

  8. An attempt of CCD camera application for concentration distribution imaging of low energy β-emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Author presented the possibility of using CCD camera to the surface investigation of the 63 Ni concentration dispersion in different materials (porcelain, SiO 2 ; humic substances). The liquid scintillation, varnish and scintillation screen were applied to convert from β - radiation to the UV-VIS light. It was proved that the number of counts registered by the CCD camera for the varnish or screen samples was proportional to the 63 Ni surface concentration. The radioluminescence of porcelain, dentin and enamel tooth can use in analysis of 63 Ni, 14 C in these materials. The advantages and faults of this method were discussed. (author)

  9. Study of the dark current in a spectrograph with a CCD camera

    OpenAIRE

    Hanselaer, Peter; Acuna, Paula; Sandoval, Claudia; Colombo, Elisa; Sandoval, José

    2014-01-01

    The spectral analysis of radiant quantities is usually performed using spectrographs with a CCD camera attached. The pixels of the CCD camera employ the photoelectric effect to generate electrical signals which are proportional to the intensity of light received. However, as a number of electrons will be generated even in the darkness, a “dark current” will be recorded too which adds to the measurement of the signal of the light source being analyzed. In this work we present the study of t...

  10. CCD digital camera maps the East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Margo H.; Smith, Milton O.; Fornari, Daniel J.

    Since the pioneering work of Ewing et al. [1946] and Edgerton [1963] on the development of modern deep-sea camera systems, photographs of the deep seabed have been fundamental to marine geological investigations, portraying deep-sea fauna and permitting study of seafloor morphology at scales ranging from centimeters to meters [e.g., Heezen and Hollister, 1971; Spiess and Tyce, 1973; Grassle et al., 1979; Ballard and Moore, 1977; Lonsdale and Spiess, 1980; Fox et al., 1988]. Deep-sea photography has advanced from single-frame bounce cameras to sophisticated remotely operated vehicles (ROV) containing a complement of optical and acoustical data sensors and altitude-recording devices. Recent advances in camera technology, notably the development of digital camera systems [e.g., Harris et al., 1987], are rapidly increasing the information content of deep-sea photographs. Digital photographs are superior to their analog counterparts because they can be computer enhanced to extract features that are difficult to resolve due to poor lighting, for example. They also lend themselves to quantitative analysis, facilitating numerical comparisons between acoustic backscatter data and optical imagery of various seafloor terrains.

  11. A Design and Development of Multi-Purpose CCD Camera System with Thermoelectric Cooling: Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Oh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a software which we developed for the multi-purpose CCD camera. This software can be used on the all 3 types of CCD - KAF-0401E (768×512, KAF-1602E (15367times;1024, KAF-3200E (2184×1472 made in KODAK Co.. For the efficient CCD camera control, the software is operated with two independent processes of the CCD control program and the temperature/shutter operation program. This software is designed to fully automatic operation as well as manually operation under LINUX system, and is controled by LINUX user signal procedure. We plan to use this software for all sky survey system and also night sky monitoring and sky observation. As our results, the read-out time of each CCD are about 15sec, 64sec, 134sec for KAF-0401E, KAF-1602E, KAF-3200E., because these time are limited by the data transmission speed of parallel port. For larger format CCD, the data transmission is required more high speed. we are considering this control software to one using USB port for high speed data transmission.

  12. Miniature CCD X-Ray Imaging Camera Technology Final Report CRADA No. TC-773-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conder, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mummolo, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of the project was to develop a compact, large active area, high spatial resolution, high dynamic range, charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating X-rays. The camera head and controller needed to be capable of operation within a vacuum environment and small enough to be fielded within the small vacuum target chambers at LLNL.

  13. Absolute spectral calibration of an intensified CCD camera using twin beams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haderka, O.; Peřina Jr., J.; Michálek, Václav; Hamar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2014), B1-B7 ISSN 0740-3224 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spectral calibration * intensified CCD camera * twin beams * photon pairs Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.970, year: 2014

  14. Ultrahigh-speed, high-sensitivity color camera with 300,000-pixel single CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, K.; Arai, T.; Yonai, J.; Hayashida, T.; Ohtake, H.; Kurita, T.; Tanioka, K.; Maruyama, H.; Namiki, J.; Yanagi, T.; Yoshida, T.; van Kuijk, H.; Bosiers, Jan T.; Etoh, T. G.

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an ultrahigh-speed, high-sensitivity portable color camera with a new 300,000-pixel single CCD. The 300,000-pixel CCD, which has four times the number of pixels of our initial model, was developed by seamlessly joining two 150,000-pixel CCDs. A green-red-green-blue (GRGB) Bayer filter is used to realize a color camera with the single-chip CCD. The camera is capable of ultrahigh-speed video recording at up to 1,000,000 frames/sec, and small enough to be handheld. We also developed a technology for dividing the CCD output signal to enable parallel, highspeed readout and recording in external memory; this makes possible long, continuous shots up to 1,000 frames/second. As a result of an experiment, video footage was imaged at an athletics meet. Because of high-speed shooting, even detailed movements of athletes' muscles were captured. This camera can capture clear slow-motion videos, so it enables previously impossible live footage to be imaged for various TV broadcasting programs.

  15. Development of X-ray CCD camera system with high readout rate using ASIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Daisuke; Anabuki, Naohisa; Miyata, Emi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Doty, John P.; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Katayama, Haruyoshi

    2009-01-01

    We report on the development of an X-ray charge-coupled device (CCD) camera system with high readout rate using application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and Camera Link standard. The distinctive ΔΣ type analog-to-digital converter is introduced into the chip to achieve effective noise shaping and to obtain a high resolution with relatively simple circuits. The unit test proved moderately low equivalent input noise of 70μV with a high readout pixel rate of 625 kHz, while the entire chip consumes only 100 mW. The Camera Link standard was applied for the connectivity between the camera system and frame grabbers. In the initial test of the whole system, we adopted a P-channel CCD with a thick depletion layer developed for X-ray CCD camera onboard the next Japanese X-ray astronomical satellite. The characteristic X-rays from 109 Cd were successfully read out resulting in the energy resolution of 379(±7)eV (FWHM) at 22.1 keV, that is, ΔE/E=1.7% with a readout rate of 44 kHz.

  16. Multi-spectral CCD camera system for ocean water color and seacoast observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Chen, Shiping; Wu, Yanlin; Huang, Qiaolin; Jin, Weiqi

    2001-10-01

    One of the earth observing instruments on HY-1 Satellite which will be launched in 2001, the multi-spectral CCD camera system, is developed by Beijing Institute of Space Mechanics & Electricity (BISME), Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST). In 798 km orbit, the system can provide images with 250 m ground resolution and a swath of 500 km. It is mainly used for coast zone dynamic mapping and oceanic watercolor monitoring, which include the pollution of offshore and coast zone, plant cover, watercolor, ice, terrain underwater, suspended sediment, mudflat, soil and vapor gross. The multi- spectral camera system is composed of four monocolor CCD cameras, which are line array-based, 'push-broom' scanning cameras, and responding for four spectral bands. The camera system adapts view field registration; that is, each camera scans the same region at the same moment. Each of them contains optics, focal plane assembly, electrical circuit, installation structure, calibration system, thermal control and so on. The primary features on the camera system are: (1) Offset of the central wavelength is better than 5 nm; (2) Degree of polarization is less than 0.5%; (3) Signal-to-noise ratio is about 1000; (4) Dynamic range is better than 2000:1; (5) Registration precision is better than 0.3 pixel; (6) Quantization value is 12 bit.

  17. Development of a portable 3CCD camera system for multispectral imaging of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoyoung; Park, Soo Hyun; Noh, Sang Ha; Lim, Jongguk; Kim, Moon S

    2014-10-27

    Recent studies have suggested the need for imaging devices capable of multispectral imaging beyond the visible region, to allow for quality and safety evaluations of agricultural commodities. Conventional multispectral imaging devices lack flexibility in spectral waveband selectivity for such applications. In this paper, a recently developed portable 3CCD camera with significant improvements over existing imaging devices is presented. A beam-splitter prism assembly for 3CCD was designed to accommodate three interference filters that can be easily changed for application-specific multispectral waveband selection in the 400 to 1000 nm region. We also designed and integrated electronic components on printed circuit boards with firmware programming, enabling parallel processing, synchronization, and independent control of the three CCD sensors, to ensure the transfer of data without significant delay or data loss due to buffering. The system can stream 30 frames (3-waveband images in each frame) per second. The potential utility of the 3CCD camera system was demonstrated in the laboratory for detecting defect spots on apples.

  18. Development of a Portable 3CCD Camera System for Multispectral Imaging of Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyoung Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested the need for imaging devices capable of multispectral imaging beyond the visible region, to allow for quality and safety evaluations of agricultural commodities. Conventional multispectral imaging devices lack flexibility in spectral waveband selectivity for such applications. In this paper, a recently developed portable 3CCD camera with significant improvements over existing imaging devices is presented. A beam-splitter prism assembly for 3CCD was designed to accommodate three interference filters that can be easily changed for application-specific multispectral waveband selection in the 400 to 1000 nm region. We also designed and integrated electronic components on printed circuit boards with firmware programming, enabling parallel processing, synchronization, and independent control of the three CCD sensors, to ensure the transfer of data without significant delay or data loss due to buffering. The system can stream 30 frames (3-waveband images in each frame per second. The potential utility of the 3CCD camera system was demonstrated in the laboratory for detecting defect spots on apples.

  19. 3D measurement for archeological artifact using CCD camera and line laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Hatano, Katsuhiro; Chikatsu, Hirofumi

    1997-07-01

    In the compilation of archival records for archeological artifacts, true ortho-graphic drawings of these artifacts have to be drawn by the archaeologists themselves or part- timers, taking a great deal of time, labor and skill. For saving the labor, the authors have developed ortho projection system using CCD camera. 3D measurement system using ortho projection system are described in this paper. Finally, it demonstrates wireframe model for jomon-pottery by using this system.

  20. Versatile ultrafast pump-probe imaging with high sensitivity CCD camera

    OpenAIRE

    Pezeril , Thomas; Klieber , Christoph; Temnov , Vasily; Huntzinger , Jean-Roch; Anane , Abdelmadjid

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A powerful imaging technique based on femtosecond time-resolved measurements with a high dynamic range, commercial CCD camera is presented. Ultrafast phenomena induced by a femtosecond laser pump are visualized through the lock-in type acquisition of images recorded by a femtosecond laser probe. This technique allows time-resolved measurements of laser excited phenomena at multiple probe wavelengths (spectrometer mode) or conventional imaging of the sample surface (ima...

  1. Development and characterization of a CCD camera system for use on six-inch manipulator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logory, L.M.; Bell, P.M.; Conder, A.D.; Lee, F.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed, constructed, and fielded a compact CCD camera system for use on the Six Inch Manipulator (SIM) at the Nova laser facility. The camera system has been designed to directly replace the 35 mm film packages on all active SIM-based diagnostics. The unit's electronic package is constructed for small size and high thermal conductivity using proprietary printed circuit board technology, thus reducing the size of the overall camera and improving its performance when operated within the vacuum environment of the Nova laser target chamber. The camera has been calibrated and found to yield a linear response, with superior dynamic range and signal-to-noise levels as compared to T-Max 3200 optic film, while providing real-time access to the data. Limiting factors related to fielding such devices on Nova will be discussed, in addition to planned improvements of the current design

  2. Online inspection of thermo-chemical heat treatment processes with CCD camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauner, Gerald; Darilion, Gerald; Pree, Ronald; Heim, Daniel; Hendorfer, G.

    2005-11-01

    Plasma nitriding belongs to the group of the thermo chemical surface heat treatments. During this process nitrogen is dissociated into the surface of the material increasing hardness, wear resistance, endurance strength and/or corrosion resistance. This paper presents a new inspection system based on a CCD camera system for monitoring such heat treatment processes (PACVD, plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition). Treatment temperatures commonly used are within the range of 350 °C to 600 °C. A near infrared enhanced CCD camera system equipped with specifically chosen spectral filters is used to measure spectral emittances during the surface modification. In particular the spectral operating range of 950nm to 1150nm of the silicon CCD camera is utilized. The measurement system is based on the principles of ratio pyrometry (dual-band method) known from non-contact temperature measurements, in which two images of the same scene, each taken at slightly different spectral bands, are used to determine the spectral light characteristics. This results in an improved relative sensitivity for spectral changes (i.e. deviations from the gray-body hypothesis) during the surface modification.

  3. A USB 2.0 computer interface for the UCO/Lick CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingzhi; Stover, Richard J.

    2004-09-01

    The new UCO/Lick Observatory CCD camera uses a 200 MHz fiber optic cable to transmit image data and an RS232 serial line for low speed bidirectional command and control. Increasingly RS232 is a legacy interface supported on fewer computers. The fiber optic cable requires either a custom interface board that is plugged into the mainboard of the image acquisition computer to accept the fiber directly or an interface converter that translates the fiber data onto a widely used standard interface. We present here a simple USB 2.0 interface for the UCO/Lick camera. A single USB cable connects to the image acquisition computer and the camera's RS232 serial and fiber optic cables plug into the USB interface. Since most computers now support USB 2.0 the Lick interface makes it possible to use the camera on essentially any modern computer that has the supporting software. No hardware modifications or additions to the computer are needed. The necessary device driver software has been written for the Linux operating system which is now widely used at Lick Observatory. The complete data acquisition software for the Lick CCD camera is running on a variety of PC style computers as well as an HP laptop.

  4. New design for the UCO/Lick Observatory CCD guide camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Mingzhi; Stover, Richard J.

    1996-03-01

    A new CCD based field acquisition and telescope guiding camera is being designed and built at UCO/Lick Observatory. Our goal is a camera which is fully computer controllable, compact in size, versatile enough to provide a wide variety of image acquisition modes, and able to operate with a wide variety of CCD detectors. The camera will improve our remote-observing capabilities since it will be easy to control the camera and obtain images over the Observatory computer network. To achieve the desired level of operating flexibility, the design incorporates state-of-the-art technologies such as high density, high speed programmable logic devices and non-volatile static memory. Various types of CCDs can be used in this system without major modification of the hardware or software. Though fully computer controllable, the camera can be operated as a stand-alone unit with most operating parameters set locally. A stand-alone display subsystem is also available. A thermoelectric device is used to cool the CCD to about -45c. Integration times can be varied over a range of 0.1 to 1000 seconds. High speed pixel skipping in both horizontal and vertical directions allows us to quickly access a selected subarea of the detector. Three different read out speeds allow the astronomer to select between high-speed/high-noise and low-speed/low-noise operation. On- chip pixel binning and MPP operation are also selectable options. This system can provide automatic sky level measurement and subtraction to accommodate dynamically changing background levels.

  5. On-Line High Dose-Rate Gamma Ray Irradiation Test of the CCD/CMOS Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, test results of gamma ray irradiation to CCD/CMOS cameras are described. From the CAMS (containment atmospheric monitoring system) data of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant station, we found out that the gamma ray dose-rate when the hydrogen explosion occurred in nuclear reactors 1{approx}3 is about 160 Gy/h. If assumed that the emergency response robot for the management of severe accident of the nuclear power plant has been sent into the reactor area to grasp the inside situation of reactor building and to take precautionary measures against releasing radioactive materials, the CCD/CMOS cameras, which are loaded with the robot, serve as eye of the emergency response robot. In the case of the Japanese Quince robot system, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras are used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. In the preceding assumptions, a major problem which arises when dealing with CCD/CMOS cameras in the severe accident situations of the nuclear power plant is the presence of high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. In the case of the DBA (design basis accident) situations of the nuclear power plant, in order to use a CCD/CMOS camera as an ad-hoc monitoring unit in the vicinity of high radioactivity structures and components of the nuclear reactor area, a robust survivability of this camera in such intense gamma-radiation fields therefore should be verified. The CCD/CMOS cameras of various types were gamma irradiated at a

  6. A simple and accurate method for the quality control of the I.I.-DR apparatus using the CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hitoshi; Shiraishi, Akihisa; Kuraishi, Masahiko

    2000-01-01

    With the advancing development of CCD cameras, the I.I.-DR apparatus has been introduced into the x-ray fluoroscopy television system. Consequently, quality control of the system has become a complicated task. We developed a simple, accurate method for quality control of the I.I.-DR apparatus using the CCD camera. Experiments were separately performed for the imager system [laser imager, DDX (dynamic digital x-ray system)] and the imaging system (I.I., ND-filter, IRIS, CCD camera). Quality control of the imager system was done by simply examining both input and output characteristics with a sliding pattern. Quality control of the imaging system was also conducted by estimating AVE (the average volume element), which was obtained using a phantom under the constant conditions. The results indicated that this simplified method is useful as a weekly quality control check of the I.I.-DR apparatus using the CCD camera. (author)

  7. A directional fast neutron detector using scintillating fibers and an intensified CCD camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holslin, Daniel; Armstrong, A.W.; Hagan, William; Shreve, David; Smith, Scott

    1994-01-01

    We have been developing and testing a scintillating fiber detector (SFD) for use as a fast neutron sensor which can discriminate against neutrons entering at angles non-parallel to the fiber axis (''directionality''). The detector/convertor component is a fiber bundle constructed of plastic scintillating fibers each measuring 10 cm long and either 0.3 mm or 0.5 mm in diameter. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were made to optimize the bundle response to a range of fast neutron energies and to intense fluxes of high energy gamma-rays. The bundle is coupled to a set of gamma-ray insenitive electro-optic intensifiers whose output is viewed by a CCD camera directly coupled to the intensifiers. Two types of CCD cameras were utilized: 1) a standard, interline RS-170 camera with electronic shuttering and 2) a high-speed (up to 850 frame/s) field-transfer camera. Measurements of the neutron detection efficiency and directionality were made using 14 MeV neutrons, and the response to gamma-rays was performed using intense fluxes from radioisotopic sources (up to 20 R/h). Recently, the detector was constructed and tested using a large 10 cm by 10 cm square fiber bundle coupled to a 10 cm diameter GEN I intensifier tube. We present a description of the various detector systems and report the results of experimental tests. ((orig.))

  8. Numerical simulations and analyses of temperature control loop heat pipe for space CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingliang; Yang, Tao; Li, Chunlin

    2016-10-01

    As one of the key units of space CCD camera, the temperature range and stability of CCD components affect the image's indexes. Reasonable thermal design and robust thermal control devices are needed. One kind of temperature control loop heat pipe (TCLHP) is designed, which highly meets the thermal control requirements of CCD components. In order to study the dynamic behaviors of heat and mass transfer of TCLHP, particularly in the orbital flight case, a transient numerical model is developed by using the well-established empirical correlations for flow models within three dimensional thermal modeling. The temperature control principle and details of mathematical model are presented. The model is used to study operating state, flow and heat characteristics based upon the analyses of variations of temperature, pressure and quality under different operating modes and external heat flux variations. The results indicate that TCLHP can satisfy the thermal control requirements of CCD components well, and always ensure good temperature stability and uniformity. By comparison between flight data and simulated results, it is found that the model is to be accurate to within 1°C. The model can be better used for predicting and understanding the transient performance of TCLHP.

  9. A machine vision system with CCD cameras for patient positioning in radiotherapy: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yamaguchi, Toshihiro; Toba, Takashi; Anai, Shigeo; Terashima, Hiromi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2005-12-01

    To determine positioning accuracy of a machine vision system in radiotherapy. The machine vision system was composed of 640 x 480 pixel CCD cameras and computerized control systems. For image acquisition, the phantom was set up for the reference position and a single CCD camera was positioned 1.5 m from the isocenter. The image data of the fiducial marker with 1.5 mm lead pellet on the lateral surface of the phantom was captured onto the CCD, and then the position of the marker was accurately calculated. The phantom was moved 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 2.00, and 3.00 mm from the reference position, using a micrometer head. The position of the fiducial marker was analyzed using a kilo-voltage fluoroscopic imaging system and a machine vision system. Using fluoroscopic images, the discrepancy between the actual movement of the phantom by micrometer heads and the measurement was found to be 0.12 +/- 0.05 mm (mean +/- standard deviation). In contrast, the detection of the movement by the machine vision system coincided with the discrepancy of 0.0067 +/- 0.0048 mm. This study suggests that the machine vision system can be used to measure small changes in patient position with a resolution of less than 0.1 mm.

  10. Continuous real-time digital data acquisition with high-resolution visible and infrared CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stufflebeam, Joseph L.; Waldie, Arthur H.; Qualtrough, John A.; Soules, David B.; Ambrose, Joseph G.; Reed, Michelle F.

    1993-08-01

    A high speed digital interface has been developed to accept real time digital pixel data from high resolution CCD cameras. The interface is currently in use with both a 640 X 486 12-bit digital infrared camera operating in non-interlaced mode at 30 frames per second, and a 756 X 484 8-bit digital visible camera operating in interlaced mode at 60 fields per second. Using programmable logic, the interface is reconfigurable to accept digital data from a variety of sensors at data rates of up to 18 megabytes per second. The buffered digital data is recorded on a hard disk array consisting of up to nine individual drives, with a present capacity exceeding 5.9 gigabytes. Continuous recording is achieved by implementing a loop function on the disk array.

  11. CCD camera-based analysis of thin film growth in industrial PACVD processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauner, G.; Schulte, T.; Forsich, C.; Heim, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we present a method for the characterization of (semi-transparent) thin film growth during PACVD processes (plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition), based on analysis of thermal radiation by means of nearinfrared imaging. Due to interference effects during thin film growth, characteristic emissivity signal variations can be observed which allow very detailed spatio-temporal analysis of growth characteristics (e.g. relative growth rates). We use a standard CCD camera with a near-infrared band-pass filter (center wavelength 1030 nm, FWHM 10nm) as a thermal imaging device. The spectral sensitivity of a Si-CCD sensor at 1μm is sufficient to allow the imaging of thermal radiation at temperatures above approx. 400°C, whereas light emissions from plasma discharges (which mainly occur in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum) barely affect the image formation.

  12. Characterization and Compensation of the Fixed Pattern Noise in the Output of a CCD Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas W. WINKLER

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A monochrome CCD camera is used in a reflectometer in order to measure the luminance of light reflected by a specimen. This application requires a compensation of the non-uniformities introduced by the optical system, also known as fixed pattern noise. We provide an image formation model and characterize the bias and the dark signal of the CCD sensor and we use a self-built integrating sphere with an inner diameter of 500 mm as a uniform light source in order to characterize the photo sensitivity of the whole optical system. Finally, a new effective approach to compensate the fixed pattern noise pixel by pixel and in dependence of the exposure time is proposed.

  13. Experimental research on femto-second laser damaging array CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Junfeng; Guo, Jin; Wang, Ting-feng; Wang, Ming

    2013-05-01

    Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) are widely used in military and security applications, such as airborne and ship based surveillance, satellite reconnaissance and so on. Homeland security requires effective means to negate these advanced overseeing systems. Researches show that CCD based EO systems can be significantly dazzled or even damaged by high-repetition rate pulsed lasers. Here, we report femto - second laser interaction with CCD camera, which is probable of great importance in future. Femto - second laser is quite fresh new lasers, which has unique characteristics, such as extremely short pulse width (1 fs = 10-15 s), extremely high peak power (1 TW = 1012W), and especially its unique features when interacting with matters. Researches in femto second laser interaction with materials (metals, dielectrics) clearly indicate non-thermal effect dominates the process, which is of vast difference from that of long pulses interaction with matters. Firstly, the damage threshold test are performed with femto second laser acting on the CCD camera. An 800nm, 500μJ, 100fs laser pulse is used to irradiate interline CCD solid-state image sensor in the experiment. In order to focus laser energy onto tiny CCD active cells, an optical system of F/5.6 is used. A Sony production CCDs are chose as typical targets. The damage threshold is evaluated with multiple test data. Point damage, line damage and full array damage were observed when the irradiated pulse energy continuously increase during the experiment. The point damage threshold is found 151.2 mJ/cm2.The line damage threshold is found 508.2 mJ/cm2.The full-array damage threshold is found to be 5.91 J/cm2. Although the phenomenon is almost the same as that of nano laser interaction with CCD, these damage thresholds are substantially lower than that of data obtained from nano second laser interaction with CCD. Then at the same time, the electric features after different degrees of damage are tested with electronic multi

  14. White-light fringe detection based on a novel light source and colour CCD camera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchta, Zdeněk; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 9 (2011), 094031:1-6 ISSN 0957-0233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP102/09/P293; GA ČR GP102/09/P630; GA MPO 2A-1TP1/127; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : low-coherence interferometry * phase-crossing algorithm * CCD camera * gauge block Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.494, year: 2011

  15. Developments of engineering model of the X-ray CCD camera of the MAXI experiment onboard the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Miyata, E; Kamazuka, T; Akutsu, D; Kouno, H; Tsunemi, H; Matsuoka, M; Tomida, H; Ueno, S; Hamaguchi, K; Tanaka, I

    2002-01-01

    MAXI, Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image, is an X-ray observatory on the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) Exposed Facility (EF) on the International Space Station (ISS). MAXI is a slit scanning camera which consists of two kinds of X-ray detectors: one is a one-dimensional position-sensitive proportional counter with a total area of approx 5000 cm sup 2 , the Gas Slit Camera (GSC), and the other is an X-ray CCD array with a total area approx 200 cm sup 2 , the Solid-state Slit Camera (SSC). The GSC subtends a field of view with an angular dimension of 1 deg. x180 deg. while the SSC subtends a field of view with an angular dimension of 1 deg. times a little less than 180 deg. . In the course of one station orbit, MAXI can scan almost the entire sky with a precision of 1 deg. and with an X-ray energy range 0.5-30 keV. We have developed an engineering model (EM) for all components of the SSC. Their performance test is underway. We have also developed several kinds of CCDs fabricated from different wafers. Since th...

  16. A rehabilitation training system with double-CCD camera and automatic spatial positioning technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chern-Sheng; Wei, Tzu-Chi; Lu, An-Tsung; Hung, San-Shan; Chen, Wei-Lung; Chang, Chia-Chang

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a computer game for machine vision integrated rehabilitation training system. The main function of the system is to allow users to conduct hand grasp-and-place movement through machine vision integration. Images are captured by a double-CCD camera, and then positioned on a large screen. After defining the right, left, upper, and lower boundaries of the captured images, an automatic spatial positioning technique is employed to obtain their correlation functions, and lookup tables are defined for cameras. This system can provide rehabilitation courses and games that allow users to exercise grasp-and-place movements, in order to improve their upper limb movement control, trigger trunk control, and balance training.

  17. Design of a fast multi-hit position sensitive detector based on a CCD camera

    CERN Document Server

    Renaud, L; Da Costa, G; Deconihout, B

    2002-01-01

    A new position sensitive detector has been designed for time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It combines a double micro-channel plate stage with a phosphor screen, the conductive coating of which is divided into an array of strip-like-shaped anodes. Time-of-flight signals are measured on the strip array with a 0.5 ns resolution, while a CCD camera records light-spots generated by ion impacts on the phosphor screen. With this particular imaging device, it is possible to accurately assign time-of-flight to positions recorded by the camera. This paper describes the main features of this new position sensitive detector and results obtained with a three-dimensional atom probe are presented.

  18. On-ground and in-orbit characterisation plan for the PLATO CCD normal cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J. P. D.; Walton, D.; Smith, A.; Hailey, M.; Curry, P.; Kennedy, T.

    2017-11-01

    PLAnetary Transits and Ocillations (PLATO) is the third European Space Agency (ESA) medium class mission in ESA's cosmic vision programme due for launch in 2026. PLATO will carry out high precision un-interrupted photometric monitoring in the visible band of large samples of bright solar-type stars. The primary mission goal is to detect and characterise terrestrial exoplanets and their systems with emphasis on planets orbiting in the habitable zone, this will be achieved using light curves to detect planetary transits. PLATO uses a novel multi- instrument concept consisting of 26 small wide field cameras The 26 cameras are made up of a telescope optical unit, four Teledyne e2v CCD270s mounted on a focal plane array and connected to a set of Front End Electronics (FEE) which provide CCD control and readout. There are 2 fast cameras with high read-out cadence (2.5 s) for magnitude ~ 4–8 stars, being developed by the German Aerospace Centre and 24 normal (N) cameras with a cadence of 25 s to monitor stars with a magnitude greater than 8. The N-FEEs are being developed at University College London's Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) and will be characterised along with the associated CCDs. The CCDs and N-FEEs will undergo rigorous on-ground characterisation and the performance of the CCDs will continue to be monitored in-orbit. This paper discusses the initial development of the experimental arrangement, test procedures and current status of the N-FEE. The parameters explored will include gain, quantum efficiency, pixel response non-uniformity, dark current and Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI). The current in-orbit characterisation plan is also discussed which will enable the performance of the CCDs and their associated N-FEE to be monitored during the mission, this will include measurements of CTI giving an indication of the impact of radiation damage in the CCDs.

  19. STRIPING NOISE REMOVAL OF IMAGES ACQUIRED BY CBERS 2 CCD CAMERA SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Amraei

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available CCD Camera is a multi-spectral sensor that is carried by CBERS 2 satellite. Imaging technique in this sensor is push broom. In images acquired by the CCD Camera, some vertical striping noise can be seen. This is due to the detectors mismatch, inter detector variability, improper calibration of detectors and low signal-to-noise ratio. These noises are more profound in images acquired from the homogeneous surfaces, which are processed at level 2. However, the existence of these noises render the interpretation of the data and extracting information from these images difficult. In this work, spatial moment matching method is proposed to modify these images. In this method, the statistical moments such as mean and standard deviation of columns in each band are used to balance the statistical specifications of the detector array to those of reference values. After the removal of the noise, some periodic diagonal stripes remain in the image where their removal by using the aforementioned method seems impossible. Therefore, to omit them, frequency domain Butterworth notch filter was applied. Finally to evaluate the results, the image statistical moments such as the mean and standard deviation were deployed. The study proves the effectiveness of the method in noise removal.

  20. Technical aspects and preliminary results of the CCD camera diagnostics on Extrap T2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecconello, M.; Brzozowski, J.

    1999-01-01

    During the last months of Extrap T2 operations an imaging acquisition system, based on charge-coupled devices (CCD) cameras, has been operated. CCD cameras are a standard diagnostic used in many fusion experiments: i) to obtain a direct insight of the plasma behaviour during the pulse, of the evolution of plasma-wall interactions and, eventually, of locked modes, ii) to measure local quantities such as the wall temperature and the impurity influxes, iii) to study the hydrogen recycling behaviour and iv) to estimate the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers. One of the aims of our imaging campaign was to check the utility of such diagnostic for T2. The purpose of this report is to describe the technical aspects involved in the use of such diagnostic and to briefly describe the results obtained. In this view, this report aims to be a guide to the development of a dedicated image acquisition system for Extrap T2, after the planned rebuild, by stressing the problems and limitations encountered during this campaign

  1. High-speed imaging using 3CCD camera and multi-color LED flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Ala; Friedl, Alexander; Cierpka, Christian; Kähler, Christian; Madhavan, Vis

    2017-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the possibility of capturing full-resolution, high-speed image sequences using a regular 3CCD color camera in conjunction with high-power light emitting diodes of three different colors. This is achieved using a novel approach, referred to as spectral-shuttering, where a high-speed image sequence is captured using short duration light pulses of different colors that are sent consecutively in very close succession. The work presented in this paper demonstrates the feasibility of configuring a high-speed camera system using low cost and readily available off-the-shelf components. This camera can be used for recording six-frame sequences at frame rates up to 20 kHz or three-frame sequences at even higher frame rates. Both color crosstalk and spatial matching between the different channels of the camera are found to be within acceptable limits. A small amount of magnification difference between the different channels is found and a simple calibration procedure for correcting the images is introduced. The images captured using the approach described here are of good quality to be used for obtaining full-field quantitative information using techniques such as digital image correlation and particle image velocimetry. A sequence of six high-speed images of a bubble splash recorded at 400 Hz is presented as a demonstration.

  2. Performance Characterization of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) CCD Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Reyann; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Champey, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding rocket instrument currently being developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), and other partners. The goal of this instrument is to observe and detect the Hanle effect in the scattered Lyman-Alpha UV (121.6nm) light emitted by the Sun's chromosphere. The polarized spectrum imaged by the CCD cameras will capture information about the local magnetic field, allowing for measurements of magnetic strength and structure. In order to make accurate measurements of this effect, the performance characteristics of the three on- board charge-coupled devices (CCDs) must meet certain requirements. These characteristics include: quantum efficiency, gain, dark current, read noise, and linearity. Each of these must meet predetermined requirements in order to achieve satisfactory performance for the mission. The cameras must be able to operate with a gain of 2.0+/- 0.5 e--/DN, a read noise level less than 25e-, a dark current level which is less than 10e-/pixel/s, and a residual non- linearity of less than 1%. Determining these characteristics involves performing a series of tests with each of the cameras in a high vacuum environment. Here we present the methods and results of each of these performance tests for the CLASP flight cameras.

  3. 3D digital image correlation using a single 3CCD colour camera and dichroic filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, F. Q.; Shao, X. X.; Quan, C.

    2018-04-01

    In recent years, three-dimensional digital image correlation methods using a single colour camera have been reported. In this study, we propose a simplified system by employing a dichroic filter (DF) to replace the beam splitter and colour filters. The DF can be used to combine two views from different perspectives reflected by two planar mirrors and eliminate their interference. A 3CCD colour camera is then used to capture two different views simultaneously via its blue and red channels. Moreover, the measurement accuracy of the proposed method is higher since the effect of refraction is reduced. Experiments are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. It is shown that the interference between the blue and red views is insignificant. In addition, the measurement accuracy of the proposed method is validated on the rigid body displacement. The experimental results demonstrate that the measurement accuracy of the proposed method is higher compared with the reported methods using a single colour camera. Finally, the proposed method is employed to measure the in- and out-of-plane displacements of a loaded plastic board. The re-projection errors of the proposed method are smaller than those of the reported methods using a single colour camera.

  4. High time resolution CCD camera with X-ray image intensifier for SPring-8 BL40XU

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, T; Yagi, N

    2003-01-01

    SPring-8 BL40XU is designed to use high flux X-ray for small angle X-ray scattering and multi purpose. The flux at the experimental hutch is about 1 x 10 sup 1 sup 5 photons/sec at 12.4 KeV, which is larger 2 approx 3 figures than other beamlines at SPring-8. To utilize the high flux X-ray efficiently, new high-speed detector is needed. Therefore, a high frame rate CCD camera C7770 (Hamamatsu) and a new 6-inch X-ray image intensifier V5445P (Hamamatsu) were developed for BL40XU. The CCD camera has three CCD chips to increase the readout speed. Three identical images are created by a prism system in the CCD camera and projected onto the three chips. The pixel number of the CCD is 640 x 480 and the frame rate is 291 frames/sec. Reduction of the number of horizontal lines leads to a faster frame rate up to a few thousands. The combination of the CCD and with an X-ray shutter also leads to faster discrete data acquisition. (author)

  5. APPLYING CCD CAMERAS IN STEREO PANORAMA SYSTEMS FOR 3D ENVIRONMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Amini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Proper recontruction of 3D environments is nowadays needed by many organizations and applications. In addition to conventional methods the use of stereo panoramas is an appropriate technique to use due to simplicity, low cost and the ability to view an environment the way it is in reality. This paper investigates the ability of applying stereo CCD cameras for 3D reconstruction and presentation of the environment and geometric measuring among that. For this purpose, a rotating stereo panorama was established using two CCDs with a base-length of 350 mm and a DVR (digital video recorder box. The stereo system was first calibrated using a 3D test-field and used to perform accurate measurements. The results of investigating the system in a real environment showed that although this kind of cameras produce noisy images and they do not have appropriate geometric stability, but they can be easily synchronized, well controlled and reasonable accuracy (about 40 mm in objects at 12 meters distance from the camera can be achieved.

  6. Applications in radiation therapy of a scintillating screen viewed by a CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schippers, J.M.; Boon, S.N.; Luijk, P. van

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dosimetry system has been designed for position-sensitive dose-measurement applications in modern radiation therapy. The system consists of a scintillating screen (Gd 2 O 2 S : Tb), observed by a low-noise CCD camera with a long integration time. The system allows reliable and accurate simultaneous 2D imaging of therapeutic dose distributions in the scintillator with sub millimeter spatial resolution. This system has been applied successfully at different applications in radiation therapy. Results of dose measurements in a treatment modality using a scanning proton beam are reported. It is shown that a quick and reliable measurement can be done. The screen+CCD system has proven to perform accurate dosimetry in applications where beams with a small (1-5 mm) diameter are used and where absolute dosimetry by means of standard ionization chambers is not possible due to their relatively large size. For the routine measurements of the alignment of therapeutic beams with respect to the tumor position, the system detects beam misalignments with an accuracy of 0.05 mm, which is more than sufficient to detect the maximum allowed misalignments in radiation therapy

  7. Contrast reduction in digital images due to x-ray induced damage to a TV camera's CCD image receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okkalides, D.

    1999-01-01

    The CCD image receptor in a monochrome TV camera was irradiated in the dark with a single-phase 80 kVp narrow beam carrying an additional 0.5 mm Al filter. It was found that the CCD responded to the x-rays with a transient signal which would reach a maximum value at about 70 mR per image frame. The signal's contrast would reach a maximum of about 7%, but was detectable at much lower exposure rates. Continuous irradiation of the CCD image receptor created a 'lesion' at the point of incidence that remained after the x-ray beam was switched off. This signal seemed to be due to permanent damage to the CCD and could be detected after a cumulative exposure of less than 20 R. It was shown that such damage could be created much more effectively if the TV camera was switched off rather than on and the maximum contrast was achieved with about 75 R and 220 R respectively. The maximum contrast achieved was about 8%. Further increase in the cumulative exposure of a particular location on the CCD image receptor was not investigated but it seemed reasonable that much higher contrast values could be reached if irradiation was continued. The latter damage described here was found to persist for at least several weeks and hence it will probably prevent any normal use of the TV camera in the future. (author)

  8. 32x32 HgCdTe/CCD infrared camera for the 2-5 micron range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monin, J.L.; Vauglin, I.; Sibille, F.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a complete infrared camera system, based on a high electron capacity detector (HgCdTe/CCD), that has been used under high background conditions to generate astronomical images. The performance of the system and some results are presented, and the use of such a detector in astronomy is discussed. 8 references

  9. CCD camera as feasible large-area-size x-ray detector for x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyang; Sakurai, Kenji

    2017-06-01

    As X-ray fluorescence radiation isotropically spreads from the sample, one of the most important requirements for spectrometers for many years has been a large solid angle. Charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras are quite promising options because they have a fairly large area size, usually larger than 150 mm 2 . The present work has examined the feasibility of a commercially available camera with an ordinary CCD chip (1024 × 1024 pixels, the size of one pixel is 13 μm × 13 μm, designed for visible light) as an X-ray fluorescence detector. As X-ray photons create charges in the CCD chip, reading very quickly the amount is the key for this method. It is very simple if the charges always go into one pixel. As the charges quite often spread to several pixels, and sometimes can be lost, it is important to recover the information by filtering out the unsuccessful events. For this, a simple, versatile, and reliable scheme has been proposed. It has been demonstrated that the energy resolution of the present camera is 150 eV at Mn Kα, and also that its overall achievement in seeing minor elements is almost compatible with conventional X-ray fluorescence detectors. When the CCD camera is combined with a micro-pinhole collimator, full field X-ray fluorescence imaging with a spatial resolution of 20 μm becomes possible. Further feasibility in practical X-ray fluorescence analysis is discussed.

  10. OP09O-OP404-9 Wide Field Camera 3 CCD Quantum Efficiency Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Nick

    2009-01-01

    The HST/Wide Field Camera (WFC) 3 UV/visible channel CCD detectors have exhibited an unanticipated quantum efficiency hysteresis (QEH) behavior. At the nominal operating temperature of -83C, the QEH feature contrast was typically 0.1-0.2% or less. The behavior was replicated using flight spare detectors. A visible light flat-field (540nm) with a several times full-well signal level can pin the detectors at both optical (600nm) and near-UV (230nm) wavelengths, suppressing the QEH behavior. We are characterizing the timescale for the detectors to become unpinned and developing a protocol for flashing the WFC3 CCDs with the instrument's internal calibration system in flight. The HST/Wide Field Camera 3 UV/visible channel CCD detectors have exhibited an unanticipated quantum efficiency hysteresis (QEH) behavior. The first observed manifestation of QEH was the presence in a small percentage of flat-field images of a bowtie-shaped contrast that spanned the width of each chip. At the nominal operating temperature of -83C, the contrast observed for this feature was typically 0.1-0.2% or less, though at warmer temperatures contrasts up to 5% (at -50C) have been observed. The bowtie morphology was replicated using flight spare detectors in tests at the GSFC Detector Characterization Laboratory by power cycling the detector while cold. Continued investigation revealed that a clearly-related global QE suppression at the approximately 5% level can be produced by cooling the detector in the dark; subsequent flat-field exposures at a constant illumination show asymptotically increasing response. This QE "pinning" can be achieved with a single high signal flat-field or a series of lower signal flats; a visible light (500-580nm) flat-field with a signal level of several hundred thousand electrons per pixel is sufficient for QE pinning at both optical (600nm) and near-UV (230nm) wavelengths. We are characterizing the timescale for the detectors to become unpinned and developing a

  11. Measuring the Flatness of Focal Plane for Very Large Mosaic CCD Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang; Estrada, Juan; Cease, Herman; Diehl, H.Thomas; Flaugher, Brenna L.; Kubik, Donna; Kuk, Keivin; Kuropatkine, Nickolai; Lin, Huan; Montes, Jorge; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab

    2010-06-08

    Large mosaic multiCCD camera is the key instrument for modern digital sky survey. DECam is an extremely red sensitive 520 Megapixel camera designed for the incoming Dark Energy Survey (DES). It is consist of sixty two 4k x 2k and twelve 2k x 2k 250-micron thick fully-depleted CCDs, with a focal plane of 44 cm in diameter and a field of view of 2.2 square degree. It will be attached to the Blanco 4-meter telescope at CTIO. The DES will cover 5000 square-degrees of the southern galactic cap in 5 color bands (g, r, i, z, Y) in 5 years starting from 2011. To achieve the science goal of constraining the Dark Energy evolution, stringent requirements are laid down for the design of DECam. Among them, the flatness of the focal plane needs to be controlled within a 60-micron envelope in order to achieve the specified PSF variation limit. It is very challenging to measure the flatness of the focal plane to such precision when it is placed in a high vacuum dewar at 173 K. We developed two image based techniques to measure the flatness of the focal plane. By imaging a regular grid of dots on the focal plane, the CCD offset along the optical axis is converted to the variation the grid spacings at different positions on the focal plane. After extracting the patterns and comparing the change in spacings, we can measure the flatness to high precision. In method 1, the regular dots are kept in high sub micron precision and cover the whole focal plane. In method 2, no high precision for the grid is required. Instead, we use a precise XY stage moves the pattern across the whole focal plane and comparing the variations of the spacing when it is imaged by different CCDs. Simulation and real measurements show that the two methods work very well for our purpose, and are in good agreement with the direct optical measurements.

  12. The simulated spectrum of the OGRE X-ray EM-CCD camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M.; Soman, M.; Holland, A.; Lumb, D.; Tutt, J.; McEntaffer, R.; Schultz, T.; Holland, K.

    2017-12-01

    The X-ray astronomical telescopes in use today, such as Chandra and XMM-Newton, use X-ray grating spectrometers to probe the high energy physics of the Universe. These instruments typically use reflective optics for focussing onto gratings that disperse incident X-rays across a detector, often a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD). The X-ray energy is determined from the position that it was detected on the CCD. Improved technology for the next generation of X-ray grating spectrometers has been developed and will be tested on a sounding rocket experiment known as the Off-plane Grating Rocket Experiment (OGRE). OGRE aims to capture the highest resolution soft X-ray spectrum of Capella, a well-known astronomical X-ray source, during an observation period lasting between 3 and 6 minutes whilst proving the performance and suitability of three key components. These three components consist of a telescope made from silicon mirrors, gold coated silicon X-ray diffraction gratings and a camera that comprises of four Electron-Multiplying (EM)-CCDs that will be arranged to observe the soft X-rays dispersed by the gratings. EM-CCDs have an architecture similar to standard CCDs, with the addition of an EM gain register where the electron signal is amplified so that the effective signal-to-noise ratio of the imager is improved. The devices also have incredibly favourable Quantum Efficiency values for detecting soft X-ray photons. On OGRE, this improved detector performance allows for easier identification of low energy X-rays and fast readouts due to the amplified signal charge making readout noise almost negligible. A simulation that applies the OGRE instrument performance to the Capella soft X-ray spectrum has been developed that allows the distribution of X-rays onto the EM-CCDs to be predicted. A proposed optical model is also discussed which would enable the missions minimum success criteria's photon count requirement to have a high chance of being met with the shortest possible

  13. Tests of a new CCD-camera based neutron radiography detector system at the reactor stations in Munich and Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, E.; Pleinert, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Schillinger, B. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Koerner, S. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-09-01

    The performance of the new neutron radiography detector designed at PSI with a cooled high sensitive CCD-camera was investigated under real neutronic conditions at three beam ports of two reactor stations. Different converter screens were applied for which the sensitivity and the modulation transfer function (MTF) could be obtained. The results are very encouraging concerning the utilization of this detector system as standard tool at the radiography stations at the spallation source SINQ. (author) 3 figs., 5 refs.

  14. Developing a CCD camera with high spatial resolution for RIXS in the soft X-ray range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, M. R.; Hall, D. J.; Tutt, J. H.; Murray, N. J.; Holland, A. D.; Schmitt, T.; Raabe, J.; Schmitt, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrometer (SAXES) at the Swiss Light Source contains a high resolution Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera used for Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS). Using the current CCD-based camera system, the energy-dispersive spectrometer has an energy resolution (E/ΔE) of approximately 12,000 at 930 eV. A recent study predicted that through an upgrade to the grating and camera system, the energy resolution could be improved by a factor of 2. In order to achieve this goal in the spectral domain, the spatial resolution of the CCD must be improved to better than 5 μm from the current 24 μm spatial resolution (FWHM). The 400 eV-1600 eV energy X-rays detected by this spectrometer primarily interact within the field free region of the CCD, producing electron clouds which will diffuse isotropically until they reach the depleted region and buried channel. This diffusion of the charge leads to events which are split across several pixels. Through the analysis of the charge distribution across the pixels, various centroiding techniques can be used to pinpoint the spatial location of the X-ray interaction to the sub-pixel level, greatly improving the spatial resolution achieved. Using the PolLux soft X-ray microspectroscopy endstation at the Swiss Light Source, a beam of X-rays of energies from 200 eV to 1400 eV can be focused down to a spot size of approximately 20 nm. Scanning this spot across the 16 μm square pixels allows the sub-pixel response to be investigated. Previous work has demonstrated the potential improvement in spatial resolution achievable by centroiding events in a standard CCD. An Electron-Multiplying CCD (EM-CCD) has been used to improve the signal to effective readout noise ratio achieved resulting in a worst-case spatial resolution measurement of 4.5±0.2 μm and 3.9±0.1 μm at 530 eV and 680 eV respectively. A method is described that allows the contribution of the X-ray spot size to be deconvolved from these

  15. MMW/THz imaging using upconversion to visible, based on glow discharge detector array and CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon, Avihai; Rozban, Daniel; Abramovich, Amir; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Kopeika, Natan S.

    2017-10-01

    An inexpensive upconverting MMW/THz imaging method is suggested here. The method is based on glow discharge detector (GDD) and silicon photodiode or simple CCD/CMOS camera. The GDD was previously found to be an excellent room-temperature MMW radiation detector by measuring its electrical current. The GDD is very inexpensive and it is advantageous due to its wide dynamic range, broad spectral range, room temperature operation, immunity to high power radiation, and more. An upconversion method is demonstrated here, which is based on measuring the visual light emitting from the GDD rather than its electrical current. The experimental setup simulates a setup that composed of a GDD array, MMW source, and a basic CCD/CMOS camera. The visual light emitting from the GDD array is directed to the CCD/CMOS camera and the change in the GDD light is measured using image processing algorithms. The combination of CMOS camera and GDD focal plane arrays can yield a faster, more sensitive, and very inexpensive MMW/THz camera, eliminating the complexity of the electronic circuits and the internal electronic noise of the GDD. Furthermore, three dimensional imaging systems based on scanning prohibited real time operation of such imaging systems. This is easily solved and is economically feasible using a GDD array. This array will enable us to acquire information on distance and magnitude from all the GDD pixels in the array simultaneously. The 3D image can be obtained using methods like frequency modulation continuous wave (FMCW) direct chirp modulation, and measuring the time of flight (TOF).

  16. Near infrared thermography by CCD cameras and application to first wall components of Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, F.

    1996-01-01

    In the Tokamak TORE-SUPRA, the plasma facing components absorbs and evacuate (active cooling) high power fluxes (up to 10 MW/m 2 ). Their thermal behavior study is essential for the success of controlled thermonuclear fusion line. The first part is devoted to the study of power deposition on the TORE-SUPRA actively cooled limiters. A model of power deposition on one of the limiters is developed. It Takes into account the magnetic topology and a description of the plasma edge. The model is validated with experimental calorimetric data obtained during a series of shots. This will allow to compare the surface temperature measurements with the predicted ones. The main purpose of this thesis was to evaluate and develop a new surface temperature measurement system. It works in the near infrared range (890 nm) and is designed to complete the existing thermographic diagnostic of TORE-SUPRA. By using the radiation laws (for a blackbody and the plasma) ant the laboratory calibration one can estimate the surface temperature of the observed object. We evaluate the performances and limits of such a device in the harsh conditions encountered in a Tokamak environment. On the one hand, in a quasi ideal situation, this analysis shows that the range of measurement is 600 deg. C to 2500 deg. C. On the other hand, when one takes into account of the plasma radiation (with an averaged central plasma density of 6.10 19 m -3 ), we find that the minimum surface temperature rise to 900 deg. C. In the near future, according to the development of IR-CCD cameras working in the near infrared range up to 2 micrometers, we will be able to keep the good spatial resolution with an improved lower limit for the temperature down to 150 deg. C. The last section deals with a number of computer tools to process the images obtained from experiments on TORE-SUPRA. A pattern recognition application was especially developed to detect a complex plasma iso-intensity structure. (author)

  17. The design and development of low- and high-voltage ASICs for space-borne CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltham, N.; Morrissey, Q.; Clapp, M.; Bell, S.; Jones, L.; Torbet, M.

    2017-12-01

    The CCD remains the pre-eminent visible and UV wavelength image sensor in space science, Earth and planetary remote sensing. However, the design of space-qualified CCD readout electronics is a significant challenge with requirements for low-volume, low-mass, low-power, high-reliability and tolerance to space radiation. Space-qualified components are frequently unavailable and up-screened commercial components seldom meet project or international space agency requirements. In this paper, we describe an alternative approach of designing and space-qualifying a series of low- and high-voltage mixed-signal application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), the ongoing development of two low-voltage ASICs with successful flight heritage, and two new high-voltage designs. A challenging sub-system of any CCD camera is the video processing and digitisation electronics. We describe recent developments to improve performance and tolerance to radiation-induced single event latchup of a CCD video processing ASIC originally developed for NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory. We also describe a programme to develop two high-voltage ASICs to address the challenges presented with generating a CCD's bias voltages and drive clocks. A 0.35 μm, 50 V tolerant, CMOS process has been used to combine standard low-voltage 3.3 V transistors with high-voltage 50 V diffused MOSFET transistors that enable output buffers to drive CCD bias drains, gates and clock electrodes directly. We describe a CCD bias voltage generator ASIC that provides 24 independent and programmable 0-32 V outputs. Each channel incorporates a 10-bit digital-to-analogue converter, provides current drive of up to 20 mA into loads of 10 μF, and includes current-limiting and short-circuit protection. An on-chip telemetry system with a 12-bit analogue-to-digital converter enables the outputs and multiple off-chip camera voltages to be monitored. The ASIC can drive one or more CCDs and

  18. Cryogenic design of the high speed CCD60 camera for wavefront sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Ma, Wenli; Wang, Mingfu; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2014-11-01

    CCD60, developed by e2v technologies, is a 128x128 pixel frame-transfer back-illuminated sensor using the EMCCD technology. This kind of detector has some attractive characteristics, such as high frame rate, low noise and high quantum efficiency. So, it is suitable for Adaptive Optical Wave Front Sensor (AO WFS) applications. However, the performance of this detector is strongly depended on its temperature. In order to achieve high multiplication gain and low dark current noise, CCD60 should be cooled under -45°. For this reason, we had designed a cooling system to cool down the CCD60 detector base on thermoelectric cooler. Detail of the design, thermal analysis and the cooling experiment are presented in this paper. The performance of multiplication gain after cooling had been tested too. The result of cooling experiment shows that the thermoelectric cooler can cool the CCD to below -60 °C under air cooled operation and an air temperature of 20 °C. The multiplication gain test tell us the multiplication gain of CCD60 can exceed 500 times on -60°.

  19. Application of conventional CCD cameras with Fabry-Perot spectrometers for airglow observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, M.M.; Roesler, F.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes Fabry-Perot/CCD annular summing applied to airglow observations. Criteria are developed for determining the optimal rectangular format CCD chip configuration which minimizes dark and read noise. The relative savings in integration time of the imaging Fabry-Perot/CCD system over the pressure-scanned Fabry-Perot/PMT system is estimated for the optimal configuration through calculations of the signal to noise ratios for three extreme (but typical) cases of source and background intensity. The largest savings in integration time in estimated for the daysky thermospheric [O{sup 1}D] (6,300 {angstrom}) case where the bright ({approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 6}R/{angstrom}) Rayleigh-scattered background dominates the read noise. The long integration times required to obtain useful signal to noise ratios for the faint ({approximately} 10R) nightsky exospheric hydrogen Balmer-{alpha} (6,563 {angstrom}) reduce the importance of the read noise term and yield large savings in integration time. The significance of the read noise term is greatly increased with the very short estimated integration times required for bright ({approximately} 200 R) nightsky lines such as thermospheric [O{sup 1}D]. Alternate CCD formats and applications methods that reduce read noise and provide improved performance in the latter case are compared against the CCD annular summing technique.

  20. A toolkit for the characterization of CCD cameras for transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulovic, M.; Rieger, B.; Van Vliet, L.J.; Koster, A.J.; Ravelli, R.B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are nowadays commonly utilized in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for applications in life sciences. Direct access to digitized images has revolutionized the use of electron microscopy, sparking developments such as automated collection of tomographic data, focal

  1. A high resolution Small Field Of View (SFOV) gamma camera: a columnar scintillator coated CCD imager for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, J. E.; Bassford, D. J.; Blake, O. E.; Blackshaw, P. E.; Perkins, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a high resolution, small field of view (SFOV), Charge Coupled Device (CCD) based camera for imaging small volumes of radionuclide uptake in tissues. The Mini Gamma Ray Camera (MGRC) is a collimated, scintillator-coated, low cost, high performance imager using low noise CCDs. The prototype MGRC has a 600 μm thick layer of columnar CsI(Tl) and operates in photon counting mode using a thermoelectric cooler to achieve an operating temperature of - 10°C. Collimation was performed using a pin hole collimator. We have measured the spatial resolution, energy resolution and efficiency using a number of radioisotope sources including 140 keV gamma-rays from 99mTc in a specially designed phantom. We also describe our first imaging of a volunteer patient.

  2. Design of an Event-Driven Random-Access-Windowing CCD-Based Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monacos, Steve P.; Lam, Raymond K.; Portillo, Angel A.; Ortiz, Gerardo G.

    2003-01-01

    Commercially available cameras are not design for the combination of single frame and high-speed streaming digital video with real-time control of size and location of multiple regions-of-interest (ROI). A new control paradigm is defined to eliminate the tight coupling between the camera logic and the host controller. This functionality is achieved by defining the indivisible pixel read out operation on a per ROI basis with in-camera time keeping capability. This methodology provides a Random Access, Real-Time, Event-driven (RARE) camera for adaptive camera control and is will suited for target tracking applications requiring autonomous control of multiple ROI's. This methodology additionally provides for reduced ROI read out time and higher frame rates compared to the original architecture by avoiding external control intervention during the ROI read out process.

  3. Color balancing in CCD color cameras using analog signal processors made by Kodak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannegundla, Ram

    1995-03-01

    The green, red, and blue color filters used for CCD sensors generally have different responses. It is often necessary to balance these three colors for displaying a high-quality image on the monitor. The color filter arrays on sensors have different architectures. A CCD with standard G R G B pattern is considered for the present discussion. A simple method of separating the colors using CDS/H that is a part of KASPs (Analog Signal Processors made by Kodak) and using the gain control, which is also a part of KASPs for color balance, is presented. The colors are separated from the video output of sensor by using three KASPs, one each for green, red, and blue colors and by using alternate sample pulses for green and 1 in 4 pulses for red and blue. The separated colors gain is adjusted either automatically or manually and sent to the monitor for direct display in the analog mode or through an A/D converter digitally to the memory. This method of color balancing demands high-quality ASPs. Kodak has designed four different chips with varying levels of power consumption and speed for analog signal processing of video output of CCD sensors. The analog ASICs have been characterized for noise, clock feedthrough, acquisition time, linearity, variable gain, line rate clamp, black muxing, affect of temperature variations on chip performance, and droop. The ASP chips have met their design specifications.

  4. Variable high-resolution color CCD camera system with online capability for professional photo studio application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitfelder, Stefan; Reichel, Frank R.; Gaertner, Ernst; Hacker, Erich J.; Cappellaro, Markus; Rudolf, Peter; Voelk, Ute

    1998-04-01

    Digital cameras are of increasing significance for professional applications in photo studios where fashion, portrait, product and catalog photographs or advertising photos of high quality have to be taken. The eyelike is a digital camera system which has been developed for such applications. It is capable of working online with high frame rates and images of full sensor size and it provides a resolution that can be varied between 2048 by 2048 and 6144 by 6144 pixel at a RGB color depth of 12 Bit per channel with an also variable exposure time of 1/60s to 1s. With an exposure time of 100 ms digitization takes approx. 2 seconds for an image of 2048 by 2048 pixels (12 Mbyte), 8 seconds for the image of 4096 by 4096 pixels (48 Mbyte) and 40 seconds for the image of 6144 by 6144 pixels (108 MByte). The eyelike can be used in various configurations. Used as a camera body most commercial lenses can be connected to the camera via existing lens adaptors. On the other hand the eyelike can be used as a back to most commercial 4' by 5' view cameras. This paper describes the eyelike camera concept with the essential system components. The article finishes with a description of the software, which is needed to bring the high quality of the camera to the user.

  5. Technical Note: Range verification system using edge detection method for a scintillator and a CCD camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saotome, Naoya; Furukawa, Takuji; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Tansho, Ryohei; Saraya, Yuichi; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Three-dimensional irradiation with a scanned carbon-ion beam has been performed from 2011 at the authors’ facility. The authors have developed the rotating-gantry equipped with the scanning irradiation system. The number of combinations of beam properties to measure for the commissioning is more than 7200, i.e., 201 energy steps, 3 intensities, and 12 gantry angles. To compress the commissioning time, quick and simple range verification system is required. In this work, the authors develop a quick range verification system using scintillator and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and estimate the accuracy of the range verification. Methods: A cylindrical plastic scintillator block and a CCD camera were installed on the black box. The optical spatial resolution of the system is 0.2 mm/pixel. The camera control system was connected and communicates with the measurement system that is part of the scanning system. The range was determined by image processing. Reference range for each energy beam was determined by a difference of Gaussian (DOG) method and the 80% of distal dose of the depth-dose distribution that were measured by a large parallel-plate ionization chamber. The authors compared a threshold method and a DOG method. Results: The authors found that the edge detection method (i.e., the DOG method) is best for the range detection. The accuracy of range detection using this system is within 0.2 mm, and the reproducibility of the same energy measurement is within 0.1 mm without setup error. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate that the authors’ range check system is capable of quick and easy range verification with sufficient accuracy.

  6. Dynamic imaging with a triggered and intensified CCD camera system in a high-intensity neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vontobel, P.; Frei, G.; Brunner, J.; Gildemeister, A.E.; Engelhardt, M.

    2005-01-01

    When time-dependent processes within metallic structures should be inspected and visualized, neutrons are well suited due to their high penetration through Al, Ag, Ti or even steel. Then it becomes possible to inspect the propagation, distribution and evaporation of organic liquids as lubricants, fuel or water. The principle set-up of a suited real-time system was implemented and tested at the radiography facility NEUTRA of PSI. The highest beam intensity there is 2x10 7 cm -2 s -1 , which enables to observe sequences in a reasonable time and quality. The heart of the detection system is the MCP intensified CCD camera PI-Max with a Peltier cooled chip (1300x1340 pixels). The intensifier was used for both gating and image enhancement, where as the information was accumulated over many single frames on the chip before readout. Although, a 16-bit dynamic range is advertised by the camera manufacturers, it must be less due to the inherent noise level from the intensifier. The obtained result should be seen as the starting point to go ahead to fit the different requirements of car producers in respect to fuel injection, lubricant distribution, mechanical stability and operation control. Similar inspections will be possible for all devices with repetitive operation principle. Here, we report about two measurements dealing with the lubricant distribution in a running motorcycle motor turning at 1200rpm. We were monitoring the periodic stationary movements of piston, valves and camshaft with a micro-channel plate intensified CCD camera system (PI-Max 1300RB, Princeton Instruments) triggered at exactly chosen time points

  7. Technical Note: Range verification system using edge detection method for a scintillator and a CCD camera system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saotome, Naoya, E-mail: naosao@nirs.go.jp; Furukawa, Takuji; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Tansho, Ryohei; Saraya, Yuichi; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji [Department of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional irradiation with a scanned carbon-ion beam has been performed from 2011 at the authors’ facility. The authors have developed the rotating-gantry equipped with the scanning irradiation system. The number of combinations of beam properties to measure for the commissioning is more than 7200, i.e., 201 energy steps, 3 intensities, and 12 gantry angles. To compress the commissioning time, quick and simple range verification system is required. In this work, the authors develop a quick range verification system using scintillator and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and estimate the accuracy of the range verification. Methods: A cylindrical plastic scintillator block and a CCD camera were installed on the black box. The optical spatial resolution of the system is 0.2 mm/pixel. The camera control system was connected and communicates with the measurement system that is part of the scanning system. The range was determined by image processing. Reference range for each energy beam was determined by a difference of Gaussian (DOG) method and the 80% of distal dose of the depth-dose distribution that were measured by a large parallel-plate ionization chamber. The authors compared a threshold method and a DOG method. Results: The authors found that the edge detection method (i.e., the DOG method) is best for the range detection. The accuracy of range detection using this system is within 0.2 mm, and the reproducibility of the same energy measurement is within 0.1 mm without setup error. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate that the authors’ range check system is capable of quick and easy range verification with sufficient accuracy.

  8. Automated CCD camera characterization. 1998 summer research program for high school juniors at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Student research reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbermann, J.

    1999-03-01

    The OMEGA system uses CCD cameras for a broad range of applications. Over 100 video rate CCD cameras are used for such purposes as targeting, aligning, and monitoring areas such as the target chamber, laser bay, and viewing gallery. There are approximately 14 scientific grade CCD cameras on the system which are used to obtain precise photometric results from the laser beam as well as target diagnostics. It is very important that these scientific grade CCDs are properly characterized so that the results received from them can be evaluated appropriately. Currently characterization is a tedious process done by hand. The operator must manually operate the camera and light source simultaneously. Because more exposures means more accurate information on the camera, the characterization tests can become very length affairs. Sometimes it takes an entire day to complete just a single plot. Characterization requires the testing of many aspects of the camera's operation. Such aspects include the following: variance vs. mean signal level--this should be proportional due to Poisson statistics of the incident photon flux; linearity--the ability of the CCD to produce signals proportional to the light it received; signal-to-noise ratio--the relative magnitude of the signal vs. the uncertainty in that signal; dark current--the amount of noise due to thermal generation of electrons (cooling lowers this noise contribution significantly). These tests, as well as many others, must be conducted in order to properly understand a CCD camera. The goal of this project was to construct an apparatus that could characterize a camera automatically

  9. Systems approach to the design of the CCD sensors and camera electronics for the AIA and HMI instruments on solar dynamics observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltham, N.; Beardsley, S.; Clapp, M.; Lang, J.; Jerram, P.; Pool, P.; Auker, G.; Morris, D.; Duncan, D.

    2017-11-01

    Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is imaging the Sun in many wavelengths near simultaneously and with a resolution ten times higher than the average high-definition television. In this paper we describe our innovative systems approach to the design of the CCD cameras for two of SDO's remote sensing instruments, the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Both instruments share use of a custom-designed 16 million pixel science-grade CCD and common camera readout electronics. A prime requirement was for the CCD to operate with significantly lower drive voltages than before, motivated by our wish to simplify the design of the camera readout electronics. Here, the challenge lies in the design of circuitry to drive the CCD's highly capacitive electrodes and to digitize its analogue video output signal with low noise and to high precision. The challenge is greatly exacerbated when forced to work with only fully space-qualified, radiation-tolerant components. We describe our systems approach to the design of the AIA and HMI CCD and camera electronics, and the engineering solutions that enabled us to comply with both mission and instrument science requirements.

  10. Alignment method for 50 m distance using laser and CCD camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Sakuo; Zhang, Chao

    2003-01-01

    The interference pattern of laser light on the CCD device is suppressed by removing the cover glass in front of the device. The reference plane of the quadrupole magnets after division and restoration becomes unreliable for six years. The measurement tool for mechanical center of the multipole magnet is useful for checking the alignment. Few magnets of which reference planes were unreliable were aligned by using this tool. This also can measure the twist between the poles. It is quite important for the suppression of light fluctuation to choose pipe material. Temperature gradient refracts the light more in the pipe. Copper pipe is better than the paper one. (author)

  11. Use of a CCD camera for the thermographic study of a transient liquid phase bonding process in steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eduardo H.; Epelbaum, Carlos; Carnero, Angel; Arcondo, Bibiana

    2001-03-01

    The bonding of steel pieces and the development of novel soldering methods, appropriate to the extended variety of applications of steels nowadays, bring the sensing of temperature an outstanding role in any metallurgical process. Transient liquid phase bonding (TLPB) processes have been successfully employed to join metals, among them steels. A thin layer of metal A, with a liquids temperature TLA, is located between two pieces of metal B, with a liquids temperature TLB higher than TLA. The joining zone is heated up to a temperature T(TLAsteel is performed in a 30 Kw induction furnace at temperatures in the range 800 degree(s)C to 1400 degree(s)C depending on the layer metal. A small window was opened between the central loops of the coil in order to observe the radiation emitted by the hot steel zone. A low price black and white CCD camera with 752x582 pixels has been adapted for temperature measurements through the coil of the furnace. The output of the camera is digitized and visualized in a 14-inch monitor. The temperature is calculated using the correlation with the gray tone present in the monitor, which is measured by means of suitable software. The technical specifications of the camera and the modifications introduced to adapt it for this work are presented. The calibration of the camera and the method employed in the measurements are described. The measured temperatures are corrected by the effect of emissivity of the materials surfaces and the environment radiation reflected. Thermographs obtained are shown and results are discussed. We conclude that a low priced camera may be used to measure temperature in this range with acceptable accuracy.

  12. Quantitative assessment of laser-dazzling effects on a CCD-camera through pattern-recognition-algorithms performance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durécu, Anne; Vasseur, Olivier; Bourdon, Pierre

    2009-09-01

    We used pattern-recognition-algorithms performance as a measurement standard for laser-dazzled images. A black and white CCD-camera observed a scene containing different geometrical patterns, which had to be recognized by the algorithm. The camera was dazzled by a nanosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. Dazzling conditions were variable in laser repetition rate, pulse energy, geometrical forms size and position relative to the laser spot. We implemented algorithms based on edge detection, which locate areas with similar forms compared with a reference symbol, using either a degree of correlation assessment or a Fourier descriptors quantitative analysis. We also characterized the dazzled area size in the image. Thanks to a cross analysis of both criteria, we succeeded in quantitatively assessing the influence of laser-dazzling on the performances of the algorithms. We point out the key role of the effective distance between a geometrical form and the dazzled area in the image on the computed degree of correlation or Fourier descriptor value of this form. The analysis of these quantitative results contributes to the better understanding of laser-dazzling, which can be useful to design efficient means to protect imaging systems.

  13. Experimental comparison of the high-speed imaging performance of an EM-CCD and sCMOS camera in a dynamic live-cell imaging test case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope T Beier

    Full Text Available The study of living cells may require advanced imaging techniques to track weak and rapidly changing signals. Fundamental to this need is the recent advancement in camera technology. Two camera types, specifically sCMOS and EM-CCD, promise both high signal-to-noise and high speed (>100 fps, leaving researchers with a critical decision when determining the best technology for their application. In this article, we compare two cameras using a live-cell imaging test case in which small changes in cellular fluorescence must be rapidly detected with high spatial resolution. The EM-CCD maintained an advantage of being able to acquire discernible images with a lower number of photons due to its EM-enhancement. However, if high-resolution images at speeds approaching or exceeding 1000 fps are desired, the flexibility of the full-frame imaging capabilities of sCMOS is superior.

  14. Recognition and Matching of Clustered Mature Litchi Fruits Using Binocular Charge-Coupled Device (CCD Color Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recognition and matching of litchi fruits are critical steps for litchi harvesting robots to successfully grasp litchi. However, due to the randomness of litchi growth, such as clustered growth with uncertain number of fruits and random occlusion by leaves, branches and other fruits, the recognition and matching of the fruit become a challenge. Therefore, this study firstly defined mature litchi fruit as three clustered categories. Then an approach for recognition and matching of clustered mature litchi fruit was developed based on litchi color images acquired by binocular charge-coupled device (CCD color cameras. The approach mainly included three steps: (1 calibration of binocular color cameras and litchi image acquisition; (2 segmentation of litchi fruits using four kinds of supervised classifiers, and recognition of the pre-defined categories of clustered litchi fruit using a pixel threshold method; and (3 matching the recognized clustered fruit using a geometric center-based matching method. The experimental results showed that the proposed recognition method could be robust against the influences of varying illumination and occlusion conditions, and precisely recognize clustered litchi fruit. In the tested 432 clustered litchi fruits, the highest and lowest average recognition rates were 94.17% and 92.00% under sunny back-lighting and partial occlusion, and sunny front-lighting and non-occlusion conditions, respectively. From 50 pairs of tested images, the highest and lowest matching success rates were 97.37% and 91.96% under sunny back-lighting and non-occlusion, and sunny front-lighting and partial occlusion conditions, respectively.

  15. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-ray Source (HTPD 08 paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugh, M; Schneider, M B

    2008-01-01

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. The intensity distribution taken by the SXI camera during a NIF shot is used to determine how accurately NIF can aim laser beams. This is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 (micro)m square pixels, and 15 (micro)m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 10W, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE ∼ 10. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation occurred at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was not observable below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris, damage, and surface defects on the CCD chip. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager

  16. Near infrared thermography by CCD cameras and application to first wall components of Tore Supra tokamak; Thermographie proche infrarouge par cameras CCD et application aux composants de premiere paroi du tokamak Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, F.

    1996-06-07

    In the Tokamak TORE-SUPRA, the plasma facing components absorbs and evacuate (active cooling) high power fluxes (up to 10 MW/m{sup 2}). Their thermal behavior study is essential for the success of controlled thermonuclear fusion line. The first part is devoted to the study of power deposition on the TORE-SUPRA actively cooled limiters. A model of power deposition on one of the limiters is developed. It takes into account the magnetic topology and a description of the plasma edge. The model is validated with experimental calorimetric data obtained during a series of shots. This will allow to compare the surface temperature measurements with the predicted ones. The main purpose of this thesis was to evaluate and develop a new temperature measurement system. It works in the near infrared range (890 nm) and is designed to complete the existing thermographic diagnostic of TORE-SUPRA. By using the radiation laws (for a blackbody and the plasma) and the laboratory calibration one can estimate the surface temperature of the observed object. We evaluate the performances and limits of such a device in the harsh conditions encountered in a Tokamak environment. On the one hand, in a quasi ideal situation, this analysis shows that the range of measurements is 600 deg. C to 2500 deg. C. On the other hand, when one takes into account of the plasma radiation (with an averaged central plasma density of 6.10{sup 19} m{sup -3}), we find that the minimum surface temperature rise to 900 deg. C instead of 700 deg. C. In the near future, according to the development of IR-CCD cameras working in the near infrared range up to 2 micrometers, we will be able to keep the good spatial resolution with an improved lower limit for the temperature down to 150 deg. C. The last section deals with a number of computer tools to process the images obtained from experiments on TORE-SUPRA. A pattern recognition application was developed to detect a complex plasma iso-intensity structure. 87 refs.

  17. Comparison between a position sensitive germanium detector and a taper optics CCD ``FRELON'' camera for diffraction enhanced imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravin, A.; Fiedler, S.; Coan, P.; Labiche, J.-C.; Ponchut, C.; Peterzol, A.; Thomlinson, W.

    2003-09-01

    Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) can significantly improve the expressiveness of radiology. The contrast mechanism of DEI, in addition to absorption contrast, exploits the differences in X-ray refraction properties, which are sensed by a perfect crystal placed between the sample and the detector. DEI needs a monochromatic collimated X-ray source, which is available for instance from synchrotrons. The X-ray beam is laminar and the sample is vertically scanned for projection imaging or is rotated for CT. Detectors should match the beam characteristics and should also accomplish the other two main requirements for DEI mammography: high spatial resolution and high Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) in a large energy range (20-60 keV). The first permit to exploit the edge contrast enhancement obtained with the DEI technique, for example the improved visualization of microcalcifications in mammographic imaging. The second allows minimizing the dose needed for a radiograph without sacrificing spatial resolution. Apart from this, a dynamic range as good as possible is required (typically from 14 to 16 bits) as well as a high readout speed, which is particularly important for CT. These specifications are difficult to be all condensed in a single detector. At the medical beamline of the ESRF two devices have been utilized for DEI radiography: a linear germanium detector (432 pixels, 350 microns pitch), which had been developed for angiography and cerebral CT and a 2048×2048 CCD camera with taper optics which has been built at the ESRF. The first detector shows an excellent DQE at zero frequency in a large energy range (˜90% from 20 keV up to 50 keV) but limited spatial resolution. In the latter a better compromise for DEI in the 20-30 keV range has been realized: a pixel size of 47 μm and a DQE(0) from 0.5 to 0.6 has been achieved. The performances of the two detectors will be presented here in detail and discussed.

  18. A New Remote Sensing Filter Radiometer Employing a Fabry-Perot Etalon and a CCD Camera for Column Measurements of Methane in the Earth Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, E. M.; Huang, W.; Heaps, W. S.

    2012-01-01

    A portable remote sensing system for precision column measurements of methane has been developed, built and tested at NASA GSFC. The sensor covers the spectral range from 1.636 micrometers to 1.646 micrometers, employs an air-gapped Fabry-Perot filter and a CCD camera and has a potential to operate from a variety of platforms. The detector is an XS-1.7-320 camera unit from Xenics Infrared solutions which combines an uncooled InGaAs detector array working up to 1.7 micrometers. Custom software was developed in addition to the graphical user basic interface X-Control provided by the company to help save and process the data. The technique and setup can be used to measure other trace gases in the atmosphere with minimal changes of the etalon and the prefilter. In this paper we describe the calibration of the system using several different approaches.

  19. Rapid detection and counting of viable beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria using a monoclonal chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay and a CCD camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Carmen; Manclús, Juan J; Abad, Antonio; Navarro, Alfonso; Montoya, Angel

    2005-08-01

    A chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay carried out with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was developed for rapid enumeration of viable beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria. LA-4 MAb, which recognizes a broad spectrum of lactic acid bacteria isolated from several breweries across Spain, was produced and characterized. Test samples were filtered through polycarbonate membranes, and the membranes with retained bacteria were incubated at 31 degrees C for 2 days. They were then subjected to a two-step chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay with MAb LA-4, and light-emitting points were detected and counted with a CCD camera. Eighteen out of 19 beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria analysed produced luminous spots that could be enumerated. Results provided by the immunochemiluminescence assay correlated very well with those obtained by visual plate counting within a range of 3-100 CFU/100 ml. Correlation coefficients were 0.994 for four strains in sterile saline solution and 0.984 for 14 strains in artificially contaminated beer. The excellent agreement suggests that luminous spots detected within 2 days of culture are produced only by viable cells.

  20. Flat Field Anomalies in an X-Ray CCD Camera Measured Using a Manson X-Ray Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Haugh

    2008-01-01

    The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a diagnostic used at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the position of the X-rays produced by lasers hitting a gold foil target. It determines how accurately NIF can point the laser beams and is critical to proper NIF operation. Imagers are located at the top and the bottom of the NIF target chamber. The CCD chip is an X-ray sensitive silicon sensor, with a large format array (2k x 2k), 24 (micro)m square pixels, and 15 (micro)m thick. A multi-anode Manson X-ray source, operating up to 10kV and 2mA, was used to characterize and calibrate the imagers. The output beam is heavily filtered to narrow the spectral beam width, giving a typical resolution E/ΔE ∼ 12. The X-ray beam intensity was measured using an absolute photodiode that has accuracy better than 1% up to the Si K edge and better than 5% at higher energies. The X-ray beam provides full CCD illumination and is flat, within ±1.5% maximum to minimum. The spectral efficiency was measured at 10 energy bands ranging from 930 eV to 8470 eV. The efficiency pattern follows the properties of Si. The maximum quantum efficiency is 0.71. We observed an energy dependent pixel sensitivity variation that showed continuous change over a large portion of the CCD. The maximum sensitivity variation was >8% at 8470 eV. The geometric pattern did not change at lower energies, but the maximum contrast decreased and was less than the measurement uncertainty below 4 keV. We were also able to observe debris on the CCD chip. The debris showed maximum contrast at the lowest energy used, 930 eV, and disappeared by 4 keV. The Manson source is a powerful tool for characterizing the imaging errors of an X-ray CCD imager. These errors are quite different from those found in a visible CCD imager

  1. Extrapolation of contrail investigations by LIDAR to larger scale measurements. Analysis and calibration of CCD camera and satellite images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussmann, R.; Homburg, F.; Freudenthaler, V.; Jaeger, H. [Frauenhofer Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The CCD image of a persistent contrail and the coincident LIDAR measurement are presented. To extrapolate the LIDAR derived optical thickness to the video field of view an anisotropy correction and calibration has to be performed. Observed bright halo components result from highly regular oriented hexagonal crystals with sizes of 200 {mu}m-2 mm. This explained by measured ambient humidities below the formation threshold of natural cirrus. Optical thickness from LIDAR shows significant discrepancies to the result from coincident NOAA-14 data. Errors result from anisotropy correction and parameterized relations between AVHRR channels and optical properties. (author) 28 refs.

  2. SU-F-BRA-16: Development of a Radiation Monitoring Device Using a Low-Cost CCD Camera Following Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, S; Fru, L Che; Desai, V; Lentz, J; Lin, C; Scarpelli, M; Simiele, E; Trestrail, A; Bednarz, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is now commonplace to handle treatments of hyperthyroidism using iodine-131 as an outpatient procedure due to lower costs and less stringent federal regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has currently updated release guidelines for these procedures, but there is still a large uncertainty in the dose to the public. Current guidelines to minimize dose to the public require patients to remain isolated after treatment. The purpose of this study was to use a low-cost common device, such as a cell phone, to estimate exposure emitted from a patient to the general public. Methods: Measurements were performed using an Apple iPhone 3GS and a Cs-137 irradiator. The charge-coupled device (CCD) camera on the phone was irradiated to exposure rates ranging from 0.1 mR/hr to 100 mR/hr and 30-sec videos were taken during irradiation with the camera lens covered by electrical tape. Interactions were detected as white pixels on a black background in each video. Both single threshold (ST) and colony counting (CC) methods were performed using MATLAB®. Calibration curves were determined by comparing the total pixel intensity output from each method to the known exposure rate. Results: The calibration curve showed a linear relationship above 5 mR/hr for both analysis techniques. The number of events counted per unit exposure rate within the linear region was 19.5 ± 0.7 events/mR and 8.9 ± 0.4 events/mR for the ST and CC methods respectively. Conclusion: Two algorithms were developed and show a linear relationship between photons detected by a CCD camera and low exposure rates, in the range of 5 mR/hr to 100-mR/hr. Future work aims to refine this model by investigating the dose-rate and energy dependencies of the camera response. This algorithm allows for quantitative monitoring of exposure from patients treated with iodine-131 using a simple device outside of the hospital.

  3. SU-F-BRA-16: Development of a Radiation Monitoring Device Using a Low-Cost CCD Camera Following Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneja, S; Fru, L Che; Desai, V; Lentz, J; Lin, C; Scarpelli, M; Simiele, E; Trestrail, A; Bednarz, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It is now commonplace to handle treatments of hyperthyroidism using iodine-131 as an outpatient procedure due to lower costs and less stringent federal regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has currently updated release guidelines for these procedures, but there is still a large uncertainty in the dose to the public. Current guidelines to minimize dose to the public require patients to remain isolated after treatment. The purpose of this study was to use a low-cost common device, such as a cell phone, to estimate exposure emitted from a patient to the general public. Methods: Measurements were performed using an Apple iPhone 3GS and a Cs-137 irradiator. The charge-coupled device (CCD) camera on the phone was irradiated to exposure rates ranging from 0.1 mR/hr to 100 mR/hr and 30-sec videos were taken during irradiation with the camera lens covered by electrical tape. Interactions were detected as white pixels on a black background in each video. Both single threshold (ST) and colony counting (CC) methods were performed using MATLAB®. Calibration curves were determined by comparing the total pixel intensity output from each method to the known exposure rate. Results: The calibration curve showed a linear relationship above 5 mR/hr for both analysis techniques. The number of events counted per unit exposure rate within the linear region was 19.5 ± 0.7 events/mR and 8.9 ± 0.4 events/mR for the ST and CC methods respectively. Conclusion: Two algorithms were developed and show a linear relationship between photons detected by a CCD camera and low exposure rates, in the range of 5 mR/hr to 100-mR/hr. Future work aims to refine this model by investigating the dose-rate and energy dependencies of the camera response. This algorithm allows for quantitative monitoring of exposure from patients treated with iodine-131 using a simple device outside of the hospital

  4. Front-illuminated versus back-illuminated photon-counting CCD-based gamma camera: important consequences for spatial resolution and energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heemskerk, Jan W T; Westra, Albert H; Linotte, Peter M; Ligtvoet, Kees M; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Beekman, Freek J

    2007-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) coupled to scintillation crystals can be used for high-resolution imaging with x-rays and gamma rays. When the CCD images can be read out fast enough, the energy and interaction position of individual gamma quanta can be estimated by a real-time image analysis of the scintillation light flashes ('photon-counting mode'). The electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) is well suited for fast read out, since even at high frame rates it has extremely low read-out noise. Back-illuminated (BI) EMCCDs have much higher quantum efficiency than front-illuminated (FI) EMCCDs. Here we compare the spatial and energy resolution of gamma cameras based on FI and BI EMCCDs. The CCDs are coupled to a 1000 μm thick columnar CsI(Tl) crystal for the purpose of Tc-99m and I-125 imaging. Intrinsic spatial resolutions of 44 μm for I-125 and 49 μm for Tc-99m were obtained when using a BI EMCCD, which is an improvement by a factor of about 1.2-2 over the FI EMCCD. Furthermore, in the energy spectrum of the BI EMCCD, the I-125 signal could be clearly separated from the background noise, which was not the case for the FI EMCCD. The energy resolution of a BI EMCCD for Tc-99m was estimated to be approximately 36 keV, full width at half maximum, at 141 keV. The excellent results for the BI EMCCD encouraged us to investigate the cooling requirements for our setup. We have found that for the BI EMCCD, the spatial and energy resolution, as well as image noise, remained stable over a range of temperatures from -50 deg. C to -15 deg. C. This is a significant advantage over the FI EMCCD, which suffered from loss of spatial and especially energy resolution at temperatures as low as -40 deg. C. We conclude that the use of BI EMCCDs may significantly improve the imaging capabilities and the cost efficiency of CCD-based high-resolution gamma cameras. (note)

  5. The OCA CCD Camera Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Tempo counter TempLess_Noise: ;; Delay during vertical transfert MOV R7, #0x03 AJMP Tempol ;; Loops three times then exit ; VT TEMPO temposisation for...AJMP Tempol ;; Loops three times then exit ;; TEMPO general temporisation for-the sequencer This function use the tempo function with R7 = FF. Data in...Delay during vertical transfert I MOV R7, #OxFF Tempol : DJNZ R7, Tempol ;; Loops three times then exit PETI ;; return from subroutine I LONGTEMPOl

  6. WE-DE-BRA-11: A Study of Motion Tracking Accuracy of Robotic Radiosurgery Using a Novel CCD Camera Based End-To-End Test System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L; M Yang, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Nelson, B [Logos Systems Intl, Scotts Valley, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A novel end-to-end test system using a CCD camera and a scintillator based phantom (XRV-124, Logos Systems Int’l) capable of measuring the beam-by-beam delivery accuracy of Robotic Radiosurgery (CyberKnife) was developed and reported in our previous work. This work investigates its application in assessing the motion tracking (Synchrony) accuracy for CyberKnife. Methods: A QA plan with Anterior and Lateral beams (with 4 different collimator sizes) was created (Multiplan v5.3) for the XRV-124 phantom. The phantom was placed on a motion platform (superior and inferior movement), and the plans were delivered on the CyberKnife M6 system using four motion patterns: static, Sine- wave, Sine with 15° phase shift, and a patient breathing pattern composed of 2cm maximum motion with 4 second breathing cycle. Under integral recording mode, the time-averaged beam vectors (X, Y, Z) were measured by the phantom and compared with static delivery. In dynamic recording mode, the beam spots were recorded at a rate of 10 frames/second. The beam vector deviation from average position was evaluated against the various breathing patterns. Results: The average beam position of the six deliveries with no motion and three deliveries with Synchrony tracking on ideal motion (sinewave without phase shift) all agree within −0.03±0.00 mm, 0.10±0.04, and 0.04±0.03 in the X, Y, and X directions. Radiation beam width (FWHM) variations are within ±0.03 mm. Dynamic video record showed submillimeter tracking stability for both regular and irregular breathing pattern; however the tracking error up to 3.5 mm was observed when a 15 degree phase shift was introduced. Conclusion: The XRV-124 system is able to provide 3D and 4D targeting accuracy for CyberKnife delivery with Synchrony. The experimental results showed sub-millimeter delivery in phantom with excellent correlation in target to breathing motion. The accuracy was degraded when irregular motion and phase shift was introduced.

  7. CCD and CMOS sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltham, Nick

    The charge-coupled device (CCD) has been developed primarily as a compact image sensor for consumer and industrial markets, but is now also the preeminent visible and ultraviolet wavelength image sensor in many fields of scientific research including space-science and both Earth and planetary remote sensing. Today"s scientific or science-grade CCD will strive to maximise pixel count, focal plane coverage, photon detection efficiency over the broadest spectral range and signal dynamic range whilst maintaining the lowest possible readout noise. The relatively recent emergence of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor technology is arguably the most important development in solid-state imaging since the invention of the CCD. CMOS technology enables the integration on a single silicon chip of a large array of photodiode pixels alongside all of the ancillary electronics needed to address the array and digitise the resulting analogue video signal. Compared to the CCD, CMOS promises a more compact, lower mass, lower power and potentially more radiation tolerant camera.

  8. Optimizing Low Light Level Imaging Techniques and Sensor Design Parameters using CCD Digital Cameras for Potential NASA Earth Science Research aboard a Small Satellite or ISS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For this project, the potential of using state-of-the-art aerial digital framing cameras that have time delayed integration (TDI) to acquire useful low light level...

  9. CCD OBSERVATIONS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Charged Coupled Device (CCD) cameras from ESO were used by groups to observe the outburst of comet Halley using a variety of telescopes and chip sets.

  10. Observation of m/n=2/1 magnetic island on the foot point of electron internal transport barrier using soft x-ray CCD camera in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobuchi, T [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8679 (Japan); Liang, Y [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 (Germany); Ida, K; Yoshinuma, M; Watanabe, K Y [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, 509-5292 (Japan)], E-mail: takashi.kobuchi@qse.tohoku.ac.jp

    2008-07-15

    The existence of m/n=2/1 magnetic islands in the plasma with an electron internal transport barrier (ITB) is identified in tangential soft x-ray emission images measured with a soft x-ray CCD camera using the Fourier-Bessel expansion reconstruction technique in the Large Helical Device. A clear m/n=2/1 magnetic island is observed in the discharge with ECRH and NBI in the direction antiparallel to the equivalent plasma current (counter-NBI), where the magnetic shear is expected to become small enough to cause the formation of a magnetic island. On the other hand, no magnetic island is observed in the ECRH and NBI in the direction parallel to the equivalent plasma current (co-NBI), where the magnetic shear is expected to be sufficiently high.

  11. Development of CCD controller for scientific application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M S; Pathan, F M; Anandarao, B G; Shah, U V; Makwana, D H

    2010-01-01

    Photoelectric equipment has wide applications such as spectroscopy, temperature measurement in infrared region and in astronomical research etc. A photoelectric transducer converts radiant energy into electrical energy. There are two types of photoelectric transducers namely photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and charged couple device (CCD) are used to convert radiant energy into electrical signal. Now the entire modern instruments use CCD technology. We have designed and developed a CCD camera controller using camera chip CD47-10 of Marconi which has 1K x 1K pixel for space application only.

  12. Ground-based CCD astrometry with wide field imagers. IV. An improved geometric-distortion correction for the blue prime-focus camera at the LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, A.; Bedin, L. R.

    2010-07-01

    High precision astrometry requires an accurate geometric-distortion solution. In this work, we present an average correction for the blue camera of the Large Binocular Telescope which enables a relative astrometric precision of ~15 mas for the BBessel and VBessel broad-band filters. The result of this effort is used in two companion papers: the first to measure the absolute proper motion of the open cluster M 67 with respect to the background galaxies; the second to decontaminate the color-magnitude of M 67 from field objects, enabling the study of the end of its white dwarf cooling sequence. Many other applications might find this distortion correction useful. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) at Mt. Graham, Arizona, under the Commissioning of the Large Binocular Blue Camera. The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are: The University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; The Ohio State University, and The Research Corporation, on behalf of The University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota and University of Virginia.Visiting Ph.D. Student at STScI under the “2008 graduate research assistantship” program.

  13. Cryostat and CCD for MEGARA at GTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Domínguez, E.; Ferrusca, D.; Tulloch, S.; Velázquez, M.; Carrasco, E.; Gallego, J.; Gil de Paz, A.; Sánchez, F. M.; Vílchez Medina, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is the new integral field unit (IFU) and multi-object spectrograph (MOS) instrument for the GTC. The spectrograph subsystems include the pseudo-slit, the shutter, the collimator with a focusing mechanism, pupil elements on a volume phase holographic grating (VPH) wheel and the camera joined to the cryostat through the last lens, with a CCD detector inside. In this paper we describe the full preliminary design of the cryostat which will harbor the CCD detector for the spectrograph. The selected cryogenic device is an LN2 open-cycle cryostat which has been designed by the "Astronomical Instrumentation Lab for Millimeter Wavelengths" at INAOE. A complete description of the cryostat main body and CCD head is presented as well as all the vacuum and temperature sub-systems to operate it. The CCD is surrounded by a radiation shield to improve its performance and is placed in a custom made mechanical mounting which will allow physical adjustments for alignment with the spectrograph camera. The 4k x 4k pixel CCD231 is our selection for the cryogenically cooled detector of MEGARA. The characteristics of this CCD, the internal cryostat cabling and CCD controller hardware are discussed. Finally, static structural finite element modeling and thermal analysis results are shown to validate the cryostat model.

  14. Investigation of the Extracellular Matrix Effect for the QCM/CCD Cell Activity Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyen-Wook; Otani, Naoya; Hiroshi, Muramatsu; Chang, Sang-Mok; Kim, Jong Min

    2018-08-01

    A real-time quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) cell activity monitoring system coupled with micro CCD cameras was developed to investigate the cultured cell activity, which could measure the viscoelastic characteristics of the cell with the QCM and observe the cell morphology changes with CCD camera simultaneously. Both the viscoelastic characteristics and the shape of the cultured cell are important factors to estimate the cell activity and the cell adhesion. The extracellular matrix (ECM) on the surface of the QCM is essential to culture the cell stably in the QCM monitoring system. To find the ECM optimization condition, the adhesive strength of cultured cells on the ECM modified glass surface was measured by using rotating water stream and CCD camera. After culturing HepG2 cells for 24 hours on the ECM modified glass plates, the glass plates were dipped in the PBS solution and rotated with 1,000, 1,300, and 1,500 rpm for 30 seconds. The adhesiveness of ECMs was investigated by calculating the remained cells after rotating. Four types of ECM, such as amino group, carboxyl group, collagen monomer, and collagen polymer, were used and tested. The current paper improves the sensing system of previous report so that measurements of four ECMs can be simultaneously conducted under the same conditions in order to enhance reliability. A collagen polymer exposed ECM was the most stable on an adhesiveness point of view, but not suitable for the QCM cell activity monitoring due to the decrease of the QCM sensitivity. The sensitivity of the QCM cell activity monitoring system using collagen monomer as ECM is about 2.6 times better than that using collagen polymer. A collagen monomer exposed ECM was more stable than amino group and carboxyl group exposed ECMs based on an adhesiveness point of view. Therefore, a collagen monomer exposed ECM was the most stable and suitable for the QCM cell activity monitoring system among the four ECMs. The changes of the resonance frequency

  15. Image differencing using masked CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushbrooke, J.G.; Ansorge, R.E.; Webber, C.J. St. J.

    1987-01-01

    A charge coupled device has some of its ''pixels'' masked by a material which is opaque to the radiation to which the device is to be exposed, each masked region being employed as a storage zone into which the charge pattern from the unmasked pixels can be transferred to enable a subsequent charge pattern to be established on further exposure of the unmasked pixels. The components of the resulting video signal corresponding to the respective charge patterns read-out from the CCD are subtracted to produce a video signal corresponding to the difference between the two images which formed the respective charge patterns. Alternate rows of pixels may be masked, or chequer-board pattern masking may be employed. In an X-ray imaging system the CCD is coupled to image intensifying and converting means. (author)

  16. CCD BVI c observations of Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Sefako, R.; Kravtsov, V. V.; Zhujko, S. V.

    2014-02-01

    In 2008-2013, we obtained 11333 CCD BVI c frames for 57 Cepheids from the General Catalogue of Variable Stars. We performed our observations with the 76-cm telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO, South Africa) and the 40-cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Astronomical Observatory of the Universidad Católica del Norte (OCA, Chile) using the SBIG ST-10XME CCD camera. The tables of observations, the plots of light curves, and the current light elements are presented. Comparison of our light curves with those constructed from photoelectric observations shows that the differences between their mean magnitudes exceed 0ṃ05 in 20% of the cases. This suggests the necessity of performing CCD observations for all Cepheids.

  17. CCD technology applied to laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Renier, Eric; Truchetet, Frederic

    1996-03-01

    Power lasers are more and more used in aerospace industry or automobile industry; their widespread use through different processes such as: welding, drilling or coating, in order to perform some surface treatments of material, requires a better understanding. In order to control the quality of the process, many technics have been developed, but most of them are based on a post-mortem analysis of the samples, and/or require an important financial investment. Welding, coating or other material treatments involving material transformations are often controlled with a metallurgical analysis. We here propose a new method, a new approach of the phenomena, we control the industrial process during the application. For this, we use information provided by two CCD cameras. One supplies information related to the intensity, and geometry of the melted surface, the second about the shape of the powder distribution within the laser beam. We use data provided by post-mortem metallurgical analysis and correlate those informations with parameters measured by both CCD, we create a datas bank which represents the relation between the measured parameters and the quality of the coating. Both informations, provided by the 2 CCD cameras allows us to optimize the industrial process. We are actually working on the real time aspect of the application and expect an implementation of the system.

  18. BRORFELDE SCHMIDT CCD CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharias, N.; Finch, C.; Wycoff, G. L.; Einicke, O. H.; Augustesen, K.; Clausen, J. V.; Hoeg, E.

    2010-01-01

    The Brorfelde Schmidt CCD Catalog (BSCC) contains about 13.7 million stars, north of +49 0 decl. with precise positions and V, R photometry. The catalog has been constructed from the reductions of 18,667 CCD frames observed with the Brorfelde Schmidt Telescope between 2000 and 2007. The Tycho-2 catalog was used for astrometric and photometric reference stars. Errors of individual positions are about 20-200 mas for stars in the R = 10-18 mag range. External comparisons with the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey reveal possible small systematic errors in the BSCC of up to about 30 mas. The catalog is supplemented with J, H, and K s magnitudes from the 2MASS catalog.

  19. CCD's at TPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeller, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    The CCD, Charge Coupled Device, is an analog shift register for which application to the readout of particle detectors has recently been realized. These devices can be used to detect optical information directly, providing an automated readout for streamer or other optical chambers, or as a single input shift register, acting in this instance as a delay line for analog information. A description is given of the latter mode of operation and its utility as a readout method for drift chambers. Most of the information contained herein has been obtained from tests performed in connection with PEP TPC project, PEP-4. That detector will employ approximately 10 4 CCD's making it a reasonable testing ground for ISABELLE size detectors

  20. Cross calibration of INSAT 3A CCD channel radiances with IRS P6 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian National Satellite (INSAT) 3A was launched in the year 2003 with communication and remote sensing payloads. The later payloads contain very high resolution radiometer (VHRR) and charge coupled devices (CCD) camera. In this paper, post-launch calibration of INSAT 3A CCD is discussed. A cross radiometric ...

  1. Precise CCD astrometric observations of minor planets and comets at the Belgrade observatory during 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protitch-Benishek V.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available 73 precise astrometric positions of seven comets and two minor planets from MPC critical list - 1093 Freda and 4954 Eric - were obtained with the CCD equipped Askania astrograph (13.5/160 of Belgrade Astronomical Observatory. The SBIG ST-7 and ST-7 CCD cameras were used in the observations.

  2. Calibration of the CCD photonic measuring system for railway inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, D. V.; Ryabichenko, R. B.; Krivosheina, E. A.

    2005-08-01

    Increasing of traffic speed is the most important task in Moscow Metro. Requirements for traffic safety grow up simultaneously with the speed increasing. Currently for track inspection in Moscow Metro is used track measurement car has built in 1954. The main drawbacks of this system are absence of automated data processing and low accuracy. Non-contact photonic measurement system (KSIR) is developed for solving this problem. New track inspection car will be built in several months. This car will use two different track inspection systems and car locating subsystem based on track circuit counting. The KSIR consists of four subsystems: rail wear, height and track gauge measurement (BFSM); rail slump measurement (FIP); contact rail measurement (FKR); speed, level and car locating (USI). Currently new subsystem for wheel flange wear (IRK) is developed. The KSIR carry out measurements in real-time mode. The BFSM subsystem contains 4 matrix CCD cameras and 4 infrared stripe illuminators. The FIP subsystem contains 4 line CCD cameras and 4 spot illuminators. The FKR subsystem contains 2 matrix CCD cameras and 2 stripe illuminators. The IRK subsystem contains 2 CCD cameras and 2 stripe illuminators. Each system calibration was carried out for their adjustment. On the first step KSIR obtains data from photonic sensors which is valued in internal measurement units. Due to the calibration on the second step non-contact system converts the data to metric measurement system.

  3. CCD image sensor induced error in PIV applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, M; Nogueira, J; Vargas, A A; Ventas, R; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, M C

    2014-01-01

    The readout procedure of charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras is known to generate some image degradation in different scientific imaging fields, especially in astrophysics. In the particular field of particle image velocimetry (PIV), widely extended in the scientific community, the readout procedure of the interline CCD sensor induces a bias in the registered position of particle images. This work proposes simple procedures to predict the magnitude of the associated measurement error. Generally, there are differences in the position bias for the different images of a certain particle at each PIV frame. This leads to a substantial bias error in the PIV velocity measurement (∼0.1 pixels). This is the order of magnitude that other typical PIV errors such as peak-locking may reach. Based on modern CCD technology and architecture, this work offers a description of the readout phenomenon and proposes a modeling for the CCD readout bias error magnitude. This bias, in turn, generates a velocity measurement bias error when there is an illumination difference between two successive PIV exposures. The model predictions match the experiments performed with two 12-bit-depth interline CCD cameras (MegaPlus ES 4.0/E incorporating the Kodak KAI-4000M CCD sensor with 4 megapixels). For different cameras, only two constant values are needed to fit the proposed calibration model and predict the error from the readout procedure. Tests by different researchers using different cameras would allow verification of the model, that can be used to optimize acquisition setups. Simple procedures to obtain these two calibration values are also described. (paper)

  4. A new approach to modelling radiation noise in CCD's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chugg, A.; Hopkinson, G.

    1998-01-01

    The energy depositions reported by Monte Carlo electron-photon irradiation transport codes are subject to a random error due to the finite number of particle histories used to generate the results. These statistical variations, normally a nuisance, may also be identified with the real radiation noise effects experienced by CCD pixels in persistent radiation environments. This paper explores the practicability of such radiation noise modelling by applying the ACCEPT code from the ITS suite to the case of a shielded CCD exposed to an electron flux. The results are compared with those obtained in a subsequent electron irradiation of the CCD by a Van de Graaff accelerator

  5. Stroboscope Based Synchronization of Full Frame CCD Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The key obstacle to the use of consumer cameras in computer vision and computer graphics applications is the lack of synchronization hardware. We present a stroboscope based synchronization approach for the charge-coupled device (CCD consumer cameras. The synchronization is realized by first aligning the frames from different video sequences based on the smear dots of the stroboscope, and then matching the sequences using a hidden Markov model. Compared with current synchronized capture equipment, the proposed approach greatly reduces the cost by using inexpensive CCD cameras and one stroboscope. The results show that our method could reach a high accuracy much better than the frame-level synchronization of traditional software methods.

  6. Analysis of lattice spots dazzling to CCD irradiated by CW laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rongzhen; Wang, Yanbin; Li, Hua; Ren, Guangsen; Hao, Yongwang

    2017-05-01

    The dazzling phenomena such as point saturation, line crosstalk present successively when laser irradiates on the CCD camera. We use CW laser at 532 nm and 1064 nm to irradiate the interline transfer area array CCD, CCD emerges lattice spots under the lens focusing. Based on geometrical optics, we use theoretical analysis and numerical simulation to study the mechanization of lattice spots. Laser jamming effects to the same CCD are different between 532 nm and 1064 nm. This is because the 532 nm laser diffracts with the chip, while 1064 nm laser interferences with its reflected light in the transmission process. Meanwhile, the mechanization of the ring surrounding the main spot is analyzed.

  7. STIS-01 CCD Functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Jeff

    2001-07-01

    This activity measures the baseline performance and commandability of the CCD subsystem. Only primary amplifier D is used. Bias, Dark, and Flat Field exposures are taken in order to measure read noise, dark current, CTE, and gain. Numerous bias frames are taken to permit construction of "superbias" frames in which the effects of read noise have been rendered negligible. Dark exposures are made outside the SAA. Full frame and binned observations are made, with binning factors of 1x1 and 2x2. Finally, tungsten lamp exposures are taken through narrow slits to confirm the slit positions in the current database. All exposures are internals. This is a reincarnation of SM3A proposal 8502 with some unnecessary tests removed from the program.

  8. CCD Astrophotography High-Quality Imaging from the Suburbs

    CERN Document Server

    Stuart, Adam

    2006-01-01

    This is a reference book for amateur astronomers who have become interested in CCD imaging. Those glorious astronomical images found in astronomy magazines might seem out of reach to newcomers to CCD imaging, but this is not the case. Great pictures are attainable with modest equipment. Adam Stuart’s many beautiful images, reproduced in this book, attest to the quality of – initially – a beginner’s efforts. Chilled-chip astronomical CCD-cameras and software are also wonderful tools for cutting through seemingly impenetrable light-pollution. CCD Astrophotography from the Suburbs describes one man’s successful approach to the problem of getting high-quality astronomical images under some of the most light-polluted conditions. Here is a complete and thoroughly tested program that will help every CCD-beginner to work towards digital imaging of the highest quality. It is equally useful to astronomers who have perfect observing conditions, as to those who have to observe from light-polluted city skies.

  9. CCD and IR array controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Robert W.; Low, Frank J.

    2000-08-01

    A family of controllers has bene developed that is powerful and flexible enough to operate a wide range of CCD and IR focal plane arrays in a variety of ground-based applications. These include fast readout of small CCD and IR arrays for adaptive optics applications, slow readout of large CCD and IR mosaics, and single CCD and IR array operation at low background/low noise regimes as well as high background/high speed regimes. The CCD and IR controllers have a common digital core based on user- programmable digital signal processors that are used to generate the array clocking and signal processing signals customized for each application. A fiber optic link passes image data and commands to VME or PCI interface boards resident in a host computer to the controller. CCD signal processing is done with a dual slope integrator operating at speeds of up to one Megapixel per second per channel. Signal processing of IR arrays is done either with a dual channel video processor or a four channel video processor that has built-in image memory and a coadder to 32-bit precision for operating high background arrays. Recent developments underway include the implementation of a fast fiber optic data link operating at a speed of 12.5 Megapixels per second for fast image transfer from the controller to the host computer, and supporting image acquisition software and device drivers for the PCI interface board for the Sun Solaris, Linux and Windows 2000 operating systems.

  10. A Bridge Deflection Monitoring System Based on CCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For long-term monitoring of the midspan deflection of Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction on 309 national roads in Zibo city, this paper proposes Zhang’s calibration-based DIC deflection monitoring method. CCD cameras are used to track the change of targets’ position, Zhang’s calibration algorithm is introduced to acquire the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of CCD cameras, and the DIC method is combined with Zhang’s calibration algorithm to measure bridge deflection. The comparative test between Zhang’s calibration and scale calibration is conducted in lab, and experimental results indicate that the proposed method has higher precision. According to the deflection monitoring scheme, the deflection monitoring software for Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction is developed by MATLAB, and a 4-channel CCD deflection monitoring system for Songjiazhuang cloverleaf junction is integrated in this paper. This deflection monitoring system includes functions such as image preview, simultaneous collection, camera calibration, deflection display, and data storage. In situ deflection curves show a consistent trend; this suggests that the proposed method is reliable and is suitable for the long-term monitoring of bridge deflection.

  11. High-resolution EM-CCD scintillation gamma cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korevaar, M.A.N.

    2013-01-01

    The development of medical imaging techniques has dramatically changed clinical practice and biomedical science in the 20th century. Nuclear Medicine imaging techniques reveal the function of organs and tissues in vivo with the aid of radioactively labeled tracer molecules. These techniques, such as

  12. The Dark Energy Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Honscheid, K.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Antonik, M.; Ballester, O.; Beaufore, L.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bigelow, B.; Bonati, M.; Boprie, D.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Campa, J.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; Cease, H.; Cela-Ruiz, J. M.; Chappa, S.; Chi, E.; Cooper, C.; da Costa, L. N.; Dede, E.; Derylo, G.; DePoy, D. L.; de Vicente, J.; Doel, P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eiting, J.; Elliott, A. E.; Emes, J.; Estrada, J.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Flores, R.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gladders, M. D.; Gregory, B.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Hao, J.; Holland, S. E.; Holm, S.; Huffman, D.; Jackson, C.; James, D. J.; Jonas, M.; Karcher, A.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kozlovsky, M.; Kron, R. G.; Kubik, D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuk, K.; Lahav, O.; Lathrop, A.; Lee, J.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, P.; Li, T. S.; Mandrichenko, I.; Marshall, J. L.; Martinez, G.; Merritt, K. W.; Miquel, R.; Muñoz, F.; Neilsen, E. H.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Olsen, J.; Palaio, N.; Patton, K.; Peoples, J.; Plazas, A. A.; Rauch, J.; Reil, K.; Rheault, J.-P.; Roe, N. A.; Rogers, H.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schmidt, R.; Schmitt, R.; Schubnell, M.; Schultz, K.; Schurter, P.; Scott, L.; Serrano, S.; Shaw, T. M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Stefanik, A.; Stuermer, W.; Suchyta, E.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tighe, R.; Tran, C.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wang, G.; Watson, M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Wester, W.; Woods, R.; Yanny, B.; DES Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel-1. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6-9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  13. THE DARK ENERGY CAMERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaugher, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Alvarez, O.; Angstadt, R.; Annis, J. T.; Buckley-Geer, E. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Honscheid, K. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Abbott, T. M. C.; Bonati, M. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Antonik, M.; Brooks, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L. [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Beaufore, L. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bernstein, G. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bernstein, R. A. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bigelow, B.; Boprie, D. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Campa, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energèticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Castander, F. J., E-mail: diehl@fnal.gov [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai, IEEC-CSIC, Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5 par-2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Collaboration: DES Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-15

    The Dark Energy Camera is a new imager with a 2.°2 diameter field of view mounted at the prime focus of the Victor M. Blanco 4 m telescope on Cerro Tololo near La Serena, Chile. The camera was designed and constructed by the Dark Energy Survey Collaboration and meets or exceeds the stringent requirements designed for the wide-field and supernova surveys for which the collaboration uses it. The camera consists of a five-element optical corrector, seven filters, a shutter with a 60 cm aperture, and a charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane of 250 μm thick fully depleted CCDs cooled inside a vacuum Dewar. The 570 megapixel focal plane comprises 62 2k × 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k × 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The CCDs have 15 μm × 15 μm pixels with a plate scale of 0.″263 pixel{sup −1}. A hexapod system provides state-of-the-art focus and alignment capability. The camera is read out in 20 s with 6–9 electron readout noise. This paper provides a technical description of the camera's engineering, construction, installation, and current status.

  14. The NEAT Camera Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jr., Ray L. Newburn

    1995-01-01

    The NEAT (Near Earth Asteroid Tracking) camera system consists of a camera head with a 6.3 cm square 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, fast electronics, and a Sun Sparc 20 data and control computer with dual CPUs, 256 Mbytes of memory, and 36 Gbytes of hard disk. The system was designed for optimum use with an Air Force GEODSS (Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance) telescope. The GEODSS telescopes have 1 m f/2.15 objectives of the Ritchey-Chretian type, designed originally for satellite tracking. Installation of NEAT began July 25 at the Air Force Facility on Haleakala, a 3000 m peak on Maui in Hawaii.

  15. Application of compound measuring method with laser and CCD to sphericity error detection of ICF target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei Zhigen; Guo Junjie; Ma Xiaojun; Gao Dangzhong

    2011-01-01

    A novel compound measuring method for sphericity error detection of ICF target is proposed. Combining the advantages of laser probe and CCD camera, this method can effectively integrate the data captured by laser probe and CCD camera into the same coordinate system by means of calibrating the position relationship of the two optical axes with a standard ball. The quasi-Newton method is employed to process the measured data with the noise data eliminated. Meanwhile, the diameter of target derived by CCD camera is used as partial initial conditions, which prevents the occurrence of local optimization due to inappropriate initial parameter selection. The experiment has been carried out on the experiment platform of a compact five-coordinate measuring machine under two kinds of measuring mode, demonstrating the validity and robustness of this method. (authors)

  16. World's fastest and most sensitive astronomical camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    The next generation of instruments for ground-based telescopes took a leap forward with the development of a new ultra-fast camera that can take 1500 finely exposed images per second even when observing extremely faint objects. The first 240x240 pixel images with the world's fastest high precision faint light camera were obtained through a collaborative effort between ESO and three French laboratories from the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers (CNRS/INSU). Cameras such as this are key components of the next generation of adaptive optics instruments of Europe's ground-based astronomy flagship facility, the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). ESO PR Photo 22a/09 The CCD220 detector ESO PR Photo 22b/09 The OCam camera ESO PR Video 22a/09 OCam images "The performance of this breakthrough camera is without an equivalent anywhere in the world. The camera will enable great leaps forward in many areas of the study of the Universe," says Norbert Hubin, head of the Adaptive Optics department at ESO. OCam will be part of the second-generation VLT instrument SPHERE. To be installed in 2011, SPHERE will take images of giant exoplanets orbiting nearby stars. A fast camera such as this is needed as an essential component for the modern adaptive optics instruments used on the largest ground-based telescopes. Telescopes on the ground suffer from the blurring effect induced by atmospheric turbulence. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way that delights poets, but frustrates astronomers, since it blurs the finest details of the images. Adaptive optics techniques overcome this major drawback, so that ground-based telescopes can produce images that are as sharp as if taken from space. Adaptive optics is based on real-time corrections computed from images obtained by a special camera working at very high speeds. Nowadays, this means many hundreds of times each second. The new generation instruments require these

  17. CCD characterization and measurements automation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotov, I.V.; Frank, J.; Kotov, A.I.; Kubánek, Petr; O´Connor, P.; Prouza, Michael; Radeka, V.; Takacs, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 695, Dec (2012), 188-192 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : CCD * characterization * test automation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.142, year: 2012

  18. Deployable Wireless Camera Penetrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, Mircea; Jones, Jack; Sherrit, Stewart; Wu, Jiunn Jeng

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, low-power camera dart has been designed and tested for context imaging of sampling sites and ground surveys from an aerobot or an orbiting spacecraft in a microgravity environment. The camera penetrators also can be used to image any line-of-sight surface, such as cliff walls, that is difficult to access. Tethered cameras to inspect the surfaces of planetary bodies use both power and signal transmission lines to operate. A tether adds the possibility of inadvertently anchoring the aerobot, and requires some form of station-keeping capability of the aerobot if extended examination time is required. The new camera penetrators are deployed without a tether, weigh less than 30 grams, and are disposable. They are designed to drop from any altitude with the boost in transmitting power currently demonstrated at approximately 100-m line-of-sight. The penetrators also can be deployed to monitor lander or rover operations from a distance, and can be used for surface surveys or for context information gathering from a touch-and-go sampling site. Thanks to wireless operation, the complexity of the sampling or survey mechanisms may be reduced. The penetrators may be battery powered for short-duration missions, or have solar panels for longer or intermittent duration missions. The imaging device is embedded in the penetrator, which is dropped or projected at the surface of a study site at 90 to the surface. Mirrors can be used in the design to image the ground or the horizon. Some of the camera features were tested using commercial "nanny" or "spy" camera components with the charge-coupled device (CCD) looking at a direction parallel to the ground. Figure 1 shows components of one camera that weighs less than 8 g and occupies a volume of 11 cm3. This camera could transmit a standard television signal, including sound, up to 100 m. Figure 2 shows the CAD models of a version of the penetrator. A low-volume array of such penetrator cameras could be deployed from an

  19. Image responses to x-ray radiation in ICCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiming; Duan, Baojun; Song, Yan; Song, Guzhou; Han, Changcai; Zhou, Ming; Du, Jiye; Wang, Qunshu; Zhang, Jianqi

    2013-08-01

    When used in digital radiography, ICCD camera will be inevitably irradiated by x-ray and the output image will degrade. In this research, we separated ICCD camera into two optical-electric parts, CCD camera and MCP image intensifier, and irradiated them respectively on Co-60 gamma ray source and pulsed x-ray source. By changing time association between radiation and the shutter of CCD camera, the state of power supply of MCP image intensifier, significant differences have been observed in output images. A further analysis has revealed the influence of the CCD chip, readout circuit in CCD camera, and the photocathode, microchannel plate and fluorescent screen in MCP image intensifier on image quality of an irradiated ICCD camera. The study demonstrated that compared with other parts, irradiation response of readout circuit is very slight and in most cases negligible. The interaction of x-ray with CCD chip usually behaves as bright spots or rough background in output images, which depends on x-ray doses. As to the MCP image intensifier, photocathode and microchannel plate are the two main steps that degrade output images. When being irradiated by x-ray, microchannel plate in MCP image intensifier tends to contribute a bright background in output images. Background caused by the photocathode looks more bright and fluctuant. Image responses of fluorescent screen in MCP image intensifier in ICCD camera and that of a coupling fiber bundle are also evaluated in this presentation.

  20. Jig Aligns Shadow Mask On CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, Carlos V.

    1989-01-01

    Alignment viewed through microscope. Alignment jig positions shadow mask on charge-coupled device (CCD) so metal film deposited on it precisely. Allows CCD package to be inserted and removed without disturbing alignment of mask. Holds CCD packages securely and isolates it electrostatically while providing electrical contact to each of its pins. When alignment jig assembled with CCD, used to move mask under micrometer control.

  1. CCD Photometry of bright stars using objective wire mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiński, Krzysztof; Zgórz, Marika [Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Słoneczna 36, 60-286 Poznań (Poland); Schwarzenberg-Czerny, Aleksander, E-mail: chrisk@amu.edu.pl [Copernicus Astronomical Centre, ul. Bartycka 18, PL 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Obtaining accurate photometry of bright stars from the ground remains problematic due to the danger of overexposing the target and/or the lack of suitable nearby comparison stars. The century-old method of using objective wire mesh to produce multiple stellar images seems promising for the precise CCD photometry of such stars. Furthermore, our tests on β Cep and its comparison star, differing by 5 mag, are very encouraging. Using a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope with the objective covered by a plastic wire mesh, in poor weather conditions, we obtained differential photometry with a precision of 4.5 mmag per two minute exposure. Our technique is flexible and may be tuned to cover a range as big as 6-8 mag. We discuss the possibility of installing a wire mesh directly in the filter wheel.

  2. Mosaic CCD method: A new technique for observing dynamics of cometary magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, T.; Takeuchi, H.; Kozuba, Y.; Okamura, S.; Konno, I.; Hamabe, M.; Aoki, T.; Minami, S.; Isobe, S.

    1992-12-01

    On April 29, 1990, the plasma tail of Comet Austin was observed with a CCD camera on the 105-cm Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory of the University of Tokyo. The area of the CCD used in this observation is only about 1 sq cm. When this CCD is used on the 105-cm Schmidt telescope at the Kiso Observatory, the area corresponds to a narrow square view of 12 ft x 12 ft. By comparison with the photograph of Comet Austin taken by Numazawa (personal communication) on the same night, we see that only a small part of the plasma tail can be photographed at one time with the CCD. However, by shifting the view on the CCD after each exposure, we succeeded in imaging the entire length of the cometary magnetosphere of 1.6 x 106 km. This new technique is called 'the mosaic CCD method'. In order to study the dynamics of cometary plasma tails, seven frames of the comet from the head to the tail region were twice imaged with the mosaic CCD method and two sets of images were obtained. Six microstructures, including arcade structures, were identified in both the images. Sketches of the plasma tail including microstructures are included.

  3. Linearity measurement for image-intensified CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhuan; Zhang, Liwei; Yan, Feng; Gu, Yongqiang; Wan, Liying

    2010-10-01

    To the characteristic of the ultraviolet CCD (UV ICCD), technique of the linearity measurement of the UV ICCD camera is studied based on the theory of radiometry. Approach of linearity measurement is discussed, and a kind of measurement system of the UV ICCD has been developed based on the method of neutral density filter. It is very important that the transmittance of the filter is independent of the wavelength in the method of neutral density filter. Black metal screen mesh with different transmittance is used in our system, and calibration of the filters' transmittance in different working positions has been done. Meanwhile, to assure the uniform of the received radiation on the target of the detector at any test points, an integrating sphere is placed behind the neutral filter to balance light. The whole measurement system mainly consists of a deuterium lamp with high stabilization, the attenuation film with transmission, integrating sphere, optical guide and electro-shift platform. Auto control is realized via special software during the test. With this instrument, the linearity of the UV ICCD was measured. Experimental results show that the nonlinearity of the UV ICCD under fixed-gain is less than 2% and the uncertainty of measurement system is less than 4%.

  4. CCD astrometric observations of comets at the Belgrade observatory during 1998 - 2000 (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protitch-Benishek V.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available 143 precise astrometric positions of seven comets were obtained with the CCD equipped Askania astrograph (13.5/160 of Belgrade Astronomical Observatory. The SBIG ST-8(1530 × 1020 pixel array camera was used in the observations.

  5. AzCam: A Windows-based CCD/CMOS Client/Server Data Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, M.; Parthasarathy, M.

    AzCam is a software package developed to utilize a common architecture for the characterization of CCD and CMOS imagers in both laboratory and astronomical observatory environments. It follows a standard client/server model in which the server runs on a PC under the Microsoft Windows operating system to allow easy integration with the many CMOS imager cameras.

  6. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschunt, E.; Platz, W.; Baer, Ul; Heinz, L.

    1978-01-01

    A gamma camera has a plurality of exchangeable collimators, one of which is replaceably mounted in the ray inlet opening of the camera, while the others are placed on separate supports. Supports are swingably mounted upon a column one above the other

  7. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, P.A.; Steidley, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a collimation system for a gamma camera for use in nuclear medicine is described. When used with a 2-dimensional position sensitive radiation detector, the novel system can produce superior images than conventional cameras. The optimal thickness and positions of the collimators are derived mathematically. (U.K.)

  8. CCD research. [design, fabrication, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassaway, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental problems encountered in designing, fabricating, and applying CCD's are reviewed. Investigations are described and results and conclusions are given for the following: (1) the development of design analyses employing computer aided techniques and their application to the design of a grapped structure; (2) the role of CCD's in applications to electronic functions, in particular, signal processing; (3) extending the CCD to silicon films on sapphire (SOS); and (4) all aluminum transfer structure with low noise input-output circuits. Related work on CCD imaging devices is summarized.

  9. Automatic locking radioisotope camera lock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosauer, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    The lock of the present invention secures the isotope source in a stored shielded condition in the camera until a positive effort has been made to open the lock and take the source outside of the camera and prevents disconnection of the source pigtail unless the source is locked in a shielded condition in the camera. It also gives a visual indication of the locked or possible exposed condition of the isotope source and prevents the source pigtail from being completely pushed out of the camera, even when the lock is released. (author)

  10. Using a Web Cam CCD to do V Band Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Paul

    2009-05-01

    With the plethora of cheap web cam based CCD cameras in the market today, it seemed expedient to find out if they can be used to do photometry. An experiment was planned to determine if it was possible to do this kind of exacting measurement. Arne Henden (AAVSO) believed it would be possible to do V band photometry to 0.05 mag accuracy with a web cam CCD. Using a 6" refractor, the heart of M42 was repeatedly imaged. Theta 2 and SAO 132322 were the comparison stars and V361 Orion was the target variable. Since the 1/4 HAD CCD chip only allows for a field of 10x7 arc minutes using the 6" refractor, the number targets was limited. The RGB on the chip itself provides the filters needed for photometry. The G band pass on the chip ranges from 425-650 nm with a peak band pass at 540, V band pass is 475-645 with a peak at 525. The results indicate that a web cam CCD can be used for V band photometry. With a 10 second calibrated exposure without the Peltier cooling being engaged, the results for the 2 target stars were ± 0.18 mag. The star Theta 2 was 0.18 brighter in V than the actual measurement from the Tycho catalog. SAO 132322 was -0.012 mag dimmer than the listed Tycho measurement. Then using SAO 132322 and Theta 2 as comparison stars, V361 Orion was estimated at 7.786 magnitudes. This is inline with visual estimates received before and after this date. With more estimates of known magnitude comparison stars, a correction factor should be estimated and applied to the variable work that will make it more accurate. This correction factor should bring it close to Arne Henden's estimate of 0.05 mag accuracy.

  11. Design of area array CCD image acquisition and display system based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Ning; Li, Tianting; Pan, Yue; Dai, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    With the development of science and technology, CCD(Charge-coupled Device) has been widely applied in various fields and plays an important role in the modern sensing system, therefore researching a real-time image acquisition and display plan based on CCD device has great significance. This paper introduces an image data acquisition and display system of area array CCD based on FPGA. Several key technical challenges and problems of the system have also been analyzed and followed solutions put forward .The FPGA works as the core processing unit in the system that controls the integral time sequence .The ICX285AL area array CCD image sensor produced by SONY Corporation has been used in the system. The FPGA works to complete the driver of the area array CCD, then analog front end (AFE) processes the signal of the CCD image, including amplification, filtering, noise elimination, CDS correlation double sampling, etc. AD9945 produced by ADI Corporation to convert analog signal to digital signal. Developed Camera Link high-speed data transmission circuit, and completed the PC-end software design of the image acquisition, and realized the real-time display of images. The result through practical testing indicates that the system in the image acquisition and control is stable and reliable, and the indicators meet the actual project requirements.

  12. Architecture of PAU survey camera readout electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Javier; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; De Vicente, Juan; Illa, Joseph; Jimenez, Jorge; Maiorino, Marino; Martinez, Gustavo

    2012-07-01

    PAUCam is a new camera for studying the physics of the accelerating universe. The camera will consist of eighteen 2Kx4K HPK CCDs: sixteen for science and two for guiding. The camera will be installed at the prime focus of the WHT (William Herschel Telescope). In this contribution, the architecture of the readout electronics system is presented. Back- End and Front-End electronics are described. Back-End consists of clock, bias and video processing boards, mounted on Monsoon crates. The Front-End is based on patch panel boards. These boards are plugged outside the camera feed-through panel for signal distribution. Inside the camera, individual preamplifier boards plus kapton cable completes the path to connect to each CCD. The overall signal distribution and grounding scheme is shown in this paper.

  13. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschunt, E.; Platz, W.; Baer, U.; Heinz, L.

    1978-01-01

    A gamma camera has a plurality of exchangeable collimators, one of which is mounted in the ray inlet opening of the camera, while the others are placed on separate supports. The supports are swingably mounted upon a column one above the other through about 90 0 to a collimator exchange position. Each of the separate supports is swingable to a vertically aligned position, with limiting of the swinging movement and positioning of the support at the desired exchange position. The collimators are carried on the supports by means of a series of vertically disposed coil springs. Projections on the camera are movable from above into grooves of the collimator at the exchange position, whereupon the collimator is turned so that it is securely prevented from falling out of the camera head

  14. Status Of Sofradir IR-CCD Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribolet, Philippe; Radisson, Patrick

    1988-05-01

    The topics of this paper deal with the IR-CCD detectors manufactured by SOFRADIR the new French joint venture. Description of the IRCCD technology and the advantages of this approach are given. In conclusion, some IR-CCD typical results are given.

  15. The WEBERSAT camera - An inexpensive earth imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephen; Raetzke, Jeffrey

    WEBERSAT is a 27 pound LEO satellite launched in 1990 into a 500 mile polar orbit. One of its payloads is a low cost CCD color camera system developed by engineering students at Weber State University. The camera is a modified Canon CI-10 with a 25 mm lens, automatic iris, and 780 x 490 pixel resolution. The iris range control potentiometer was made programmable; a 10.7 MHz digitization clock, fixed focus support, and solid tantalum capacitors were added. Camera output signals, composite video, red, green, blue, and the digitization clock are fed to a flash digitizer, where they are processed for storage in RAM. Camera control commands are stored and executed via the onboard computer. The CCD camera has successfully imaged meteorological features of the earth, land masses, and a number of astronomical objects.

  16. A fluorescent screen + CCD system for quality assurance of therapeutic scanned ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshita, E., E-mail: eriuli@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Furukawa, T., E-mail: t_furu@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Inaniwa, T., E-mail: taku@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Sato, S., E-mail: shin_s@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Himukai, T., E-mail: himukai@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Shirai, T., E-mail: t_shirai@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Noda, K., E-mail: noda_k@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    A fluorescent screen + a charge coupled device (CCD) system were developed to verify the performance of scanned ion beams at the HIMAC. The fluorescent light from the screen is observed by the CCD camera. Two-dimensional fields, produced by the scanning process, i.e., the position and the size of the beam for each scan, represent of the important issues in scanning irradiation. In the developed system, the two-dimensional relative fluence and the flatness of the irradiation field were measured in a straightforward technique from the luminance distribution on the screen. The position and the size of the beams were obtained from centroid computation results of the brightness. By the good sensitivity and spatial resolution of the fluorescent screen + CCD system, the scanned ion beams were verified as the measurements at the HIMAC prototype scanning system.

  17. A fluorescent screen + CCD system for quality assurance of therapeutic scanned ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, E.; Furukawa, T.; Inaniwa, T.; Sato, S.; Himukai, T.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2011-12-01

    A fluorescent screen + a charge coupled device (CCD) system were developed to verify the performance of scanned ion beams at the HIMAC. The fluorescent light from the screen is observed by the CCD camera. Two-dimensional fields, produced by the scanning process, i.e., the position and the size of the beam for each scan, represent of the important issues in scanning irradiation. In the developed system, the two-dimensional relative fluence and the flatness of the irradiation field were measured in a straightforward technique from the luminance distribution on the screen. The position and the size of the beams were obtained from centroid computation results of the brightness. By the good sensitivity and spatial resolution of the fluorescent screen + CCD system, the scanned ion beams were verified as the measurements at the HIMAC prototype scanning system.

  18. CCD-based vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Damerell, C J S

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, CCD-based vertex detectors have been used to construct some of the most precise 'tracking microscopes' in particle physics. They were initially used by the ACCMOR collaboration for fixed target experiments in CERN, where they enabled the lifetimes of some of the shortest-lived charm particles to be measured precisely. The migration to collider experiments was accomplished in the SLD experiment, where the original 120 Mpixel detector was later upgraded to one with 307 Mpixels. This detector was used in a range of physics studies which exceeded the capability of the LEP detectors, including the most precise limit to date on the Bs mixing parameter. This success, and the high background hit densities that will inevitably be encountered at the future TeV-scale linear collider, have established the need for a silicon pixel-based vertex detector at this machine. The technical options have now been broadened to include a wide range of possible silicon imaging technologies as well as CCDs (mon...

  19. VUV Testing of Science Cameras at MSFC: QE Measurement of the CLASP Flight Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, Patrick R.; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Hyde, D.; Robertson, B.; Beabout, B.; Beabout, D.; Stewart, M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras were built and tested for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The CLASP camera design includes a frame-transfer e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detector, dual channel analog readout electronics and an internally mounted cold block. At the flight operating temperature of -20 C, the CLASP cameras achieved the low-noise performance requirements (less than or equal to 25 e- read noise and greater than or equal to 10 e-/sec/pix dark current), in addition to maintaining a stable gain of approximately equal to 2.0 e-/DN. The e2v CCD57-10 detectors were coated with Lumogen-E to improve quantum efficiency (QE) at the Lyman- wavelength. A vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) monochromator and a NIST calibrated photodiode were employed to measure the QE of each camera. Four flight-like cameras were tested in a high-vacuum chamber, which was configured to operate several tests intended to verify the QE, gain, read noise, dark current and residual non-linearity of the CCD. We present and discuss the QE measurements performed on the CLASP cameras. We also discuss the high-vacuum system outfitted for testing of UV and EUV science cameras at MSFC.

  20. CMOS IMAGING SENSOR TECHNOLOGY FOR AERIAL MAPPING CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Neumann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  1. Is Flat fielding Safe for Precision CCD Astronomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Michael; Davis, Christopher P.; Roodman, Aaron

    2017-08-01

    The ambitious goals of precision cosmology with wide-field optical surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) demand precision CCD astronomy as their foundation. This in turn requires an understanding of previously uncharacterized sources of systematic error in CCD sensors, many of which manifest themselves as static effective variations in pixel area. Such variation renders a critical assumption behind the traditional procedure of flat fielding—that a sensor’s pixels comprise a uniform grid—invalid. In this work, we present a method to infer a curl-free model of a sensor’s underlying pixel grid from flat-field images, incorporating the superposition of all electrostatic sensor effects—both known and unknown—present in flat-field data. We use these pixel grid models to estimate the overall impact of sensor systematics on photometry, astrometry, and PSF shape measurements in a representative sensor from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) and a prototype LSST sensor. Applying the method to DECam data recovers known significant sensor effects for which corrections are currently being developed within DES. For an LSST prototype CCD with pixel-response non-uniformity (PRNU) of 0.4%, we find the impact of “improper” flat fielding on these observables is negligible in nominal .7″ seeing conditions. These errors scale linearly with the PRNU, so for future LSST production sensors, which may have larger PRNU, our method provides a way to assess whether pixel-level calibration beyond flat fielding will be required.

  2. Development and evaluation of a CCD-based digital imaging system for mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccaro, Michele F.; Toker, Emre

    1993-05-01

    We have developed a CCD-based, high performance, filmless imaging system for stereotactic biopsy procedures in mammography. The CCD camera is based on a 1024 X 1024 pixel format, full-frame, scientific grade, front-illuminated, MPP mode CCD, directly coupled to an X-ray intensifying screen via a 2:1 fiber optic reducer. The CCD is cooled to -10 degree(s)C, and is digitized in slow-scan, correlated double sampling mode at 500 Kpixels/second with 12-bit contrast resolution. X-ray images acquired with the system are processed and displayed on a high resolution monitor within 20 seconds of exposure. System design and specifications will be described, and evaluation of physical performance characteristics will be discussed. The system has been used in over 100 stereotactic breast biopsy procedures to date, and has been shown to significantly improve the speed and accuracy of the biopsy procedure, due to the near real-time acquisition and display of x-ray images. Initial results also indicate that the fiber optic coupled CCD-based imaging system provides superior detectability of low contrast breast lesions and microcalcifications at lower patient dose, as compared to conventional film-screen detectors.

  3. Accurate Radiometric Calibration using Mechanically-Shuttered CCD Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D.; Liang, D.

    Acquiring accurate radiometric measurements is an essential part of characterizing non-resolvable satellites. For instance, temporal photometric signatures provide information on characteristic size, reflectance, and stability, spin rate, etc., and with more detailed analysis, shape and attitude. Multi-color photometric measurements provide information on material composition and the effects of space weathering. Thermal infrared radiometry provides gray-body temperatures and emissivity properties. Many of these methods rely on accurate radiometric calibration. For CCD systems, the calibration process generally entails removing bias and dark signals from the raw frames, dividing by a flat-field frame to account for non-uniformities, and applying a sensitivity factor to convert the remaining signal into photon-flux or energy-flux units. However, when using mechanically-shuttered camera systems, another effect must be accounted for to obtain accurately calibrated data: the finite time required for the mechanical shutter to open and close. Measurements for both two-bladed and iris mechanical shutters indicate that neglecting this effect can lead to calibration errors of 10% or more in short-duration exposures. We present methods for measuring this effect, either in a laboratory setting or with the instrument mounted on a telescope, and the additional steps required to calibrate CCD data.

  4. BVRI CCD photometry of the metal-poor globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E.

    1990-01-01

    BVRI photometry of the low metallicity globular cluster M68 (NGC 4590) was obtained with a CCD camera and the 2.2-m ESO telescope. The resulting BV color-magnitude diagrams are compared with the observations of McClure et al. (1987). The observations are also compared with theoretical isochrones, yielding a cluster age of 13 Gyr with a likely external uncertainty of 2 or 3 Gyr. 25 refs

  5. Měření absolutní kvantové účinnosti iCCD kamer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálek, Václav; Hamar, Martin; Haderka, O.; Peřina, J.; Machulka, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2012), s. 24-27 ISSN 0447-6441 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100713; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : quantum efficiency * intensified CCD camera * standardless measurement Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  6. 145CCD astrometric positions of comets and minor planets: Observed during March-September 1998 at the Belgrade observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benishek Vl.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present precise astrometric positions of four comets and four minor planets from the MPC critical list. All the observations were carried out with CCD equipped Askania astrograph (13.5/160. The SBIG ST-8 camera was used. Comet 1998 M5 (Stonehouse occulted an anonymous star on July 9 and that phenomenon was observed successfully.

  7. pnCCD for photon detection from near-infrared to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Andritschke, Robert; Hartmann, Robert; Herrmann, Sven; Holl, Peter; Lutz, Gerhard; Strueder, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    A pnCCD is a special type of charge-coupled device developed for spectroscopy and imaging of X-rays with high time resolution and quantum efficiency. Its most famous application is the operation on the XMM-Newton satellite, an X-ray astronomy mission that was launched by the European space agency in 1999. The excellent performance of the focal plane camera has been maintained for more than 6 years in orbit. The energy resolution in particular has shown hardly any degradation since launch. In order to satisfy the requirements of future X-ray astronomy missions as well as those of ground-based experiments, a new type of pnCCD has been developed. This 'frame-store pnCCD' shows an enhanced performance compared to the XMM-Newton type of pnCCD. Now, more options in device design and operation are available to tailor the detector to its respective application. Part of this concept is a programmable analog signal processor, which has been developed for the readout of the CCD signals. The electronic noise of the new detector has a value of only 2 electrons equivalent noise charge (ENC), which is less than half of the figure achieved for the XMM-Newton-type pnCCD. The energy resolution for the Mn-K α line at 5.9 keV is approximately 130 eV FWHM. We have close to 100% quantum efficiency for both low- and high-energy photon detection (e.g. the C-K line at 277 eV, and the Ge-K α line at 10 keV, respectively). Very high frame rates of 1000 images/s have been achieved due to the ultra-fast readout accomplished by the parallel architecture of the pnCCD and the analog signal processor. Excellent spectroscopic performance is shown even at the relatively high operating temperature of -25 deg. C that can be achieved by a Peltier cooler. The applications of the low-noise and fast pnCCD detector are not limited to the detection of X-rays. With an anti-reflective coating deposited on the photon entrance window, we achieve high quantum efficiency also for near-infrared and optical

  8. High resolution RGB color line scan camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Theodore E.; Huettig, Fred

    1998-04-01

    A color line scan camera family which is available with either 6000, 8000 or 10000 pixels/color channel, utilizes off-the-shelf lenses, interfaces with currently available frame grabbers, includes on-board pixel by pixel offset correction, and is configurable and controllable via RS232 serial port for computer controlled or stand alone operation is described in this paper. This line scan camera is based on an available 8000 element monochrome line scan camera designed by AOA for OEM use. The new color version includes improvements such as better packaging and additional user features which make the camera easier to use. The heart of the camera is a tri-linear CCD sensor with on-chip color balancing for maximum accuracy and pinned photodiodes for low lag response. Each color channel is digitized to 12 bits and all three channels are multiplexed together so that the resulting camera output video is either a 12 or 8 bit data stream at a rate of up to 24Megpixels/sec. Conversion from 12 to 8 bit, or user-defined gamma, is accomplished by on board user-defined video look up tables. The camera has two user-selectable operating modes; lows speed, high sensitivity mode or high speed, reduced sensitivity mode. The intended uses of the camera include industrial inspection, digital archiving, document scanning, and graphic arts applications.

  9. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, K.H.; Kotschak, O.; Conrad, B.

    1976-01-01

    A gamma camera with a simplified setup as compared with the state of engineering is described permitting, apart from good localization, also energy discrimination. Behind the usual vacuum image amplifier a multiwire proportional chamber filled with trifluorine bromium methane is connected in series. Localizing of the signals is achieved by a delay line, energy determination by means of a pulse height discriminator. With the aid of drawings and circuit diagrams, the setup and mode of operation are explained. (ORU) [de

  10. Fusion neutron damage to a charge coupled device camera

    OpenAIRE

    Amaden, Christopher Dean

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A charge coupled device (CCD) camera's performance has been degraded by damage produced by 14 MeV neutrons (n) from the Rotating Target Neutron Source. High energy neutrons produce atomic dislocation in doped silicon electronics. This thesis explores changes in Dark Current (J), Charge Transfer Inefficiency (CTI), and Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) as measures of neutron damage. The camera was irradiated to a fluence, Phi, of 6.60 x ...

  11. Gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berninger, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    The light pulse output of a scintillator, on which incident collimated gamma rays impinge, is detected by an array of photoelectric tubes each having a convexly curved photocathode disposed in close proximity to the scintillator. Electronic circuitry connected to outputs of the phototubes develops the scintillation event position coordinate electrical signals with good linearity and with substantial independence of the spacing between the scintillator and photocathodes so that the phototubes can be positioned as close to the scintillator as is possible to obtain less distortion in the field of view and improved spatial resolution as compared to conventional planar photocathode gamma cameras

  12. Development of a CCD-based pyrometer for surface temperature measurement of casting billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Lang, Xianli; Hu, Zhenwei; Shu, Shuangbao

    2017-06-01

    In order to achieve high accuracy and good stability of temperature measurement results, an online vision-based temperature field measurement system for continuous casting billets is developed instead of the conventional single-point radiation pyrometer in this paper. This system is a hybrid temperature measurement system which consists of a monochrome array CCD camera with high resolution and a single spot colorimetric thermometer simultaneously. In this system, a narrow-band spectrum radiation temperature measurement model is established for the optical CCD-based pyrometer system, and the non-uniformity of the temperature field measurement due to the inter-element sensitivity deviations of the CCD-array detector and photometric distortion caused by the vignetting in the optical system is analyzed in detail and compensated. Furthermore, in order to eliminate the temperature fluctuation caused by the stripped iron oxide scale on billets, a temperature field reconstruction approach, which took full advantage of the high resolution characteristic of CCD and the distribution character of the surface temperature field of billets, is introduced in this system. Meanwhile, based on the narrow band spectral thermometry theory, the spot temperature measured by the colorimetric thermometer is used to correct the temperature field measured by the CCD camera on-line so as to reduce the temperature measurement error caused by the inconclusive absolute emissivity of different grades of steel and the interference of industrial dust. Currently, the system has been successfully applied and verified in some continuous casting production lines. Industrial trials indicate that the system could effectively eliminate false temperature variation caused by striped iron oxide scale and provide information about changes of processing parameters in the continuous casting production line in real time.

  13. SLR digital camera for forensic photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Har, Donghwan; Son, Youngho; Lee, Sungwon

    2004-06-01

    Forensic photography, which was systematically established in the late 19th century by Alphonse Bertillon of France, has developed a lot for about 100 years. The development will be more accelerated with the development of high technologies, in particular the digital technology. This paper reviews three studies to answer the question: Can the SLR digital camera replace the traditional silver halide type ultraviolet photography and infrared photography? 1. Comparison of relative ultraviolet and infrared sensitivity of SLR digital camera to silver halide photography. 2. How much ultraviolet or infrared sensitivity is improved when removing the UV/IR cutoff filter built in the SLR digital camera? 3. Comparison of relative sensitivity of CCD and CMOS for ultraviolet and infrared. The test result showed that the SLR digital camera has a very low sensitivity for ultraviolet and infrared. The cause was found to be the UV/IR cutoff filter mounted in front of the image sensor. Removing the UV/IR cutoff filter significantly improved the sensitivity for ultraviolet and infrared. Particularly for infrared, the sensitivity of the SLR digital camera was better than that of the silver halide film. This shows the possibility of replacing the silver halide type ultraviolet photography and infrared photography with the SLR digital camera. Thus, the SLR digital camera seems to be useful for forensic photography, which deals with a lot of ultraviolet and infrared photographs.

  14. New camera systems for fuel services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, W.; Beck, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    AREVA NP Fuel Services have many years of experience in visual examination and measurements on fuel assemblies and associated core components by using state of the art cameras and measuring technologies. The used techniques allow the surface and dimensional characterization of materials and shapes by visual examination. New enhanced and sophisticated technologies for fuel services f. e. are two shielded color camera systems for use under water and close inspection of a fuel assembly. Nowadays the market requirements for detecting and characterization of small defects (lower than the 10th of one mm) or cracks and analyzing surface appearances on an irradiated fuel rod cladding or fuel assembly structure parts have increased. Therefore it is common practice to use movie cameras with higher resolution. The radiation resistance of high resolution CCD cameras is in general very low and it is not possible to use them unshielded close to a fuel assembly. By extending the camera with a mirror system and shielding around the sensitive parts, the movie camera can be utilized for fuel assembly inspection. AREVA NP Fuel Services is now equipped with such kind of movie cameras. (orig.)

  15. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  16. THE ACCURACY OF Hβ CCD PHOTOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kim

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available We have undertaken CCD observations of field standard stars with Hβ photometric system to investigate the reliability of Hβ CCD photometry. Flat fielding with dome flat and sky flat for Hβw and Hβn filter was compared with that of B filter in UBV system and, from these, we have not found any difference. It was confirmed that there is a good linear relationship between our Hβ values observed with 2.3m reflector and standard values. However, Hβ values observed with 60cm reflector at Sobaeksan Astronomy Observatory showed very poor relationship. To investigate the accuracy of Hβ CCD photometry for fainter objects, open cluster NGC2437 was observed and reduced with DoPHOT, and the results were compared with those for photoelectric photometry of Stetson (1981.

  17. The IEEE-1394 Digital Camera Application in the Taiwan Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Changhor; Wang, Min-Huey

    2005-01-01

    The CCD camera with digital interface has been adopted for the diagnostics purpose recently. The long distance transmission with digital interface eliminates image distortion. Without frame grabber in the computer that is also another benefit. These applications include screen monitor and optical transition radiation monitor image for injection study, synchrotron radiation monitor of the booster synchrotron and storage ring. An intensified gated CCD camera is also applied for transient profile study. Wider dynamic range and the flexibility of the newly camera provide various functional enhancements for the diagnostics purpose. The effort and achievement will be summary in this report.

  18. The MVACS Robotic Arm Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H. U.; Hartwig, H.; Kramm, R.; Koschny, D.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Thomas, N.; Fernades, M.; Smith, P. H.; Reynolds, R.; Lemmon, M. T.; Weinberg, J.; Marcialis, R.; Tanner, R.; Boss, B. J.; Oquest, C.; Paige, D. A.

    2001-08-01

    The Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) is one of the key instruments newly developed for the Mars Volatiles and Climate Surveyor payload of the Mars Polar Lander. This lightweight instrument employs a front lens with variable focus range and takes images at distances from 11 mm (image scale 1:1) to infinity. Color images with a resolution of better than 50 μm can be obtained to characterize the Martian soil. Spectral information of nearby objects is retrieved through illumination with blue, green, and red lamp sets. The design and performance of the camera are described in relation to the science objectives and operation. The RAC uses the same CCD detector array as the Surface Stereo Imager and shares the readout electronics with this camera. The RAC is mounted at the wrist of the Robotic Arm and can characterize the contents of the scoop, the samples of soil fed to the Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer, the Martian surface in the vicinity of the lander, and the interior of trenches dug out by the Robotic Arm. It can also be used to take panoramic images and to retrieve stereo information with an effective baseline surpassing that of the Surface Stereo Imager by about a factor of 3.

  19. Multi-MGy Radiation Hardened Camera for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Sylvain; Boukenter, Aziz; Ouerdane, Youcef; Goiffon, Vincent; Corbiere, Franck; Rolando, Sebastien; Molina, Romain; Estribeau, Magali; Avon, Barbara; Magnan, Pierre; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Raine, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing cameras for surveillance systems to monitor nuclear facilities or nuclear waste storages. Particularly, for today's and the next generation of nuclear facilities increasing safety requirements consecutive to Fukushima Daiichi's disaster have to be considered. For some applications, radiation tolerance needs to overcome doses in the MGy(SiO 2 ) range whereas the most tolerant commercial or prototypes products based on solid state image sensors withstand doses up to few kGy. The objective of this work is to present the radiation hardening strategy developed by our research groups to enhance the tolerance to ionizing radiations of the various subparts of these imaging systems by working simultaneously at the component and system design levels. Developing radiation-hardened camera implies to combine several radiation-hardening strategies. In our case, we decided not to use the simplest one, the shielding approach. This approach is efficient but limits the camera miniaturization and is not compatible with its future integration in remote-handling or robotic systems. Then, the hardening-by-component strategy appears mandatory to avoid the failure of one of the camera subparts at doses lower than the MGy. Concerning the image sensor itself, the used technology is a CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) designed by ISAE team with custom pixel designs used to mitigate the total ionizing dose (TID) effects that occur well below the MGy range in classical image sensors (e.g. Charge Coupled Devices (CCD), Charge Injection Devices (CID) and classical Active Pixel Sensors (APS)), such as the complete loss of functionality, the dark current increase and the gain drop. We'll present at the conference a comparative study between these radiation-hardened pixel radiation responses with respect to conventional ones, demonstrating the efficiency of the choices made. The targeted strategy to develop the complete radiation hard camera

  20. Multi-MGy Radiation Hardened Camera for Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Sylvain; Boukenter, Aziz; Ouerdane, Youcef [Universite de Saint-Etienne, Lab. Hubert Curien, UMR-CNRS 5516, F-42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Goiffon, Vincent; Corbiere, Franck; Rolando, Sebastien; Molina, Romain; Estribeau, Magali; Avon, Barbara; Magnan, Pierre [ISAE, Universite de Toulouse, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Raine, Melanie [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2015-07-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing cameras for surveillance systems to monitor nuclear facilities or nuclear waste storages. Particularly, for today's and the next generation of nuclear facilities increasing safety requirements consecutive to Fukushima Daiichi's disaster have to be considered. For some applications, radiation tolerance needs to overcome doses in the MGy(SiO{sub 2}) range whereas the most tolerant commercial or prototypes products based on solid state image sensors withstand doses up to few kGy. The objective of this work is to present the radiation hardening strategy developed by our research groups to enhance the tolerance to ionizing radiations of the various subparts of these imaging systems by working simultaneously at the component and system design levels. Developing radiation-hardened camera implies to combine several radiation-hardening strategies. In our case, we decided not to use the simplest one, the shielding approach. This approach is efficient but limits the camera miniaturization and is not compatible with its future integration in remote-handling or robotic systems. Then, the hardening-by-component strategy appears mandatory to avoid the failure of one of the camera subparts at doses lower than the MGy. Concerning the image sensor itself, the used technology is a CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) designed by ISAE team with custom pixel designs used to mitigate the total ionizing dose (TID) effects that occur well below the MGy range in classical image sensors (e.g. Charge Coupled Devices (CCD), Charge Injection Devices (CID) and classical Active Pixel Sensors (APS)), such as the complete loss of functionality, the dark current increase and the gain drop. We'll present at the conference a comparative study between these radiation-hardened pixel radiation responses with respect to conventional ones, demonstrating the efficiency of the choices made. The targeted strategy to develop the complete radiation hard camera

  1. Feasibility study of a lens-coupled charge-coupled device gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hakjae; Jung, Youngjun; Kim, Jungmin; Bae, Seungbin; Lee, Kisung; Kang, Jungwon

    2011-01-01

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) is generally used in a digital camera as a light-collecting device such as a photomultiplier tube (PMT). Because of its low sensitivity and very high dark current, CCD have not been popularly used for gamma imaging systems. However, a recent CCD technological breakthrough has improved CCD sensitivity, and the use of a Peltier cooling system can significantly minimize the dark current. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a prototype CCD gamma camera consisting of a CsI scintillator, optical lenses, and a CCD module. Despite electron-multiplying (EM) CCDs having higher performance, in this study, we built a cost-effective system consisted of low-cost components compared to EMCCDs. Our prototype detector consists of a CsI scintillator, two optical lenses, and a conventional Peltier-cooled CCD. The performance of this detector was evaluated by acquiring the sensitivity, resolution, and the modulation transfer function (MTF). The sensitivity of the prototype detector showed excellent linearity. With a 1 mm-diameter pinhole collimator, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 1.1 mm Tc-99m line source image was 2.85 mm. These results show that the developed prototype camera is feasible for small animal gamma imaging.

  2. Mechanical Design of the LSST Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordby, Martin; Bowden, Gordon; Foss, Mike; Guiffre, Gary; /SLAC; Ku, John; /Unlisted; Schindler, Rafe; /SLAC

    2008-06-13

    The LSST camera is a tightly packaged, hermetically-sealed system that is cantilevered into the main beam of the LSST telescope. It is comprised of three refractive lenses, on-board storage for five large filters, a high-precision shutter, and a cryostat that houses the 3.2 giga-pixel CCD focal plane along with its support electronics. The physically large optics and focal plane demand large structural elements to support them, but the overall size of the camera and its components must be minimized to reduce impact on the image stability. Also, focal plane and optics motions must be minimized to reduce systematic errors in image reconstruction. Design and analysis for the camera body and cryostat will be detailed.

  3. Hybrid Fiber-Optic/CCD Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, W. C.; Janesick, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low noise and linearity of charge-coupled devices (CCD's) combined with optical waveguide components in hybrid, integrated chip package. Concept used to measure laser flux in fiber-gyro application using sensing fibers that range from several to several tens of kilometers in length. Potential applications include optical delay measurement and linear detector of light flux emanating from fiber-optic waveguides.

  4. Protein diffraction experiments with Atlas CCD detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan; Kovaľ, Tomáš; Dušek, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 64, Suppl. - abstracts (2008), C192 ISSN 0108-7673. [Congress of the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr) /21./. 23.08.2008-31.08.2008, Osaka] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : x-ray data collection * CCD detectors * protein crystallography applications Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  5. Camera for Quasars in the Early Universe (CQUEAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunbin; Park, W.; Lim, J.; Jeong, H.; Kim, J.; Oh, H.; Pak, S.; Im, M.; Kuehne, J.

    2010-05-01

    The early universe of z ɳ is where the first stars, galaxies, and quasars formed, starting the re-ionization of the universe. The discovery and the study of quasars in the early universe allow us to witness the beginning of history of astronomical objects. In order to perform a medium-deep, medium-wide, imaging survey of quasars, we are developing an optical CCD camera, CQUEAN (Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse) which uses a 1024*1024 pixel deep-depletion CCD. It has an enhanced QE than conventional CCD at wavelength band around 1μm, thus it will be an efficient tool for observation of quasars at z > 7. It will be attached to the 2.1m telescope at McDonald Observatory, USA. A focal reducer is designed to secure a larger field of view at the cassegrain focus of 2.1m telescope. For long stable exposures, auto-guiding system will be implemented by using another CCD camera viewing an off-axis field. All these instruments will be controlled by the software written in python on linux platform. CQUEAN is expected to see the first light during summer in 2010.

  6. Hyper Suprime-Cam: Camera dewar design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Yutaka; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Kamata, Yukiko; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Utsumi, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Uraguchi, Fumihiro; Furusawa, Hisanori; Morokuma, Tomoki; Uchida, Tomohisa; Miyatake, Hironao; Mineo, Sogo; Fujimori, Hiroki; Aihara, Hiroaki; Karoji, Hiroshi; Gunn, James E.; Wang, Shiang-Yu

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the detailed design of the CCD dewar and the camera system which is a part of the wide-field imager Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. On the 1.°5 diameter focal plane (497 mm in physical size), 116 four-side buttable 2 k × 4 k fully depleted CCDs are tiled with 0.3 mm gaps between adjacent chips, which are cooled down to -100°C by two pulse tube coolers with a capability to exhaust 100 W heat at -100°C. The design of the dewar is basically a natural extension of Suprime-Cam, incorporating some improvements such as (1) a detailed CCD positioning strategy to avoid any collision between CCDs while maximizing the filling factor of the focal plane, (2) a spherical washers mechanism adopted for the interface points to avoid any deformation caused by the tilt of the interface surface to be transferred to the focal plane, (3) the employment of a truncated-cone-shaped window, made of synthetic silica, to save the back focal space, and (4) a passive heat transfer mechanism to exhaust efficiently the heat generated from the CCD readout electronics which are accommodated inside the dewar. Extensive simulations using a finite-element analysis (FEA) method are carried out to verify that the design of the dewar is sufficient to satisfy the assigned errors. We also perform verification tests using the actually assembled CCD dewar to supplement the FEA and demonstrate that the design is adequate to ensure an excellent image quality which is key to the HSC. The details of the camera system, including the control computer system, are described as well as the assembling process of the dewar and the process of installation on the telescope.

  7. Fully depleted back-illuminated p-channel CCD development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bebek, Chris J.; Bercovitz, John H.; Groom, Donald E.; Holland, Stephen E.; Kadel, Richard W.; Karcher, Armin; Kolbe, William F.; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Palaio, Nicholas P.; Prasad, Val; Turko, Bojan T.; Wang, Guobin

    2003-07-08

    An overview of CCD development efforts at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is presented. Operation of fully-depleted, back-illuminated CCD's fabricated on high resistivity silicon is described, along with results on the use of such CCD's at ground-based observatories. Radiation damage and point-spread function measurements are described, as well as discussion of CCD fabrication technologies.

  8. Improvement in the light sensitivity of the ultrahigh-speed high-sensitivity CCD with a microlens array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, T.,; Yonai, J.; Kitamura, K.; Arai, T.; Kurita, T.; Tanioka, K.; Maruyama, H.; Etoh, T. Goji; Kitagawa, S.; Hatade, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takeuchi, H.; Iida, K.

    2008-02-01

    We are advancing the development of ultrahigh-speed, high-sensitivity CCDs for broadcast use that are capable of capturing smooth slow-motion videos in vivid colors even where lighting is limited, such as at professional baseball games played at night. We have already developed a 300,000 pixel, ultrahigh-speed CCD, and a single CCD color camera that has been used for sports broadcasts and science programs using this CCD. However, there are cases where even higher sensitivity is required, such as when using a telephoto lens during a baseball broadcast or a high-magnification microscope during science programs. This paper provides a summary of our experimental development aimed at further increasing the sensitivity of CCDs using the light-collecting effects of a microlens array.

  9. X-ray imaging using digital cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Nicola M.; Edgar, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of using the combination of a computed radiography (storage phosphor) cassette and a semiprofessional grade digital camera for medical or dental radiography is investigated. We compare the performance of (i) a Canon 5D Mk II single lens reflex camera with f1.4 lens and full-frame CMOS array sensor and (ii) a cooled CCD-based camera with a 1/3 frame sensor and the same lens system. Both systems are tested with 240 x 180 mm cassettes which are based on either powdered europium-doped barium fluoride bromide or needle structure europium-doped cesium bromide. The modulation transfer function for both systems has been determined and falls to a value of 0.2 at around 2 lp/mm, and is limited by light scattering of the emitted light from the storage phosphor rather than the optics or sensor pixelation. The modulation transfer function for the CsBr:Eu2+ plate is bimodal, with a high frequency wing which is attributed to the light-guiding behaviour of the needle structure. The detective quantum efficiency has been determined using a radioisotope source and is comparatively low at 0.017 for the CMOS camera and 0.006 for the CCD camera, attributed to the poor light harvesting by the lens. The primary advantages of the method are portability, robustness, digital imaging and low cost; the limitations are the low detective quantum efficiency and hence signal-to-noise ratio for medical doses, and restricted range of plate sizes. Representative images taken with medical doses are shown and illustrate the potential use for portable basic radiography.

  10. A self triggered intensified Ccd (Stic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charon, Y.; Laniece, P.; Bendali, M.

    1990-01-01

    We are developing a new device based on the results reported previously of the successfull coincidence detection of β- particles with a high spatial resolution [1]. The novelty of the device consists in triggering an intensified CCD, i.e. a CCD coupled to an image intensifier (II), by an electrical signal collected from the II itself. This is a suitable procedure for detecting with high efficiency and high resolution low light rare events. The trigger pulse is obtained from the secondary electrons produced by multiplication in a double microchannel plate (MCP) and collected on the aluminized layer protecting the phosphor screen in the II. Triggering efficiencies up to 80% has been already achieved

  11. A self triggered intensified CCD (STIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, Y.; Laniece, P.; Bendali, M.; Gaillard, J. M.; Leblanc, M.; Mastrippolito, R.; Tricoire, H.; Valentin, L.

    1991-12-01

    We are developing a new device based on the results reported previously of the successful coincidence detection of β - particles with a high spatial resolution. The novelty of the device consists in triggering and intensified CCD, i.e. a CCD coupled to an image intensifier (II), by an electrical signal collected from the II itself. This is a suitable procedure for detecting low light and rare events with high efficiency and high resolution. The trigger pulse is obtained from the secondary electrons produced by multiplication in a double microchannel plate (MCP) and collected on the aluminized layer protecting the phosphor screen in the II. Triggering efficiencies up to 80% have already been achieved.

  12. Flat-Field Calibration of CCD Detector for Long TraceProfilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Franck, Keith D.; Irick, Steve C.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison,Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-07-31

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasersrequires x-ray optical systems with extremely high-performance,generally, of diffraction limited quality. Fabrication and use of suchoptics requires highly accurate metrology. In the present paper, wediscuss a way to improve the performance of the Long Trace Profiler(LTP), a slope measuring instrument widely used at synchrotron facilitiesto characterize x-ray optics at high-spatial-wavelengths fromapproximately 2 mm to 1 m. One of the major sources of LTP systematicerror is the detector. For optimal functionality, the detector has topossess the smallest possible pixel size/spacing, a fast method ofshuttering, and minimal non-uniformity of pixel-to-pixel photoresponse.While the first two requirements are determined by choice of detector,the non-uniformity of photoresponse of typical detectors such as CCDcameras is around 2-3 percent. We describe a flat-field calibration setupspecially developed for calibration of CCD camera photo-response and darkcurrent with an accuracy of better than 0.5 percent. Such accuracy isadequate for use of a camera as a detector for an LTP with performance of~;0.1 microradian (rms). We also present the design details of thecalibration system and results of calibration of a DALSA CCD camera usedfor upgrading our LTP-II instrument at the ALS Optical MetrologyLaboratory.

  13. Modelling charge storage in Euclid CCD structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, A S; Holland, A; Hall, D J; Burt, D

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of ESA's proposed Euclid mission is to observe the distribution of galaxies and galaxy clusters, enabling the mapping of the dark architecture of the universe [1]. This requires a high performance detector, designed to endure a harsh radiation environment. The e2v CCD204 image sensor was redesigned for use on the Euclid mission [2]. The resulting e2v CCD273 has a narrower serial register electrode and transfer channel compared to its predecessor, causing a reduction in the size of charge packets stored, thus reducing the number of traps encountered by the signal electrons during charge transfer and improving the serial Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) under irradiation [3]. The proposed Euclid CCD has been modelled using the Silvaco TCAD software [4], to test preliminary calculations for the Full Well Capacity (FWC) and the channel potential of the device and provide indications of the volume occupied by varying signals. These results are essential for the realisation of the mission objectives and for radiation damage studies, with the aim of producing empirically derived formulae to approximate signal-volume characteristics in the devices. These formulae will be used in the radiation damage (charge trapping) models. The Silvaco simulations have been tested against real devices to compare the experimental measurements to those predicted in the models. Using these results, the implications of this study on the Euclid mission can be investigated in more detail.

  14. Proposal of secure camera-based radiation warning system for nuclear detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Ken'ichi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Akiba, Norimitsu; Kakuda, Hidetoshi; Imoto, Daisuke; Hirabayashi, Manato; Kuroki, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    Counter-terrorisms against radiological and nuclear threat are significant issues toward Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. In terms of cost benefit, it is not easy to build a warning system for nuclear detection to prevent a Dirty Bomb attack (dispersion of radioactive materials using a conventional explosive) or a Silent Source attack (hidden radioactive materials) from occurring. We propose a nuclear detection system using the installed secure cameras. We describe a method to estimate radiation dose from noise pattern in CCD images caused by radiation. Some dosimeters under neutron and gamma-ray irradiations (0.1mSv-100mSv) were taken in CCD video camera. We confirmed amount of noise in CCD images increased in radiation exposure. The radiation detection using CMOS in secure cameras or cell phones has been implemented. However, in this presentation, we propose a warning system including neutron detection to search shielded nuclear materials or radiation exposure devices using criticality. (author)

  15. A comparison of CsI:Tl and GOS in a scintillator-CCD detector for nuclear medicine imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugby, S. L.; Jambi, L. K.; Lees, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    A number of portable gamma cameras for medical imaging use scintillator-CCD based detectors. This paper compares the performance of a scintillator-CCD based portable gamma camera with either a columnar CsI:Tl or a pixelated GOS scintillator installed. The CsI:Tl scintillator has a sensitivity of 40% at 140.5 keV compared to 54% with the GOS scintillator. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the pixelated GOS detector was 1.09 mm, over 4 times poorer than for CsI:Tl. Count rate capability was also found to be significantly lower when the GOS scintillator was used. The uniformity was comparable for both scintillators.

  16. True RGB line-scan camera for color machine vision applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemstrom, Guy F.

    1994-10-01

    The design and technical capabilities of a true RGB 3 CCD chip color line scan camera are presented within this paper. The camera was developed for accurate color monitoring and analysis in industrial applications. A black & white line scan camera has been designed and built utilizing the same modular architecture of the color line scan camera. Color separation is made possible with a tri-chromatic RGB beam splitter. Three CCD linear arrays are precisely mounted to the output surfaces of the prism and the outputs of each CCD are exactly matched pixel by pixel. The beam splitter prism can be tailored to separate other spectral components than the standard RGB. A typical CCD can detect between 200 and 100 nm. Either two or three spectral regions can be separated using a beam splitter prism. The camera is totally digital and has a 16-bit parallel computer interface to communicate with a signal processing board. Because of the open architecture of the camera it's possible for the customer to design a board with some special functions handling the preprocessing of the data (for example RGB - HSI conversion). The camera can also be equipped with a high speed CPU-board with enough of local memory to do some image processing inside the camera before sending the data forward. The camera has been used in real industrial applications and has proven that its high resolution and high dynamic range can be used to measure minute color differences, enabling the separation or grading of objects such as minerals, food or other materials that could not otherwise be measured with a black and white camera.

  17. Upgrade of ESO's FIERA CCD Controller and PULPO Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Moreno, J.; Geimer, C.; Balestra, A.; Haddad, N.

    An overview of FIERA is presented with emphasis on its recent upgrade to PCI. The PCI board hosts two DSPs, one for real time control of the camera and another for on-the-fly processing of the incoming video data. In addition, the board is able to make DMA transfers, to synchronize to other boards alike, to be synchronized by a TIM bus and to control PULPO via RS232. The design is based on the IOP480 chip from PLX, for which we have developed a device driver for both Solaris and Linux. One computer is able to host more than one board and therefore can control an array of FIERA detector electronics. PULPO is a multifunctional subsystem widely used at ESO for the housekeeping of CCD cryostat heads and for shutter control. The upgrade of PULPO is based on an embedded PC running Linux. The upgraded PULPO is able to handle 29 temperature sensors, control 8 heaters and one shutter, read out one vacuum sensor and log any combination of parameters.

  18. Modeling Pluto-Charon Mutual Events. 2; CCD Observations with the 60 in. Telescope at Palomar Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Dunbar, R. S.; Tedesco, E. F.; Gibson, J.; Marcialis, R. L.; Wong, F.; Bennett, S.; Dobrovolskis, A.

    1995-01-01

    We present observations of 15 Pluto-Charon mutual events which were obtained with the 60 in. telescope at Palomar Mountain Observatory. A CCD camera and Johnson V filter were used for the observations, except for one event that was observed with a Johnson B filter, and another event that was observed with a Gunn R filter. We observed two events in their entirety, and three pairs of complementary mutual occultation-transit events.

  19. Camera-induced broadening of infrared spectral lines recorded using Ebert-type spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovović, J.; Šišović, N. M.; Videnović, I. R.

    2018-02-01

    Extensive broadening of Ne I and Kr I spectral lines in infrared region, recorded by means of back-thinned CCD camera and Ebert-type spectrometer is studied. The results indicate that physical processes inside the CCD camera are responsible for alteration of the instrumental profile in infrared region, regardless of used source of radiation. The fitting procedure, including single pseudo-Voigt and superposition of two Lorentzian functions is suggested. The wavelength dependence of fitting parameters is described by second order polynomial curves, which may serve for revealing the instrumental profile shape at required wavelength.

  20. Radiation Dose-Rate Extraction from the Camera Image of Quince 2 Robot System using Optical Character Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    In the case of the Japanese Quince 2 robot system, 7 CCD/CMOS cameras were used. 2 CCD cameras of Quince robot are used for the forward and backward monitoring of the surroundings during navigation. And 2 CCD (or CMOS) cameras are used for monitoring the status of front-end and back-end motion mechanics such as flippers and crawlers. A CCD camera with wide field of view optics is used for monitoring the status of the communication (VDSL) cable reel. And another 2 CCD cameras are assigned for reading the indication value of the radiation dosimeter and the instrument. The Quince 2 robot measured radiation in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor of the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The CCD camera with wide field-of-view (fisheye) lens reads indicator of the dosimeter loaded on the Quince 2 robot, which was sent to carry out investigating the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor situation. The camera image with gamma ray dose-rate information is transmitted to the remote control site via VDSL communication line. At the remote control site, the radiation information in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor can be perceived by monitoring the camera image. To make up the radiation profile in the surveyed refueling floor, the gamma ray dose-rate information in the image should be converted to numerical value. In this paper, we extract the gamma ray dose-rate value in the unit 2 reactor building refueling floor using optical character recognition method

  1. Stitching images of dual-cameras onboard satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yonghua; Xu, Kai; Zhao, Ruishan; Zhang, Guo; Cheng, Kan; Zhou, Ping

    2017-06-01

    The way of installing dual-cameras on one satellite is adopted to further enlarge the imaging swath, thereby improving the efficiency of data capturing. In this case, stitching images of dual-cameras with high precision is a key step in the practical application. Due to the inadequate overlapping area of dual-cameras, stitching their images by classic methods may cause internal accuracy loss of the mosaic image. The reason is that classic methods estimate the geometric transformation of dual-cameras merely by a few unevenly distributed precise tie points in overlapping area of dual-cameras, which is similar to the case of using unevenly distributed ground control points (GCPs) in block adjustment. This paper proposed a new method to precisely stitch images of dual cameras without losing internal accuracy. First, a model was built to recover the relative geometric relation of dual-cameras and eliminate Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) distortions of each camera, then a virtual camera model depending on the calibrated geometric relation was adopted to achieve a seamless mosaic image. The panchromatic images of camera A and camera B onboard Yaogan-24 were collected as the experimental data. Experiment results show that the calibration accuracies of dual-cameras are better than 0.3 pixels, and the stitching accuracies can reach the sub-pixel level, ranging from 0.3 to 0.5 pixels. On the other hand, the positioning accuracies with GCPs of the mosaic image and of individual camera are better than 0.6 pixels and 0.5 pixels respectively, so the internal accuracy loss of the mosaic image only reaches 0.1 pixels, which can be neglected. This demonstrates that the proposed method can achieve seamless mosaic images without losing internal accuracy.

  2. Gene silencing of CCD7 and CCD8 in Phelipanche aegyptiaca by tobacco rattle virus system retarded the parasite development on the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Radi; Dubey, Neeraj Kumar; Yahyaa, Mosaab; Abu-Nassar, Jackline; Ibdah, Mwafaq

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones are phytohormones that stimulate seed germination of parasitic plants including Phelipanche aegyptiaca. Strigolactones are derived from carotenoids via a pathway involving the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases CCD7 and CCD8. We report here identification of PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 orthologous genes from P. aegyptiaca. Expression analysis of PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 genes showed significant variation in their transcript levels in seeds and tubercles of P. aegyptiaca at different developmental stages. These two parasitic PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 genes were silenced in P. aegyptiaca using a trans-silencing approach in Nicotiana benthamiana. The transient knock-down of PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 inhibited tubercle development and the infestation process in host plants. Our results suggest an important role of the strigolactone associated genes (PaCCD7 and PaCCD8) in the parasite life cycle.

  3. Design and evaluation of a high-performance charge coupled device camera for astronomical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jie; Guan, Yong; Zhang, Weigong; Pan, Wei; Liu, Hui

    2009-10-01

    The Space Solar Telescope (SST) is the first Chinese space astronomy mission. This paper introduces the design of a high-performance 2K × 2K charge coupled device (CCD) camera that is an important payload in the Space Solar Telescope. The camera is composed of an analogue system and a digital embedded system. The analogue system is first discussed in detail, including the power and bias voltage supply circuit, power protection unit, CCD clock driver circuit, 16 bit A/D converter and low-noise amplifier circuit. The digital embedded system integrated with an NIOS II soft-core processor serves as the control and data acquisition system of the camera. In addition, research on evaluation methods for CCDs was carried out to evaluate the performance of the TH7899 CCD camera in relation to the requirements of the SST project. We present the evaluation results, including readout noise, linearity, quantum efficiency, dark current, full-well capacity, charge transfer efficiency and gain. The results show that this high-performance CCD camera can satisfy the specifications of the SST project.

  4. Noise and sensitivity of x-ray framing cameras at Nike (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawley, C. J.; Deniz, A. V.; Lehecka, T.

    1999-01-01

    X-ray framing cameras are the most widely used tool for radiographing density distributions in laser and Z-pinch driven experiments. The x-ray framing cameras that were developed specifically for experiments on the Nike laser system are described. One of these cameras has been coupled to a CCD camera and was tested for resolution and image noise using both electrons and x rays. The largest source of noise in the images was found to be due to low quantum detection efficiency of x-ray photons.

  5. Initial Demonstration of 9-MHz Framing Camera Rates on the FAST UV Drive Laser Pulse Trains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Edstrom Jr., D. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2016-10-09

    We report the configuration of a Hamamatsu C5680 streak camera as a framing camera to record transverse spatial information of green-component laser micropulses at 3- and 9-MHz rates for the first time. The latter is near the time scale of the ~7.5-MHz revolution frequency of the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) ring and its expected synchroton radiation source temporal structure. The 2-D images are recorded with a Gig-E readout CCD camera. We also report a first proof of principle with an OTR source using the linac streak camera in a semi-framing mode.

  6. Southern Clusters for Standardizing CCD Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, T. T.

    2017-06-01

    Standardizing photometric measurements typically involves undertaking all-sky photometry. This can be laborious and time-consuming and, for CCD photometry, particularly challenging. Transforming photometry to a standard system is, however, a crucial step when routinely measuring variable stars, as it allows photoelectric measurements from different observers to be combined. For observers in the northern hemisphere, standardized UBVRI values of stars in open clusters such as M67 and NGC 7790 have been established, greatly facilitating quick and accurate transformation of CCD measurements. Recently the AAVSO added the cluster NGC 3532 for southern hemisphere observers to similarly standardize their photometry. The availability of NGC 3532 standards was announced on the AAVSO Variable Star Observing, Photometry forum on 27 October 2016. Published photometry, along with some new measurements by the author, provide a means of checking these NGC 3532 standards which were determined through the AAVSO's Bright Star Monitor (BSM) program (see: https://www.aavso.org/aavsonet-epoch-photometry-database). New measurements of selected stars in the open clusters M25 and NGC 6067 are also included.

  7. CCD developed for scientific application by Hamamatsu

    CERN Document Server

    Miyaguchi, K; Dezaki, J; Yamamoto, K

    1999-01-01

    We have developed CCDs for scientific applications that feature a low readout noise of less than 5 e-rms and low dark current of 10-25 pA/cm sup 2 at room temperature. CCDs with these characteristics will prove extremely useful in applications such as spectroscopic measurement and dental radiography. In addition, a large-area CCD of 2kx4k pixels and 15 mu m square pixel size has recently been completed for optical use in astronomical observations. Applications to X-ray astronomy require the most challenging device performance in terms of deep depletion, high CTE, and focal plane size, among others. An abuttable X-ray CCD, having 1024x1024 pixels and 24 mu m square pixel size, is to be installed in an international space station (ISS). We are now striving to achieve the lowest usable cooling temperature by means of a built-in TEC with limited power consumption. Details on the development status are described in this report. We would also like to present our future plans for a large active area and deep depleti...

  8. New Design Concept for Universal CCD Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonyong Han

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the CCDs are widely used in astronomical observations either in direct imaging use or spectroscopic mode. However according to the recent technical advances, new large format CCDs are rapidly developed which have better performances with higher quantum efficiency and sensitivity. In many cases, some microprocessors have been adopted to deal with necessary digital logic for a CCD imaging system. This could often lack the flexibility of a system for a user to upgrade with new devices, especially of it is a commercial product. A new design concept has been explored which could provide the opportunity to deal with any format of devices from ant manufactures effectively for astronomical purposes. Recently available PLD (Programmable Logic Devices technology makes it possible to develop such digital circuit design, which can be integrated into a single component, instead of using microprocessors. The design concept could dramatically increase the efficiency and flexibility of a CCD imaging system, particularly when new or large format devices are available and to upgrade the performance of a system. Some variable system control parameters can be selected by a user with a wider range of choice. The software can support such functional requirements very conveniently. This approach can be applied not only to astronomical purpose, but also to some related fields, such as remote sensing and industrial applications.

  9. Development of low-noise CCD drive electronics for the world space observatory ultraviolet spectrograph subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Mike; Clapp, Matthew; King, James; Morse, Tom; Mihalcea, Ionut; Waltham, Nick; Hayes-Thakore, Chris

    2016-07-01

    World Space Observatory Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) is a major Russian-led international collaboration to develop a large space-borne 1.7 m Ritchey-Chrétien telescope and instrumentation to study the universe at ultraviolet wavelengths between 115 nm and 320 nm, exceeding the current capabilities of ground-based instruments. The WSO Ultraviolet Spectrograph subsystem (WUVS) is led by the Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences and consists of two high resolution spectrographs covering the Far-UV range of 115-176 nm and the Near-UV range of 174-310 nm, and a long-slit spectrograph covering the wavelength range of 115-305 nm. The custom-designed CCD sensors and cryostat assemblies are being provided by e2v technologies (UK). STFC RAL Space is providing the Camera Electronics Boxes (CEBs) which house the CCD drive electronics for each of the three WUVS channels. This paper presents the results of the detailed characterisation of the WUVS CCD drive electronics. The electronics include a novel high-performance video channel design that utilises Digital Correlated Double Sampling (DCDS) to enable low-noise readout of the CCD at a range of pixel frequencies, including a baseline requirement of less than 3 electrons rms readout noise for the combined CCD and electronics system at a readout rate of 50 kpixels/s. These results illustrate the performance of this new video architecture as part of a wider electronics sub-system that is designed for use in the space environment. In addition to the DCDS video channels, the CEB provides all the bias voltages and clocking waveforms required to operate the CCD and the system is fully programmable via a primary and redundant SpaceWire interface. The development of the CEB electronics design has undergone critical design review and the results presented were obtained using the engineering-grade electronics box. A variety of parameters and tests are included ranging from general system metrics, such as the power and mass

  10. Those Nifty Digital Cameras!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    1996-01-01

    Describes digital photography--an electronic imaging technology that merges computer capabilities with traditional photography--and its uses in education. Discusses how a filmless camera works, types of filmless cameras, advantages and disadvantages, and educational applications of the consumer digital cameras. (AEF)

  11. Adapting Virtual Camera Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In a three-dimensional virtual environment aspects such as narrative and interaction completely depend on the camera since the camera defines the player’s point of view. Most research works in automatic camera control aim to take the control of this aspect from the player to automatically gen...

  12. Programmable Clock Waveform Generation for CCD Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.; Marin, J.

    2006-07-01

    Charge transfer efficiency in CCDs is closely related to the clock waveform. In this paper, an experimental framework to explore different FPGA based clock waveform generator designs is described. Two alternative design approaches for controlling the rise/fall edge times and pulse width of the CCD clock signal have been implemented: level-control and time-control. Both approaches provide similar characteristics regarding the edge linearity and noise. Nevertheless, dissimilarities have been found with respect to the area and frequency range of application. Thus, while the time-control approach consumes less area, the level control approach provides a wider range of clock frequencies since it does not suffer capacitor discharge effect. (Author) 8 refs.

  13. BVRI CCD photometry of Omega Centauri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-01-01

    Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of V vs B-V, V vs V-I, and V vs B-I have been constructed based on 179 BVRI CCD frames of two adjoining 4x2.5-arcmin fields in Omega Cen (NGC 5139) obtained with the 1.54-m Danish La Silla telescope. The spread in the main sequences noted in the three CMDs indicates that the wide range in chemical composition among the evolved stars in this cluster persists as well in the unevolved stars. This result suggests that the abundance variations are primordial. A difference in magnitude between the turnoff and the horizontal branch of 3.8 + or - 0.15 is found which is greater than a previous value. 38 references

  14. Chromatic Modulator for a High-Resolution CCD or APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank; Hull, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    A chromatic modulator has been proposed to enable the separate detection of the red, green, and blue (RGB) color components of the same scene by a single charge-coupled device (CCD), active-pixel sensor (APS), or similar electronic image detector. Traditionally, the RGB color-separation problem in an electronic camera has been solved by use of either (1) fixed color filters over three separate image detectors; (2) a filter wheel that repeatedly imposes a red, then a green, then a blue filter over a single image detector; or (3) different fixed color filters over adjacent pixels. The use of separate image detectors necessitates precise registration of the detectors and the use of complicated optics; filter wheels are expensive and add considerably to the bulk of the camera; and fixed pixelated color filters reduce spatial resolution and introduce color-aliasing effects. The proposed chromatic modulator would not exhibit any of these shortcomings. The proposed chromatic modulator would be an electromechanical device fabricated by micromachining. It would include a filter having a spatially periodic pattern of RGB strips at a pitch equal to that of the pixels of the image detector. The filter would be placed in front of the image detector, supported at its periphery by a spring suspension and electrostatic comb drive. The spring suspension would bias the filter toward a middle position in which each filter strip would be registered with a row of pixels of the image detector. Hard stops would limit the excursion of the spring suspension to precisely one pixel row above and one pixel row below the middle position. In operation, the electrostatic comb drive would be actuated to repeatedly snap the filter to the upper extreme, middle, and lower extreme positions. This action would repeatedly place a succession of the differently colored filter strips in front of each pixel of the image detector. To simplify the processing, it would be desirable to encode information on

  15. Programmable charge-coupled device /CCD/ correlator for pattern classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, D. J.; Eversole, W. L.; Hewes, C. R.; Benz, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    The potential use of charge coupled device (CCD) programmable digital/analog correlators for multispectral data classification is discussed. CCD digital/analog correlator technology and the experimental evaluation of a 32-stage 4-bit test device are presented. The design of an IC for use in a multispectral classification system for 16 sensors and 8 bit accuracy is reviewed.

  16. Development and validation of a CCD-laser aerosol detective system for measuring the ambient aerosol phase function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yuxuan; Zhao, Chunsheng; Xu, Wanyun; Zhao, Gang; Tao, Jiangchuan; Kuang, Ye

    2017-06-01

    Aerosol phase function represents the angular scattering property of aerosols, which is crucial for understanding the climate effects of aerosols that have been identified as one of the largest uncertainties in the evaluation of radiative forcing. So far, there is a lack of instruments with which to measure the aerosol phase function directly and accurately in laboratory studies and in situ measurements. A portable instrument with high angular range and resolution has been developed for the measurement of the phase function of ambient aerosols in this study. The charge-coupled device-laser aerosol detective system (CCD-LADS) measures the aerosol phase function both across a relatively wide angular range of 10-170° and at a high resolution of 0.1°. The system includes a continuous laser, two charge-coupled device cameras and the corresponding fisheye lenses. The CCD-LADS was validated by both a laboratory study and a field measurement. The comparison between the aerosol phase function retrieved from CCD-LADS and Mie-scattering model shows good agreement. Compared with the TSI polar nephelometer, CCD-LADS has the advantages of wider detection range and better stability.

  17. An optical test bench for the precision characterization of absolute quantum efficiency for the TESS CCD detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, A.; Villasenor, J.; Kissel, S.; Ricker, G.; Vanderspek, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search for planets transiting bright stars with Ic ∼< 13. TESS has been selected by NASA for launch in 2018 as an Astrophysics Explorer mission, and is expected to discover a thousand or more planets that are smaller in size than Neptune. TESS will employ four wide-field optical charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras with a band-pass of 650 nm–1050 nm to detect temporary drops in brightness of stars due to planetary transits. The 1050 nm limit is set by the quantum efficiency (QE) of the CCDs. The detector assembly consists of four back-illuminated MIT Lincoln Laboratory CCID-80 devices. Each CCID-80 device consists of 2048×2048 imaging array and 2048×2048 frame store regions. Very precise on-ground calibration and characterization of CCD detectors will significantly assist in the analysis of the science data obtained in space. The characterization of the absolute QE of the CCD detectors is a crucial part of the characterization process because QE affects the performance of the CCD significantly over the redder wavelengths at which TESS will be operating. An optical test bench with significantly high photometric stability has been developed to perform precise QE measurements. The design of the test setup along with key hardware, methodology, and results from the test campaign are presented.

  18. Design and test of optoelectronic system of alignment control based on CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, A. G.; Gorbachyov, A. A.; Krasnyashchikh, A. V.; Pantushin, A. N.; Timofeev, A. N.

    2008-10-01

    In this work, design, implementation and test of a system intended for positioning of the elements of turbine units relative to the line of shaft with high precision, are discussed. A procedure of the conversion of coordinates from the instrument system into the system connected with the practical position of the axis of turbine has been devised. It is shown that optoelectronic systems of aligment built by autoreflexive scheme can be used for high precision measurements.

  19. Single-Pulse Dual-Energy Mammography Using a Binary Screen Coupled to Dual CCD Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    scheme with four classes of mammographic density patterns.1�-18 More recently, the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System ( BIRADS ) was introduced...to how radiologists assign breast density currently using the 4 classification scheme of the BIRADS , except that the scale was expanded. Computer... BIRADs breast density scale may want to consider increasing the number of categories from 4 to 7. It is conceivable that if radiologists were to

  20. High resolution low energy X-ray microradiography using a CCD camera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Touš, J.; Horodysky, P.; Blažek, K.; Nikl, Martin; Mareš, Jiří A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, C1 (2011), s. 1-5 ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : X-ray radiography and digital radiography * inspection with x-rays * detection of defects Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.869, year: 2011

  1. A Flight Photon Counting Camera for the WFIRST Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    A photon counting camera based on the Teledyne-e2v CCD201-20 electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) is being developed for the NASA WFIRST coronagraph, an exoplanet imaging technology development of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, CA) that is scheduled to launch in 2026. The coronagraph is designed to directly image planets around nearby stars, and to characterize their spectra. The planets are exceedingly faint, providing signals similar to the detector dark current, and require the use of photon counting detectors. Red sensitivity (600-980nm) is preferred to capture spectral features of interest. Since radiation in space affects the ability of the EMCCD to transfer the required single electron signals, care has been taken to develop appropriate shielding that will protect the cameras during a five year mission. In this poster, consideration of the effects of space radiation on photon counting observations will be described with the mitigating features of the camera design. An overview of the current camera flight system electronics requirements and design will also be described.

  2. Modeling and calibration of a 4-line-camera system for precise coordinate measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Wang, Xiangjun

    2017-10-01

    The research in this paper is intended for a precise position measurement system based on 4 line-cameras. Each camera is equipped with a cylindrical lens that can stretch an image point into a line which is perpendicular to the linear CCD, thus providing one dimension of projected coordinate of the corresponding 3D point. This system has a symmetrical structure with four line-cameras being divided into two identical groups. In each group, the two linecameras are fixed together with orientations normal to each other. Those two line-cameras form a 2D image sensor that can determine a light of sight on which the target point lies, just like an area array CCD camera does. With two groups of line-cameras, the position of 3D points can be detected. In this paper, a model of the 4-line-camera system for computing the coordinates of 3D target points in object frame is proposed, which is linear and computationally efficient. In addition, a calibration approach is presented in which the exterior orientations of the four line-cameras are obtained. Experiment results have shown that the system can achieve high accuracy in coordinate measurement of light spots from 0.5m to 3.5m, which demonstrate the performance of our proposed modeling and calibration methods.

  3. Radiation camera exposure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martone, R.J.; Yarsawich, M.; Wolczek, W.

    1976-01-01

    A system and method for governing the exposure of an image generated by a radiation camera to an image sensing camera is disclosed. The exposure is terminated in response to the accumulation of a predetermined quantity of radiation, defining a radiation density, occurring in a predetermined area. An index is produced which represents the value of that quantity of radiation whose accumulation causes the exposure termination. The value of the predetermined radiation quantity represented by the index is sensed so that the radiation camera image intensity can be calibrated to compensate for changes in exposure amounts due to desired variations in radiation density of the exposure, to maintain the detectability of the image by the image sensing camera notwithstanding such variations. Provision is also made for calibrating the image intensity in accordance with the sensitivity of the image sensing camera, and for locating the index for maintaining its detectability and causing the proper centering of the radiation camera image

  4. BVI CCD photometry of 47 Tucanae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.

    1987-01-01

    CCD BVI main-sequence photometry of 47 Tuc is presented, matched to the recent BVI isochrones of VandenBerg and Bell (1985). The main-sequence turnoffs are found to be at V = 17.60 + or - 0.1, B-V = 0.56 + or - 0.02; V-I = 0.68 + or - 0.02, and B-I = 1.24 + or - 0.02. The magnitude difference between the main-sequence turnoff and the horizontal branch is 3.55 + or - 0.15 for all three color indices. A consistent age for 47 Tuc of 17 Gyr and a consistent distance modulus of (m-M)v = 13.2 are obtained for all three indices, and an absolute magnitude of Mv = 0.85 is determined for the horizontal branch stars. The results also favor the adoption of (Fe/H) near -0.5 as the best abundance value for 47 Tuc. 38 references

  5. An Efficient Image Compressor for Charge Coupled Devices Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the discrete wavelet transforms- (DWT- based compressor, such as JPEG2000 and CCSDS-IDC, is widely seen as the state of the art compression scheme for charge coupled devices (CCD camera. However, CCD images project on the DWT basis to produce a large number of large amplitude high-frequency coefficients because these images have a large number of complex texture and contour information, which are disadvantage for the later coding. In this paper, we proposed a low-complexity posttransform coupled with compressing sensing (PT-CS compression approach for remote sensing image. First, the DWT is applied to the remote sensing image. Then, a pair base posttransform is applied to the DWT coefficients. The pair base are DCT base and Hadamard base, which can be used on the high and low bit-rate, respectively. The best posttransform is selected by the lp-norm-based approach. The posttransform is considered as the sparse representation stage of CS. The posttransform coefficients are resampled by sensing measurement matrix. Experimental results on on-board CCD camera images show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms the CCSDS-IDC-based coder, and its performance is comparable to that of the JPEG2000 at low bit rate and it does not have the high excessive implementation complexity of JPEG2000.

  6. True RGB line scan camera for color machine vision applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemstrom, Guy F.

    1994-11-01

    In this paper a true RGB 3-chip color line scan camera is described. The camera was mainly developed for accurate color measuring in industrial applications. Due to the camera's modularity it's also possible to use it as a B/W-camera. The color separation is made with a RGB-beam splitter. The CCD linear arrays are fixed with a high accuracy to the beam splitters output in order to match the pixels of the three different CCDs on each other. This makes the color analyses simple compared to color line arrays where line or pixel matching has to be done. The beam splitter can be custom made to separate spectral components other than standard RGB. The spectral range is from 200 to 1000 nm for most CCDs and two or three spectral areas can be separately measured with the beam splitter. The camera is totally digital and has a 16-bit parallel computer interface to communicate with a signal processing board. Because of the open architecture of the camera it's possible for the customer to design a board with some special functions handling the preprocessing of the data (for example RGB - HSI conversion). The camera can also be equipped with a high speed CPU-board with enough local memory to do some image processing inside the camera before sending the data forward. The camera has been used in real industrial applications and has proven that its high resolution and high dynamic range can be used to measure color differences of small amounts to separate or grade objects such as minerals, food or other materials that can't be measured with a black and white camera.

  7. Solid state video cameras

    CERN Document Server

    Cristol, Y

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Video Cameras reviews the state of the art in the field of solid-state television cameras as compiled from patent literature. Organized into 10 chapters, the book begins with the basic array types of solid-state imagers and appropriate read-out circuits and methods. Documents relating to improvement of picture quality, such as spurious signal suppression, uniformity correction, or resolution enhancement, are also cited. The last part considerssolid-state color cameras.

  8. Automated Meteor Detection by All-Sky Digital Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Tomáš; Šimberová, Stanislava

    2017-12-01

    We have developed a set of methods to detect meteor light traces captured by all-sky CCD cameras. Operating at small automatic observatories (stations), these cameras create a network spread over a large territory. Image data coming from these stations are merged in one central node. Since a vast amount of data is collected by the stations in a single night, robotic storage and analysis are essential to processing. The proposed methodology is adapted to data from a network of automatic stations equipped with digital fish-eye cameras and includes data capturing, preparation, pre-processing, analysis, and finally recognition of objects in time sequences. In our experiments we utilized real observed data from two stations.

  9. LSST Camera Optics Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riot, V J; Olivier, S; Bauman, B; Pratuch, S; Seppala, L; Gilmore, D; Ku, J; Nordby, M; Foss, M; Antilogus, P; Morgado, N

    2012-05-24

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) uses a novel, three-mirror, telescope design feeding a camera system that includes a set of broad-band filters and three refractive corrector lenses to produce a flat field at the focal plane with a wide field of view. Optical design of the camera lenses and filters is integrated in with the optical design of telescope mirrors to optimize performance. We discuss the rationale for the LSST camera optics design, describe the methodology for fabricating, coating, mounting and testing the lenses and filters, and present the results of detailed analyses demonstrating that the camera optics will meet their performance goals.

  10. Enzymatic study on AtCCD4 and AtCCD7 and their potential to form acyclic regulatory metabolites

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2016-09-29

    The Arabidopsis carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (AtCCD4) is a negative regulator of the carotenoid content of seeds and has recently been suggested as a candidate for the generation of retrograde signals that are thought to derive from the cleavage of poly-cis-configured carotene desaturation intermediates. In this work, we investigated the activity of AtCCD4 in vitro and used dynamic modeling to determine its substrate preference. Our results document strict regional specificity for cleavage at the C9–C10 double bond in carotenoids and apocarotenoids, with preference for carotenoid substrates and an obstructing effect on hydroxyl functions, and demonstrate the specificity for all-trans-configured carotenes and xanthophylls. AtCCD4 cleaved substrates with at least one ionone ring and did not convert acyclic carotene desaturation intermediates, independent of their isomeric states. These results do not support a direct involvement of AtCCD4 in generating the supposed regulatory metabolites. In contrast, the strigolactone biosynthetic enzyme AtCCD7 converted 9-cis-configured acyclic carotenes, such as 9-cis-ζ-carotene, 9\\'-cis-neurosporene, and 9-cis-lycopene, yielding 9-cis-configured products and indicating that AtCCD7, rather than AtCCD4, is the candidate for forming acyclic retrograde signals.

  11. X-ray framing camera for pulsed, high current, electron beam x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Failor, B H; Riordan, j c; Lojewski, D Y

    2007-01-01

    High power x-ray sources built for nuclear weapons effects testing are evolving toward larger overall diameters and smaller anode cathode gaps. We describe a framing camera developed to measure the time-evolution of these 20-50 ns pulsed x-ray sources produced by currents in the 1.5-2.5 MA range and endpoint voltages between 0.2 and 1.5 MV. The camera has up to 4 frames with 5 ns gate widths; the frames are separated by 5 ns. The image data are recorded electronically with a gated intensified CCD camera and the data are available immediately following a shot. A fast plastic scintillator (2.1 ns decay time) converts the x-rays to visible light and, for high sensitivity, a fiber optic imaging bundle carries the light to the CCD input. Examples of image data are shown.

  12. Micrometer and CCD measurements of double stars (Series 51

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available 36 micrometric measurements of 20 double or multiple systems carried out with the Zeiss 65/1055 cm Refractor of Belgrade Observatory are communicated. Also 35 CCD measurements of 15 double or multiple systems are included.

  13. Correlation and image compression for limited-bandwidth CCD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Douglas G.

    2005-07-01

    As radars move to Unmanned Aerial Vehicles with limited-bandwidth data downlinks, the amount of data stored and transmitted with each image becomes more significant. This document gives the results of a study to determine the effect of lossy compression in the image magnitude and phase on Coherent Change Detection (CCD). We examine 44 lossy compression types, plus lossless zlib compression, and test each compression method with over 600 CCD image pairs. We also derive theoretical predictions for the correlation for most of these compression schemes, which compare favorably with the experimental results. We recommend image transmission formats for limited-bandwidth programs having various requirements for CCD, including programs which cannot allow performance degradation and those which have stricter bandwidth requirements at the expense of CCD performance.

  14. Analysis of tap weight errors in CCD transversal filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricco, Bruno; Wallinga, Hans

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented to determine and evaluate the actual tap weight errors in CCD split-electrode transversal filters. It is concluded that the correlated part in the tap weight errors dominates the random errors.

  15. Target Image Matching Algorithm Based on Binocular CCD Ranging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposed target image in a subpixel level matching algorithm for binocular CCD ranging, which is based on the principle of binocular CCD ranging. In the paper, firstly, we introduced the ranging principle of the binocular ranging system and deduced a binocular parallax formula. Secondly, we deduced the algorithm which was named improved cross-correlation matching algorithm and cubic surface fitting algorithm for target images matched, and it could achieve a subpixel level matching for binocular CCD ranging images. Lastly, through experiment we have analyzed and verified the actual CCD ranging images, then analyzed the errors of the experimental results and corrected the formula of calculating system errors. Experimental results showed that the actual measurement accuracy of a target within 3 km was higher than 0.52%, which meet the accuracy requirements of the high precision binocular ranging.

  16. CCD vertex detector for the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanov, K D

    2003-01-01

    The R and D program at the LCFI collaboration is dedicated to the building of CCD-based vertex detector, satisfying the challenging requirements of the proposed future linear colliders. The mechanical part of the program targets the development of precision thin detector ladders, using large back-thinned unsupported CCDs under tension. Another part of the program aims to achieve very fast readout of the sensors using column-parallel CCDs, bump bonded to a dedicated CMOS readout chip. Each column of the CCD is read and processed independently, which gives the ultimate speed performance. Some results on modelling of the proposed column parallel CCD with device simulator CAD tools are presented. Tests on fast commercial CCD are being carried out to provide information on noise performance and handling of MIP-like charges at high clock frequencies.

  17. Miniaturized electronic system for the Planetary Integrated Camera-Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Stanley L.; Graham, Richard; Ramirez, Luis J.

    1994-09-01

    This paper discusses the design, and implementation of a miniaturized electronic system for the Planetary Integrated Camera Spectrometer (PICS). The PICS electronics demonstrate the application of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and of analog hybrid technology to space flight multi-spectral systems. A discussion of the electronic system design illustrates how signals from a multi-sensor instrument containing an UV CCD, two visible CCDs, and a near-IR focal plane assembly can be processed through a common set of electronics. Following the system design discussion, the actual electronic design will be presented. Each miniaturized module will be discussed as to functionality and performance. The test setup for bench checkout of a cooled CCD and an IR FPA, including results with breadboard electronics and with the hybrids are also described.

  18. Thermal Cameras and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal cameras are passive sensors that capture the infrared radiation emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero. This type of camera was originally developed as a surveillance and night vision tool for the military, but recently the price has dropped, significantly opening up...

  19. Collection and processing data for high quality CCD images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-03-01

    Coherent Change Detection (CCD) with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is a technique whereby very subtle temporal changes can be discerned in a target scene. However, optimal performance requires carefully matching data collection geometries and adjusting the processing to compensate for imprecision in the collection geometries. Tolerances in the precision of the data collection are discussed, and anecdotal advice is presented for optimum CCD performance. Processing considerations are also discussed.

  20. First observations from a CCD all-sky spectrograph at Barentsburg (Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Chernouss

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A digital CCD all-sky spectrograph was made by the Polar Geophysical Institute (PGI to support IPY activity in auroral research. The device was tested at the Barentsburg observatory of PGI during the winter season of 2005–2006. The spectrograph is based on a cooled CCD and a transmission grating. The main features of this spectrograph are: a wide field of view (~180°, a wide spectral range (380–740 nm, a spectral resolution of 0.6 nm, a background level of about 100 R at 1-min exposure time. Several thousand spectra of nightglow and aurora were recorded during the observation season. It was possible to register both the strong auroral emissions, as well as weak ones. Spectra of aurora, including nitrogen and oxygen molecular and atomic emissions, as well as OH emissions of the nightglow are shown. A comparison has been conducted of auroral spectra obtained by the film all-sky spectral camera C-180-S at Spitsbergen during IGY, with spectra obtained at Barentsburg during the last winter season. The relationship between the red (630.0 nm and green (557.7 nm auroral emissions shows that the green emission is dominant near the minimum of the solar cycle activity (2005–2006. The opposite situation is observed during 1958–1959, with a maximum solar cycle activity.

  1. Holographic particle image velocimetry: signal recovery from under-sampled CCD data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupland, J. M.

    2004-04-01

    Holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) has now been demonstrated by several research groups as a method to make three-component velocity measurements from a three-dimensional fluid flow field. More recently digital HPIV has become a hot topic with the promise of near-real-time measurements without the often cumbersome optics and wet processing associated with traditional holographic methods. It is clear, however, that CCD cameras have a limited number of pixels and are not capable of resolving more than a small fraction of the interference pattern that is recorded by a typical particulate hologram. In this paper, we consider under-sampling of the interference pattern to reduce the information content and to allow recordings to be made on a CCD sensor. We describe the basic concept of model fitting to under-sampled data and demonstrate signal recovery through computer simulation. A three-dimensional analysis shows that in general, periodic sampling strategies can result in multiple particle images in the reconstruction. It is shown, however, that the significance of these peaks is reduced in the case of high numerical aperture (NA) reconstruction and can be virtually eliminated by dithering the position of sampling apertures.

  2. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  3. Laser-induced damage threshold of camera sensors and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Bastian; Ritt, Gunnar; Körber, Michael; Eberle, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The continuous development of laser systems towards more compact and efficient devices constitutes an increasing threat to electro-optical imaging sensors such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices (CCD). These types of electronic sensors are used in day-to-day life but also in military or civil security applications. In camera systems dedicated to specific tasks, also micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) like a digital micromirror device (DMD) are part of the optical setup. In such systems, the DMD can be located at an intermediate focal plane of the optics and it is also susceptible to laser damage. The goal of our work is to enhance the knowledge of damaging effects on such devices exposed to laser light. The experimental setup for the investigation of laser-induced damage is described in detail. As laser sources both pulsed lasers and continuous-wave (CW) lasers are used. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is determined by the single-shot method by increasing the pulse energy from pulse to pulse or in the case of CW-lasers, by increasing the laser power. Furthermore, we investigate the morphology of laser-induced damage patterns and the dependence of the number of destructed device elements on the laser pulse energy or laser power. In addition to the destruction of single pixels, we observe aftereffects like persisting dead columns or rows of pixels in the sensor image.

  4. Radiotherapy film densitometry using a slow-scan, cooled, digital CCD imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    A method of performing high-resolution two-dimensional film densitometry for full size radiographic film (35 x 43 cm) using a cooled CCD camera was proposed. Studies were performed to evaluate the physical characteristics of the camera system and recommendations were made to assure maximum accuracy of density measurement. Test films of various sizes and densities, as well as clinical dosimetry films, were measured with the CCD densitometer and the reference transmission densitometer. The measured densities agreed within the stated accuracy of the transmission densitometer for all films with maximum density less than or equal to 1.5 optical density units. The 0.2 mm spatial resolution with 4096 shades of gray made it possible to study dose distributions even for films containing areas of high dose gradients. Patient verification radiographs were used to study exit beam dose distributions to detect errors in beam placement, patient position, and proper placement of beam modifying devices such as wedges and compensators. For studying photon beam dose distributions within phantoms, a method was developed using lead foils placed lateral to the film plane to filter very low energy scattered photons. The error in measurement of central axis percentage depth dose from film for 4 MV x-rays, 25 x 25 cm field was decreased from 65% to 4%. The method requires only two calibration films for density to dose conversion and represents an important advance in the field of film densitometry for radiotherapy. The technique was applied to the study of dynamic wedge dose distribution from a 6 MV linear accelerator. The phantom modification decreased the error in percentage depth dose from 21% to 1% for the 15 x 15 cm beam with 60 degree wedge angle. Profile off-axis errors for the same beam were decreased from 8% to 3%. The film dosimetry system provides fast, high resolution film density data for use in radiotherapy imaging and quality assurance

  5. Use and validation of mirrorless digital single light reflex camera for recording of vitreoretinal surgeries in high definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Khanduja

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the use of commercial digital single light reflex (DSLR for vitreoretinal surgery recording and compare it to standard 3-chip charged coupling device (CCD camera. Methods: Simultaneous recording was done using Sony A7s2 camera and Sony high-definition 3-chip camera attached to each side of the microscope. The videos recorded from both the camera systems were edited and sequences of similar time frames were selected. Three sequences that selected for evaluation were (a anterior segment surgery, (b surgery under direct viewing system, and (c surgery under indirect wide-angle viewing system. The videos of each sequence were evaluated and rated on a scale of 0-10 for color, contrast, and overall quality Results: Most results were rated either 8/10 or 9/10 for both the cameras. A noninferiority analysis by comparing mean scores of DSLR camera versus CCD camera was performed and P values were obtained. The mean scores of the two cameras were comparable for each other on all parameters assessed in the different videos except of color and contrast in posterior pole view and color on wide-angle view, which were rated significantly higher (better in DSLR camera. Conclusion: Commercial DSLRs are an affordable low-cost alternative for vitreoretinal surgery recording and may be used for documentation and teaching.

  6. Educational Applications for Digital Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Terence; Cavanaugh, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Discusses uses of digital cameras in education. Highlights include advantages and disadvantages, digital photography assignments and activities, camera features and operation, applications for digital images, accessory equipment, and comparisons between digital cameras and other digitizers. (AEF)

  7. The laser scanning camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagger, M.

    The prototype development of a novel lenseless camera is reported which utilises a laser beam scanned in a raster by means of orthogonal vibrating mirrors to illuminate the field of view. Laser light reflected from the scene is picked up by a conveniently sited photosensitive device and used to modulate the brightness of a T.V. display scanned in synchronism with the moving laser beam, hence producing a T.V. image of the scene. The camera which needs no external lighting system can act in either a wide angle mode or by varying the size and position of the raster can be made to zoom in to view in detail any object within a 40 0 overall viewing angle. The resolution and performance of the camera are described and a comparison of these aspects is made with conventional T.V. cameras. (author)

  8. Gamma camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Gerber, M.S.; Schlosser, P.A.; Steidley, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed description is given of a novel gamma camera which is designed to produce superior images than conventional cameras used in nuclear medicine. The detector consists of a solid state detector (e.g. germanium) which is formed to have a plurality of discrete components to enable 2-dimensional position identification. Details of the electronic processing circuits are given and the problems and limitations introduced by noise are discussed in full. (U.K.)

  9. The Circular Camera Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    2014-01-01

    It has been an accepted precept in film theory that specific stylistic features do not express specific content. Nevertheless, it is possible to find many examples in the history of film in which stylistic features do express specific content: for instance, the circular camera movement is used re...... such as the circular camera movement. Keywords: embodied perception, embodied style, explicit narration, interpretation, style pattern, television style...

  10. Meteor Film Recording with Digital Film Cameras with large CMOS Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slansky, P. C.

    2016-12-01

    In this article the author combines his professional know-how about cameras for film and television production with his amateur astronomy activities. Professional digital film cameras with high sensitivity are still quite rare in astronomy. One reason for this may be their costs of up to 20 000 and more (camera body only). In the interim, however,consumer photo cameras with film mode and very high sensitivity have come to the market for about 2 000 EUR. In addition, ultra-high sensitive professional film cameras, that are very interesting for meteor observation, have been introduced to the market. The particular benefits of digital film cameras with large CMOS sensors, including photo cameras with film recording function, for meteor recording are presented by three examples: a 2014 Camelopardalid, shot with a Canon EOS C 300, an exploding 2014 Aurigid, shot with a Sony alpha7S, and the 2016 Perseids, shot with a Canon ME20F-SH. All three cameras use large CMOS sensors; "large" meaning Super-35 mm, the classic 35 mm film format (24x13.5 mm, similar to APS-C size), or full format (36x24 mm), the classic 135 photo camera format. Comparisons are made to the widely used cameras with small CCD sensors, such as Mintron or Watec; "small" meaning 12" (6.4x4.8 mm) or less. Additionally, special photographic image processing of meteor film recordings is discussed.

  11. Neutron cameras for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from 16 N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with 16 N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins

  12. Purification and crystallization of Vibrio fischeri CcdB and its complexes with fragments of gyrase and CcdA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jonge, Natalie, E-mail: ndejonge@vub.ac.be; Buts, Lieven; Vangelooven, Joris [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, VIB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Mine, Natacha; Van Melderen, Laurence [Laboratoire de Génétique des Procaryotes, Institut de Biologie et de Médecine, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Gosselies (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, VIB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-04-01

    A CcdB homologue from V. fischeri was overexpressed in E. coli and purified. The free protein was crystallized, as were its complexes with fragments of E. coli and V. fischeri gyrase and with the F-plasmid CcdA C-terminal domain. The ccd toxin–antitoxin module from the Escherichia coli F plasmid has a homologue on the Vibrio fischeri integron. The homologue of the toxin (CcdB{sub Vfi}) was crystallized in two different crystal forms. The first form belongs to space group I23 or I2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameter a = 84.5 Å, and diffracts to 1.5 Å resolution. The second crystal form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.5, b = 43.6, c = 37.5 Å, β = 110.0°, and diffracts to 1.7 Å resolution. The complex of CcdB{sub Vfi} with the GyrA14{sub Vfi} fragment of V. fischeri gyrase crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.5, b = 94.6, c = 58.1 Å, and diffracts to 2.2 Å resolution. The corresponding mixed complex with E. coli GyrA14{sub Ec} crystallizes in space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 130.1, b = 90.8, c = 58.1 Å, β = 102.6°, and diffracts to 1.95 Å. Finally, a complex between CcdB{sub Vfi} and part of the F-plasmid antitoxin CcdA{sub F} crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 62.6, c = 82.0 Å, and diffracts to 1.9 Å resolution.

  13. A METHOD FOR SELF-CALIBRATION IN SATELLITE WITH HIGH PRECISION OF SPACE LINEAR ARRAY CAMERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available At present, the on-orbit calibration of the geometric parameters of a space surveying camera is usually processed by data from a ground calibration field after capturing the images. The entire process is very complicated and lengthy and cannot monitor and calibrate the geometric parameters in real time. On the basis of a large number of on-orbit calibrations, we found that owing to the influence of many factors, e.g., weather, it is often difficult to capture images of the ground calibration field. Thus, regular calibration using field data cannot be ensured. This article proposes a real time self-calibration method for a space linear array camera on a satellite using the optical auto collimation principle. A collimating light source and small matrix array CCD devices are installed inside the load system of the satellite; these use the same light path as the linear array camera. We can extract the location changes of the cross marks in the matrix array CCD to determine the real-time variations in the focal length and angle parameters of the linear array camera. The on-orbit status of the camera is rapidly obtained using this method. On one hand, the camera’s change regulation can be mastered accurately and the camera’s attitude can be adjusted in a timely manner to ensure optimal photography; in contrast, self-calibration of the camera aboard the satellite can be realized quickly, which improves the efficiency and reliability of photogrammetric processing.

  14. Digital autoradiography using room temperature CCD and CMOS imaging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabello, Jorge; Bailey, Alexis; Kitchen, Ian; Prydderch, Mark; Clark, Andy; Turchetta, Renato; Wells, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    CCD (charged coupled device) and CMOS imaging technologies can be applied to thin tissue autoradiography as potential imaging alternatives to using conventional film. In this work, we compare two particular devices: a CCD operating in slow scan mode and a CMOS-based active pixel sensor, operating at near video rates. Both imaging sensors have been operated at room temperature using direct irradiation with images produced from calibrated microscales and radiolabelled tissue samples. We also compare these digital image sensor technologies with the use of conventional film. We show comparative results obtained with 14 C calibrated microscales and 35 S radiolabelled tissue sections. We also present the first results of 3 H images produced under direct irradiation of a CCD sensor operating at room temperature. Compared to film, silicon-based imaging technologies exhibit enhanced sensitivity, dynamic range and linearity

  15. Noise analysis for CCD-based ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John J; Hodgkinson, Jane; Saffell, John R; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-09-20

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of the noise behavior of two CCD spectrometers in common use, an AvaSpec-3648 CCD UV spectrometer and an Ocean Optics S2000 Vis spectrometer. Light sources used include a deuterium UV/Vis lamp and UV and visible LEDs. Common noise phenomena include source fluctuation noise, photoresponse nonuniformity, dark current noise, fixed pattern noise, and read noise. These were identified and characterized by varying light source, spectrometer settings, or temperature. A number of noise-limiting techniques are proposed, demonstrating a best-case spectroscopic noise equivalent absorbance of 3.5×10(-4)  AU for the AvaSpec-3648 and 5.6×10(-4)  AU for the Ocean Optics S2000 over a 30 s integration period. These techniques can be used on other CCD spectrometers to optimize performance.

  16. Technology of Sand Level Detection Based on CCD Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing; Li, Xianglin; Chen, Xiaohui; Zhang, Tengfei; Feng, Chi; Zhang, Fei

    Heavy oil takes advantage of proportion in world petroleum resources. Thermal recovery technology, the chief means of heavy-oil exploitation, has been widely applied in development of world heavy-oil reservoir. To study the effect of sand-control technology in the process of heavy-oil thermal recovery, A HTRSTS (Heavy-oil Thermal Recovery Simulation Testing System) has been build. The detection of sand level in sand container is very important. The sand level detection technology adopted in this system is image processing technique based on CCD. Sand container image is taken by CCD, and then HTRSTS locks the interface between sand and liquid through CCD scanning. The preliminary experimental result shows that the standard deviation is about 0.02 liter, which could satisfy practical requirement quite well.

  17. Digital Printing Quality Detection and Analysis Technology Based on CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Zheng, Liping

    2017-12-01

    With the help of CCD digital printing quality detection and analysis technology, it can carry out rapid evaluation and objective detection of printing quality, and can play a certain control effect on printing quality. It can be said CDD digital printing quality testing and analysis of the rational application of technology, its digital printing and printing materials for a variety of printing equipments to improve the quality of a very positive role. In this paper, we do an in-depth study and discussion based on the CCD digital print quality testing and analysis technology.

  18. Status of the Dark Energy Survey Camera (DECam) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaugher, Brenna L.; Abbott, Timothy M.C.; Angstadt, Robert; Annis, Jim; Antonik, Michelle, L.; Bailey, Jim; Ballester, Otger.; Bernstein, Joseph P.; Bernstein, Rebbeca; Bonati, Marco; Bremer, Gale; /Fermilab /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /ANL /Texas A-M /Michigan U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Ohio State U. /University Coll. London /LBNL /SLAC /IFAE

    2012-06-29

    The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration has completed construction of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), a 3 square degree, 570 Megapixel CCD camera which will be mounted on the Blanco 4-meter telescope at CTIO. DECam will be used to perform the 5000 sq. deg. Dark Energy Survey with 30% of the telescope time over a 5 year period. During the remainder of the time, and after the survey, DECam will be available as a community instrument. All components of DECam have been shipped to Chile and post-shipping checkout finished in Jan. 2012. Installation is in progress. A summary of lessons learned and an update of the performance of DECam and the status of the DECam installation and commissioning will be presented.

  19. Status of the Dark Energy Survey Camera (DECam) project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaugher, Brenna L.; McLean, Ian S.; Ramsay, Suzanne K.; Abbott, Timothy M. C.; Angstadt, Robert; Takami, Hideki; Annis, Jim; Antonik, Michelle L.; Bailey, Jim; Ballester, Otger; Bernstein, Joseph P.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Bonati, Marco; Bremer, Gale; Briones, Jorge; Brooks, David; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Campa, Juila; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco; Castilla, Javier; Cease, Herman; Chappa, Steve; Chi, Edward C.; da Costa, Luis; DePoy, Darren L.; Derylo, Gregory; de Vincente, Juan; Diehl, H. Thomas; Doel, Peter; Estrada, Juan; Eiting, Jacob; Elliott, Anne E.; Finley, David A.; Flores, Rolando; Frieman, Josh; Gaztanaga, Enrique; Gerdes, David; Gladders, Mike; Guarino, V.; Gutierrez, G.; Grudzinski, Jim; Hanlon, Bill; Hao, Jiangang; Holland, Steve; Honscheid, Klaus; Huffman, Dave; Jackson, Cheryl; Jonas, Michelle; Karliner, Inga; Kau, Daekwang; Kent, Steve; Kozlovsky, Mark; Krempetz, Kurt; Krider, John; Kubik, Donna; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuhlmann, Steve E.; Kuk, Kevin; Lahav, Ofer; Langellier, Nick; Lathrop, Andrew; Lewis, Peter M.; Lin, Huan; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Martinez, Gustavo; McKay, Timothy; Merritt, Wyatt; Meyer, Mark; Miquel, Ramon; Morgan, Jim; Moore, Peter; Moore, Todd; Neilsen, Eric; Nord, Brian; Ogando, Ricardo; Olson, Jamieson; Patton, Kenneth; Peoples, John; Plazas, Andres; Qian, Tao; Roe, Natalie; Roodman, Aaron; Rossetto, B.; Sanchez, E.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Scarpine, Vic; Schalk, Terry; Schindler, Rafe; Schmidt, Ricardo; Schmitt, Richard; Schubnell, Mike; Schultz, Kenneth; Selen, M.; Serrano, Santiago; Shaw, Terri; Simaitis, Vaidas; Slaughter, Jean; Smith, R. Christopher; Spinka, Hal; Stefanik, Andy; Stuermer, Walter; Sypniewski, Adam; Talaga, R.; Tarle, Greg; Thaler, Jon; Tucker, Doug; Walker, Alistair R.; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wester, William; Woods, Robert J.; Worswick, Sue; Zhao, Allen

    2012-09-24

    The Dark Energy Survey Collaboration has completed construction of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), a 3 square degree, 570 Megapixel CCD camera which will be mounted on the Blanco 4-meter telescope at CTIO. DECam will be used to perform the 5000 sq. deg. Dark Energy Survey with 30% of the telescope time over a 5 year period. During the remainder of the time, and after the survey, DECam will be available as a community instrument. All components of DECam have been shipped to Chile and post-shipping checkout finished in Jan. 2012. Installation is in progress. A summary of lessons learned and an update of the performance of DECam and the status of the DECam installation and commissioning will be presented.

  20. LSST camera readout chip ASPIC: test tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antilogus, P.; Bailly, Ph; Jeglot, J.; Juramy, C.; Lebbolo, H.; Martin, D.; Moniez, M.; Tocut, V.; Wicek, F.

    2012-02-01

    The LSST camera will have more than 3000 video-processing channels. The readout of this large focal plane requires a very compact readout chain. The correlated ''Double Sampling technique'', which is generally used for the signal readout of CCDs, is also adopted for this application and implemented with the so called ''Dual Slope integrator'' method. We have designed and implemented an ASIC for LSST: the Analog Signal Processing asIC (ASPIC). The goal is to amplify the signal close to the output, in order to maximize signal to noise ratio, and to send differential outputs to the digitization. Others requirements are that each chip should process the output of half a CCD, that is 8 channels and should operate at 173 K. A specific Back End board has been designed especially for lab test purposes. It manages the clock signals, digitizes the analog differentials outputs of ASPIC and stores data into a memory. It contains 8 ADCs (18 bits), 512 kwords memory and an USB interface. An FPGA manages all signals from/to all components on board and generates the timing sequence for ASPIC. Its firmware is written in Verilog and VHDL languages. Internals registers permit to define various tests parameters of the ASPIC. A Labview GUI allows to load or update these registers and to check a proper operation. Several series of tests, including linearity, noise and crosstalk, have been performed over the past year to characterize the ASPIC at room and cold temperature. At present, the ASPIC, Back-End board and CCD detectors are being integrated to perform a characterization of the whole readout chain.

  1. The cooling control system for focal plane assembly of astronomical satellite camera based on TEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuqing; Du, Yunfei; Gao, Wei; Li, Baopeng; Fan, Xuewu; Yang, Wengang

    2017-02-01

    The dark current noise existing in the CCD of the astronomical observation camera has a serious influence on its working performance, reducing the working temperature of CCD can suppress the influence of dark current effectively. By analyzing the relationship between the CCD chip and the dark current noise, the optimum working temperature of the red band CCD focal plane is identified as -75°. According to the refrigeration temperature, a cooling control system for focal plane based on a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) was designed. It is required that the system can achieve high precision temperature control for the target. In the cooling control system, the 80C32 microcontroller was used as its systematic core processor. The advanced PID control algorithm is adopted to control the temperature of the top end of TEC. The bottom end of the TEC setting a constant value according to the target temperature used to assist the upper TEC to control the temperature. The experimental results show that the cooling system satisfies the requirements of the focal plane for the astronomical observation camera, it can reach the working temperature of -75° and the accuracy of ±2°.

  2. Development of CCD Imaging System Using Thermoelectric Cooling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsik Park

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available We developed low light CCD imaging system using thermoelectric cooling method collaboration with a company to design a commercial model. It consists of Kodak KAF-0401E (768x512 pixels CCD chip,thermoelectric module manufactured by Thermotek. This TEC system can reach an operative temperature of -25deg. We employed an Uniblitz VS25S shutter and it has capability a minimum exposure time 80ms. The system components are an interface card using a Korea Astronomy Observatory (hereafter KAO ISA bus controller, image acquisition with AD9816 chip, that is 12bit video processor. The performance test with this imaging system showed good operation within the initial specification of our design. It shows a dark current less than 0.4e-/pixel/sec at a temperature of -10deg, a linearity 99.9+/-0.1%, gain 4.24e-adu, and system noise is 25.3e- (rms. For low temperature CCD operation, we designed a TEC, which uses a one-stage peltier module and forced air heat exchanger. This TEC imaging system enables accurate photometry (+/-0.01mag even though the CCD is not at 'conventional' cryogenic temperatures (140K. The system can be a useful instrument for any other imaging applications. Finally, with this system, we obtained several images of astronomical objects for system performance tests.

  3. Programmable CCD imaging system for synchrotron radiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodricks, B.; Brizard, C.

    1991-07-01

    A real-time imaging system for x-ray detection has been developed. The CAMAC-based system has a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) as its active detection element. The electronics consists of a CAMAC-crate-based dedicated microprocessor coupled to arbitrary waveform generators, programmable timing, and ADC modules. The hardware flexibility achievable through this system enables one to use virtually any commercially available CCD. A dedicated CAMAC-based display driver allows for real-time imaging on a high-resolution color monitor. An optional front end consisting of a fiber-optic taper and a focusing optical lens system coupled to a phosphor screen allows for large area imaging. Further, programming flexibility, in which the detector can be used in different read-out modes, enables it to be exploited for time-resolved experiments. In one mode, sections of the CCD can be read-out with millisecond time-resolution and, in another, the use of the CCD as a storage device is exploited resulting microsecond time-resolution. Three different CCDs with radically different read-out timings and waveforms have been tested. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Flatfielding Errors in Strömvil CCD Photometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle R. P.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of determining the error of the flat field in CCD photometry is detailed and our methods of doing this are described. We now have reached a precision of 1-1.5 % in our photometry. Color-magnitude diagrams of the open cluster M67 (ours and Laugalys et al. 2003 are compared.

  5. Multicolour CCD Photometric Study of Galactic Star Clusters SAI 63 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    colour–magnitude (CMD) and colour–colour diagrams of star clusters, it is possible to determine the underlying properties ... The reality of these newly discovered open clusters was confirmed by means of their J, (J −H) and Ks, (J − Ks) CMDs. ... The data were obtained using the 2 K×2 K. CCD system at the f/13 Cassegrain ...

  6. Developments in X-ray and astronomical CCD imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, J.A.; Burke, B.E.; Kosicki, B.B.; Reich, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    There have been many recent developments in the attributes and capabilities of silicon-based CCD detectors for use in space and ground-based astronomy. The imagers used as X-ray detectors require very low noise and excellent quantum efficiency over the energy range of 200-10000 eV. This is achieved using a combination of front and back-illuminated imagers fabricated on a 5000 Ω-cm resistivity material. A requirement for ground-based imagers is very good sensitivity between 350 and 1000 nm, as well as low noise and a high degree of spatial uniformity. We will describe the fabrication and performance of these imagers. Special features integrated into the CCD pixel architecture have increased the capability of the imagers. A fast electronic shutter has been developed for a wavefront sensor in an adaptive optics system. An orthogonal transfer CCD has been designed to compensate for the image motion relative to the CCD focal plane. Also, an antiblooming drain process has been developed so bright sources do not extend spatially into adjacent pixels in back- and front-illuminated imagers. Aspects of the design, fabrication, and performance of imagers with these features will be described

  7. Technical challenges and recent progress in CCD imagers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosiers, Jan T. [DALSA Professional Imaging, High Tech Campus 12a, M/S 01 (WAD01), 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)]. E-mail: jan.bosiers@dalsa.com; Peters, Inge M. [DALSA Professional Imaging, High Tech Campus 12a, M/S 01 (WAD01), 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Draijer, Cees [DALSA Professional Imaging, High Tech Campus 12a, M/S 01 (WAD01), 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Theuwissen, Albert [DALSA Semiconductor, High Tech Campus 12a, M/S 01 (WAD01), 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2006-09-01

    This paper gives a review of the performance of charge-coupled device (CCD) imagers for use in consumer, professional and scientific applications. An overview of recent developments and the current state-of-the-art are presented. An extensive list of references is included.

  8. A GRAPH READER USING A CCD IMAGE SENSOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... 3. Data Processing. The microcontroller, the CCD sensor, the stepper motor and the rest of the system are interfaced to the PC where data processing and overall control are done. A software program in. QUICKBASIC is used to process the pixels. First the 1024 pixels of an image line are received from the.

  9. BVRI CCD photometry of the globular cluster NGC 2808

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaino, G.; Liller, W.; Alvarado, F.; Wenderoth, E.

    1990-01-01

    As a part of a continuing program, CCD color-magnitude diagrams are presented for the bright globular cluster NGC 2808 in the four colors comprising BVRI. From a comparison of four different CMDs with theoretical isochrones, an age of 16 + or - 2 Gyr is obtained, assuming a value for Fe/H near -1.3. 28 refs

  10. CCD photometry of apparent dwarf galaxies in Fornax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillipps, S.; Grimley, P.L.; Disney, M.J.; Cawson, M.G.M.; Kibblewhite, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Blue and red CCD surface photometry of two apparent dwarf galaxies in the Fornax cluster region is presented. Luminosity profiles are derived and their form discussed. The fainter galaxy resembles an archetypal diffuse dwarf elliptical but the brighter of the pair is either an unusual red dwarf or a background galaxy in chance juxtaposition. (author)

  11. Multicolour CCD Photometric Study of Galactic Star Clusters SAI 63 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2014) 35, 143–156 c Indian Academy of Sciences. Multicolour CCD Photometric Study of Galactic Star Clusters. SAI 63 and SAI 75. R. K. S. Yadav1,∗, S. I. Leonova2, R. Sagar1 & E. V. Glushkova2. 1Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak,. Nainital 263 129, India.

  12. New on-orbit geometric interior parameters self-calibration approach based on three-view stereoscopic images from high-resolution multi-TDI-CCD optical satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yufeng; Wang, Mi; Jin, Shuying; He, Luxiao; Tian, Yuan

    2018-03-19

    To increase the field of view (FOV), combining multiple time-delayed and integrated charge-coupled devices (TDI-CCD) into the camera and the pushbroom imaging modality are traditionally used with high-resolution optical satellites. It is becoming increasingly labor- and cost-intensive to build and maintain a calibration field with high resolution and broad coverage. This paper introduces a simple and feasible on-orbit geometric self-calibration approach for high-resolution multi-TDI-CCD optical satellites based on three-view stereoscopic images. With the aid of the a priori geometric constraint of tie points in the triple-overlap regions of stereoscopic images, as well as tie points between adjacent single TDI-CCD images (STIs), high accuracy calibration of all TDI-CCD detectors can be achieved using a small number of absolute ground control points (GCPs) covering the selected primary STI. This method greatly reduces the demand on the calibration field and thus is more time-, effort- and cost-effective. Experimental results indicated that the proposed self-calibration approach is effective for increasing the relative internal accuracy without the limitations associated with using a traditional reference calibration field, which could have great significance for future super-high-resolution optical satellites.

  13. Pixel History for Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borncamp, D.; Grogin, N.; Bourque, M.; Ogaz, S.

    2017-06-01

    Excess thermal energy present in a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can result in additional electrical current. This excess charge is trapped within the silicon lattice structure of the CCD electronics. It can persist through multiple exposures and have an adverse effect on science performance of the detectors unless properly flagged and corrected for. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take occasional long-exposure images with the camera shutter closed. These images, generally referred to as "dark" images, allow for the measurement of the thermal-electron contamination present in each pixel of the CCD lattice. This so-called "dark current" can then be subtracted from the science images by re-scaling the dark to the corresponding exposure times. Pixels that have signal above a certain threshold are traditionally marked as "hot" and flagged in the data quality array. Many users will discard these because of the extra current. However, these pixels may not be unusable because of an unreliable dark subtraction; if we find these pixels to be stable over an anneal period, we can properly subtract the charge and the extra Poisson noise from this dark current will be propagated into the error arrays. Here we present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every individual pixel of the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel (WFC) CCDs over time and allows pixels that were previously flagged as unusable to be brought back into the science image as a reliable pixel.

  14. Communities, Cameras, and Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Communities, Cameras, and Conservation (CCC) is the most exciting and valuable program the author has seen in her 30 years of teaching field science courses. In this citizen science project, students and community volunteers collect data on mountain lions ("Puma concolor") at four natural areas and public parks along the Front Range of Colorado.…

  15. Mars Observer camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Masursky, H.; Veverka, J.; Ravine, M. A.; Soulanille, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars Observer camera (MOC) is a three-component system (one narrow-angle and two wide-angle cameras) designed to take high spatial resolution pictures of the surface of Mars and to obtain lower spatial resolution, synoptic coverage of the planet's surface and atmosphere. The cameras are based on the 'push broom' technique; that is, they do not take 'frames' but rather build pictures, one line at a time, as the spacecraft moves around the planet in its orbit. MOC is primarily a telescope for taking extremely high resolution pictures of selected locations on Mars. Using the narrow-angle camera, areas ranging from 2.8 km x 2.8 km to 2.8 km x 25.2 km (depending on available internal digital buffer memory) can be photographed at about 1.4 m/pixel. Additionally, lower-resolution pictures (to a lowest resolution of about 11 m/pixel) can be acquired by pixel averaging; these images can be much longer, ranging up to 2.8 x 500 km at 11 m/pixel. High-resolution data will be used to study sediments and sedimentary processes, polar processes and deposits, volcanism, and other geologic/geomorphic processes.

  16. The world's fastest camera

    CERN Multimedia

    Piquepaille, Roland

    2006-01-01

    This image processor is not your typical digital camera. It took 6 years to 20 people and $6 million to build the "Regional Calorimeter Trigger"(RCT) which will be a component of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, one of the detectors on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland (1 page)

  17. Camera as Cultural Critique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    researchers, cameras, and filmed subjects already inherently comprise analytical decisions. It is these ethnographic qualities inherent in audiovisual and photographic imagery that make it of particular value to a participatory anthropological enterprise that seeks to resist analytic closure and seeks instead...

  18. Automatic Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Preuss, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Automatically generating computer animations is a challenging and complex problem with applications in games and film production. In this paper, we investigate howto translate a shot list for a virtual scene into a series of virtual camera configurations — i.e automatically controlling the virtual...

  19. Programmable CCD imaging system for synchrotron radiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodricks, B.; Brizard, C.

    1992-01-01

    A real-time imaging system for x-ray detection has been developed. The CAMAC-based system has a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) as its active detection element. The electronics consist of a CAMAC-crate-based dedicated microprocessor coupled to arbitrary waveform generators, programmable timing, and ADC modules. The hardware flexibility achievable through this system enables one to use virtually any commercially available CCD. A dedicated CAMAC-based display driver allows for real-time imaging on a high-resolution color monitor. An optional front end consisting of a fiber-optic taper and a focusing optical lens system coupled to a phosphor screen allows for large area imaging. Further, programming flexibility, in which the detector can be used in different read-out modes, enables it to be exploited for time-resolved experiments. In one mode, sections of the CCD can be read-out with millisecond time-resolution and, in another, the use of the CCD as a storage device is exploited resulting in microsecond time-resolution. Three different CCDs with radically different read-out timings and waveforms have been tested: the TI 4849, a 39Ox584 pixel array; TC 215, a 1024x1O24 pixel array; and the TH 7883, a 576x384 pixel array. The TC 215 and TI 4849 are single-phase CCDs manufactured by Texas Instruments, and the TH 7883 is a four-phase device manufactured by Thomson-CSF. The CCD characterized for uniformity, charge transfer efficiency (CTE), linearity, and sensitivity is the TC215

  20. Study of x-ray CCD image sensor and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuyun; Li, Tianze

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we expounded the composing, specialty, parameter, its working process, key techniques and methods for charge coupled devices (CCD) twice value treatment. Disposal process for CCD video signal quantification was expatiated; X-ray image intensifier's constitutes, function of constitutes, coupling technique of X-ray image intensifier and CCD were analyzed. We analyzed two effective methods to reduce the harm to human beings when X-ray was used in the medical image. One was to reduce X-ray's radiation and adopt to intensify the image penetrated by X-ray to gain the same effect. The other was to use the image sensor to transfer the images to the safe area for observation. On this base, a new method was presented that CCD image sensor and X-ray image intensifier were combined organically. A practical medical X-ray photo electricity system was designed which can be used in the records and time of the human's penetrating images. The system was mainly made up with the medical X-ray, X-ray image intensifier, CCD vidicon with high resolution, image processor, display and so on. Its characteristics are: change the invisible X-ray into the visible light image; output the vivid images; short image recording time etc. At the same time we analyzed the main aspects which affect the system's resolution. Medical photo electricity system using X-ray image sensor can reduce the X-ray harm to human sharply when it is used in the medical diagnoses. At last we analyzed and looked forward the system's application in medical engineering and the related fields.

  1. The PAU Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, R.; Ballester, O.; Cardiel-Sas, L.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Castilla, J.; Crocce, M.; de Vicente, J.; Delfino, M.; Fernández, E.; Fosalba, P.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztañaga, E.; Grañena, F.; Jiménez, J.; Madrid, F.; Maiorino, M.; Martí, P.; Miquel, R.; Neissner, C.; Ponce, R.; Sánchez, E.; Serrano, S.; Sevilla, I.; Tonello, N.; Troyano, I.

    2011-11-01

    The PAU Camera (PAUCam) is a wide-field camera designed to be mounted at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) prime focus, located at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos in the island of La Palma (Canary Islands).Its primary function is to carry out a cosmological survey, the PAU Survey, covering an area of several hundred square degrees of sky. Its purpose is to determine positions and distances using photometric redshift techniques. To achieve accurate photo-z's, PAUCam will be equipped with 40 narrow-band filters covering the range from 450 to850 nm, and six broad-band filters, those of the SDSS system plus the Y band. To fully cover the focal plane delivered by the telescope optics, 18 CCDs 2k x 4k are needed. The pixels are square of 15 μ m size. The optical characteristics of the prime focus corrector deliver a field-of-view where eight of these CCDs will have an illumination of more than 95% covering a field of 40 arc minutes. The rest of the CCDs will occupy the vignetted region extending the field diameter to one degree. Two of the CCDs will be devoted to auto-guiding.This camera have some innovative features. Firstly, both the broad-band and the narrow-band filters will be placed in mobile trays, hosting 16 such filters at most. Those are located inside the cryostat at few millimeters in front of the CCDs when observing. Secondly, a pressurized liquid nitrogen tank outside the camera will feed a boiler inside the cryostat with a controlled massflow. The read-out electronics will use the Monsoon architecture, originally developed by NOAO, modified and manufactured by our team in the frame of the DECam project (the camera used in the DES Survey).PAUCam will also be available to the astronomical community of the WHT.

  2. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosseille, C; Aubert, D; Auger, L; Bazzoli, S; Beck, T; Brunel, P; Burillo, M; Chollet, C; Gazave, J; Jasmin, S; Maruenda, P; Moreau, I; Oudot, G; Raimbourg, J; Soullié, G; Stemmler, P; Zuber, C

    2014-11-01

    Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an "air-box" that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  3. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoulea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosseille, C.; Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Beck, T.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Gazave, J.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C.

    2014-11-01

    Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an "air-box" that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  4. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trosseille, C., E-mail: clement.trosseille@cea.fr; Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Beck, T. [CEA, DEN, CADARACHE, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Gazave, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33116 Le Barp (France)

    2014-11-15

    Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  5. The LSST Camera 500 watt -130 degC Mixed Refrigerant Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowden, Gordon B.; Langton, Brian J.; /SLAC; Little, William A.; /MMR-Technologies, Mountain View, CA; Powers, Jacob R; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC; Spektor, Sam; /MMR-Technologies, Mountain View, CA

    2014-05-28

    The LSST Camera has a higher cryogenic heat load than previous CCD telescope cameras due to its large size (634 mm diameter focal plane, 3.2 Giga pixels) and its close coupled front-end electronics operating at low temperature inside the cryostat. Various refrigeration technologies are considered for this telescope/camera environment. MMR-Technology’s Mixed Refrigerant technology was chosen. A collaboration with that company was started in 2009. The system, based on a cluster of Joule-Thomson refrigerators running a special blend of mixed refrigerants is described. Both the advantages and problems of applying this technology to telescope camera refrigeration are discussed. Test results from a prototype refrigerator running in a realistic telescope configuration are reported. Current and future stages of the development program are described. (auth)

  6. How to photograph the moon and planets with your digital camera

    CERN Document Server

    Buick, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Since the advent of astronomical CCD imaging it has been possible for amateurs to produce images of a quality that was attainable only by universities and professional observatories just a decade ago. However, astronomical CCD cameras are still very expensive, and technology has now progressed so that digital cameras - the kind you use on holiday - are more than capable of photographing the brighter astronomical objects, notably the Moon and major planets. Tony Buick has worked for two years on the techniques involved, and has written this illustrated step-by-step manual for anyone who has a telescope (of any size) and a digital camera. The color images he has produced - there are over 300 of them in the book - are of breathtaking quality. His book is more than a manual of techniques (including details of how to make a low-cost DIY camera mount) and examples; it also provides a concise photographic atlas of the whole of the nearside of the Moon - with every image made using a standard digital camera - and des...

  7. How to photograph the Moon and planets with your digital camera

    CERN Document Server

    Buick, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Since the advent of astronomical CCD imaging it has been possible for amateurs to produce images of a quality that was attainable only by universities and professional observatories just a decade ago. However, astronomical CCD cameras are still very expensive, and technology has now progressed so that digital cameras - the kind you use on holiday - are more than capable of photographing the brighter astronomical objects, notably the Moon and major planets. Tony Buick has worked for two years on the techniques involved, and has written this illustrated step-by-step manual for anyone who has a telescope (of any size) and a digital camera. The color images he has produced - there are over 300 of them in the book - are of breathtaking quality. His book is more than a manual of techniques (including details of how to make a low-cost DIY camera mount) and examples; it also provides a concise photographic atlas of the whole of the nearside of the Moon - with every image made using a standard digital camera - and des...

  8. MISR radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This file contains the Radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask dataset. It is used to determine whether a scene is classified as clear or cloudy. A new parameter has...

  9. Toward a digital camera to rival the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2011-07-01

    All things considered, electronic imaging systems do not rival the human visual system despite notable progress over 40 years since the invention of the CCD. This work presents a method that allows design engineers to evaluate the performance gap between a digital camera and the human eye. The method identifies limiting factors of the electronic systems by benchmarking against the human system. It considers power consumption, visual field, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and properties related to signal and noise power. A figure of merit is defined as the performance gap of the weakest parameter. Experimental work done with observers and cadavers is reviewed to assess the parameters of the human eye, and assessment techniques are also covered for digital cameras. The method is applied to 24 modern image sensors of various types, where an ideal lens is assumed to complete a digital camera. Results indicate that dynamic range and dark limit are the most limiting factors. The substantial functional gap, from 1.6 to 4.5 orders of magnitude, between the human eye and digital cameras may arise from architectural differences between the human retina, arranged in a multiple-layer structure, and image sensors, mostly fabricated in planar technologies. Functionality of image sensors may be significantly improved by exploiting technologies that allow vertical stacking of active tiers.

  10. Image Mosaicking Approach for a Double-Camera System in the GaoFen2 Optical Remote Sensing Satellite Based on the Big Virtual Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yufeng; Jin, Shuying; Wang, Mi; Zhu, Ying; Dong, Zhipeng

    2017-06-20

    The linear array push broom imaging mode is widely used for high resolution optical satellites (HROS). Using double-cameras attached by a high-rigidity support along with push broom imaging is one method to enlarge the field of view while ensuring high resolution. High accuracy image mosaicking is the key factor of the geometrical quality of complete stitched satellite imagery. This paper proposes a high accuracy image mosaicking approach based on the big virtual camera (BVC) in the double-camera system on the GaoFen2 optical remote sensing satellite (GF2). A big virtual camera can be built according to the rigorous imaging model of a single camera; then, each single image strip obtained by each TDI-CCD detector can be re-projected to the virtual detector of the big virtual camera coordinate system using forward-projection and backward-projection to obtain the corresponding single virtual image. After an on-orbit calibration and relative orientation, the complete final virtual image can be obtained by stitching the single virtual images together based on their coordinate information on the big virtual detector image plane. The paper subtly uses the concept of the big virtual camera to obtain a stitched image and the corresponding high accuracy rational function model (RFM) for concurrent post processing. Experiments verified that the proposed method can achieve seamless mosaicking while maintaining the geometric accuracy.

  11. Volumetric particle image velocimetry with a single plenoptic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahringer, Timothy W.; Lynch, Kyle P.; Thurow, Brian S.

    2015-11-01

    A novel three-dimensional (3D), three-component (3C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique based on volume illumination and light field imaging with a single plenoptic camera is described. A plenoptic camera uses a densely packed microlens array mounted near a high resolution image sensor to sample the spatial and angular distribution of light collected by the camera. The multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) computed tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct a volumetric intensity field from individual snapshots and a cross-correlation algorithm is used to estimate the velocity field from a pair of reconstructed particle volumes. This work provides an introduction to the basic concepts of light field imaging with a plenoptic camera and describes the unique implementation of MART in the context of plenoptic image data for 3D/3C PIV measurements. Simulations of a plenoptic camera using geometric optics are used to generate synthetic plenoptic particle images, which are subsequently used to estimate the quality of particle volume reconstructions at various particle number densities. 3D reconstructions using this method produce reconstructed particles that are elongated by a factor of approximately 4 along the optical axis of the camera. A simulated 3D Gaussian vortex is used to test the capability of single camera plenoptic PIV to produce a 3D/3C vector field, where it was found that lateral displacements could be measured to approximately 0.2 voxel accuracy in the lateral direction and 1 voxel in the depth direction over a 300× 200× 200 voxel volume. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated experimentally using a home-built plenoptic camera based on a 16-megapixel interline CCD camera and a 289× 193 array of microlenses and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. 3D/3C measurements were performed in the wake of a low Reynolds number circular cylinder and compared with measurements made using a conventional 2D/2C PIV system. Overall, single camera

  12. Accuracy Potential and Applications of MIDAS Aerial Oblique Camera System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, M.

    2012-07-01

    Airborne oblique cameras such as Fairchild T-3A were initially used for military reconnaissance in 30s. A modern professional digital oblique camera such as MIDAS (Multi-camera Integrated Digital Acquisition System) is used to generate lifelike three dimensional to the users for visualizations, GIS applications, architectural modeling, city modeling, games, simulators, etc. Oblique imagery provide the best vantage for accessing and reviewing changes to the local government tax base, property valuation assessment, buying & selling of residential/commercial for better decisions in a more timely manner. Oblique imagery is also used for infrastructure monitoring making sure safe operations of transportation, utilities, and facilities. Sanborn Mapping Company acquired one MIDAS from TrackAir in 2011. This system consists of four tilted (45 degrees) cameras and one vertical camera connected to a dedicated data acquisition computer system. The 5 digital cameras are based on the Canon EOS 1DS Mark3 with Zeiss lenses. The CCD size is 5,616 by 3,744 (21 MPixels) with the pixel size of 6.4 microns. Multiple flights using different camera configurations (nadir/oblique (28 mm/50 mm) and (50 mm/50 mm)) were flown over downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado. Boresight fights for 28 mm nadir camera were flown at 600 m and 1,200 m and for 50 mm nadir camera at 750 m and 1500 m. Cameras were calibrated by using a 3D cage and multiple convergent images utilizing Australis model. In this paper, the MIDAS system is described, a number of real data sets collected during the aforementioned flights are presented together with their associated flight configurations, data processing workflow, system calibration and quality control workflows are highlighted and the achievable accuracy is presented in some detail. This study revealed that the expected accuracy of about 1 to 1.5 GSD (Ground Sample Distance) for planimetry and about 2 to 2.5 GSD for vertical can be achieved. Remaining systematic

  13. ACCURACY POTENTIAL AND APPLICATIONS OF MIDAS AERIAL OBLIQUE CAMERA SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne oblique cameras such as Fairchild T-3A were initially used for military reconnaissance in 30s. A modern professional digital oblique camera such as MIDAS (Multi-camera Integrated Digital Acquisition System is used to generate lifelike three dimensional to the users for visualizations, GIS applications, architectural modeling, city modeling, games, simulators, etc. Oblique imagery provide the best vantage for accessing and reviewing changes to the local government tax base, property valuation assessment, buying & selling of residential/commercial for better decisions in a more timely manner. Oblique imagery is also used for infrastructure monitoring making sure safe operations of transportation, utilities, and facilities. Sanborn Mapping Company acquired one MIDAS from TrackAir in 2011. This system consists of four tilted (45 degrees cameras and one vertical camera connected to a dedicated data acquisition computer system. The 5 digital cameras are based on the Canon EOS 1DS Mark3 with Zeiss lenses. The CCD size is 5,616 by 3,744 (21 MPixels with the pixel size of 6.4 microns. Multiple flights using different camera configurations (nadir/oblique (28 mm/50 mm and (50 mm/50 mm were flown over downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado. Boresight fights for 28 mm nadir camera were flown at 600 m and 1,200 m and for 50 mm nadir camera at 750 m and 1500 m. Cameras were calibrated by using a 3D cage and multiple convergent images utilizing Australis model. In this paper, the MIDAS system is described, a number of real data sets collected during the aforementioned flights are presented together with their associated flight configurations, data processing workflow, system calibration and quality control workflows are highlighted and the achievable accuracy is presented in some detail. This study revealed that the expected accuracy of about 1 to 1.5 GSD (Ground Sample Distance for planimetry and about 2 to 2.5 GSD for vertical can be achieved. Remaining

  14. PROPERTY OF THE LARGE FORMAT DIGITAL AERIAL CAMERA DMC II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jacobsen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Z/I Imaging introduced with the DMC II 140, 230 and 250 digital aerial cameras with a very large format CCD for the panchromatic channel. The CCDs have with 140 / 230 / 250 mega pixel a size not available in photogrammetry before. CCDs in general have a very high relative accuracy, but the overall geometry has to be checked as well as the influence of not flat CCDs. A CCD with a size of 96mm × 82mm must have a flatness or knowledge of flatness in the range of 1μm if the camera accuracy in the range of 1.3μm shall not be influenced. The DMC II cameras have been evaluated with three different flying heights leading to 5cm, 9cm and 15cm or 20cm GSD, crossing flight lines and 60% side lap. The optimal test conditions guaranteed the precise determination of the object coordinates as well as the systematic image errors. All three camera types show only very small systematic image errors, ranging in the root mean square between 0.12μm up to 0.3μm with extreme values not exceeding 1.6μm. The remaining systematic image errors, determined by analysis of the image residuals and not covered by the additional parameters, are negligible. A standard deviation of the object point heights below the GSD, determined at independent check points, even in blocks with just 20% side lap and 60% end lap is standard. Corresponding to the excellent image geometry the object point coordinates are only slightly influenced by the self calibration. For all DMCII types the handling of image models for data acquisition must not be supported by an improvement of the image coordinates by the determined systematic image errors. Such an improvement up to now is not standard for photogrammetric software packages. The advantage of a single monolithic CCD is obvious. An edge analysis of pan-sharpened DMC II 250 images resulted in factors for the effective resolution below 1.0. The result below 1.0 is only possible by contrast enhancement, but this requires with low image noise

  15. Accurate estimation of camera shot noise in the real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Rostislav S.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays digital cameras are essential parts of various technological processes and daily tasks. They are widely used in optics and photonics, astronomy, biology and other various fields of science and technology such as control systems and video-surveillance monitoring. One of the main information limitations of photo- and videocameras are noises of photosensor pixels. Camera's photosensor noise can be divided into random and pattern components. Temporal noise includes random noise component while spatial noise includes pattern noise component. Temporal noise can be divided into signal-dependent shot noise and signal-nondependent dark temporal noise. For measurement of camera noise characteristics, the most widely used methods are standards (for example, EMVA Standard 1288). It allows precise shot and dark temporal noise measurement but difficult in implementation and time-consuming. Earlier we proposed method for measurement of temporal noise of photo- and videocameras. It is based on the automatic segmentation of nonuniform targets (ASNT). Only two frames are sufficient for noise measurement with the modified method. In this paper, we registered frames and estimated shot and dark temporal noises of cameras consistently in the real-time. The modified ASNT method is used. Estimation was performed for the cameras: consumer photocamera Canon EOS 400D (CMOS, 10.1 MP, 12 bit ADC), scientific camera MegaPlus II ES11000 (CCD, 10.7 MP, 12 bit ADC), industrial camera PixeLink PL-B781F (CMOS, 6.6 MP, 10 bit ADC) and video-surveillance camera Watec LCL-902C (CCD, 0.47 MP, external 8 bit ADC). Experimental dependencies of temporal noise on signal value are in good agreement with fitted curves based on a Poisson distribution excluding areas near saturation. Time of registering and processing of frames used for temporal noise estimation was measured. Using standard computer, frames were registered and processed during a fraction of second to several seconds only. Also the

  16. Exposing diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørtoft, Kamilla; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    Health care is dominated by many different models and normative theories for the ways in which healthcare related meetings with patients and clients ideally speaking should take place. However, there seems to be a dialectic tension between these normative theories and situated embodied practices....... A prominent research theme in health care studies is, therefore, to explicate the gap between theory and practice. The question this paper addresses is how a learning environment can be designed to bridge this theory-practice gap, expose the differences in situated interactions and qualify health...... focus on their own professional discipline and its tasks 2) stimulates collaborative learning when they discuss their different interpretations of the ethnographic video narratives and achieve a deeper understanding of each other’s work and their clients’ lifeworlds, which might lead to a better...

  17. Body worn camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishwariya, A.; Pallavi Sudhir, Gulavani; Garg, Nemesa; Karthikeyan, B.

    2017-11-01

    A body worn camera is small video camera worn on the body, typically used by police officers to record arrests, evidence from crime scenes. It helps preventing and resolving complaints brought by members of the public; and strengthening police transparency, performance, and accountability. The main constants of this type of the system are video format, resolution, frames rate, and audio quality. This system records the video in .mp4 format with 1080p resolution and 30 frames per second. One more important aspect to while designing this system is amount of power the system requires as battery management becomes very critical. The main design challenges are Size of the Video, Audio for the video. Combining both audio and video and saving it in .mp4 format, Battery, size that is required for 8 hours of continuous recording, Security. For prototyping this system is implemented using Raspberry Pi model B.

  18. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector rings positioned side-by-side or offset by one-half of the detector cross section around a patient area to detect radiation therefrom. Each ring contains a plurality of scintillation detectors which are positioned around an inner circumference with a septum ring extending inwardly from the inner circumference along each outer edge of each ring. An additional septum ring is positioned in the middle of each ring of detectors and parallel to the other septa rings, whereby the inward extent of all the septa rings may be reduced by one-half and the number of detectors required in each ring is reduced. The additional septa reduces the costs of the positron camera and improves its performance

  19. Gamma camera display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    A gamma camera having an array of photomultipliers coupled via pulse shaping circuitry and a resistor weighting circuit to a display for forming an image of a radioactive subject is described. A linearizing circuit is coupled to the weighting circuit, the linearizing circuit including a nonlinear feedback circuit with diode coupling to the weighting circuit for linearizing the correspondence between points of the display and points of the subject. 4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures

  20. Scanning gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engdahl, L.W.; Batter, J.F. Jr.; Stout, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning system for a gamma camera providing for the overlapping of adjacent scan paths is described. A collimator mask having tapered edges provides for a graduated reduction in intensity of radiation received by a detector thereof, the reduction in intensity being graduated in a direction normal to the scanning path to provide a blending of images of adjacent scan paths. 31 claims, 15 figures

  1. Two-dimensional spectrophotometry of planetary nebulae by CCD imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacoby, G.H.; Africano, J.L.; Quigley, R.J.; Western Washington Univ., Bellingham, WA)

    1987-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the electron temperature and density and the ionic abundances of O(+), O(2+), N(+), and S(+) have been derived from CCD images of the planetary nebulae NGC 40 and NGC 6826 taken in the important emission lines of forbidden O II, forbidden O III, H-beta, forbidden N II, and forbidden S II. The steps required in the derivation of the absolute fluxes, line, ratios, and ionic abundances are outlined and then discussed in greater detail. The results show that the CCD imaging technique for two-dimensional spectrophotometry can effectively compete with classical spectrophotometry, providing the added benefits of complete spatial coverage at seeing-disk spatial resolution. The multiplexing in the spatial dimension, however, results in a loss of spectral information, since only one emission line is observed at any one time. 37 references

  2. Optimization of polarimetry sensitivity for X-ray CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashida, K; Tsunemi, H; Hashimoto, Y; Ohtani, M

    1999-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry with CCD has been performed using a polarized X-ray beam from an electron impact X-ray source. The standard data reduction method employing double-pixel events yields the modulation factor M of 0.14 at 27 keV and 0.24 at 43 keV for the 12 mu m pixel size CCD chip. We develop a new data reduction method, in which multi-pixel events are employed, and which approximates the charge spread as an oval shape. We optimize the reduction parameters, so that we improve the P sub m sub i sub n (minimum detectable polarization degree) by factor of three from the value obtained through the usual double-pixel event method.

  3. CCD-based thermoreflectance microscopy: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzaneh, M; Maize, K; Shakouri, A; Lueerssen, D; Summers, J A; Hudgings, Janice A; Mayer, P M; Ram, R J; Raad, P E; Pipe, K P

    2009-01-01

    CCD-based thermoreflectance microscopy has emerged as a high resolution, non-contact imaging technique for thermal profiling and performance and reliability analysis of numerous electronic and optoelectronic devices at the micro-scale. This thermography technique, which is based on measuring the relative change in reflectivity of the device surface as a function of change in temperature, provides high-resolution thermal images that are useful for hot spot detection and failure analysis, mapping of temperature distribution, measurement of thermal transient, optical characterization of photonic devices and measurement of thermal conductivity in thin films. In this paper we review the basic physical principle behind thermoreflectance as a thermography tool, discuss the experimental setup, resolutions achieved, signal processing procedures and calibration techniques, and review the current applications of CCD-based thermoreflectance microscopy in various devices. (topical review)

  4. CCD readout of GEM-based neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, F A F; Fetal, S T G; Fraga, M; Guérard, B; Manzini, G; Margato, L M S; Oed, A; Policarpo, Armando; Vuure, T V

    2002-01-01

    We report on the optical readout of the gas electron multiplier (GEM) operated with a gaseous mixture suitable for the detection of thermal neutrons: sup 3 He-CF sub 4. A CCD system operating in the 400-1000 nm band was used to collect the light. Spectroscopic data on the visible and NIR scintillation of He-CF sub 4 are presented. Images of the tracks of the proton and triton recorded with a triple GEM detector are also shown.

  5. A Simple Approach to Collecting Useful Wildlife Data Using Remote Camera-Traps in Undergraduate Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Remote camera-traps are commonly used to estimate the abundance, diversity, behavior and habitat use of wildlife in an inexpensive and nonintrusive manner. Because of the increasing use of remote-cameras in wildlife studies, students interested in wildlife biology should be exposed to the use of remote-cameras early in their academic careers.…

  6. Stellar CCD Photometry: New Approach, Principles and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bassuny Alawy, A.

    A new approach is proposed and developed to handle pre-processed CCD frames in order to identify stellar images and derive their relevant parameters. It relies on: 1) Identifying stellar images and assigning approximate positions of their centres using an artificial intelligence technique, (Knowledge Based System), 2) Accurate determination of the centre co-ordinates applying an elementary statistical concept and 3) Estimating the image peak intensity as a stellar magnitude measure employing simple numerical analysis approach. The method has been coded for personal computer users. A CCD frame of the star cluster M67 was adopted as a test case. The results obtained are discussed in comparison with the DAOPHOTII ones and the corresponding published data. Exact coincidence has been found between both results except in very few cases. These exceptions have been discussed in the light of the basis of both methods and the cluster plates. It has been realised that the method suggested represents a very simple, extremely fast, high precision method of stellar CCD photometry. Moreover, it is more capable than DAOPHOTII of handling blended and distorted stellar images. These characteristics show the usefulness of the present method in some astronomical applications, such as auto-focusing and auto-guiding, beside the main purpose, viz. stellar photometry.

  7. Analysis of Dark Current in BRITE Nanostellite CCD Sensors †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popowicz, Adam

    2018-01-01

    The BRightest Target Explorer (BRITE) is the pioneering nanosatellite mission dedicated for photometric observations of the brightest stars in the sky. The BRITE charge coupled device (CCD) sensors are poorly shielded against extensive flux of energetic particles which constantly induce defects in the silicon lattice. In this paper we investigate the temporal evolution of the generation of the dark current in the BRITE CCDs over almost four years after launch. Utilizing several steps of image processing and employing normalization of the results, it was possible to obtain useful information about the progress of thermal activity in the sensors. The outcomes show a clear and consistent linear increase of induced damage despite the fact that only about 0.14% of CCD pixels were probed. By performing the analysis of temperature dependencies of the dark current, we identified the observed defects as phosphorus-vacancy (PV) pairs, which are common in proton irradiated CCD matrices. Moreover, the Meyer-Neldel empirical rule was confirmed in our dark current data, yielding EMN=24.8 meV for proton-induced PV defects. PMID:29415471

  8. Radiation-resistant camera tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahata, Takao; Manabe, Sohei; Makishima, Yasuhiro

    1982-01-01

    It was a long time ago that Toshiba launched on manufacturing black-and-white radiation-resistant camera tubes employing nonbrowning face-plate glass for ITV cameras used in nuclear power plants. Now in compliance with the increasing demand in nuclear power field, the Company is at grips with the development of radiation-resistant single color-camera tubes incorporating a color-stripe filter for color ITV cameras used under radiation environment. Herein represented are the results of experiments on characteristics of materials for single color-camera tubes and prospects for commercialization of the tubes. (author)

  9. LiCHy: The CAF’s LiDAR, CCD and Hyperspectral Integrated Airborne Observation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Pang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the design, implementation and performance of a novel airborne system, which integrates commercial waveform LiDAR, CCD (Charge-Coupled Device camera and hyperspectral sensors into a common platform system. CAF’s (The Chinese Academy of Forestry LiCHy (LiDAR, CCD and Hyperspectral Airborne Observation System is a unique system that permits simultaneous measurements of vegetation vertical structure, horizontal pattern, and foliar spectra from different view angles at very high spatial resolution (~1 m on a wide range of airborne platforms. The horizontal geo-location accuracy of LiDAR and CCD is about 0.5 m, with LiDAR vertical resolution and accuracy 0.15 m and 0.3 m, respectively. The geo-location accuracy of hyperspectral image is within 2 pixels for nadir view observations and 5–7 pixels for large off-nadir observations of 55° with multi-angle modular when comparing to LiDAR product. The complementary nature of LiCHy’s sensors makes it an effective and comprehensive system for forest inventory, change detection, biodiversity monitoring, carbon accounting and ecosystem service evaluation. The LiCHy system has acquired more than 8000 km2 of data over typical forests across China. These data are being used to investigate potential LiDAR and optical remote sensing applications in forest management, forest carbon accounting, biodiversity evaluation, and to aid in the development of similar satellite configurations. This paper describes the integration of the LiCHy system, the instrument performance and data processing workflow. We also demonstrate LiCHy’s data characteristics, current coverage, and potential vegetation applications.

  10. The PLATO camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubier, D.; Bodin, P.; Pasquier, H.; Fredon, S.; Levacher, P.; Vola, P.; Buey, T.; Bernardi, P.

    2017-11-01

    PLATO (PLAnetary Transits and Oscillation of stars) is a candidate for the M3 Medium-size mission of the ESA Cosmic Vision programme (2015-2025 period). It is aimed at Earth-size and Earth-mass planet detection in the habitable zone of bright stars and their characterisation using the transit method and the asterosismology of their host star. That means observing more than 100 000 stars brighter than magnitude 11, and more than 1 000 000 brighter than magnitude 13, with a long continuous observing time for 20 % of them (2 to 3 years). This yields a need for an unusually long term signal stability. For the brighter stars, the noise requirement is less than 34 ppm.hr-1/2, from a frequency of 40 mHz down to 20 μHz, including all sources of noise like for instance the motion of the star images on the detectors and frequency beatings. Those extremely tight requirements result in a payload consisting of 32 synchronised, high aperture, wide field of view cameras thermally regulated down to -80°C, whose data are combined to increase the signal to noise performances. They are split into 4 different subsets pointing at 4 directions to widen the total field of view; stars in the centre of that field of view are observed by all 32 cameras. 2 extra cameras are used with color filters and provide pointing measurement to the spacecraft Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) loop. The satellite is orbiting the Sun at the L2 Lagrange point. This paper presents the optical, electronic and electrical, thermal and mechanical designs devised to achieve those requirements, and the results from breadboards developed for the optics, the focal plane, the power supply and video electronics.

  11. Single Particle Damage Events in Candidate Star Camera Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Paul; Marshall, Cheryl; Polidan, Elizabeth; Wacyznski, Augustyn; Johnson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Si charge coupled devices (CCDs) are currently the preeminent detector in star cameras as well as in the near ultraviolet (uv) to visible wavelength region for astronomical observations in space and in earth-observing space missions. Unfortunately, the performance of CCDs is permanently degraded by total ionizing dose (TID) and displacement damage effects. TID produces threshold voltage shifts on the CCD gates and displacement damage reduces the charge transfer efficiency (CTE), increases the dark current, produces dark current nonuniformities and creates random telegraph noise in individual pixels. In addition to these long term effects, cosmic ray and trapped proton transients also interfere with device operation on orbit. In the present paper, we investigate the dark current behavior of CCDs - in particular the formation and annealing of hot pixels. Such pixels degrade the ability of a CCD to perform science and also can present problems to the performance of star camera functions (especially if their numbers are not correctly anticipated). To date, most dark current radiation studies have been performed by irradiating the CCDs at room temperature but this can result in a significantly optimistic picture of the hot pixel count. We know from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that high dark current pixels (so-called hot pixels or hot spikes) accumulate as a function of time on orbit. For example, the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys/Wide Field Camera instrument performs monthly anneals despite the loss of observational time, in order to partially anneal the hot pixels. Note that the fact that significant reduction in hot pixel populations occurs for room temperature anneals is not presently understood since none of the commonly expected defects in Si (e.g. divacancy, E center, and A-center) anneal at such a low temperature. A HST Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) CCD manufactured by E2V was irradiated while operating at -83C and the dark current studied as a function of

  12. Stereoscopic camera design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David J.; Jones, Christopher K.; Stewart, James N.; Smith, Alan

    2002-05-01

    It is clear from the literature that the majority of work in stereoscopic imaging is directed towards the development of modern stereoscopic displays. As costs come down, wider public interest in this technology is expected to increase. This new technology would require new methods of image formation. Advances in stereo computer graphics will of course lead to the creation of new stereo computer games, graphics in films etc. However, the consumer would also like to see real-world stereoscopic images, pictures of family, holiday snaps etc. Such scenery would have wide ranges of depth to accommodate and would need also to cope with moving objects, such as cars, and in particular other people. Thus, the consumer acceptance of auto/stereoscopic displays and 3D in general would be greatly enhanced by the existence of a quality stereoscopic camera. This paper will cover an analysis of existing stereoscopic camera designs and show that they can be categorized into four different types, with inherent advantages and disadvantages. A recommendation is then made with regard to 3D consumer still and video photography. The paper will go on to discuss this recommendation and describe its advantages and how it can be realized in practice.

  13. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the addiction antidote CcdA in complex with its toxin CcdB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buts, Lieven; De Jonge, Natalie; Loris, Remy; Wyns, Lode; Dao-Thi, Minh-Hoa

    2005-01-01

    The CcdA C-terminal domain was crystallized in complex with CcdB in two crystal forms that diffract to beyond 2.0 Å resolution. CcdA and CcdB are the antidote and toxin of the ccd addiction module of Escherichia coli plasmid F. The CcdA C-terminal domain (CcdA C36 ; 36 amino acids) was crystallized in complex with CcdB (dimer of 2 × 101 amino acids) in three different crystal forms, two of which diffract to high resolution. Form II belongs to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 37.6, b = 60.5, c = 83.8 Å and diffracts to 1.8 Å resolution. Form III belongs to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 41.0, b = 37.9, c = 69.6 Å, β = 96.9°, and diffracts to 1.9 Å resolution

  14. Pulsed-neutron imaging by a high-speed camera and center-of-gravity processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochiki, K.; Uragaki, T.; Koide, J.; Kushima, Y.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Taketani, A.; Otake, Y.; Matsumoto, Y.; Su, Y.; Hiroi, K.; Shinohara, T.; Kai, T.

    2018-01-01

    Pulsed-neutron imaging is attractive technique in the research fields of energy-resolved neutron radiography and RANS (RIKEN) and RADEN (J-PARC/JAEA) are small and large accelerator-driven pulsed-neutron facilities for its imaging, respectively. To overcome the insuficient spatial resolution of the conunting type imaging detectors like μ NID, nGEM and pixelated detectors, camera detectors combined with a neutron color image intensifier were investigated. At RANS center-of-gravity technique was applied to spots image obtained by a CCD camera and the technique was confirmed to be effective for improving spatial resolution. At RADEN a high-frame-rate CMOS camera was used and super resolution technique was applied and it was recognized that the spatial resolution was futhermore improved.

  15. CCD Development Progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Kolbe, W.F.; Holland, S.E.; Bebek, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    P-channel CCD imagers, 200-300um thick, fully depleted, and back-illuminat ed are being developed for scientific applications including ground- and space-based astronomy and x-ray detection. These thick devices have extended IR response, good point-spread function (PSF) and excellent radiation tolerance. Initially, these CCDs were made in-house at LBNL using 100 mm diameter wafers. Fabrication on high-resistivity 150 mm wafers is now proceeding according to a model in which the wafers are fir...

  16. CCD data processor for maximum likelihood feature classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, H. F.; Kelly, W. L.; Husson, C.; Culotta, P. W.; Snyder, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes an advanced technology development which utilizes a high speed analog/binary CCD correlator to perform the matrix multiplications necessary to implement onboard feature classification. The matrix manipulation module uses the maximum likelihood classification algorithm assuming a Gaussian probability density function. The module will process 16 element multispectral vectors at rates in excess of 500 thousand multispectral vector elements per second. System design considerations for the optimum use of this module are discussed, test results from initial device fabrication runs are presented, and the performance in typical processing applications is described

  17. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  18. Positron emission tomography camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    A positron emission tomography camera having a plurality of detector planes positioned side-by-side around a patient area to detect radiation. Each plane includes a plurality of photomultiplier tubes and at least two rows of scintillation crystals on each photomultiplier tube extend across to adjacent photomultiplier tubes for detecting radiation from the patient area. Each row of crystals on each photomultiplier tube is offset from the other rows of crystals, and the area of each crystal on each tube in each row is different than the area of the crystals on the tube in other rows for detecting which crystal is actuated and allowing the detector to detect more inter-plane slides. The crystals are offset by an amount equal to the length of the crystal divided by the number of rows. The rows of crystals on opposite sides of the patient may be rotated 90 degrees relative to each other

  19. Junocam: Juno's Outreach Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Caplinger, M. A.; Ingersoll, A.; Ravine, M. A.; Jensen, E.; Bolton, S.; Orton, G.

    2017-11-01

    Junocam is a wide-angle camera designed to capture the unique polar perspective of Jupiter offered by Juno's polar orbit. Junocam's four-color images include the best spatial resolution ever acquired of Jupiter's cloudtops. Junocam will look for convective clouds and lightning in thunderstorms and derive the heights of the clouds. Junocam will support Juno's radiometer experiment by identifying any unusual atmospheric conditions such as hotspots. Junocam is on the spacecraft explicitly to reach out to the public and share the excitement of space exploration. The public is an essential part of our virtual team: amateur astronomers will supply ground-based images for use in planning, the public will weigh in on which images to acquire, and the amateur image processing community will help process the data.

  20. Optical design of the comet Shoemaker-Levy speckle camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissinger, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    An optical design is presented in which the Lick 3 meter telescope and a bare CCD speckle camera system was used to image the collision sites of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet with the Planet Jupiter. The brief overview includes of the optical constraints and system layout. The choice of a Risley prism combination to compensate for the time dependent atmospheric chromatic changes are described. Plate scale and signal-to-noise ratio curves resulting from imaging reference stars are compared with theory. Comparisons between un-corrected and reconstructed images of Jupiter`s impact sites. The results confirm that speckle imaging techniques can be used over an extended time period to provide a method to image large extended objects.

  1. Single photon detection and localization accuracy with an ebCMOS camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajgfinger, T. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Dominjon, A., E-mail: agnes.dominjon@nao.ac.jp [Université de Lyon, Université de Lyon 1, Lyon 69003 France. (France); Barbier, R. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Université de Lyon, Université de Lyon 1, Lyon 69003 France. (France)

    2015-07-01

    The CMOS sensor technologies evolve very fast and offer today very promising solutions to existing issues facing by imaging camera systems. CMOS sensors are very attractive for fast and sensitive imaging thanks to their low pixel noise (1e-) and their possibility of backside illumination. The ebCMOS group of IPNL has produced a camera system dedicated to Low Light Level detection and based on a 640 kPixels ebCMOS with its acquisition system. After reminding the principle of detection of an ebCMOS and the characteristics of our prototype, we confront our camera to other imaging systems. We compare the identification efficiency and the localization accuracy of a point source by four different photo-detection devices: the scientific CMOS (sCMOS), the Charge Coupled Device (CDD), the Electron Multiplying CCD (emCCD) and the Electron Bombarded CMOS (ebCMOS). Our ebCMOS camera is able to identify a single photon source in less than 10 ms with a localization accuracy better than 1 µm. We report as well efficiency measurement and the false positive identification of the ebCMOS camera by identifying more than hundreds of single photon sources in parallel. About 700 spots are identified with a detection efficiency higher than 90% and a false positive percentage lower than 5. With these measurements, we show that our target tracking algorithm can be implemented in real time at 500 frames per second under a photon flux of the order of 8000 photons per frame. These results demonstrate that the ebCMOS camera concept with its single photon detection and target tracking algorithm is one of the best devices for low light and fast applications such as bioluminescence imaging, quantum dots tracking or adaptive optics.

  2. Development of a driving method suitable for ultrahigh-speed shooting in a 2M-fps 300k-pixel single-chip color camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonai, J.; Arai, T.; Hayashida, T.; Ohtake, H.; Namiki, J.; Yoshida, T.; Etoh, T. Goji

    2012-03-01

    We have developed an ultrahigh-speed CCD camera that can capture instantaneous phenomena not visible to the human eye and impossible to capture with a regular video camera. The ultrahigh-speed CCD was specially constructed so that the CCD memory between the photodiode and the vertical transfer path of each pixel can store 144 frames each. For every one-frame shot, the electric charges generated from the photodiodes are transferred in one step to the memory of all the parallel pixels, making ultrahigh-speed shooting possible. Earlier, we experimentally manufactured a 1M-fps ultrahigh-speed camera and tested it for broadcasting applications. Through those tests, we learned that there are cases that require shooting speeds (frame rate) of more than 1M fps; hence we aimed to develop a new ultrahigh-speed camera that will enable much faster shooting speeds than what is currently possible. Since shooting at speeds of more than 200,000 fps results in decreased image quality and abrupt heating of the image sensor and drive circuit board, faster speeds cannot be achieved merely by increasing the drive frequency. We therefore had to improve the image sensor wiring layout and the driving method to develop a new 2M-fps, 300k-pixel ultrahigh-speed single-chip color camera for broadcasting purposes.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Chinese HJ-1 CCD, GF-1 WFV and ZY-3 MUX Sensor Data for Leaf Area Index Estimations for Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, China has developed and launched several satellites with high spatial resolutions, such as the resources satellite No. 3 (ZY-3 with a multi-spectral camera (MUX and 5.8 m spatial resolution, the satellite GaoFen No. 1 (GF-1 with a wide field of view (WFV camera and 16 m spatial resolution, and the environment satellite (HJ-1A/B with a charge-coupled device (CCD sensor and 30 m spatial resolution. First, to analyze the potential application of ZY-3 MUX, GF-1 WFV, and HJ-1 CCD to extract the leaf area index (LAI at the regional scale, this study estimated LAI from the relationships between physical model-based spectral vegetation indices (SVIs and LAI values that were generated from look-up tables (LUTs, simulated from the combination of the PROSPECT-5B leaf model and the scattering by arbitrarily inclined leaves with the hot-spot effect (SAILH canopy reflectance model. Second, to assess the surface reflectance quality of these sensors after data preprocessing, the well-processed surface reflectance products of the Landsat-8 operational land imager (OLI sensor with a convincing data quality were used to compare the performances of ZY-3 MUX, GF-1 WFV, and HJ-1 CCD sensors both in theory and reality. Apart from several reflectance fluctuations, the reflectance trends were coincident, and the reflectance values of the red and near-infrared (NIR bands were comparable among these sensors. Finally, to analyze the accuracy of the LAI estimated from ZY-3 MUX, GF-1 WFV, and HJ-1 CCD, the LAI estimations from these sensors were validated based on LAI field measurements in Huailai, Hebei Province, China. The results showed that the performance of the LAI that was inversed from ZY-3 MUX was better than that from GF-1 WFV, and HJ-1 CCD, both of which tended to be systematically underestimated. In addition, the value ranges and accuracies of the LAI inversions both decreased with decreasing spatial resolution.

  4. Detailed calibration of the PI-LCX:1300 high performance single photon counting hard x-ray CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Wen, Xian-Lun; Wei, Lai; Zhu, Bin; Wu, Yu-Chi; Dong, Ke-Gong; Jiao, Chun-Ye; Wu, Bo; He, Ying-Ling; Zhang, Fa-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Min; Gu, Yu-Qiu

    2017-02-01

    Not Available Project supported by the Science Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2013A0103003 and 2012B0102008) and the National High-Tech Inertial Confinement Fusion Committee of China.

  5. Band selection from a hyperspectral data-cube for a real-time multispectral 3CCD camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, P.J.; Breejen, E. den; Franken, E.M.; Jong, A.N. de; Winkel, J.

    2001-01-01

    Given a specific task, like detection of hidden objects (i.e. vehicles and landmines) in a natural background, hyperspectral data gives a significant advantage over RGB-color or gray-value images. It introduces however, a trade-off between cost, speed, signal-to-noise ratio, spectral resolution, and

  6. Quantum spatial correlations in high-gain parametric down-conversion measured by means of a CCD camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jedrkiewicz, O.; Brambilla, E.; Bache, Morten

    2006-01-01

    demonstrate that the peak value of the normalized spatial correlations between signal and idler lies well above the line marking the boundary between the classical and the quantum domain. This effect is equivalent to the apparent violation of the Cauchy-Schwartz inequality, predicted by some of us years ago...

  7. An algorithm for automated detection, localization and measurement of local calcium signals from camera-based imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ellefsen, Kyle; Settle, Brett; Parker, Ian; Smith, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Local Ca2+ transients such as puffs and sparks form the building blocks of cellular Ca2+ signaling in numerous cell types. They have traditionally been studied by line scan confocal microscopy, but advances in TIRF microscopy together with improved electron-multiplied CCD (EMCCD) camera snow enable rapid (>500 frames s−1) imaging of subcellular Ca2+ signals with high spatial resolution in two dimensions. This approach yields vastly more information (ca. 1GB per minute) than line scan imaging,...

  8. Mars Exploration Rover Navigation Camera in-flight calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, J.M.; Bell, J.F.; Johnson, J. R.; Joseph, J.; Wolff, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Navigation Camera (Navcam) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) spacecraft provide support for both tactical operations as well as scientific observations where color information is not necessary: large-scale morphology, atmospheric monitoring including cloud observations and dust devil movies, and context imaging for both the thermal emission spectrometer and the in situ instruments on the Instrument Deployment Device. The Navcams are a panchromatic stereoscopic imaging system built using identical charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors and nearly identical electronics boards as the other cameras on the MER spacecraft. Previous calibration efforts were primarily focused on providing a detailed geometric calibration in line with the principal function of the Navcams, to provide data for the MER navigation team. This paper provides a detailed description of a new Navcam calibration pipeline developed to provide an absolute radiometric calibration that we estimate to have an absolute accuracy of 10% and a relative precision of 2.5%. Our calibration pipeline includes steps to model and remove the bias offset, the dark current charge that accumulates in both the active and readout regions of the CCD, and the shutter smear. It also corrects pixel-to-pixel responsivity variations using flat-field images, and converts from raw instrument-corrected digital number values per second to units of radiance (W m-2 nm-1 sr-1), or to radiance factor (I/F). We also describe here the initial results of two applications where radiance-calibrated Navcam data provide unique information for surface photometric and atmospheric aerosol studies. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Fundamental performance differences of CMOS and CCD imagers: part V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom; Andrews, James; Tower, John; Pinter, Jeff

    2013-02-01

    Previous papers delivered over the last decade have documented developmental progress made on large pixel scientific CMOS imagers that match or surpass CCD performance. New data and discussions presented in this paper include: 1) a new buried channel CCD fabricated on a CMOS process line, 2) new data products generated by high performance custom scientific CMOS 4T/5T/6T PPD pixel imagers, 3) ultimate CTE and speed limits for large pixel CMOS imagers, 4) fabrication and test results of a flight 4k x 4k CMOS imager for NRL's SoloHi Solar Orbiter Mission, 5) a progress report on ultra large stitched Mk x Nk CMOS imager, 6) data generated by on-chip sub-electron CDS signal chain circuitry used in our imagers, 7) CMOS and CMOSCCD proton and electron radiation damage data for dose levels up to 10 Mrd, 8) discussions and data for a new class of PMOS pixel CMOS imagers and 9) future CMOS development work planned.

  10. An advanced CCD emulator with 32MB image memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, P.; Fried, J.; Kotov, I.

    2012-07-01

    As part of the LSST sensor development program we have developed an advanced CCD emulator for testing new multichannel readout electronics. The emulator, based on an Altera Stratix II FPGA for timing and control, produces 4 channels of simulated video waveforms in response to an appropriate sequence of horizontal and vertical clocks. It features 40MHz, 16-bit DACs for reset and video generation, 32MB of image memory for storage of arbitrary grayscale bitmaps, and provision to simulate reset and clock feedthrough ("glitches") on the video channels. Clock inputs are qualified for proper sequences and levels before video output is generated. Binning, region of interest, and reverse clock sequences are correctly recognized and appropriate video output will be produced. Clock transitions are timestamped and can be played back to a control PC. A simplified user interface is provided via a daughter card having an ARM M3 Cortex microprocessor and miniature color LCD display and joystick. The user can select video modes from stored bitmap images, or flat, gradient, bar, chirp, or checkerboard test patterns; set clock thresholds and video output levels; and set row/column formats for image outputs. Multiple emulators can be operated in parallel to simulate complex CCDs or CCD arrays.

  11. Fast event recorder utilizing a CCD analog shift register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducar, R.J.; McIntyre, P.M.

    1978-01-01

    A system of electronics has been developed to allow the capture and recording of relatively fast, low-amplitude analog events. The heart of the system is a dual 455-cell analog shift register charge-coupled device, Fairchild CCD321ADC-3. The CCD is operated in a dual clock mode. The input is sampled at a selectable clock rate of .25-20 MHz. The stored analog data is then clocked out at a slower rate, typically about .25 MHz. The time base expansion of the analog data allows for analog-to-digital conversion and memory storage using conventional medium-speed devices. The digital data is sequentially loaded into a static RAM and may then be block transferred to a computer. The analog electronics are housed in a single-width NIM module, and the RAM memory in a single-width CAMAC module. Each pair of modules provides six parallel channels. Cost is about $200.00 per channel. Applications are described for ionization imaging (TPC, IRC) and long-drift calorimetry in liquid argon

  12. Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) causing respiratory distress syndrome in a newborn infant. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Kristina Imeen; Schirg, Eckart; Galanski, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), also known as Scheuthauer Marie-Sainton Syndrome, is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder, characterized by general retardation in bone ossification, hypoplastic clavicles and various craniofacial and dental abnormalities. Early diagnosis of CCD can be difficult, because the majority of craniofacial abnormalities become obvious only during adolescence. We present a rare case of CCD with neonatal manifestation and would like to promote the awareness of this rare disorder and the importance of early diagnosis.

  13. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT): Camera Design, Performance and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, R.; Sakao, T.; Hara, H.; Tsuneta, S.; Matsuzaki, K.; Kumagai, K.; Shimojo, M.; Minesugi, K.; Shibasaki, K.; Deluca, E. E.; Golub, L.; Bookbinder, J.; Caldwell, D.; Cheimets, P.; Cirtain, J.; Dennis, E.; Kent, T.; Weber, M.

    2008-06-01

    The X-ray Telescope (XRT) aboard the Hinode satellite is a grazing incidence X-ray imager equipped with a 2048×2048 CCD. The XRT has 1 arcsec pixels with a wide field of view of 34×34 arcmin. It is sensitive to plasmas with a wide temperature range from DPCM or JPEG, depending on the purpose. This results in higher cadence and/or wider field of view for a given telemetry bandwidth. With a focus adjust mechanism, a higher resolution of Gaussian focus may be available on-axis. This paper follows the first instrument paper for the XRT (Golub et al., Solar Phys. 243, 63, 2007) and discusses the design and measured performance of the X-ray CCD camera for the XRT and its control system with the MDP.

  14. The Eye of the Camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rompay, Thomas Johannes Lucas; Vonk, Dorette J.; Fransen, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses the effects of security cameras on prosocial behavior. Results from previous studies indicate that the presence of others can trigger helping behavior, arising from the need for approval of others. Extending these findings, the authors propose that security cameras can likewise

  15. The terminal vibration of laser spot tail in dual channel type linear CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Cheng, Deyan; Shi, Yubin; Zhang, Jianmin

    2017-11-01

    A special phenomenon about laser spot tail in dual channel type linear CCD is studied. In the CCD, the charges packets in odd and even number pixels are respectively transferred by two channels, in which, the threshold difference of surface full well induces the length difference of spot tails. So, the terminal vibration of spot tail is caused. A simulation of this phenomenon is given and qualitatively validated by the experiment results of laser irradiating a dual channel type linear CCD. In the experiment, the phenomenon has been used to estimate relative size of surface full well thresholds in two channels of CCD.

  16. Fast Data Acquisition in Heavy Ion CT Using Intensifying Screen—EMCCD Camera System With Beam Intensity Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraishi, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinji; Satoh, Hitoshi; Hara, Hidetake; Mogaki, Tatsuya; Hara, Satoshi; Miyake, Shoko; Watanabe, Yusuke; Koba, Yusuke

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the feasibility of fast data acquisition in heavy ion CT (IonCT) technique with an X-ray intensifying screen-charged coupled device (CCD) camera system. This technique is based on measuring the residual range distribution of heavy ions after passing through an object. We took a large number of images with a CCD camera for one projection by changing the range shifter (RS) thickness to obtain a characteristic curve similar to a Bragg curve and then to estimate the relative residual range. We used a high quality Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera, which drastically reduced data acquisition time. We also used a parallel-plate ionization chamber upstream of an object to monitor the time variation in heavy ion beam intensity from a synchrotron accelerator and to perform beam intensity correction for all EMCCD images. Experiments were conducted using a broad beam of 12C, which was generated by spreading out the pencil beam accelerated up to 400 MeV/u by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator, in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, with a scatterer. We demonstrated that a fast CT data acquisition, 14 min for 256 projections, is possible for an electron density phantom, consisting of six rods with a relative electron density resolution of 0.017, using the proposed technique with HIMAC.

  17. Optical follow-up observations of Locburst GRB locations with OMC test camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezek, Tomas; Hudec, Rene; Soldan, Jan; Hroch, Filip; Mas-Hesse, Miguel; Gimenez, Alvaro

    1999-01-01

    The test camera of the Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC) experiment for INTEGRAL spacecraft achieving the angular pixel size of 18 arcsec and the field of view 7.5 deg. x 5.1 deg. has been successfully developed and tested at the Astronomical Institute Ondrejov. The test camera is able to provide imaging down to 15 mag over the whole field of view within one exposure of 300 seconds. Although developed primarily to test the OMC performance and help with software development, this device is ideally suitable for the use as ground-based camera for the sites where Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory BATSE Locburst triggers are followed-up in optical waveband and also for wide-field sky monitoring in general. The low cost of this camera makes it possible to duplicate the system to a number of observing sites. A chart and a corresponding CCD-image for the BACODINE Locburst Position 6368 taken with OMC test camera at Ondrejov observatory are also presented. The image taken 18 hours after the trigger was computer-blinked with the frame taken 30 days later. No optical activity has been found down to 13.5 mag

  18. Periscope-camera system for visible and infrared imaging diagnostics on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, S.S.; Dimock, D.L.; Hayes, S.; Long, D.; Lowrence, J.L.; Mastrocola, V.; Renda, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Young, K.M.

    1985-05-01

    An optical diagnostic consisting of a periscope which relays images of the torus interior to an array of cameras is used on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to view plasma discharge phenomena and inspect vacuum vessel internal structures in both visible and near-infrared wavelength regions. Three periscopes view through 20-cm-diameter fused-silica windows which are spaced around the torus midplane to provide a viewing coverage of approximately 75% of the vacuum vessel internal surface area. The periscopes have f/8 optics and motor-driven controls for focusing, magnification selection (5 0 , 20 0 , and 60 0 field of view), elevation and azimuth setting, mast rotation, filter selection, iris aperture, and viewing port selection. The four viewing ports on each periscope are equipped with multiple imaging devices which include: (1) an inspection eyepiece, (2) standard (RCA TC2900) and fast (RETICON) framing rate television cameras, (3) a PtSi CCD infrared imaging camera, (4) a 35 mm Nikon F3 still camera, or (5) a 16 mm Locam II movie camera with variable framing up to 500 fps. Operation of the periscope-camera system is controlled either locally or remotely through a computer-CAMAC interface. A description of the equipment and examples of its application are presented

  19. Gamma camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Gerber, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The invention provides a composite solid state detector for use in deriving a display, by spatial coordinate information, of the distribution or radiation emanating from a source within a region of interest, comprising several solid state detector components, each having a given surface arranged for exposure to impinging radiation and exhibiting discrete interactions therewith at given spatially definable locations. The surface of each component and the surface disposed opposite and substantially parallel thereto are associated with impedence means configured to provide for each opposed surface outputs for signals relating the given location of the interactions with one spatial coordinate parameter of one select directional sense. The detector components are arranged to provide groupings of adjacently disposed surfaces mutually linearly oriented to exhibit a common directional sense of the spatial coordinate parameter. Means interconnect at least two of the outputs associated with each of the surfaces within a given grouping for collecting the signals deriving therefrom. The invention also provides a camera system for imaging the distribution of a source of gamma radiation situated within a region of interest

  20. Modular scintillation camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Improved optical coupling modules to be used in coded-aperture-type radiographic imaging systems. In a first system, a rotating slit coded-aperture is employed between the radioactive object and the module. The module consists of one pair of side-by-side photomultipliers receiving light rays from a scintillation crystal exposed to the object via the coded-aperture. The light rays are guided to the photomultipliers by a mask having a central transverse transparent window, or by a cylindrical lens, the mask or lens being mounted in a light-conveying quartz block assembly providing internal reflections at opposite faces of the assembly. This generates output signals from the photomultipliers which can be utilized to compute one-dimensional coordinate values for restoring the image of the radioactive object on a display screen. In another form of optical coupling module, usable with other types of coded-apertures, four square photomultipliers form a substantially square block and receive light rays from scintillations from a scintillation crystal exposed to the radioactive object via the coded-aperture. The light rays are guided to the photomultipliers by a square mask or a centrally transparent square lens configuration mounted in a light-conveying assembly formed by internally reflecting quartz blocks, the optical rays being directed to the respective photomultipliers so as to generate resultant output signals which can be utilized to compute image coordinate values for two-dimensional representation of the radioactive object being examined

  1. Contribution of the Chromosomal ccdAB Operon to Bacterial Drug Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kritika; Tripathi, Arti; Sahu, Alishan; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2017-10-01

    One of the first identified and best-studied toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems in Escherichia coli is the F-plasmid-based CcdAB system. This system is involved in plasmid maintenance through postsegregational killing. More recently, ccdAB homologs have been found on the chromosome, including in pathogenic strains of E. coli and other bacteria. However, the functional role of chromosomal ccdAB genes, if any, has remained unclear. We show that both the native ccd operon of the E. coli O157 strain ( ccd O157 ) and the ccd operon from the F plasmid ( ccd F ), when inserted on the E. coli chromosome, lead to protection from cell death under multiple antibiotic stress conditions through formation of persisters, with the O157 operon showing higher protection. While the plasmid-encoded CcdB toxin is a potent gyrase inhibitor and leads to bacterial cell death even under fully repressed conditions, the chromosomally encoded toxin leads to growth inhibition, except at high expression levels, where some cell death is seen. This was further confirmed by transiently activating the chromosomal ccd operon through overexpression of an active-site inactive mutant of F-plasmid-encoded CcdB. Both the ccd F and ccd O157 operons may share common mechanisms for activation under stress conditions, eventually leading to multidrug-tolerant persister cells. This study clearly demonstrates an important role for chromosomal ccd systems in bacterial persistence. IMPORTANCE A large number of free-living and pathogenic bacteria are known to harbor multiple toxin-antitoxin systems, on plasmids as well as on chromosomes. The F-plasmid CcdAB system has been extensively studied and is known to be involved in plasmid maintenance. However, little is known about the function of its chromosomal counterpart, found in several pathogenic E. coli strains. We show that the native chromosomal ccd operon of the E. coli O157 strain is involved in drug tolerance and confers protection from cell death under multiple

  2. Double Stars in the USNO CCD Astrograpic Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    autocor- relations ( DVA ) of USNO speckle camera observation of UCAC doubles. The views are background-subtracted and rescaled im- ages for three binary...figure is available in the online journal.) 2.5. Quadrant Assignment and Magnitude Differences Although the DVA (Bagnuolo et al. 1992) is unable to

  3. CCD-based optical CT scanning of highly attenuating phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Nowais, Shamsa [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Doran, Simon J [CRUK Clinical MR Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Simon.Doran@icr.ac.uk

    2009-05-01

    The introduction of optical computed tomography (optical-CT) offers economic and easy to use 3-D optical readout for gel dosimeters. However, previous authors have noted some challenges regarding the accuracy of such imaging techniques at high values of optical density. In this paper, we take a closer look at the 'cupping' artefact evident in both light-scattering polymer systems and highly light absorbing phantoms using our CCD-based optical scanner. In addition, a technique is implemented whereby the maximum measurable optical absorbance is extended to correct for any errors that may have occurred in the estimated value of the dark current or ambient light reaching the detector. The results indicate that for absorbance values up to 2.0, the optical scanner results have good accuracy, whereas this is not the case at high absorbance values for reasons yet to be explained.

  4. Electromagnetic Compatibility Assessment of CCD Detector Acquisition Chains not Synchronized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletto, M.; Boschetti, D.; Ciancetta, E.; Maiorano, E.; Stagnaro, L.

    2016-05-01

    Euclid is a space observatory managed by the European Space Agency; it is the second medium class mission (see Figure 1) in the frame of Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program.In the frame of this project, the electromagnetic interference between two different and not synchronized Charge Coupled Device (CCD) (see Figure 2) acquisition chains has been evaluated. The key parameter used for this assessment is the electromagnetic noise induced on each other. Taking into account the specificity of the issue, radiation coupling at relative low frequency and in near field conditions, classical approach based on simulations and testing on qualification model cannot be directly applied. Based on that, it has been decided to investigate the issue by test in an incremental way.

  5. BV photographic and CCD photometry of IC 4651

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony-Twarog, B.J.; Mukherjee, K.; Twarog, B.A.; Caldwell, N.

    1988-05-01

    A BV photometric survey in IC 4651 based on photographic and CCD material calibrated with photoelectric photometry from Eggen (1971) and Anthony-Twarog and Twarog (1987) has been completed. The color-magnitude diagram is consistent with an age of 2.4 + or - 0.3 x 10 to the 9th yr derived by comparison with the isochrones of VandenBerg (1985) if the apparent distance modulus and reddening derived from uvby photometry in Anthony-Twarog and Twarog (1987) are employed. While evidence is found of a hook in the upper main sequence, no evidence is found of a significantly bifurcated main sequence for this cluster, although it is similar in age to NGC 752 and NGC 3680, where this phenomenon has been noted. Finally, the survey has not resolved the apparent deficit of main-sequence stars fainter than V = 14.5 noted in Anthony-Twarog and Twarog (1987). 16 references.

  6. BV photographic and CCD photometry of IC 4651

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Mukherjee, Krishna; Twarog, Bruce A.; Caldwell, Nelson

    1988-05-01

    A BV photometric survey in IC 4651 based on photographic and CCD material calibrated with photoelectric photometry from Eggen (1971) and Anthony-Twarog and Twarog (1987) has been completed. The color-magnitude diagram is consistent with an age of 2.4 + or - 0.3 x 10 to the 9th yr derived by comparison with the isochrones of VandenBerg (1985) if the apparent distance modulus and reddening derived from uvby photometry in Anthony-Twarog and Twarog (1987) are employed. While evidence is found of a hook in the upper main sequence, no evidence is found of a significantly bifurcated main sequence for this cluster, although it is similar in age to NGC 752 and NGC 3680, where this phenomenon has been noted. Finally, the survey has not resolved the apparent deficit of main-sequence stars fainter than V = 14.5 noted in Anthony-Twarog and Twarog (1987).

  7. Chromatic Modulator for High Resolution CCD or APS Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor); Hull, Anthony B. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A system for providing high-resolution color separation in electronic imaging. Comb drives controllably oscillate a red-green-blue (RGB) color strip filter system (or otherwise) over an electronic imaging system such as a charge-coupled device (CCD) or active pixel sensor (APS). The color filter is modulated over the imaging array at a rate three or more times the frame rate of the imaging array. In so doing, the underlying active imaging elements are then able to detect separate color-separated images, which are then combined to provide a color-accurate frame which is then recorded as the representation of the recorded image. High pixel resolution is maintained. Registration is obtained between the color strip filter and the underlying imaging array through the use of electrostatic comb drives in conjunction with a spring suspension system.

  8. High Quality Camera Surveillance System

    OpenAIRE

    Helaakoski, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Oulu University of Applied Sciences Information Technology Author: Ari Helaakoski Title of the master’s thesis: High Quality Camera Surveillance System Supervisor: Kari Jyrkkä Term and year of completion: Spring 2015 Number of pages: 31 This master’s thesis was commissioned by iProtoXi Oy and it was done to one iProtoXi customer. The aim of the thesis was to make a camera surveillance system which is using a High Quality camera with pan and tilt possibility. It should b...

  9. Control system for gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    An improved gamma camera arrangement is described which utilizing a solid state detector, formed of high purity germanium. the central arrangement of the camera operates to effect the carrying out of a trapezoidal filtering operation over antisymmetrically summed spatial signals through gated integration procedures utilizing idealized integrating intervals. By simultaneously carrying out peak energy evaluation of the input signals, a desirable control over pulse pile-up phenomena is achieved. Additionally, through the use of the time derivative of incoming pulse or signal energy information to initially enable the control system, a low level information evaluation is provided serving to enhance the signal processing efficiency of the camera

  10. Report on the Radiation Effects Testing of the Infrared and Optical Transition Radiation Camera Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Presented in this report are the results tests performed at Argonne National Lab in collaboration with Los Alamos National Lab to assess the reliability of the critical 99Mo production facility beam monitoring diagnostics. The main components of the beam monitoring systems are two cameras that will be exposed to radiation during accelerator operation. The purpose of this test is to assess the reliability of the cameras and related optical components when exposed to operational radiation levels. Both X-ray and neutron radiation could potentially damage camera electronics as well as the optical components such as lenses and windows. This report covers results of the testing of component reliability when exposed to X-ray radiation. With the information from this study we provide recommendations for implementing protective measures for the camera systems in order to minimize the occurrence of radiation-induced failure within a ten month production run cycle.

  11. Converting structures to optimize the Synchrotron X radiation detection by CCD systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanella, G.; Zannoni, R.

    1987-01-01

    It is pointed out how the quantum efficiency of X ray detection for CCD detecting system can be improved enlarging their sensivity range by means of heavy element converting structures. So the problem of fabricating CCD with a deep emptying layer is avoided

  12. Analyzer for gamma cameras diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oramas Polo, I.; Osorio Deliz, J. F.; Diaz Garcia, A.

    2013-01-01

    This research work was carried out to develop an analyzer for gamma cameras diagnostic. It is composed of an electronic system that includes hardware and software capabilities, and operates from the acquisition of the 4 head position signals of a gamma camera detector. The result is the spectrum of the energy delivered by nuclear radiation coming from the camera detector head. This system includes analog processing of position signals from the camera, digitization and the subsequent processing of the energy signal in a multichannel analyzer, sending data to a computer via a standard USB port and processing of data in a personal computer to obtain the final histogram. The circuits are composed of an analog processing board and a universal kit with micro controller and programmable gate array. (Author)

  13. New generation of meteorology cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janout, Petr; Blažek, Martin; Páta, Petr

    2017-12-01

    A new generation of the WILLIAM (WIde-field aLL-sky Image Analyzing Monitoring system) camera includes new features such as monitoring of rain and storm clouds during the day observation. Development of the new generation of weather monitoring cameras responds to the demand for monitoring of sudden weather changes. However, new WILLIAM cameras are ready to process acquired image data immediately, release warning against sudden torrential rains, and send it to user's cell phone and email. Actual weather conditions are determined from image data, and results of image processing are complemented by data from sensors of temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure. In this paper, we present the architecture, image data processing algorithms of mentioned monitoring camera and spatially-variant model of imaging system aberrations based on Zernike polynomials.

  14. A Refrigerated Web Camera for Photogrammetric Video Measurement inside Biomass Boilers and Combustion Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Granada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a prototype instrumentation system for photogrammetric measuring of bed and ash layers, as well as for flying particle detection and pursuit using a single device (CCD web camera. The system was designed to obtain images of the combustion process in the interior of a domestic boiler. It includes a cooling system, needed because of the high temperatures in the combustion chamber of the boiler. The cooling system was designed using CFD simulations to ensure effectiveness. This method allows more complete and real-time monitoring of the combustion process taking place inside a boiler. The information gained from this system may facilitate the optimisation of boiler processes.

  15. A refrigerated web camera for photogrammetric video measurement inside biomass boilers and combustion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteiro, Jacobo; Riveiro, Belén; Granada, Enrique; Armesto, Julia; Eguía, Pablo; Collazo, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a prototype instrumentation system for photogrammetric measuring of bed and ash layers, as well as for flying particle detection and pursuit using a single device (CCD) web camera. The system was designed to obtain images of the combustion process in the interior of a domestic boiler. It includes a cooling system, needed because of the high temperatures in the combustion chamber of the boiler. The cooling system was designed using CFD simulations to ensure effectiveness. This method allows more complete and real-time monitoring of the combustion process taking place inside a boiler. The information gained from this system may facilitate the optimisation of boiler processes.

  16. High-Voltage Clock Driver for Photon-Counting CCD Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses the CCD97 from e2v technologies as it is being evaluated at Goddard Space Flight Center's Detector Characterization Laboratory (DCL) for possible use in ultra-low background noise space astronomy applications, such as Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C). The CCD97 includes a photoncounting mode where the equivalent output noise is less than one electron. Use of this mode requires a clock signal at a voltage level greater than the level achievable by the existing CCD (charge-coupled-device) electronics. A high-voltage waveform generator has been developed in code 660/601 to support the CCD97 evaluation. The unit generates required clock waveforms at voltage levels from -20 to +50 V. It deals with standard and arbitrary waveforms and supports pixel rates from 50 to 500 kHz. The system is designed to interface with existing Leach CCD electronics.

  17. On the absolute calibration of SO2 cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Illing, Sebastian; Kern, Christoph; Alvarez Nieves, Jose Manuel; Vogel, Leif; Zielcke, Johannes; Delgados Granados, Hugo; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide emission rate measurements are an important tool for volcanic monitoring and eruption risk assessment. The SO2 camera technique remotely measures volcanic emissions by analysing the ultraviolet absorption of SO2 in a narrow spectral window between 300 and 320 nm using solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere. The SO2 absorption is selectively detected by mounting band-pass interference filters in front of a two-dimensional, UV-sensitive CCD detector. One important step for correct SO2 emission rate measurements that can be compared with other measurement techniques is a correct calibration. This requires conversion from the measured optical density to the desired SO2 column density (CD). The conversion factor is most commonly determined by inserting quartz cells (cuvettes) with known amounts of SO2 into the light path. Another calibration method uses an additional narrow field-of-view Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system (NFOVDOAS), which measures the column density simultaneously in a small area of the camera’s field-of-view. This procedure combines the very good spatial and temporal resolution of the SO2 camera technique with the more accurate column densities obtainable from DOAS measurements.

  18. Behavioral Model of High Performance Camera for NIF Optics Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackel, B M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop software that will model the behavior of the high performance Spectral Instruments 1000 series Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera located in the Final Optics Damage Inspection (FODI) system on the National Ignition Facility. NIF's target chamber will be mounted with 48 Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) to convert the laser light from infrared to ultraviolet and focus it precisely on the target. Following a NIF shot, the optical components of each FOA must be carefully inspected for damage by the FODI to ensure proper laser performance during subsequent experiments. Rapid image capture and complex image processing (to locate damage sites) will reduce shot turnaround time; thus increasing the total number of experiments NIF can conduct during its 30 year lifetime. Development of these rapid processes necessitates extensive offline software automation -- especially after the device has been deployed in the facility. Without access to the unique real device or an exact behavioral model, offline software testing is difficult. Furthermore, a software-based behavioral model allows for many instances to be running concurrently; this allows multiple developers to test their software at the same time. Thus it is beneficial to construct separate software that will exactly mimic the behavior and response of the real SI-1000 camera

  19. Force Limited Random Vibration Test of TESS Camera Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlicek, Alexandra; Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Rey, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a spaceborne instrument consisting of four wide field-of-view-CCD cameras dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets around the brightest stars. As part of the environmental testing campaign, force limiting was used to simulate a realistic random vibration launch environment. While the force limit vibration test method is a standard approach used at multiple institutions including Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), it is still difficult to find an actual implementation process in the literature. This paper describes the step-by-step process on how the force limit method was developed and applied on the TESS camera mass model. The process description includes the design of special fixtures to mount the test article for properly installing force transducers, development of the force spectral density using the semi-empirical method, estimation of the fuzzy factor (C2) based on the mass ratio between the supporting structure and the test article, subsequent validating of the C2 factor during the vibration test, and calculation of the C.G. accelerations using the Root Mean Square (RMS) reaction force in the spectral domain and the peak reaction force in the time domain.

  20. Astronomy and the camera obscura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, M.

    2000-02-01

    The camera obscura (from Latin meaning darkened chamber) is a simple optical device with a long history. In the form considered here, it can be traced back to 1550. It had its heyday during the Victorian era when it was to be found at the seaside as a tourist attraction or sideshow. It was also used as an artist's drawing aid and, in 1620, the famous astronomer-mathematician, Johannes Kepler used a small tent camera obscura to trace the scenery.

  1. Science, conservation, and camera traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas; O'Connel, Allan F.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    Biologists commonly perceive camera traps as a new tool that enables them to enter the hitherto secret world of wild animals. Camera traps are being used in a wide range of studies dealing with animal ecology, behavior, and conservation. Our intention in this volume is not to simply present the various uses of camera traps, but to focus on their use in the conduct of science and conservation. In this chapter, we provide an overview of these two broad classes of endeavor and sketch the manner in which camera traps are likely to be able to contribute to them. Our main point here is that neither photographs of individual animals, nor detection history data, nor parameter estimates generated from detection histories are the ultimate objective of a camera trap study directed at either science or management. Instead, the ultimate objectives are best viewed as either gaining an understanding of how ecological systems work (science) or trying to make wise decisions that move systems from less desirable to more desirable states (conservation, management). Therefore, we briefly describe here basic approaches to science and management, emphasizing the role of field data and associated analyses in these processes. We provide examples of ways in which camera trap data can inform science and management.

  2. New Sensors for Cultural Heritage Metric Survey: The ToF Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto Chiabrando

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ToF cameras are new instruments based on CCD/CMOS sensors which measure distances instead of radiometry. The resulting point clouds show the same properties (both in terms of accuracy and resolution of the point clouds acquired by means of traditional LiDAR devices. ToF cameras are cheap instruments (less than 10.000 € based on video real time distance measurements and can represent an interesting alternative to the more expensive LiDAR instruments. In addition, the limited weight and dimensions of ToF cameras allow a reduction of some practical problems such as transportation and on-site management. Most of the commercial ToF cameras use the phase-shift method to measure distances. Due to the use of only one wavelength, most of them have limited range of application (usually about 5 or 10 m. After a brief description of the main characteristics of these instruments, this paper explains and comments the results of the first experimental applications of ToF cameras in Cultural Heritage 3D metric survey.  The possibility to acquire more than 30 frames/s and future developments of these devices in terms of use of more than one wavelength to overcome the ambiguity problem allow to foresee new interesting applications.

  3. First Light with a 67-Million-Pixel WFI Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    optical astronomical instruments - the "Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD's)" - are currently restricted to about 4000 x 4000 pixels. For the time being, the only possible way towards even larger detector areas is by assembling mosaics of CCD's. ESO , MPI-A and OAC have therefore undertaken a joint project to build a new and large astronomical camera with a mosaic of CCD's. This new Wide Field Imager (WFI) comprises eight CCD's with high sensitivity from the ultraviolet to the infrared spectral domain, each with 2046 x 4098 pixels. Mounted behind an advanced optical system at the Cassegrain focus of the 2.2-m telescope of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (MPG) at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, the combined 8184 x 8196 = 67,076,064 pixels cover a square field-of-view with an edge of more than half a degree (over 30 arcmin) [1]. Compared to the viewing field of the human eye, this may still appear small, but in the domain of astronomical instrumentation, it is indeed a large step forward. For comparison, the largest field-of-view with the FORS1 instrument at the VLT is about 7 arcmin. Moreover, the level of detail detectable with the WFI (theoretical image sharpness) exceeds what is possible with the naked eye by a factor of about 10,000. The WFI project was completed in only two years in response to a recommendation to ESO by the "La Silla 2000" Working Group and the Scientific-Technical Committee (STC) to offer this type of instrument to the community. The MPI-A proposed to build such an instrument for the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope and a joint project was soon established. A team of astronomers from the three institutions is responsible for the initial work with the WFI at La Silla. A few other Cameras of this size are available, e.g. at Hawaii, Kitt Peak (USA) and Cerro Tololo (Chile), but this is the first time that a telescope this large has been fully dedicated to wide-field imaging with an 8kx8k CCD. The first WFI images Various exposures were obtained during the early

  4. Sub-Camera Calibration of a Penta-Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, K.; Gerke, M.

    2016-03-01

    Penta cameras consisting of a nadir and four inclined cameras are becoming more and more popular, having the advantage of imaging also facades in built up areas from four directions. Such system cameras require a boresight calibration of the geometric relation of the cameras to each other, but also a calibration of the sub-cameras. Based on data sets of the ISPRS/EuroSDR benchmark for multi platform photogrammetry the inner orientation of the used IGI Penta DigiCAM has been analyzed. The required image coordinates of the blocks Dortmund and Zeche Zollern have been determined by Pix4Dmapper and have been independently adjusted and analyzed by program system BLUH. With 4.1 million image points in 314 images respectively 3.9 million image points in 248 images a dense matching was provided by Pix4Dmapper. With up to 19 respectively 29 images per object point the images are well connected, nevertheless the high number of images per object point are concentrated to the block centres while the inclined images outside the block centre are satisfying but not very strongly connected. This leads to very high values for the Student test (T-test) of the finally used additional parameters or in other words, additional parameters are highly significant. The estimated radial symmetric distortion of the nadir sub-camera corresponds to the laboratory calibration of IGI, but there are still radial symmetric distortions also for the inclined cameras with a size exceeding 5μm even if mentioned as negligible based on the laboratory calibration. Radial and tangential effects of the image corners are limited but still available. Remarkable angular affine systematic image errors can be seen especially in the block Zeche Zollern. Such deformations are unusual for digital matrix cameras, but it can be caused by the correlation between inner and exterior orientation if only parallel flight lines are used. With exception of the angular affinity the systematic image errors for corresponding

  5. SUB-CAMERA CALIBRATION OF A PENTA-CAMERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jacobsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Penta cameras consisting of a nadir and four inclined cameras are becoming more and more popular, having the advantage of imaging also facades in built up areas from four directions. Such system cameras require a boresight calibration of the geometric relation of the cameras to each other, but also a calibration of the sub-cameras. Based on data sets of the ISPRS/EuroSDR benchmark for multi platform photogrammetry the inner orientation of the used IGI Penta DigiCAM has been analyzed. The required image coordinates of the blocks Dortmund and Zeche Zollern have been determined by Pix4Dmapper and have been independently adjusted and analyzed by program system BLUH. With 4.1 million image points in 314 images respectively 3.9 million image points in 248 images a dense matching was provided by Pix4Dmapper. With up to 19 respectively 29 images per object point the images are well connected, nevertheless the high number of images per object point are concentrated to the block centres while the inclined images outside the block centre are satisfying but not very strongly connected. This leads to very high values for the Student test (T-test of the finally used additional parameters or in other words, additional parameters are highly significant. The estimated radial symmetric distortion of the nadir sub-camera corresponds to the laboratory calibration of IGI, but there are still radial symmetric distortions also for the inclined cameras with a size exceeding 5μm even if mentioned as negligible based on the laboratory calibration. Radial and tangential effects of the image corners are limited but still available. Remarkable angular affine systematic image errors can be seen especially in the block Zeche Zollern. Such deformations are unusual for digital matrix cameras, but it can be caused by the correlation between inner and exterior orientation if only parallel flight lines are used. With exception of the angular affinity the systematic image errors

  6. CameraHRV: robust measurement of heart rate variability using a camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Amruta; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2018-02-01

    The inter-beat-interval (time period of the cardiac cycle) changes slightly for every heartbeat; this variation is measured as Heart Rate Variability (HRV). HRV is presumed to occur due to interactions between the parasym- pathetic and sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, it is sometimes used as an indicator of the stress level of an individual. HRV also reveals some clinical information about cardiac health. Currently, HRV is accurately measured using contact devices such as a pulse oximeter. However, recent research in the field of non-contact imaging Photoplethysmography (iPPG) has made vital sign measurements using just the video recording of any exposed skin (such as a person's face) possible. The current signal processing methods for extracting HRV using peak detection perform well for contact-based systems but have poor performance for the iPPG signals. The main reason for this poor performance is the fact that current methods are sensitive to large noise sources which are often present in iPPG data. Further, current methods are not robust to motion artifacts that are common in iPPG systems. We developed a new algorithm, CameraHRV, for robustly extracting HRV even in low SNR such as is common with iPPG recordings. CameraHRV combined spatial combination and frequency demodulation to obtain HRV from the instantaneous frequency of the iPPG signal. CameraHRV outperforms other current methods of HRV estimation. Ground truth data was obtained from FDA-approved pulse oximeter for validation purposes. CameraHRV on iPPG data showed an error of 6 milliseconds for low motion and varying skin tone scenarios. The improvement in error was 14%. In case of high motion scenarios like reading, watching and talking, the error was 10 milliseconds.

  7. Measured and calculated K-fluorescence effects on the MTF of an amorphous-selenium based CCD x-ray detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David M; Belev, George; Kasap, Safa; Yaffe, Martin J

    2012-02-01

    Theoretical reasoning suggests that direct conversion digital x-ray detectors based upon photoconductive amorphous-selenium (a-Se) could attain very high values of the MTF (modulation transfer function) at spatial frequencies well beyond 20 cycles mm(-1). One of the fundamental factors affecting resolution loss, particularly at x-ray energies just above the K-edge of selenium (12.66 keV), is the K-fluorescence reabsorption mechanism, wherein energy can be deposited in the detector at locations laterally displaced from the initial x-ray interaction site. This paper compares measured MTF changes above and below the Se K-edge of a CCD based a-Se x-ray detector with theoretical expectations. A prototype 25 μm sampling pitch (Nyquist frequency = 20 cycles mm(-1), 200 μm thick a-Se layer based x-ray detector, utilizing a specialized CCD readout device (200 × 400 area array), was used to make edge images with monochromatic x-rays above and below the K-edge of Se. A vacuum double crystal monochromator, exposed to polychromatic x-rays from a synchrotron, formed the monochromatic x-ray source. The monochromaticity of the x-rays was 99% or better. The presampling MTF was determined using the slanted edge method. The theory modeling the MTF performance of the detector includes the basic x-ray interaction physics in the a-Se layer as well as effects related to the operation of the CCD and charge trapping at a blocking layer present at the CCD/a-Se interface. The MTF performance of the prototype a-Se CCD was reduced from the theoretical value prescribed by the basic Se x-ray interaction physics, principally by the presence of a blocking layer. Nevertheless, the K-fluorescence reduction in the MTF was observed, approximately as predicted by theory. For the CCD prototype detector, at five cycles mm(-1), there was a 14% reduction of the MTF, from a value of 0.7 below the K-edge of Se, to 0.6 just above the K-edge. The MTF of an a-Se x-ray detector has been measured using

  8. Documentation to the 2015-16 Common Core of Data (CCD) Universe Files. NCES 2017-074

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glander, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The Common Core of Data (CCD) is a national statistical program that collects and compiles administrative data from SEAs covering the universe of all public elementary and secondary schools and school districts in the United States. The first CCD collection was for SY 1986-87. The predecessor to CCD was the Elementary and Secondary General…

  9. The fly's eye camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, L.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.; Jaskó, A.; Vida, K.; Oláh, K.; Mezö, G.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce the Fly's Eye Camera System, an all-sky monitoring device intended to perform time domain astronomy. This camera system design will provide complementary data sets for other synoptic sky surveys such as LSST or Pan-STARRS. The effective field of view is obtained by 19 cameras arranged in a spherical mosaic form. These individual cameras of the device stand on a hexapod mount that is fully capable of achieving sidereal tracking for the subsequent exposures. This platform has many advantages. First of all it requires only one type of moving component and does not include unique parts. Hence this design not only eliminates problems implied by unique elements, but the redundancy of the hexapod allows smooth operations even if one or two of the legs are stuck. In addition, it can calibrate itself by observed stars independently from both the geographical location (including northen and southern hemisphere) and the polar alignment of the full mount. All mechanical elements and electronics are designed within the confines of our institute Konkoly Observatory. Currently, our instrument is in testing phase with an operating hexapod and reduced number of cameras.

  10. The CAOS camera platform: ushering in a paradigm change in extreme dynamic range imager design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A.

    2017-02-01

    Multi-pixel imaging devices such as CCD, CMOS and Focal Plane Array (FPA) photo-sensors dominate the imaging world. These Photo-Detector Array (PDA) devices certainly have their merits including increasingly high pixel counts and shrinking pixel sizes, nevertheless, they are also being hampered by limitations in instantaneous dynamic range, inter-pixel crosstalk, quantum full well capacity, signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity, spectral flexibility, and in some cases, imager response time. Recently invented is the Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) Camera platform that works in unison with current Photo-Detector Array (PDA) technology to counter fundamental limitations of PDA-based imagers while providing high enough imaging spatial resolution and pixel counts. Using for example the Texas Instruments (TI) Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) to engineer the CAOS camera platform, ushered in is a paradigm change in advanced imager design, particularly for extreme dynamic range applications.

  11. Camera sensor arrangement for crop/weed detection accuracy in agronomic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Juan; Guerrero, José Miguel; Montalvo, Martín; Emmi, Luis; Guijarro, María; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo; Pajares, Gonzalo

    2013-04-02

    In Precision Agriculture, images coming from camera-based sensors are commonly used for weed identification and crop line detection, either to apply specific treatments or for vehicle guidance purposes. Accuracy of identification and detection is an important issue to be addressed in image processing. There are two main types of parameters affecting the accuracy of the images, namely: (a) extrinsic, related to the sensor's positioning in the tractor; (b) intrinsic, related to the sensor specifications, such as CCD resolution, focal length or iris aperture, among others. Moreover, in agricultural applications, the uncontrolled illumination, existing in outdoor environments, is also an important factor affecting the image accuracy. This paper is exclusively focused on two main issues, always with the goal to achieve the highest image accuracy in Precision Agriculture applications, making the following two main contributions: (a) camera sensor arrangement, to adjust extrinsic parameters and (b) design of strategies for controlling the adverse illumination effects.

  12. CCD Parallaxes for 309 Late-type Dwarfs and Subdwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahn, Conard C.; Harris, Hugh C.; Subasavage, John P.; Ables, Harold D.; Guetter, Harry H.; Harris, Fred H.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Monet, Alice B.; Monet, David G.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Stone, Ronald C.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Walker, Richard L.; Tilleman, Trudy M. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 W. Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86005-8521 (United States); Canzian, Blaise J. [L-3 Communications/Brashear, 615 Epsilon Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15238-2807 (United States); Henden, Arne H. [AAVSO, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Leggett, S. K. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Levine, Stephen E., E-mail: jsubasavage@nofs.navy.mil [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001-4499 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    New, updated, and/or revised CCD parallaxes determined with the Strand Astrometric Reflector at the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station are presented. Included are results for 309 late-type dwarf and subdwarf stars observed over the 30+ years that the program operated. For 124 of the stars, parallax determinations from other investigators have already appeared in the literature and we compare the different results. Also included here are new or updated VI photometry on the Johnson–Kron-Cousins system for all but a few of the faintest targets. Together with 2MASS JHK{sub s} near-infrared photometry, a sample of absolute magnitude versus color and color versus color diagrams are constructed. Because large proper motion was a prime criterion for targeting the stars, the majority turn out to be either M-type subdwarfs or late M-type dwarfs. The sample also includes 50 dwarf or subdwarf L-type stars, and four T dwarfs. Possible halo subdwarfs are identified in the sample based on tangential velocity, subluminosity, and spectral type. Residuals from the solutions for parallax and proper motion for several stars show evidence of astrometric perturbations.

  13. CCD Parallaxes for 309 Late-type Dwarfs and Subdwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahn, Conard C.; Harris, Hugh C.; Subasavage, John P.; Ables, Harold D.; Canzian, Blaise J.; Guetter, Harry H.; Harris, Fred H.; Henden, Arne H.; Leggett, S. K.; Levine, Stephen E.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Monet, Alice B.; Monet, David G.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Stone, Ronald C.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Walker, Richard L.; Tilleman, Trudy M.

    2017-10-01

    New, updated, and/or revised CCD parallaxes determined with the Strand Astrometric Reflector at the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station are presented. Included are results for 309 late-type dwarf and subdwarf stars observed over the 30+ years that the program operated. For 124 of the stars, parallax determinations from other investigators have already appeared in the literature and we compare the different results. Also included here are new or updated VI photometry on the Johnson-Kron-Cousins system for all but a few of the faintest targets. Together with 2MASS JHK s near-infrared photometry, a sample of absolute magnitude versus color and color versus color diagrams are constructed. Because large proper motion was a prime criterion for targeting the stars, the majority turn out to be either M-type subdwarfs or late M-type dwarfs. The sample also includes 50 dwarf or subdwarf L-type stars, and four T dwarfs. Possible halo subdwarfs are identified in the sample based on tangential velocity, subluminosity, and spectral type. Residuals from the solutions for parallax and proper motion for several stars show evidence of astrometric perturbations.

  14. CCD imaging technology and the war on crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Glenn E.

    1992-08-01

    Linear array based CCD technology has been successfully used in the development of an Automatic Currency Reader/Comparator (ACR/C) system. The ACR/C system is designed to provide a method for tracking US currency in the organized crime and drug trafficking environments where large amounts of cash are involved in illegal transactions and money laundering activities. United States currency notes can be uniquely identified by the combination of the denomination serial number and series year. The ACR/C system processes notes at five notes per second using a custom transport a stationary linear array and optical character recognition (OCR) techniques to make such identifications. In this way large sums of money can be " marked" (using the system to read and store their identifiers) and then circulated within various crime networks. The system can later be used to read and compare confiscated notes to the known sets of identifiers from the " marked" set to document a trail of criminal activities. With the ACR/C law enforcement agencies can efficiently identify currency without actually marking it. This provides an undetectable means for making each note individually traceable and facilitates record keeping for providing evidence in a court of law. In addition when multiple systems are used in conjunction with a central data base the system can be used to track currency geographically. 1.

  15. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  16. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Brian W., E-mail: brian.miller@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Barrett, Harrison H.; Bradford Barber, H.; Furenlid, Lars R. [Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-12-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector's response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  17. EDICAM (Event Detection Intelligent Camera)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP RMI, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary); Szabolics, T., E-mail: szabolics.tamas@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP RMI, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary); Kocsis, G.; Szepesi, T.; Dunai, D. [Wigner RCP RMI, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We present EDICAM's hardware modules. ► We present EDICAM's main design concepts. ► This paper will describe EDICAM firmware architecture. ► Operation principles description. ► Further developments. -- Abstract: A new type of fast framing camera has been developed for fusion applications by the Wigner Research Centre for Physics during the last few years. A new concept was designed for intelligent event driven imaging which is capable of focusing image readout to Regions of Interests (ROIs) where and when predefined events occur. At present these events mean intensity changes and external triggers but in the future more sophisticated methods might also be defined. The camera provides 444 Hz frame rate at full resolution of 1280 × 1024 pixels, but monitoring of smaller ROIs can be done in the 1–116 kHz range even during exposure of the full image. Keeping space limitations and the harsh environment in mind the camera is divided into a small Sensor Module and a processing card interconnected by a fast 10 Gbit optical link. This camera hardware has been used for passive monitoring of the plasma in different devices for example at ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS with the first version of its firmware. The new firmware and software package is now available and ready for testing the new event processing features. This paper will present the operation principle and features of the Event Detection Intelligent Camera (EDICAM). The device is intended to be the central element in the 10-camera monitoring system of the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator.

  18. QuadCam - A Quadruple Polarimetric Camera for Space Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuljan, J.

    A specialised quadruple polarimetric camera for space situational awareness, QuadCam, has been built at the Defence Technology Agency (DTA), New Zealand, as part of collaboration with the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), United Kingdom. The design was based on a similar system originally developed at Dstl, with some significant modifications for improved performance. The system is made up of four identical CCD cameras looking in the same direction, but in a different plane of polarisation at 0, 45, 90 and 135 degrees with respect to the reference plane. A standard set of Stokes parameters can be derived from the four images in order to describe the state of polarisation of an object captured in the field of view. The modified design of the DTA QuadCam makes use of four small Raspberry Pi computers, so that each camera is controlled by its own computer in order to speed up the readout process and ensure that the four individual frames are taken simultaneously (to within 100-200 microseconds). In addition, a new firmware was requested from the camera manufacturer so that an output signal is generated to indicate the state of the camera shutter. A specialised GPS unit (also developed at DTA) is then used to monitor the shutter signals from the four cameras and record the actual time of exposure to an accuracy of about 100 microseconds. This makes the system well suited for the observation of fast-moving objects in the low Earth orbit (LEO). The QuadCam is currently mounted on a Paramount MEII robotic telescope mount at the newly built DTA space situational awareness observatory located on Whangaparaoa Peninsula near Auckland, New Zealand. The system will be used for tracking satellites in low Earth orbit and geostationary belt as well. The performance of the camera has been evaluated and a series of test images have been collected in order to derive the polarimetric signatures for selected satellites.

  19. Streak cameras and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernet, J.M.; Imhoff, C.

    1987-01-01

    Over the last several years, development of various measurement techniques in the nanosecond and pico-second range has led to increased reliance on streak cameras. This paper will present the main electronic and optoelectronic performances of the Thomson-CSF TSN 506 cameras and their associated devices used to build an automatic image acquisition and processing system (NORMA). A brief survey of the diversity and the spread of the use of high speed electronic cinematography will be illustrated by a few typical applications [fr

  20. Discriminação de variedades de citros em imagens CCD/CBERS-2 Discrimination of citrus varieties using CCD/CBERS-2 satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieda Del'Arco Sanches

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve o objetivo de avaliar as imagens CCD/CBERS-2 quanto à possibilidade de discriminarem variedades de citros. A área de estudo localiza-se em Itirapina (SP e, para este estudo, foram utilizadas imagens CCD de três datas (30/05/2004, 16/08/2004 e 11/09/2004. Um modelo que integra os elementos componentes da cena citrícola sensoriada é proposto com o objetivo de explicar a variabilidade das respostas das parcelas de citros em imagens orbitais do tipo CCD/CBERS-2. Foram feitas classificações pelos algoritmos Isoseg e Maxver e, de acordo com o índice kappa, concluiu-se que é possível obterem-se exatidões qualificadas como muito boas, sendo que as melhores classificações foram conseguidas com imagens da estação seca.This paper was aimed at evaluating the possibility of discriminating citrus varieties in CCD imageries from CBERS-2 satellite ("China-Brazil Earth Resouces Satellite". The study area is located in Itirapina, São Paulo State. For this study, three CCD images from 2004 were acquired (May 30, August 16, and September 11. In order to acquire a better understanding and for explaining the variability of the spectral behavior of the citrus areas in orbital images (like as the CCD/CBERS-2 images a model that integrates the elements of the citrus scene is proposed and discussed. The images were classified by Isoseg and MaxVer classifiers. According to kappa index, it was possible to obtain classifications qualified as 'very good'. The best results were obtained with the images from the dry season.

  1. The invention and early history of the CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, George E.

    2011-05-01

    As the first practical solid state imaging device, the invention of the charge coupled device has profoundly affected image sensing technology. They are used in a wide range of applications both as area and linear imaging devices starting with the replacement of imaging tubes used in commercial TV cameras and cam-corders. The rapid rise of their use in digital cameras has initiated the demise of film photography and created vast new markets with great economic benefit for many. Other uses include a wide variety of scientific, surveillance, and scanning applications. The inception of the device at Bell Labs by W. S. Boyle and G. E. Smith, Bell Syst. Tech. J. 49, 587 (1970);G. F. Amelio, M. F. Tompsett, and G. E. Smith, Bell Syst. Tech. J. 49, 593 (1970); W. S. Boyle and G. E. Smith, U.S. patent 3,792,322 (12 February 1974) was strongly influenced by several unique factors existing both within Bell Labs and the current world state of technology. These factors and their relevance will be discussed along with the train of thought leading to the invention. Early experimental devices and their initial applications were vigorously pursued and will be described. Mention of current applications will be given.

  2. The invention and early history of the CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, George E.

    2009-01-01

    As the first practical solid-state imaging device, the invention of the Charge Coupled Device has profoundly affected image sensing technology. They are used in a wide range of applications as both area and linear imaging devices starting with the replacement of imaging tubes used in commercial TV cameras and camcorders. The rapid increase of their use in digital cameras has initiated the demise of film photography and created vast new markets with great economic benefit for many. Other uses include a wide variety of scientific, surveillance and scanning applications. The inception of the device at Bell Labs by Willard S. Boyle and George E. Smith in 1969 was strongly influenced by several unique factors existing both within Bell Labs and the current world state of technology. These factors and their relevance will be discussed along with the train of thought leading to the invention. Early experimental devices and their initial applications were vigorously pursued and will be described. Current applications will be mentioned.

  3. Buildings exposed to fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The 24 lectures presented to the colloquium cover the following subject fields: (1) Behaviour of structural components exposed to fire; (2) Behaviour of building materials exposed to fire; (3) Thermal processes; (4) Safety related, theoretical studies. (PW) [de

  4. Miniature Spatial Heterodyne Raman Spectrometer with a Cell Phone Camera Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Patrick D; Angel, S Michael

    2017-05-01

    A spatial heterodyne Raman spectrometer (SHRS) with millimeter-sized optics has been coupled with a standard cell phone camera as a detector for Raman measurements. The SHRS is a dispersive-based interferometer with no moving parts and the design is amenable to miniaturization while maintaining high resolution and large spectral range. In this paper, a SHRS with 2.5 mm diffraction gratings has been developed with 17.5 cm -1 theoretical spectral resolution. The footprint of the SHRS is orders of magnitude smaller than the footprint of charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors typically employed in Raman spectrometers, thus smaller detectors are being explored to shrink the entire spectrometer package. This paper describes the performance of a SHRS with 2.5 mm wide diffraction gratings and a cell phone camera detector, using only the cell phone's built-in optics to couple the output of the SHRS to the sensor. Raman spectra of a variety of samples measured with the cell phone are compared to measurements made using the same miniature SHRS with high-quality imaging optics and a high-quality, scientific-grade, thermoelectrically cooled CCD.

  5. Evaluation of solid-state camera systems in varying illumination conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Jyrki; Saviaro, Jani; Ailisto, Heikki J.

    2001-06-01

    We propose a practical method for the expeditious determination of the performance of imaging CCD and CMOS camera systems. Special attention is paid to the operation of these devices in varying illumination conditions, which is typical to many surveillance and consumer electronics applications. One emerging application utilizing imaging sensors in variable illumination conditions is the third generation mobile phone, which will deliver wirelessly pictures, graphics, and video. In our method, determination of the system performance is based on the imaging of a calibrated gray scale test chart as a function of illuminance. At each level of illumination the system response is characterized by a signal to random noise figure. The signal is calculated as the difference of the system response to the lightest and darkest areas of the gray scale. The random noise is measured as the standard deviation of the gray values in a difference of two successive images of the test pattern. The proposed method is applied in three exemplary cases: (1) comparison of inexpensive CCD and CMOS cameras, (2) analysis of the effect of wireless image transmission, and (3) comparison of the effects of automatic and manual gain controls.

  6. Indium antimonide infrared CCD linear imaging arrays with on-chip preprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, R. D.; Koch, T. L.; Parrish, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the fabrication of a new InSb CCD chip based on an improved process which eliminates the limitations inherent with the earlier techniques. This process includes planar junction formation and an aluminum and SiO2 material system which is amenable to state-of-the-art chemical and plasma delineation techniques. Further, the new chip integrates for the first time in monolithic format InSb IR detectors with an InSb CCD. The reported experiments represent the first operation of an InSb infrared CCD array. In addition to fuller characterization of the 20-element charge-coupled infrared imaging device, several factors which influence device performance are currently being addressed. These include surface state density, the CCD output circuit, and storage time (dark current).

  7. arXiv Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-26

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068  e- rms/pixel. This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while ...

  8. The interaction of DNA gyrase with the bacterial toxin CcdB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Howells, A J; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    CcdB is a bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase. Analysis of the interaction of CcdB with gyrase reveals two distinct complexes. An initial complex (alpha) is formed by direct interaction between GyrA and CcdB; this complex can be detected by affinity column and gel-shift analysis, and has...... of this initial complex with ATP in the presence of GyrB and DNA slowly converts it to a second complex (beta), which has a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis and is unable to catalyse supercoiling. The efficiency of formation of this inactive complex is dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CcdB. We suggest...

  9. Software design of control system of CCD side-scatter lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Dong; Deng, Qian; Zhang, Zhanye; Wang, Zhenzhu; Yu, Siqi; Tao, Zongming; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2018-03-01

    Because of the existence of blind zone and transition zone, the application of backscattering lidar in near-ground is limited. The side-scatter lidar equipped with the Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) can separate the transmitting and receiving devices to avoid the impact of the geometric factors which is exited in the backscattering lidar and, detect the more precise near-ground aerosol signals continuously. Theories of CCD side-scatter lidar and the design of control system are introduced. The visible control of laser and CCD and automatic data processing method of the side-scatter lidar are developed by using the software of Visual C #. The results which are compared with the calibration of the atmospheric aerosol lidar data show that signals from the CCD side- scatter lidar are convincible.

  10. The Camera Comes to Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  11. High-speed holographic camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaro, Marc

    The high-speed holographic camera is a disgnostic instrument using holography as an information storing support. It allows us to take 10 holograms, of an object, with exposures times of 1,5ns, separated in time by 1 or 2ns. In order to get these results easily, no mobile part is used in the set-up [fr

  12. Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2007-01-01

    Just like art historians have focused on e.g. composition or lighting, this dissertation takes a single stylistic parameter as its object of study: camera movement. Within film studies this localized avenue of middle-level research has become increasingly viable under the aegis of a perspective k...

  13. The LSST camera system overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Kirk; Kahn, Steven; Nordby, Martin; Burke, David; O'Connor, Paul; Oliver, John; Radeka, Veljko; Schalk, Terry; Schindler, Rafe

    2006-06-01

    The LSST camera is a wide-field optical (0.35-1um) imager designed to provide a 3.5 degree FOV with better than 0.2 arcsecond sampling. The detector format will be a circular mosaic providing approximately 3.2 Gigapixels per image. The camera includes a filter mechanism and, shuttering capability. It is positioned in the middle of the telescope where cross-sectional area is constrained by optical vignetting and heat dissipation must be controlled to limit thermal gradients in the optical beam. The fast, f/1.2 beam will require tight tolerances on the focal plane mechanical assembly. The focal plane array operates at a temperature of approximately -100°C to achieve desired detector performance. The focal plane array is contained within an evacuated cryostat, which incorporates detector front-end electronics and thermal control. The cryostat lens serves as an entrance window and vacuum seal for the cryostat. Similarly, the camera body lens serves as an entrance window and gas seal for the camera housing, which is filled with a suitable gas to provide the operating environment for the shutter and filter change mechanisms. The filter carousel can accommodate 5 filters, each 75 cm in diameter, for rapid exchange without external intervention.

  14. Toy Cameras and Color Photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speight, Jerry

    1979-01-01

    The technique of using toy cameras for both black-and-white and color photography in the art class is described. The author suggests that expensive equipment can limit the growth of a beginning photographer by emphasizing technique and equipment instead of in-depth experience with composition fundamentals and ideas. (KC)

  15. Gamma camera with reflectivity mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention there is provided a radiographic camera comprising: a scintillator; a plurality of photodectors positioned to face said scintillator; a plurality of masked regions formed upon a face of said scintillator opposite said photdetectors and positioned coaxially with respective ones of said photodetectors for decreasing the amount of internal reflection of optical photons generated within said scintillator. (auth)

  16. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD and bee age impact honey bee pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis vanEngelsdorp

    Full Text Available Honey bee (Apis mellifera colonies continue to experience high annual losses that remain poorly explained. Numerous interacting factors have been linked to colony declines. Understanding the pathways linking pathophysiology with symptoms is an important step in understanding the mechanisms of disease. In this study we examined the specific pathologies associated with honey bees collected from colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD and compared these with bees collected from apparently healthy colonies. We identified a set of pathological physical characteristics that occurred at different rates in CCD diagnosed colonies prior to their collapse: rectum distension, Malpighian tubule iridescence, fecal matter consistency, rectal enteroliths (hard concretions, and venom sac color. The multiple differences in rectum symptomology in bees from CCD apiaries and colonies suggest effected bees had trouble regulating water. To ensure that pathologies we found associated with CCD were indeed pathologies and not due to normal changes in physical appearances that occur as an adult bee ages (CCD colonies are assumed to be composed mostly of young bees, we documented the changes in bees of different ages taken from healthy colonies. We found that young bees had much greater incidences of white nodules than older cohorts. Prevalent in newly-emerged bees, these white nodules or cellular encapsulations indicate an active immune response. Comparing the two sets of characteristics, we determined a subset of pathologies that reliably predict CCD status rather than bee age (fecal matter consistency, rectal distension size, rectal enteroliths and Malpighian tubule iridescence and that may serve as biomarkers for colony health. In addition, these pathologies suggest that CCD bees are experiencing disrupted excretory physiology. Our identification of these symptoms is an important first step in understanding the physiological pathways that underlie CCD and

  17. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and bee age impact honey bee pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Traynor, Kirsten S; Andree, Michael; Lichtenberg, Elinor M; Chen, Yanping; Saegerman, Claude; Cox-Foster, Diana L

    2017-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies continue to experience high annual losses that remain poorly explained. Numerous interacting factors have been linked to colony declines. Understanding the pathways linking pathophysiology with symptoms is an important step in understanding the mechanisms of disease. In this study we examined the specific pathologies associated with honey bees collected from colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and compared these with bees collected from apparently healthy colonies. We identified a set of pathological physical characteristics that occurred at different rates in CCD diagnosed colonies prior to their collapse: rectum distension, Malpighian tubule iridescence, fecal matter consistency, rectal enteroliths (hard concretions), and venom sac color. The multiple differences in rectum symptomology in bees from CCD apiaries and colonies suggest effected bees had trouble regulating water. To ensure that pathologies we found associated with CCD were indeed pathologies and not due to normal changes in physical appearances that occur as an adult bee ages (CCD colonies are assumed to be composed mostly of young bees), we documented the changes in bees of different ages taken from healthy colonies. We found that young bees had much greater incidences of white nodules than older cohorts. Prevalent in newly-emerged bees, these white nodules or cellular encapsulations indicate an active immune response. Comparing the two sets of characteristics, we determined a subset of pathologies that reliably predict CCD status rather than bee age (fecal matter consistency, rectal distension size, rectal enteroliths and Malpighian tubule iridescence) and that may serve as biomarkers for colony health. In addition, these pathologies suggest that CCD bees are experiencing disrupted excretory physiology. Our identification of these symptoms is an important first step in understanding the physiological pathways that underlie CCD and factors

  18. Síntese, caracterização e estudos de interação de um análogo da antitoxina CcdA empregando fluorescência no estado estacionário Synthesis, characterization and interaction studies of an analog of CcdA antitoxin by steady state fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Aparecida Cotrim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems contribute to plasmid stability by a mechanism called post-segregational killing. The ccd was the first TA system to be discovered with CcdB being the toxin and CcdA the antitoxin. CcdA, an 8.3 kDa protein, interacts with CcdB (11.7 kDa, preventing the cytotoxic activity of CcdB on the DNA gyrase. As an approach to understanding this interaction, CcdA41, a polypeptide derived from CcdA, was synthesized by solid-phase methodology and its interaction with CcdB was analyzed by steady state fluorescence. CcdA41 formed a stable complex with CcdBET2, a peptide based on CcdB, the more recently described bacterial topoisomerase inhibitor.

  19. On the absolute calibration of SO2 cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lübcke

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sulphur dioxide emission rate measurements are an important tool for volcanic monitoring and eruption risk assessment. The SO2 camera technique remotely measures volcanic emissions by analysing the ultraviolet absorption of SO2 in a narrow spectral window between 300 and 320 nm using solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere. The SO2 absorption is selectively detected by mounting band-pass interference filters in front of a two-dimensional, UV-sensitive CCD detector. One important step for correct SO2 emission rate measurements that can be compared with other measurement techniques is a correct calibration. This requires conversion from the measured optical density to the desired SO2 column density (CD. The conversion factor is most commonly determined by inserting quartz cells (cuvettes with known amounts of SO2 into the light path. Another calibration method uses an additional narrow field-of-view Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy system (NFOV-DOAS, which measures the column density simultaneously in a small area of the camera's field-of-view. This procedure combines the very good spatial and temporal resolution of the SO2 camera technique with the more accurate column densities obtainable from DOAS measurements. This work investigates the uncertainty of results gained through the two commonly used, but quite different, calibration methods (DOAS and calibration cells. Measurements with three different instruments, an SO2 camera, a NFOV-DOAS system and an Imaging DOAS (I-DOAS, are presented. We compare the calibration-cell approach with the calibration from the NFOV-DOAS system. The respective results are compared with measurements from an I-DOAS to verify the calibration curve over the spatial extent of the image. The results show that calibration cells, while working fine in some cases, can lead to an overestimation of the SO2 CD by up to 60% compared with CDs from the DOAS measurements. Besides these errors of calibration

  20. Camera for coherent diffractive imaging and holography with a soft-x-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajt, Sasa; Chapman, Henry N.; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Alameda, Jennifer B.; Woods, Bruce W.; Frank, Matthias; Bogan, Michael J.; Barty, Anton; Boutet, Sebastien; Marchesini, Stefano; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Hajdu, Janos; Shapiro, David

    2008-01-01

    We describe a camera to record coherent scattering patterns with a soft-x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). The camera consists of a laterally graded multilayer mirror, which reflects the diffraction pattern onto a CCD detector. The mirror acts as a bandpass filter for both the wavelength and the angle, which isolates the desired scattering pattern from nonsample scattering or incoherent emission from the sample. The mirror also solves the particular problem of the extreme intensity of the FEL pulses, which are focused to greater than 10 14 W/cm 2 . The strong undiffracted pulse passes through a hole in the mirror and propagates onto a beam dump at a distance behind the instrument rather than interacting with a beam stop placed near the CCD. The camera concept is extendable for the full range of the fundamental wavelength of the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) FEL (i.e., between 6 and 60 nm) and into the water window. We have fabricated and tested various multilayer mirrors for wavelengths of 32, 16, 13.5, and 4.5 nm. At the shorter wavelengths mirror roughness must be minimized to reduce scattering from the mirror. We have recorded over 30,000 diffraction patterns at the FLASH FEL with no observable mirror damage or degradation of performance

  1. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, P.; Kobayashi, K.; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Hyde, D.; Robertson, B.; Beabout, D.; Beabout, B.; Stewart, M.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1 percent in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1 percent polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30 percent) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-alpha line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with 10 e-/pixel/second dark current, 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 +/- 0.5 and 1.0 percent residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  2. Architectural Design Document for Camera Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta

    1998-01-01

    Architecture of camera simulator models and data interface for the Maneuvering of Inspection/Servicing Vehicle (MIV) study.......Architecture of camera simulator models and data interface for the Maneuvering of Inspection/Servicing Vehicle (MIV) study....

  3. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  4. The Use of Camera Traps in Wildlife

    OpenAIRE

    Yasin Uçarlı; Bülent Sağlam

    2013-01-01

    Camera traps are increasingly used in the abundance and density estimates of wildlife species. Camera traps are very good alternative for direct observation in case, particularly, steep terrain, dense vegetation covered areas or nocturnal species. The main reason for the use of camera traps is eliminated that the economic, personnel and time loss in a continuous manner at the same time in different points. Camera traps, motion and heat sensitive, can take a photo or video according to the mod...

  5. Stereo Pinhole Camera: Assembly and experimental activities

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Gilmário Barbosa; Departamento de Ciência da Computação, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Joinville; Cunha, Sidney Pinto; Centro de Tecnologia da Informação Renato Archer, Campinas

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the assembling of a stereo pinhole camera for capturing stereo-pairs of images and proposes experimental activities with it. A pinhole camera can be as sophisticated as you want, or so simple that it could be handcrafted with practically recyclable materials. This paper describes the practical use of the pinhole camera throughout history and currently. Aspects of optics and geometry involved in the building of the stereo pinhole camera are presented with illustrations. Fur...

  6. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrester, Tavis; O'Brien, Tim; Fegraus, Eric; Jansen, P.A.; Palmer, Jonathan; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge; Stern, Beth; McShea, William

    2016-01-01

    Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an

  7. A camera specification for tendering purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunt, M.J.; Davies, M.D.; Kenyon, N.G.

    1985-01-01

    A standardized document is described which is suitable for sending to companies which are being invited to tender for the supply of a gamma camera. The document refers to various features of the camera, the performance specification of the camera, maintenance details, price quotations for various options and delivery, installation and warranty details. (U.K.)

  8. Research on the affect of differential-images technique to the resolution of infrared spatial camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guang; An, Yuan; Qi, Yingchun; Hu, Fusheng

    2007-12-01

    The optical system of infrared spatial camera adopts bigger relative aperture and bigger pixel size on focal plane element. These make the system have bulky volume and low resolution. The potential of the optical systems can not be exerted adequately. So, one method for improving resolution of infrared spatial camera based on multi-frame difference-images is introduced in the dissertation. The method uses more than one detectors to acquire several difference images, and then reconstructs a new high-resolution image from these images through the relationship of pixel grey value. The technique of difference-images that uses more than two detectors is researched, and it can improve the resolution 2.5 times in theory. The relationship of pixel grey value between low-resolution difference-images and high-resolution image is found by analyzing the energy of CCD sampling, a general relationship between the enhanced times of the resolution of the detected figure with differential method and the least count of CCD that will be used to detect figure is given. Based on the research of theory, the implementation process of utilizing difference-images technique to improve the resolution of the figure was simulated used Matlab software by taking a personality image as the object, and the software can output the result as an image. The result gotten from the works we have finished proves that the technique is available in high-resolution image reconstruction. The resolution of infrared spatial camera can be improved evidently when holding the size of optical structure or using big size detector by applying for difference image technique. So the technique has a high value in optical remote fields.

  9. Re-analysis of the Giotto mission data obtained by the Halley Multicolour Camera (HMC) with aim of large particles detection in the inner coma of comet 1P/Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalygina, O. S.; Keller, H. U.; Blum, J.

    2015-10-01

    The Giotto spacecraft (SC) mission was the ESA's first interplanetary mission, that made close-up observations of a comet. The Giotto spaceprobe passed the nucleus of comet Halley at a fly-by distance of only 596 km early on 14 March 1986. During the approach, 2304 images of the comet were taken by the Halley Multicolour Camera (HMC) through different filters. The HMC experiment was a high-resolution imaging system onboard the spin-stabilized SC. Its spin axis was closely aligned with the SC-comet relative-velocity vector. Pointing of the camera was achieved by the spinning motion of the SC for one dimension and by rotation about an axis perpendicular to the spin of the SC for the other dimension. The spin period was about 4 seconds and the nominal imaging resolution was 22 m at 1000 km distance [1, 2]. HMC was taking images in the so-called Time Delay and Integration mode [2]. In this mode, only a narrow part of the CCD detector was uncovered, and vertical scan-out was provided by the spacecraft (and therefore the camera) spinning. During this spinning charges were transferred line-by-line in the same direction. The slit was made wider than 1 pixel, which increased exposure time but degraded the sharpness to some extent. The portion of the sky swept by the exposed lines during image acquisition was a section of an annulus resulting in over-sampling at the end of the exposed lines nearest the SC spin axis and under-sampling at the other end [2]. Several impacts of dust particles on the spacecraft were detected during the fly-by by the analysis of the changes in the SC attitude and spin period [1]. The changes occurred in large steps, requiring many impacts of massive dust particles well above an effective mass of 10 mg, which implies that a significant part of the cometary dust mass is contained in rather large particles. Moreover, since the time of the Giotto mission, large dust particles have been detected in the inner coma of other comets. The coma of comet 103P

  10. Relative camera localisation in non-overlapping camera networks using multiple trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    John, V.; Englebienne, G.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present an automatic camera calibration algorithm using multiple trajectories in a multiple camera network with non-overlapping field-of-views (FOV). Visible trajectories within a camera FOV are assumed to be measured with respect to the camera local co-ordinate system.

  11. Shielding of cosmic-ray-induced background in CCD detectors for X-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffermann, Elmar; Friedrich, Peter; Freyberg, Michael; Kettenring, Günther; Krämer, Ludwig; Meidinger, Norbert; Predehl, Peter; Strüder, Lothar

    2004-09-01

    An active anticoincidence detector system for background reduction cannot be integrated in CCD detectors for X-ray astronomy. The background rate within an integration-readout interval would result in an unacceptable dead time of about 50% or more. Events of minimum ionizing particles can be discriminated in CCD detectors due to their high energy deposit and their image pattern. Events of X-rays or charged particles within the accepted energy band originating from cosmic ray interaction with the material surrounding the CCD cannot be distinguished from valid cosmic X-ray events and therefore contribute to the background noise. Graded-Z shielding is an efficient method to shift the energy of the locally produced X-rays to low energies. At low energies low-Z shielding material can be used, which rather produces Auger electrons than fluorescent X-rays. Low energy electrons can be stopped in the passivation layer of the CCD. Due to the low operating temperature of the CCD (~170 K) the shielding material has to have a similar thermal expansion coefficient as silicon. With regard to future X-ray missions the properties of several shielding materials like aluminium oxide, aluminium nitride, silicon nitride and boron carbide were investigated in more detail. The results are presented.

  12. Modelling Virtual Camera Behaviour Through Player Gaze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picardi, Andrea; Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    In a three-dimensional virtual environment, aspects such as narrative and interaction largely depend on the placement and animation of the virtual camera. Therefore, virtual camera control plays a critical role in player experience and, thereby, in the overall quality of a computer game. Both game...... on the relationship between virtual camera, game-play and player behaviour. We run a game user experiment to shed some light on this relationship and identify relevant dif- ferences between camera behaviours through different game sessions, playing behaviours and player gaze patterns. Re- sults show that users can...... be efficiently profiled in dissimilar clusters according to camera control as part of their game- play behaviour....

  13. Stereo Pinhole Camera: Assembly and experimental activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmário Barbosa Santos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the assembling of a stereo pinhole camera for capturing stereo-pairs of images and proposes experimental activities with it. A pinhole camera can be as sophisticated as you want, or so simple that it could be handcrafted with practically recyclable materials. This paper describes the practical use of the pinhole camera throughout history and currently. Aspects of optics and geometry involved in the building of the stereo pinhole camera are presented with illustrations. Furthermore, experiments are proposed by using the images obtained by the camera for 3D visualization through a pair of anaglyph glasses, and the estimation of relative depth by triangulation is discussed.

  14. Adapting virtual camera behaviour through player modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Research in virtual camera control has focused primarily on finding methods to allow designers to place cameras effectively and efficiently in dynamic and unpredictable environments, and to generate complex and dynamic plans for cinematography in virtual environments. In this article, we propose...... a novel approach to virtual camera control, which builds upon camera control and player modelling to provide the user with an adaptive point-of-view. To achieve this goal, we propose a methodology to model the player’s preferences on virtual camera movements and we employ the resulting models to tailor...

  15. Initial laboratory evaluation of color video cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P L

    1991-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video cameras used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than identify an intruder. Monochrome cameras are adequate for that application and were selected over color cameras because of their greater sensitivity and resolution. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Color information is useful for identification purposes, and color camera technology is rapidly changing. Thus, Sandia National Laboratories established an ongoing program to evaluate color solid-state cameras. Phase one resulted in the publishing of a report titled, Initial Laboratory Evaluation of Color Video Cameras (SAND--91-2579).'' It gave a brief discussion of imager chips and color cameras and monitors, described the camera selection, detailed traditional test parameters and procedures, and gave the results of the evaluation of twelve cameras. In phase two six additional cameras were tested by the traditional methods and all eighteen cameras were tested by newly developed methods. This report details both the traditional and newly developed test parameters and procedures, and gives the results of both evaluations.

  16. Strategy for the development of a smart NDVI camera system for outdoor plant detection and agricultural embedded systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworak, Volker; Selbeck, Joern; Dammer, Karl-Heinz; Hoffmann, Matthias; Zarezadeh, Ali Akbar; Bobda, Christophe

    2013-01-24

    The application of (smart) cameras for process control, mapping, and advanced imaging in agriculture has become an element of precision farming that facilitates the conservation of fertilizer, pesticides, and machine time. This technique additionally reduces the amount of energy required in terms of fuel. Although research activities have increased in this field, high camera prices reflect low adaptation to applications in all fields of agriculture. Smart, low-cost cameras adapted for agricultural applications can overcome this drawback. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) for each image pixel is an applicable algorithm to discriminate plant information from the soil background enabled by a large difference in the reflectance between the near infrared (NIR) and the red channel optical frequency band. Two aligned charge coupled device (CCD) chips for the red and NIR channel are typically used, but they are expensive because of the precise optical alignment required. Therefore, much attention has been given to the development of alternative camera designs. In this study, the advantage of a smart one-chip camera design with NDVI image performance is demonstrated in terms of low cost and simplified design. The required assembly and pixel modifications are described, and new algorithms for establishing an enhanced NDVI image quality for data processing are discussed.

  17. Strategy for the Development of a Smart NDVI Camera System for Outdoor Plant Detection and Agricultural Embedded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Zarezadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of (smart cameras for process control, mapping, and advanced imaging in agriculture has become an element of precision farming that facilitates the conservation of fertilizer, pesticides, and machine time. This technique additionally reduces the amount of energy required in terms of fuel. Although research activities have increased in this field, high camera prices reflect low adaptation to applications in all fields of agriculture. Smart, low-cost cameras adapted for agricultural applications can overcome this drawback. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI for each image pixel is an applicable algorithm to discriminate plant information from the soil background enabled by a large difference in the reflectance between the near infrared (NIR and the red channel optical frequency band. Two aligned charge coupled device (CCD chips for the red and NIR channel are typically used, but they are expensive because of the precise optical alignment required. Therefore, much attention has been given to the development of alternative camera designs. In this study, the advantage of a smart one-chip camera design with NDVI image performance is demonstrated in terms of low cost and simplified design. The required assembly and pixel modifications are described, and new algorithms for establishing an enhanced NDVI image quality for data processing are discussed.

  18. Per-Pixel Coded Exposure for High-Speed and High-Resolution Imaging Using a Digital Micromirror Device Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-speed photography is an important tool for studying rapid physical phenomena. However, low-frame-rate CCD (charge coupled device or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor camera cannot effectively capture the rapid phenomena with high-speed and high-resolution. In this paper, we incorporate the hardware restrictions of existing image sensors, design the sampling functions, and implement a hardware prototype with a digital micromirror device (DMD camera in which spatial and temporal information can be flexibly modulated. Combined with the optical model of DMD camera, we theoretically analyze the per-pixel coded exposure and propose a three-element median quicksort method to increase the temporal resolution of the imaging system. Theoretically, this approach can rapidly increase the temporal resolution several, or even hundreds, of times without increasing bandwidth requirements of the camera. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method via extensive examples and achieve 100 fps (frames per second gain in temporal resolution by using a 25 fps camera.

  19. Signal Detection of Multi-Channel Capillary Electrophoresis Chip Based on CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongfeng; Yan, Weiping; Yang, Xiaobo; Li, Jiechao; Zhu, Jieying

    2012-12-01

    A kind of multi-channel capillary electrophoresis (CE) chip signal detection system based on CCD was developed. The output signal of the CCD sensor was processed by a series of pre-processing circuits and ADC, and then it was collected by the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chip which communicated with a host computer. The core in FPGA was designed to control the signal flow of the CCD and transfer the data to PC based on a Nios II embedded soft-processor. The application of PC was used to store the data and demonstrate the curve. The measurement of the fluorescent signals for different concentration Rhodamine B dyes is presented and the comparison with other detection systems is also discussed.

  20. High-aperture monochromator-reflectometer and its usefulness for CCD calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakov, Eugene A.; Shcherbakov, Alexander V.; Pertsov, Andrei A.; Polkovnikov, Vladimir N.; Pestov, Alexey E.; Pariev, Dmitry E.; Chkhalo, Nikolai I.

    2017-05-01

    We present a laboratory high-aperture monochromator-reflectometer employing laser-plasma radiation source and three replaceable Schwarzschild objectives for a certain range of applications in the soft X-ray spectral waveband. Three sets of X-ray multilayer mirrors for the Schwarzschild objectives enable operation of the reflectometer at the wavelengths of 135, 171 and 304 Å, while a goniometer with three degrees of freedom allows different measurement modes. We have used the facility for a laboratory CCD calibration at the wavelengths specified. Combined with the results of the CCD sensitivity measurements conducted in the VUV spectral waveband, the total outcome provides a more comprehensive understanding of the CCD effectivity in a wide spectral range.

  1. Tape measuring system using linear encoder and digital camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Tae Bong; Jeong, Don Young; Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Jae Wan; Kim, Jong Ahn

    2013-04-01

    We have designed and constructed the calibration system of line standards such as tape and rule for the secondary calibration laboratories. The system consists of the main body with linear stage and linear encoder, the optical microscope with digital camera, and the computer. The base of the system is a aluminum profile with 2.9 m length, 0.09 m height and 0.18 m width. The linear stage and the linear encoder are fixed on the aluminum profile. The micro-stage driven by micrometer is fixed on the carriage of the long linear stage, and the optical microscope with digital camera and the tablet PC are on the this stage. The linear encoder counts the moving distance of the linear stage with resolution of 1 μm and its counting value is transferred to the tablet PC. The image of the scale mark of the tape is captured by the CCD camera of optical microscope and transferred to the PC through USB interface. The computer automatically determines the center of the scale mark by image processing technique and at the same time reads the moving distance of the linear stage. As a result, the computer can calculate the interval between the scale marks of the tape. In order to achieve the high accuracy, the linear encoder should be calibrated using the laser interferometer or the rigid steel rule. This calibration data of the linear encoder is stored at the computer and the computer corrects the reading value of the linear encoder. In order to determine the center of the scale mark, we use three different algorithms. First, the image profile over specified threshold level is fitted in even order polynomial and the axis of the polynomial is used as the center of the line. Second, the left side and right side areas at the center of the image profile are calculated so that two areas are same. Third, the left and right edges of the image profile are determined at every intensity level of the image and the center of the graduation is calculated as an average of the centers of the left

  2. Test technology on divergence angle of laser range finder based on CCD imaging fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sheng-bing; Chen, Zhen-xing; Lv, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Laser range finder has been equipped with all kinds of weapons, such as tank, ship, plane and so on, is important component of fire control system. Divergence angle is important performance and incarnation of horizontal resolving power for laser range finder, is necessary appraised test item in appraisal test. In this paper, based on high accuracy test on divergence angle of laser range finder, divergence angle test system is designed based on CCD imaging, divergence angle of laser range finder is acquired through fusion technology for different attenuation imaging, problem that CCD characteristic influences divergence angle test is solved.

  3. Design and implementation of high sensitive CCD on gallium arsenide based miniaturized spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiamin; Shen, Jianhua; Guo, Fangmin

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a method on how to design and implement a miniaturized spectrometer with low-light-level (LLL) CCD on GaAs is introduced. The optical system uses a blazed grating as the dispersive element and a 1×64 CCD on GaAs as the sensor. We apply a highly integrated Cortex-M4 MCU (STM32F407), to build the data acquisition and analysis unit, providing Wi-Fi interface to communicate with the PC software. It can complete the tasks like data acquisition, digital filtering, spectral display, network communication, human-computer interaction etc.

  4. Construction of a photochemical reactor combining a CCD spectrophotometer and a LED radiation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombár, Melinda; Józsa, Éva; Braun, Mihály; Ősz, Katalin

    2012-10-01

    An inexpensive photoreactor using LED light sources and a fibre-optic CCD spectrophotometer as a detector was built by designing a special cell holder for standard 1.000 cm cuvettes. The use of this device was demonstrated by studying the aqueous photochemical reaction of 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone. The developed method combines the highly quantitative data collection of CCD spectrophotometers with the possibility of illuminating the sample independently of the detecting light beam, which is a substantial improvement of the method using diode array spectrophotometers as photoreactors.

  5. A CCD-based area detector for X-ray crystallography using synchrotron and laboratory sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.C.; Li Youli; Stanton, M.; Xie Yuanhui; O'Mara, D.; Kalata, K.

    1993-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a CCD-based area detector suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies using both synchrotron and laboratory sources are described. The active area is 75 mm in diameter, the FWHM of the point response function is 0.20 mm, and for Bragg peaks the dynamic range is 900 and the DQE ∼0.3. The 1320x1035-pixel Kodak CCD is read out into an 8 Mbyte memory system in 0.14 s and digitized to 12 bits. X-ray crystallographic data collected at the NSLS synchrotron from cubic insulin crystals are presented. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of the algorithms for recovering reflectance from virtual digital camera response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gebejes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years many new methods for quality control in graphic industry are proposed. All of these methodshave one in common – using digital camera as a capturing device and appropriate image processing method/algorithmto obtain desired information. With the development of new, more accurate sensors, digital cameras becameeven more dominant and the use of cameras as measuring device became more emphasized. The idea of using cameraas spectrophotometer is interesting because this kind of measurement would be more economical, faster, widelyavailable and it would provide a possibility of multiple colour capture with a single shot. This can be very usefulfor capturing colour targets for characterization of different properties of a print device. A lot of effort is put into enablingcommercial colour CCD cameras (3 acquisition channels to obtain enough of the information for reflectancerecovery. Unfortunately, RGB camera was not made with the idea of performing colour measurements but ratherfor producing an image that is visually pleasant for the observer. This somewhat complicates the task and seeks fora development of different algorithms that will estimate the reflectance information from the available RGB cameraresponses with minimal possible error. In this paper three different reflectance estimation algorithms are evaluated(Orthogonal projection,Wiener and optimized Wiener estimation, together with the method for reflectance approximationbased on principal component analysis (PCA. The aim was to perform reflectance estimation pixelwise and analyze the performance of some reflectance estimation algorithms locally, at some specific pixels in theimage, and globally, on the whole image. Performances of each algorithm were evaluated visually and numericallyby obtaining pixel wise colour difference and pixel wise difference of estimated reflectance to the original values. Itwas concluded that Wiener method gives the best reflectance estimation

  7. Intercomparison of SO2 camera systems for imaging volcanic gas plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Campion, Robin; Mori, Toshiya; Smekens, Jean-François; Stebel, Kerstin; Tamburello, Giancarlo; Burton, Mike; Platt, Ulrich; Prata, Fred

    2015-07-01

    SO2 camera systems are increasingly being used to image volcanic gas plumes. The ability to derive SO2 emission rates directly from the acquired imagery at high time resolution allows volcanic process studies that incorporate other high time-resolution datasets. Though the general principles behind the SO2 camera have remained the same for a number of years, recent advances in CCD technology and an improved understanding of the physics behind the measurements have driven a continuous evolution of the camera systems. Here we present an intercomparison of seven different SO2 cameras. In the first part of the experiment, the various technical designs are compared and the advantages and drawbacks of individual design options are considered. Though the ideal design was found to be dependent on the specific application, a number of general recommendations are made. Next, a time series of images recorded by all instruments at Stromboli Volcano (Italy) is compared. All instruments were easily able to capture SO2 clouds emitted from the summit vents. Quantitative comparison of the SO2 load in an individual cloud yielded an intra-instrument precision of about 12%. From the imagery, emission rates were then derived according to each group's standard retrieval process. A daily average SO2 emission rate of 61 ± 10 t/d was calculated. Due to differences in spatial integration methods and plume velocity determination, the time-dependent progression of SO2 emissions varied significantly among the individual systems. However, integration over distinct degassing events yielded comparable SO2 masses. Based on the intercomparison data, we find an approximate 1-sigma precision of 20% for the emission rates derived from the various SO2 cameras. Though it may still be improved in the future, this is currently within the typical accuracy of the measurement and is considered sufficient for most applications.

  8. Human tracking over camera networks: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Wan, Wanggen; Hwang, Jenq-Neng; Muhammad, Rizwan; Yang, Mingyang; Han, Kang

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, automated human tracking over camera networks is getting essential for video surveillance. The tasks of tracking human over camera networks are not only inherently challenging due to changing human appearance, but also have enormous potentials for a wide range of practical applications, ranging from security surveillance to retail and health care. This review paper surveys the most widely used techniques and recent advances for human tracking over camera networks. Two important functional modules for the human tracking over camera networks are addressed, including human tracking within a camera and human tracking across non-overlapping cameras. The core techniques of human tracking within a camera are discussed based on two aspects, i.e., generative trackers and discriminative trackers. The core techniques of human tracking across non-overlapping cameras are then discussed based on the aspects of human re-identification, camera-link model-based tracking and graph model-based tracking. Our survey aims to address existing problems, challenges, and future research directions based on the analyses of the current progress made toward human tracking techniques over camera networks.

  9. Image compensation for camera and lighting variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Wayne D.; Britton, Douglas F.

    1996-12-01

    With the current trend of integrating machine vision systems in industrial manufacturing and inspection applications comes the issue of camera and illumination stabilization. Unless each application is built around a particular camera and highly controlled lighting environment, the interchangeability of cameras of fluctuations in lighting become a problem as each camera usually has a different response. An empirical approach is proposed where color tile data is acquired using the camera of interest, and a mapping is developed to some predetermined reference image using neural networks. A similar analytical approach based on a rough analysis of the imaging systems is also considered for deriving a mapping between cameras. Once a mapping has been determined, all data from one camera is mapped to correspond to the images of the other prior to performing any processing on the data. Instead of writing separate image processing algorithms for the particular image data being received, the image data is adjusted based on each particular camera and lighting situation. All that is required when swapping cameras is the new mapping for the camera being inserted. The image processing algorithms can remain the same as the input data has been adjusted appropriately. The results of utilizing this technique are presented for an inspection application.

  10. Using DSLR cameras in digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié-Zuluaga, Diego; Herrera-Ramírez, Jorge; García-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    In Digital Holography (DH), the size of the bidimensional image sensor to record the digital hologram, plays a key role on the performance of this imaging technique; the larger the size of the camera sensor, the better the quality of the final reconstructed image. Scientific cameras with large formats are offered in the market, but their cost and availability limit their use as a first option when implementing DH. Nowadays, DSLR cameras provide an easy-access alternative that is worthwhile to be explored. The DSLR cameras are a wide, commercial, and available option that in comparison with traditional scientific cameras, offer a much lower cost per effective pixel over a large sensing area. However, in the DSLR cameras, with their RGB pixel distribution, the sampling of information is different to the sampling in monochrome cameras usually employed in DH. This fact has implications in their performance. In this work, we discuss why DSLR cameras are not extensively used for DH, taking into account the problem reported by different authors of object replication. Simulations of DH using monochromatic and DSLR cameras are presented and a theoretical deduction for the replication problem using the Fourier theory is also shown. Experimental results of DH implementation using a DSLR camera show the replication problem.

  11. Optimising camera traps for monitoring small mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair S Glen

    Full Text Available Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera's field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1 trigger speed, 2 passive infrared vs. microwave sensor, 3 white vs. infrared flash, and 4 still photographs vs. video. We also tested a new approach to standardise each camera's field of view. We compared the success rates of four camera trap designs in detecting and taking recognisable photographs of captive stoats (Mustelaerminea, feral cats (Felis catus and hedgehogs (Erinaceuseuropaeus. Trigger speeds of 0.2-2.1 s captured photographs of all three target species unless the animal was running at high speed. The camera with a microwave sensor was prone to false triggers, and often failed to trigger when an animal moved in front of it. A white flash produced photographs that were more readily identified to species than those obtained under infrared light. However, a white flash may be more likely to frighten target animals, potentially affecting detection probabilities. Video footage achieved similar success rates to still cameras but required more processing time and computer memory. Placing two camera traps side by side achieved a higher success rate than using a single camera. Camera traps show considerable promise for monitoring invasive mammal control operations. Further research should address how best to standardise the size of each camera's field of view, maximise the probability that an animal encountering a camera trap will be detected, and eliminate visible or audible cues emitted by camera traps.

  12. Optimising camera traps for monitoring small mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Alistair S; Cockburn, Stuart; Nichols, Margaret; Ekanayake, Jagath; Warburton, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera's field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1) trigger speed, 2) passive infrared vs. microwave sensor, 3) white vs. infrared flash, and 4) still photographs vs. video. We also tested a new approach to standardise each camera's field of view. We compared the success rates of four camera trap designs in detecting and taking recognisable photographs of captive stoats (Mustelaerminea), feral cats (Felis catus) and hedgehogs (Erinaceuseuropaeus). Trigger speeds of 0.2-2.1 s captured photographs of all three target species unless the animal was running at high speed. The camera with a microwave sensor was prone to false triggers, and often failed to trigger when an animal moved in front of it. A white flash produced photographs that were more readily identified to species than those obtained under infrared light. However, a white flash may be more likely to frighten target animals, potentially affecting detection probabilities. Video footage achieved similar success rates to still cameras but required more processing time and computer memory. Placing two camera traps side by side achieved a higher success rate than using a single camera. Camera traps show considerable promise for monitoring invasive mammal control operations. Further research should address how best to standardise the size of each camera's field of view, maximise the probability that an animal encountering a camera trap will be detected, and eliminate visible or audible cues emitted by camera traps.

  13. UCXp camera imaging principle and key technologies of data post-processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Fangyan; Li, Guoqing; Zuo, Zhengli; Liu, Jianmin; Wu, Liang; Yu, Xiaoping; Zhao, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    The large format digital aerial camera product UCXp was introduced into the Chinese market in 2008, the image consists of 17310 columns and 11310 rows with a pixel size of 6 mm. The UCXp camera has many advantages compared with the same generation camera, with multiple lenses exposed almost at the same time and no oblique lens. The camera has a complex imaging process whose principle will be detailed in this paper. On the other hand, the UCXp image post-processing method, including data pre-processing and orthophoto production, will be emphasized in this article. Based on the data of new Beichuan County, this paper will describe the data processing and effects

  14. Assessment of laser-dazzling effects on TV cameras by means of pattern recognition algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durécu, Anne; Vasseur, Olivier; Bourdon, Pierre; Eberle, Bernd; Bürsing, Helge; Dellinger, Jean; Duchateau, Nicolas

    2007-10-01

    Imaging systems are widespread observation tools used to fulfil various functions such as detection, recognition, identification and video-tracking. These devices can be dazzled by using intensive light sources, e.g. lasers. In order to avoid such a disturbance, dazzling effects in TV-cameras must be better understood. In this paper we studied the influence of laser-dazzling on the performance of pattern recognition algorithms. The experiments were performed using a black and white TV-CCD-camera, dazzled by a nanosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. The camera observed a scene comprising different geometrical forms which had to be recognized by the algorithm. Different dazzling conditions were studied by varying the laser repetition rate, the pulse energy and the position of the geometrical forms relative to the laser spot. The algorithm is based on edge detection and locates areas with forms similar to a reference symbol. As a measure of correspondence it computes the degree of correlation of the different areas. The experiments show that dazzling can highly affect the performance of the used pattern recognition algorithms by generating lots of spurious edges which mimic the reference symbol. As a consequence dazzling results in detrimental effects, since it not only prevents the recognizing of well defined symbols, but it also creates many false alarms.

  15. SHOK—The First Russian Wide-Field Optical Camera in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Kornilov, V. G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Amelushkin, A. M.; Petrov, V. L.; Yashin, I. V.; Svertilov, S. I.; Vedenkin, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Onboard the spacecraft Lomonosov is established two fast, fixed, very wide-field cameras SHOK. The main goal of this experiment is the observation of GRB optical emission before, synchronously, and after the gamma-ray emission. The field of view of each of the cameras is placed in the gamma-ray burst detection area of other devices located onboard the "Lomonosov" spacecraft. SHOK provides measurements of optical emissions with a magnitude limit of ˜ 9-10m on a single frame with an exposure of 0.2 seconds. The device is designed for continuous sky monitoring at optical wavelengths in the very wide field of view (1000 square degrees each camera), detection and localization of fast time-varying (transient) optical sources on the celestial sphere, including provisional and synchronous time recording of optical emissions from the gamma-ray burst error boxes, detected by the BDRG device and implemented by a control signal (alert trigger) from the BDRG. The Lomonosov spacecraft has two identical devices, SHOK1 and SHOK2. The core of each SHOK device is a fast-speed 11-Megapixel CCD. Each of the SHOK devices represents a monoblock, consisting of a node observations of optical emission, the electronics node, elements of the mechanical construction, and the body.

  16. NAOMI instrument: a product line of compact and versatile cameras designed for HR and VHR missions in Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquet, Ph.; Brouard, L.; Chinal, E.

    2017-11-01

    Astrium has developed a product line of compact and versatile instruments for HR and VHR missions in Earth Observation. These cameras consist on a Silicon Carbide Korsch-type telescope, a focal plane with one or several retina modules - including five lines CCD, optical filters and front end electronics - and the instrument main electronics. Several versions have been developed with a telescope pupil diameter from 200 mm up to 650 mm, covering a large range of GSD (from 2.5 m down to sub-metric) and swath (from 10km up to 30 km) and compatible with different types of platform. Nine cameras have already been manufactured for five different programs: ALSAT2 (Algeria), SSOT (Chile), SPOT6 & SPOT7 (France), KRS (Kazakhstan) and VNREDSat (Vietnam). Two of them have already been launched and are delivering high quality images.

  17. Reconstruction of Daily 30 m Data from HJ CCD, GF-1 WFV, Landsat, and MODIS Data for Crop Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingquan Wu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the recent launch of new satellites and the developments of spatiotemporal data fusion methods, we are entering an era of high spatiotemporal resolution remote-sensing analysis. This study proposed a method to reconstruct daily 30 m remote-sensing data for monitoring crop types and phenology in two study areas located in Xinjiang Province, China. First, the Spatial and Temporal Data Fusion Approach (STDFA was used to reconstruct the time series high spatiotemporal resolution data from the Huanjing satellite charge coupled device (HJ CCD, Gaofen satellite no. 1 wide field-of-view camera (GF-1 WFV, Landsat, and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data. Then, the reconstructed time series were applied to extract crop phenology using a Hybrid Piecewise Logistic Model (HPLM. In addition, the onset date of greenness increase (OGI and greenness decrease (OGD were also calculated using the simulated phenology. Finally, crop types were mapped using the phenology information. The results show that the reconstructed high spatiotemporal data had a high quality with a proportion of good observations (PGQ higher than 0.95 and the HPLM approach can simulate time series Normalized Different Vegetation Index (NDVI very well with R2 ranging from 0.635 to 0.952 in Luntai and 0.719 to 0.991 in Bole, respectively. The reconstructed high spatiotemporal data were able to extract crop phenology in single crop fields, which provided a very detailed pattern relative to that from time series MODIS data. Moreover, the crop types can be classified using the reconstructed time series high spatiotemporal data with overall accuracy equal to 0.91 in Luntai and 0.95 in Bole, which is 0.028 and 0.046 higher than those obtained by using multi-temporal Landsat NDVI data.

  18. Photogrammetric Applications of Immersive Video Cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiatek, K.; Tokarczyk, R.

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigates immersive videography and its application in close-range photogrammetry. Immersive video involves the capture of a live-action scene that presents a 360° field of view. It is recorded simultaneously by multiple cameras or microlenses, where the principal point of each camera is offset from the rotating axis of the device. This issue causes problems when stitching together individual frames of video separated from particular cameras, however there are ways to ov...

  19. Family Of Calibrated Stereometric Cameras For Direct Intraoral Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Sean; Moffitt, Francis; Symes, Douglas; Baumrind, Sheldon

    1983-07-01

    In order to study empirically the relative efficiencies of different types of orthodontic appliances in repositioning teeth in vivo, we have designed and constructed a pair of fixed-focus, normal case, fully-calibrated stereometric cameras. One is used to obtain stereo photography of single teeth, at a scale of approximately 2:1, and the other is designed for stereo imaging of the entire dentition, study casts, facial structures, and other related objects at a scale of approximately 1:8. Twin lenses simultaneously expose adjacent frames on a single roll of 70 mm film. Physical flatness of the film is ensured by the use of a spring-loaded metal pressure plate. The film is forced against a 3/16" optical glass plate upon which is etched an array of 16 fiducial marks which divide the film format into 9 rectangular regions. Using this approach, it has been possible to produce photographs which are undistorted for qualitative viewing and from which quantitative data can be acquired by direct digitization of conventional photographic enlargements. We are in the process of designing additional members of this family of cameras. All calibration and data acquisition and analysis techniques previously developed will be directly applicable to these new cameras.

  20. Approximations to camera sensor noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaodan; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2013-02-01

    Noise is present in all image sensor data. Poisson distribution is said to model the stochastic nature of the photon arrival process, while it is common to approximate readout/thermal noise by additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN). Other sources of signal-dependent noise such as Fano and quantization also contribute to the overall noise profile. Question remains, however, about how best to model the combined sensor noise. Though additive Gaussian noise with signal-dependent noise variance (SD-AWGN) and Poisson corruption are two widely used models to approximate the actual sensor noise distribution, the justification given to these types of models are based on limited evidence. The goal of this paper is to provide a more comprehensive characterization of random noise. We concluded by presenting concrete evidence that Poisson model is a better approximation to real camera model than SD-AWGN. We suggest further modification to Poisson that may improve the noise model.

  1. Streak camera recording of interferometer fringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, N.L.; Chau, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    The use of an electronic high-speed camera in the streaking mode to record interference fringe motion from a velocity interferometer is discussed. Advantages of this method over the photomultiplier tube-oscilloscope approach are delineated. Performance testing and data for the electronic streak camera are discussed. The velocity profile of a mylar flyer accelerated by an electrically exploded bridge, and the jump-off velocity of metal targets struck by these mylar flyers are measured in the camera tests. Advantages of the streak camera include portability, low cost, ease of operation and maintenance, simplified interferometer optics, and rapid data analysis

  2. Decision about buying a gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    A large part of the referral to a nuclear medicine department is usually for imaging studies. Sooner or later, the nuclear medicine specialist will be called upon to make a decision about when and what type of gamma camera to buy. There is no longer an option of choosing between a rectilinear scanner and a gamma camera as the former is virtually out of the market. The decision that one has to make is when to invest in a gamma camera, and then on what basis to select the gamma camera

  3. Research on Double CCD Dimensional Metrology Applying in Large Forge Piece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, C H; Xiong, Z

    2006-01-01

    As development of computer vision, stereoscopic vision sensors have been used more and more widely, and double CCD vision sensor with its simplicity of operator, highaccuracy and high-efficiency has been used in many spheres. It can be used in dimensional metrology of large forge piece, which greatly improves the efficiency and accuracy of large forge piece measurement

  4. MiCPhot: A prime-focus multicolor CCD photometer on the 85-cm Telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Aiying; Jiang Xiaojun; Wei Jianyan; Zhang Yanping

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new BV RI multicolor CCD photometric system situated at the prime focus of the 85-cm telescope at the Xinglong Station of NAOC. Atmospheric extinction effects, photometric accuracy and color calibration dependence of the system are investigated. Additional attention was paid to giving observers guidance in estimating throughput, detection limit, signal-to-noise ratio and exposure time. (invited reviews)

  5. The study of interferometer spectrometer based on DSP and linear CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hua; Peng, Yuexiang; Xu, Xinchen; Xing, Xiaoqiao

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, general theory of Fourier-transform spectrometer and polarization interferometer is presented. A new design is proposed for Fourier-transform spectrometer based on polarization interferometer with Wollaston prisms and linear CCD. Firstly, measured light is changed into linear polarization light by polarization plate. And then the light can be split into ordinary and extraordinary lights by going through one Wollaston prism. At last, after going through another Wollaston prism and analyzer, interfering fringes can be formed on linear CCD behind the analyzer. The linear CCD is driven by CPLD to output amplitude of interfering fringes and synchronous signals of frames and pixels respectively. DSP is used to collect interference pattern signals from CCD and the digital data of interfering fringes are processed by using 2048-point-FFT. Finally, optical spectrum of measured light can be display on LCD connected to DSP with RS232. The spectrometer will possess the features of firmness, portability and the ability of real-time analyzing. The work will provide a convenient and significant foundation for application of more high accuracy of Fourier-transform spectrometer.

  6. Fast neutron fields imaging with a CCD-based luminescent detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mikerov, V

    1999-01-01

    The paper considers some questions concerned with the development of an imaging system based on a CCD-detector for visualising fast neutron fields. From those the most important are: development of fast neutron screens, detector resistance to irradiation fields, and feasibility of fast neutron radiography and tomography at various neutron sources.

  7. Real-time spot size camera for pulsed high-energy radiographic machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    The focal spot size of an x-ray source is a critical parameter which degrades resolution in a flash radiograph. For best results, a small round focal spot is required. Therefore, a fast and accurate measurement of the spot size is highly desirable to facilitate machine tuning. This paper describes two systems developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory's Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays (PHERMEX) facility. The first uses a CCD camera combined with high-brightness floors, while the second utilizes phosphor storage screens. Other techniques typically record only the line spread function on radiographic film, while systems in this paper measure the more general two-dimensional point-spread function and associated modulation transfer function in real time for shot-to-shot comparison

  8. Operational experience of a large area x-ray camera for protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachimiak, A.; Jorden, A. R.; Loeffen, P. W.; Naday, I.; Sanishvili, R.; Westbrook, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    After 3 years experience of operating very large area (210mm x 210mm) CCD-based detectors at the Advanced Photon Source, operational experience is reported. Four such detectors have been built, two for Structural Biology Center (APS-1 and SBC-2), one for Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotrons Radiation Center (Gold-2) at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source and one for Osaka University by Oxford Instruments, for use at Spring 8 (PX-21O). The detector is specifically designed as a high resolution and fast readout camera for macromolecular crystallography. Design trade-offs for speed and size are reviewed in light of operational experience and future requirements are considered. Operational data and examples of crystallography data are presented, together with plans for more development

  9. MASCARA: The Multi-site All-Sky CAmeRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Poole Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-site All-Sky CAmeRA, MASCARA, is an instrument currently in the design phase, that is aimed to find the brightest transiting planet systems in the sky. It will consist of several stations across the globe, each monitoring the near-entire sky using a battery of CCD-detectors plus wide-field lenses, targeting stars in the V = 4 − 8 magnitude range. MASCARA will be able to detect individual transits from Jupiter-size planets over this whole magnitude range, while smaller planets will be found by co-adding transit events. We expect to discover up to a dozen bright transit systems in this way. These will be extremely valuable for atmospheric follow-up studies.

  10. Detector and control system design and performance for the SuMIRe prime focus spectrograph (PFS) cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, James E.; Fitzgerald, Roger; Hart, Murdock; Hope, Stephen C.; Loomis, Craig; Peacock, Grant O.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Carr, Michael A.; Smee, Stephen A.; Tamura, Naoyuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Shimono, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the design, construction, and performance of the detector system for the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS). SuMIRe PFS is a massively multi-plexed ground-based spectrograph consisting of four identical spectrograph modules, each receiving roughly 600 fibers from a 2394 fiber robotic positioner at the prime focus. Each spectrograph module has three channels covering the wavelength ranges 3800Å-6400Å, 6400-9550Å. and 9550-12600Å, with the dispersed light being imaged in each channel by a f/1.07 vacuum Schmidt camera. In this paper we describe the CCD system for the two visible channels and the overall control and data acquisition systems for the cameras, and discuss the test system for detector characterization. This system will also serve for testing the H4RG infrared detectors for the near IR channel. The first red system, utilizing a 200-micron thick fully depleted p-channel Hamamatsu CCD, is finished and has been tested. The performance is excellent, with low noise, high CTE, and very good low-level and overall linearity. The test system uses essentially all the `flight' electronics and power supplies, in an effort to assess performance in an environment as nearly like the one to be seen in operation as possible.

  11. Silvaco ATLAS model of ESA's Gaia satellite e2v CCD91-72 pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabroke, George; Holland, Andrew; Burt, David; Robbins, Mark

    2010-07-01

    The Gaia satellite is a high-precision astrometry, photometry and spectroscopic ESA cornerstone mission, currently scheduled for launch in 2012. Its primary science drivers are the composition, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. Gaia will achieve its unprecedented accuracy requirements with detailed calibration and correction for CCD radiation damage and CCD geometric distortion. In this paper, the third of the series, we present our 3D Silvaco ATLAS model of the Gaia e2v CCD91-72 pixel. We publish e2v's design model predictions for the capacities of one of Gaia's pixel features, the supplementary buried channel (SBC), for the first time. Kohley et al. (2009) measured the SBC capacities of a Gaia CCD to be an order of magnitude smaller than e2v's design. We have found the SBC doping widths that yield these measured SBC capacities. The widths are systematically 2 μm offset to the nominal widths. These offsets appear to be uncalibrated systematic offsets in e2v photolithography, which could either be due to systematic stitch alignment offsets or lateral ABD shield doping diffusion. The range of SBC capacities were used to derive the worst-case random stitch error between two pixel features within a stitch block to be +/-0.25 μm, which cannot explain the systematic offsets. It is beyond the scope of our pixel model to provide the manufacturing reason for the range of SBC capacities, so it does not allow us to predict how representative the tested CCD is. This open question has implications for Gaia's radiation damage and geometric calibration models.

  12. A configurable distributed high-performance computing framework for satellite's TDI-CCD imaging simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bo; Mao, Bingjing; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2010-11-01

    This paper renders a configurable distributed high performance computing(HPC) framework for TDI-CCD imaging simulation. It uses strategy pattern to adapt multi-algorithms. Thus, this framework help to decrease the simulation time with low expense. Imaging simulation for TDI-CCD mounted on satellite contains four processes: 1) atmosphere leads degradation, 2) optical system leads degradation, 3) electronic system of TDI-CCD leads degradation and re-sampling process, 4) data integration. Process 1) to 3) utilize diversity data-intensity algorithms such as FFT, convolution and LaGrange Interpol etc., which requires powerful CPU. Even uses Intel Xeon X5550 processor, regular series process method takes more than 30 hours for a simulation whose result image size is 1500 * 1462. With literature study, there isn't any mature distributing HPC framework in this field. Here we developed a distribute computing framework for TDI-CCD imaging simulation, which is based on WCF[1], uses Client/Server (C/S) layer and invokes the free CPU resources in LAN. The server pushes the process 1) to 3) tasks to those free computing capacity. Ultimately we rendered the HPC in low cost. In the computing experiment with 4 symmetric nodes and 1 server , this framework reduced about 74% simulation time. Adding more asymmetric nodes to the computing network, the time decreased namely. In conclusion, this framework could provide unlimited computation capacity in condition that the network and task management server are affordable. And this is the brand new HPC solution for TDI-CCD imaging simulation and similar applications.

  13. Simulation of W dust transport in the KSTAR tokamak, comparison with fast camera data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Autricque

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, dust transport in tokamak plasmas is studied through both experimental and modeling aspects. Image processing routines allowing dust tracking on CCD camera videos are presented. The DUMPRO (DUst Movie PROcessing code features a dust detection method and a trajectory reconstruction algorithm. In addition, a dust transport code named DUMBO (DUst Migration in a plasma BOundary is briefly described. It has been developed at CEA in order to simulate dust grains transport in tokamaks and to evaluate the contribution of dust to the impurity inventory of the plasma. Like other dust transport codes, DUMBO integrates the Orbital Motion Limited (OML approach for dust/plasma interactions modeling. OML gives direct expressions for plasma ions and electrons currents, forces and heat fluxes on a dust grain. The equation of motion is solved, giving access to the dust trajectory. An attempt of model validation is made through comparison of simulated and measured trajectories on the 2015 KSTAR dust injection experiment, where W dust grains were successfully injected in the plasma using a gun-type injector. The trajectories of the injected particles, estimated using the DUMPRO routines applied on videos from the fast CCD camera in KSTAR, show two distinct general dust behaviors, due to different dust sizes. Simulations were made with DUMBO to match the measurements. Plasma parameters were estimated using different diagnostics during the dust injection experiment plasma discharge. The experimental trajectories show longer lifetimes than the simulated ones. This can be due to the substitution of a boiling/sublimation point to the usual vaporization/sublimation cooling, OML limitations (eventual potential barriers in the vicinity of a dust grain are neglected and/or to the lack of a vapor shielding model in DUMBO.

  14. Análise de mapas de represas publicados na web usando imagens orbitais CCD/CBERS no estado de Minas Gerais Analysis of dams maps published on the web by using orbital CCD/CBERS images in Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ferreira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, bancos de dados públicos e gratuitos disponíveis na World Wide Web (WEB foram utilizados para avaliar as áreas das superfícies dos espelhos d'água das represas de Furnas e do Funil, no Estado de Minas Gerais. O objetivo foi comparar as informações obtidas nos bancos da WEB com os valores das áreas calculadas a partir de imagens do sensor CCD a bordo dos satélites CBERS2 e CBERS2B. A área da represa de Furnas obtida a partir das imagens CCD/CBERS2B, ano 2008, foi de 1.138 km², mas nos bancos de dados consultados esta área estava entre 1.182 e 1.503 km². A represa do Funil, construída em 2003, com superfície de espelho d'água de 29,37 km² e uma ilha com área de 1,93 km² não aparecem nos bancos Atlas, Geominas, IGAM e IBGE. Os resultados mostraram algumas discrepâncias nos bancos de dados publicados na WEB, tais como diferenças em áreas e supressão ou extrapolação de limites do espelho d'água. Concluiu-se que, até o momento, os responsáveis por algumas publicações de bancos de dados no Estado de Minas Gerais não tiveram rigor suficiente com as atualizações. As imagens CCD/CBERS, que também são dados públicos disponíveis na WEB, mostraram ser produtos adequados para verificar, atualizar e melhorar as informações publicadas.In this work some public databases from the World Wide Web (WEB were used to find the area of the Furnas and Funil Dams in Minas Gerais State. The purpose of this work was to compare the WEB public databases values and the real values obtained from the CCD camera images on board CBERS2 and CBERS2B satellites. The Furnas Dam area obtained from CCD/ CBERS2B images, in 2008, was 1.138 km², but in the consulted databases this area ranged from 1.182 to 1.503 km². The dam of the Funil, built in 2003, with a water surface of 29.37 km² and an island with 1.93 km² area, did not appear in Atlas, Geominas, IGAM and IBGE databases. The results revealed some problems in the WEB public

  15. Automatic inference of geometric camera parameters and intercamera topology in uncalibrated disjoint surveillance cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, R.J.M. den; Bouma, H.; Baan, J.; Eendebak, P.T.; Rest, J.H.C. van

    2015-01-01

    Person tracking across non-overlapping cameras and other types of video analytics benefit from spatial calibration information that allows an estimation of the distance between cameras and a relation between pixel coordinates and world coordinates within a camera. In a large environment with many

  16. Ultra fast x-ray streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, L.W.; McConaghy, C.F.

    1975-01-01

    A unique ultrafast x-ray sensitive streak camera, with a time resolution of 50psec, has been built and operated. A 100A thick gold photocathode on a beryllium vacuum window is used in a modified commerical image converter tube. The X-ray streak camera has been used in experiments to observe time resolved emission from laser-produced plasmas. (author)

  17. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavis Forrester

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an open data standard for storing and sharing camera trap data, developed by experts from a variety of organizations. The standard captures information necessary to share data between projects and offers a foundation for collecting the more detailed data needed for advanced analysis. The data standard captures information about study design, the type of camera used, and the location and species names for all detections in a standardized way. This information is critical for accurately assessing results from individual camera trapping projects and for combining data from multiple studies for meta-analysis. This data standard is an important step in aligning camera trapping surveys with best practices in data-intensive science. Ecology is moving rapidly into the realm of big data, and central data repositories are becoming a critical tool and are emerging for camera trap data. This data standard will help researchers standardize data terms, align past data to new repositories, and provide a framework for utilizing data across repositories and research projects to advance animal ecology and conservation.

  18. Active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation (SINDE) camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simova, E.; Rochefort, P.A., E-mail: eli.simova@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    A proof-of-concept video camera for active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation has been demonstrated. An active multispectral imaging technique has been implemented in the visible and near infrared by using light emitting diodes with wavelengths spanning from 400 to 970 nm. This shows how the camera can be used in nondestructive evaluation to inspect surfaces and spectrally identify materials and corrosion. (author)

  19. Digital airborne camera introduction and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sandau, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen great innovations on the airborne camera. This book is the first ever written on the topic and describes all components of a digital airborne camera ranging from the object to be imaged to the mass memory device.

  20. Driving with head-slaved camera system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oving, A.B.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    In a field experiment, we tested the effectiveness of a head-slaved camera system for driving an armoured vehicle under armour. This system consists of a helmet-mounted display (HMD), a headtracker, and a motion platform with two cameras. Subjects performed several driving tasks on paved and in

  1. Optimization of Camera Parameters in Volume Intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Sayaka; Shoji, Kenji; Toyama, Fubito; Miyamichi, Juichi

    Volume intersection is one of the simplest techniques for reconstructing 3-D shape from 2-D silhouettes. 3D shapes can be reconstructed from multiple view images by back-projecting them from the corresponding viewpoints and intersecting the resulting solid cones. The camera position and orientation (extrinsic camera parameters) of each viewpoint with respect to the object are needed to accomplish reconstruction. However, even a little variation in the camera parameters makes the reconstructed 3-D shape smaller than that with the exact parameters. The problem of optimizing camera parameters deals with determining exact ones based on multiple silhouette images and approximate ones. This paper examines attempts to optimize camera parameters by reconstructing a 3-D shape via the concept of volume intersection and then maximizing the volume of the 3-D shape. We have tested the proposed method to optimize the camera parameters using a VRML model. In experiments we apply the downhill simplex method to optimize them. The results of experiments show that the maximized volume of the reconstructed 3-D shape is one of the criteria to optimize camera parameters in camera arrangement like this experiment.

  2. Laser scanning camera inspects hazardous area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryatt, A.; Miprode, C.

    1985-01-01

    Main operational characteristics of a new laser scanning camera are presented. The camera is intended primarily for low level high resolution viewing inside nuclear reactors. It uses a He-Ne laser beam raster; by detecting the reflected light by means of a phomultiplier, the subject under observation can be reconstructed in an electronic video store and reviewed on a conventional monitor screen

  3. Rosetta Star Tracker and Navigation Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta

    1998-01-01

    Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera.......Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera....

  4. Centering mount for a gamma camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkhodzhaev, A.Kh.; Kuznetsov, N.K.; Ostryj, Yu.E.

    1988-01-01

    A device for centering a γ-camera detector in case of radionuclide diagnosis is described. It permits the use of available medical coaches instead of a table with a transparent top. The device can be used for centering a detector (when it is fixed at the low end of a γ-camera) on a required area of the patient's body

  5. Securing Embedded Smart Cameras with Trusted Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winkler Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Camera systems are used in many applications including video surveillance for crime prevention and investigation, traffic monitoring on highways or building monitoring and automation. With the shift from analog towards digital systems, the capabilities of cameras are constantly increasing. Today's smart camera systems come with considerable computing power, large memory, and wired or wireless communication interfaces. With onboard image processing and analysis capabilities, cameras not only open new possibilities but also raise new challenges. Often overlooked are potential security issues of the camera system. The increasing amount of software running on the cameras turns them into attractive targets for attackers. Therefore, the protection of camera devices and delivered data is of critical importance. In this work we present an embedded camera prototype that uses Trusted Computing to provide security guarantees for streamed videos. With a hardware-based security solution, we ensure integrity, authenticity, and confidentiality of videos. Furthermore, we incorporate image timestamping, detection of platform reboots, and reporting of the system status. This work is not limited to theoretical considerations but also describes the implementation of a prototype system. Extensive evaluation results illustrate the practical feasibility of the approach.

  6. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.; Soetens, F.

    2005-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  7. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.H.H.; Soetens, F.

    2006-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  8. Wavefront analysis for plenoptic camera imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Yin-Sen; Xu Bing; Yang Ping; Tang Guo-Mao

    2017-01-01

    The plenoptic camera is a single lens stereo camera which can retrieve the direction of light rays while detecting their intensity distribution. In this paper, to reveal more truths of plenoptic camera imaging, we present the wavefront analysis for the plenoptic camera imaging from the angle of physical optics but not from the ray tracing model of geometric optics. Specifically, the wavefront imaging model of a plenoptic camera is analyzed and simulated by scalar diffraction theory and the depth estimation is redescribed based on physical optics. We simulate a set of raw plenoptic images of an object scene, thereby validating the analysis and derivations and the difference between the imaging analysis methods based on geometric optics and physical optics are also shown in simulations. (paper)

  9. Lessons Learned from Crime Caught on Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasco, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: The widespread use of camera surveillance in public places offers criminologists the opportunity to systematically and unobtrusively observe crime, their main subject matter. The purpose of this essay is to inform the reader of current developments in research on crimes caught on camera. Methods: We address the importance of direct observation of behavior and review criminological studies that used observational methods, with and without cameras, including the ones published in this issue. We also discuss the uses of camera recordings in other social sciences and in biology. Results: We formulate six key insights that emerge from the literature and make recommendations for future research. Conclusions: Camera recordings of real-life crime are likely to become part of the criminological tool kit that will help us better understand the situational and interactional elements of crime. Like any source, it has limitations that are best addressed by triangulation with other sources. PMID:29472728

  10. Lessons Learned from Crime Caught on Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz; Bernasco, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: The widespread use of camera surveillance in public places offers criminologists the opportunity to systematically and unobtrusively observe crime, their main subject matter. The purpose of this essay is to inform the reader of current developments in research on crimes caught on camera....... Methods: We address the importance of direct observation of behavior and review criminological studies that used observational methods, with and without cameras, including the ones published in this issue. We also discuss the uses of camera recordings in other social sciences and in biology. Results: We...... formulate six key insights that emerge from the literature and make recommendations for future research. Conclusions: Camera recordings of real-life crime are likely to become part of the criminological tool kit that will help us better understand the situational and interactional elements of crime. Like...

  11. Stereo Cameras for Clouds (STEREOCAM) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oktem, Rusen [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    The three pairs of stereo camera setups aim to provide synchronized and stereo calibrated time series of images that can be used for 3D cloud mask reconstruction. Each camera pair is positioned at approximately 120 degrees from the other pair, with a 17o-19o pitch angle from the ground, and at 5-6 km distance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Central Facility at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) observatory to cover the region from northeast, northwest, and southern views. Images from both cameras of the same stereo setup can be paired together to obtain 3D reconstruction by triangulation. 3D reconstructions from the ring of three stereo pairs can be combined together to generate a 3D mask from surrounding views. This handbook delivers all stereo reconstruction parameters of the cameras necessary to make 3D reconstructions from the stereo camera images.

  12. Superconducting millimetre-wave cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfardini, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    I present a review of the developments in kinetic inductance detectors (KID) for mm-wave and THz imaging-polarimetry in the framework of the Grenoble collaboration. The main application that we have targeted so far is large field-of-view astronomy. I focus in particular on our own experiment: NIKA2 (Néel IRAM KID Arrays). NIKA2 is today the largest millimetre camera available to the astronomical community for general purpose observations. It consists of a dual-band, dual-polarisation, multi-thousands pixels system installed at the IRAM 30-m telescope at Pico Veleta (Spain). I start with a general introduction covering the underlying physics and the KID working principle. Then I describe briefly the instrument and the detectors, to conclude with examples of pictures taken on the Sky by NIKA2 and its predecessor, NIKA. Thanks to these results, together with the relative simplicity and low cost of the KID fabrication, industrial applications requiring passive millimetre-THz imaging have now become possible.

  13. Towards Adaptive Virtual Camera Control In Computer Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2011-01-01

    model of the camera behaviour that can be used to control camera movements based on player preferences. For this purpose, we collect eye gaze, camera and game-play data from subjects playing a 3D platform game, we cluster gaze and camera information to identify camera behaviour profiles and we employ...

  14. Error modeling and analysis of star cameras for a class of 1U spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, David M.

    As spacecraft today become increasingly smaller, the demand for smaller components and sensors rises as well. The smartphone, a cutting edge consumer technology, has impressive collections of both sensors and processing capabilities and may have the potential to fill this demand in the spacecraft market. If the technologies of a smartphone can be used in space, the cost of building miniature satellites would drop significantly and give a boost to the aerospace and scientific communities. Concentrating on the problem of spacecraft orientation, this study sets ground to determine the capabilities of a smartphone camera when acting as a star camera. Orientations determined from star images taken from a smartphone camera are compared to those of higher quality cameras in order to determine the associated accuracies. The results of the study reveal the abilities of low-cost off-the-shelf imagers in space and give a starting point for future research in the field. The study began with a complete geometric calibration of each analyzed imager such that all comparisons start from the same base. After the cameras were calibrated, image processing techniques were introduced to correct for atmospheric, lens, and image sensor effects. Orientations for each test image are calculated through methods of identifying the stars exposed on each image. Analyses of these orientations allow the overall errors of each camera to be defined and provide insight into the abilities of low-cost imagers.

  15. Performance Characterization of UV Science Cameras Developed for the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champey, Patrick; Kobayashi, Ken; Winebarger, Amy; Cirtin, Jonathan; Hyde, David; Robertson, Bryan; Beabout, Brent; Beabout, Dyana; Stewart, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a science camera suitable for sub-orbital missions for observations in the UV, EUV and soft X-ray. Six cameras will be built and tested for flight with the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP), a joint National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and MSFC sounding rocket mission. The goal of the CLASP mission is to observe the scattering polarization in Lyman-alpha and to detect the Hanle effect in the line core. Due to the nature of Lyman-alpha polarization in the chromosphere, strict measurement sensitivity requirements are imposed on the CLASP polarimeter and spectrograph systems; science requirements for polarization measurements of Q/I and U/I are 0.1% in the line core. CLASP is a dual-beam spectro-polarimeter, which uses a continuously rotating waveplate as a polarization modulator, while the waveplate motor driver outputs trigger pulses to synchronize the exposures. The CCDs are operated in frame-transfer mode; the trigger pulse initiates the frame transfer, effectively ending the ongoing exposure and starting the next. The strict requirement of 0.1% polarization accuracy is met by using frame-transfer cameras to maximize the duty cycle in order to minimize photon noise. Coating the e2v CCD57-10 512x512 detectors with Lumogen-E coating allows for a relatively high (30%) quantum efficiency at the Lyman-$\\alpha$ line. The CLASP cameras were designed to operate with =10 e- /pixel/second dark current, = 25 e- read noise, a gain of 2.0 and =0.1% residual non-linearity. We present the results of the performance characterization study performed on the CLASP prototype camera; dark current, read noise, camera gain and residual non-linearity.

  16. Autonomous Multicamera Tracking on Embedded Smart Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischof Horst

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a strong trend towards the deployment of advanced computer vision methods on embedded systems. This deployment is very challenging since embedded platforms often provide limited resources such as computing performance, memory, and power. In this paper we present a multicamera tracking method on distributed, embedded smart cameras. Smart cameras combine video sensing, processing, and communication on a single embedded device which is equipped with a multiprocessor computation and communication infrastructure. Our multicamera tracking approach focuses on a fully decentralized handover procedure between adjacent cameras. The basic idea is to initiate a single tracking instance in the multicamera system for each object of interest. The tracker follows the supervised object over the camera network, migrating to the camera which observes the object. Thus, no central coordination is required resulting in an autonomous and scalable tracking approach. We have fully implemented this novel multicamera tracking approach on our embedded smart cameras. Tracking is achieved by the well-known CamShift algorithm; the handover procedure is realized using a mobile agent system available on the smart camera network. Our approach has been successfully evaluated on tracking persons at our campus.

  17. UAV CAMERAS: OVERVIEW AND GEOMETRIC CALIBRATION BENCHMARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cramer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Different UAV platforms and sensors are used in mapping already, many of them equipped with (sometimes modified cameras as known from the consumer market. Even though these systems normally fulfil their requested mapping accuracy, the question arises, which system performs best? This asks for a benchmark, to check selected UAV based camera systems in well-defined, reproducible environments. Such benchmark is tried within this work here. Nine different cameras used on UAV platforms, representing typical camera classes, are considered. The focus is laid on the geometry here, which is tightly linked to the process of geometrical calibration of the system. In most applications the calibration is performed in-situ, i.e. calibration parameters are obtained as part of the project data itself. This is often motivated because consumer cameras do not keep constant geometry, thus, cannot be seen as metric cameras. Still, some of the commercial systems are quite stable over time, as it was proven from repeated (terrestrial calibrations runs. Already (pre-calibrated systems may offer advantages, especially when the block geometry of the project does not allow for a stable and sufficient in-situ calibration. Especially for such scenario close to metric UAV cameras may have advantages. Empirical airborne test flights in a calibration field have shown how block geometry influences the estimated calibration parameters and how consistent the parameters from lab calibration can be reproduced.

  18. Uav Cameras: Overview and Geometric Calibration Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, M.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Zurhorst, A.

    2017-08-01

    Different UAV platforms and sensors are used in mapping already, many of them equipped with (sometimes) modified cameras as known from the consumer market. Even though these systems normally fulfil their requested mapping accuracy, the question arises, which system performs best? This asks for a benchmark, to check selected UAV based camera systems in well-defined, reproducible environments. Such benchmark is tried within this work here. Nine different cameras used on UAV platforms, representing typical camera classes, are considered. The focus is laid on the geometry here, which is tightly linked to the process of geometrical calibration of the system. In most applications the calibration is performed in-situ, i.e. calibration parameters are obtained as part of the project data itself. This is often motivated because consumer cameras do not keep constant geometry, thus, cannot be seen as metric cameras. Still, some of the commercial systems are quite stable over time, as it was proven from repeated (terrestrial) calibrations runs. Already (pre-)calibrated systems may offer advantages, especially when the block geometry of the project does not allow for a stable and sufficient in-situ calibration. Especially for such scenario close to metric UAV cameras may have advantages. Empirical airborne test flights in a calibration field have shown how block geometry influences the estimated calibration parameters and how consistent the parameters from lab calibration can be reproduced.

  19. Automatic camera tracking for remote manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoughton, R.S.; Martin, H.L.; Bentz, R.R.

    1984-04-01

    The problem of automatic camera tracking of mobile objects is addressed with specific reference to remote manipulators and using either fixed or mobile cameras. The technique uses a kinematic approach employing 4 x 4 coordinate transformation matrices to solve for the needed camera PAN and TILT angles. No vision feedback systems are used, as the required input data are obtained entirely from position sensors from the manipulator and the camera-positioning system. All hardware requirements are generally satisfied by currently available remote manipulator systems with a supervisory computer. The system discussed here implements linear plus on/off (bang-bang) closed-loop control with a +-2 0 deadband. The deadband area is desirable to avoid operator seasickness caused by continuous camera movement. Programming considerations for camera control, including operator interface options, are discussed. The example problem presented is based on an actual implementation using a PDP 11/34 computer, a TeleOperator Systems SM-229 manipulator, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) camera-positioning system. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  20. First results from the TOPSAT camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Paul; Tosh, Ian; Morris, Nigel; Burton, Gary; Cawley, Steve

    2017-11-01

    The TopSat camera is a low cost remote sensing imager capable of producing 2.5 metre resolution panchromatic imagery, funded by the British National Space Centre's Mosaic programme. The instrument was designed and assembled at the Space Science & Technology Department of the CCLRC's Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK, and was launched on the 27th October 2005 from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Northern Russia on a Kosmos-3M. The camera utilises an off-axis three mirror system, which has the advantages of excellent image quality over a wide field of view, combined with a compactness that makes its overall dimensions smaller than its focal length. Keeping the costs to a minimum has been a major design driver in the development of this camera. The camera is part of the TopSat mission, which is a collaboration between four UK organisations; QinetiQ, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL), RAL and Infoterra. Its objective is to demonstrate provision of rapid response high resolution imagery to fixed and mobile ground stations using a low cost minisatellite. The paper "Development of the TopSat Camera" presented by RAL at the 5th ICSO in 2004 described the opto-mechanical design, assembly, alignment and environmental test methods implemented. Now that the spacecraft is in orbit and successfully acquiring images, this paper presents the first results from the camera and makes an initial assessment of the camera's in-orbit performance.

  1. Automatic camera tracking for remote manipulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoughton, R.S.; Martin, H.L.; Bentz, R.R.

    1984-07-01

    The problem of automatic camera tracking of mobile objects is addressed with specific reference to remote manipulators and using either fixed or mobile cameras. The technique uses a kinematic approach employing 4 x 4 coordinate transformation matrices to solve for the needed camera PAN and TILT angles. No vision feedback systems are used, as the required input data are obtained entirely from position sensors from the manipulator and the camera-positioning system. All hardware requirements are generally satisfied by currently available remote manipulator systems with a supervisory computer. The system discussed here implements linear plus on/off (bang-bang) closed-loop control with a +-2-deg deadband. The deadband area is desirable to avoid operator seasickness caused by continuous camera movement. Programming considerations for camera control, including operator interface options, are discussed. The example problem presented is based on an actual implementation using a PDP 11/34 computer, a TeleOperator Systems SM-229 manipulator, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) camera-positioning system. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Automatic camera tracking for remote manipulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoughton, R.S.; Martin, H.L.; Bentz, R.R.

    1984-04-01

    The problem of automatic camera tracking of mobile objects is addressed with specific reference to remote manipulators and using either fixed or mobile cameras. The technique uses a kinematic approach employing 4 x 4 coordinate transformation matrices to solve for the needed camera PAN and TILT angles. No vision feedback systems are used, as the required input data are obtained entirely from position sensors from the manipulator and the camera-positioning system. All hardware requirements are generally satisfied by currently available remote manipulator systems with a supervisory computer. The system discussed here implements linear plus on/off (bang-bang) closed-loop control with a +-2/sup 0/ deadband. The deadband area is desirable to avoid operator seasickness caused by continuous camera movement. Programming considerations for camera control, including operator interface options, are discussed. The example problem presented is based on an actual implementation using a PDP 11/34 computer, a TeleOperator Systems SM-229 manipulator, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) camera-positioning system. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Towards next generation 3D cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit

    2017-03-01

    We are in the midst of a 3D revolution. Robots enabled by 3D cameras are beginning to autonomously drive cars, perform surgeries, and manage factories. However, when deployed in the real-world, these cameras face several challenges that prevent them from measuring 3D shape reliably. These challenges include large lighting variations (bright sunlight to dark night), presence of scattering media (fog, body tissue), and optically complex materials (metal, plastic). Due to these factors, 3D imaging is often the bottleneck in widespread adoption of several key robotics technologies. I will talk about our work on developing 3D cameras based on time-of-flight and active triangulation that addresses these long-standing problems. This includes designing `all-weather' cameras that can perform high-speed 3D scanning in harsh outdoor environments, as well as cameras that recover shape of objects with challenging material properties. These cameras are, for the first time, capable of measuring detailed (<100 microns resolution) scans in extremely demanding scenarios with low-cost components. Several of these cameras are making a practical impact in industrial automation, being adopted in robotic inspection and assembly systems.

  4. A Real-Time Lane Detection Algorithm Based on Intelligent CCD Parameters Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-shu Ge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lane departure warning system (LDWS has been regarded as an efficient method to lessen the damages of road traffic accident resulting from driver fatigue or inattention. Lane detection is one of the key techniques for LDWS. To overcome the contradiction between complexity of algorithm and the real-time requirement for vehicle onboard system, this paper introduces a new lane detection method based on intelligent CCD parameters regulation. In order to improve the real-time capability of the system, a CCD parameters regulating method is proposed which enhances the contrast between lane line and road surfaces and reduces image noise, so it lays a good foundation for the following lane detection. Hough transform algorithm is improved by selection and classification of seed points. Finally the lane line is extracted through some restrictions. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, which improves not only real-time capability but also the accuracy of the system.

  5. Determining the Spectral Resolution of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Raman Instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.

    2012-01-01

    A new method based on dispersion equations is described to express the spectral resolution of an applied charge-coupled device (CCD) Czerny-Turner Raman instrument entirely by means of one equation and principal factors determined by the actual setup. The factors involved are usual quantities...... resolution of the Raman instrument. An essential feature of the new method is a proposed way to compensate for non-ideality (diffractions, aberrations, etc.) by use of a hyperbola model function to describe the relationship between the width of the entrance slit and the image signal width on the CCD....... The model depends on the spectrometer magnification and a diffraction and aberration compensation factor denoted as A. A could be approximated as a constant that can be determined by the experimental method. The validity of the new expression has been examined by measuring the band width of the 1332.4 cm(-1...

  6. Matching CCD images to a stellar catalog using locality-sensitive hashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Yu, Jia-Zong; Peng, Qing-Yu

    2018-02-01

    The usage of a subset of observed stars in a CCD image to find their corresponding matched stars in a stellar catalog is an important issue in astronomical research. Subgraph isomorphic-based algorithms are the most widely used methods in star catalog matching. When more subgraph features are provided, the CCD images are recognized better. However, when the navigation feature database is large, the method requires more time to match the observing model. To solve this problem, this study investigates further and improves subgraph isomorphic matching algorithms. We present an algorithm based on a locality-sensitive hashing technique, which allocates quadrilateral models in the navigation feature database into different hash buckets and reduces the search range to the bucket in which the observed quadrilateral model is located. Experimental results indicate the effectivity of our method.

  7. Brayton Isotope Power System. Phase I. (Ground demonstration system) Configuration Control Document (CCD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration control document (CCD) defines the BIPS-GDS configuration. The GDS configuration is similar to a conceptual flight system design, referred to as the BIPS-FS, which is discussed in App. I. The BIPS is being developed by ERDA as a 500 to 2000 W(e), 7-y life, space power system utilizing a closed Brayton cycle gas turbine engine to convert thermal energy (from an isotope heat source) to electrical energy at a net efficiency exceeding 25 percent. The CCD relates to Phase I of an ERDA Program to qualify a dynamic system for launch in the early 1980's. Phase I is a 35-month effort to provide an FS conceptual design and GDS design, fabrication, and test. The baseline is a 7-year life, 450-pound, 4800 W(t), 1300 W(e) system which will use two multihundred watt (MHW) isotope heat sources being developed

  8. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy using a diode laser and CCD detector for tissue diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, U.

    1993-09-01

    This paper surveys the possibility to observe high-quality NIR Raman spectra of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent samples with the use of a diode laser, a fibre optic sample, a single spectrometer and a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. A shifted excitation difference technique was implemented for removing the broad-band fluorescence emission from Raman spectra of the highly fluorescent samples. Raman spectra of 1.4-dioxane, toluene, rhodamine 6G, and HITCI in the 640 to 1840 cm -1 spectral region and 1.4-dioxane and toluene in the 400 to 3400 cm -1 spectral region have been recorded. The results open the field of sensitive tissue characterisation and the possibility of optical biopsy in vivo by using NIR Raman spectroscopy with fibre optic sampling, a single spectrometer, and a CCD detector

  9. Design method of general-purpose driving circuit for CCD based on CPLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Tang Benqi; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun; Huang Shaoyan

    2005-01-01

    It is very important for studying the radiation damage effects and mechanism systematically about CCD to develop a general-purpose test platform. The paper discusses the design method of general-purpose driving circuit for CCD based on CPLD and the realization approach. A main controller has being designed to read the data file from the outer memory, setup the correlative parameter registers and produce the driving pulses according with parameter request strictly, which is based on MAX7000S by using MAX-PLUS II software. The basic driving circuit module has being finished based on this method. The output waveform of the module is the same figure as the simulation waveform. The result indicates that the design method is feasible. (authors)

  10. An X-ray CCD signal generator with true random arrival time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Jia; Xu Yuming; Chen Yong; Cui Weiwei; Li Wei; Zhang Ziliang; Han Dawei; Wang Yusan; Wang Juan

    2011-01-01

    An FPGA-based true random signal generator with adjustable amplitude and exponential distribution of time interval is presented. Since traditional true random number generators (TRNG) are resource costly and difficult to transplant, we employed a method of random number generation based on jitter and phase noise in ring oscillators formed by gates in an FPGA. In order to improve the random characteristics, a combination of two different pseudo-random processing circuits is used for post processing. The effects of the design parameters, such as sample frequency are discussed. Statistical tests indicate that the generator can well simulate the timing behavior of random signals with Poisson distribution. The X-ray CCD signal generator will be used in debugging the CCD readout system of the Low Energy X-ray Instrument onboard the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). (authors)

  11. Thermal IR imaging system using a self-scanned HgCdTe/CCD detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain-Abidi, A. S.; Ostrow, H.; Rubin, B.

    1980-01-01

    It is likely that future high resolution earth observation imaging systems will utilize self-scanned IR detectors. In an initial step toward this goal, an IR imaging system operating in the 10 to 12 micron spectral region has been developed. This system uses a 9-element HgCdTe/CCD linear array operating in the photoconductive mode, nine pre-amplifiers and a silicon CCD multiplexer integrated into a focal plane assembly. Opto-mechanical techniques are used to scan the scene and images are produced in real time. The imaging performance of this system is described and measurements of noise, responsivity, specific detectivity, and detector sensitivity profiles are presented. The requirements for more advanced detector arrays for use in future NASA remote sensing missions are also discussed.

  12. Camera-based driver assistance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, camera-based driver assistance systems have taken an important step: from laboratory setup to series production. This tutorial gives a brief overview on the technology behind driver assistance systems, presents the most significant functionalities and focuses on the processes of developing camera-based systems for series production. We highlight the critical points which need to be addressed when camera-based driver assistance systems are sold in their thousands, worldwide - and the benefit in terms of safety which results from it.

  13. Scintillation camera with second order resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.

    1976-01-01

    A scintillation camera for use in radioisotope imaging to determine the concentration of radionuclides in a two-dimensional area is described in which means is provided for second order positional resolution. The phototubes, which normally provide only a single order of resolution, are modified to provide second order positional resolution of radiation within an object positioned for viewing by the scintillation camera. The phototubes are modified in that multiple anodes are provided to receive signals from the photocathode in a manner such that each anode is particularly responsive to photoemissions from a limited portion of the photocathode. Resolution of radioactive events appearing as an output of this scintillation camera is thereby improved

  14. A Benchmark for Virtual Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Automatically animating and placing the virtual camera in a dynamic environment is a challenging task. The camera is expected to maximise and maintain a set of properties — i.e. visual composition — while smoothly moving through the environment and avoiding obstacles. A large number of different....... For this reason, in this paper, we propose a benchmark for the problem of virtual camera control and we analyse a number of different problems in different virtual environments. Each of these scenarios is described through a set of complexity measures and, as a result of this analysis, a subset of scenarios...

  15. Determining camera parameters for round glassware measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldner, F O; Costa, P B; Leta, F R; Gomes, J F S; Filho, D M E S

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays there are many types of accessible cameras, including digital single lens reflex ones. Although these cameras are not usually employed in machine vision applications, they can be an interesting choice. However, these cameras have many available parameters to be chosen by the user and it may be difficult to select the best of these in order to acquire images with the needed metrological quality. This paper proposes a methodology to select a set of parameters that will supply a machine vision system with the needed quality image, considering the measurement required of a laboratory glassware

  16. Collony Collapse Disorder (CCD). A review of the possible Factors and Agents involved

    OpenAIRE

    Espinosa del Alba, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Póster Colony collapse disorder is a complex phenomenon that affects managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies, whose main trait is a rapid loss of adult worker bees. Adult worker bees are responsible of the majority of the hive tasks, so their absence means shortly after the collapse and dead of the colony. CCD has been reported mainly from USA, but also from Europe.

  17. Novel plasma torch diagnostic method based on multiple exposition CCD and correlation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šonský, Jiří; Něnička, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, - (2006), B1371-B1376 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /22./. Prague, 26.06.2006-29.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/04/1341 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : plasma torch * CCD * correlation analysis Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  18. Using NIST Crystal Data Within Siemens Software for Four-Circle and SMART CCD Diffractometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byram, Susan K.; Campana, Charles F.; Fait, James; Sparks, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    NIST Crystal Data developed at The National Institute for Standards and Technology has been incorporated with Siemens single crystal software for data collection on four-circle and two-dimensional CCD diffractometers. Why this database is useful in the process of single crystal structure determination, and how the database is searched, are described. Ideas for future access to this and other databases are presented. PMID:27805166

  19. Smear correction of highly variable, frame-transfer CCD images with application to polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Francisco A; Feller, Alex; Nagaraju, Krishnappa

    2015-07-01

    Image smear, produced by the shutterless operation of frame-transfer CCD detectors, can be detrimental for many imaging applications. Existing algorithms used to numerically remove smear do not contemplate cases where intensity levels change considerably between consecutive frame exposures. In this report, we reformulate the smearing model to include specific variations of the sensor illumination. The corresponding desmearing expression and its noise properties are also presented and demonstrated in the context of fast imaging polarimetry.

  20. The use of a CCD imaging system for X-ray film intensity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigg, M.W.; Barnea, Z.

    1994-01-01

    The use of a simple CCD-based imaging system for digitizing and x-ray film image is demonstrated. A method of extending the region of linear response of the film based upon an analytic representation of the observed response to a series of increasing exposures is described. The validity of the procedure is illustrated through an example of the absolute intensity measurement of a reflection of cadmium sulphide. 3 refs., 7 figs