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Sample records for cc burr db

  1. Suboccipital burr holes and craniectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Guilherme C; Rhoton, Albert L; Cruz, Oswaldo R; Peace, David

    2005-08-15

    The goal of this study was to delimit the external cranial projection of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses, and to establish initial strategic systematized burr hole sites for lateral infratentorial suboccipital approaches based on external cranial landmarks particularly related to the lambdoid, occipitomastoid, and parietomastoid sutures. The external cranial projection of the transverse and sigmoid sinuses was studied through their external outlining obtained with the aid of multiple small perforations made from inside to outside along the inner margins of the sinuses of 50 paired temporoparietooccipital regions in 25 dried adult human skulls. The burr hole placement was studied by evaluating the supratentorial, over-the-sinuses, and infratentorial components of 1-cm-diameter openings made at strategic sites identified in the initial part of the study, which was performed in another 50 paired temporoparietooccipital regions. The asterion and the midpoint of the inion-asterion line were found to be particularly related to the inferior half of the transverse sinus; the transverse and sigmoid sinuses' transition occurs 1 cm anteriorly to the asterion across the parietomastoid suture, and the most superior part of the sigmoid sinus is located anteriorly to the occipitomastoid suture, with its posterior margin crossing this suture posteriorly to the most superior aspect of the mastoid process, which is located at the most superior level of the mastoid notch. Burr holes made at the midpoint of the inion-asterion line, at the asterion, 1 cm anterior to the asterion, just inferiorly to the parietomastoid suture, and over the occipitomastoid suture at the most superior level of the mastoid notch are appropriate to expose the inferior half of the transverse sinus at its midpoint, the inferior half of the transverse sinus at its most lateral aspect, the transverse and sigmoid sinuses' transition, and the posterior margin of the basal aspect of the sigmoid sinus

  2. Progress in the battle with the burr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1981-04-01

    Although US industry still spends more for removing burrs than it needs to, significant improvements in deburring are developing. Standards for burrs are now in reasonably common use at many companies. The mechanisms by which burrs form and by which one can predict their properties have been documented, and some deburring economics have been described. Advances in a number of processes have emerged within the past two years, and the entire subject of deburring has been receiving greater emphasis in most high-technology countries than before.

  3. Percutaneous epidural drainage through a burr hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila M Falsarella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial extradural collection may cause an increase in intracranial pressure, requiring rapid emergency treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality. We described an alternative CT-guided percutaneous access for extradural collection drainage. We report a case of a patient with previous craniectomy for meningioma ressection who presented to the Emergency Department with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. Brains CT showed a extradural collection with subfalcine herniation. After multidisciplinary discussion a CT-guided percutaneous drainage through previous burr hole was performed. The patient was discharged after 36 hours of admission, without further symptoms. We describe a safe and effective alternative percutaneous access for extradural collection drainage in patients with previous burr hole.

  4. Finite Element Modeling of Burr Formation in Metal Cutting

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Sangkee; Dornfeld, David; Kim, J.; Shyu, B.

    2007-01-01

    In order to advance understanding of the burr formation process, a series of finite element models are introduced. First a finite element model of the burr formation of two-dimensional orthogonal cutting is introduced and validated with experimental observations. A detailed and thorough examination of the drilling burr forming process is undertaken. This information is then used in the construction of an analytical model and, leads to development of a three-dimensional finite element mode...

  5. A METHOD OF PROVIDING BURR-FREE BORES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    from vaporised and/or ionised material. As a result, vaporised melt material is sprayed to the sides or upwards along the sides of a drilled hole. These squirts can either damage the surface around the processed area or result in an upward burr. The method according to the invention provides...... an additional local steam/plasma pressure causing the ejected material to change direction in such a manner that the surface of the material is not damaged or a stricking burr is not formed. The local steam/plasma pressure can, for instance, be provided by an intense secondary laser beam being emitted downwards...

  6. Comparative study between cortical bone graft versus bone dust for reconstruction of cranial burr holes

    OpenAIRE

    Worm, Paulo Valdeci; Ferreira, Nelson Pires; Faria, Mário de Barros; Ferreira, Marcelo Paglioli; Kraemer, Jorge Luiz; Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2010-01-01

    Background: As a consequence of the progressive evolution of neurosurgical techniques, there has been increasing concern with the esthetic aspects of burr holes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the use of cortical bone graft and bone dust for correcting cranial deformities caused by neurosurgical trephines. Methods: Twenty-three patients were enrolled for cranial burr hole reconstruction with a 1-year follow-up. A total of 108 burr holes were treated; 36 burr holes were ...

  7. Hole quality and burr reduction in drilling aluminium sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Piska, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of the metal drilling process requires creation of minimum amount of burrs and uniform appearance of the drilled holes. In this paper, an experimental investigation was performed on 2 mm sheets of wrought aluminium alloy Al99.7Mg0.5Cu-H24, using 1.6 and 2 mm diameter drills. Cutting...

  8. Hole quality and burr reduction in drilling aluminium sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Piska, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of the metal drilling process requires creation of minimum amount of burrs and uniform appearance of the drilled holes. In this paper, an experimental investigation was performed on 2 mm sheets of wrought aluminium alloy Al99.7Mg0.5Cu-H24, using 1.6 and 2 mm diameter drills. Cutting...

  9. Burr Hole Drainage for Complicated Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fang Liu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a potentially severe condition that is caused by continuous cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Clinically, most patients have a benign course and the condition remits after conservative management. We report two consecutive patients who presented with acute expansion of subdural collection and disturbed consciousness. Both patients recovered completely after undergoing burr hole drainage.

  10. 21 CFR 886.4070 - Powered corneal burr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to remove rust rings from the cornea of the eye. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). When intended only for rust ring removal, the device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered corneal burr. 886.4070 Section 886.4070...

  11. Study on Burr Formation at the Top Edge in Rectangular Groove Cutting

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Jun Deng; Zi Chun Xie; Ping Lin; Tong Kui Xu

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on burr formation in machining operations has usually been limited to the study of the rollover burr in the cutting direction. In this paper, a 3D finite element model to simulate rectangular groove cutting operation has been developed using commercial finite element software, employing experimentally determined mechanical properties at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The plastic deformation behavior and three-dimensional burr formation during rectangular groove cutt...

  12. Dreamweaver CC for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, Janine

    2013-01-01

    Turn your wonderful website dreams into robust realities with the help of Dreamweaver CC For Dummies! Creating dynamic websites is easy with Dreamweaver CC and this friendly, full-color guide. Updated for the latest version of Adobe's world-renowned web development tool, Dreamweaver CC For Dummies covers all aspects of creating websites, from understanding web design basics to using style sheets, integrating multimedia, implementing responsive design, testing and publishing your sites, and more. With the professional guidance of Web design expert Jan

  13. Study on Burr Formation at the Top Edge in Rectangular Groove Cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jun Deng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on burr formation in machining operations has usually been limited to the study of the rollover burr in the cutting direction. In this paper, a 3D finite element model to simulate rectangular groove cutting operation has been developed using commercial finite element software, employing experimentally determined mechanical properties at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The plastic deformation behavior and three-dimensional burr formation during rectangular groove cutting is investigated. The simulated burr profile and cutting force prove that the developed model can capture the thermo-mechanical mechanisms in rectangular groove cutting and can simulate burr development with considerable accuracy. The study concentrates on the influence of cutting parameters on burr formation which are also conducted. The results show that the feed rate and rake angle are the cutting parameters which have a major influence on burr size in the groove cutting operation. And the effect of cutting velocity and minor clearance angle in the traditional range on burr size are quite limited.

  14. Researches regarding the reducing of burr size by optimising the cutting parameters on a CNC milling machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biriş Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some experimental researches regarding burrs dimensions reduction that appear after the milling process together with an approach to reduce or eliminate the burrs resulted after this process. In order to reduce burrs dimensions, the milling process was executed with different cutting parameters and strategies then the results were evaluated.

  15. Photoshop CC for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stretch your creativity beyond the cloud with this fully-updated Photoshop guide!Photoshop puts amazing design and photo-editing tools in the hands of creative professionals and hobbyists everywhere, and the latest version - Photoshop CC - is packed with even more powerful tools to help you manage and enhance your images. This friendly, full-color guide introduces you to the basics of Photoshop CC and provides clear explanations of the menus, panels, tools, options, and shortcuts you'll use the most. Plus, you'll learn valuable tips for fixing common photo flaws, improvin

  16. Illustrator CC digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A complete training package lets you learn Adobe Illustrator CC at your own speed Adobe Illustrator is the leading drawing and illustration software used to create artwork for a variety of media. This book-and-DVD package provides 13 self-paced lessons that get you up to speed on the latest version of Illustrator (Creative Cloud). Step-by-step instructions in the full-color book are supported by video tutorials on the DVD. Together, these tools will help you learn Adobe Illustrator basics, essential skills, and all the new capabilities in Illustrator CC-in no time.  Includes step-by-step in

  17. Staphylococcus aureus CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    among parsimony-informative SNPs, allowing for the generation of a highly accurate phylogenetic reconstruction of the CC398 clonal lineage. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that MSSA from humans formed the most ancestral clades. The most derived lineages were composed predominantly of livestock...

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Burr Orbital Motion in Rotational Atherectomy with Particle Image Velocimetry Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihao; Liu, Yang; Pitre, John J; Bull, Joseph L; Gurm, Hitinder S; Shih, Albert J

    2018-04-01

    Rotational atherectomy (RA) uses a high-speed rotating burr introduced via a catheter through the artery to remove hardened atherosclerotic plaque. Current clinical RA technique lacks consensus on burr size and rotational speed. The rotating burr orbits inside the artery due to the fluid force of the blood. Different from a common RA technique of upsizing burrs for larger luminal gain, a small burr can orbit to treat a large lumen. A 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to simulate the burr motion and study the fluid flow and force in RA. A particle image velocimetry experiment was conducted to measure and validate the flow field including the radial and axial velocities and a pair of counter-rotating vortices near the burr equator in CFD. The hydraulic force on the burr and the contact force between the burr and the arterial wall were estimated by CFD. The contact force can be reduced by using smaller burr and lower rotational speed. Utilizing the small burr orbital motion has the potential to be an improved RA technique.

  19. Formation of interlayer gap and control of interlayer burr in dry drilling of stacked aluminum alloy plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Wei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In aircraft assembly, interlayer burr formation in dry drilling of stacked metal materials is a common problem. Traditional manual deburring operation seriously affects the assembly quality and assembly efficiency, is time-consuming and costly, and is not conducive to aircraft automatic assembly based on industrial robot. In this paper, the formation of drilling exit burr and the influence of interlayer gap on interlayer burr formation were studied, and the mechanism of interlayer gap formation in drilling stacked aluminum alloy plates was investigated, a simplified mathematical model of interlayer gap based on the theory of plates and shells and finite element method was established. The relationship between interlayer gap and interlayer burr, as well as the effect of feed rate and pressing force on interlayer burr height and interlayer gap was discussed. The result shows that theoretical interlayer gap has a positive correlation with interlayer burr height and preloading pressing force is an effective method to control interlayer burr formation.

  20. Mathematical Model to estimate the wind power using four-parameter Burr distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sanming; Wang, Zhijie; Pan, Zhaoxu

    2018-03-01

    When the real probability of wind speed in the same position needs to be described, the four-parameter Burr distribution is more suitable than other distributions. This paper introduces its important properties and characteristics. Also, the application of the four-parameter Burr distribution in wind speed prediction is discussed, and the expression of probability distribution of output power of wind turbine is deduced.

  1. Recurrence relations for higher moments of order statistics from doubly truncated Burr distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinder Pushkarna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have obtained recurrence relations for higher moments of order statistics from doubly truncated Burr distribution, which enable one to obtain all the single, double (product and higher moments of any order of all order statistics for any sample size from doubly truncated Burr distribution in a simple recursive manner, thus generalizing the earlier work done by Khan and Khan (1987 and also by Pushkarna, Saran and Tiwari (2012.

  2. Outcome of burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Soo; Hironaka, Yasuhiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Asai, Hideki; Watanabe, Tomoo; Nishio, Kenji; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    We have performed burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma from April 2007 in twenty five patients. All patients were deep comatose and showed cerebral herniation sign with bilateral pupillary abnormalities. Burr hole surgeries were performed as soon as possible after CT evaluation. Continually decomporresive craiectomies were followed if clinical improvements were achieved and mild baribiturate-moderate hypothermia combined (MB-MH) therapy was induced postoperatively in some cases. The mean average was 65.6 years (range 16-93). The causes of head injuries were traffic accident in 9, fall down in 13 and unknown in 3. The mean Glasgow coma scale (GCS) on admission was 4.4 (range 3-9). The mean time interval from arrival to burr hole surgery was 33.5 minutes (range 21-50 minutes). Decompressive craniectomy was indicated in 14 cases and MB-MH therapy was induced in 13 cases. The overall clinical outcome consisted of good recovery in 3, moderate disability in 2, severe disability in 3, persistent vegetative state in 3 and death in 14. Favorable results can be expected even in patients with serious acute subdural hematoma. Emergent burr hole surgery was effective to decrease intracranial pressure rapidly and to save time. So active burr hole surgery in the emergency room is strongly recommended to all cases of severe acute subdural hematoma. (author)

  3. Comparative study between cortical bone graft versus bone dust for reconstruction of cranial burr holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, Paulo V; Ferreira, Nelson P; Faria, Mario B; Ferreira, Marcelo P; Kraemer, Jorge L; Collares, Marcus V M

    2010-12-22

    As a consequence of the progressive evolution of neurosurgical techniques, there has been increasing concern with the esthetic aspects of burr holes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the use of cortical bone graft and bone dust for correcting cranial deformities caused by neurosurgical trephines. Twenty-three patients were enrolled for cranial burr hole reconstruction with a 1-year follow-up. A total of 108 burr holes were treated; 36 burr holes were reconstructed with autogenous cortical bone discs (33.3%), and the remaining 72 with autogenous wet bone powder (66.6%). A trephine was specifically designed to produce this coin-shaped bone plug of 14 mm in diameter, which fit perfectly over the burr holes. The reconstructions were studied 12 months after the surgical procedure, using three-dimensional quantitative computed tomography. Additionally, general and plastic surgeons blinded for the study evaluated the cosmetic results of those areas, attributing scores from 0 to 10. The mean bone densities were 987.95 ± 186.83 Hounsfield units (HU) for bone fragment and 473.55 ± 220.34 HU for bone dust (P holes because of their lower degree of bone resorption and, consequently, better cosmetic results. The lack of donor site morbidity associated with procedural low cost qualifies the cortical autograft as the first choice for correcting cranial defects created by neurosurgical trephines.

  4. Burr hole washout versus craniotomy for chronic subdural hematoma: patient outcome and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Worley, Emmagene; Shelburne, Christopher; Pullarkat, Ranjit; Watson, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH), which are frequently encountered in neurosurgical practice, are, in the majority of cases, ideally treated with surgical drainage. Despite this common practice, there is still controversy surrounding the best surgical procedure. With lack of clear evidence of a superior technique, surgeons are free to base the decision on other factors that are not related to patient care. A retrospective chart review of 119 patients requiring surgical drainage of CSDH was conducted at a large tertiary care center over a three-year period. Of the cases reviewed, 58 patients underwent craniotomy, while 61 patients underwent burr hole washout. The study focused on re-operation rates, mortality, and morbidity, as measured by Glasgow coma scores (GCS), discharge Rankin disability scores, and discharge disposition. Secondary endpoints included length of stay and cost of procedure. Burr hole washout was superior to craniotomy with respect to patient outcome, length of stay and recurrence rates. In both study groups, patients required additional surgical procedures (6.6% of burr hole patients and 24.1% of craniotomy patients) (P = 0.0156). Of the patients treated with craniotomy, 51.7% were discharged home, whereas 65.6% of the burr hole patients were discharged home. Patients who underwent burr hole washout spent a mean of 78.8 minutes in the operating suite while the patients undergoing craniotomy spent 129.4 minutes (P craniotomy group (P = 0.0465). Based on this retrospective study, burr hole washout is superior for both patients' clinical and financial outcome; however, prospective long-term multicenter clinical studies are required to verify these findings.

  5. Mastering MariaDB

    CERN Document Server

    Razzoli, Federico

    2014-01-01

    This book is intended for intermediate users who want to learn how to administrate a MariaDB server or a set of servers. It is aimed at MariaDB users, and hence working knowledge of MariaDB is a prerequisite.

  6. Instant InnoDB

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This book is a complete reference guide, designed to provide you with answers and solutions to all the common problems you encounter within InnoDB, helping you achieve higher performance and greater stability in your InnoDB databases.The ""InnoDB Quick Reference Guide"" features content for all skill levels of MySQL administrators, developers, and engineers.

  7. Prediction of Burr Size in Drilling Operation of Al 2014 Alloy Using Taguchi Design Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Sreenivasulu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the influence of cutting parameters like cutting speed, feed rate, drill diameter, point angle and clearance angle on the burr size of Al 2014 alloy during drilling on CNC vertical machining center. A plan of experiments based on Taguchi method has been used to acquire the data. An orthogonal array, signal to noise (S/N ratio and analysis of variance (ANOVA are employed to investigate machining characteristics using HSS twist drill bits with variable tool geometry and maintain constant helix angle of 450 . Confirmation tests have been carried out to predict the optimal setting of process parameters to validate the proposed method and obtained the values 0.232 mm and 0.173 mm for burr height and thickness respectively

  8. Rotational atherectomy as endovascular haute couture: a road map of tools and techniques for the interventional management of burr entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdouh, Ziad; Abdel-Massih, Tony; Roule, Vincent; Sarkis, Antoine; Grollier, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    Rotational atherectomy (RA) is used as a debulking technique prior to stenting in some specialized cardiac centers for calcified coronary lesions amenable to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A specific possible complication, burr entrapment, is unusual but carries serious risks and may sometimes necessitate surgery as a rescue procedure. However, different modalities using a percutaneous approach were proposed as a bail-out. We aim to propose a framework for possible management for trapped RA burr. A literature review of the most relevant cases of entrapped burr during PCI was performed. Twelve cases were reported and different solutions were discussed. Surgery was needed in only 1 patient to retrieve the trapped burr, and in all the other cases, different percutaneous solutions were successful to retract the trapped device. These cases illustrate that burr entrapment during RA, albeit rare, may occur and may transform a relatively simple PCI to a procedure failure. Although prevention is better than treatment, the operators should be aware of such serious complication and they should keep in mind that various possible percutaneous solutions may be successful to retrieve the burr and to avoid surgery. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A STUDY ON MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC SUBDURAL HAEMATOMA- BURR HOLE EVACUATION AND MINI CRANIOTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic SDH is one of the common neurosurgical conditions requiring surgical treatment. The incidence of chronic SDH is 1.7- 18 per 1,00,000 population. The incidence is higher in the elderly patients, i.e. 58 per 1,00,000. Various treatment modalities available for the treatment of chronic SDH indicate that there is no gold standard for the treatment of chronic SDH. Recurrence is the major problem following treatment and can be as high as 30%. Mini craniotomy is one of the surgical options that can offer better view of the subdural space and may allow us to efficiently clear the loculations and haematoma fluid and thereby decreasing the incidence of recurrences and the need for reoperations. Small craniotomies have not been studied well in the literature except for a few publications. In this study, we are comparing mini craniotomy and burr hole evacuation for the treatment of chronic SDH. MATERIALS AND METHODS All the patients with chronic subdural haematoma operated between August 2013 and January 2016. Patients with recurrent SDH on the same side and patients who underwent different procedures on either side (in case of bilateral haematomas were excluded from the study. The patients were operated by two senior surgeons with one surgeon doing burr hole evacuation and another doing mini craniotomy. Preoperative status and postoperative status was analysed. RESULTS All the patients were analysed both preoperatively and postoperatively. In both the groups, most of the patients shown improvement following surgery, but recurrences are more in burr hole group when compared to mini craniotomy. CONCLUSION Mini craniotomy allows better view of the subdural space and better evacuation of chronic subdural haematoma. Cure rate is higher with mini craniotomy compared to burr hole evacuation.

  10. Burr hole aspiration of brain abscess in children with cyanotic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.; Ahmed, S; Hussain, M.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of burr hole aspiration of brain abscess in children with cyanotic heart disease in terms of number of aspirations and residual abscess. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery at The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Multan, from July 2010 to June 2014. Methodology: Pediatric patients of cyanotic heart disease with brain abscess were admitted. After taking history, clinical examination and necessary investigation, spiration of abscess through a burr hole was performed. Data was collected through pre-designed proforma. Analysis of results was performed and comparison was made through statistical package for social sciences (SPSS-20). Results: Total number of patients were 50 with 31 (62%) male and 19 (38%) female children. Patients' age ranged from 5-10 years with mean age of 7.44 +-1.11 years. Single abscess in supra tentorial was commonly found in 44 (88%) patients. Multiple abscesses were present in 4 (8%) patients. Cerebellum was involved in 2 (4%) patients. Abscess was completely aspirated in single attempt in 37 (74%) patients, two attempts in 9 (18%) patients, and three attempts in 4 (8%) patients. No bacterial growth on culture was reported in 32 (64%) patients. Culture was positive in 18 (36%) patients. Postoperative hematoma developed in 2 (4%) patients. No mortality was reported in early postoperative period. Conclusion: Aspiration of brain abscess in children with cyanotic heart disease through a burr hole is safe and successful. (author)

  11. Instant MongoDB

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Amol

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. MongoDB Starter is a fast and practical guide designed to help you start developing high-performance and scalable applications using MongoDB.MongoDB Starter is ideal for developers who are new to MongoDB and who need a no-nonsense guide on how to start working with it. No knowledge of MongoDB is required to follow this book, but some knowledge of C++ would be helpful.

  12. License - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available database as follows: PGDBj - Ortholog DB © Akihiro Nakaya (Osaka University) licensed under CC Attribution-...ice. About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us License - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive ... ...List Contact us PGDBj - Ortholog DB License License to Use This Database Last updated : 2017/03/07 You may u...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data

  13. Treatment of irrigation through burr hole with siphonage drainage for chronic subdural hematoma: a report of 139 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    She-peng WEI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of irrigation through burr hole with siphonage drainage on chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH.Methods The clinical data of 139 patients with CSDH(89 males and 50 females,aged from 48 to 87 with mean of 66.4 years hospitalized from Jan.2006 to Dec.2010 were retrospectively reviewed.All the patients were finally diagnosed by radiology,and divided into 3 groups according to the operative method,i.e.parietal burr hole irrigation with drainage group(group A,n=47,parietal burr hole irrigation and aspiration group(group B,n=41,and frontal burr hole irrigation with siphonage drainage group(group C,n=51.All the patients were treated with closed drainage for 2-6 days.The activity of daily living(ADL scores was measured before and 7 days after operation in all patients.The patients were followed-up for 12-36 months to observe the treatment results.Results No death occurred in the 3 groups during the follow-up period.The improvement of ADL was markedly better in group C than in group B(P 0.05.Conclusion The frontal burr hole irrigation with siphonage drainage has a definite treatment effect for CSDH with a low recurrence rate and less complications,and is appropriate to use in most of CSDH patients.

  14. Teach yourself visually Photoshop CC

    CERN Document Server

    Wooldridge, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Get savvy with the newest features and enhancements of Photoshop CC The newest version of Photoshop boasts enhanced and new features that afford you some amazing and creative ways to create images with impact, and this popular guide gets visual learners up to speed quickly. Packed with colorful screen shots that illustrate the step-by-step instructions, this visual guide is perfect for Photoshop newcomers as well as experienced users who are looking for some beginning to intermediate-level techniques to give their projects the ""wow"" factor! Veteran and bestselling authors Mik

  15. Adobe Photoshop CC for photographers

    CERN Document Server

    Evening, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Adobe Photoshop for Photographers 2014 Release by Photoshop hall-of-famer and acclaimed digital imaging professional Martin Evening has been fully updated to include detailed instruction for all of the updates to Photoshop CC 2014 on Adobe's Creative Cloud, including significant new features, such as Focus Area selections, enhanced Content-Aware filling, and new Spin and Path blur gallery effects. This guide covers all the tools and techniques photographers and professional image editors need to know when using Photoshop, from workflow guidance to core skills to advanced techniques for profess

  16. Scaling CouchDB

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    This practical guide offers a short course on scaling CouchDB to meet the capacity needs of your distributed application. Through a series of scenario-based examples, this book lets you explore several methods for creating a system that can accommodate growth and meet expected demand. In the process, you learn about several tools that can help you with replication, load balancing, clustering, and load testing and monitoring. Apply performance tips for tuning your databaseReplicate data, using Futon and CouchDB's RESTful interfaceDistribute CouchDB's workload through load balancingLearn option

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 310254 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sp. CC9605 MIAPLPMPAEPLLEQYGQGARLCPCANDQITLVFSQEYPFDLVELEQLLEAVGWSRRPIRRVRKALSHSLLKVGLWRHDPRVPRLVGFARCTGDGVFEATVWDVAVHPLYQGNGLGKQLMAYILEALDQMGTERVSLFADPGVVSFYQGQGWDLEPQGHRCAFWYAN ...

  18. dbSNP

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — dbSNP is a database of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and multiple small-scale variations that include insertions/deletions, microsatellites, and...

  19. dbVar

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — dbVar is a database of genomic structural variation. It accepts data from all species and includes clinical data. It can accept diverse types of events, including...

  20. A comparative study of irrigation versus no irrigation during burr hole craniostomy to treat chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang-Ping; Yuan, Ye; Guan, Jun-Wen; Jiang, Xiao-Bing

    2017-09-11

    Burr hole craniostomy is a widely used method for the evacuation of CSDH. However it is not clear whether the irrigation during operation improves the prognosis or gives rise to additional complications instead. This retrospective cohort study was conducted to determine this issue. Patients attending two medical centers in China who underwent burr hole drainage with irrigation (BHDI) or burr hole drainage without irrigation (BHD) for unilateral CSDH during January 2013 to December 2016 were included in this study. The patients' clinical information and follow-up data were retrospectively reviewed, and the radiologic findings were processed using the 3D Slicer software. The differences in outcomes were identified using t-test, chi-square test, or Fisher's exact test. A total of 151 patients comprising 63 patients in the BHD group and 88 patients in the BHDI group were included. Patients in the BHDI group had a higher volume of pneumocrania on the first postoperative day than that of patients in the BHD group (p  0.05). Irrigation had no improvement in the long-term curative effect on CSDH, but it increased the risk of short-term complication in terms of pneumocrania. Therefore, this study suggests that irrigation is not an obligatory procedure during burr hole drainage.

  1. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN COTTON BURR COMPOST, MULCH COMPOST, AND PEAT: MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL USE FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted batch tests on the nature and kinetics of removal of added nitrate in cotton burr compost, mulch compost, and sphagnum peat that may be potentially used in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for groundwater nitrate remediation. A rigorous steam autoclaving protocol (...

  2. Burr hole trepanation for chronic subdural hematomas: is surgical education safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldaner, Nicolai; Sosnova, Marketa; Sarnthein, Johannes; Bozinov, Oliver; Regli, Luca; Stienen, Martin N

    2018-01-08

    There is a paucity of data concerning the safety and efficacy of surgical education for neurosurgical residents in the evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas (cSDH) by burr hole trepanation. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on consecutive patients receiving burr hole trepanation for uni- or bilateral cSDH. Patients operated by a supervised neurosurgery resident (teaching cases) were compared to patients operated by a board-certified faculty neurosurgeon (BCFN; non-teaching cases). The primary endpoint was surgical revision for any reason until the last follow-up. The secondary endpoint was occurrence of any complication until the last follow-up. Clinical status, type of complications, mortality, length of surgery (LOS), and hospitalization (LOH) were tertiary endpoints. A total of n = 253 cases were analyzed, of which n = 217 (85.8%) were teaching and n = 36 (14.2%) non-teaching cases. The study groups were balanced in terms of age, sex, surgical risk (ASA score), and preoperative status (Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), modified Rankin Scale (mRS), National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)). The cohort was followed for a mean of 242 days (standard deviation 302). In multivariate analysis, teaching cases were as likely as non-teaching cases to require revision surgery (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.27-1.59; p = 0.348) as well as to experience any complication until the last follow-up (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.37-1.67; p = 0.532). Mean LOS was about 10 min longer in teaching cases (53.0 ± 26.1 min vs. 43.5 ± 17.8 min; p = 0.036), but LOH was similar. There were no group differences in clinical status, mortality and type of complication at discharge, and the last follow-up. Burr hole trepanation for cSDH can be safely performed by supervised neurosurgical residents enrolled in a structured training program, without increasing the risk for revision surgery, perioperative complications, or worse outcome.

  3. Comparison of the burr and chemically induced periodontal defects using different field-of-view sizes and voxel resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagis, Nilsun; Eren, Hakan; Kolsuz, Mehmet Eray; Kurt, Mehmet Hakan; Avsever, Hakan; Orhan, Kaan

    2018-03-01

    This study assessed the use of different voxel resolutions in a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit for the detection of artificially induced periodontal bone defects created using burr, burr and chemicals, and only chemicals. Seven dry skulls were used in this study. In total, 65 dehiscence defects, 43 fenestration defects, and 76 control sites with no periodontal defects were examined. Images were obtained from a CBCT unit (3 D Accuitomo; J Morita Mfg. Corp., Kyoto, Japan), using 3 field-of-view (FOV) sizes (4 × 4 cm; 6 × 6 cm; and 8 × 8 cm) and 4 scan modes (standard, high-definition, high-fidelity, and low-dose). Overall, κ coefficients for interobserver agreement on burr-induced periodontal defects ranged from 0.336 to 0.795, with the lowest κ value (indicating a fair degree of agreement) obtained for images acquired in standard mode with a voxel size of 0.160 mm 3 . κ coefficients for the detection of periodontal defects were highest (indicating moderate to high degrees of interobserver agreement) for smaller voxel sizes and high-resolution images. Statistical comparison among groups (burr, burr + chemicals, and chemicals only) was performed using 1-way analysis of variance with post hoc tests. The CBCT scan mode may affect the diagnosis of periodontal defects. The technique used to create periodontal defects also affected diagnosis. For this kind of experiment, burr-induced or burr + chemical-induced defects should be used, rather than those induced solely using a chemical technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Burr X Pareto Distribution: Properties, Applications and VaR Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Ç. Korkmaz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new three-parameter Pareto distribution is introduced and studied. We discuss various mathematical and statistical properties of the new model. Some estimation methods of the model parameters are performed. Moreover, the peaks-over-threshold method is used to estimate Value-at-Risk (VaR by means of the proposed distribution. We compare the distribution with a few other models to show its versatility in modelling data with heavy tails. VaR estimation with the Burr X Pareto distribution is presented using time series data, and the new model could be considered as an alternative VaR model against the generalized Pareto model for financial institutions.

  5. Prognosis on follow-up CT of chronic subdural hematomas treated by burr hole evacuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higeta, Toshiaki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hakuji

    1986-01-01

    A consecutive series of 47 adult patients with chronic subdural hematoma was studied in respect to postoperative follow-up CT after burr hole evacuation. In 15 of our patients, the CT scan was normalized within 60 days. Six patients required reoperation because of reaccumulation or of poor re-expansion, and in 13 patients the follow-up CT showed a persisting subdural fluid collection even after 60 postoperative days. Further studying the correlation between the prognosis on follow-up CT and various factors, such as patient's age, preoperative neurological condition and CT findings or others, authors found that the elderly, especially older than 70 years, had a poor prognosis, and that the prognosis was correlated to the density and the thickness of hematoma on preoperative CT scan. (author)

  6. Treatment of nonhealing corneal ulcers in 60 horses with diamond burr debridement (2010-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassaline-Utter, Mary; Cutler, Tim J; Michau, Tammy M; Nunnery, Catherine M

    2014-07-01

    To review the signalment, clinical characteristics, and outcome of horses with nonhealing corneal ulcers treated with diamond burr debridement (DBD); and to evaluate the role of ulcer duration, size and location, and bandage contact lens (BCL) placement on healing. From January 2012-April 2013, 60 horses were diagnosed with ulcers classified as nonhealing based on the presence of raised epithelial margins and duration of at least 7 days. Retrospective record review. Average age of included horses was 14.68 years, SD 8.17 years. There were three times as many males (45) as females (15), (χ12 = 15, P = 0.001). Forty-eight horses (80%) had nonhealing ulcers uncomplicated by associated corneal disease. In the remaining horses, associated corneal disease included esinophilic keratitis (10%), calcific band keratopathy (5%), endothelial decompensation (1.67%), habronemiasis(1.67%), and lid suture abrasion (1.67%). Average corneal ulcer duration prior to diamond burr debridement (DBD) was 29.0 days (n = 56). Ulcers occurred most commonly in the axial cornea (41%). Fifty-five of 60 horses (92%) healed with DBD. Healing time, defined as time to epithelialization following DBD, averaged 15.5 days, SD 9.32 days, and was not correlated with patient age or ulcer duration, location, or size prior to or following DBD. Healing time was significantly longer for eyes in which a BCL had been placed (n = 28, 19.0 days) than for eyes without a BCL (n = 32, 12.9 days), F(1,58) = 5.543, P = 0.02. DBD was considered a failure for five horses (8%). DBD may be an effective treatment for nonhealing corneal ulcers in horses. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Dicty_cDB: [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 3.7 1 CC645451 |CC645451.1 OGMAS66TV ZM_0.7_1.5_KB Zea mays genomic clone ZMMBMa0330L11, genomic survey se... ZM_0.7_1.5_KB Zea mays genomic clone ZMMBMa0219J04, DNA sequence. 42 3.7 1 CC645442 |CC645442.1 OGM

  8. Les cardiopathies congenitales (cc) au Togo aspects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The petrology of the. Follot (16.96%) and the CIA (06.25%) 112 patients have been transferred to foreign countries of which 74.10% Suisse 107 CC have been operated. The evolution has been favourable in 89.18%. In Togo, the discovery of the CC has been done lately posing therefore a problem of therapeutic choice.

  9. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-31

    This report summarizes EMaCC activities for fiscal year 1990 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the department. The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the department. (JL)

  10. Scaling MongoDB

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorow, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Create a MongoDB cluster that will to grow to meet the needs of your application. With this short and concise book, you'll get guidelines for setting up and using clusters to store a large volume of data, and learn how to access the data efficiently. In the process, you'll understand how to make your application work with a distributed database system. Scaling MongoDB will help you: Set up a MongoDB cluster through shardingWork with a cluster to query and update dataOperate, monitor, and backup your clusterPlan your application to deal with outages By following the advice in this book, you'l

  11. ProteomicsDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Samaras, Patroklos; Frejno, Martin; Gessulat, Siegfried; Barnert, Maximilian; Kienegger, Harald; Krcmar, Helmut; Schlegl, Judith; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Aiche, Stephan; Kuster, Bernhard; Wilhelm, Mathias

    2018-01-04

    ProteomicsDB (https://www.ProteomicsDB.org) is a protein-centric in-memory database for the exploration of large collections of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics data. ProteomicsDB was first released in 2014 to enable the interactive exploration of the first draft of the human proteome. To date, it contains quantitative data from 78 projects totalling over 19k LC-MS/MS experiments. A standardized analysis pipeline enables comparisons between multiple datasets to facilitate the exploration of protein expression across hundreds of tissues, body fluids and cell lines. We recently extended the data model to enable the storage and integrated visualization of other quantitative omics data. This includes transcriptomics data from e.g. NCBI GEO, protein-protein interaction information from STRING, functional annotations from KEGG, drug-sensitivity/selectivity data from several public sources and reference mass spectra from the ProteomeTools project. The extended functionality transforms ProteomicsDB into a multi-purpose resource connecting quantification and meta-data for each protein. The rich user interface helps researchers to navigate all data sources in either a protein-centric or multi-protein-centric manner. Several options are available to download data manually, while our application programming interface enables accessing quantitative data systematically. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. MongoDB high availability

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrabani, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    This book has a perfect balance of concepts and their practical implementation along with solutions to make a highly available MongoDB server with clear instructions and guidance. If you are using MongoDB in a production environment and need a solution to make a highly available MongoDB server, this book is ideal for you. Familiarity with MongoDB is expected so that you understand the content of this book.

  13. Dicty_cDB: SSF684 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available equence iiimiiiilkk***ncn*nkenkssw**nici*rsmmstliflvfrt*sid*tfttnttt tnttttr*rft*sgsst*cc*wfiiyfn*ihcwlikrsi...***ncn*nkenkssw**nici*rsmmstliflvfrt*sid*tfttnttt tnttttr*rft*sgsst*cc*wfiiyfn*ihcwlikrsiicvcpfnii*pyinwisli

  14. DB2 9 for Developers

    CERN Document Server

    Gunning, Philip K

    2008-01-01

    Written by an "in-the-trenches" consultant, this guide hails the newest version of DB2 as a major release, highlighting the large number of totally new features, most notably the addition of XML capabilities. Packed with the information DB2 developers and administrators need to know when implementing version 9, the discussion covers upgrading from prior releases of DB2, converting relational data to XML data, and how DB2 supports industry standard schemas. With detailed examples and useful scripts, users learn how to develop DB2 XML applications, design an XML database, and tune the

  15. Dicty_cDB: VSK347 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ne IMAGE:6102449 5', mRNA sequence. 46 0.59 1 CC621012 |CC621012.1 OGMAW07TH ZM_0.7_1.5_KB Zea mays genomic ...clone ZMMBMa0331B13, genomic survey sequence. 46 0.59 1 CC621020 |CC621020.1 OGMAW07TV ZM_0.7_1.5_KB Zea may

  16. Influence of Postoperative Thrombosis Prophylaxis on the Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Burr-Hole Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licci, Maria; Kamenova, Maria; Guzman, Raphael; Mariani, Luigi; Soleman, Jehuda

    2018-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is a commonly encountered disease in neurosurgic practice, whereas its increasing prevalence is compatible with the ageing population. Recommendations concerning postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis after burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematoma are lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma and postoperative application of thrombosis prophylaxis. Retrospective, consecutive sample of patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for chronic subdural hematoma over 3 years. Single, academic medical center. All patients undergoing surgical evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma with burr-hole drainage. Exclusion: patients under the age of 18 years, who presented with an acute subdural hematoma and those who underwent a craniotomy. We compared patients receiving thrombosis prophylaxis treatment after burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematoma with those who were not treated. Primary outcome measure was reoperation of chronic subdural hematoma due to recurrence. Secondary outcome measures were thromboembolic and cardiovascular events, hematologic findings, morbidity, and mortality. In addition, a subanalysis comparing recurrence rate dependent on the application time of thrombosis prophylaxis ( 48 hr) was undertaken. Overall recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma was 12.7%. Out of the 234 analyzed patients, 135 (57.3%) received postoperative thrombosis prophylaxis (low-molecular-weight heparin) applied subcutaneously. Recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma occurred in the thrombosis prophylaxis group and control group in 12 patients (8.9%) and 17 patients (17.2%), respectively, showing no significant difference (odds ratio, 0.47 [95% CI, 0.21 - 1.04]). A subanalysis comparing recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma dependent on the application time of thrombosis prophylaxis ( 48 hr) showed no significant difference either (odds ratio, 2.80 [95% CI, 0

  17. MariaDB cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bartholomew, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    A practical cookbook, filled with advanced recipes , and plenty of code and commands used for illustration,which will make your learning curve easy and quick.This book is for anyone who wants to learn more about databases in general or MariaDB in particular. Some familiarity with SQL databases is assumed, but the recipes are approachable to almost anyone with basic database skills.

  18. Adobe Edge Animate CC for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Rohde, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The easy way to build HTML5 mobile and web apps using Adobe's new Edge Animate CC Edge Animate CC is an approachable WYSIWYG alternative for leveraging the power of languages like HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript to design and develop for the web and mobile devices, even if you have no programming experience. Written by Michael Rohde, the book calls on this seasoned web developer's wealth of experience using Edge Animate CC, and a companion website includes all code from the book to help you apply what you learn as you go. Features an easy-to-use interface, with a propert

  19. InDesign CC digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Learn the newest version of Adobe's premiere page design software-InDesign CC- with this complete package Written by a team of expert instructors, this complete book-and-DVD package teaches even the most inexperienced beginner how to design eye-popping layouts for brochures, magazines, e-books, and flyers. Step-by-step instructions in the full-color book are enhanced by video tutorials on the companion DVD. Thirteen self-paced lessons let you learn Adobe InDesign CC (Creative Cloud) at your own speed; it's like having your own personal tutor teaching you the hottest new version of this leadi

  20. RavenDB high performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Brian

    2013-01-01

    RavenDB High Performance is comprehensive yet concise tutorial that developers can use to.This book is for developers & software architects who are designing systems in order to achieve high performance right from the start. A basic understanding of RavenDB is recommended, but not required. While the book focuses on advanced topics, it does not assume that the reader has a great deal of prior knowledge of working with RavenDB.

  1. Global spread of mouse-adapted Staphylococcus aureus lineages CC1, CC15, and CC88 among mouse breeding facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrochen, Daniel M; Grumann, Dorothee; Schulz, Daniel; Gumz, Janine; Trübe, Patricia; Pritchett-Corning, Kathleen; Johnson, Sarah; Nicklas, Werner; Kirsch, Petra; Martelet, Karine; Brandt, Jens van den; Berg, Sabine; Bröker, Barbara M; Wiles, Siouxsie; Holtfreter, Silva

    2017-11-20

    We previously reported that laboratory mice from all global vendors are frequently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Genotyping of a snap sample of murine S. aureus isolates from Charles River, US, showed that mice were predominantly colonized with methicillin-sensitive CC88 strains. Here, we expanded our view and investigated whether laboratory mice from other global animal facilities are colonized with similar strains or novel S. aureus lineages, and whether the murine S. aureus isolates show features of host adaptation. In total, we genotyped 230 S. aureus isolates from various vendor facilities of laboratory mice around the globe (Charles River facilities in the USA, Canada, France, and Germany; another US facility) and university- or company-associated breeding facilities in Germany, China and New Zealand. Spa typing was performed to analyse the clonal relationship of the isolates. Moreover, multiplex PCRs were performed for human-specific virulence factors, the immune-evasion cluster (IEC) and superantigen genes (SAg). We found a total of 58 different spa types that clustered into 15 clonal complexes (CCs). Three of these S. aureus lineages had spread globally among laboratory mice and accounted for three quarters of the isolates: CC1 (13.5%), CC15 (14.3%), and CC88 (47.0%). Compared to human colonizing isolates of the same lineages, the murine isolates frequently lacked IEC genes and SAg genes on mobile genetic elements, implying long-term adaptation to the murine host. In conclusion, laboratory mice from various vendors are colonized with host-adapted S. aureus-strains of a few lineages, predominantly the CC88 lineage. S. aureus researchers must be cautioned that S. aureus colonization might be a relevant confounder in infection and vaccination studies and are therefore advised to screen their mice before experimentation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  2. Burr-Hole Drainage for Chronic Subdural Hematoma Under Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid: A Comparative Risk Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Maria; Nevzati, Edin; Lutz, Katharina; Dolp, Armando; Fandino, Javier; Mariani, Luigi; Soleman, Jehuda

    2017-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical diseases typically affecting older people. Many of these patients have coronary artery disease and receive antiplatelet therapy, usually acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Despite growing clinical relevance, there is still a lack of data focusing on the perioperative management of such patients. The aim of this study is to compare the perioperative and postoperative bleeding and cardiovascular complication rates of patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for cSDH with and without discontinuation of low-dose ASA. Of 963 consecutive patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for cSDH, 198 (20.5%) patients were receiving low-dose ASA treatment. In 26 patients (13.1%), ASA was not discontinued (ASA group; ASA discontinuation ≤7 days); in the remaining patients (n = 172; 86.9%), ASA was discontinued at least for 7 days (control group). The primary outcome measure was recurrent cSDH that required revision surgery owing to clinical symptoms, whereas secondary outcome measures were postoperative cardiovascular and thromboembolic events, other complications, operation and hospitalization time, morbidity, and mortality. No statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups regarding recurrence of cSDH (P = 1). Cardiovascular event rates, surgical morbidity, and mortality did not significantly differ between patients with and without discontinuation of low-dose ASA. Given the lack of guidelines regarding perioperative management with antiplatelet therapy, our findings elucidate one issue, showing comparable recurrence rates with and without discontinuation of low-dose ASA in patients undergoing burr-hole drainage for cSDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mycophenolate Mofetil Ameliorates Diabetic Nephropathy in db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Woo Seo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low-grade inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complication. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF has an anti-inflammatory effect, inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation. Previous studies showed attenuation of diabetic nephropathy with MMF, but the underlying mechanisms were unclear. This study aimed to identify the effect of MMF on diabetic nephropathy and investigate its action mechanisms in type 2 diabetic mice model. Eight-week-old db/db and control mice (db/m mice received vehicle or MMF at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks. MMF-treated diabetic mice showed decreased albuminuria, attenuated mesangial expansion, and profibrotic mRNA expressions despite the high glucose level. The number of infiltrated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the kidney was significantly decreased in MMF-treated db/db mice and it resulted in attenuating elevated intrarenal TNF-α and IL-17. The renal chemokines expression and macrophages infiltration were also attenuated by MMF treatment. The decreased expression of glomerular nephrin and WT1 was recovered with MMF treatment. MMF prevented the progression of diabetic nephropathy in db/db mice independent of glycemic control. These results suggest that the effects of MMF in diabetic nephropathy are mediated by CD4+ T cell regulation and related cytokines.

  4. Dicty_cDB: SHF243 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omic DNA, chromosome 11. 44 0.22 2 BE401607 |BE401607.1 CNW03PL506 ITEC CNW Wheat Powdery Mildew Resistant L...ibrary Triticum aestivum cDNA clone CNW03PL506, mRNA sequence. 42 0.24 2 CC810021 |CC810021.1 ZMMBBc0497L19f

  5. Quantitative computed tomography and cranial burr holes: a model to evaluate the quality of cranial reconstruction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, Paulo Valdeci; Ferreira, Nelson Pires; Ferreira, Marcelo Paglioli; Kraemer, Jorge Luiz; Lenhardt, Rene; Alves, Ronnie Peterson Marcondes; Wunderlich, Ricardo Castilho; Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2012-05-01

    Current methods to evaluate the biologic development of bone grafts in human beings do not quantify results accurately. Cranial burr holes are standardized critical bone defects, and the differences between bone powder and bone grafts have been determined in numerous experimental studies. This study evaluated quantitative computed tomography (QCT) as a method to objectively measure cranial bone density after cranial reconstruction with autografts. In each of 8 patients, 2 of 4 surgical burr holes were reconstructed with autogenous wet bone powder collected during skull trephination, and the other 2 holes, with a circular cortical bone fragment removed from the inner table of the cranial bone flap. After 12 months, the reconstructed areas and a sample of normal bone were studied using three-dimensional QCT; bone density was measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Mean (SD) bone density was 1535.89 (141) HU for normal bone (P holes is an excellent model to accurately measure the quality of new bone in cranial reconstructions and also seems to be an appropriate choice of experimental model to clinically test any cranial bone or bone substitute reconstruction.

  6. Surface anatomy of the posterolateral cranium regarding the localization of the initial burr-hole for a retrosigmoid approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozbuga, Mustafa; Boran, Burak O; Sahinoglu, Kayihan

    2006-01-01

    Knowing the location of the venous sinuses is essential for the localization of the initial burr-hole for a retrosigmoid approach, in order to avoid inadvertent entry into the venous sinuses and limitation of the size of the bony opening. In this anatomic study, external landmarks of the posterolateral cranium have been studied, in order to reveal the relationship with the venous sinuses. Eighty-four dried adult human skulls were studied and study of both sides yielded 168 sides. Morphometric measurements of the posterolateral cranium have been performed and relations of the external landmarks with the venous sinuses have been studied. The anatomic position of the asterion was variable. The superior nuchal line was roughly parallel and below the lower margin of the sulcus of transverse sinus in all specimens. The sigmoid sinus, between the superior and inferior bends, seemed to descend along an axis defined by the junction of the squamosal-parietomastoid suture and the mastoid tip, in a slightly oblique fashion. In conclusion, a burr-hole placed just below the superior nuchal line and posterior to the axis defined by the mastoid tip and the squamosal-parietomastoid suture junction is appropriate for both avoiding inadvertent entry into the sinus and limiting the size of the craniotomy.

  7. Latency analyses of CC-NUMA and CC-COMA rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.; Yan, Y. [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This paper focuses comparative performance modeling and evaluation of CC-NUMA and CC-COMA on a hierarchical ring shared-memory architecture. Intensive performance measurements of the two models have been conducted on the KSR-1. The experimental results support the analytical models, and present practical observations and comparisons of the two cache coherence memory systems. Our analytical and experimental results show that a CC-COMA system balances the work load well. However the overhead of frequent data movement may match the gains obtained from improving load balance. Although a CC-NUMA system may not automatically balance the load at the system level, it provides an option for a user to explicitly handle data locality for a possible performance improvement.

  8. $\\Xi_{cc}$ decays and properties

    CERN Multimedia

    Traill, Murdo Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The $\\Xi$ particles are baryons contains 2 constituent charm quarks in their structure which are expected to decay to high multi-body final states. The LHCb detector is ideally designed for studies of them due to its excellent particle identification and vertex reconstruction. Its capabilities in this area of physics was firmly demonstrated when LHCb announced the discovery of the first ever doubly charmed baryon, $\\Xi^{++}_{cc}$, in decays of $\\Xi^{++}_{cc} \\to \\Lambda^+K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ in 2017. This doubly charmed baryon was observed as a highly significant structure in the $\\Lambda^+_c K^-\\pi^+\\pi^+$ mass spectrum from proton-proton collision data recorded by the LHCb detector in Run2. A yield of 313 $\\pm$ 33 $\\Xi^{++}_{cc}$ candidates is measured and the local significances is in excess of 12 $\\sigma$ in the 13 TeV data. The properties of the peak suggest it is inconsistent with being a strongly decaying state. From the 13 TeV data, the mass is measured to be $3621.40\\pm 0.72(stat.) \\pm 0.27(syst....

  9. MongoDB and PHP

    CERN Document Server

    Francia, Steve

    2012-01-01

    What would happen if you optimized a data store for the operations application developers actually use? You'd arrive at MongoDB, the reliable document-oriented database. With this concise guide, you'll learn how to build elegant database applications with MongoDB and PHP. Written by the Chief Solutions Architect at 10gen-the company that develops and supports this open source database-this book takes you through MongoDB basics such as queries, read-write operations, and administration, and then dives into MapReduce, sharding, and other advanced topics. Get out of the relational database rut,

  10. The efficacy and safety of burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage for chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma in children under 2 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kazuya; Akutsu, Nobuyuki; Otsuka, Kunitoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Kawamura, Atsufumi; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2016-12-01

    Various treatment modalities have been used in the management of chronic subdural hematoma and subdural hygroma (CSDH/SDHy) in children. However, few studies have examined burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage in such cases. Here, we retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage for CSDH/SDHy in children under 2 years old. We also aimed to determine the predictors of CSDH/SDHy recurrence. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 25 children under 2 years old who underwent burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage for CSDH/SDHy at a pediatric teaching hospital over a 10-year period. We analyzed the relationship between CSDH/SDHy recurrence and factors such as abusive head trauma, laterality of CSDH/SDHy, and subdural fluid collection type (hematoma or hygroma). CSDH/SDHy recurred in 5 of the 25 patients (20 %), requiring a second operation at an average of 0.92 ± 1.12 months after the initial procedure. The mean follow-up period was 25.1 ± 28.6 months. There were no complications related to either operation. None of the assessed factors were statistically associated with recurrence. Burr-hole craniotomy without continuous drainage for CSDH/SDHy appears safe in children aged under 2 years and results in a relatively low recurrence rate. No predictors of CSDH/SDHy recurrence were identified. Advantages of this method include avoiding external subdural drainage-related complications. However, burr-hole drainage may be more effective for CSDH, which our data suggests is more likely to recur than SDHy, providing the procedure is performed with specific efforts to reduce complications.

  11. An Overview of CC Coherent Pion Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Zachary

    2017-01-01

    Neutrino cross-sections are a critical component to any neutrino measurement. With the modern neutrino experiments aiming to measure precision parameters, such as those in long-baseline oscillation experiments, the need for a detailed understanding of neutrino interactions has become even more important. Within this landscape remains a number of experimental challenges in the regime of low energy neutrino cross-sections. This talk will give an overview of recent publications on Charged Current-Coherent Pion Production (CC-Coh Pion) results from a number of experimental collaborations. Specifically, the lack of observation from the SciBooNE and T2K collaborations to observe CC-Coh Pion below one GeV in contrast to the observation of this signature at higher energies by other experiments. The work presented here is a part of the beginning steps to a reanalysis of the SciBooNE data using a modern neutrino generator in order to better understand the previous results. There will be included details of a liquid Argon purification system that is being built at UTA, and of plans for a ``Baby Time Projection Chamber (TPC)'' which will also be built at UTA, and the instrumentation and detector methods used in their construction. The closing is a look to the future for a new analysis at low neutrino energies utilizing Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) based at Fermilab.

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 78213804 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Syncc9605_2296 Synechococcus sp. CC9605 MHRSLLLWIVAMACTTSSVGASQSWKRSLPLQEASQQAVTAANAVINQSGSEECLRGKFSNAILRLSNSCDVSGYSSTECELASKIAGQESKLSMSDMIATSETLLDLLGDSATSN

  13. Trepanation or complete removal of the outer table of the calvarium for granulation induction: the Erbium:YAG laser as an alternative to the rose head burr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valesky, Eva M; Vogl, Thomas; Kaufmann, Roland; Meissner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Large scalp defects devoid of periosteum following tumor excisions are a surgical challenge. In this case, drilling the outer table of the calvarium with a rose head burr is a standard method to induce granulation tissue. We describe an alternative for trepanation or complete removal of the outer table of the calvarium. We demonstrate the use of an erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (erbium:YAG) laser for the induction of granulation tissue, compare this technique with the standard procedure and evaluate the benefits and limitations. The erbium:YAG laser is an excellent method for trepanation or complete removal of the outer table of the calvarium and induction of granulation tissue. Conclusion: The use of the laser for trepanation of the calvarium gives results comparable to those of the rose head burr for inducing granulation tissue but has its benefits. Therefore, this method should become a standard alternative to the known procedure.

  14. Optimization of Burr size, Surface Roughness and Circularity Deviation during Drilling of Al 6061 using Taguchi Design Method and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Sreenivasulu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the influence of cutting parameters like cutting speed, feed rate, drill diameter, point angle and clearance angle on the burr size, surface roughness and circularity deviation of Al 6061 during drilling on CNC vertical machining center. A plan of experiments based on Taguchi technique has been used to acquire the data. An orthogonal array, signal to noise (S/N ratio and analysis of variance (ANOVA are employed to investigate machining characteristics of Al 6061 using HSS twist drill bits of variable tool geometry and maintain constant helix angle of 45 degrees. Confirmation tests have been carried out to predict the optimal setting of process parameters to validate the used approach, obtained the values of 0.2618mm, 0.1821mm, 3.7451µm, 0.0676mm for burr height, burr thickness, surface roughness and circularity deviation respectively. Finally, artificial neural network has been applied to compare the predicted values with the experimental values, good agreement was shown between the predictive model results and the experimental measurements. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  15. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D

    2017-01-01

    for cerebral glucose hypometabolism and unravel the functionality of cerebral mitochondria in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate and tissue...... extracts were analysed by mass spectrometry. Oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of brain mitochondria of db/db mice were assessed by Seahorse XFe96 and luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. Glucose hypometabolism was observed for both cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice....... Significant increased metabolism of [1,2-(13)C]acetate and [U-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyrate was observed for hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Furthermore, brain mitochondria of db/db mice exhibited elevated oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis rate. This study provides evidence of several changes in brain energy...

  16. Dicty_cDB: SLA124 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FP_125701 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum cDNA clone WHAP020_G...AA22DB11 5', mRNA sequence. 202 2e-49 2 CF588057 |CF588057.1 USDA-FP_121200-058 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid...86814 |CN586814.1 USDA-FP_129886 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum cDNA clone WHAP090_B10,

  17. Integration of Rabbit Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Hydroxyapatite Burr Hole Button Device for Bone Interface Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Gayathri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells, multipotent stem cells isolated from adipose tissue, present close resemblance to the natural in vivo milieu and microenvironment of bone tissue and hence widely used for in bone tissue engineering applications. The present study evaluates the compatibility of tissue engineered hydroxyapatite burr hole button device (HAP-BHB seeded with Rabbit Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (ADMSCs. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress response, apoptotic behavior, attachment, and adherence of adipose MSC seeded on the device were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal microscopy. The results of the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay indicated that powdered device material was noncytotoxic up to 0.5 g/mL on cultured cells. It was also observed that oxidative stress related reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis on cell seeded device were similar to those of control (cells alone except in 3-day period which showed increased reactive oxygen species generation. Further scanning electron and confocal microscopy indicated a uniform attachment of cells and viability up to 200 μm deep inside the device, respectively. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the in-house developed HAP-BHB device seeded with ADMSCs is nontoxic/safe compatible device for biomedical application and an attractive tissue engineered device for calvarial defect regeneration.

  18. Replacement of Neisseria meningitidis C cc11/ET-15 variant by a cc103 hypervirulent clone, Brazil 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, Guilherme; Cordeiro, Soraia; Gomes, Erica; Romanelli, Cinthia; Andrade, Claudia; Reis, Joice; de Filippis, Ivano

    2013-08-01

    Outbreaks caused by serogroup C meningococci in the northeast region of Brazil from 2005 to 2011 were associated to the emergence of variant ET-15 of cc11, which has been replaced by cc103 from 2006 to date. The increase of cc103 should be closely monitored to prevent the spread of this clone to neighbouring regions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The IRPVM-DB database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, L.M.; Gillemot, F.; Yanko, L.; Lyssakov, V.

    1997-01-01

    The IRPVM-DB (International Reactor Pressure Vessel Material Database) initiated by the IAEA IWG LMNPP is going to collect the available surveillance and research data world-wide on RPV material ageing. This paper presents the purpose of the database; it summarizes the type and the relationship of data included; it gives information about the data access and protection; and finally, it summarizes the state of art of the database. (author). 1 ref., 2 figs

  20. A New Characterization of ACC0 and Probabilistic CC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucký, Michal

    2010-01-01

    that use only O(log n) random bits. This may be viewed as evidence contrary to the conjecture. As a consequence of our construction we get that all of ACC0 can be computed by probabilistic CC0 circuits that use only O(log n) random bits. Thus, if one were able to derandomize such circuits, one would obtain...... a collapse of circuit classes giving ACC0 = CC0. We present a derandomization of probabilistic CC0 circuits using And and Or gates to obtain ACC0 = And ο Or ο CC0 = Or ο And ο CC0. (And and Or gates of sublinear fan-in suffice in non-uniform setting.) Both these results hold for uniform as well as non......-uniform circuit classes. For non-uniform circuits we obtain the stronger conclusion that ACC0 = rand - ACC0 = rand - CC0 = rand(log n)- CC0, i.e., probabilistic ACC0 circuits can be simulated by probabilistic CC0 circuits using only O(log n) random bits. As an application of our results we obtain...

  1. Radiological diagnosis and intervention of cholangiocarcinomas (CC); Radiologische Diagnostik und Intervention von Cholangiokarzinomen (CC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S.; Eichler, K.; Gruber-Rouh, T.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Weisser, P. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Trojan, J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik I: Gastroenterologie, Endokrinologie, Pneumologie/Allergologie

    2012-10-15

    To present current data on diagnosis, indication and different therapy options in patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CC) based on an analysis of the current literature and clinical experience. The diagnostic routine includes laboratory investigations with parameters of cholestasis and also serum tumor markers CA19 - 9 and CEA. After ultrasound for clarifying a tumor and/or dilated bile ducts, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be performed with magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP). The accuracy (positive predictive value) for diagnosing a CC is 37 - 84 % (depending on the location) for ultrasound, 79 - 94 % for computed tomography (CT), and 95 % for MRI and MRCP. An endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) can then be planned, especially if biliary drainage or cytological or histological specimen sampling is intended. A curative approach can be achieved by surgical resection, rarely by liver transplantation. However, many patients are not eligible for surgery. In addition to systemic chemotherapy, locoregional therapies such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) - also known as chemoperfusion -, drug eluting beads-therapy (DEB) as well as thermoablative procedures, such as laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), microwave ablation (MWA) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be provided with a palliative intention.

  2. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), Fiscal year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1991-05-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees are established and are continuing their own programs: Structural Ceramics, Electrochemical Technologies, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Superconductivity. In addition, the EMaCC aids in obtaining materialsrelated inputs for both intra- and inter-agency compilations. Membership in the EMaCC is open to any Department organizational unit; participants are appointed by Division or Office Directors. The current active membership is listed on the following four pages. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1990 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department. The Chairman of EMaCC for FY 1990 was Scott L. Richlen; the Executive Secretary was Dr. Jerry Smith.

  3. Getting started with MariaDB

    CERN Document Server

    Bartholomew, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A practical, hands-on, beginner-friendly guide to installing and using MariaDB.Getting Started with MariaDB is for anyone who wants to learn more about databases in general or MariaDB in particular. No prior database experience is required. It is assumed that you have basic knowledge of software installation, editing files with a text editor, and using the command line and terminal.

  4. CouchDB the definitive guide

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, J; Slater, Noah

    2010-01-01

    Three of CouchDB's creators show you how to use this document-oriented database as a standalone application framework or with high-volume, distributed applications. With its simple model for storing, processing, and accessing data, CouchDB is ideal for web applications that handle huge amounts of loosely structured data. That alone would stretch the limits of a relational database, yet CouchDB offers an open source solution that's reliable, scales easily, and responds quickly. CouchDB works with self-contained data that has loose or ad-hoc connections. It's a model that fits many real-world

  5. Laser surface texturing of cast iron steel: dramatic edge burr reduction and high speed process optimisation for industrial production using DPSS picosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneel, David; Kearsley, Andrew; Karnakis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In this work we present picosecond DPSS laser surface texturing optimisation of automotive grade cast iron steel. This application attracts great interest, particularly in the automotive industry, to reduce friction between moving piston parts in car engines, in order to decrease fuel consumption. This is accomplished by partially covering with swallow microgrooves the inner surface of a piston liner and is currently a production process adopting much longer pulse (microsecond) DPSS lasers. Lubricated interface conditions of moving parts require from the laser process to produce a very strictly controlled surface topography around the laser formed grooves, whose edge burr height must be lower than 100 nm. To achieve such a strict tolerance, laser machining of cast iron steel was investigated using an infrared DPSS picosecond laser (10ps duration) with an output power of 16W and a repetition rate of 200 kHz. The ultrashort laser is believed to provide a much better thermal management of the etching process. All studies presented here were performed on flat samples in ambient air but the process is transferrable to cylindrical geometry engine liners. We will show that reducing significantly the edge burr below an acceptable limit for lubricated engine production is possible using such lasers and remarkably the process window lies at very high irradiated fluences much higher that the single pulse ablation threshold. This detailed experimental work highlights the close relationship between the optimised laser irradiation conditions as well as the process strategy with the final size of the undesirable edge burrs. The optimised process conditions are compatible with an industrial production process and show the potential for removing extra post)processing steps (honing, etc) of cylinder liners on the manufacturing line saving time and cost.

  6. Search for the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S -F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    A search for the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^{+}$ in the decay mode $\\Xi_{cc}^{+} \\to \\Lambda_c^+ K^- \\pi^+$ is performed with a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.65 fb$^{-1}$, of $pp$ collisions recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. No significant signal is found in the mass range 3300--3800 MeV$/c^2$. Upper limits at the 95\\% confidence level on the ratio of the $\\Xi_{cc}^{+}$ production cross-section times branching fraction to that of the $\\Lambda_c^+$, $R$, are given as a function of the $\\Xi_{cc}^{+}$ mass and lifetime. The largest upper limits range from $R<1.5 \\times 10^{-2}$ for a lifetime of 100 fs to $R<3.9 \\times 10^{-4}$ for a lifetime of 400 fs.

  7. The ModelCC Model-Driven Parser Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Berzal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Syntax-directed translation tools require the specification of a language by means of a formal grammar. This grammar must conform to the specific requirements of the parser generator to be used. This grammar is then annotated with semantic actions for the resulting system to perform its desired function. In this paper, we introduce ModelCC, a model-based parser generator that decouples language specification from language processing, avoiding some of the problems caused by grammar-driven parser generators. ModelCC receives a conceptual model as input, along with constraints that annotate it. It is then able to create a parser for the desired textual syntax and the generated parser fully automates the instantiation of the language conceptual model. ModelCC also includes a reference resolution mechanism so that ModelCC is able to instantiate abstract syntax graphs, rather than mere abstract syntax trees.

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigation of 1J(CC) and (n)J(CC) coupling constants in strychnine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, R Thomas; Buevich, Alexei V; Martin, Gary E

    2012-10-05

    A relatively unexplored and unexploited means of establishing molecular structure, stereochemistry, and probing vicinal bond angles is through the use of long-range (13)C-(13)C coupling constants. The measurement of these multifunctional, diagnostic (3)J(CC) couplings has not been reported on sample amounts viable for the practicing organic chemist. A generalized protocol for the measurement of (1)J(CC) and (3)J(CC) couplings using a 4.6 mg sample of strychnine as a model compound is described, and the utility of DFT calculations for the prediction of these useful molecular descriptors and the congruence of the calculated and experimental data is demonstrated.

  9. Portulaca oleracea Ameliorates Diabetic Vascular Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in db/db Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, An Sook; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Yoon, Jung Joo; Kim, Jin Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with significantly accelerated rates of micro- and macrovascular complications such as diabetic vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of the aqueous extract of Portulaca oleracea L. (AP), an edible plant used as a folk medicine, on diabetic vascular complications. The db/db mice were treated with AP (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 10 weeks, and AP treatment markedly lowered blood glucose, plasma triglyceride, plasma level of LDL-cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure in diabetic db/db mice. Furthermore, AP significantly increased plasma level of HDL-cholesterol and insulin level. The impairment of ACh- and SNP-induced vascular relaxation of aortic rings were ameliorated by AP treatment in diabetic db/db mice. This study also showed that overexpression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-selectin, MMP-2, and ET-1 were observed in aortic tissues of untreated db/db mice, which were significantly suppressed by treatment with AP. We also found that the insulin immunoreactivity of the pancreatic islets remarkably increased in AP treated db/db mice compared with untreated db/db mice. Taken together, AP suppresses hyperglycemia and diabetic vascular inflammation, and prevents the development of diabetic endothelial dysfunction for the development of diabetes and its vascular complications. PMID:22474522

  10. A theoretical study on the aromaticity of benzene and related derivatives incorporating a C-C C-C fragment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanchez-Sanz, Goar; Trujillo, Cristina; Rozas, I.; Elguero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 35 (2013), s. 7333-7344 ISSN 0040-4020 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : dehydroannulenes * aromaticity * NICS * chemical shifts * benzene Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.817, year: 2013

  11. Optimization of Drilling Parameters for Reducing the Burr Height in Machining the Silicon Carbide Particle (SiCp) Coated with Multi Wall Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNT) Reinforced in Aluminum Alloy (A 356) Using Meta Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, M.; Prakash, S.

    2017-05-01

    This paper explains the optimization of drilling parameters using meta modeling approach to reduce the burr height while machining Silicon Carbide Particle (SiCp) coated with Multi Wall Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNT) and reinforced in aluminum alloy (A 356). The specimen is prepared by the combination of sonication and stir casting processes. The volume fraction of MWCNT used is 1.5% and the volume fraction of SiCp is 10%. The combination of input parameters for drilling the holes is designed using Taguchi experimental design technique. The input parameters chosen for drilling operations are spindle speed, feed rate and drill diameter. The ranges of input parameters are listed in Table 1. The tools used for drilling operation are made up of solid carbide drill bit. Meta model is a mathematical and statistical model whose second-order model can be fitted by factorial design. The optimization model can be improved significantly by the second-order model compared to the first-order model. Twenty-seven holes are drilled using vertical machining center in the prepared specimen (A 356/MWCNT coated SiCp). Desirability function shows the optimized values of input parameters to obtain minimum burr height. Meta modeling approach is used to design a model using input parameters and output response burr height. The residuals plot shows the predicted values are closer to the measured values. This plot explains that the Meta model is adequately used to predict the burr height. The optimized values of input parameters for obtaining minimum burr height are the combination of high speed, low feed and low drill diameter. The minimum value of burr height observed in this experiment is 0.002mm and it is obtained in the optimized combination of N3, f1 and d1.

  12. IBM DB2 97 Advanced Administration Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Neagu, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    This cookbook has recipes written in a simple, easy to understand format, with lots of screenshots and insightful tips and hints. If you are a DB2 Database Administrator who wants to understand and get hands on with the underlying aspects of database administration, then this book is for you. This book assumes that you have a basic understanding of DB2 database concepts.

  13. Getting started with OrientDB

    CERN Document Server

    Tesoriero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial aimed at making you an OrientDB expert, through the use of practical examples, explained in a step-by-step format.Getting Started with OrientDB 1.3.0 is great for database designers, developers, and systems engineers. It is assumed that you are familiar with NoSQL concepts, Java, and networking principles.

  14. Origin and diversification of land plant CC-type glutaredoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, M; Bhave, M; Zachgo, S

    2009-07-31

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are ubiquitous glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymes implicated in redox homeostasis, particularly oxidative stress response. Three major classes of GRX genes exist, the CPYC, CGFS classes are present in all pro- and eukaryote species, whereas the CC-type class GRXs are specific to land plants. In the basal land plant Physcomitrella patens, only two CC-type GRXs are present, compared with 21 in Arabidopsis. In contrast, sizes of the CPYC and CGFS classes remained rather similar throughout plant evolution, raising the interesting question as to when the CC-type GRXs first originated and how and why they expanded during land plant evolution. Recent evidence suggests that CC-type GRXs may have been recruited during evolution into diverse plant-specific functions of flower development (ROXY1, ROXY2) and pathogenesis response (ROXY19/GRX480). In the present study, GRX genes from the genomes of a range of green algae and evolutionarily diverse land plant species were identified; Ostreococcus, Micromonas, Volvox, Selaginella, Vitis, Sorghum, and Brachypodium. Previously identified sequences from Chlamydomonas, Physcomitrella, Oryza, Arabidopsis, and Populus were integrated to generate a more comprehensive understanding of the forces behind the evolution of various GRX classes. The analysis indicates that the CC-type GRXs probably arose by diversification from the CPYC class, at a time coinciding with colonization of land by plants. This strong differential expansion of the CC-type class occurred exclusively in the angiosperms, mainly through paleopolyploidy duplication events shortly after the monocot-eudicot split, and more recently through multiple tandem duplications that occurred independently in five investigated angiosperm lineages. The presented data suggest that following duplications, subfunctionalization, and subsequent neofunctionalization likely facilitated the sequestration of land plant-specific CC-type GRXs into novel functions

  15. Anti-Diabetic Activities of Jiaotaiwan in db/db Mice by Augmentation of AMPK Protein Activity and Upregulation of GLUT4 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jiaotaiwan (JTW, which is composed of Coptis chinensis (CC and cinnamon (CIN, is one of the most well-known traditional Chinese medicines. In this study, we investigated the antidiabetic effects and mechanism of JTW in db/db mice. Results showed that JTW significantly decreased the level of fasting blood glucose and improved glucose and insulin tolerance better than CC or CIN alone. JTW also effectively protected the pancreatic islet shape, augmented the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the liver, and increased the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 protein in skeletal muscle and white fat. AMPK and GLUT4 contributed to glucose metabolism regulation and had an essential function in the development of diabetes mellitus (DM. Therefore, the mechanisms of JTW may be related to suppressing gluconeogenesis by activating AMPK in the liver and affecting glucose uptake in surrounding tissues through the upregulation of GLUT4 protein expression. These findings provided a new insight into the antidiabetic clinical applications of JTW and demonstrated the potential of JTW as a new drug candidate for DM treatment.

  16. Ultrasonographic Characterization of the db/db Mouse: An Animal Model of Metabolic Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Faita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of an animal model able to reliably mirror organ damage occurring in metabolic diseases is an urgent need. These models, mostly rodents, have not been fully characterized in terms of cardiovascular, renal, and hepatic ultrasound parameters, and only sparse values can be found in literature. Aim of this paper is to provide a detailed, noninvasive description of the heart, vessels, liver, and kidneys of the db/db mouse by ultrasound imaging. Sixteen wild type and thirty-four db/db male mice (11-week-old were studied. State-of-the-art ultrasound technology was used to acquire images of cardiovascular, renal, and hepatic districts. A set of parameters describing function of the selected organs was evaluated. db/db mice are characterized by systolic and diastolic dysfunction, confirmed by strain analysis. Abdominal aortic and carotid stiffness do not seem to be increased in diabetic rodents; furthermore, they are characterized by a smaller mean diameter for both vessels. Renal microcirculation is significantly compromised, while liver steatosis is only slightly higher in db/db mice than in controls. We offer here for the first time an in vivo detailed ultrasonographic characterization of the db/db mouse, providing a useful tool for a thoughtful choice of the right rodent model for any experimental design.

  17. Impaired Muscle Regeneration in Ob/ob and Db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai-Huong Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In obesity and type 2 diabetes, efficient skeletal muscle repair following injury may be required, not only for restoring muscle structure and function, but also for maintaining exercise capacity and insulin sensitivity. The hypothesis of this study was that muscle regeneration would be impaired in ob/ob and db/db mice, which are common mouse models of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Muscle injury was produced by cardiotoxin injection, and regeneration was assessed by morphological and immunostaining techniques. Muscle regeneration was delayed in ob/ob and db/db mice, but not in a less severe model of insulin resistance – feeding a high-fat diet to wild-type mice. Angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and myoblast accumulation were also impaired in ob/ob and db/db mice, but not the high-fat diet mice. The impairments in muscle regeneration were associated with impaired macrophage accumulation; macrophages have been shown previously to be required for efficient muscle regeneration. Impaired regeneration in ob/ob and db/db mice could be due partly to the lack of leptin signaling, since leptin is expressed both in damaged muscle and in cultured muscle cells. In summary, impaired muscle regeneration in ob/ob and db/db mice was associated with reduced macrophage accumulation, angiogenesis, and myoblast activity, and could have implications for insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscle of obese and type 2 diabetic patients.

  18. Efficient C/C++ programming smaller, faster, better

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Efficient C/C++ Programming describes a practical, real-world approach to efficient C/C++ programming. Topics covered range from how to save storage using a restricted character set and how to speed up access to records by employing hash coding and caching. A selective mailing list system is used to illustrate rapid access to and rearrangement of information selected by criteria specified at runtime.Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins by discussing factors to consider when deciding whether a program needs optimization. In the next chapter, a supermarket price lookup system is used to

  19. MongoDB the definitive guide

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorow, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    How does MongoDB help you manage a huMONGOus amount of data collected through your web application? With this authoritative introduction, you'll learn the many advantages of using document-oriented databases, and discover why MongoDB is a reliable, high-performance system that allows for almost infinite horizontal scalability. Written by engineers from 10gen, the company that develops and supports this open source database, MongoDB: The Definitive Guide provides guidance for database developers, advanced configuration for system administrators, and an overview of the concepts and use cases f

  20. A business plan for SylvaDB

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez Sánchez de León, Juan Luis

    2014-01-01

    Pla de negoci i descripció de producte per SylvaDB, un sistema de gestió de base de dades orientada a grafs desenvolupada al CulturePlex Lab, al Canadà. Plan de negocio y descripción de producto para SylvaDB, un sistema de gestión de base de datos orientada a grafos desarrollada en el CulturePlex Lab, en Canadá. A business plan and product description for SylvaDB, a graph database management system developed in the CulturePlex Lab, Canada.

  1. Crossing Levels and Representations: The Connected Chemistry (CC1) Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Sharona T.; Wilensky, Uri

    2009-01-01

    Connected Chemistry (named CC1 to denote Connected Chemistry Chapter 1) is a computer-based environment for learning the topics of gas laws and kinetic molecular theory in chemistry. It views chemistry from an "emergent" perspective, how macroscopic phenomena result from the interaction of many submicroscopic particles. Connected Chemistry employs…

  2. The CC-Theory of the Origin of Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, J.E.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I propose a research programme based on a theory called the CC-theory, consisting of three very tentative and speculative hypotheses that together account for the origin of the major aspects of natural language. The core hypothesis (which I will call the Conceptual Copy Hypothesis or

  3. Get more control over your C/C++ service

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Are you looking for a way to better diagnose or monitor your C/C++ programs? Find out more about CMX - a neat, lightweight library (<32Kb) which targets this need. It allows to expose information from inside a process through a simple API, enabling pre-failure detection in combination with your favourite monitoring system.

  4. MRSA CC398 in the pig production chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broens, E.M.; Graat, E.A.M.; Wolf, van der P.J.; Giessen, van de A.W.; Duijkeren, van E.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Nes, van A.; Mevius, D.J.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, a distinct clone of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA CC398) was found in pigs and people in contact with pigs. The structure of the pig production chain in high technology pig husbandry enables pathogens to spread during animal trading, with an increasing prevalence in

  5. Cell volume regulation in hemoglobin CC and AA erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, L.R.; Orringer, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    Swelling hemoglobin CC erythrocytes stimulates a ouabain-insensitive K flux that restores original cell volume. Studies were performed with the K analog, 86 Rb. This volume regulatory pathway was characterized for its anion dependence, sensitivity to loop diuretics, and requirement for Na. The swelling-induced K flux was eliminated if intracellular chloride was replaced by nitrate and both swelling-activated K influx and efflux were partially inhibited by 1 mM furosemide or bumetanide. K influx in swollen hemoglobin CC cells was not diminished when Na in the incubation medium was replaced with choline, indicating Na independence of the swelling-induced flux. Identical experiments with hemoglobin AA cells also demonstrated a swelling-induced increase in K flux, but the magnitude and duration of this increase were considerably less than that seen with hemoglobin CC cells. The increased K flux in hemoglobin AA cells was likewise sensitive to anion replacement and to loop diuretics and did not require the presence of Na. These data indicate that a volume-activated K pathway with similar transport characteristics exists in both hemoglobin CC and AA red cells

  6. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  7. Cohort profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2014-06-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70,000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  8. Novel fixation method of a periprosthetic fracture of the acetabulum using burr holes through the retained cup for locking screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Browne, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum associated with a total hip arthroplasty is relatively low but may be increasing. Treatment options depend upon the stability of the prosthesis. In this case, we report an unusual fracture pattern where a large portion of posterior column remained osseointegrated to a displaced uncemented acetabular component and removal of the cup would have resulted in massive structural bone loss and potential pelvic discontinuity. A metal cutting burr was used to create additional screw holes in the cup to allow us to retain the original implant and also obtain fixation of the fracture. The patient had a good outcome at one year with a healed fracture, stable implant, and excellent function. To our knowledge, this technique has not been previously described and offers surgeons an approach to fix these challenging fractures.

  9. Proteases in Plasma and Kidney of db/db Mice as Markers of Diabetes-Induced Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadler-Olsen, E.; Winberg, J.-O.; Reinholt, F. P.; Larsen, T.; Uhlin-Hansen, L.; Jenssen, T.; Berg, E.; Kolset, S. O.

    2011-01-01

    Db/db mice are overweight, dyslipidemic and develop diabetic complications, relevant for similar complications in human type 2 diabetes. We have used db/db and db/+ control mice to investigate alterations in proteinase expression and activity in circulation and kidneys by SDS-PAGE zymography, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and in situ zymography. Plasma from db/db mice contained larger amounts of serine proteinases compared to db/+ mice. Kidneys from the db/db mice had a significantly larger glomerular surface area and somewhat thicker glomerular basement membranes compared to the db/+ mice. Furthermore, kidney extracts from db/+ mice contained metalloproteinases with M r of approximately 92000, compatible with MMP-9, not observed in db/db mice. These results indicate that higher levels of serine proteinases in plasma may serve as potential markers for kidney changes in db/db mice, whereas a decrease in MMP-9 in the kidney may be related to the glomerular changes. PMID:22363890

  10. Perivascular adipose tissue control of insulin-induced vasoreactivity in muscle is impaired in db/db mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meijer, Rick I; Bakker, Wineke; Alta, Caro-Lynn A F

    2013-01-01

    (-/-) were studied. In AMPKa2(-/-) resistance arteries, insulin caused vasoconstriction in the presence of PVAT, and AMPKa2(+/+) resistance arteries showed a neutral response. On the other hand, inhibition of the inflammatory kinase Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) in db/db PVAT restored insulin...... in muscle, the underlying mechanisms, and how obesity disturbs this vasodilation. Insulin-induced vasoreactivity of resistance arteries was studied with PVAT from C57BL/6 or db/db mice. PVAT weight in muscle was higher in db/db mice compared with C57BL/6 mice. PVAT from C57BL/6 mice uncovered insulin......-induced vasodilation; this vasodilation was abrogated with PVAT from db/db mice. Blocking adiponectin abolished the vasodilator effect of insulin in the presence of C57BL/6 PVAT, and adiponectin secretion was lower in db/db PVAT. To investigate this interaction further, resistance arteries of AMPKa2(+/+) and AMPKa2...

  11. Loss of the Intellectual Disability and Autism Gene Cc2d1a and Its Homolog Cc2d1b Differentially Affect Spatial Memory, Anxiety, and Hyperactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Zamarbide

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of genes are mutated in non-syndromic intellectual disability (ID and autism spectrum disorder (ASD, with each gene often involved in only a handful of cases. Such heterogeneity can be daunting, but rare recessive loss of function (LOF mutations can be a good starting point to provide insight into the mechanisms of neurodevelopmental disease. Biallelic LOF mutations in the signaling scaffold CC2D1A cause a rare form of autosomal recessive ID, sometimes associated with ASD and seizures. In parallel, we recently reported that Cc2d1a-deficient mice present with cognitive and social deficits, hyperactivity and anxiety. In Drosophila, loss of the only ortholog of Cc2d1a, lgd, is embryonically lethal, while in vertebrates, Cc2d1a has a homolog Cc2d1b which appears to be compensating, indicating that Cc2d1a and Cc2d1b have a redundant function in humans and mice. Here, we generate an allelic series of Cc2d1a and Cc2d1b LOF to determine the relative role of these genes during behavioral development. We generated Cc2d1b knockout (KO, Cc2d1a/1b double heterozygous and double KO mice, then performed behavioral studies to analyze learning and memory, social interactions, anxiety, and hyperactivity. We found that Cc2d1a and Cc2d1b have partially overlapping roles. Overall, loss of Cc2d1b is less severe than loss of Cc2d1a, only leading to cognitive deficits, while Cc2d1a/1b double heterozygous animals are similar to Cc2d1a-deficient mice. These results will help us better understand the deficits in individuals with CC2D1A mutations, suggesting that recessive CC2D1B mutations and trans-heterozygous CC2D1A and CC2D1B mutations could also contribute to the genetics of ID.

  12. Efficacy of Acetylshikonin in Preventing Obesity and Hepatic Steatosis in db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ling Su

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zicao (Lithospermum erythrorhizon has been used in clinics as a traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Acetylshikonin (AS is the main ingredient of Zicao, Xinjiang, China. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-obesity and anti-nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD efficacy of AS in a model of spontaneous obese db/db mice. Mice were divided into Wild Type (WT groups and db/db groups, which received no treatment or treatment with 100 mg/kg/day clenbuterol (CL hydrochloride or 540 mg/kg/day AS by oral gavage for eight weeks. The results provided the evidence that AS prevented obesity and NAFLD including reduction in body weight, food efficiency ratio, serum triglyceride (TG and free fatty acid (FFA levels in db/db mice. Administration of AS markedly suppressed the levels of hepatic alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and pro-inflammatory cytokines in treated groups when compared with that of db/db groups. Further investigation of the lipid synthesis-related protein using Western blotting revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1, fatty acid synthetase (FAS and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR were significantly downregulated by AS treatment. These findings suggest that AS exerts anti-obesity and anti-NAFLD effects through the regulation of lipid metabolism and anti-inflammatory effects.

  13. Validity of leptin receptor-deficiency (db/db) type 2 diabetes mellitus mice as a model of secondary osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Le; You, Yong-Ke; Zhu, Tracy Y.; Zheng, Li-Zhen; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Chen, Hai-Yong; Yao, Dong; Lan, Hui-Yao; Qin, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validation of the leptin receptor-deficient mice model for secondary osteoporosis associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at bone micro-architectural level. Thirty three 36-week old male mice were divided into four groups: normal control (db/m) (n = 7), leptin receptor-deficient T2DM (db/db) (n = 8), human C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic normal control (crp/db/m) (n = 7), and human CRP transgenic T2DM (crp/db/db) (n = 11). Lumber vertebrae (L5) and bilateral lower limbs were scanned by micro-CT to analyze trabecular and cortical bone quality. Right femora were used for three-point bending to analyze the mechanical properties. Trabecular bone quality at L5 was better in db/db or crp/db/db group in terms of bone mineral density (BMD), bone volume fraction, connectivity density, trabecular number and separation (all p  0.05). Maximum loading and energy yield in mechanical test were similar among groups while the elastic modulus in db/db and crp/db/db significantly lower than db/m. The leptin-receptor mice is not a proper model for secondary osteoporosis associated with T2DM.

  14. Zinc Prevents the Development of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy in db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shudong Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM is highly prevalent in type 2 diabetes (T2DM patients. Zinc is an important essential trace metal, whose deficiency is associated with various chronic ailments, including vascular diseases. We assessed T2DM B6.BKS(D-Leprdb/J (db/db mice fed for six months on a normal diet containing three zinc levels (deficient, adequate, and supplemented, to explore the role of zinc in DCM development and progression. Cardiac function, reflected by ejection fraction, was significantly decreased, along with increased left ventricle mass and heart weight to tibial length ratio, in db/db mice. As a molecular cardiac hypertrophy marker, atrial natriuretic peptide levels were also significantly increased. Cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy were accompanied by significantly increased fibrotic (elevated collagen accumulation as well as transforming growth factor β and connective tissue growth factor levels and inflammatory (enhanced expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, caspase recruitment domain family member 9, and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10, and activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in the heart. All these diabetic effects were exacerbated by zinc deficiency, and not affected by zinc supplementation, respectively. Mechanistically, oxidative stress and damage, mirrored by the accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, was significantly increased along with significantly decreased expression of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidants (NQO-1 and catalase. This was also exacerbated by zinc deficiency in the db/db mouse heart. These results suggested that zinc deficiency promotes the development and progression of DCM in T2DM db/db mice. The exacerbated effects by zinc deficiency on the heart of db/db mice may be related to further suppression of Nrf2 expression and function.

  15. Observation of the Doubly Charmed Baryon Ξcc ++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alfonso Albero, A.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Beliy, N.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Berninghoff, D.; Bertholet, E.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjoern, M. B.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Borysova, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brundu, D.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Byczynski, W.; Cadeddu, S.; Cai, H.; Calabrese, R.; Calladine, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chitic, S.-G.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Colombo, T.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Douglas, L.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Federici, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Declara, P.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Grabowski, J. P.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hancock, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hasse, C.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Hecker, M.; Heinicke, K.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Huard, Z.-C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Ibis, P.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kazeev, N.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozeiha, M.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, P.-R.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Lisovskyi, V.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Loi, A.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Macko, V.; Mackowiak, P.; Maddock, B.; Maddrell-Mander, S.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Maisuzenko, D.; Majewski, M. W.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Marangotto, D.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Mead, J. V.; Meadows, B.; Meaux, C.; Meier, F.; Meinert, N.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Millard, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Minzoni, L.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Mombacher, T.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Pullen, H.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Quintana, B.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Ravonel Salzgeber, M.; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Ruiz Vidal, J.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Gonzalo, D.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarpis, G.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stepanova, M.; Stevens, H.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; Szymanski, M.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Usachov, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagner, A.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M. A.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    A highly significant structure is observed in the Λc+K-π+π+ mass spectrum, where the Λc+ baryon is reconstructed in the decay mode p K-π+. The structure is consistent with originating from a weakly decaying particle, identified as the doubly charmed baryon Ξcc ++. The difference between the masses of the Ξcc ++ and Λc+ states is measured to be 1334.94 ±0.72 (stat.) ±0.27 (syst. ) MeV /c2 , and the Ξcc ++ mass is then determined to be 3621.40 ±0.72 (stat.) ±0.27 (syst. ) ±0.14 (Λc+) MeV /c2 , where the last uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge of the Λc+ mass. The state is observed in a sample of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7 fb-1, and confirmed in an additional sample of data collected at 8 TeV.

  16. Observation of the Doubly Charmed Baryon Ξ_{cc}^{++}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alfonso Albero, A; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baryshnikov, F; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Beiter, A; Bel, L J; Beliy, N; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Beranek, S; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Berninghoff, D; Bertholet, E; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Bjoern, M B; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Borysova, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brundu, D; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Byczynski, W; Cadeddu, S; Cai, H; Calabrese, R; Calladine, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chitic, S-G; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Ciambrone, P; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Colombo, T; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Del Buono, L; Dembinski, H-P; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Nezza, P; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Douglas, L; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziewiecki, M; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Federici, L; Ferguson, D; Fernandez, G; Fernandez Declara, P; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gabriel, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Grabowski, J P; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruber, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hancock, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hasse, C; Hatch, M; He, J; Hecker, M; Heinicke, K; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Z-C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Ibis, P; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kazeev, N; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozeiha, M; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, P-R; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Lisovskyi, V; Liu, X; Loh, D; Loi, A; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Macko, V; Mackowiak, P; Maddock, B; Maddrell-Mander, S; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Maisuzenko, D; Majewski, M W; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Marangotto, D; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Mead, J V; Meadows, B; Meaux, C; Meier, F; Meinert, N; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Millard, E; Minard, M-N; Minzoni, L; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Mombacher, T; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Pullen, H; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Quintana, B; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Ravonel Salzgeber, M; Reboud, M; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Robert, A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Ruiz Vidal, J; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Gonzalo, D; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarpis, G; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stepanova, M; Stevens, H; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; Szymanski, M; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Usachov, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagner, A; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M A; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zonneveld, J B; Zucchelli, S

    2017-09-15

    A highly significant structure is observed in the Λ_{c}^{+}K^{-}π^{+}π^{+} mass spectrum, where the Λ_{c}^{+} baryon is reconstructed in the decay mode pK^{-}π^{+}. The structure is consistent with originating from a weakly decaying particle, identified as the doubly charmed baryon Ξ_{cc}^{++}. The difference between the masses of the Ξ_{cc}^{++} and Λ_{c}^{+} states is measured to be 1334.94±0.72(stat.)±0.27(syst.)  MeV/c^{2}, and the Ξ_{cc}^{++} mass is then determined to be 3621.40±0.72(stat.)±0.27(syst.)±0.14(Λ_{c}^{+})  MeV/c^{2}, where the last uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge of the Λ_{c}^{+} mass. The state is observed in a sample of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7  fb^{-1}, and confirmed in an additional sample of data collected at 8 TeV.

  17. Dynamic analysis of C/C composite finger seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guoding

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A seal device as an important component of aeroengines has decisive influence on performance, reliability, and working life of aeroengines. With the development of aeroengines, demands on the performance characteristics of seal devices are made strictly. Finger seal as a novel kind of sealing device, recently attracts more and more attentions in academic circles and engineering fields at home and abroad. Research on finger seals has been extensively developed, especially on leakage and wear performances under dynamic conditions. However, it is a pity that the work on finger seals has been limited with a single approach that is improving the performance by structural optimization; in addition, the technology of dynamic analysis on finger seals is weak. Aiming at the problems mentioned above, a distributed mass equivalent dynamic model of finger seals considering the coupling effect of overlaid laminates is established in the present paper, the dynamic performance of 2.5 dimension C/C composite finger seal is analyzed with the model, and then the effects of fiber bundle density and fiber bundle preparation direction on finger seal’s dynamic performance are discussed, as well as compared with those of Co-based alloy finger seal. The current work is about dynamic analysis of finger seals and application of C/C composite in this paper may have much academic significance and many engineering values for improving research level of finger seal dynamics and exploring feasibility of C/C composite being used for finger seals.

  18. Getting started with LevelDB

    CERN Document Server

    Dent, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The book is a concise guide for using LevelDB. It explains database concepts and the use of C++, ranging from the basics all the way to high level topics in an easy to follow, step-by-step format.The book is meant for developers who want an embedded database for their applications. Experienced programmers can pick up on the sophisticated data mapping patterns and tuning tips.Getting Started with LevelDB requires a minimal background in programming in C++ or Objective-C for OS/X or iOS and familiarity with XCode. Therefore it teaches enough C++ to use LevelDB without presuming any C++ knowledge

  19. Dienogest inhibits C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 expression in human endometriotic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Shizuka; Nakakuki, Masanori; Ichioka, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yutaka; Hashiba, Masamichi; Miyazaki, Hiroyasu; Kyo, Satoru

    2017-07-01

    C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 is thought to contribute to the development of endometriosis by recruiting Th17 lymphocytes into endometriotic foci. The present study investigated the effects of dienogest, a progesterone receptor agonist used to treat endometriosis, on C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 expression by endometriotic cells. Effects of dienogest on mRNA expression and protein secretion of C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 induced by interleukin 1β were assessed in three immortalized endometriotic epithelial cell lines, parental cells (EMosis-CC/TERT1), and stably expressing human progesterone receptor isoform A (EMosis-CC/TERT1/PRA+) or isoform B (EMosis-CC/TERT1/PRA-/PRB+). Dienogest markedly inhibited interleukin 1β-stimulated C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 mRNA expression and protein secretion in EMosis-CC/TERT1/PRA-/PRB+, which was abrogated by the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486. In EMosis-CC/TERT1/PRA+, dienogest slightly inhibited C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 mRNA and protein. In EMosis-CC/TERT1, dienogest slightly inhibited C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 mRNA, but had no effect on C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 protein. Dienogest inhibited interleukin 1β-induced up-regulation of C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 in endometriotic epithelial cells, mainly mediated by progesterone receptor B. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcriptional Profile of Kidney from Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haojun Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN, a common diabetic microvascular complication, is characterized by progressive glomerular sclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in DN remain to be elucidated. We explored changes in the transcriptional profile in spontaneous type 2 diabetic db/db mice by using the cDNA microarray. Compared with control db/m mice, the db/db mice exhibited marked increases in body weight, kidney weight, and urinary albumin excretion. Renal histological analysis revealed mesangial expansion and thickness of the basement membrane in the kidney of the db/db mice. A total of 355 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified by microarray analysis. Pathway enrichment analysis suggested that biological oxidation, bile acid metabolism, and steroid hormone synthesis were the 3 major significant pathways. The top 10 hub genes were selected from the constructed PPI network of DEGs, including Ccnb2 and Nr1i2, which remained largely unclear in DN. We believe that our study can help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying DN.

  1. Protective effects of astragaloside IV on db/db mice with diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhi Ding

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy (DR is a common diabetic eye disease which is well-known as the result of microvascular retinal changes. Although the potential biological functions of astragaloside IV (AS IV have long been described in traditional system of medicine, its protective effect on DR remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the function and mechanism of AS IV on type 2 diabetic db/db mice.Db/db mice were treated with AS IV (4.5 mg/kg or 9 mg/kg or physiological saline by oral gavage for 20 weeks along with db/m mice. In each group, retinal ganglion cell (RGC function was measured by pattern electroretinogram (ERG and apoptosis was determined by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. Blood and retina aldose reductase (AR activity were quantified by chemiluminescence analysis. The expressions of phosporylated-ERK1/2, NF-κB were determined by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the expression of related downstream proteins were quantified by Label-based Mouse Antibody Array.Administration of AS IV significantly improved the amplitude in pattern ERG and reduced the apoptosis of RGCs.in db/db mice. Furthermore, downregulation of AR activity, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, NF-κB and related cytokine were observed in AS IV treatment group.Our study indicated that AS IV, as an inhibitor of AR, could prevent the activation of ERK1/2 phosporylation and NF-kB and further relieve the RGCs disfunction in db/db mice with DR. It has provided a basis for investigating the clinical efficacy of AR inhibitors in preventing DR.

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09678-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 36 1.7 4 ( CP000107 ) Ehrlichia canis str. Jake, complete genome. 36 1.8 22 ( CC643845 ) OGM...omic clone ZMM... 36 2.2 2 ( CL998449 ) ZMMBHf0011o10.f ZMMBHf Zea mays genomic clone ZMM... 36 2.2 2 ( CC643859 ) OGM

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13367-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available M... 46 1.4 1 ( CG050943 ) PUKCN30TD ZM_0.6_1.0_KB Zea mays genomic clone ZM... 46 1.4 1 ( CC715537 ) OGM...AH53TV ZM_0.7_1.5_KB Zea mays genomic clone ZM... 46 1.4 1 ( CC715527 ) OGMAH53TH ZM

  4. Selected CC and CXC chemokines in children with atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Machura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : There are only limited data on CC and CXC chemokines regulation in children with asthma. Aim: We compared the serum profile of selected CC and CXC chemokines in patients with atopic asthma and healthy children. Material and methods : Serum concentration of CC chemokines RANTES, MCP-1, and CXC chemokines IP-10, MIG, IL-8, RANTES was measured using cytometric bead array in 44 children with atopic asthma and 17 healthy subjects. Results: The concentration of RANTES was significantly higher and the MIG level was lower in all children with asthma as compared to their control counterparts. We observed increased RANTES and decreased MIG levels also in patients with stable asthma when compared with children in the control group. The IP-10 concentration was similar between the whole asthma group and healthy controls, while significantly increased levels of this chemokine in acute asthma have been observed when compared to stable asthma. For MCP-1 and IL-8, the serum concentration was similar in all compared groups. The MIG concentration correlated positively with IP-10, IL-8, and CRP levels and negatively with the eosinophil count. A negative correlation between the IP-10 and eosinophil count and a negative correlation between FEV1 and IP-10 were found. Conclusions : An increased serum RANTES level in children with asthma may result in enhancement of Th2 lymphocyte recruitment into the airway. A decreased expression of Th1 chemokine MIG in children with stable asthma may contribute to a diminished antagonizing effect on Th2 cytokine production and hence intensify Th2 predominance. An increased IP-10 level in children during an asthma attack suggest that this chemokine is a serological marker of disease exacerbation.

  5. Cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadel, Daniel R.; Lowe, K. Todd

    2015-08-01

    A flow velocimetry method, cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV), is presented as a robust, simplified, and high dynamic range implementation of the Doppler global/planar Doppler velocimetry technique. A sweep of several gigahertz of the vapor absorption spectrum is used for each velocity sample, with signals acquired from both Doppler-shifted scattered light within the flow and a non-Doppler shifted reference beam. Cross-correlation of these signals yields the Doppler shift between them, averaged over the duration of the scan. With presently available equipment, velocities from 0 ms-1 to over 3000 ms-1 can notionally be measured simultaneously, making the technique ideal for high speed flows. The processing routine is shown to be robust against large changes in the vapor pressure of the iodine cell, benefiting performance of the system in facilities where ambient conditions cannot be easily regulated. Validation of the system was performed with measurements of a model wind turbine blade boundary layer made in a 1.83 m by 1.83 m subsonic wind tunnel for which laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements were acquired alongside the CC-DGV results. CC-DGV uncertainties of ±1.30 ms-1, ±0.64 ms-1, and ±1.11 ms-1 were determined for the orthogonal stream-wise, transverse-horizontal, and transverse-vertical velocity components, and root-mean-square deviations of 2.77 ms-1 and 1.34 ms-1 from the LDV validation results were observed for Reynolds numbers of 1.5 million and 2 million, respectively. Volumetric mean velocity measurements are also presented for a supersonic jet, with velocity uncertainties of ±4.48 ms-1, ±16.93 ms-1, and ±0.50 ms-1 for the orthogonal components, and self-validation done by collapsing the data with a physical scaling.

  6. Analysis specifications for the CC3 biosphere model biotrac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szekely, J.G.; Wojciechowski, L.C.; Stephens, M.E.; Halliday, H.A.

    1994-12-01

    The CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3) model BIOTRAC (Biosphere Transport and Consequences) describes the movement in the biosphere of releases from an underground disposal vault, and the consequent radiological dose to a reference individual. Concentrations of toxic substances in different parts of the biosphere are also calculated. BIOTRAC was created specifically for the postclosure analyses of the Environmental Impact Statement that AECL is preparing on the concept for disposal of Canada`s nuclear fuel waste. The model relies on certain assumptions and constraints on the system, which are described by Davis et al. Accordingly, great care must be exercised if BIOTRAC is used for any other purpose.

  7. Photoshop CC top 100 simplified tips and tricks

    CERN Document Server

    Sholik, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Take your Photoshop skill set to the next level with these essential techniques If you're already familiar with Photoshop basics and are ready to learn some new tips, tricks, and techniques, then this is the book for you! Full-color, step-by-step instructions take you beyond the essentials and show you how to make the most of the newest features of Photoshop CC (Creative Cloud). Beautiful photos will inspire you to experiment with Photoshop's features, and numbered instructions make the techniques easy to learn. Encourages you to expand your skill set with creative, or

  8. CC-3 CAMAC crate controller for IBM PC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, A.N.; Ghodgaonkar, M.D.; Bairi, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    The specifications and implementation details of CAMAC Crate Controller CC-3 for IBM-PC compatible as a host computer, having capability to transfer high speed data with direct memory access (DMA) scheme and logic to execute CAMAC cycles directly from the crate controller, to implement the block algorithms specified in ANSI/IEEE Std. 683-1976 (Reaff-1981) are described. The maximum data transfer rate measured with 8 bit interface of PC-AT is 240K byte per second. This work is carried out under Seventh Five Year Plan Project on Modernisation of reactor Control Instrumentation and Development of CAMAC and Fastbus Instrumentation. (author). 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 appendixes

  9. PENGARUH KELOMPOK REFERENSI TERHADAP KEPUTUSAN PEMBELIAN KAWASAKI NINJA 250 CC

    OpenAIRE

    Kartika WB, Sylvia; Sidig, Rosyid

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the affect of reference groups  on purchasing decision of  Kawasaki Ninja 250 cc in the city of Jambi. Size of sample consist of 100 unit that chousen randomly. While data analysis used  multiple regression analysis. The results showed that simultaneouly   normative, value expression, and  informative have significant role. But, based on partiall test  normative has no significant affect. Hence,  reference group h...

  10. The mTOR kinase inhibitors, CC214-1 and CC214-2, preferentially block the growth of EGFRvIII-activated glioblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gini, Beatrice; Zanca, Ciro; Guo, Deliang; Matsutani, Tomoo; Masui, Kenta; Ikegami, Shiro; Yang, Huijun; Nathanson, David; Villa, Genaro R.; Shackelford, David; Zhu, Shaojun; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Babic, Ivan; Akhavan, David; Lin, Kelly; Assuncao, Alvaro; Gu, Yuchao; Bonetti, Bruno; Mortensen, Deborah S.; Xu, Shuichan; Raymon, Heather K.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Furnari, Frank B; James, David; Kroemer, Guido; Heath, James; Hege, Kristen; Chopra, Rajesh; Cloughesy, Timothy; Mischel, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose mTOR pathway hyperactivation occurs in nearly 90% of glioblastomas, but the allosteric mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has failed in the clinic. Here we examine the efficacy of the newly discovered ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitors CC214-1 and CC214-2 in glioblastoma, identifying molecular determinants of response and mechanisms of resistance, and develop a pharmacological strategy to overcome it. Experimental design We performed in vitro and in vivo studies in glioblastoma cell lines and an intracranial model to: determine the potential efficacy of the recently reported mTOR kinase inhibitors CC214-1 (in vitro use) and CC214-2 (in vivo use) at inhibiting rapamycin resistant signaling and blocking GBM growth and a novel single cell technology, DNA Encoded Antibody Libraries, was used to identify mechanisms of resistance. Results Here we demonstrate that CC214-1 and CC214-2 suppress rapamycin-resistant mTORC1 signaling; block mTORC2 signaling and significantly inhibit the growth of glioblastomas in vitro and in vivo. EGFRvIII expression and PTEN loss enhance sensitivity to CC214 compounds, consistent with enhanced efficacy in strongly mTOR-activated tumors. Importantly, CC214 compounds potently induce autophagy, preventing tumor cell death. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy greatly sensitizes GBM cells and orthotopic xenografts to CC214-1 and CC214-2 induced cell death. Conclusions These results identify CC214-1 and CC214-2 as potentially efficacious mTOR kinase inhibitors in GBM and suggest a strategy for identifying patients most likely to benefit from mTOR inhibition. This study also demonstrates a central role for autophagy in preventing mTOR-kinase inhibitor-mediated tumor cell death, and suggests a pharmacological strategy for overcoming it. PMID:24030701

  11. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), Fiscal year 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-03-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees are established and are continuing their own programs: Structural Ceramics, Electrochemical Technologies, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Superconductivity. In addition, the EMaCC aids in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and inter-agency compilations. The first part of the Program Descriptions consists of a funding summary for each Assistant Secretary office and the Office of Energy Research. This is followed by a summary of project titles and objectives, including the program/project manager(s) and principal investigator. The second part of the Program Descriptions consists of more detailed project summaries with project goals and accomplishments.

  12. Analysis specifications for the CC3 biosphere model BIOTRAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szekely, J.G.; Wojciechowski, L.C.; Stephens, M.E.; Halliday, H.A.

    1994-12-01

    AECL Research is assessing a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste in a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. A computer program called the Systems Variability Analysis Code (SYVAC) has been developed as an analytical tool for the postclosure (long-term) assessment of the concept. SYVAC3, the third generation of the code, is an executive program that directs repeated simulation of the disposal system to take into account parameter variation. For the postclosure assessment, the system model, CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3), was developed to describe a hypothetical disposal system that includes a disposal vault, the local geosphere and the biosphere in the vicinity of any discharge zones. BIOTRAC (BIOsphere TRansport And Consequences) is the biosphere model in the CC3 system model. The specifications for BIOTRAC, which were developed over a period of seven years, were subjected to numerous walkthrough examinations by the Biosphere Model Working Group to ensure that the intent of the model developers would be correctly specified for transformation into FORTRAN code. The FORTRAN version of BIOTRAC was written from interim versions of these specifications. Improvements to the code are based on revised versions of these specifications. The specifications consist of a data dictionary; sets of synopses, data flow diagrams and mini specs for the component models of BIOTRAC (surface water, soil, atmosphere, and food chain and dose); and supporting calculations (interface to the geosphere, consequences, and mass balance). (author). 20 refs., tabs., figs

  13. DBA2J db/db mice are susceptible to early albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis that correlate with systemic insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Mette V; Pinto, Vanda; Stevenson, Kirsty; Worm, Jesper; Fink, Lisbeth N; Coward, Richard J M

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of kidney failure in the world. To understand important mechanisms underlying this condition, and to develop new therapies, good animal models are required. In mouse models of type 1 diabetes, the DBA/2J strain has been shown to be more susceptible to develop kidney disease than other common strains. We hypothesized this would also be the case in type 2 diabetes. We studied db/db and wild-type (wt) DBA/2J mice and compared these with the db/db BLKS/J mouse, which is currently the most widely used type 2 DN model. Mice were analyzed from age 6 to 12 wk for systemic insulin resistance, albuminuria, and glomerular histopathological and ultrastructural changes. Body weight and nonfasted blood glucose were increased by 8 wk in both genders, while systemic insulin resistance commenced by 6 wk in female and 8 wk in male db/db DBA/2J mice. The urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) was closely linked to systemic insulin resistance in both sexes and was increased ~50-fold by 12 wk of age in the db/db DBA/2J cohort. Glomerulosclerosis, foot process effacement, and glomerular basement membrane thickening were observed at 12 wk of age in db/db DBA/2J mice. Compared with db/db BLKS/J mice, db/db DBA/2J mice had significantly increased levels of urinary ACR, but similar glomerular histopathological and ultrastructural changes. The db/db DBA/2J mouse is a robust model of early-stage albuminuric DN, and its levels of albuminuria correlate closely with systemic insulin resistance. This mouse model will be helpful in defining early mechanisms of DN and ultimately the development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Investigation of the effect of tool edge geometry upon cutting variables, tool wear and burr formation using finite element simulation - A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartkulvanich, Partchapol; Al-Zkeri, Ibrahim; Yen Yungchang; Altan, Taylan

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the progress made on FEM simulations of metal cutting processes conducted at the Engineering Research Center (ERC/NSM). Presented research focuses on the performance of various cutting edge geometries (hone and chamfer edges) for different tool materials and specifically on: 1) the effect of round and chamfer edge geometries on the cutting variables in machining carbon steels and 2) the effect of the edge hone size upon the flank wear and burr formation behavior in face milling of A356-T6 aluminum alloy. In the second task, an innovative design of edge preparation with varying hone size around the tool nose is also explored using FEM.In order to model three-dimensional conventional turning and face milling with two-dimensional orthogonal cutting simulations, 2D simulation cross-sections consisting of the cutting speed direction and chip flow direction are selected at different locations along the tool nose radius. Then the geometries of the hone and chamfer edges and their associated tool angles as well as uncut chip thickness are determined on these planes and employed in cutting simulations. The chip flow direction on the tool rake face are obtained by examining the wear grooves on the experimental inserts or estimated by using Oxley's approximation theory of oblique cutting. Simulation results are compared with the available experimental results (e.g. cutting forces) both qualitatively and quantitatively

  15. MRSA CC398 in the pig production chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broens, E M; Graat, E A M; van der Wolf, P J; van de Giessen, A W; van Duijkeren, E; Wagenaar, J A; van Nes, A; Mevius, D J; de Jong, M C M

    2011-02-01

    In 2005, a distinct clone of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA CC398) was found in pigs and people in contact with pigs. The structure of the pig production chain in high technology pig husbandry enables pathogens to spread during animal trading, with an increasing prevalence in herds further down the chain. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the MRSA status of the supplying herd on the MRSA status of the receiving herd in order to gain more insight into the role of animal trading as a transmission route for MRSA CC398. Nasal samples (60-80 pigs per herd) were collected from 38 herds; in 20 herds, environmental samples were collected as well. Ten MRSA-positive herds (based on the results of nasal swabs of 10 individual pigs per herd) from a prior study were included in the data analysis. Herds were classified as MRSA positive if at least one sample tested positive. The 48 herds were part of 14 complete (40 herds) and 4 incomplete (8 herds) pig production chains. Fifty-six percent of the herds were classified as MRSA positive. MRSA-positive herds were observed at the start (breeding herds), middle (farrowing herds) and the end (finishing herds) of the pig production chain. All of the herds in 8 chains tested MRSA positive;, all of the herds in 5 chains tested MRSA negative and in the remaining 5 chains, MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative herds were detected. Seven spa types were found, which were all previously confirmed to belong to CC398. All of the isolates were susceptible to mupirocin, linezolid, rifampicin, fusidic acid and cotrimoxazole. Resistance against tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin was found in 100, 74 and 76% of the isolates, respectively. Seventy-nine percent of herds with a MRSA-positive supplier of pigs were MRSA positive, whereas 23% of herds with a MRSA-negative supplier were MRSA positive (OR=10.8; 95% CI: 1.5-110.1; P=0.011). The presence of entirely MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative chains and the

  16. Using SciDB to Support Photon Science Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becla, Jack; Wang, Daniel; lim, Kian-Tat; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    Array data analytic systems like SciDB hold great potential to accelerate processing data from SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source and other experiments. SciDB is unique in its ability to integrate storage and processing of array data efficiently, providing both space-efficient storage and out-of-memory efficient parallel array processing. We describe a recent effort to leverage SciDB to store and process LCLS data. The work includes development of software to import data into SciDB, subsequent benchmarks, and interactive manipulation of data in SciDB.

  17. The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 in antiviral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andreasen, Susanne Ørding

    2002-01-01

    response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking CCR5 (CCR5(-/-) mice). This infection is a classical model for studying antiviral immunity, and influx of CCR5-expressing CD8(+) T cells and macrophages is essential for both virus control and associated immunopathology. Results showed......The CC chemokine receptor CCR5 is an important coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and there is a major thrust to develop anti-CCR5-based therapies for HIV-1. However, it is not known whether CCR5 is critical for a normal antiviral T-cell response. This study investigated the immune...... influence of CCR5 was found, not even when viral peptide was used as local trigger instead of live virus. Finally, long-term CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune surveillance was efficiently sustained in CCR5(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results indicate that expression of CCR5 is not critical for T cell...

  18. The db/db mouse: a useful model for the study of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bogdanov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To characterize the sequential events that are taking place in retinal neurodegeneration in a murine model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes (db/db mouse. METHODS: C57BLKsJ-db/db mice were used as spontaneous type 2 diabetic animal model, and C57BLKsJ-db/+ mice served as the control group. To assess the chronological sequence of the abnormalities the analysis was performed at different ages (8, 16 and 24 weeks. The retinas were evaluated in terms of morphological and functional abnormalities [electroretinography (ERG]. Histological markers of neurodegeneration (glial activation and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In addition glutamate levels and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST expression were assessed. Furthermore, to define gene expression changes associated with early diabetic retinopathy a transcriptome analyses was performed at 8 week. Furthermore, an additional interventional study to lower blood glucose levels was performed. RESULTS: Glial activation was higher in diabetic than in non diabetic mice in all the stages (p<0.01. In addition, a progressive loss of ganglion cells and a significant reduction of neuroretinal thickness were also observed in diabetic mice. All these histological hallmarks of neurodegeneration were less pronounced at week 8 than at week 16 and 24. Significant ERG abnormalities were present in diabetic mice at weeks 16 and 24 but not at week 8. Moreover, we observed a progressive accumulation of glutamate in diabetic mice associated with an early downregulation of GLAST. Morphological and ERG abnormalities were abrogated by lowering blood glucose levels. Finally, a dysregulation of several genes related to neurotransmission and oxidative stress such as UCP2 were found at week 8. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that db/db mouse reproduce the features of the neurodegenerative process that occurs in the human diabetic eye. Therefore, it seems an appropriate model for investigating the

  19. [Comporison Sduty of Microstructure by Metallographicalk on the Polarized Light and Texture by XRD of CC 5083 and CC 5182 Aluminium Alloy after Cold Rolling and Recrystallization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-biao; Li, Yong-wei; Tan, Yuan-biao; Ma, Min; Wang, Xue-min; Liu, Wen-chang

    2015-03-01

    At present the study of relation between microstructure, texture and performance of CC 5083 aluminium alloy after cold tolling and recrystallization processes is still finitude. So that the use of the CC 5083 aluminium alloy be influenced. Be cased into electrical furnace, hot up with unlimited speed followed the furnace hot up to different temperature and annealed 2h respectively, and be cased into salt-beth furnace, hot up quickly to different temperature and annealed 30 min respectively for CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy after cold roling with 91.5% reduction. The microstructure be watched use metallographic microscope, the texture be inspected by XRD. The start temperature of recrystallization and grain grow up temperature within annealing in the electric furnace of CC 5083 aluminum alloy board is 343 degrees C, and the shap of grain after grow up with long strip (the innovation point ); The start temperature of recrystallization within annealling in the salt bath furnace of CC 5083 is 343 degrees C. The start temperature and end temperature of recrystallization within annealling of CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy is 371 degrees C. The grain grow up outstanding of cold rooled CC 5152 aluminum alloy after annealed with 454 degrees C in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace. The start temperature of grain grow up of CC 5083 alluminurn alloy annealed in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace respectively is higher than the start temperature of grain grow up of CC 5182 alluminum alloy annealed in the electric furnace and salt bath furnace respectively. The strat temperature of recrystallization grain grow up is higher than which annealled with other three manner annealing process. The recrystallization temperature of CC 5182 annealed in the salt bath furnace is higher than which annealed in the electric furnace. The recrystallization temperature of the surface layer of CC 5083 and CC 5182 aluminum alloy is higher than the inner layer (the innovation

  20. Biocide Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus CC398 and CC30 Isolates from Pigs and Identification of the Biocide Resistance Genes, qacG and qacC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seier-Petersen, Maria Amalie; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Ingmer, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in particular clonal complex (CC) 398, is increasingly found in livestock. Recently, MRSA CC30 was identified in Danish pigs. We determined the susceptibility of porcine S. aureus isolates of CC398 and CC30 to disinfectants used in pig...... farming (benzalkonium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde, sodium hypochlorite, and caustic soda). Furthermore, efflux pump activity, antimicrobial resistance profiles, hemolysis properties, and the presence of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL......)-encoding virulence factors were investigated. Methods: Susceptibilities to biocides and antimicrobial agents of 79 porcine S. aureus isolates were determined by the microdilution method. Isolates comprised 21 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 40 MRSA isolates belonging to CC398 and 13 MSSA and 5 MRSA...

  1. RavenDB 2.x beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Tannir, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Written in a friendly, example-driven Beginner's Guide format, there are plenty of step-by-step instructions and examples that are designed to help you get started with RavenDB. If you are a .NET developer, new to document-oriented databases, and you wish to learn how to build applications using NoSQL databases, then this book is for you. Experience with relational database systems will be helpful, but not necessary.

  2. Radial pulsations in DB white dwarfs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaler, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical models of DB white dwarfs are unstable against radial pulsation at effective temperatures near 20,000-30,000 K. Many high-overtone modes are unstable, with periods ranging from 12 s down to the acoustic cutoff period of approximately 0.1 s. The blue edge for radial instability lies at slightly higher effective temperatures than for nonradial pulsations, with the temperature of the blue edge dependent on the assumed efficiency of convection. Models with increased convective efficiency have radial blue edges that are increasingly closer to the nonradial blue edge; in all models the instability persists into the nonradial instability strip. Radial pulsations therefore may exist in the hottest DB stars that lie below the DB gap; the greatest chance for detection would be observations in the ultraviolet. These models also explain why searches for radial pulsations in DA white dwarfs have failed: the efficient convection needed to explain the blue edge for nonradial DA pulsation means that the radial instability strip is 1000 K cooler than found in previous investigations. The multiperiodic nature of the expected pulsations can be used to advantage to identify very low amplitude modes using the uniform spacing of the modes in frequency. This frequency spacing is a direct indicator of the mass of the star.

  3. The Safety and Efficacy of Dexmedetomidine versus Sufentanil in Monitored Anesthesia Care during Burr-Hole Surgery for Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Retrospective Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH is a very common clinical emergency encountered in neurosurgery. While both general anesthesia (GA and monitored anesthesia care (MAC can be used during CSDH surgery, MAC is the preferred choice among surgeons. Further, while dexmedetomidine (DEX is reportedly a safe and effective agent for many diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, there have been no trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of DEX vs. sufentanil in CSDH surgery. Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of DEX vs. sufentanil in MAC during burr-hole surgery for CSDH.Methods: In all, 215 fifteen patients underwent burr-hole surgery for CSDH with MAC and were divided into three groups: Group D1 (n=67, DEX infusion at 0.5 μg·kg–1 for 10 min, Group D2 (n=75, DEX infusion at 1 μg·kg–1 for 10 min, and Group S (n=73, sufentanil infusion 0.3 μg·kg–1 for 10 min. Ramsay sedation scale (RSS of all three groups was maintained at 3. Anesthesia onset time, total number of intraoperative patient movements, hemodynamics, total cumulative dose of DEX, time to first dose and amount of rescue midazolam or fentanyl, percentage of patients converted to alternative sedative or anesthetic therapy, postoperative recovery time, adverse events, and patient and surgeon satisfaction scores were recorded.Results: The anesthesia onset time was significantly less in group D2 (17.36±4.23 vs. 13.42±2.12 vs. 15.98±4.58 min, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P<0.001. More patients in groups D1 and S required rescue midazolam to achieve RSS=3 (74.63% vs. 42.67% vs. 71.23%, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P<0.001. However, the total dose of rescue midazolam was significantly higher in group D1 (2.8±0.3 vs. 1.9±0.3 vs. 2.0±0.4 mg, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P<0.001. The time to first dose of rescue midazolam was significantly longer in group D2 (17.32±4.47 vs. 23.56±5.36 vs. 16.55±4.91 min, respectively, for D1, D2, S; P<0.001. Significantly fewer

  4. Effect of pioglitazone on metabolic features in endotoxemia model in obese diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoranjan; Mohapatra, Jogeswar; Malik, Umar; Nagar, Jignesh; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ramachandran, Balaraman; Jain, Mukul R

    2017-06-01

    Infectious diseases are more frequent in diabetic patients, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Endotoxemia affects glucose metabolism and lipolytic capacity. The aims of the present study were to determine whether endotoxemia exacerbates metabolic features (adipose inflammation, adipogenesis, and insulin resistance [IR]) in an animal model of diabetes (i.e. db/db mice) after acute infection and the effects of pioglitazone. Female db/db mice treated with pioglitazone (3 and 30 mg/kg, p.o.) for 14 days were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 200 μg/kg), followed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to evaluate the expression of genes in white adipose tissue (WAT) involved in: (i) adipogenesis (lipoprotein lipase [Lpl], fatty acid binding protein-4 [Ap2] and adiponectin [Adipoq]); (ii) insulin signaling (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma [Pparg], suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 [Socs3], solute carrier family 2 [facilitated glucose transporter], member 4 [Slc2a4]); and (iii) inflammation (tumor necrosis factor [Tnf], interleukin-6 [Il6], monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [Ccl2], cyclo-oxygenase-2 [prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2; Ptgs2]). Experimental endotoxemia downregulated mRNA expression of Pparg, Slc2a4, Adipoq, Lpl, and Ap2, which coincided with upregulation of Il6, Tnf, Ccl2, Ptgs2, and Socs3 expression. Pioglitazone dose-dependently decreased Tnf, Il6, Ccl2, Ptgs2, and Socs3 expression in WAT, in association with upregulation of Lpl, Ap2, Slc2a4, and Adipoq expression, indicating improvement in endotoxin-induced IR. The findings suggest that LPS challenge exacerbates IR in db/db mice by altering the expression of genes in WAT involved in adipogenesis and inflammation, which is effectively controlled by pioglitazone treatment. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya, E-mail: jyli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Nan, Fa-Jun, E-mail: fjnan@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Li, Jia, E-mail: jli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  6. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome

  7. Access of vehicles to DB netz infrastructure; Zugang von Fahrzeugen zur DB-Netz-Infrastruktur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, U. [DB Systemtechnik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ruch, M. [DB Energie GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    For line access it is necessary to take into account and observe the requirements of the infrastructure. The requirements and certifications for the power supply system and pantograph-overhead contact line interaction are described in the DB guidelines 810.0241 and 810.0242. (orig.) [German] Fuer den Netzzugang muessen die Anforderungen der Infrastruktur beachtet und eingehalten werden. Die Anforderungen und die erforderlichen Nachweise fuer den Bereich Energieversorgung und Zusammenwirken von Stromabnehmer und Oberleitung sind in den Richtlinien 810.0241 und 810.0242 der DB enthalten. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of Exopolysaccharide Produced by Streptococcus thermophilus CC30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Ramya Krishna Kanamarlapudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An exopolysaccharide (EPS producing strain CC30 was isolated from raw milk and identified as Streptococcus thermophilus with morphological and 16S sequencing analysis. The strain was shown to produce 1.95 g/L of EPS when grown in skim milk lactose medium at 30°C by increasing the viscosity of the medium. The EPS was isolated and purified, and it was shown to consist of glucose and galactose in 1 : 1 ratio, with molecular weights ranging from 58 to 180 kDa. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the EPS to have amide, hydroxyl, and carboxyl groups. Under Atomic Force Microscopy, EPS showed spike-like lumps of EPS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM studies showed that it had irregular lumps with a coarse surface. The EPS displayed pseudoplastic nature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA reported a degradation temperature of 110.84°C. The purified EPS exhibited reducing activity, hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging activity, and emulsification activity. The results of the present study indicated that EPS producing Streptococcus thermophilus could serve as a promising candidate for further exploitation in food industry.

  9. Analysis specifications for the CC3 geosphere model GEONET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnyk, T.W.

    1995-04-01

    AECL is assessing a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste in a sealed vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. A computer program has been developed as an analytical tool for the postclosure assessment case study, a system model, CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3), has been developed to describe a hypothetical disposal system. This system model includes separate models for the engineered barriers within the disposal vault, the geosphere in which the vault is emplaced, and the biosphere in the vicinity of any discharge zones. The system model is embedded within a computer code SYVAC3, (SYstems Variability Analysis Code, generation 3), which takes parameter uncertainty into account by repeated simulation of the system. GEONET (GEOsphere NETwork) is the geosphere model component of this system model. It simulates contaminant transport from the vault to the biosphere along a transport network composed of one-dimensional transport segments that are connected together in three-dimensional space. This document is a set of specifications for GEONET that were developed over a number of years. Improvements to the code will be based on revisions to these specifications. The specifications consist of a model synopsis, describing all the relevant equations and assumptions used in the model, a set of formal data flow diagrams and minispecifications, and a data dictionary. (author). 26 refs., 20 figs

  10. Database design and SQL for DB2

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, James

    2013-01-01

    Thorough and updated coverage of database design and SQL for DB2 are the focus of this guide for the relational database-management system used on IBM i computer systems. Suitable for classroom instruction or self-study, this book explains the most widely used database language and the way that language is implemented on a variety of computer platforms. Topics covered include database concepts, SQL inquiries, web applications, and database security, and the material is reinforced by numerous illustrations, examples, and exercises.

  11. JACoW SIP4C/C++ at CERN - Status and lessons learned

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Steen; Dworak, Andrzej; Gourber-Pace, Marine; Hoguin, Frederic; Lauener, Joel; Locci, Frank; Sigerud, Katarina; Sliwinski, Wojciech

    2018-01-01

    After 4 years of promoting the Software Improvement Process for C/C++ (SIP4C/C++) initiative at CERN, we describe the current status for tools and procedures along with how they have been integrated into our environment. Based on feedback from four project teams, we present reasons for and against their adoption. Finally, we show how SIP4C/C++ has improved development and delivery processes as well as the first-line support of delivered products.

  12. Klaim-DB: A Modeling Language for Distributed Database Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xi; Li, Ximeng; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We present the modelling language, Klaim-DB, for distributed database applications. Klaim-DB borrows the distributed nets of the coordination language Klaim but essentially re-incarnates the tuple spaces of Klaim as databases, and provides high-level language abstractions for the access and manip......We present the modelling language, Klaim-DB, for distributed database applications. Klaim-DB borrows the distributed nets of the coordination language Klaim but essentially re-incarnates the tuple spaces of Klaim as databases, and provides high-level language abstractions for the access...

  13. Carnosine enhances diabetic wound healing in the db/db mouse model of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansurudeen, Ishrath; Sunkari, Vivekananda Gupta; Grünler, Jacob; Peters, Verena; Schmitt, Claus Peter; Catrina, Sergiu-Bogdan; Brismar, Kerstin; Forsberg, Elisabete Alcantara

    2012-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a progressive disorder with severe late complications. Normal wound healing involves a series of complex and well-orchestrated molecular events dictated by multiple factors. In diabetes, wound healing is grossly impaired due to defective, and dysregulated cellular and molecular events at all phases of wound healing resulting in chronic wounds that fail to heal. Carnosine, a dipeptide of alanine and histidine and an endogenous antioxidant is documented to accelerate healing of wounds and ulcers. However, not much is known about its role in wound healing in diabetes. Therefore, we studied the effect of carnosine in wound healing in db/db mice, a mice model of Type 2 DM. Six millimeter circular wounds were made in db/db mice and analyzed for wound healing every other day. Carnosine (100 mg/kg) was injected (I.P.) every day and also applied locally. Treatment with carnosine enhanced wound healing significantly, and wound tissue analysis showed increased expression of growth factors and cytokines genes involved in wound healing. In vitro studies with human dermal fibroblasts and microvascular-endothelial cells showed that carnosine increases cell viability in presence of high glucose. These effects, in addition to its known role as an antioxidant and a precursor for histamine synthesis, provide evidence for a possible therapeutic use of carnosine in diabetic wound healing.

  14. Impaired Hippocampal Glutamate and Glutamine Metabolism in the db/db Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Velde; Nissen, Jakob Dahl; Christensen, Sofie Kjellerup

    2017-01-01

    in the db/db mouse model of T2DM. Glutamate and glutamine are both substrates for mitochondrial oxidation, and oxygen consumption was assessed in isolated brain mitochondria by Seahorse XFe96 analysis. In addition, acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices were incubated with [U-13C......]glutamate and [U-13C]glutamine, and tissue extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The oxygen consumption rate using glutamate and glutamine as substrates was not different in isolated cerebral mitochondria of db/db mice compared to controls. Hippocampal slices of db/db mice exhibited......Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, and changes in brain energy metabolism have been suggested as a causative mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the cerebral metabolism of the important amino acids glutamate and glutamine...

  15. Search for the rare decays J/psi -> D(0)e(+) e(-) + c.c. and psi -> D(0)e(+) e(-) + c.c.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Tiemens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Using the data samples of (1310.6 +/- 7.2) x 10(6) J/psi events and (448.1 +/- 2.9) x 10(6) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector, we search for the rare decays J/psi -> D(0)e(+) e(-) + c.c. and psi(3686) -> D(0)e(+) e(-) + c.c. No significant signals are observed and the corresponding

  16. Measurements of psi -> K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c. and psi -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Duan, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of 1.06 x 10(8) psi(3686) events produced in e(+)e(-) collisions at root s = 3.686 GeV and collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we present studies of the decays psi(3686) -> K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c. and psi(3686) -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c.

  17. Application of C/C composites to the combustion chamber of rocket engines. Part 1: Heating tests of C/C composites with high temperature combustion gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadano, Makoto; Sato, Masahiro; Kuroda, Yukio; Kusaka, Kazuo; Ueda, Shuichi; Suemitsu, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Kude, Yukinori

    1995-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) has various superior properties, such as high specific strength, specific modulus, and fracture strength at high temperatures of more than 1800 K. Therefore, C/C composite is expected to be useful for many structural applications, such as combustion chambers of rocket engines and nose-cones of space-planes, but C/C composite lacks oxidation resistivity in high temperature environments. To meet the lifespan requirement for thermal barrier coatings, a ceramic coating has been employed in the hot-gas side wall. However, the main drawback to the use of C/C composite is the tendency for delamination to occur between the coating layer on the hot-gas side and the base materials on the cooling side during repeated thermal heating loads. To improve the thermal properties of the thermal barrier coating, five different types of 30-mm diameter C/C composite specimens constructed with functionally gradient materials (FGM's) and a modified matrix coating layer were fabricated. In this test, these specimens were exposed to the combustion gases of the rocket engine using nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) / monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) to evaluate the properties of thermal and erosive resistance on the thermal barrier coating after the heating test. It was observed that modified matrix and coating with FGM's are effective in improving the thermal properties of C/C composite.

  18. Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC398 from Livestock Veterinarians to Their Household Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkade, Erwin; Kluytmans-van den Bergh, Marjolein; van Benthem, Birgit; van Cleef, Brigitte; van Rijen, Miranda; Bosch, Thijs; Schouls, Leo; Kluytmans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    There are indications that livestock-associated MRSA CC398 has a reduced human-to-human transmissibility, limiting its impact on public health and justifying modified control measures. This study determined the transmissibility of MRSA CC398 from livestock veterinarians to their household members in the community as compared to MRSA non-CC398 strains. A one-year prospective cohort study was performed to determine the presence of MRSA CC398 in four-monthly nasal and oropharyngeal samples of livestock veterinarians (n  =  137) and their household members (n  =  389). In addition, a cross-sectional survey was performed to detect the presence of MRSA non-CC398 in hospital derived control patients (n  =  20) and their household members (n  =  41). Staphylococcus aureus isolates were genotyped by staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Mean MRSA CC398 prevalence over the study period was 44% (range 41.6–46.0%) in veterinarians and 4.0% (range 2.8–4.7%) in their household members. The MRSA CC398 prevalence in household members of veterinarians was significantly lower than the MRSA non-CC398 prevalence in household members of control patients (PRR 6.0; 95% CI 2.4–15.5), indicating the reduced transmissibility of MRSA CC398. The impact of MRSA CC398 appears to be low at the moment. However, careful monitoring of the human-to-human transmissibility of MRSA CC398 remains important. PMID:25062364

  19. Comparing MongoDB to SQL Server, Replicated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Azizi

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractParker et al [1] studied the performance difference between MongoDB and Microsoft SQL Server on basis of a number of insert, update and select scenarios. As the result of their study, they conclude that MongoDB has got a better performance when it comes to insert, update and simple

  20. CandidaDB: a genome database for Candida albicans pathogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Enfert, C; Goyard, S; Rodriguez-Arnaveilhe, S; Frangeul, L; Jones, L; Tekaia, F; Bader, O; Albrecht, Antje; Castillo, L; Dominguez, A; Ernst, J F; Fradin, C; Gaillardin, C; Garcia-Sanchez, S; de Groot, P; Hube, B; Klis, F M; Krishnamurthy, S; Kunze, D; Lopez, M-C; Mavor, A; Martin, N; Moszer, I; Onésime, D; Perez Martin, J; Sentandreu, R; Valentin, E; Brown, A J P

    2005-01-01

    CandidaDB is a database dedicated to the genome of the most prevalent systemic fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans. CandidaDB is based on an annotation of the Stanford Genome Technology Center C.albicans genome sequence data by the European Galar Fungail Consortium. CandidaDB Release 2.0 (June 2004) contains information pertaining to Assembly 19 of the genome of C.albicans strain SC5314. The current release contains 6244 annotated entries corresponding to 130 tRNA genes and 5917 protein-coding genes. For these, it provides tentative functional assignments along with numerous pre-run analyses that can assist the researcher in the evaluation of gene function for the purpose of specific or large-scale analysis. CandidaDB is based on GenoList, a generic relational data schema and a World Wide Web interface that has been adapted to the handling of eukaryotic genomes. The interface allows users to browse easily through genome data and retrieve information. CandidaDB also provides more elaborate tools, such as pattern searching, that are tightly connected to the overall browsing system. As the C.albicans genome is diploid and still incompletely assembled, CandidaDB provides tools to browse the genome by individual supercontigs and to examine information about allelic sequences obtained from complementary contigs. CandidaDB is accessible at http://genolist.pasteur.fr/CandidaDB.

  1. Observation of the decay psi -> Lambda(Sigma)over-bar(+/-) pi(-/+) + c.c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. T.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. J.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, H. L.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Moeini, H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, G. G.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S. L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. B.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Werner, M.J.; Zheng, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of 1:06 X 10(8) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector, we present the first observation of the decays of psi(3686) -> Lambda(Sigma) over bar (+) pi(-) + c.c. and psi(3686) -> Lambda(Sigma) over bar (-) pi(+) + c.c. The branching fractions are measured to be B(psi(3686)

  2. Rhodium-catalyzed C-C Bond Cleavage Reactions - An Update

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korotvička, A.; Nečas, D.; Kotora, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 10 (2012), s. 1170-1214 ISSN 1385-2728 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : rhodium * C-C bond cleavage * catalysis * synthesis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.039, year: 2012

  3. Analysis of PCBs in Sewage sludge for the characterization study of ERM-CC392

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korytar, P.; Dao, Q.T.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was measurement of PCB congeners (28, 52, 101, 105, 118, 138, 153, 156, 170, 180) in a sewage sludge material ERM – CC392, in a control sample and in ampoule of the “Beltest” solution as part of the characterization study of ERM – CC392 “PCBs in Sewage sludge” organized by

  4. 76 FR 44800 - Election of Reduced Research Credit Under Section 280C(c)(3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... of Reduced Research Credit Under Section 280C(c)(3) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury... Sec. 1.280C- 4(c). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Selig, (202) 622-3040 (not a toll-free... 280C(c)(3). On July 16, 2009, a notice of proposed rulemaking (REG-130200-08) was published in the...

  5. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Fiscal year 1996. Annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his or her capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1996 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  6. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Fiscal year 1996. Annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his or her capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1996 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department

  7. Red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) intake decreases oxidative stress in obese diabetic (db/db) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noratto, Giuliana D; Chew, Boon P; Atienza, Liezl M

    2017-07-15

    Red raspberry fruit intake was investigated on obese diabetic (db/db) mice for 8weeks. Animals fed isocaloric diets (5.3% freeze-dried raspberry, or control) were assessed for obesity-diabetes-disease risk biomarkers. Results showed that raspberry intake improved antioxidant status and lessened plasma interleukin (IL)-6 (0.3-fold of control, p0.05). Plasma levels of total cholesterol (T-CHL), low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-CHL), and resistin were higher in the raspberry group. Overall, the enhanced detoxifying cell defenses exerted by raspberry intake might be due to its polyphenolics and fibre. This study demonstrates in vivo that raspberry intake, at a dose that can be achieved by human consumption, might protect against diabetes-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Curcumin restores mitochondrial functions and decreases lipid peroxidation in liver and kidneys of diabetic db/db mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María G Soto-Urquieta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrosative and oxidative stress play a key role in obesity and diabetes-related mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective was to investigate the effect of curcumin treatment on state 3 and 4 oxygen consumption, nitric oxide (NO synthesis, ATPase activity and lipid oxidation in mitochondria isolated from liver and kidneys of diabetic db/db mice. RESULTS: Hyperglycaemia increased oxygen consumption and decreased NO synthesis in liver mitochondria isolated from diabetic mice relative to the control mice. In kidney mitochondria, hyperglycaemia increased state 3 oxygen consumption and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS levels in diabetic mice relative to control mice. Interestingly, treating db/db mice with curcumin improved or restored these parameters to normal levels; also curcumin increased liver mitochondrial ATPase activity in db/db mice relative to untreated db/db mice. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that hyperglycaemia modifies oxygen consumption rate, NO synthesis and increases TBARS levels in mitochondria from the liver and kidneys of diabetic mice, whereas curcumin may have a protective role against these alterations.

  9. ToxRefDB - Release user-friendly web-based tool for mining ToxRefDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    The updated URL link is for a table of NCCT ToxCast public datasets. The next to last row of the table has the link for the US EPA ToxCast ToxRefDB Data Release October 2014. ToxRefDB provides detailed chemical toxicity data in a publically accessible searchable format. ToxRefD...

  10. Modeling Solar Atmospheric Phenomena with AtomDB and PyAtomDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Marcus; Foster, Adam

    2018-01-01

    Taking advantage of the modeling tools made available by PyAtomDB (Foster 2015), we evaluated the impact of changing atomic data on solar phenomena, in particular their effects on models of coronal mass ejections (CME). Intitially, we perform modifications to the canonical SunNEI code (Murphy et al. 2011) in order to include non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) processes that occur in the CME modeled in SunNEI. The methods used involve the consideration of radiaitive cooling as well as ion balance calculations. These calculations were subsequently implemented within the SunNEI simulation. The insertion of aforementioned processes and parameter customizaton produced quite similar results of the original except for the case of iron. These differences were traced to inconsistencies in the recombination rates for Argon-like iron ions between the CHIANTI and AtomDB databases, even though they in theory use the same data. The key finding was that theoretical models are greatly impacted by the relative atomic database update cycles.Following the SunNEI comparison, we then use the AtomDB database to model the time depedencies of intensity flux spikes produced by a coronal shock wave (Ma et al. 2011). We produced a theretical representation for an ionizing plasma that interpolated over the intensity in four Astronomical Imaging Assembly (AIA) filters. Specifically, the 171 A (Fe IX) ,193 A (Fe XII, FeXXIV),211 A (Fe XIV),and 335 A (Fe XVI) wavelengths in order to assess the comparative spectral emissions between AtomDB and the observed data. The results of the theoretical model, in principle, shine light on both the equilibrium conditions before the shock and the non-equilibrium response to the shock front, as well as discrepancies introduced by changing the atomic data.

  11. Salvianolic Acid B Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Dyslipidemia in db/db Mice through the AMPK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Qing Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Salvianolic acid B (Sal B, a major polyphenolic compound of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, has been shown to possess potential antidiabetic activities. However, the action mechanism of SalB in type 2 diabetes has not been investigated extensively. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Sal B on diabetes-related metabolic changes in a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes, as well as its potential molecular mechanism. Methods: Male C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice were orally treated with Sal B (50 and 100 mg/kg or metformin (positive drug, 300 mg/kg for 6 weeks. Results: Both doses of Sal B significantly decreased fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, triglyceride and free fatty acid levels, reduced hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and improved insulin intolerance in db/db mice. High dose Sal B also significantly improved glucose intolerance, increased hepatic glycolytic gene expression and muscle glycogen content, and ameliorated histopathological alterations of pancreas, similar to metformin. Sal B treatment resulted in increased phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK protein expression in skeletal muscle and liver, increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 and glycogen synthase protein expressions in skeletal muscle, and increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase (p-ACC protein expressions in liver. Conclusion: Our data suggest that Sal B displays beneficial effects in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes at least in part via modulation of the AMPK pathway.

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05902-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _CD102_063 SV5 Solanum chacoense cDNA, mRN... 46 1.4 1 ( DN922450 ) 42800.2 Common Scab-Challenge...L1065DB01, 5... 46 1.4 1 ( CV471779 ) 44996.1 Common Scab-Challenged Tubers Solan...um tub... 46 1.4 1 ( CV470021 ) 42800.1 Common Scab-Challenged Tubers Solanum tub... 46 1.4 1 ( CK276538 ) E

  13. The Effect of Microporous Polysaccharide Hemospheres on Wound Healing and Scarring in Wild-Type and db/db Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kyle J; Cao, Wei; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Levinson, Howard

    2017-04-01

    Hemostasis, the initial phase of wound healing, sets the stage for tissue repair. Microporous polysaccharide hemosphere powder (MPH) is an FDA-approved hemostatic agent that may impact the wound-healing process. This study examined the role of MPH in murine wild-type and diabetic (db/db) wound-healing models and a foreign body response scarring model. The powder was topically applied to excisional wounds in wild-type C57BL/6 mice and db/db mice. The effect of MPH on scarring was evaluated by applying it to the expanded polytetrafluoroethylene tube implantation model. In wild-type mice, topically applied MPH increased epithelial thickness. Levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were decreased in MPH-treated wild-type wounds, whereas Rho-associated protein kinase 2 (ROCK2) and transforming growth factor β levels were increased. In db/db mice, topical wound MPH application decreased epithelial thickness and delayed wound closure. The db/db wounds displayed an increased collagen index. The ROCK2 was increased in a similar manner to wild-type mice, whereas α-SMA and transforming growth factor β levels were decreased. The MPH-treated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene tube mice showed increased α-SMA levels and depressed ROCK2 levels. There were no changes in histologic parameters of the foreign body response. The results suggest that MPH does not adversely impact wound healing in wild-type mice, both topically and around implants, but prolongs time to closure and diminishes thickness in db/db wounds. The MPH application alters contractile proteins in all wound models. These changes could have downstream effects on the wound healing process, and further investigation into the use of MPH in altered or impaired states of wound healing is warranted.

  14. Structural Insights into the Interaction Between a Potent Anti-Inflammatory Protein, Viral CC Chemokine Inhibitor (vCCI), and the Human CC Chemokine, Eotaxin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Nai-Wei; Gao, Yong; Schill, Megan S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2014-01-30

    Chemokines play important roles in the immune system, not only recruiting leukocytes to the site of infection and inflammation but also guiding cell homing and cell development. The soluble poxvirusencoded protein vCCI, a CC chemokine inhibitor, can bind to human CC chemokines tightly to impair the host immune defense. This protein has no known homologs in eukaryotes, and may represent a potent method to stop inflammation. Previously, our structure of the vCCI:MIP-1β complex indicated that vCCI uses negatively charged residues in β-sheet II to interact with positively charged residues in the MIP-1βN-terminus, 20’s region and 40’s loop. However, the interactions between vCCI and other CC chemokines have not yet been fully explored. Here, we used NMR and fluorescence anisotropy to study the interaction between vCCI and eotaxin-1 (CCL11), another CC chemokine that is an important factor in the asthma response. NMR results reveal that the binding pattern is very similar to the vCCI:MIP-1βcomplex, and suggest that electrostatic interactions provide a major contribution to binding. Fluorescence anisotropy results on variants of eotaxin-1 further confirm the critical roles of the charged residues in eotaxin. Compared to wild-type eotaxin, single, double, or triple mutations at these critical charged residues weaken the binding. One exception is the K47A mutation that exhibits increased affinity for vCCI, which can be explained structurally. In addition, the binding affinity between vCCI and other wild type CC chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β and RANTES, were determined as 1.09 nM, 1.16 nM, and 0.22 nM, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first work quantitatively measuring the binding affinity between vCCI and different CC chemokines.

  15. Durability Indicators Comparison for SCC and CC in Tropical Coastal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Calado

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concrete (SCC demands more studies of durability at higher temperatures when subjected to more aggressive environments in comparison to the conventional vibrated concrete (CC. This work aims at presenting results of durability indicators of SCC and CC, having the same water/binder relations and constituents. The applied methodologies were electrical resistivity, diffusion of chloride ions and accelerated carbonation experiments, among others, such as microstructure study, scanning electron microscope and microtomography experiments. The tests were performed in a research laboratory and at a construction site of the Pernambuco Arena. The obtained results shows that the SCC presents an average electrical resistivity 11.4% higher than CC; the average chloride ions diffusion was 63.3% of the CC; the average accelerated carbonation penetration was 45.8% of the CC; and the average open porosity was 55.6% of the CC. As the results demonstrated, the SCC can be more durable than CC, which contributes to elucidate the aspects related to its durability and consequent prolonged life cycle.

  16. CC10 reduces inflammation in meconium aspiration syndrome in newborn piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angert, Robert M; Pilon, Aprile L; Chester, Darrin; Davis, Jonathan M

    2007-12-01

    Complications from meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) remain significant despite a variety of therapeutic interventions. Clara cell protein (CC10) is a novel anti-inflammatory agent that can also inhibit phospholipase A2 (PLA2) (an important component of meconium). The present study examined whether administration of recombinant human CC10 (rhCC10) would reduce inflammation and improve lung function in a piglet model of MAS. Following meconium instillation, piglets exhibited significant physiologic dysfunction that improved significantly after surfactant administration. Analysis of tracheal aspirates revealed significant increases in both tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and interleukin (IL)-8 after meconium instillation. rhCC10-treated animals had significantly lower TNF-alpha levels at 24 h (561 +/- 321 versus 1357 +/- 675 pg/mL, p < 0.05) compared with saline controls. There were no differences between rhCC10-treated and untreated groups with respect to other measured physiologic variables or inflammatory markers, including secretory PLA2 activity. Histologic analyses revealed marked inflammatory infiltrates and thickened alveolar walls, but no significant differences among rhCC10 and control animals. Newborn piglets with MAS have significant physiologic dysfunction, marked inflammatory changes and histologic abnormalities, which was partially counteracted by a single dose of exogenous surfactant and rhCC10.

  17. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) Fiscal Year 1999 annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-10-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1999 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  18. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Annual technical report, Fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1987 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department

  19. SciDB: Open Source DMAS for Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    SciDB Team

    2013-11-01

    SciDB is a DMAS (Data Management and Analytics Software System) optimized for data management of big data and for big analytics. SciDB is organized around multidimensional array storage, a generalization of relational tables, and is designed to be scalable up to petabytes and beyond. Complex analytics are simplified with SciDB because arrays and vectors are first-class objects with built-in optimized operations. Spatial operators and time-series analysis are easy to express. Interfaces to common scientific tools like R as well as programming languages like C++ and Python are provided.

  20. Molecular signatures database (MSigDB) 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Subramanian, Aravind; Pinchback, Reid; Thorvaldsdóttir, Helga; Tamayo, Pablo; Mesirov, Jill P

    2011-06-15

    Well-annotated gene sets representing the universe of the biological processes are critical for meaningful and insightful interpretation of large-scale genomic data. The Molecular Signatures Database (MSigDB) is one of the most widely used repositories of such sets. We report the availability of a new version of the database, MSigDB 3.0, with over 6700 gene sets, a complete revision of the collection of canonical pathways and experimental signatures from publications, enhanced annotations and upgrades to the web site. MSigDB is freely available for non-commercial use at http://www.broadinstitute.org/msigdb.

  1. Florentine Renaissance Resources. Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532, Ed. by D. Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, A. Molho, R. Barducci, 2000. Online Catasto of 1427, Ed. by D. Herlihy, C. Klapisch-Zuber, Vers. 1.2., Brown University, Providence, R.I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bicchierai

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Florentine Renaissance Resources. - Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532, Edited by David Herlihy, R. Burr Litchfield, Anthony Molho and Roberto Barducci , 2000 - Online Catasto of 1427, Edited by David Herlihy, Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, Version 1.2., Brown University, Providence, R.I. , 1996

  2. Bedside burr hole for intracranial pressure monitoring performed by pediatric intensivists in children with CNS infections in a resource-limited setting: 10-year experience at a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit; Kumar, Ramesh; Singhi, Pratibha; Jayashree, Muralidharan; Bansal, Arun

    2015-06-01

    Intracranial pressure monitoring can help in early identification of raised intracranial pressure and in setting more informed goals for treatment. We describe our 10-year experience of bedside burr holes performed by pediatric intensivists to establish intracranial pressure monitoring in children with CNS infections in a resource-limited setting and the technical difficulties and complications encountered. Descriptive study of prospectively recorded data. PICU of a tertiary care academic institute. Consecutive comatose patients with raised intracranial pressure who underwent intracranial pressure monitoring from 2004 to 2013. An intraparenchymal (1.2 mm) or an intraventricular transducer (3.4 mm) (Codman) was placed by a pediatric intensivist through a micro burr hole using a standard protocol. Technical difficulties during the procedure and complications were recorded. Over 10 years, 265 intracranial pressure catheters were placed in 259 patients, mainly for acute CNS infections (n = 242, 93.4%). Median age of patients was 4.8 years, youngest being 6 weeks; 21 patients (8.1%) were younger than 1 year. Intraparenchymal transducer was used in 252 patients (97.3%). Median (interquartile range) duration of intracranial pressure monitoring was 96 hours (72-144 hr). Complications were seen in 3.5% of patients (n = 9/259); the incidence was 0.28 per 1,000 hours of intracranial pressure monitoring. Procedure-related ventriculitis occurred in three of seven patients (42.8%) with intraventricular catheter, in contrast to none in patients with intraparenchymal transducer. Overall mortality was 32.8% (n = 85). On Cox-regression analysis, "blood component therapy" was an independent predictor of poor outcome defined as death or severe neurodisability (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.16-2.16; p = 0.004). In a resource-limited setting, pediatric intensivists can safely and successfully perform burr holes at bedside for establishing intraparenchymal intracranial pressure

  3. DB-02, a C-6-cyclohexylmethyl substituted pyrimidinone HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor with nanomolar activity, displays an improved sensitivity against K103N or Y181C than S-DABOs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available 6-(cyclohexylmethyl-5-ethyl-2-((2-oxo-2-phenylethylthiopyrimidin-4(3H-one (DB-02 is a member of the newly reported synthetic anti-HIV-1 compounds dihydro-aryl/alkylsulfanyl-cyclohexylmethyl-oxopyrimidines, S-DACOs. In vitro anti-HIV-1 activity and resistance profile studies have suggested that DB-02 has very low cytotoxicity (CC50>1mM to cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. It displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity against laboratory adapted strains and primary isolated strains including different subtypes and tropism strains (EC50s range from 2.40 to 41.8 nM. Studies on site-directed mutagenesis, genotypic resistance profiles revealed that V106A was the major resistance contributor for the compound. Molecular docking analysis showed that DB-02 located in the hydrophobic pocket with interactions of Lys101, Val106, Leu234, His235. DB-02 also showed non-antagonistic effects to four approved antiretroviral drugs. All studies indicated that DB-02 would be a potential NNRTI with low cytotoxicity and improved activity.

  4. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-10-18

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed.

  5. The business value of DB2 for z/OS IBM DB2 analytics accelerator and optimizer

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, John; Li, Ruiping; Parekh, Surekha; Purcell, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Celebrating the 30th anniversary of the first release of DB2, this book highlights the important milestones, capabilities, and impacts of the database management software for IBM's mainframe operating system. Special focus is given to IBM DB2 Analytics Accelerator, covering the key design and operational aspects that enable IBM DB2 for z/OS clients to benefit from faster performance, reduced CPU usage, and lower costs. The second half of the book discusses performance enhancements and cost-saving measures in the version 10 release and is rich with hints and tips for a successful upgrade. A spe

  6. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, Fiscal Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-08-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations.

  7. StarDB: a large-scale DBMS for strings

    KAUST Repository

    Sahli, Majed

    2015-08-01

    Strings and applications using them are proliferating in science and business. Currently, strings are stored in file systems and processed using ad-hoc procedural code. Existing techniques are not flexible and cannot efficiently handle complex queries or large datasets. In this paper, we demonstrate StarDB, a distributed database system for analytics on strings. StarDB hides data and system complexities and allows users to focus on analytics. It uses a comprehensive set of parallel string operations and provides a declarative query language to solve complex queries. StarDB automatically tunes itself and runs with over 90% efficiency on supercomputers, public clouds, clusters, and workstations. We test StarDB using real datasets that are 2 orders of magnitude larger than the datasets reported by previous works.

  8. Eukaryotic Pathogen Database Resources (EuPathDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — EuPathDB Bioinformatics Resource Center for Biodefense and Emerging/Re-emerging Infectious Diseases is a portal for accessing genomic-scale datasets associated with...

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04605-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . 46 2.2 1 ( DB766622 ) Apis mellifera head cDNA, RIKEN full-length enric... 46 2.2 1 ( FG291142 ) 1108793330728 New World... Screwworm Egg 9261 ESTs C... 46 2.2 1 ( FG290464 ) 1108793321772 New World... Screwworm Egg 9261 ESTs C... 46 2.2 1 ( FG288754 ) 1108793276247 New World Screwworm Egg 9261 ESTs ...C... 46 2.2 1 ( FG285961 ) 1108770710727 New World Screwworm Egg 9261 ESTs C... 46 2.2 1 ( CT030663 ) Mouse ..._142_D08_3APR2008_058 BN18DYSC Brassic... 44 8.7 1 ( FG286796 ) 1108770726415 New World

  10. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Annual technical report, fiscal year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-06-30

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees are established and are continuing their own programs: Structural Ceramics, Batteries and Fuel Cells, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Superconductivity (established in FY 1987). In addition, the EMaCC aids in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Membership in the EMaCC is open to any Department organizational unit; participants are appointed by Division or Office Directors. The current active membership is listed on the following four pages. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1988 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  11. Evaluation by Rocket Combustor of C/C Composite Cooled Structure Using Metallic Cooling Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegoshi, Masao; Ono, Fumiei; Ueda, Shuichi; Saito, Toshihito; Hayasaka, Osamu

    In this study, the cooling performance of a C/C composite material structure with metallic cooling tubes fixed by elastic force without chemical bonding was evaluated experimentally using combustion gas in a rocket combustor. The C/C composite chamber was covered by a stainless steel outer shell to maintain its airtightness. Gaseous hydrogen as a fuel and gaseous oxygen as an oxidizer were used for the heating test. The surface of these C/C composites was maintained below 1500 K when the combustion gas temperature was about 2800 K and the heat flux to the combustion chamber wall was about 9 MW/m2. No thermal damage was observed on the stainless steel tubes that were in contact with the C/C composite materials. The results of the heating test showed that such a metallic tube-cooled C/C composite structure is able to control the surface temperature as a cooling structure (also as a heat exchanger) as well as indicated the possibility of reducing the amount of coolant even if the thermal load to the engine is high. Thus, application of this metallic tube-cooled C/C composite structure to reusable engines such as a rocket-ramjet combined-cycle engine is expected.

  12. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging in breast carcinoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike; Lengana, Thabo; Modiselle, Moshe; Vorster, Mariza; Zeevaart, JanRijn; Ebenhan, Thomas [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Maes, Alex [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-04-15

    To report on imaging findings using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET in a series of 19 breast carcinoma patients. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging results obtained were compared to routinely performed staging examinations and analyzed as to lesion location and progesterone receptor status. Out of 81 tumor lesions identified, 84% were identified on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC SUVmean values of distant metastases proved significantly higher (mean, 6.86, SD, 5.68) when compared to those of primary or local recurrences (mean, 2.45, SD, 2.55, p = 0.04) or involved lymph nodes (mean, 3.18, SD, 1.79, p = 0.011). SUVmean values of progesterone receptor-positive lesions proved not significantly different from progesterone receptor-negative lesions. SUV values derived from FDG PET/CT, available in seven patients, and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging proved weakly correlated (r = 0.407, p = 0.015). {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging in breast carcinoma confirms the reported considerable variation of PSMA expression on human solid tumors using immunohistochemistry. (orig.)

  13. DB2 10.1 fundamentals certification study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Roger E

    2014-01-01

    Beginning with an explanation of the certification process and working through fundamental exam objectives, this guide gives test-takers all they need to know to pass IBM's DB2 10.1 Fundamentals certification exam (Exam 610). All the subjects covered on the exam are included: planning, security, data concurrency, working with databases and database objects, working with data using SQL and XQuery, working with DB2 tables, views, and indexes-and more. The book concludes with an

  14. GigaDB: announcing the GigaScience database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneddon Tam P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the launch of GigaScience journal, here we provide insight into the accompanying database GigaDB, which allows the integration of manuscript publication with supporting data and tools. Reinforcing and upholding GigaScience’s goals to promote open-data and reproducibility of research, GigaDB also aims to provide a home, when a suitable public repository does not exist, for the supporting data or tools featured in the journal and beyond.

  15. "Plug" ósseo autógeno para orifícios de trepanação: nota técnica Autogenic bone plug to seal burr holes: technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSUÉ GUIMARÃES GRANHA VIALOGO

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Vários materiais são utilizados para ocluir os orifícios de trepanação em neurocirurgia, por motivos variados: para evitar fístula liquórica após trepanações, para auxiliar a fixação do "flap" ósseo e por motivos estéticos, na região frontal. Dentre estes materiais citamos os heterólogos (botões de silicone, miniplacas de metal, cera de osso, metilmetacrilato, gelfoam, cimento de polímero vegetal, cerâmica de hidroxiapatita, e os autólogos (pó de osso originado da trepanação, gordura, músculo, aponeurose. Os materiais heterólogos ou sintéticos podem provocar reação de corpo estranho com erosão da pele e exposição do material, tornando necessária sua retirada, em tempo variável no pós-operatório. Há cerca de três anos, o autor vem utilizando um botão ou "plug" ósseo autólogo, feito com surgicel e o pó de osso proveniente da trepanação, com bom resultado estético eliminando as desconfortáveis depressões cranianas pós-trepanação. Apresentamos a técnica de confecção deste prático `plug ósseo autólogo'. Nas neuroendoscopias, praticamente sanou-se o problema da fístula liquórica e reação de corpo estranho. Encorajamos a utilização deste botão ósseo autólogo em nosso meio, como método eficiente, econômico e biologicamente aceitável para ocluir orifícios cranianos de trepanação.Many neurosurgical procedures can be performed by a single burr hole: neuroendoscopy, microvascular decompression, stereotactic procedures, chronic subdural haematomas. It is technically difficult to suture and close the dura, located at the bottom of such holes, which can lately lead to CSF leakage. On the other hand, the surgical material used to seal the burr holes can be divided in heterogenic (metal screws, silicon plugs, gelfoam, bone wax, metilmetacrilate, hidroxiapatite, and autogenic (fat, aponeurosis, muscle, and bone dust from trephination. The heterogenic group always brings the possibility of

  16. LocSigDB: a database of protein localization signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Simarjeet; Pandey, Sanjit; Srinivasan, Satish M.; Mohammed, Akram; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    LocSigDB (http://genome.unmc.edu/LocSigDB/) is a manually curated database of experimental protein localization signals for eight distinct subcellular locations; primarily in a eukaryotic cell with brief coverage of bacterial proteins. Proteins must be localized at their appropriate subcellular compartment to perform their desired function. Mislocalization of proteins to unintended locations is a causative factor for many human diseases; therefore, collection of known sorting signals will help support many important areas of biomedical research. By performing an extensive literature study, we compiled a collection of 533 experimentally determined localization signals, along with the proteins that harbor such signals. Each signal in the LocSigDB is annotated with its localization, source, PubMed references and is linked to the proteins in UniProt database along with the organism information that contain the same amino acid pattern as the given signal. From LocSigDB webserver, users can download the whole database or browse/search for data using an intuitive query interface. To date, LocSigDB is the most comprehensive compendium of protein localization signals for eight distinct subcellular locations. Database URL: http://genome.unmc.edu/LocSigDB/ PMID:25725059

  17. Antihyperglycemic and Antiobesity Effects of JAL2 on db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seung Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lonicera japonica Thunb. (LJT and Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch. (RGL have been used traditionally as a herbal medicine in Korean medicine. Using LC/Q-TOF was performed to profile the two herbal medicines and the mixture of LJR and RGL (JAL2, ratio 1 : 1. We performed oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and plasma GLP-1 and insulin secretion by multiplex assays to investigate antidiabetic effects of LJT, RGL, and JAL2 in db/db mice, the mice model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Also, the antiobesity-related factors such as plasma peptide YY (PYY, triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and weight of liver, epididymal, and retroperitoneal fat tissue were investigated. Through the multiplex assay, it was found that JAL2 treatment more efficiently attenuated high levels of blood glucose by stimulating GLP-1 secretion and reduced LDL concentration and weight of liver and retroperitoneal fat tissue compared to LJT or RGL treated separately. These results suggest that the JAL2 has antidiabetes and antiobesity effects in T2DM mice model.

  18. DPP-4 inhibitor des-F-sitagliptin treatment increased insulin exocytosis from db/db mice {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamatsu, Shinya, E-mail: shinya@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Nakamichi, Yoko; Aoyagi, Kyota; Nishiwaki, Chiyono [Department of Biochemistry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Anti-diabetic new drug, DPP-4 inhibitor, can affect the insulin exocytosis. {yields} DPP-4 inhibitor treatment altered syntaxin 1 expression. {yields} Treatment of db/db mice with DPP-4 inhibitor increased insulin release. -- Abstract: Incretin promotes insulin secretion acutely. Recently, orally-administered DPP-4 inhibitors represent a new class of anti-hyperglycemic agents. Indeed, inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4), sitagliptin, has just begun to be widely used as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes. However, the effects of sitagliptin-treatment on insulin exocytosis from single {beta}-cells are yet unknown. We therefore investigated how sitagliptin-treatment in db/db mice affects insulin exocytosis by treating db/db mice with des-F-sitagliptin for 2 weeks. Perfusion studies showed that 2 weeks-sitagliptin treatment potentiated insulin secretion. We then analyzed insulin granule motion and SNARE protein, syntaxin 1, by TIRF imaging system. TIRF imaging of insulin exocytosis showed the increased number of docked insulin granules and increased fusion events from them during first-phase release. In accord with insulin exocytosis data, des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the number of syntaxin 1 clusters on the plasma membrane. Thus, our data demonstrated that 2-weeks des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the fusion events of insulin granules, probably via increased number of docked insulin granules and that of syntaxin 1 clusters.

  19. DPP-4 inhibitor des-F-sitagliptin treatment increased insulin exocytosis from db/db mice β cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamatsu, Shinya; Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Nakamichi, Yoko; Aoyagi, Kyota; Nishiwaki, Chiyono

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Anti-diabetic new drug, DPP-4 inhibitor, can affect the insulin exocytosis. → DPP-4 inhibitor treatment altered syntaxin 1 expression. → Treatment of db/db mice with DPP-4 inhibitor increased insulin release. -- Abstract: Incretin promotes insulin secretion acutely. Recently, orally-administered DPP-4 inhibitors represent a new class of anti-hyperglycemic agents. Indeed, inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4), sitagliptin, has just begun to be widely used as therapeutics for type 2 diabetes. However, the effects of sitagliptin-treatment on insulin exocytosis from single β-cells are yet unknown. We therefore investigated how sitagliptin-treatment in db/db mice affects insulin exocytosis by treating db/db mice with des-F-sitagliptin for 2 weeks. Perfusion studies showed that 2 weeks-sitagliptin treatment potentiated insulin secretion. We then analyzed insulin granule motion and SNARE protein, syntaxin 1, by TIRF imaging system. TIRF imaging of insulin exocytosis showed the increased number of docked insulin granules and increased fusion events from them during first-phase release. In accord with insulin exocytosis data, des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the number of syntaxin 1 clusters on the plasma membrane. Thus, our data demonstrated that 2-weeks des-F-sitagliptin-treatment increased the fusion events of insulin granules, probably via increased number of docked insulin granules and that of syntaxin 1 clusters.

  20. Pitavastatin suppresses diethylnitrosamine-induced liver preneoplasms in male C57BL/KsJ-db/db obese mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Masahito; Tanaka, Takuji; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Yasuda, Yoichi; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Kubota, Masaya; Terakura, Daishi; Baba, Atsushi; Ohno, Tomohiko; Kochi, Takahiro; Tsurumi, Hisashi

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic abnormalities, including inflammation and lipid accumulation in the liver, play a role in liver carcinogenesis. Adipocytokine imbalances, such as decreased serum adiponectin levels, are also involved in obesity-related liver tumorigenesis. In the present study, we examined the effects of pitavastatin - a drug used for the treatment of hyperlipidemia - on the development of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced liver preneoplastic lesions in C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db/db) obese mice. Male db/db mice were administered tap water containing 40 ppm DEN for 2 weeks and were subsequently fed a diet containing 1 ppm or 10 ppm pitavastatin for 14 weeks. At sacrifice, feeding with 10 ppm pitavastatin significantly inhibited the development of hepatic premalignant lesions, foci of cellular alteration, as compared to that in the untreated group by inducing apoptosis, but inhibiting cell proliferation. Pitavastatin improved liver steatosis and activated the AMPK-α protein in the liver. It also decreased free fatty acid and aminotransferases levels, while increasing adiponectin levels in the serum. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the expression of TNF-α and interleukin-6 mRNAs in the liver were decreased by pitavastatin treatment, suggesting attenuation of the chronic inflammation induced by excess fat deposition. Pitavastatin is effective in inhibiting the early phase of obesity-related liver tumorigenesis and, therefore, may be useful in the chemoprevention of liver cancer in obese individuals

  1. Anti-diabetic effect of amorphastilbol through PPARα/γ dual activation in db/db mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woojung; Ham, Jungyeob; Kwon, Hak Cheol; Kim, Yong Kee; Kim, Su-Nam

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Amorphastilbol stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ. ► Amorphastilbol improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. ► There are no side effects, such as hepatomegaly, in amorphastilbol-treated mice. ► Amorphastilbol can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against T2DM. - Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered as desirable targets for metabolic syndrome treatments, even though their specific agonists have several side effects, including body weight gain, edema, and tissue failure. The effects of amorphastilbol (APH) on glucose- and lipid metabolism were investigated with in vitro 3T3-L1 adipocyte systems and in vivo db/db mice model. APH selectively stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ, which are able to enhance fatty acid oxidation and glucose utilization. Furthermore, APH improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. More importantly, there are no significant side effects, such as weight gain or hepatomegaly, in APH-treated animals, implying that APH do not adversely affect liver or lipid metabolism. All our data suggest that APH can be used as potential therapeutic agents against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders, including obesity, by enhancing glucose and lipid metabolism

  2. Pluronic L-81 ameliorates diabetic symptoms in db/db mice through transcriptional regulation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Wo-Shing; Lu, Li-Wei; Tam, Sidney; Ko, Otis King Hung; Chow, Billy KC; He, Ming-Liang; Ng, Samuel S; Yeung, Chung-Man; Liu, Ching-Chiu; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie C

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To test whether oral L-81 treatment could improve the condition of mice with diabetes and to investigate how L-81 regulates microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) activity in the liver. METHODS: Genetically diabetic (db/db) mice were fed on chow supplemented with or without L-81 for 4 wk. The body weight, plasma glucose level, plasma lipid profile, and adipocyte volume of the db/db mice were assessed after treatment. Toxicity of L-81 was also evaluated. To understand the molecular mechanism, HepG2 cells were treated with L-81 and the effects on apolipoprotein B (apoB) secretion and mRNA level of the MTP gene were assessed. RESULTS: Treatment of db/db mice with L-81 significantly reduced and nearly normalized their body weight, hyperphagia and polydipsia. L-81 also markedly decreased the fasting plasma glucose level, improved glucose tolerance, and attenuated the elevated levels of plasma cholesterol and triglyceride. At the effective dosage, little toxicity was observed. Treatment of HepG2 cells with L-81 not only inhibited apoB secretion, but also significantly decreased the mRNA level of the MTP gene. Similar to the action of insulin, L-81 exerted its effect on the MTP promoter. CONCLUSION: L-81 represents a promising candidate in the development of a selective insulin-mimetic molecule and an anti-diabetic agent. PMID:19554651

  3. Anti-diabetic effect of amorphastilbol through PPARα/γ dual activation in db/db mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woojung; Ham, Jungyeob; Kwon, Hak Cheol [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kee, E-mail: yksnbk@sookmyung.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Su-Nam, E-mail: snkim@kist.re.kr [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Amorphastilbol stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ. ► Amorphastilbol improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. ► There are no side effects, such as hepatomegaly, in amorphastilbol-treated mice. ► Amorphastilbol can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against T2DM. - Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered as desirable targets for metabolic syndrome treatments, even though their specific agonists have several side effects, including body weight gain, edema, and tissue failure. The effects of amorphastilbol (APH) on glucose- and lipid metabolism were investigated with in vitro 3T3-L1 adipocyte systems and in vivo db/db mice model. APH selectively stimulates the transcriptional activities of both PPARα and PPARγ, which are able to enhance fatty acid oxidation and glucose utilization. Furthermore, APH improves glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice. More importantly, there are no significant side effects, such as weight gain or hepatomegaly, in APH-treated animals, implying that APH do not adversely affect liver or lipid metabolism. All our data suggest that APH can be used as potential therapeutic agents against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders, including obesity, by enhancing glucose and lipid metabolism.

  4. Evaluación de la reproducción inducida del blanquillo ( Sorubim cuspicaudus Littmann, Burr Nass, 2000 con ovaprim®.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Atencio G

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El blanquillo ( Sorubim suspicaudus Littmann, Burr &Nass, 2000 presenta características de importanciapara la acuicultura, destacándose la calidad de sucarne y el alto valor comercial. No se reproduce enconfinamiento, por lo que es necesario sureproducción inducida con sustancias hormonales.Responde bien a la inducción con extracto de pituitariade capa (EPC; sin embargo, no se ha evaluado suinducción con extracto de análogos deGonodotropine Releasing Hormone de salmón(sGnRH-a y domperidone en un vehículo inerte. Porlo tanto, entre mayo y noviembre/02, se evaluó eldesempeño reproductivo del blanquillo inducido condiferentes dosificaciones de Ovaprim®: 0.25 (T2,0.050 (T3 y 0.75 ml/kg de peso vivo (T4, aplicadoen una sola dosificación, por inyección en la basede la aleta pectoral. Además, un grupo fue inducidocon 8 mg EPC/kg de peso vivo (TI, en dos inyeccionesde 10 y7 90% de la dosis total, con intervalo de 6horas, por vía intramuscular. Se indujeron entre seisy nueve hembras por tratamiento con igual númerode machos. El desempeño reproductivo fue evaluadomediante el índice de ovulación (hembras ovuladas/hembras tratadas, tasa de fertilización medida a las4 horas pos-eclosión (HPF, tasa de eclosión medidaa las 10 HPF y la fecundidad tanto absoluta comorelativa. El Ovaprim® mostró ser efectivo para inducirla ovulación del blanquillo en las dosificacionesevaluadas (0.25 a 0.75 mL/kg, con respuestassimilares en el desempeño reproductivo a lasobtenidas en EPC. La ovulación con Ovaprim® seobtuvo entre las 12.8 y 14.0 horas con temperaturapromedio del agua de 27.3ºC. El índice de ovulaciónosciló entre 66.7% (T2 y 83.3% (T3; la tasa defertilización osciló entre 88.0% (T3 y 42.0% (T1; latasa de eclosión osciló entre 83.7% (T3 y 40.3%(T1;la fecundidad absoluta osciló entre 40370.6 (T1 y82992.5 ovocitos/hembra (T2; la fecundad relativa,expresada en gramos de ovocitos/kg de hembra,osciló entre 32.1 (T3 y 63.1(T2; el di

  5. Effects of low-intensity pulsed electromagnetic fields on bone microarchitecture, mechanical strength and bone turnover in type 2 diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianjun; Zeng, Zhaobin; Zhao, Yantao; Jing, Da; Tang, Chuhua; Ding, Yin; Feng, Xue

    2017-09-07

    Type 2 diabetic patients have impaired bone quality, leading to increased fracture risk. Substantial evidence demonstrates that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) could resist osteopenia/osteoporosis induced by estrogen deficiency and disuse. However, the effects of PEMF on osteopenia/osteoporosis associated with diabetes, especially for more prevalent type 2 diabetes, remain poorly understood. We herein investigated the skeletal effects and mechanisms of PEMF (15 Hz, 20 Gs) on leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice with typical type 2 diabetic symptoms. Our µCT results showed that 12-week PEMF exposure significantly improved both cancellous and cortical bone microarchitecture in db/db mice. Three-point bending and biomechanical indentation testing demonstrated that PEMF improved whole-bone structural properties and tissue-level material properties in db/db mice. PEMF significantly promoted bone formation in db/db mice evidenced by increased serum osteocalcin and bone mineral apposition rate, whereas PEMF exerted no observable alteration in bone resorption. Real-time PCR showed that PEMF upregulated tibial gene expression of osteoblastogenesis-related of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling but not osteoclastogenesis-related RANKL-RANK signaling in db/db mice. Our findings demonstrate that PEMF improved bone quantity and quality with obvious anabolic activities in db/db mice, and imply that PEMF might become a clinically applicable treatment modality for improving bone quality in type 2 diabetic patients.

  6. Plant DB link - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e Site Policy | Contact Us Plant DB link - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods

  7. Exogenous lytic activity of SPN9CC endolysin against gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-A; Shin, Hakdong; Heu, Sunggi; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-06-28

    Concerns over drug-resistant bacteria have stimulated interest in developing alternative methods to control bacterial infections. Endolysin, a phage-encoded enzyme that breaks down bacterial peptidoglycan at the terminal stage of the phage reproduction cycle, is reported to be effective for the control of bacterial pathogenic bacteria. Bioinformatic analysis of the SPN9CC bacteriophage genome revealed a gene that encodes an endolysin with a domain structure similar to those of the endolysins produced by the P1 and P22 coliphages. The SPN9CC endolysin was purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The endolysin was relatively stable and active over a broad temperature range (from 24°C to 65°C). It showed maximal activity at 50°C, and its optimum pH range was from pH 7.5 to 8.5. The SPN9CC endolysin showed antimicrobial activity against only gram-negative bacteria and functioned by cutting the glycosidic bond of peptidoglycan. Interestingly, the SPN9CC endolysin could lyse intact gram-negative bacteria in the absence of EDTA as an outer membrane permeabilizer. The exogenous lytic activity of the SPN9CC endolysin makes it a potential therapeutic agent against gram-negative bacteria.

  8. An NMR study of the covalent and noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scahill, T.A.; Jensen, R.M.; Swenson, D.H.; Hatzenbuhler, N.T.; Petzold, G.; Wierenga, W.; Brahme, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of the antitumor drug CC-1065 has been studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This study involves two parts, the elucidation of the covalent binding site of the drug to DNA and a detailed investigation of the noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 with a DNA fragment through analysis of 2D NOE (NOESY) experiments. A CC-1065-DNA adduct was prepared, and an adenine adduct was released upon heating. NMR ( 1 H and 13 C) analysis of the adduct shows that the drug binds to N3 of adenine by reaction of its cyclopropyl group. The reaction pathway and product formed were determined by analysis of the 13 C DEPT spectra. An octamer duplex, d(CGATTAGC·GCTAATCG), was synthesized and used in the interaction study of CC-1065 and the oligomer. The duplex and the drug-octamer complex were both analyzed by 2D spectroscopy (COSY, NOESY). The relative intensity of the NOEs observed between the drug (CC-1065) and the octamer duplex shows conclusively that the drug is located in the minor groove, covalently attached to N3 of adenine 6 and positioned from the 3' → 5' end in relation to strand A [d(CGATTA 6 GC)]. A mechanism for drug binding and stabilization can be inferred from the NOE data and model-building studies

  9. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of CcPILS gene of Hickory (Carya cathayensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Yuan, Huwei; Gao, Liuxiao; Guo, Haipeng; Qiu, Lingling; Xu, Dongbin; Yan, Daoliang; Zheng, Bingsong

    2017-04-01

    PILS is a key auxin efflux carrier protein in the auxin signal transduction. A CcPILS gene related to hickory (Carya carthayensis) grafting process was obtained by RACE techniques. The full length of CcPILS gene was1541bp contained a 1263bp length open reading flame (ORF). The CcPILS encoded 294 amino acids with molecular weight of 46 kDa, PI 5.38 and localized at endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The gene contained a central hydrophilic loop separating two hydrophobic domains of about five transmembrane regions each. The gene of CcPILS belonged to Clade III sub-family of PILS and its sequence had high homology with Arabidopsis. Real Time RT-PCR analysis showed that the gene expressions were weakly induced in bud, inflorescence, fruit, leaf and stem, while strongly in root. The expression levels were strongly induced and reached a peak at the third day of grafting in scion and rootstock of hickory, which were 1.45 and 3.45 times higher, respectively, compared to that of control. The results indicated that CcPILS may be involved in regulating the expression of genes related to auxin signal transduction during hickory graft process.

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15891-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :none) Candida dubliniensis CD36 chromo... 122 5e-26 AM270139_47( AM270139 |pid:none) Aspergillus niger...-04 FM992692_190( FM992692 |pid:none) Candida dubliniensis CD36 chromo... 51 1e-04 BT051683_1( BT051683 |pid:none) Medic... dubliniensis CD36 chromo... 224 7e-57 AM042543_1( AM042543 |pid:none) Sordaria macrospora partial kbp ge...zed and subtracted western ... 52 7e-16 3 ( DB751149 ) Apis mellifera head cDNA, RIKEN full-length enric...s tropicalis EST, clone TGas138l22 3'. 46 8e-15 5 ( FE260864 ) CAZO1635.rev CAZO Naegleria gruberi Flagella

  11. Anti-diabetic and hypolipidemic effects of Sargassum yezoense in db/db mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su-Nam, E-mail: snkim@kist.re.kr [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woojung [Natural Medicine Center, KIST Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Gyu-Un [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Research Center for Cell Fate Control, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Kee, E-mail: yksnbk@sookmyung.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sargassum yezoense (SY) treatment improved glucose and lipid impairment in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This pharmacological action is associated with PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} dual activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It decreases the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It increases the expression of UCP3 for lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered to be desirable targets for metabolic syndrome, even though their specific agonists have several side effects including body weight gain, edema and tissue failure. Previously, we have reported in vitro effects of Sargassum yezoense (SY) and its ingredients, sargaquinoic acid (SQA) and sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA), on PPAR{alpha}/{gamma} dual transcriptional activation. In this study, we describe in vivo pharmacological property of SY on metabolic disorders. SY treatment significantly improved glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice model. More importantly, there are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly in SY-treated animals, indicating little side effects of SY in liver and lipid metabolism. In addition, SY led to a decrease in the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver responsible for lowering blood glucose level and an increase in the expression of UCP3 in adipose tissue for the reduction of total and LDL-cholesterol level. Altogether, our data suggest that SY would be a potential therapeutic agent against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders by ameliorating the glucose and lipid metabolism.

  12. Anti-diabetic and hypolipidemic effects of Sargassum yezoense in db/db mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su-Nam; Lee, Woojung; Bae, Gyu-Un; Kim, Yong Kee

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sargassum yezoense (SY) treatment improved glucose and lipid impairment in vivo. ► This pharmacological action is associated with PPARα/γ dual activation. ► It decreases the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver. ► It increases the expression of UCP3 for lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. ► There are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been considered to be desirable targets for metabolic syndrome, even though their specific agonists have several side effects including body weight gain, edema and tissue failure. Previously, we have reported in vitro effects of Sargassum yezoense (SY) and its ingredients, sargaquinoic acid (SQA) and sargahydroquinoic acid (SHQA), on PPARα/γ dual transcriptional activation. In this study, we describe in vivo pharmacological property of SY on metabolic disorders. SY treatment significantly improved glucose and lipid impairment in db/db mice model. More importantly, there are no significant side effects such as body weight gain and hepatomegaly in SY-treated animals, indicating little side effects of SY in liver and lipid metabolism. In addition, SY led to a decrease in the expression of G6Pase for gluconeogenesis in liver responsible for lowering blood glucose level and an increase in the expression of UCP3 in adipose tissue for the reduction of total and LDL-cholesterol level. Altogether, our data suggest that SY would be a potential therapeutic agent against type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders by ameliorating the glucose and lipid metabolism.

  13. Genetic transformation of marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. CC9311 (Cyanophyceae) by electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaxin; Lin, Hanzhi; Jiang, Peng; Li, Fuchao; Qin, Song

    2013-03-01

    Synechococcus sp. CC9311 is a marine cyanobacterium characterized by type IV chromatic acclimation (CA). A genetic transformation system was developed as a first step to elucidate the molecular mechanism of CA. The results show that Synechococcus sp. CC9311 cells were sensitive to four commonly used antibiotics: ampicillin, kanamycin, spectinomycin, and chloramphenicol. An integrative plasmid to disrupt the putative phycoerythrin lyase gene mpeV, using a kanamycin resistance gene as selectable marker, was constructed by recombinant polymerase chain reaction. The plasmid was then transformed into Synechococcus sp. CC9311 via electroporation. High transformation efficiency was achieved at a field strength of 2 kV/cm. DNA analysis showed that mpeV was fully disrupted following challenge of the transformants with a high concentration of kanamycin. In addition, the transformants that displayed poor growth on agar SN medium could be successfully plated on agarose SN medium.

  14. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Annual technical report, fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1993 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department. The program descriptions consist of a funding summary for each Assistant Secretary office and the Office of Energy Research, and detailed project summaries with project goals and accomplishments. The FY 1993 budget summary table for DOE Materials Activities in each of the programs is presented.

  15. Coefficient αcc in design value of concrete compressive strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goleš Danica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coefficient αcc introduces the effects of rate and duration of loading on compressive strength of concrete. These effects may be partially or completely compensated by the increase in concrete strength over time. Selection of the value of this coefficient, in recommended range between 0.8 and 1.0, is carried out through the National Annexes to Eurocode 2. This paper presents some considerations related to the introduction of this coefficient and its value adopted in some European countries. The article considers the effect of the adoption of conservative value αcc=0.85 on design value of compressive and flexural resistance of rectangular cross-section made of normal and high strength concrete. It analyzes the influence of different values of coefficient αcc on the area of reinforcement required to achieve the desired resistance of cross-section.

  16. Longitudinal study on transmission of MRSA CC398 within pig herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broens Els M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the detection of MRSA CC398 in pigs in 2004, it has emerged in livestock worldwide. MRSA CC398 has been found in people in contact with livestock and thus has become a public health issue. Data from a large-scale longitudinal study in two Danish and four Dutch pig herds were used to quantify MRSA CC398 transmission rates within pig herds and to identify factors affecting transmission between pigs. Results Sows and their offspring were sampled at varying intervals during a production cycle. Overall MRSA prevalence of sows increased from 33% before farrowing to 77% before weaning. Overall MRSA prevalence of piglets was > 60% during the entire study period. The recurrent finding of MRSA in the majority of individuals indicates true colonization or might be the result of contamination. Transmission rates were estimated using a Susceptible-Infectious-Susceptible (SIS-model, which resulted in values of the reproduction ratio (R0 varying from 0.24 to 8.08. Transmission rates were higher in pigs treated with tetracyclins and β-lactams compared to untreated pigs implying a selective advantage of MRSA CC398 when these antimicrobials are used. Furthermore, transmission rates were higher in pre-weaning pigs compared to post-weaning pigs which might be explained by an age-related susceptibility or the presence of the sow as a primary source of MRSA CC398. Finally, transmission rates increased with the relative increase of the infection pressure within the pen compared to the total infection pressure, implying that within-pen transmission is a more important route compared to between-pen transmission and transmission through environmental exposure. Conclusion Our results indicate that MRSA CC398 is able to spread and persist in pig herds, resulting in an endemic situation. Transmission rates are affected by the use of selective antimicrobials and by the age of pigs.

  17. Why is the linking C-C bond in tetrahedranyltetrahedrane so short?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong

    2006-02-02

    [structure: see text]. The block-localized wave function (BLW) method has been employed to probe the origin of the very short linking C-C bond (1.436 A) in tetrahedranyltetrahedrane. Computations show that the vicinal hyperconjugative interactions between the two tetrahedranyl groups is stronger than the conjugation in butadiene, and if there were no hyperconjugation effect, the bond distance would be 1.491 A. Thus, both the hybridization mode and hyperconjugative interactions contribute to the shortening of the central C-C bond in tetrahedranyltetrahedrane.

  18. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC). Annual Technical Report, Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2001-07-31

    The Energy Materials Coordinating Committee Annual Report (attached, DOE/SC-0040) provides an annual summary of non-classified materials-related research programs supported by various elements within the Department of Energy. The EMaCC Annual Report is a useful working tool for project managers who want to know what is happening in other divisions, and it provides a guide for persons in industry and academia to the materials program within the Department. The major task of EMaCC this year was to make the Annual Report a more user-friendly document by removing redundant program information and shortening the project summaries.

  19. Monitoring and Diagnostics for C/C++ Real-Time Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Yves

    Knowledge about the internal state of computational processes is essential for problem diagnostics as well as for constant monitoring and pre-failure recognition. The CMX li- brary provides monitoring capabilities similiar to the Java Management Extensions (JMX) for C and C++ applications. This thesis provides a detailed analysis of the requirements for monitoring and diagnos- tics of the C/C++ processes at CERN. The developed CMX library enables real-time C/C++ processes to expose values with- out harming their normal execution. CMX is portable and can be integrated in different monitoring architectures.

  20. Sharing mutants and experimental information prepublication using FgMutantDb (https://scabusa.org/FgMutantDb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Thomas T; Basenko, Evelina; Harb, Omar; Brown, Neil A; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Bregitzer, Phil P

    2018-02-02

    There is no comprehensive storage for generated mutants of Fusarium graminearum or data associated with these mutants. Instead, researchers relied on several independent and non-integrated databases. FgMutantDb was designed as a simple spreadsheet that is accessible globally on the web that will function as a centralized source of information on F. graminearum mutants. FgMutantDb aids in the maintenance and sharing of mutants within a research community. It will serve also as a platform for disseminating prepublication results as well as negative results that often go unreported. Additionally, the highly curated information on mutants in FgMutantDb will be shared with other databases (FungiDB, Ensembl, PhytoPath, and PHI-base) through updating reports. Here we describe the creation and potential usefulness of FgMutantDb to the F. graminearum research community, and provide a tutorial on its use. This type of database could be easily emulated for other fungal species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of diabetic neuropathy in the BKS db/db mouse: a model of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Manjusha; Hur, Junguk; Hong, Yu; Backus, Carey; Hayes, John M; Oh, Sang Su; Kretzler, Matthias; Feldman, Eva L

    2011-07-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy (DN) is essential for the design of mechanism-based therapies. We examined changes in global gene expression to define pathways regulated by diabetes in peripheral nerve. Microarray data for 24-week-old BKS db/db and db/+ mouse sciatic nerve were analyzed to define significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs); DEGs were further analyzed to identify regulated biological processes and pathways. Expression profile clustering was performed to identify coexpressed DEGs. A set of coexpressed lipid metabolism genes was used for promoter sequence analysis. Gene expression changes are consistent with structural changes of axonal degeneration. Pathways regulated in the db/db nerve include lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling, apoptosis, and axon guidance. Promoter sequences of lipid metabolism-related genes exhibit evidence of coregulation of lipid metabolism and nervous system development genes. Our data support existing hypotheses regarding hyperglycemia-mediated nerve damage in DN. Moreover, our analyses revealed a possible coregulation mechanism connecting hyperlipidemia and axonal degeneration. © 2011 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. DB2 9 for Linux, Unix, and Windows database administration certification study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Roger E

    2007-01-01

    In DB2 9 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows Database Administration Certification Study Guide, Roger E. Sanders-one of the world's leading DB2 authors and an active participant in the development of IBM's DB2 certification exams-covers everything a reader needs to know to pass the DB2 9 UDB DBA Certification Test (731).This comprehensive study guide steps you through all of the topics that are covered on the test, including server management, data placement, database access, analyzing DB2 activity, DB2 utilities, high availability, security, and much more. Each chapter contains an extensive set of p

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01437-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ytica Sheared DNA Entam... 34 5.5 2 ( EL359934 ) CCEM4689.b1_A21.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 32 5.5...L357608 ) CCEM2424.b1_P05.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 32 5.6 2 ( EH698526 ) CCIS10356.b1_H22.ab1 CC...5.6 2 ( EH708513 ) CCIS7811.b1_F09.ab1 CCI(LMS) chicory Cichorium in... 32 5.6 2 ( EL355060 ) CCEM11709.b1_J23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...34 5.6 2 ( BJ325542 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:dda1g08, 5' e... 32 5.6 2 ( EL365580 ) CCES1656.b1_P05.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06686-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 477 |pid:none) Methanosaeta thermophila PT, com... 37 0.22 EF175614_1( EF175614 |pid:none) Yersinia intermed...CHO_OF382xn20r1.ab1 CHO_OF Nicotiana tabacum geno... 48 0.16 1 ( EJ323709 ) 1095403525209 Global-Ocean-Sampli...br... 48 0.16 1 ( CX574665 ) TTE00035304 Amplicon Express - Conjugative Form T... 48 0.16 1 ( AC09...ar... 40 1.1 2 ( DQ102703 ) Coreana raphaelis mitochondrion, complete genome. 30 1.1 4 ( AC095058 ) Homo sapie.... 36 2.1 2 ( CP000263 ) Buchnera aphidicola str. Cc (Cinara cedri), compl... 42 2

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04013-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pid:none) Flavobacterium psychrophilum JIP... 98 3e-19 EU678894_1( EU678894 |pid:none) Bacillus intermedius ...46 3e-04 2 ( EH672780 ) CCIL10412.b1_G11.ab1 CCI(LMS) chicory Cichorium i... 46 3e-04 2 ( EJ368820 ) 1092963715450 Global-Ocean-Sampl...41 |pid:none) Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, com... 89 2e-16 AH1770( AH1770 ) conserved hypothetical protein lin2710 [imported...AY653733 ) Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus, complete genome. 62 3e-05 1 ( EH678404 ) CCIL3410.b1_D14.ab1 CC...ngs S... 44 6.8 1 >( AC116963 ) Dictyostelium discoideum chromosome 2 map 4657875-4914984 strain AX4, compl

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10913-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .013 ( Q92738 ) RecName: Full=USP6 N-terminal-like protein; AltName: Fu... 44 0.013 D13644_1( D13644 |pid:none) Homo sapie...4 2 ( AC090393 ) Homo sapiens chromosome 18, clone RP11-738B2, com... 36 2.7 7 ( ER548332 ) 1093016199934 Global-Ocean-Sampli...288 pro... 44 0.012 BC051184_1( BC051184 |pid:none) Mus musculus USP6 N-terminal like,... 44 0.013 AK099868_... BT038351 |pid:none) Zea mays full-length cDNA clone ZM... 44 0.013 (Q80XC3) RecName: Full=USP6 N-terminal-li...095506062409 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-31-01-01-1... 48 0.83 1 ( CC504594 ) CH240_344F23.TARBAC13P2 CHORI-240

  7. NGSmethDB 2017: enhanced methylomes and differential methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrón, Ricardo; Gómez-Martín, Cristina; Carpena, Pedro; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro; Barturen, Guillermo; Hackenberg, Michael; Oliver, José L

    2017-01-04

    The 2017 update of NGSmethDB stores whole genome methylomes generated from short-read data sets obtained by bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) technology. To generate high-quality methylomes, stringent quality controls were integrated with third-part software, adding also a two-step mapping process to exploit the advantages of the new genome assembly models. The samples were all profiled under constant parameter settings, thus enabling comparative downstream analyses. Besides a significant increase in the number of samples, NGSmethDB now includes two additional data-types, which are a valuable resource for the discovery of methylation epigenetic biomarkers: (i) differentially methylated single-cytosines; and (ii) methylation segments (i.e. genome regions of homogeneous methylation). The NGSmethDB back-end is now based on MongoDB, a NoSQL hierarchical database using JSON-formatted documents and dynamic schemas, thus accelerating sample comparative analyses. Besides conventional database dumps, track hubs were implemented, which improved database access, visualization in genome browsers and comparative analyses to third-part annotations. In addition, the database can be also accessed through a RESTful API. Lastly, a Python client and a multiplatform virtual machine allow for program-driven access from user desktop. This way, private methylation data can be compared to NGSmethDB without the need to upload them to public servers. Database website: http://bioinfo2.ugr.es/NGSmethDB. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. 50 tips and tricks for MongoDB developers

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorow, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Getting started with MongoDB is easy, but once you begin building applications with it, you'll face some complex issues. What are the tradeoffs between normalized and denormalized data? How do you handle replica set failure and failover? This collection of MongoDB tips, tricks, and hacks helps you resolve issues with everything from application design and implementation to data safety and monitoring. You get specific guidance in five topic areas directly from engineers at 10gen, the company that develops and supports this open source database: Application Design Tips: What to keep in mind wh

  9. SilkDB: a knowledgebase for silkworm biology and genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Xia, Qingyou; He, Ximiao

    2005-01-01

    of the large-scale, genome-wide sequence assembly, cDNAs, clusters of expressed sequence tags (ESTs), transposable elements (TEs), mutants, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and functional annotations of genes with assignments to InterPro domains and Gene Ontology (GO) terms. SilkDB also hosts a set...... by using B.mori genome sequence as a reference framework. Designed as a basic platform, SilkDB strives to provide a comprehensive knowledgebase about the silkworm and present the silkworm genome and related information in systematic and graphical ways for the convenience of in-depth comparative studies...

  10. PHP and MongoDB Web Development Beginner's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Rubayeet

    2011-01-01

    The book follows a "Code first, explain later" approach, using practical examples in PHP to demonstrate unique features of MongoDB. This book is packed with step-by-step instructions and practical examples, along with challenges to test and improve your knowledge. This book assumes that you are experienced in web application development using PHP, HTML, and CSS. Having working knowledge of using a relational database system such as MySQL will help you grasp some of the concepts quicker, but it is not strictly mandatory. No prior knowledge of MongoDB is required.

  11. Characterization of C/C composites porosity for the fusion; Caracterisation de la porosite de composites C/C d'interet pour la fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.; Ballet, A.C.; Pardanaud, C.; Roubin, P. [Universite de Provence, Centre St-Jerome, Laboratoire PIIM, 13 - Marseille (France); Beurroies, I.; Richou, M. [Universite de Provence, Centre St-Jerome, Laboratoire Madirel, 13 - Marseille (France); Brosset, C.; Pegourie, B. [Association EURATOM-CEA sur la Fusion Controlee, CE Cadarache, 13 - St-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    In tokamaks, the composites C/C are used as components facing the plasma because of their excellent thermo-mechanical properties. In Tore Supra tokamak, analysis of particles of graphite erosion showed a big deuterium retention by the machine wall. This fuel retention will lead in ITER to a non acceptable level of tritium. As the diffusion in materials is bound to the porosity, the authors realized a study of two composites porosity: N11 and NB31. Different analysis methods have been performed and the temperature or grain size dependence studied. (A.L.B.)

  12. Automation of ETE-CC 2/3 (Effluent Treatment Station); Automacao da ETE-CC 2/3 (Estacao de Tratamento de Efluentes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinzato, Frederico Takashi Di Tanno; Esteves, Joao Paulo Leite; Souza, Rafael Soares de; Gomes, Lucio Nascimento; Santos, Leonardo Paiva [Companhia Siderurgica Nacional (CSN), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    The present technical contribution presents the results of the implantation of a complete automation system of the ETE-CC 2/3 (Effluent Treatment Station of Continuous Casting Machine 2 and 3 of CSN), improving the reliability and the operation mode of the plant. The implanted system has the following features: remote operation and remote monitoring of all equipment of station; redundancy of operation stations, PLC's, communication networks and UPS; possibility of local control of equipment without automation system; wireless system of control and monitoring for the filters; recording system for all process variables. (author)

  13. Diet supplementation with green tea extract epigallocatechin gallate prevents progression to glucose intolerance in db/db mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortsäter Henrik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green tea was suggested as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of diabetes more than 70 years ago, but the mechanisms behind its antidiabetic effect remains elusive. In this work, we address this issue by feeding a green tea extract (TEAVIGO™ with a high content of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG or the thiazolidinedione PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone, as positive control, to db/db mice, an animal model for diabetes. Methods Young (7 week-old db/db mice were randomized and assigned to receive diets supplemented with or without EGCG or rosiglitazone for 10 weeks. Fasting blood glucose, body weight and food intake was measured along the treatment. Glucose and insulin levels were determined during an oral glucose tolerance test after 10 weeks of treatment. Pancreata were sampled at the end of the study for blinded histomorphometric analysis. Islets were isolated and their mRNA expression analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The results show that, in db/db mice, EGCG improves glucose tolerance and increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. EGCG supplementation reduces the number of pathologically changed islets of Langerhans, increases the number and the size of islets, and heightens pancreatic endocrine area. These effects occurred in parallel with a reduction in islet endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, possibly linked to the antioxidative capacity of EGCG. Conclusions This study shows that the green tea extract EGCG markedly preserves islet structure and enhances glucose tolerance in genetically diabetic mice. Dietary supplementation with EGCG could potentially contribute to nutritional strategies for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. On the C-C coupling of the naphthylium ion with methane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roithová, Jana; Ricketts, Claire; Schröder, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 73, 6/7 (2008), s. 811-821 ISSN 0010-0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : C-C coupling * dications * mass spectrometry * methane * naphthylium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.784, year: 2008

  15. Empirical analysis of the relationship between CC and SLOC in a large corpus of Java methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Landman (Davy); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen); A. Serebrenik (Alexander); L.M.F. Moonen (Leon); L. Pollock

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstract

    Measuring the internal quality of source code is one of the traditional goals of making software development into an engineering discipline. Cyclomatic Complexity (CC) is an often used source code quality metric, next to Source Lines of Code (SLOC). However, the

  16. Students' Learning with the Connected Chemistry (CC1) Curriculum: Navigating the Complexities of the Particulate World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Sharona T.; Wilensky, Uri

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this study is students' learning with a Connected Chemistry unit, CC1 (denotes Connected Chemistry, chapter 1), a computer-based environment for learning the topics of gas laws and kinetic molecular theory in chemistry (Levy and Wilensky 2009). An investigation was conducted into high-school students' learning with Connected…

  17. Polarizable Embedded RI-CC2 Method for Two-Photon Absorption Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hršak, Dalibor; Khah, Alireza Marefat; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel polarizable embedded resolution-of-identity coupled cluster singles and approximate doubles (PERI-CC2) method for calculation of two-photon absorption (TPA) spectra of large molecular systems. The method was benchmarked for three types of systems: a water-solvated molecule...

  18. Immune response CC Chemokines, CCL2 and CCL5 are associated with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav

    2011-04-04

    Abstract Background Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)-CCL5) are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Results BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. Conclusions These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  19. The cc-bar and bb-bar spectroscopy in the two-step potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulshreshtha, D.S.; Kaiserslautern Univ.

    1984-07-01

    We investigate the spectroscopy of the charmonium (cc-bar) and bottonium (bb-bar) bound states in a static flavour independent nonrelativistic quark-antiquark (qq-bar) two-step potential model proposed earlier. Our predictions are in good agreement with experimental data and with other theoretical predictions. (author)

  20. The Role of CC-Chemokines in the Regulation of Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisyah Ridiandries

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is critical for survival and in the regenerative response to tissue injury or ischemia. However, in diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis, inflammation can cause unregulated angiogenesis leading to excessive neovascularization, which exacerbates disease. Current anti-angiogenic therapies cause complete inhibition of both inflammatory and ischemia driven angiogenesis causing a range of side effects in patients. Specific inhibition of inflammation-driven angiogenesis would therefore be immensely valuable. Increasing evidence suggests that the CC-chemokine class promotes inflammation-driven angiogenesis, whilst there is little evidence for a role in ischemia-mediated angiogenesis. The differential regulation of angiogenesis by CC-chemokines suggests it may provide an alternate strategy to treat angiogenesis associated pathological diseases. The focus of this review is to highlight the significant role of the CC-chemokine class in inflammation, versus ischemia driven angiogenesis, and to discuss the related pathologies including atherosclerosis, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. We examine the pros and cons of anti-angiogenic therapies currently in clinical trials. We also reveal novel therapeutic strategies that cause broad-spectrum inhibition of the CC-chemokine class that may have future potential for the specific inhibition of inflammatory angiogenesis.

  1. Effect of salt stress on the physiology of Frankia sp strain CcI6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... production and nitrogenase activity were also influenced by NaCl. [Oshone R, Mansour SR and Tisa LS 2013 Effect of salt stress on the physiology of Frankia sp strain CcI6. J. Biosci. 38 699–702] DOI 10.1007/s12038-. 013-9371-2. 1. Introduction. Among the soil-dwelling actinobacteria, members of the.

  2. Bacillus velezensis CC09: A Potential 'Vaccine' for Controlling Wheat Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xingxing; Zhang, Wanling; Cai, Xunchao; Zhu, Tong; Xue, Yarong; Liu, Changhong

    2018-04-11

    Biocontrol bacteria that can act like a "vaccine", stimulating plant resistance to pathogenic diseases, are still not fully elucidated. In this study, an endophytic bacterium, Bacillus velezensis CC09, labeled with green fluorescent protein, was tested for its colonization, migration, and expression of genes encoding iturin A synthetase within wheat tissues and organs as well as for protective effects against wheat take-all and spot blotch diseases. The results showed that strain CC09 not only formed biofilm on the root surface but was also widely distributed in almost every tissue, including the epidermis, cortex, and xylem vessels, and even migrated to stems and leaves, resulting in 66.67% disease-control efficacy (DCE) of take-all and 21.64% DCE of spot blotch. Moreover, the gene cluster encoding iturin A synthase under the control of the p itu promoter is expressed in B. velezensis CC09 in wheat tissues, which indicates that iturin A might contribute to the in-vivo antifungal activity and leads to the disease control. All these data suggested that strain CC09 can act like a 'vaccine' in the control of wheat diseases, with a single treatment inoculated on roots through multiple mechanisms.

  3. MiR?30c protects diabetic nephropathy by suppressing epithelial?to?mesenchymal transition in db/db mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yanru; Yin, Zhongwei; Li, Huaping; Fan, Jiahui; Yang, Shenglan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2017-01-01

    Summary Epithelial?to?mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a significant role in tubulointerstitial fibrosis, which is a hallmark of diabetic nephropathy. Thus, identifying the mechanisms of EMT activation could be meaningful. In this study, loss of miR?30c accompanied with increased EMT was observed in renal tubules of db/db mice and cultured HK2 cells exposed to high glucose. To further explore the roles of miR?30c in EMT and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, recombinant adeno?associated viral vec...

  4. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-08-08

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed. The EMaCC Charter and the memorandum approving it are presented in the Appendix of this report. The FY 2002 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on page 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 10. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 2002 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 2002 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  5. Effect of zinc nutriture on tissue zinc (Zn) in the diabetic C57BL/KsJ db/db mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, D.L.; Smith, C.C.; Walker, M.S.; Yunice, A.A.; Rennert, O.M.

    1986-01-01

    The genetically obese diabetic db/db mouse has been reported to have low serum (S) and femur (F) Zn concentrations. In order to examine whether this animal model is predisposed to dietary Zn deficiency, they measured tissue Zn concentrations (conc.) in db/db, heterozygous db/m, and homozygous m/m control mice fed either a zinc deficient diet (2 ppm Zn) ad libitum or a zinc adequate diet (20 ppm Zn) either ad libitum or in restricted amounts (equal to that consumed by mice on the 2 ppm Zn diet) for 12 wks. The results were analyzed by analysis of variance for a completely randomized 3X3 design. Similar clinical manifestations of Zn deficiency were seen in mice of all 3 genotypes after 8-10 weeks on 2 ppm Zn. S Zn(p=0.0001) and F Zn conc.(p=0.0001) and content(p=0.0001) of those 3 groups showed similar marked reductions. S Zn was not reduced in db/db mice fed 20 ppm Zn. F Zn conc. was mildly reduced in these mice but not to the extent observed in mice fed 2 ppm Zn. Liver (L) Zn conc. was not affected by either genotype or diet, but total L Zn(p=0.0001) was greater in db/db mice due to their larger L weight. Kidney (K) Zn conc.(p=0.0001) of db/db mice was slightly but significantly decreased, but their total K Zn content(p=0.0001) was increased due to their greater K weights. They conclude that, in spite of its having a decreased F Zn conc. and content, the db/db mouse does not appear to be particularly susceptible to dietary Zn deficiency

  6. Download - Plabrain DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us Plabrain...s Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Download - Plabrain DB | LSDB Archive ...

  7. Web development with MongoDB and Node.js

    CERN Document Server

    Krol, Jason

    2014-01-01

    This book is designed for developers of any skill level that want to get up and running using Node.js and MongoDB to build full featured web applications. A basic understanding of JavaScript and HTML is the only requirement for this book.

  8. ProOpDB: Prokaryotic Operon DataBase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Blanca; Ciria, Ricardo; Martinez-Guerrero, Cristian E; Merino, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The Prokaryotic Operon DataBase (ProOpDB, http://operons.ibt.unam.mx/OperonPredictor) constitutes one of the most precise and complete repositories of operon predictions now available. Using our novel and highly accurate operon identification algorithm, we have predicted the operon structures of more than 1200 prokaryotic genomes. ProOpDB offers diverse alternatives by which a set of operon predictions can be retrieved including: (i) organism name, (ii) metabolic pathways, as defined by the KEGG database, (iii) gene orthology, as defined by the COG database, (iv) conserved protein domains, as defined by the Pfam database, (v) reference gene and (vi) reference operon, among others. In order to limit the operon output to non-redundant organisms, ProOpDB offers an efficient method to select the most representative organisms based on a precompiled phylogenetic distances matrix. In addition, the ProOpDB operon predictions are used directly as the input data of our Gene Context Tool to visualize their genomic context and retrieve the sequence of their corresponding 5' regulatory regions, as well as the nucleotide or amino acid sequences of their genes.

  9. SolveDB: Integrating Optimization Problem Solvers Into SQL Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siksnys, Laurynas; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2016-01-01

    for optimization problems, (2) an extensible infrastructure for integrating different solvers, and (3) query optimization techniques to achieve the best execution performance and/or result quality. Extensive experiments with the PostgreSQL-based implementation show that SolveDB is a versatile tool offering much...

  10. Update History of This Database - dbQSNP | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us dbQSNP Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/02/16 dbQSNP English archiv...e Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - dbQSNP | LSDB Archive ...

  11. Update History of This Database - DB-SPIRE | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us DB-SPIRE Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/02/16 DB-SPIRE English ar...ase Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - DB-SPIRE | LSDB Archive ...

  12. RegaDB: Community-driven data management and analysis for infectious diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libin, P.; Beheydt, G.; Deforche, K.; Imbrechts, S.; Ferreira, F.; Van Laethem, K.; Theys, K.; Carvalho, A.P.; Cavaco-Silva, J.; Lapadula, G.; Torti, C.; Assel, M.; Wesner, S.; Snoeck, J.; Ruelle, J.; de Bel, A.; Lacor, P.; de Munter, P.; van Wijngaerden, E.; Zazzi, M.; Kaiser, R.; Ayouba, A.; Peeters, M.; de Oliveira, T.; Alcantara, L.C.J.; Grossman, Z.; Sloot, P.; Otelea, D.; Paraschiv, S.; Boucher, C.; Camacho, R.J.; Vandamme, A.-M.

    2013-01-01

    RegaDB is a free and open source data management and analysis environment for infectious diseases. RegaDB allows clinicians to store, manage and analyze patient data, including viral genetic sequences. Moreover, RegaDB provides researchers with a mechanism to collect data in a uniform format and

  13. Programmer's guide for the CC3 computer models of the concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougan, K.D.

    1996-11-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is assessing a concept for disposing of CANDU reactor fuel waste in a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. A computer program called the Systems Variability Analysis Code (SYVAC) was developed as an analytical tool for the postclosure (long-term) assessment of the concept, and for environmental assessments of other systems. SYVAC3, the third generation of the code, is an executive program that directs repeated simulation of the disposal system, which is described by the CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3) model. The CC3 model is comprised of the disposal vault submodel, the local geosphere submodel and the biosphere submodel. The CC3 Proarammer's Guide describes the programming philosophy and programming conventions not covered in the project standards. The guide includes a description of the overall logic for the CC3 vault, geosphere, and biosphere submodels. Each of the CC3 submodels is also isolated from the other two submbdels to create autonomous or 'stand-alone' submodels. The techniques used to isolate a CC3 submodel, and in particular to determine the submodells input and output data interface, are described. Structure charts are provided for the CC3 model and stand-alone submodels. This guide is meant as a companion document to the CC3 User's Manual. This guide does not describe how to use the CC3 software. The user should consult the CC3 User's Manual to determine how to configure, compile, link, and run the CC3 source code, as well as how to modify the data in the input files. It is intended that the CC3 code version CC305 be executed with SYVAC3 version SV309 and the Modelling Algorithm Library (ML3) version ML303, both developed for the assessment of the concept. SYVAC3-CC3-ML3 (also referred to as 'SC3') can be run on any platform containing an ANSI FORTRAN 77 compliant compiler. Recommended hardware environments are specified in the CC3 User's Manual. (author)

  14. Dissection of metabolic pathways in the Db/Db mouse model by integrative proteome and acetylome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölper, Soraya; Nolte, Hendrik; Bober, Eva; Braun, Thomas; Krüger, Marcus

    2015-03-01

    Insulin resistance is often associated with excessive caloric intake and metabolic syndrome (MS) favours the development of Diabetes Mellitus Type II (T2DM). T2DM is a chronic disease with severe long-term consequences, such as dyslipidemia, retinopathy, kidney failure, and cardiovascular diseases. Although studied extensively, several aspects of T2DM remain poorly understood. Liver is the leading organ in the maintenance of metabolic fitness serving as the first relay station for processing dietary information in a direct response to nutritional input and changes in insulin and other endocrine signals. Evidence from several murine models suggests a unique function of the liver in the development of MS and T2DM. Here, we utilised Db/Db mice to understand the impact of T2DM on the proteome of liver cells. Global analysis of the liver proteome using a SILAC approach identified 407 significantly regulated proteins under diabetic conditions out of 8500 identified liver proteins. Furthermore, we mapped 1604 different acetylation sites in liver proteins. After normalization of the protein level, we identified 34 regulated acetyl lysine residues on 21 individual proteins, which were significantly altered in Db/Db compared to wild-type livers. We reason that the dataset provides a versatile resource for functional studies aiming to understand consequences of changes in protein abundances and acetylation in livers of diabetic animals.

  15. Reversibility of β-Cell-Specific Transcript Factors Expression by Long-Term Caloric Restriction in db/db Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjun Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is characterized by β-cell dedifferentiation, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The purpose of the current study was to explore the mechanisms of β-cell dedifferentiation with and without long-term control of calorie intake. We used a diabetes mouse model (db/db to analyze the changes in the expression levels of β-cell-specific transcription factors (TFs and functional factors with long-term caloric restriction (CR. Our results showed that chronic euglycemia was maintained in the db/db mice with long-term CR intervention, and β-cell dedifferentiation was significantly reduced. The expression of Glut2, Pdx1, and Nkx6.1 was reversed, while MafA expression was significantly increased with long-term CR. GLP-1 pathway was reactivated with long-term CR. Our work showed that the course of β-cell dedifferentiation can intervene by long-term control of calorie intake. Key β-cell-specific TFs and functional factors play important roles in maintaining β-cell differentiation. Targeting these factors could optimize T2D therapies.

  16. Acceleration of biliary cholesterol secretion restores glycemic control and alleviates hypertriglyceridemia in obese db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kai; Sabeva, Nadezhda S; Wang, Yuhuan; Liu, Xiaoxi; Lester, Joshua D; Liu, Jingjing; Liang, Shuang; Graf, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies support a role for cholesterol in the development of obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Mice lacking the ABCG5 ABCG8 (G5G8) sterol transporter have reduced biliary cholesterol secretion and are more susceptible to steatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and loss of glycemic control when challenged with a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that accelerating G5G8-mediated biliary cholesterol secretion would correct these phenotypes in obese mice. Obese (db/db) male and their lean littermates were administered a cocktail of control adenovirus or adenoviral vectors encoding ABCG5 and ABCG8 (AdG5G8). Three days after viral administration, measures of lipid and glucose homeostasis were determined, and tissues were collected for biochemical analyses. AdG5G8 increased biliary cholesterol and fecal sterol elimination. Fasting glucose and triglycerides declined, and glucose tolerance improved in obese mice expressing G5G8 compared with mice receiving control adenovirus. These changes were associated with a reduction in phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in liver, suggesting alleviation of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Phosphorylated insulin receptor and protein kinase B were increased, indicating restored hepatic insulin signaling. However, there was no reduction in hepatic triglycerides after the 3-day treatment period. Accelerating biliary cholesterol secretion restores glycemic control and reduces plasma triglycerides in obese db/db mice.

  17. Sodium fluorocitrate having protective effect on palmitate-induced beta cell death improves hyperglycemia in diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ik-Rak; Choi, Sung-E; Hong, Seung A; Hwang, Yoonjung; Kang, Yup

    2017-10-10

    Beta cell loss and insulin resistance play roles in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Elevated levels of free fatty acids in plasma might contribute to the loss of beta cells. The objective of this study was to find a chemical that could protect against palmitate-induced beta cell death and investigate whether such chemical could improve hyperglycemia in mouse model of type 2 diabetes. Sodium fluorocitrate (SFC), an aconitase inhibitor, was found to be strongly and specifically protective against palmitate-induced INS-1 beta cell death. However, the protective effect of SFC on palmitate-induced cell death was not likely to be due to its inhibitory activity for aconitase since inhibition or knockdown of aconitase failed to protect against palmitate-induced cell death. Since SFC inhibited the uptake of palmitate into INS-1 cells, reduced metabolism of fatty acids was thought to be involved in SFC's protective effect. Ten weeks of treatment with SFC in db/db diabetic mice reduced glucose level but remarkably increased insulin level in the plasma. SFC improved impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release and also reduced the loss of beta cells in db/db mice. Conclusively, SFC possessed protective effect against palmitate-induced lipotoxicity and improved hyperglycemia in mouse model of type 2 diabetes.

  18. GC/TOFMS analysis of metabolites in serum and urine reveals metabolic perturbation of TCA cycle in db/db mice involved in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengjie; Wang, Xufang; Aa, Jiye; Qin, Weisong; Zha, Weibin; Ge, Yongchun; Liu, Linsheng; Zheng, Tian; Cao, Bei; Shi, Jian; Zhao, Chunyan; Wang, Xinwen; Yu, Xiaoyi; Wang, Guangji; Liu, Zhihong

    2013-06-01

    Early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is difficult although it is of crucial importance to prevent its development. To probe potential markers and the underlying mechanism of DN, an animal model of DN, the db/db mice, was used and serum and urine metabolites were profiled using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Metabolic patterns were evaluated based on serum and urine data. Principal component analysis of the data revealed an obvious metabonomic difference between db/db mice and controls, and db/db mice showed distinctly different metabolic patterns during the progression from diabetes to early, medium, and later DN. The identified metabolites discriminating between db/db mice and controls suggested that db/db mice have perturbations in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA, citrate, malate, succinate, and aconitate), lipid metabolism, glycolysis, and amino acid turnover. The db/db mice were characterized by acidic urine, high TCA intermediates in serum at week 6 and a sharp decline thereafter, and gradual elevation of free fatty acids in the serum. The sharp drop of serum TCA intermediates from week 6 to 8 indicated the downregulated glycolysis and insulin resistance. However, urinary TCA intermediates did not decrease in parallel with those in the serum from week 6 to 10, and an increased portion of TCA intermediates in the serum was excreted into the urine at 8, 10, and 12 wk than at 6 wk, indicating kidney dysfunction occurred. The relative abundances of TCA intermediates in urine relative to those in serum were suggested as an index of renal damage.

  19. An aqueous extract of Portulaca oleracea ameliorates diabetic nephropathy through suppression of renal fibrosis and inflammation in diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, An Sook; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Yoon, Jung Joo; Kim, Jin Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is one of the most common microvascular complications of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. In the present study, we investigated the renoprotective effect of the aqueous extract of Portulaca oleracea (AP) on diabetic nephropathy accelerated by renal fibrosis and inflammation in type 2 diabetic db/db mice. The mice were treated with AP (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for ten weeks to examine the long-term effects on diabetic nephropathy and renal dysfunction. We found that AP treatment markedly lowered blood glucose to 412 ± 11.4 mg/dl and plasma creatinine level to 2.3 ± 0.8 mg/dl compared to db/db mice (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, respectively). This study also showed that treatment with AP significantly decreased water intake and urine volume in diabetic db/db mice (p < 0.05). In immunohistological study, the renal expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), advanced glycation end products (AGE), and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 markedly increased in the renal cortex of untreated db/db mice (p < 0.01). In contrast, AP treatment significantly reduced these expressions to 50 ± 2.1%, 48 ± 2.8%, 61 ± 1.1%, respectively (p < 0.01). Furthermore, NF-κB p65 activation in renal tissues markedly increased in untreated db/db mice, which was significantly suppressed by AP treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that AP attenuates diabetic nephropathy through inhibition of renal fibrosis and inflammation in db/db mice.

  20. Importance of triples contributions to NMR spin-spin coupling constants computed at the CC3 and CCSDT levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Gauss, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    that the most important contributions arising from connected triple excitations in the coupled cluster expansion are accounted for at the CC3 level. Thus we believe that the CC3 method will become the standard approach for calculation of reference values of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants....

  1. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 57 - DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education, and Related Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DoD-CC on Early Intervention, Special Education... SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PROVISION OF EARLY INTERVENTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS Pt. 57, App. E Appendix E to Part 57—DoD-CC on Early Intervention...

  2. Mechanical Vibration Mitigates the Decrease of Bone Quantity and Bone Quality of Leptin Receptor-Deficient Db/Db Mice by Promoting Bone Formation and Inhibiting Bone Resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Da; Luo, Erping; Cai, Jing; Tong, Shichao; Zhai, Mingming; Shen, Guanghao; Wang, Xin; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-09-01

    Leptin, a major hormonal product of adipocytes, is involved in regulating appetite and energy metabolism. Substantial studies have revealed the anabolic actions of leptin on skeletons and bone cells both in vivo and in vitro. Growing evidence has substantiated that leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice exhibit decreased bone mass and impaired bone microstructure despite several conflicting results previously reported. We herein systematically investigated bone microarchitecture, mechanical strength, bone turnover and its potential molecular mechanisms in db/db mice. More importantly, we also explored an effective approach for increasing bone mass in leptin receptor-deficient animals in an easy and noninvasive manner. Our results show that deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture and decreases of skeletal mechanical strength-including maximum load, yield load, stiffness, energy, tissue-level modulus and hardness-in db/db mice were significantly ameliorated by 12-week, whole-body vibration (WBV) with 0.5 g, 45 Hz via micro-computed tomography (μCT), three-point bending, and nanoindentation examinations. Serum biochemical analysis shows that WBV significantly decreased serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b) and CTx-1 levels and also mitigated the reduction of serum osteocalcin (OCN) in db/db mice. Bone histomorphometric analysis confirmed that decreased bone formation-lower mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, and osteoblast numbers in cancellous bone-in db/db mice were suppressed by WBV. Real-time PCR assays show that WBV mitigated the reductions of tibial alkaline phosphatase (ALP), OCN, Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), type I collagen (COL1), BMP2, Wnt3a, Lrp6, and β-catenin mRNA expression, and prevented the increases of tibial sclerostin (SOST), RANK, RANKL, RANL/osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene levels in db/db mice. Our results show that WBV promoted bone quantity and quality in db/db mice with obvious

  3. Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd Medi·Ca CC for Enumeration of Coliform Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Fumihiko; Shimizu, Mai; Suzuki, Takeo; Hamada, Chie; Iwase, Tatsuhiko; Okochi, Norihiko; Yamazaki, Mamoru; Kyotani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    A ready-made dry medium method for coliform count, the Medi·Ca CC method, was compared to the Violet Red Bile Agar method (Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 4, Enumeration of Escherichia coli and the Coliform Bacteria, Section G) for nine raw foods from four food categories: raw ground pork, raw lamb, raw ground chicken, raw tuna fillet, raw salmon fillet, raw shrimp, fresh peeled banana, fresh cut pineapple, and fresh cut apple. The 95% confidence interval for the mean difference between the two methods at each contamination level for seven matrixes from all four categories fell within the range of -0.50 to 0.50, and no statistical difference was observed at all three contamination levels for four matrixes from three categories. These results demonstrated that the Medi·Ca CC method is a reasonable alternative to the reference method for raw meat, raw poultry, raw fish, and fresh fruits.

  4. Quick Way to Port Existing C/C++ Chemoinformatics Toolkits to the Web Using Emscripten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Jin, Xi

    2017-10-23

    Emscripten is a special open source compiler that compiles C and C++ code into JavaScript. By utilizing this compiler, some typical C/C++ chemoinformatics toolkits and libraries are quickly ported to to web. The compiled JavaScript files have sizes similar to native programs, and from a series of constructed benchmarks, the performance of the compiled JavaScript codes is also close to that of the native codes and is better than the handwritten JavaScript codes. Therefore, we believe that Emscripten is a feasible and practical tool for reusing existing C/C++ codes on the web, and many other chemoinformatics or molecular calculation software tools can also be easily ported by Emscripten.

  5. ccPDB: compilation and creation of data sets from Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Chauhan, Jagat Singh; Gromiha, M Michael; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2012-01-01

    ccPDB (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/ccpdb/) is a database of data sets compiled from the literature and Protein Data Bank (PDB). First, we collected and compiled data sets from the literature used for developing bioinformatics methods to annotate the structure and function of proteins. Second, data sets were derived from the latest release of PDB using standard protocols. Third, we developed a powerful module for creating a wide range of customized data sets from the current release of PDB. This is a flexible module that allows users to create data sets using a simple six step procedure. In addition, a number of web services have been integrated in ccPDB, which include submission of jobs on PDB-based servers, annotation of protein structures and generation of patterns. This database maintains >30 types of data sets such as secondary structure, tight-turns, nucleotide interacting residues, metals interacting residues, DNA/RNA binding residues and so on.

  6. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa, E-mail: lapochoap@unal.edu.co; Veloza, Stella [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, D.C. (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    The radiotracer called {sup 68}Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  7. Cacao 3 (Cc 3, Arte rupestre del formativo temprano en Antofagasta de la Sierra, Catamarca, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Rodrigo Martel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo hemos abordado el estudio de la producción del arte rupestre del sitio Cacao 3 –Cc3- (Antofagasta de la Sierra, Catamarca con relación a las prácticas socioculturales de grupos agropastoriles del periodo Formativo Temprano en la Puna meridional argentina, haciendo hincapié en el emplazamiento del sitio y su asociación contextual con las demás evidencias arqueológicas conocidas para el área de estudio y estableciendo las relaciones entre las manifestaciones rupestres de Cc3 con las de otros sitios, a nivel micro y macrorregional, a través de indicadores estilísticos

  8. The CC-Bio Project: Studying the Effects of Climate Change on Quebec Biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Vescovi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Anticipating the effects of climate change on biodiversity is now critical for managing wild species and ecosystems. Climate change is a global driver and thus affects biodiversity globally. However, land-use planners and natural resource managers need regional or even local predictions. This provides scientists with formidable challenges given the poor documentation of biodiversity and its complex relationships with climate. We are approaching this problem in Quebec, Canada, through the CC-Bio Project (http://cc‑bio.uqar.ca/, using a boundary organization as a catalyst for team work involving climate modelers, biologists, naturalists, and biodiversity managers. In this paper we present the CC-Bio Project and its general approach, some preliminary results, the emerging hypothesis of the northern biodiversity paradox (a potential increase of biodiversity in northern ecosystems due to climate change, and an early assessment of the conservation implications generated by our team work.

  9. Long-lived transient anion of c-C4F8O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočišek, J.; Janečková, R.; Fedor, J.

    2018-02-01

    We report partial cross sections for electron attachment to c-C4F8O, a gas with promising technological applications in free-electron-rich environments. The dissociative electron attachment leads to a number of anionic fragments resulting from complex bond-breaking and bond-forming processes. However, the anion with the highest abundance is the non-dissociated (transient) parent anion which is formed around 0.9 eV electron energy. Its lifetime reaches tens of microseconds. We discuss the origin of this long lifetime, the anion's strong interactions with other molecules, and the consequences for electron-scavenging properties of c-C4F8O in denser environments, in particular for its use in mixtures with CO2 and N2.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet Light Curves Reveal Interesting Properties of CC Sculptoris and RZ Leonis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Toloza, Odette; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Pala, Anna F. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Dai, Zhibin [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 396 Yangfangwang, Guandu District, Kunming, 650216 (China); Waagen, Elizabeth O. [AAVSO, 48 Bay State Rd, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward M., E-mail: szkody@astro.washington.edu [Department of Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Time-tag ultraviolet data obtained on the Hubble Space Telescope in 2013 reveal interesting variability related to the white dwarf spin in the two cataclysmic variables RZ Leo and CC Scl. RZ Leo shows a period at 220 s and its harmonic at 110 s, thus identifying it as a likely Intermediate Polar (IP). The spin signal is not visible in a short single night of ground-based data in 2016, but the shorter exposures in that data set indicate a possible partial eclipse. The much larger UV amplitude of the spin signal in the known IP CC Scl allows the spin of 389 s, previously only seen at outburst, to be visible at quiescence. Spectra created from the peaks and troughs of the spin times indicate a hotter temperature of several thousand degrees during the peak phases, with multiple components contributing to the UV light.

  11. DB2 11 the ultimate database for cloud, analytics, and mobile

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, John; Jones, Gareth; Parekh, Surekha; Yothers, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Building on the prior book ""DB2 11: The Database for Big Data and Analytics,"" published in 2013, this book is written particularly for new and existing DB2 for z/OS customers and users who want to learn as much as they can about the new software version before migrating their organizations to DB2 11 for z/OS. The book begins with a technical overview of DB2 11 features and explains how the new functions in DB2 11 can help enterprise customers address the challenges they face with the explosion of data and information. There has been rapid growth in the variety, volume, and velocity of dat

  12. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2006-09-29

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed. The FY 2004 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on page 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 10. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 2004 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 2004 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus CC398 clade associated with human-to-human transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Alex J; van Wamel, Willem; Vandendriessche, Stien; Larsen, Jesper; Denis, Olivier; Garcia-Graells, Cristina; Uhlemann, Ann-Catrin; Lowy, Franklin D; Skov, Robert; Lindsay, Jodi A

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 (CC398) isolates colonize livestock and can spread to human contacts. Genetic analysis of isolates epidemiologically associated with human-to-human, but not livestock, transmission in multiple countries and continents identified a common clade that was negative for tet(M) and positive for bacteriophage 3. Another group of human-to-human-transmitted isolates belonged to the common livestock-associated clade but had acquired a unique 7 bacteriophage.

  14. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), Fiscal year 1992. Annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The DOE EMaCC serves to coordinate the department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the department. This document presents summaries of budgets and of research projects, arranged according to the offices of energy efficiency and renewable energy, energy research, environmental restoration and waste management, nuclear energy, civilian radioactive waste management, defense, and fossil energy. A directory and a keyword index are included.

  15. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2005-08-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed. The FY 2004 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on page 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 10. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 2004 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 2004 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  16. Photoinduced C-C Cross-Coupling of Aryl Chlorides and Inert Arenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lele Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a facile, efficient, and catalyst-free method to realize C-C cross-coupling of aryl chlorides and inert arenes under UV light irradiation. The aryl radical upon homolytic cleavage of C-Cl bond initiated the nucleophilic substitution reaction with inert arenes to give biaryl products. This mild reaction mode can also be applied to other synthetic reactions, such as the construction of C-N bonds and trifluoromethylated compounds.

  17. Resurgence of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W ST-11 (cc11) in Madagascar, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoanandrasana, Saïda; Raberahona, Mihaja; Milenkov, Milen; Rakotomahefa Narison, Mbolanirina Lala; Ranaivo Rabetokotany, Felana; Rakotovao, Luc; Randria, Mamy Jean de Dieu; Hong, Eva; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Rakoto-Andrianarivelo, Mala

    2017-02-01

    The resurgence of invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W with sequence type ST-11 (cc11) was observed in Madagascar in 2015-2016. Three cases were investigated in this study. Molecular characterization of the strains suggests the local transmission of a single genotype that may have been circulating for years. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    The following text briefly describes the materials research programs of the Department of Energy. It is organized by office and organizational charts are provided to allow easy identification of the materials research programs of each office. These program descriptions have been prepared from inputs submitted by many different EMaCC members. This report is not a comprehensive summary of the Department's programs, but rather a compilation of the programs of those offices that submitted inputs

  19. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-03-01

    The following text briefly describes the materials research programs of the Department of Energy. It is organized by office and organizational charts are provided to allow easy identification of the materials research programs of each office. These program descriptions have been prepared from inputs submitted by many different EMaCC members. This report is not a comprehensive summary of the Department's programs, but rather a compilation of the programs of those offices that submitted inputs.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Biocontrol Strain Bacillus velezensis CC09

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Xunchao; Kang, Xingxing; Xi, Huan; Liu, Changhong; Xue, Yarong

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus velezensis is a heterotypic synonym of B. methylotrophicus, B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum, and Bacillus oryzicola, and has been used to control plant fungal diseases. In order to fully understand the genetic basis of antimicrobial capacities, we did a complete genome sequencing of the endophytic B.?velezensis strain CC09. Genes tightly associated with biocontrol ability, including nonribosomal peptide synthetases, polyketide synthetases, iron acquisition, colonization, and vo...

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Biocontrol Strain Bacillus velezensis CC09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xunchao; Kang, Xingxing; Xi, Huan; Liu, Changhong; Xue, Yarong

    2016-09-29

    Bacillus velezensis is a heterotypic synonym of B. methylotrophicus, B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum, and Bacillus oryzicola, and has been used to control plant fungal diseases. In order to fully understand the genetic basis of antimicrobial capacities, we did a complete genome sequencing of the endophytic B. velezensis strain CC09. Genes tightly associated with biocontrol ability, including nonribosomal peptide synthetases, polyketide synthetases, iron acquisition, colonization, and volatile organic compound synthesis were identified in the genome. Copyright © 2016 Cai et al.

  2. Discovery of the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^{++}$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Spradlin, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration announced the first observation of the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}^{++}$, which was discovered decaying to a $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}$ final state. A highly significant structure is found in the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}K^{-}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{+}$ mass spectrum in proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at center-of-mass energies of 13 TeV and 8 TeV. The peak contains $313 \\pm 33$ decays in the 13 TeV sample and $113 \\pm 21$ decays in the 8 TeV, with local significances in excess of $12\\sigma$ and $7\\sigma$ respectively. The narrow structure has a width that is consistent with experimental resolution, and its properties are consistent with those of a weakly decaying state and inconsistent with those of a strongly decaying state. The difference between the masses of the structure, identified as $\\Xi_{cc}^{++}$, and the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}$ baryon is $1334.94 \\pm 0.72(\\mbox{stat.}) \\pm 0.27(\\mbox{syst.})\\,\\mbox{MeV}/c^{2}$, and the mass of the $\\Xi_{cc}^{++}$ baryon ...

  3. On-chip isothermal, chemical cycling polymerase chain reaction (ccPCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persat, Alexandre; Santiago, Juan

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate a novel ccPCR technique for microfluidic DNA amplification where temperature is held constant in space and time. The polymerase chain reaction is a platform of choice for biological assays and typically based on a three-step thermal cycling: DNA denaturation, primers annealing and extension by an enzyme. We here demonstrate a novel technique where high concentration chemical denaturants (solvents) denature DNA. We leverage the high electrophoretic mobility of DNA and the electrical neutrality of denaturants to achieve chemical cycling. We focus DNA with isotachophoresis (ITP); a robust electrophoretic preconcentration technique which generates strong electric field gradients and protects the sample from dispersion. We apply a pressure-driven flow to balance electromigration velocity and keep the DNA sample stationary in a microchannel. We drive the DNA through a series of high denaturant concentration zones. DNA denatures at high denaturant concentration. At low denaturant concentration, the enzyme creates complementary strands. DNA reaction kinetics are slower than buffer reactions involved in ITP. We demonstrate successful ccPCR amplification for detection of E. Coli. The ccPCR has the potential for simpler chemistry than traditional PCR.

  4. Joint study on activation of international nuclear information use through implementation INIS DB server with IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. C.; Yi, J. H.; Kim, T. W.; Chun, Y. C.; Yoo, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In order to install the INIS DB host site in Korea, the Korea INIS national center has cooperated with KAERI and organizations concerned, contacted the INIS secretariat participated in the consultative meeting of INIS liaison officers, and strengthened the relationship with Asian and Oceanian countries. And KAERI staff and a maintenance engineer participated training seminar on INIS DB installation and maintenance. The Korea national center obtained the INIS DB server code and data by international cooperation activity. Based these code and data, hardware and software for INIS DB server are purchased. INIS DB server system was installed the software and INIS database(2,347,302) was constructed. In 2003 INIS host DB site started to provide web service in Korea. Also It enables the users in the member countries in Asia as well as domestic users to get quick information. It will also bring the active use of the domestic INIS DB and the increase of the productivity of domestic research activities

  5. Getting Started with GEO, CouchDB, and Nodejs

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Mick

    2011-01-01

    Today's mobile devices have GPS and standard APIs to give you access to coordinates-but what can you do with that data? With this concise book, application developers learn how to work with location data quickly and easily, using Node.js, CouchDB, and other open source tools and libraries. Node.js makes it simple to run event code on the Web, and the CouchDB document-oriented database lets you store location data and perform complex queries on it quickly. You'll learn how to get started with these tools, and then use them together to build an example project called MapChat, using HTML and Ja

  6. Transcriptomes of Frankia sp. strain CcI3 in growth transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bickhart Derek M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frankia sp. strains are actinobacteria that form N2-fixing root nodules on angiosperms. Several reference genome sequences are available enabling transcriptome studies in Frankia sp. Genomes from Frankia sp. strains differ markedly in size, a consequence proposed to be associated with a high number of indigenous transposases, more than 200 of which are found in Frankia sp. strain CcI3 used in this study. Because Frankia exhibits a high degree of cell heterogeneity as a consequence of its mycelial growth pattern, its transcriptome is likely to be quite sensitive to culture age. This study focuses on the behavior of the Frankia sp. strain CcI3 transcriptome as a function of nitrogen source and culture age. Results To study global transcription in Frankia sp. CcI3 grown under different conditions, complete transcriptomes were determined using high throughput RNA deep sequencing. Samples varied by time (five days vs. three days and by culture conditions (NH4+ added vs. N2 fixing. Assembly of millions of reads revealed more diversity of gene expression between five-day and three-day old cultures than between three day old cultures differing in nitrogen sources. Heat map analysis organized genes into groups that were expressed or repressed under the various conditions compared to median expression values. Twenty-one SNPs common to all three transcriptome samples were detected indicating culture heterogeneity in this slow-growing organism. Significantly higher expression of transposase ORFs was found in the five-day and N2-fixing cultures, suggesting that N starvation and culture aging provide conditions for on-going genome modification. Transposases have previously been proposed to participate in the creating the large number of gene duplication or deletion in host strains. Subsequent RT-qPCR experiments confirmed predicted elevated transposase expression levels indicated by the mRNA-seq data. Conclusions The overall pattern of

  7. Analyzing GAIAN Database (GaianDB) on a Tactical Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    we connected 3 Raspberry Pi’s running GaianDB and our augmented version of splatform to a network of 3 CSRs. The Raspberry Pi is a low power, low...based on Debian from a connected secure digital high capacity (SDHC) card or a universal serial bus (USB) device. The Raspberry Pi comes equipped with...requirements, capabilities, and cost make the Raspberry Pi a useful device for sensor experimentation. From there, we performed 3 types of benchmarks

  8. Disparate phospho-Smad2 levels in advanced type 2 diabetes patients with diabetic nephropathy and early experimental db/db mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lise Høj; Fog-Tonnesen, Morten; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    protein (BMP) ligands, such as Gremlin1, USAG1 and Sclerostin, were strongly up-regulated suggesting a dampening effect on BMP pathways. Together, these results indicate a lack of translation from T2D patient kidneys to the db/db model with regards to Smad signaling pathway. It is plausible that a strong...

  9. Jejunal proteins secreted by db/db mice or insulin-resistant humans impair the insulin signaling and determine insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenella Salinari

    Full Text Available Two recent studies demonstrated that bariatric surgery induced remission of type 2 diabetes very soon after surgery and far too early to be attributed to weight loss. In this study, we sought to explore the mechanism/s of this phenomenon by testing the effects of proteins from the duodenum-jejunum conditioned-medium (CM of db/db or Swiss mice on glucose uptake in vivo in Swiss mice and in vitro in both Swiss mice soleus and L6 cells. We studied the effect of sera and CM proteins from insulin resistant (IR and insulin-sensitive subjects on insulin signaling in human myoblasts.db/db proteins induced massive IR either in vivo or in vitro, while Swiss proteins did not. In L6 cells, only db/db proteins produced a noticeable increase in basal (473Ser-Akt phosphorylation, lack of GSK3β inhibition and a reduced basal (389Thr-p70-S6K1 phosphorylation. Human IR serum markedly increased basal (473Ser-Akt phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. Human CM IR proteins increased by about twofold both basal and insulin-stimulated (473Ser-Akt. Basal (9Ser-GSK3β phosphorylation was increased by IR subjects serum with a smaller potentiating effect of insulin.These findings show that jejunal proteins either from db/db mice or from insulin resistant subjects impair muscle insulin signaling, thus inducing insulin resistance.

  10. Molecular hydrogen improves obesity and diabetes by inducing hepatic FGF21 and stimulating energy metabolism in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Naomi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohta, Shigeo

    2011-07-01

    Recent extensive studies have revealed that molecular hydrogen (H(2)) has great potential for improving oxidative stress-related diseases by inhaling H(2) gas, injecting saline with dissolved H(2), or drinking water with dissolved H(2) (H(2)-water); however, little is known about the dynamic movement of H(2) in a body. First, we show that hepatic glycogen accumulates H(2) after oral administration of H(2)-water, explaining why consumption of even a small amount of H(2) over a short span time efficiently improves various disease models. This finding was supported by an in vitro experiment in which glycogen solution maintained H(2). Next, we examined the benefit of ad libitum drinking H(2)-water to type 2 diabetes using db/db obesity model mice lacking the functional leptin receptor. Drinking H(2)-water reduced hepatic oxidative stress, and significantly alleviated fatty liver in db/db mice as well as high fat-diet-induced fatty liver in wild-type mice. Long-term drinking H(2)-water significantly controlled fat and body weights, despite no increase in consumption of diet and water. Moreover, drinking H(2)-water decreased levels of plasma glucose, insulin, and triglyceride, the effect of which on hyperglycemia was similar to diet restriction. To examine how drinking H(2)-water improves obesity and metabolic parameters at the molecular level, we examined gene-expression profiles, and found enhanced expression of a hepatic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), which functions to enhance fatty acid and glucose expenditure. Indeed, H(2) stimulated energy metabolism as measured by oxygen consumption. The present results suggest the potential benefit of H(2) in improving obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

  11. Data Container Study for Handling array-based data using Hive, Spark, MongoDB, SciDB and Rasdaman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M.; Hu, F.; Yang, J.; Yu, M.; Yang, C. P.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscience communities have come up with various big data storage solutions, such as Rasdaman and Hive, to address the grand challenges for massive Earth observation data management and processing. To examine the readiness of current solutions in supporting big Earth observation, we propose to investigate and compare four popular data container solutions, including Rasdaman, Hive, Spark, SciDB and MongoDB. Using different types of spatial and non-spatial queries, datasets stored in common scientific data formats (e.g., NetCDF and HDF), and two applications (i.e. dust storm simulation data mining and MERRA data analytics), we systematically compare and evaluate the feature and performance of these four data containers in terms of data discover and access. The computing resources (e.g. CPU, memory, hard drive, network) consumed while performing various queries and operations are monitored and recorded for the performance evaluation. The initial results show that 1) the popular data container clusters are able to handle large volume of data, but their performances vary in different situations. Meanwhile, there is a trade-off between data preprocessing, disk saving, query-time saving, and resource consuming. 2) ClimateSpark, MongoDB and SciDB perform the best among all the containers in all the queries tests, and Hive performs the worst. 3) These studied data containers can be applied on other array-based datasets, such as high resolution remote sensing data and model simulation data. 4) Rasdaman clustering configuration is more complex than the others. A comprehensive report will detail the experimental results, and compare their pros and cons regarding system performance, ease of use, accessibility, scalability, compatibility, and flexibility.

  12. Accessory genetic content in Campylobacter jejuni ST21CC isolates from feces and blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarp, C P A; Akinrinade, O; Kaden, R; Johansson, C; Rautelin, H

    2017-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important foodborne pathogen and the most commonly reported bacterial cause of gastroenteritis. C. jejuni is occasionally found in blood, although mechanisms important for invasiveness have remained unclear. C. jejuni is divided into many different lineages, of which the ST21 clonal complex (CC) is widely distributed. Here, we performed comparative genomic and in vitro analyses on 17C. jejuni ST21CC strains derived from human blood and feces in order to identify features associated with isolation site. The ST21CC lineage is divided into two large groups; centered around ST-21 and ST-50. Our clinical strains, typed as ST-50, showed further microevolution into two distinct clusters. These clusters were distinguished by major differences in their capsule loci and the distribution of accessory genetic content, including C. jejuni integrated elements (CJIEs) and plasmids. Accessory genetic content was more common among fecal than blood strains, whereas blood strains contained a hybrid capsule locus which partially consisted of C. jejuni subsp. doylei-like content. In vitro infection assays with human colon cell lines did not show significant differences in adherence and invasion between the blood and fecal strains. Our results showed that CJIEs and plasmid derived genetic material were less common among blood isolates than fecal isolates; in contrast, hybrid capsule loci, especially those containing C. jejuni subsp. doylei-like gene content, were found among many isolates derived from blood. The role of these findings requires more detailed investigation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  13. Economical impact of the BIG/CC technology use on the sugar cane industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, L.C. de; Nascimento, M.J.M. do [Brascep Engenharia Ltda., Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    The use of biomass as primary fuel for power and steam production using modern conversion technology such as the Biomass Integrated Gas Turbine/Combined Cycle (BIG/CC) has both technical and commercial potential. Brazil is implementing a BIG/CC Demonstration Plant to burn wood from eucalyptus short rotation forest and to test sugar cane bagasse as feedstock. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of using biomass as a feedstock for power generation, its suitability for applications in developing countries, and the possibilities it offers for commercial activities in regions which currently have a low level of economic activities. The purpose of this paper is to show the potential applicability of this technology in the sugar cane industries of Developing Countries such as Brazil. The same quantity of sugar cane already processed in each sugar mill can produce sizable quantities of electric power at competitive costs, in addition to the traditional products -- sugar and/or ethanol, which will cause an economical impact, duplicating the revenue of these industries. The application of the BIG/CC technology in the Sugar Cane Industry may lead to the following scenario in developing countries: (1) power shall be produced at very competitive prices by specialized private firms associated with sugar mills; (2) plant sizes will be smaller -- 15 to 100 MW -- when based on biomass, a compared to large fossil fuel plants now prevailing; (3) ethanol and sugar production costs will be reduced due to more efficient and economical processes and due to the additional revenue from power production; (4) becoming more competitive with gasoline, ethanol production tends to increase, which will influence the automobile industry and improve the quality of life in big cities.

  14. C=C π Bond Modified Graphitic Carbon Nitride Films for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Cell Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Juncao; Xi, Lifei; Li, Jianfu; Xiong, Ze; Huang, Chao; Lange, Kathrin M; Tang, Jinyao; Shalom, Menny; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2017-05-04

    Applications of graphitic carbon nitride (g-CN) in photoelectrochemical and optoelectronic devices are still hindered due to the difficulties in synthesis of g-CN films with tunable chemical, physical and catalytic properties. Herein we present a general method to alter the electronic and photoelectrochemical properties of g-CN films by annealing. We found that N atoms can be removed from the g-CN networks after annealing treatment. Assisted by theoretical calculations, we confirm that upon appropriate N removal, the adjacent C atoms will form new C=C π bonds. Detailed calculations demonstrate that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) are located at the structure unit with C=C π bonds and the electrons are more delocalized. Valence band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra together with optical absorption spectra unveil that the structure changes result in the alteration of the g-CN energy levels and position of band edges. Our results show that the photocurrent density of the annealed g-CN film is doubled compared with the pristine one, thanks to the better charge separation and transport within the film induced by the new C=C π bonds. An ultrathin TiO 2 film (2.2 nm) is further deposited on the g-CN film as stabilizer and the photocurrent density is kept at 0.05 mA cm -2 at 1.23 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode after two-cycle stability assessment. This work enables the applications of g-CN films in many electronic and optoelectronic devices. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Analisis Konsumsi Bahan Bakar Motor Bensin Yang Terpasang Pada Sepeda Motor Suzuki Smash 110cc

    OpenAIRE

    Parende, Ferdywanto; Gunawan, Hardi; Gede, I Nyoman

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to determine the fuel consumption of gasoline engine mounted on a 110cc Suzuki Smash. The data taken on the motorcycle in different gear ratios and speed for a travel distance of 2.5 km.Analysis was conducted on gear ratios 2, 3 and 4 at speeds of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 km / h. Observations and calculations for the arrays of indicate that fuel consumption on gear ratio 2 is 359.2, 410.9, 439.0, 545.9, and 648.9 g / h respectively. At gear ratio 3 is 296.9, 295.8, 408.6, 494...

  16. Thermal shock resistances of a bonding material of C/C composite and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumada, Akira; Oku, Tatsuo; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Motojima, Osamu; Noda, Nobuaki; McEnaney, B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to the development and the safety design of plasma facing components for fusion reactor devices. We evaluated the thermal shock resistance and the thermal shock fracture toughness of a bonding material which was jointed a carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) to oxygen-free copper. We also examined the microstructures of the bonding layers using a scanning electron microscope before and after thermal shock tests. The bonding material did not fracture during thermal shock tests. However, thermal cracks and delamination cracks were observed in the bonding layers. (author)

  17. An iron-capped metal-organic polyyne: {[Fe](C[triple bond]C)2[W][triple bond]CC[triple bond]CC[triple bond][W](C[triple bond]C)2[Fe]}.

    OpenAIRE

    Semenov Sergey N; Taghipourian Shiva F; Blacque Olivier; Fox Thomas; Venkatesan Koushik; Berke Heinz

    2010-01-01

    The organometallic conjugated complex H(C[triple bond]C)(2)[W][triple bond]CC[triple bond]CC[triple bond][W](C[triple bond]C)(2)H {[W] = W(dppe)(2); dppe = 12 bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane} containing a ditungstenatetradecaheptayne unit was synthesized by utilizing a new and efficient coupling method. The stannylated derivative was converted to the tetranuclear complex which exhibits efficient long range electron transfer.

  18. Differential response of bone and kidney to ACEI in db/db mice: A potential effect of captopril on accelerating bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiao-Li; Sha, Nan-Nan; Shu, Bing; Zhao, Yong-Jian; Wang, Xin-Luan; Xiao, Hui-Hui; Shi, Qi; Wong, Man-Sau; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2017-04-01

    The components of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are expressed in the kidney and bone. Kidney disease and bone injury are common complications associated with diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, on the kidney and bone of db/db mice. The db/db mice were orally administered by gavage with captopril for 8weeks with db/+ mice as the non-diabetic control. Serum and urine biochemistries were determined by standard colorimetric methods or ELISA. Histological measurements were performed on the kidney by periodic acid-schiff staining and on the tibial proximal metaphysis by safranin O and masson-trichrome staining. Trabecular bone mass and bone quality were analyzed by microcomputed tomography. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied for molecular analysis on mRNA and protein expression. Captopril significantly improved albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis in db/db mice, and these effects might be attributed to the down-regulation of angiotensin II expression and the expression of its down-stream profibrotic factors in the kidney, like connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Urinary excretion of calcium and phosphorus markedly increased in db/db mice in response to captopril. Treatment with captopril induced a decrease in bone mineral density and deterioration of trabecular bone at proximal metaphysis of tibia in db/db mice, as shown in the histological and reconstructed 3-dimensional images. Even though captopril effectively reversed the diabetes-induced changes in calcium-binding protein 28-k and vitamin D receptor expression in the kidney as well as the expression of RAS components and bradykinin receptor-2 in bone tissue, treatment with captopril increased the osteoclast-covered bone surface, reduced the osteoblast-covered bone surface, down-regulated the expression of type 1 collagen and transcription factor runt-related transcription

  19. Genotypic and Phenotypic Markers of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC9 in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Xiaohua; Wang, Xiaolin; Fan, Yanping; Peng, Yang; Li, Ling; Li, Shunming; Huang, Jingya; Yao, Zhenjiang; Chen, Sidong

    2016-01-01

    Use of antimicrobials in industrial food animal production is associated with the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals and humans. The livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 9 (CC9) is associated with animals and related workers in Asia. This study aimed to explore the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA CC9 in humans. We conducted a cross-sectional study of livestock workers and controls in Guangdong, China. The ...

  20. RB1CC1 activates RB1 pathway and inhibits proliferation and cologenic survival in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokuhiro Chano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 (RB1CC1, also known as FIP200 plays a role in the enhancement of the RB1 pathway through the direct binding to a GC-rich region 201bp upstream (from the initiation ATG of the RB1 promoter. Here, we identified hSNF5 and p53 as the binding partners of RB1CC1 by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assays. Interaction between these molecules and the RB1 pathway was analyzed by the assays of chromatin immunoprecipitation, luciferase-reporter, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot. The tumor growth suppression by RB1CC1 was evaluated by flow cytometry or by a cell growth assay. The nuclear RB1CC1 complex involving hSNF5 and/or p53 activated transcription of RB1, p16 and p21, and suppressed tumor cell growth. Furthermore, nuclear RB1CC1 expression significantly correlated with those of RB1 and p16 in breast cancer tissue in vivo, and the Ki-67 proliferation index was dependent on p53 as well as RB1CC1. The present study indicates that RB1CC1 together with hSNF5 and/or p53 enhances the RB1 pathway through transcriptional activation of RB1, p16 and p21. Evaluation of RB1CC1 expression combined with RB1 and p53 status is expected to provide useful information in clinical practice and future therapeutic strategies in breast cancer.

  1. Direct conversion of cellulose using carbon monoxide and water on a Pt-Mo2C/C catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    CO and H2O were employed as the hydrogen source for cellulose conversion to polyols. Pt-Mo2C/C tandem catalyst with the Pt-Mo 2C domain responsible for H2 and/or H production and the Pt-C domain for cellulose conversion was fabricated. Considerable polyols were obtained over this tandem Pt-Mo2C/C catalyst. This journal is © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Synthesis and preliminary cytotoxicity study of a cephalosporin-CC-1065 analogue prodrug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hong

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT is a promising new approach to deliver anticancer drugs selectively to tumor cells. In this approach, an enzyme is conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody. The antibody selectively localizes the enzyme to the tumor cell surface. Subsequent administration of a prodrug substrate of the enzyme leads to the enzyme-catalyzed release of the free drug at the tumor site. The free drug will destroy the tumor cells selectively, thus, reducing side effects. Results A CC-1065 analogue was conjugated to a cephalosporin affording prodrug 2. The prodrug and its corresponding free drug, 1, have IC50 values of 0.9 and 0.09 nM, respectively, against U937 leukemia cells in vitro. Conclusions For the first time, a prodrug comprised of a cephalosporin and a CC-1065 analogue has been synthesized. The preliminary in vitro studies show that the prodrug was 10-fold less toxic than the free drug. Prodrug 2 has the potential to be useful in cancer treatment using the ADEPT approach.

  3. Optimization of labelling PSMA-HBED-CC peptide with 68Ga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcarde, Lais F.; Dias, Luis A.P.; Massicano, Adriana V.F.; Mengatti, Jair; Araujo, Elaine B. de

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of metastases or recurrent prostate cancer (PC) lesions is of clinical relevance in terms of clinical staging, prognosis and therapy management. When PC is not treated, it is potentially lethal. Clinical methods for diagnosis of PC include the dosage of prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and the rectal touch. Unfortunately, these initial procedures are not specific for PC detection. The level of PSA, in about 20 to 30% of the cases is high, due to benign pathologies, that result in false positive and unneeded biopsy. The prostatic specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein and differs from the PSA that is a free protein in blood. High levels of PSMA are observed in almost all prostatic pathologies and low levels were observed in brain, kidneys, salivary glands and small intestine. This fact stimulated the development of PSMA inhibitor molecules that could be used as a vector for imaging tumor agents and that could perfuse in the tumor microvasculature. Recent studies suggest that the chelator HBED-CC contributes intrinsically for the labelling of the PSMA inhibitor peptide based in urea - Glu-urea-Lys (Ahx) – to the pharmacophore group. This work describes the study of labelling conditions of PSMA-HBED-CC with 68 Ga and determined the ideal conditions to obtaining the high radiochemical purity (≥ 95%) and stability, without final purification, and stimulates the in vitro and in vivo evaluation to determine the potential of the radiopharmaceutical for clinical application. (author)

  4. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), fiscal year 1985. Annual technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-05-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meeting/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees on Structural Ceramics, Batteries and Fuel Cells, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Steel are established and are continuing their own program. The FY 1985 and FY 1986 meeting program is given. The EMaCC aids in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and inter-agency compilations. Brief summaries of the materials research programs associated with each office and division are presented, including tables listing individual projects and the FY 1985 budgets for each. More details on the individual projects within the divisions and the specific tasks or subcontracts within the various projects are given in the paragraph descriptions.

  5. A two-dimensional conjugated aromatic polymer via C-C coupling reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Luo, Xin; Bao, Yang; Liu, Yan Peng; Ning, Guo-Hong; Abdelwahab, Ibrahim; Li, Linjun; Nai, Chang Tai; Hu, Zhi Gang; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Bin; Quek, Su Ying; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-06-01

    The fabrication of crystalline 2D conjugated polymers with well-defined repeating units and in-built porosity presents a significant challenge to synthetic chemists. Yet they present an appealing target because of their desirable physical and electronic properties. Here we report the preparation of a 2D conjugated aromatic polymer synthesized via C-C coupling reactions between tetrabromopolyaromatic monomers. Pre-arranged monomers in the bulk crystal undergo C-C coupling driven by endogenous solid-state polymerization to produce a crystalline polymer, which can be mechanically exfoliated into micrometre-sized lamellar sheets with a thickness of 1 nm. Isothermal gas-sorption measurements of the bulk material reveal a dominant pore size of ~0.6 nm, which indicates uniform open channels from the eclipsed stacking of the sheets. When employed as an organic anode in an ambient-temperature sodium cell, the material allows a fast charge/discharge of sodium ions, with impressive reversible capacity, rate capability and stability metrics.

  6. Optimization of labelling PSMA-HBED-CC peptide with {sup 68}Ga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcarde, Lais F.; Dias, Luis A.P.; Massicano, Adriana V.F.; Mengatti, Jair; Araujo, Elaine B. de, E-mail: lais_alcarde@hotmail.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Early detection of metastases or recurrent prostate cancer (PC) lesions is of clinical relevance in terms of clinical staging, prognosis and therapy management. When PC is not treated, it is potentially lethal. Clinical methods for diagnosis of PC include the dosage of prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and the rectal touch. Unfortunately, these initial procedures are not specific for PC detection. The level of PSA, in about 20 to 30% of the cases is high, due to benign pathologies, that result in false positive and unneeded biopsy. The prostatic specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein and differs from the PSA that is a free protein in blood. High levels of PSMA are observed in almost all prostatic pathologies and low levels were observed in brain, kidneys, salivary glands and small intestine. This fact stimulated the development of PSMA inhibitor molecules that could be used as a vector for imaging tumor agents and that could perfuse in the tumor microvasculature. Recent studies suggest that the chelator HBED-CC contributes intrinsically for the labelling of the PSMA inhibitor peptide based in urea - Glu-urea-Lys (Ahx) – to the pharmacophore group. This work describes the study of labelling conditions of PSMA-HBED-CC with {sup 68}Ga and determined the ideal conditions to obtaining the high radiochemical purity (≥ 95%) and stability, without final purification, and stimulates the in vitro and in vivo evaluation to determine the potential of the radiopharmaceutical for clinical application. (author)

  7. C-C Coupling on Single-Atom-Based Heterogeneous Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Zaicheng; Wang, Bin; Tang, Yu; Nguyen, Luan; Li, Yuting; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2018-01-24

    Compared to homogeneous catalysis, heterogeneous catalysis allows for ready separation of products from the catalyst and thus reuse of the catalyst. C-C coupling is typically performed on a molecular catalyst which is mixed with reactants in liquid phase during catalysis. This homogeneous mixing at a molecular level in the same phase makes separation of the molecular catalyst extremely challenging and costly. Here we demonstrated that a TiO 2 -based nanoparticle catalyst anchoring singly dispersed Pd atoms (Pd 1 /TiO 2 ) is selective and highly active for more than 10 Sonogashira C-C coupling reactions (R≡CH + R'X → R≡R'; X = Br, I; R' = aryl or vinyl). The coupling between iodobenzene and phenylacetylene on Pd 1 /TiO 2 exhibits a turnover rate of 51.0 diphenylacetylene molecules per anchored Pd atom per minute at 60 °C, with a low apparent activation barrier of 28.9 kJ/mol and no cost of catalyst separation. DFT calculations suggest that the single Pd atom bonded to surface lattice oxygen atoms of TiO 2 acts as a site to dissociatively chemisorb iodobenzene to generate an intermediate phenyl, which then couples with phenylacetylenyl bound to a surface oxygen atom. This coupling of phenyl adsorbed on Pd 1 and phenylacetylenyl bound to O ad of TiO 2 forms the product molecule, diphenylacetylene.

  8. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), fiscal year 1985. Annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meeting/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees on Structural Ceramics, Batteries and Fuel Cells, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Steel are established and are continuing their own program. The FY 1985 and FY 1986 meeting program is given. The EMaCC aids in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and inter-agency compilations. Brief summaries of the materials research programs associated with each office and division are presented, including tables listing individual projects and the FY 1985 budgets for each. More details on the individual projects within the divisions and the specific tasks or subcontracts within the various projects are given in the paragraph descriptions

  9. A macrophage inflammatory protein homolog encoded by guinea pig cytomegalovirus signals via CC chemokine receptor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, Mark; Miao Zhenhua; Wang Yu; Haggerty, Shannon; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of cellular immune effector proteins, including chemokines (CKs) and CK receptor-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Sequence of the guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) genome identified an open reading frame (ORF) which predicted a 101 amino acid (aa) protein with homology to the macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) subfamily of CC (β) CKs, designated GPCMV-MIP. To assess functionality of this CK, recombinant GPCMV-MIP was expressed in HEK293 cells and assayed for its ability to bind to and functionally interact with a variety of GPCRs. Specific signaling was observed with the hCCR1 receptor, which could be blocked with hMIP -1α in competition experiments. Migration assays revealed that GPCMV-MIP was able to induce chemotaxis in hCCR1-L1.2 cells. Antisera raised against a GST-MIP fusion protein immunoprecipitated species of ∼12 and 10 kDa from GPCMV-inoculated tissue culture lysates, and convalescent antiserum from GPCMV-infected animals was immunoreactive with GST-MIP by ELISA assay. These results represent the first substantive in vitro characterization of a functional CC CK encoded by a cytomegalovirus

  10. C-C Double Bond Cleavage of Linear α,β-Unsaturated Ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sung Gon; Jun, Chul Ho [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-11-15

    In conclusion, we have demonstrated the C-C double bond cleavage of α,β-unsaturated ketone under a catalytic system consisting of Rh(I) complex, 2-amino-3-picoline, cyclohexylamine, and benzoic acid. This reaction undergoes a retro-Mannich-type fragmentation of α,β-unsaturated ketone through the conjugate addition of cyclohexylamine followed by Rh(I)-catalyzed C-H bond activation. The activation of C-H bonds by transition-metal complexes is one of the most efficient methods to form C-C bonds in organic synthesis. We have successfully developed a Rh(I)-catalyzed C-H bond activation series using 2-amino-pyridine derivatives or benzylamine as a chelation auxiliary to induce cyclometalation. In the course of our studies on chelation-assisted C-H bond activation, we reported a Rh(I)-catalyzed hydroiminoacylation of alkynes with allylamine derivatives or aldehydes, which was further applied to the retro-Mannich-type fragmentation of the resulting α,β-unsaturated ketimine by primary amines. Encouraged by these results, we also developed a Rh(I)-catalyzed C-H bond activation of the ring opening in 2-cycloalkenones and a chelation-assisted β-alkylation of α,β-unsaturated ketone using Rh(I) catalyst and various amines.

  11. C-C Double Bond Cleavage of Linear α,β-Unsaturated Ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sung Gon; Jun, Chul Ho

    2004-01-01

    In conclusion, we have demonstrated the C-C double bond cleavage of α,β-unsaturated ketone under a catalytic system consisting of Rh(I) complex, 2-amino-3-picoline, cyclohexylamine, and benzoic acid. This reaction undergoes a retro-Mannich-type fragmentation of α,β-unsaturated ketone through the conjugate addition of cyclohexylamine followed by Rh(I)-catalyzed C-H bond activation. The activation of C-H bonds by transition-metal complexes is one of the most efficient methods to form C-C bonds in organic synthesis. We have successfully developed a Rh(I)-catalyzed C-H bond activation series using 2-amino-pyridine derivatives or benzylamine as a chelation auxiliary to induce cyclometalation. In the course of our studies on chelation-assisted C-H bond activation, we reported a Rh(I)-catalyzed hydroiminoacylation of alkynes with allylamine derivatives or aldehydes, which was further applied to the retro-Mannich-type fragmentation of the resulting α,β-unsaturated ketimine by primary amines. Encouraged by these results, we also developed a Rh(I)-catalyzed C-H bond activation of the ring opening in 2-cycloalkenones and a chelation-assisted β-alkylation of α,β-unsaturated ketone using Rh(I) catalyst and various amines

  12. Quantification of C=C and C=O Surface Carbons in Detonation Nanodiamond by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, J -F; Fang, X -W; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2014-05-08

    The ability of solid-state 13C NMR to detect and quantify small amounts of sp2-hybridized carbon on the surface of ~5 nm diameter nanodiamond particles is demonstrated. The C=C carbon fraction is only 1.1 ± 0.4% in pristine purified detonation nanodiamond, while a full single-layer graphitic or “bucky diamond” shell would contain ca. 25% of all C in a 5 nm diameter particle. Instead of large aromatic patches repeatedly proposed in the recent literature, sp3-hybridized CH and COH carbons cover most of the nanodiamond particle surface, accounting for ~5% each. C=O and COO groups also seen in X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) but not detected in previous NMR studies make up ca. 1.5% of all C. They are removed by heat treatment at 800 °C, which increases the aromatic fraction. 13C{1H} NMR demonstrates that the various sp2-hybridized carbons are mostly not protonated, but cross-polarization shows that they are separated from 1H by only a few bond lengths, which proves that they are near the protonated surface. Together, the observed C–H, C–OH, C=O, and C=C groups account for 12–14% of all C, which matches the surface fraction expected for bulk-terminated 5 nm diameter diamond particles.

  13. Towards an unbiased comparison of CC, BCC, and FCC lattices in terms of prealiasing

    KAUST Repository

    Vad, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    In the literature on optimal regular volume sampling, the Body-Centered Cubic (BCC) lattice has been proven to be optimal for sampling spherically band-limited signals above the Nyquist limit. On the other hand, if the sampling frequency is below the Nyquist limit, the Face-Centered Cubic (FCC) lattice was demonstrated to be optimal in reducing the prealiasing effect. In this paper, we confirm that the FCC lattice is indeed optimal in this sense in a certain interval of the sampling frequency. By theoretically estimating the prealiasing error in a realistic range of the sampling frequency, we show that in other frequency intervals, the BCC lattice and even the traditional Cartesian Cubic (CC) lattice are expected to minimize the prealiasing. The BCC lattice is superior over the FCC lattice if the sampling frequency is not significantly below the Nyquist limit. Interestingly, if the original signal is drastically undersampled, the CC lattice is expected to provide the lowest prealiasing error. Additionally, we give a comprehensible clarification that the sampling efficiency of the FCC lattice is lower than that of the BCC lattice. Although this is a well-known fact, the exact percentage has been erroneously reported in the literature. Furthermore, for the sake of an unbiased comparison, we propose to rotate the Marschner-Lobb test signal such that an undue advantage is not given to either lattice. © 2014 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Design, Implementation and Applications of 3d Web-Services in DB4GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, M.; Kuper, P. V.; Dittrich, A.; Wild, P.; Butwilowski, E.; Al-Doori, M.

    2013-09-01

    The object-oriented database architecture DB4GeO was originally designed to support sub-surface applications in the geo-sciences. This is reflected in DB4GeO's geometric data model as well as in its import and export functions. Initially, these functions were designed for communication with 3D geological modeling and visualization tools such as GOCAD or MeshLab. However, it soon became clear that DB4GeO was suitable for a much wider range of applications. Therefore it is natural to move away from a standalone solution and to open the access to DB4GeO data by standardized OGC web-services. Though REST and OGC services seem incompatible at first sight, the implementation in DB4GeO shows that OGC-based implementation of web-services may use parts of the DB4GeO-REST implementation. Starting with initial solutions in the history of DB4GeO, this paper will introduce the design, adaptation (i.e. model transformation), and first steps in the implementation of OGC Web Feature (WFS) and Web Processing Services (WPS), as new interfaces to DB4GeO data and operations. Among its capabilities, DB4GeO can provide data in different data formats like GML, GOCAD, or DB3D XML through a WFS, as well as its ability to run operations like a 3D-to-2D service, or mesh-simplification (Progressive Meshes) through a WPS. We then demonstrate, an Android-based mobile 3D augmented reality viewer for DB4GeO that uses the Web Feature Service to visualize 3D geo-database query results. Finally, we explore future research work considering DB4GeO in the framework of the research group "Computer-Aided Collaborative Subway Track Planning in Multi-Scale 3D City and Building Models".

  15. SU-PhysioDB: a physiological signals database for body area network security

    OpenAIRE

    Karaoğlan Altop, Duygu; Karaoglan Altop, Duygu; Levi, Albert; Tuzcu, Volkan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new physiological signals database, SU-PhysioDB, that contains simultaneous measurements of electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure (BP) and body temperature (BT) signals. SU-PhysioDB can be used to evaluate the performance of the security mechanisms designed for the communication among the biosensors within Body Area Networks (BANs). We present a detailed description of our SU-PhysioDB database along with providing a performance comparison of two specific physiological ...

  16. Scalable Web Application using Node.JS and CouchDB

    OpenAIRE

    Paudyal, Umesh

    2011-01-01

    This report presents design and implementation of a protoype application using server side javascript programming language, node.JS and couchDB as backend database. It scales and evaluates the developed prototype application and the couchDB for their scalability and performance. The report concludes that node.JS is a suitable framework for development of scalable web servers and couchDB as a backend database, though natively not distributed and scalable, can be scaled and distributed across m...

  17. cuticleDB: a relational database of Arthropod cuticular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis Judith H

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The insect exoskeleton or cuticle is a bi-partite composite of proteins and chitin that provides protective, skeletal and structural functions. Little information is available about the molecular structure of this important complex that exhibits a helicoidal architecture. Scores of sequences of cuticular proteins have been obtained from direct protein sequencing, from cDNAs, and from genomic analyses. Most of these cuticular protein sequences contain motifs found only in arthropod proteins. Description cuticleDB is a relational database containing all structural proteins of Arthropod cuticle identified to date. Many come from direct sequencing of proteins isolated from cuticle and from sequences from cDNAs that share common features with these authentic cuticular proteins. It also includes proteins from the Drosophila melanogaster and the Anopheles gambiae genomes, that have been predicted to be cuticular proteins, based on a Pfam motif (PF00379 responsible for chitin binding in Arthropod cuticle. The total number of the database entries is 445: 370 derive from insects, 60 from Crustacea and 15 from Chelicerata. The database can be accessed from our web server at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/cuticleDB. Conclusions CuticleDB was primarily designed to contain correct and full annotation of cuticular protein data. The database will be of help to future genome annotators. Users will be able to test hypotheses for the existence of known and also of yet unknown motifs in cuticular proteins. An analysis of motifs may contribute to understanding how proteins contribute to the physical properties of cuticle as well as to the precise nature of their interaction with chitin.

  18. ProCarDB: a database of bacterial carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nupur, L N U; Vats, Asheema; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Ashwani

    2016-05-26

    Carotenoids have important functions in bacteria, ranging from harvesting light energy to neutralizing oxidants and acting as virulence factors. However, information pertaining to the carotenoids is scattered throughout the literature. Furthermore, information about the genes/proteins involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids has tremendously increased in the post-genomic era. A web server providing the information about microbial carotenoids in a structured manner is required and will be a valuable resource for the scientific community working with microbial carotenoids. Here, we have created a manually curated, open access, comprehensive compilation of bacterial carotenoids named as ProCarDB- Prokaryotic Carotenoid Database. ProCarDB includes 304 unique carotenoids arising from 50 biosynthetic pathways distributed among 611 prokaryotes. ProCarDB provides important information on carotenoids, such as 2D and 3D structures, molecular weight, molecular formula, SMILES, InChI, InChIKey, IUPAC name, KEGG Id, PubChem Id, and ChEBI Id. The database also provides NMR data, UV-vis absorption data, IR data, MS data and HPLC data that play key roles in the identification of carotenoids. An important feature of this database is the extension of biosynthetic pathways from the literature and through the presence of the genes/enzymes in different organisms. The information contained in the database was mined from published literature and databases such as KEGG, PubChem, ChEBI, LipidBank, LPSN, and Uniprot. The database integrates user-friendly browsing and searching with carotenoid analysis tools to help the user. We believe that this database will serve as a major information centre for researchers working on bacterial carotenoids.

  19. CC2D1A Regulates Human Intellectual and Social Function as well as NF-κB Signaling Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, M. Chiara; Xiong, Lan; Shaheen, Ranad; Tambunan, Dimira E.; Di Costanzo, Stefania; Mitisalis, Vanessa; Tischfield, David J.; Cinquino, Antonella; Ghaziuddin, Mohammed; Christian, Mehtab; Jiang, Qin; Laurent, Sandra; Nanjiani, Zohair A.; Rasheed, Saima; Hill, R. Sean; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Gleason, Danielle; Sabbagh, Diya; Salih, Mustafa A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability (ID) are often comorbid, but the extent to which they share common genetic causes remains controversial. Here, we present two autosomal-recessive “founder” mutations in the CC2D1A gene causing fully penetrant cognitive phenotypes, including mild-to-severe ID, ASD, as well as seizures, suggesting shared developmental mechanisms. CC2D1A regulates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, and we found its strongest effect to be on the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Cc2d1a gain and loss of function both increase activation of NF-κB, revealing a critical role of Cc2d1a in homeostatic control of intra-cellular signaling. Cc2d1a knockdown in neurons reduces dendritic complexity and increases NF-κB activity, and the effects of Cc2d1a depletion can be rescued by inhibiting NF-κB activity. Homeostatic regulation of neuronal signaling pathways provides a mechanism whereby common founder mutations could manifest diverse symptoms in different patients. PMID:25066123

  20. CC2D1A Regulates Human Intellectual and Social Function as well as NF-κB Signaling Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chiara Manzini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD and intellectual disability (ID are often comorbid, but the extent to which they share common genetic causes remains controversial. Here, we present two autosomal-recessive “founder” mutations in the CC2D1A gene causing fully penetrant cognitive phenotypes, including mild-to-severe ID, ASD, as well as seizures, suggesting shared developmental mechanisms. CC2D1A regulates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, and we found its strongest effect to be on the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. Cc2d1a gain and loss of function both increase activation of NF-κB, revealing a critical role of Cc2d1a in homeostatic control of intracellular signaling. Cc2d1a knockdown in neurons reduces dendritic complexity and increases NF-κB activity, and the effects of Cc2d1a depletion can be rescued by inhibiting NF-κB activity. Homeostatic regulation of neuronal signaling pathways provides a mechanism whereby common founder mutations could manifest diverse symptoms in different patients.

  1. 60-dB Bragg gratings in planar waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouanno, Jean-Marc; Hübner, Jörg; Kristensen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Bragg gratings are widely used as wavelength-selective elements in fiber devices. Integrated optics is a very attractive alternative for realizing such components. This way, multifunctional devices with high mechanical and thermal stability can be made using a technology with potential for mass-production....... The main limitation until now was the quality of the gratings written in planar waveguides. We report here 60-dB transmission dips obtained with 6-mm-long Bragg gratings written in Ge-doped planar waveguides...

  2. FungiDB: An Integrated Bioinformatic Resource for Fungi and Oomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelina Y. Basenko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available FungiDB (fungidb.org is a free online resource for data mining and functional genomics analysis for fungal and oomycete species. FungiDB is part of the Eukaryotic Pathogen Genomics Database Resource (EuPathDB, eupathdb.org platform that integrates genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and phenotypic datasets, and other types of data for pathogenic and nonpathogenic, free-living and parasitic organisms. FungiDB is one of the largest EuPathDB databases containing nearly 100 genomes obtained from GenBank, Aspergillus Genome Database (AspGD, The Broad Institute, Joint Genome Institute (JGI, Ensembl, and other sources. FungiDB offers a user-friendly web interface with embedded bioinformatics tools that support custom in silico experiments that leverage FungiDB-integrated data. In addition, a Galaxy-based workspace enables users to generate custom pipelines for large-scale data analysis (e.g., RNA-Seq, variant calling, etc.. This review provides an introduction to the FungiDB resources and focuses on available features, tools, and queries and how they can be used to mine data across a diverse range of integrated FungiDB datasets and records.

  3. Update History of This Database - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us PGDBj - Ortholog DB Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/03/07 PGDBj Orth...L of the Whole data download The URL of The original website information 2014/05/12 PGDBj Ortholog DB (Relea...se57 ver.) English archive site is opened. (Archive V1) 2012/08/01 PGDBj Ortholog DB ( http://pgdbj.jp/ortho...e Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data

  4. Database Description - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us PGDBj - Ortholog DB Database Description General information of database Database name PGDBj - Orth...olog DB Alternative name Plant Genome Database Japan - Ortholog Database DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc01194...teria Taxonomy ID: 1117 Database description Orthology is a homologous relationship among genes derived from...o predict the divergence of gene function based on syntenic relationships among species. PGDBj Ortholog DB i...f utilization of database PGDBj Ortholog DB is hierarchically organized to reflect evolutionary relationship

  5. Inhibition of miR-92a Suppresses Oxidative Stress and Improves Endothelial Function by Upregulating Heme Oxygenase-1 in db/db Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Lingshan; Zhao, Lei; Song, Wencong; Wang, Li; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Hongsong; Huang, Yuhong; Lau, Chi Wai; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Luo, Jiang-Yun; Huang, Yu

    2018-02-10

    Inhibition of microRNA-92a (miR-92a) is reported to suppress endothelial inflammation and delay atherogenesis. We hypothesize that miR-92a inhibition protects endothelial function through suppressing oxidative stress in diabetic db/db mice. In this study, we found elevated expression of miR-92a in aortic endothelium from db/db mice and in renal arteries from diabetic subjects. Endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and oxidized low-density lipoprotein express higher level of miR-92a. Overexpression of miR-92a impairs endothelium-dependent relaxations (EDRs) in C57BL/6 mouse aortas. Overexpression of miR-92a suppresses expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a critical cytoprotective enzyme, whereas inhibition of miR-92a increases HO-1 expression in human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) and db/db mouse aortas. Importantly, miR-92a inhibition by Ad-anti-miR-92a improved EDRs and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in db/db mouse aortas. HO-1 inhibition by SnMP or HO-1 knockdown by shHO-1 reversed the suppressive effect of miR-92a inhibition on ROS production induced by AGE treatment in C57BL/6 mouse aortas. In addition, SnMP reversed miR-92a inhibition-induced improvement of EDRs in AGE-treated C57BL/6 mouse aortas and in db/db mouse aortas. Expression of miR-92a is increased in diabetic aortic endothelium and inhibition of miR-92a exerts vasoprotective effect in diabetic mice through HO-1 upregulation in ECs. MiR-92a expression is elevated in diabetic ECs. MiR-92a overexpression impairs endothelial function and suppresses HO-1 expression in ECs. Inhibition of miR-92a attenuates oxidative stress and improves endothelial function through enhancing HO-1 expression and activity in db/db mouse aortas. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 358-370.

  6. FlavorDB: a database of flavor molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neelansh; Sethupathy, Apuroop; Tuwani, Rudraksh; Nk, Rakhi; Dokania, Shubham; Iyer, Arvind; Gupta, Ayushi; Agrawal, Shubhra; Singh, Navjot; Shukla, Shubham; Kathuria, Kriti; Badhwar, Rahul; Kanji, Rakesh; Jain, Anupam; Kaur, Avneet; Nagpal, Rashmi; Bagler, Ganesh

    2018-01-04

    Flavor is an expression of olfactory and gustatory sensations experienced through a multitude of chemical processes triggered by molecules. Beyond their key role in defining taste and smell, flavor molecules also regulate metabolic processes with consequences to health. Such molecules present in natural sources have been an integral part of human history with limited success in attempts to create synthetic alternatives. Given their utility in various spheres of life such as food and fragrances, it is valuable to have a repository of flavor molecules, their natural sources, physicochemical properties, and sensory responses. FlavorDB (http://cosylab.iiitd.edu.in/flavordb) comprises of 25,595 flavor molecules representing an array of tastes and odors. Among these 2254 molecules are associated with 936 natural ingredients belonging to 34 categories. The dynamic, user-friendly interface of the resource facilitates exploration of flavor molecules for divergent applications: finding molecules matching a desired flavor or structure; exploring molecules of an ingredient; discovering novel food pairings; finding the molecular essence of food ingredients; associating chemical features with a flavor and more. Data-driven studies based on FlavorDB can pave the way for an improved understanding of flavor mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. GiSAO.db: a database for ageing research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grillari Johannes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related gene expression patterns of Homo sapiens as well as of model organisms such as Mus musculus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster are a basis for understanding the genetic mechanisms of ageing. For an effective analysis and interpretation of expression profiles it is necessary to store and manage huge amounts of data in an organized way, so that these data can be accessed and processed easily. Description GiSAO.db (Genes involved in senescence, apoptosis and oxidative stress database is a web-based database system for storing and retrieving ageing-related experimental data. Expression data of genes and miRNAs, annotation data like gene identifiers and GO terms, orthologs data and data of follow-up experiments are stored in the database. A user-friendly web application provides access to the stored data. KEGG pathways were incorporated and links to external databases augment the information in GiSAO.db. Search functions facilitate retrieval of data which can also be exported for further processing. Conclusions We have developed a centralized database that is very well suited for the management of data for ageing research. The database can be accessed at https://gisao.genome.tugraz.at and all the stored data can be viewed with a guest account.

  8. Procurement of Beams in Multiple D&B Bridge Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CT. Ramanathan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Selected infrastructure development projects are being implemented by Design and Build (D&B pocurement system in Sabah (East Malaysia by the Public Works Department (PWD. In the first phase 45 bridge replacement projects were awarded in 5 packages. These simultaneous multiple Bridge projects are for the development of the backward areas and hence their timely completion is utmost important. Procurement and production of bridge beams have been the critical element of construction in these rural areas and no researches has been reported on various aspects of procurement of the bridge beams in multiple D&B projects. The aspects of procurement researched in this work include the determination of a common beam element for the ease of procurement and the optimization of the construction methodology, the finalization and purchasing plate dimensions to suite the manufacturer's production range, the delivery of materials, the planning and monitoring of fabrication, the preparation and assembly, and the erection and launching of beams. The beams are optimized using element optimization techniques. The most important problems in fabricating steel girders were in planning and scheduling of materials for the fabrication and the fabrication process. Findings in all the aspects of production of steel girders are highlighted through a case study of six long span bridges at various locations in Sabah. Solutions drawn from lessons learnt which minimize wastages, and aids in timely completion of beams in multiple bridge construction are discussed.

  9. MultitaskProtDB: a database of multitasking proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Sergio; Ferragut, Gabriela; Amela, Isaac; Perez-Pons, JosepAntoni; Piñol, Jaume; Mozo-Villarias, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    We have compiled MultitaskProtDB, available online at http://wallace.uab.es/multitask, to provide a repository where the many multitasking proteins found in the literature can be stored. Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biological functions. Usually, multitasking proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. This ability of proteins to perform multitasking functions helps us to understand one of the ways used by cells to perform many complex functions with a limited number of genes. Even so, the study of this phenomenon is complex because, among other things, there is no database of moonlighting proteins. The existence of such a tool facilitates the collection and dissemination of these important data. This work reports the database, MultitaskProtDB, which is designed as a friendly user web page containing >288 multitasking proteins with their NCBI and UniProt accession numbers, canonical and additional biological functions, monomeric/oligomeric states, PDB codes when available and bibliographic references. This database also serves to gain insight into some characteristics of multitasking proteins such as frequencies of the different pairs of functions, phylogenetic conservation and so forth.

  10. Crescimento da base craniana nos diferentes tipos faciais nos relacionamentos maxilomandibulares ortopédicos de Classe I, II e III: Parte 2 (Crescimento médio de Ba-Na, CC-Na e CC-Ba Cranial base growth in different facial types in Class I, II and III orthopedic maxillomandibular relationship: Part 2 (Mean growth of Ba-Na, CC-Na and CC-Ba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucelma Vilela Pieri

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: este estudo retrospectivo avaliou o crescimento médio da base craniana nos diferentes tipos faciais e de relacionamentos maxilomandibulares ortopédicos.METODOLOGIA: uma amostra aleatória de 300 pacientes brasileiros leucodermas (131 do gênero masculino, 169 do gênero feminino, com idade média inicial de 10 anos e 2 meses (dentadura mista e final de 14 anos e 8 meses (segundos molares em oclusão e tempo médio de observação de 4 anos e 5 meses, foi selecionada em uma clínica particular, em São Paulo, Brasil. Havia 118 Classe I, 151 Classe II e 31 Classe III. Todas as 600 radiografias cefalométricas laterais foram obtidas no mesmo aparelho de raios-x. As análises de Ricketts e Schwarz modificadas por Faltin foram usadas. As medidas lineares (Ba-Na, CC-Na e CC-Ba foram feitas manualmente pelo mesmo examinador em T1 e T2. Os relacionamentos foram estudados juntos e separadamente, considerando tipo facial e gênero. O teste t-pareado e ANOVA foram aplicados. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: o tipo facial retrovertido cresceu significantemente mais em CC-Na na Classe II, sendo a sua correção desfavorável no gênero feminino; com tendência favorável na Classe III e crescimento dentro do esperado na Classe I. O neutrovertido cresceu significantemente mais em CC-Na nas Classes I e II, sendo desfavorável na Classe II; com crescimento eqüitativo de CC-Na e CC-Ba na Classe III e levemente acima do esperado na Classe I. O provertido teve crescimento eqüitativo em todas as Classes, sendo significantemente favorável na Classe II mandibular; com tendência favorável na Classe III e crescimento médio acima do esperado na Classe I.AIM: This retrospective study evaluated the cranial base mean growth in different facial types and orthopedic maxillomandibular relationship. METHODS: A random sample of 300 Brazilian Caucasian patients (131 males, 169 females, initial and final mean age (10 years 2 months-mixed dentition; 14 years 8 months

  11. Comparative Effectiveness of Initial Antiretroviral Therapy Regimens: ACTG 5095 and 5142 Clinical Trials Relative to ART-CC Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugavero, Michael J.; May, Margaret; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Gulick, Roy M.; Riddler, Sharon A.; Haubrich, Richard; Napravnik, Sonia; Abgrall, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Harris, Ross; Gill, M. John; de Wolf, Frank; Hogg, Robert; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Chêne, Geneviève; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Guest, Jodie L.; Smith, Colette; Murillas, Javier; Berenguer, Juan; Wyen, Christoph; Domingo, Pere; Kitahata, Mari M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Saag, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The generalizability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinical trial efficacy findings to routine care settings is not well studied. We compared the relative effectiveness of initial ART regimens estimated in AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG) randomized controlled trials with that among patients receiving ART at Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) study sites. Methods Treatment-naive HIV-infected patients initiating identical ART regimens in ACTG trials (A5095 and A5142) and at 15 ART-CC cohort study sites were included. Virological failure (HIV-1 RNA >200 copies/ml) at 24- and 48-weeks, incident AIDS-defining events and mortality were measured according to study design (ART-CC cohort vs. ACTG trial) and stratified by 3rd drug [Abacavir (ABC), Efavirenz (EFV), and Lopinavir/r (LPV/r)]. We used logistic regression to estimate and compare odds ratios for virological failure between different regimens and study designs, and used Cox models to estimate and compare hazard ratios for AIDS and death. Results Compared with patients receiving ABC, those receiving EFV had roughly half the odds of 24-week virologic failure (>200 copies/mL) in both ACTG 5095 (OR=0.53, 95% CI 0.36–0.79) and ART-CC (0.46, 0.37–0.57). Virologic superiority of EFV (vs. ABC) appeared comparable in ART-CC and ACTG 5095 (ratio of ORs 0.86, 95% CI 0.54–1.35). Odds ratios for 48-week virologic failure, comparing EFV with LPV/r, were also comparable in ACTG 5142 and ART-CC (ratio of ORs 0.87, 0.45–1.69). Conclusions Between ART regimen virologic efficacy of 3rd drugs ABC, EFV, and LPV/r observed in the ACTG 5095 and 5142 trials appear generalizable to the routine care setting of ART-CC clinical cohorts. PMID:21857357

  12. Asynchronous Group Key Distribution on top of the CC2420 Security Mechanisms for Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Tranberg

    2009-01-01

    scheme with no time synchronization requirements. The scheme decreases the number of key updates by providing them on an as needed basis according to the amount of network traffic. We evaluate the CC2420 radio security mechanism and show how to use it as a basis to implement secure group communication......A sensor network is a network consisting of small, inexpensive, low-powered sensor nodes that communicate to complete a common task. Sensor nodes are characterized by having limited communication and computation capabilities, energy, and storage. They often are deployed in hostile environments...... creating a demand for encryption and authentication of the messages sent between them. Due to severe resource constraints on the sensor nodes, efficient key distribution schemes and secure communication protocols with low overhead are desired. In this paper we present an asynchronous group key distribution...

  13. Design of belt conveyor electric control device based on CC-link bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Goufen; Zhan, Minhua; Li, Jiehua

    2016-01-01

    In view of problem of the existing coal mine belt conveyor is no field bus communication function, two levels belt conveyor electric control system design is proposed based on field bus. Two-stage belt conveyor electric control system consists of operation platform, PLC control unit, various sensors, alarm device and the water spraying device. The error protection is realized by PLC programming, made use of CC-Link bus technology, the data share and the cooperative control came true between host station and slave station. The real-time monitor was achieved by the touch screen program. Practical application shows that the system can ensure the coalmine production, and improve the automatic level of the coalmine transport equipment.

  14. Isolation, Fractionation and Characterization of Catalase from Neurospora crassa (InaCC F226)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani; Ambarsari, L.; Lindawati, E.

    2017-03-01

    Catalase from Indigenous isolate Neurospora crassa InaCC F226 has been isolated, fractionated and characterized. Production of catalase by Neurospora crassa was done by using PDA medium (Potato Dextrosa Agar) and fractionated with ammonium sulphate with 20-80% saturation. Fraction 60% was optimum saturation of ammonium sulphate and had highest specific activity 3339.82 U/mg with purity 6.09 times, total protein 0.920 mg and yield 88.57%. The optimum pH and temperature for catalase activity were at 40°C and pH 7.0, respectively. The metal ions that stimulated catalase activity acted were Ca2+, Mn2+ and Zn2+, and inhibitors were EDTA, Mg2+ and Cu2+. Based on Km and Vmax values were 0.2384 mM and 13.3156 s/mM.

  15. Is puberty an accelerator of type 1 diabetes in IL6-174CC females?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillespie, Kathleen M; Nolsøe, Runa; Betin, Virginie M

    2005-01-01

    but not in males. We found that the IL6-174CC genotype was significantly less frequent in females diagnosed after than in those diagnosed before the age of 10 years (19 vs. 13%, P = 0.016). No genotype difference was observed in males stratified for age at onset. Among children diagnosed after age 10, the median...... age of onset was 11.9 years (intraquartile range 10.7-14.6) in 34 girls homozygous for IL6-174C compared with 13.2 years (11.6-15.4) in 229 girls with other genotypes and 13.5 years (12.0-15.6) in 339 males with any IL6-174 genotype (P = 0.012). These data support the hypothesis that pubertal changes...

  16. Automated Coverage Tester for the Oracle Archiver of WinCC OA

    CERN Document Server

    Voitier, A; Gonzalez-Berges, M

    2011-01-01

    A large number of control systems at CERN are built with the commercial SCADA tool WinCC OA (formerly PVSS) [1]. They cover projects in the experiments, accelerators and infrastructure. An important component is the Oracle archiver used for long term storage of process data (events) and alarms. The archived data provide feedback to the operators and experts about how the system was behaving at particular moment in the past. In addition a subset of these data is used for offline physics analysis (conditions data). Large volumes of data are produced by the different facilities at CERN (several Terabytes per year). The consistency of the archived data has to be ensured from writing to reading as well as throughout updates of the control systems. The complexity of the archiving subsystem comes from the multiplicity of data types, required performance and other factors such as operating system, environment variables or versions of the different software components. Therefore an automatic tester has been implemente...

  17. General Data Acquisition Platform for Wireless Sensor Network Based on CC2538

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhi-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are the hotspots of current research and have very wide application prospects. Its front end is a sensor that can sense and check the external world. This paper takes temperature and humidity as the research object, and builds a wireless sensor network data acquisition platform by combining the Internet of things and the WeChat public platform. The platform uses DHT11 temperature and humidity sensors and CC2538 sensor nodes to obtain the relevant data, through the server and database for data access. The combination with WeChat public platform not only allows us to view the temperature and humidity in the WeChat public, but also allows us to understand the environmental changes of the relevant detection area more conveniently and quickly. The effectiveness of the platform is also demonstrated by the collection of temperature and humidity data.

  18. SSW library: an SIMD Smith-Waterman C/C++ library for use in genomic applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyao Zhao

    Full Text Available The Smith-Waterman algorithm, which produces the optimal pairwise alignment between two sequences, is frequently used as a key component of fast heuristic read mapping and variation detection tools for next-generation sequencing data. Though various fast Smith-Waterman implementations are developed, they are either designed as monolithic protein database searching tools, which do not return detailed alignment, or are embedded into other tools. These issues make reusing these efficient Smith-Waterman implementations impractical.To facilitate easy integration of the fast Single-Instruction-Multiple-Data Smith-Waterman algorithm into third-party software, we wrote a C/C++ library, which extends Farrar's Striped Smith-Waterman (SSW to return alignment information in addition to the optimal Smith-Waterman score. In this library we developed a new method to generate the full optimal alignment results and a suboptimal score in linear space at little cost of efficiency. This improvement makes the fast Single-Instruction-Multiple-Data Smith-Waterman become really useful in genomic applications. SSW is available both as a C/C++ software library, as well as a stand-alone alignment tool at: https://github.com/mengyao/Complete-Striped-Smith-Waterman-Library.The SSW library has been used in the primary read mapping tool MOSAIK, the split-read mapping program SCISSORS, the MEI detector TANGRAM, and the read-overlap graph generation program RZMBLR. The speeds of the mentioned software are improved significantly by replacing their ordinary Smith-Waterman or banded Smith-Waterman module with the SSW Library.

  19. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Ortiz Zacarías, Natalia V.; de Vries, Henk; Han, Gye Won; Gustavsson, Martin; Dabros, Marta; Zhao, Chunxia; Cherney, Robert J.; Carter, Percy; Stamos, Dean; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Heitman, Laura H.; Tebben, Andrew; Kufareva, Irina; Handel , Tracy M. (Vertex Pharm); (Leiden-MC); (USC); (BMS); (UCSD)

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, here we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.

  20. Automated coverage tester for the Oracle archiver of WinCC OA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitier, A.; Golonka, P.; Gonzalez-Berges, M.

    2012-01-01

    A large number of control systems at CERN are built with the commercial SCADA tool WinCC OA (formerly PVSS). They cover projects in the experiments, accelerators and infrastructure. An important component is the Oracle archiver used for long term storage of process data (events) and alarms. The archived data provide feedback to the operators and experts about how the system was behaving at particular moment in the past. In addition a subset of these data is used for offline physics analysis (conditions data). Large volumes of data are produced by the different facilities at CERN (several Tera-bytes per year). The consistency of the archived data has to be ensured from writing to reading as well as throughout updates of the control systems. The complexity of the archiving subsystem comes from the multiplicity of data types, required performance and other factors such as operating system, environment variables or versions of the different software components. Therefore an automatic tester has been implemented to systematically execute test scenarios under different conditions. The tests are based on scripts which are automatically generated from templates, therefore they can cover a wide range of software contexts. The tester has been fully written in the same software environment as the targeted SCADA system. The current implementation is able to handle over 300 test cases, both for events and alarms. It has enabled to report issues to the provider of WinCC OA. The template mechanism allows sufficient flexibility to adapt the suite of tests to future needs. The developed tools are generic enough to be used to test other parts of the control systems. (authors)

  1. Evolutionary blueprint for host- and niche-adaptation in Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin John Mcgavin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC30 has caused infectious epidemics for more than 60 years, and therefore provides a model system to evaluate how evolution has influenced the disease potential of closely related strains. In previous multiple genome comparisons, phylogenetic analyses established three major branches that evolved from a common ancestor. Clade 1, comprised of historic pandemic phage type 80/81 methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA, and Clade 2 comprised of contemporary community acquired methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA were hyper-virulent in murine infection models. Conversely, Clade 3 strains comprised of contemporary hospital associated MRSA (HA-MRSA and clinical MSSA exhibited attenuated virulence, due to common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP’s that abrogate production of α-hemolysin Hla, and interfere with signaling of the accessory gene regulator agr. We have now completed additional in silico genome comparisons of fifteen additional CC30 genomes in the public domain, to assess the hypothesis that Clade 3 has evolved to favor niche adaptation. In addition to SNP’s that influence agr and hla, other common traits of Clade 3 include tryptophan auxotrophy due to a di-nucleotide deletion within trpD, a premature stop codon within isdH encoding an immunogenic cell surface protein involved in iron acquisition, loss of a genomic toxin-antitoxin addiction module, acquisition of S. aureus pathogenicity islands SaPI4, and SaPI2 encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin tst, and increased copy number of insertion sequence ISSau2, which appears to target transcription terminators. Compared to other Clade 3 MSSA, S. aureus MN8, which is associated with Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome, exhibited a unique ISSau2 insertion, and enhanced production of toxic shock syndrome toxin encoded by SaPI2. Cumulatively, our data support the notion that Clade 3 strains are following an evolutionary blueprint towards niche-adaptation.

  2. Factors associated with the occurrence of MRSA CC398 in herds of fattening pigs in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alt Katja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MRSA in herds of fattening pigs in different regions of Germany, and to determine factors associated with the occurrence of this pathogen. For this purpose pooled dust samples were collected, and a questionnaire covered information regarding herd characteristics and management practices. Samples were pre-enriched in high-salt medium followed by selective enrichment containing cefoxitin/aztreonam, and culturing. Presumptive colonies were confirmed by multiplex-PCR targeting nuc-, mecA- and 16S rRNA-genes. Isolates were spa- and SCCmec-, and in selected cases, multilocus sequence-typed. Susceptibilities to 13 antimicrobials were determined by broth microdilution. Statistical analysis was carried out using backward stepwise logistic regression to calculate odds ratios with the MRSA test result as the outcome and herd characteristics as categorical covariates. Results Overall, 152 of 290 (52% fattening pig farms tested positive for MRSA. The prevalence in the east, north- and south-west of Germany ranged from 39 to 59%. t011 (66% and t034 (23% were the most commonly identified spa-types, and 85% of isolates carried SCCmec Type V. Identified spa-types were all associated with clonal complex CC398. Susceptibility testing revealed that all isolates were resistant to tetracycline. High resistance rates were also found for sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (40%, and quinupristin/dalfopristin (32%. In addition, 83% of strains displayed multidrug resistant (> 3 substance classes phenotypes. Logistic regression revealed herd size (large farms OR: 5.4; CI: 2.7-11.2; p Conclusions MRSA CC398 is widely distributed among herds of fattening pigs in Germany. Farm management plays a crucial role in the dissemination of MRSA with herd size, and production type representing potential major indicators.

  3. Factors associated with the occurrence of MRSA CC398 in herds of fattening pigs in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Katja; Fetsch, Alexandra; Schroeter, Andreas; Guerra, Beatriz; Hammerl, Jens A; Hertwig, Stefan; Senkov, Natalja; Geinets, Anna; Mueller-Graf, Christine; Braeunig, Juliane; Kaesbohrer, Annemarie; Appel, Bernd; Hensel, Andreas; Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois

    2011-11-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MRSA in herds of fattening pigs in different regions of Germany, and to determine factors associated with the occurrence of this pathogen. For this purpose pooled dust samples were collected, and a questionnaire covered information regarding herd characteristics and management practices. Samples were pre-enriched in high-salt medium followed by selective enrichment containing cefoxitin/aztreonam, and culturing. Presumptive colonies were confirmed by multiplex-PCR targeting nuc-, mecA- and 16S rRNA-genes. Isolates were spa- and SCCmec-, and in selected cases, multilocus sequence-typed. Susceptibilities to 13 antimicrobials were determined by broth microdilution. Statistical analysis was carried out using backward stepwise logistic regression to calculate odds ratios with the MRSA test result as the outcome and herd characteristics as categorical covariates. Overall, 152 of 290 (52%) fattening pig farms tested positive for MRSA. The prevalence in the east, north- and south-west of Germany ranged from 39 to 59%.t011 (66%) and t034 (23%) were the most commonly identified spa-types, and 85% of isolates carried SCCmec Type V. Identified spa-types were all associated with clonal complex CC398. Susceptibility testing revealed that all isolates were resistant to tetracycline. High resistance rates were also found for sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (40%), and quinupristin/dalfopristin (32%). In addition, 83% of strains displayed multidrug resistant (> 3 substance classes) phenotypes.Logistic regression revealed herd size (large farms OR: 5.4; CI: 2.7-11.2; p pig operations. MRSA CC398 is widely distributed among herds of fattening pigs in Germany. Farm management plays a crucial role in the dissemination of MRSA with herd size, and production type representing potential major indicators.

  4. Chemotherapy of second stage human African trypanosomiasis: comparison between the parenteral diamidine DB829 and its oral prodrug DB868 in vervet monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Thuita

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness ranks among the most neglected tropical diseases based on limited availability of drugs that are safe and efficacious, particularly against the second stage (central nervous system [CNS] of infection. In response to this largely unmet need for new treatments, the Consortium for Parasitic Drug Development developed novel parenteral diamidines and corresponding oral prodrugs that have shown cure of a murine model of second stage HAT. As a rationale for selection of one of these compounds for further development, the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of intramuscular (IM active diamidine 2,5-bis(5-amidino-2-pyridylfuran (DB829; CPD-0802 and oral prodrug2,5-bis[5-(N-methoxyamidino-2-pyridyl]furan (DB868 were compared in the vervet monkey model of second stage HAT. Treatment was initiated 28 days post-infection of monkeys with T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537. Results showed that IM DB829 at 5 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days, 5 mg/kg/day every other day for 5 doses, or 2.5 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days cured all monkeys (5/5. Oral DB868 was less successful, with no cures (0/2 at 3 mg/kg/day for 10 days and cure rates of 1/4 at 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days and 20 mg/kg/day for 10 days; in total, only 2/10 monkeys were cured with DB868 dose regimens. The geometric mean plasma Cmax of IM DB829 at 5 mg/kg following the last of 5 doses was 25-fold greater than that after 10 daily oral doses of DB868 at 20 mg/kg. These data suggest that the active diamidine DB829, administered IM, should be considered for further development as a potential new treatment for second stage HAT.

  5. Chemotherapy of Second Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis: Comparison between the Parenteral Diamidine DB829 and Its Oral Prodrug DB868 in Vervet Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuita, John K.; Wolf, Kristina K.; Murilla, Grace A.; Bridges, Arlene S.; Boykin, David W.; Mutuku, James N.; Liu, Qiang; Jones, Susan K.; Gem, Charles O.; Ching, Shelley; Tidwell, Richard R.; Wang, Michael Z.; Paine, Mary F.; Brun, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness) ranks among the most neglected tropical diseases based on limited availability of drugs that are safe and efficacious, particularly against the second stage (central nervous system [CNS]) of infection. In response to this largely unmet need for new treatments, the Consortium for Parasitic Drug Development developed novel parenteral diamidines and corresponding oral prodrugs that have shown cure of a murine model of second stage HAT. As a rationale for selection of one of these compounds for further development, the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of intramuscular (IM) active diamidine 2,5-bis(5-amidino-2-pyridyl)furan (DB829; CPD-0802) and oral prodrug2,5-bis[5-(N-methoxyamidino)-2-pyridyl]furan (DB868) were compared in the vervet monkey model of second stage HAT. Treatment was initiated 28 days post-infection of monkeys with T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537. Results showed that IM DB829 at 5 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days, 5 mg/kg/day every other day for 5 doses, or 2.5 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days cured all monkeys (5/5). Oral DB868 was less successful, with no cures (0/2) at 3 mg/kg/day for 10 days and cure rates of 1/4 at 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days and 20 mg/kg/day for 10 days; in total, only 2/10 monkeys were cured with DB868 dose regimens. The geometric mean plasma Cmax of IM DB829 at 5 mg/kg following the last of 5 doses was 25-fold greater than that after 10 daily oral doses of DB868 at 20 mg/kg. These data suggest that the active diamidine DB829, administered IM, should be considered for further development as a potential new treatment for second stage HAT. PMID:25654243

  6. Chemotherapy of second stage human African trypanosomiasis: comparison between the parenteral diamidine DB829 and its oral prodrug DB868 in vervet monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuita, John K; Wolf, Kristina K; Murilla, Grace A; Bridges, Arlene S; Boykin, David W; Mutuku, James N; Liu, Qiang; Jones, Susan K; Gem, Charles O; Ching, Shelley; Tidwell, Richard R; Wang, Michael Z; Paine, Mary F; Brun, Reto

    2015-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, sleeping sickness) ranks among the most neglected tropical diseases based on limited availability of drugs that are safe and efficacious, particularly against the second stage (central nervous system [CNS]) of infection. In response to this largely unmet need for new treatments, the Consortium for Parasitic Drug Development developed novel parenteral diamidines and corresponding oral prodrugs that have shown cure of a murine model of second stage HAT. As a rationale for selection of one of these compounds for further development, the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of intramuscular (IM) active diamidine 2,5-bis(5-amidino-2-pyridyl)furan (DB829; CPD-0802) and oral prodrug2,5-bis[5-(N-methoxyamidino)-2-pyridyl]furan (DB868) were compared in the vervet monkey model of second stage HAT. Treatment was initiated 28 days post-infection of monkeys with T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537. Results showed that IM DB829 at 5 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days, 5 mg/kg/day every other day for 5 doses, or 2.5 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days cured all monkeys (5/5). Oral DB868 was less successful, with no cures (0/2) at 3 mg/kg/day for 10 days and cure rates of 1/4 at 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days and 20 mg/kg/day for 10 days; in total, only 2/10 monkeys were cured with DB868 dose regimens. The geometric mean plasma Cmax of IM DB829 at 5 mg/kg following the last of 5 doses was 25-fold greater than that after 10 daily oral doses of DB868 at 20 mg/kg. These data suggest that the active diamidine DB829, administered IM, should be considered for further development as a potential new treatment for second stage HAT.

  7. Combining active-space coupled-cluster methods with moment energy corrections via the CC(P;Q) methodology, with benchmark calculations for biradical transition states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jun; Piecuch, Piotr

    2012-04-14

    We have recently suggested the CC(P;Q) methodology that can correct energies obtained in the active-space coupled-cluster (CC) or equation-of-motion (EOM) CC calculations, which recover much of the nondynamical and some dynamical electron correlation effects, for the higher-order, mostly dynamical, correlations missing in the active-space CC/EOMCC considerations. It is shown that one can greatly improve the description of biradical transition states, both in terms of the resulting energy barriers and total energies, by combining the CC approach with singles, doubles, and active-space triples, termed CCSDt, with the CC(P;Q)-style correction due to missing triple excitations defining the CC(t;3) approximation.

  8. A Tutorial in Creating Web-Enabled Databases with Inmagic DB/TextWorks through ODBC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    Explains how to create Web-enabled databases. Highlights include Inmagic's DB/Text WebPublisher product called DB/TextWorks; ODBC (Open Database Connectivity) drivers; Perl programming language; HTML coding; Structured Query Language (SQL); Common Gateway Interface (CGI) programming; and examples of HTML pages and Perl scripts. (LRW)

  9. Update History of This Database - MicrobeDB.jp | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us MicrobeDB.jp Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/06/29 Archive V2 is r...ion Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - MicrobeDB.jp | LSDB Archive ...

  10. Update History of This Database - Dicty_cDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us Dicty_cDB Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2015/01/09 The original websi...ase Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - Dicty_cDB | LSDB Archive ...

  11. Ontology - MicrobeDB.jp | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us MicrobeDB.jp Ontology Data detail Data name Ontology DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc01181-004.V002 V...atabase Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Ontology - MicrobeDB.jp | LSDB Archive ...

  12. Transformasi Skema Basis Data Relasional Menjadi Model Data Berorientasi Dokumen pada MongoDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gede Winaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MongoDB is a database that uses document-oriented data storage models. In fact, to  migrate from a relational database to NoSQL databases such as MongoDB is not an easy matter especially if the data are extremely complex. Based on the documentation that has been done by several global companies related to the use of MongoDB, it can be concluded that the process of migration from RDBMS to MongoDB require quite a long time. One process that takes quite a lot is transformation of relational database schema into a document-oriented data model on MongoDB.             This research discusses the development transformation system of relational database schema to the document oriented data model in MongoDB. The process of transformation is done by utilizing the structure and relationships between tables in the scheme as the main parameters of the modeling algorithm. In the process of the modeling documents, it necessary to adjustments the specifications of MongoDB document that formed document model can be implemented in MongoDB.             Document models are formed from transformation process can be a single document, embedded document, referenced document or combination of these. Document models are formed depending on the type, rules, and the value of the relationships cardinality between tables in the relational database schema.

  13. Ortholog - MicrobeDB.jp | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us MicrobeDB.jp Ortholog Data detail Data name Ortholog DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc01181-010.V002 V...814 triples - About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Ortholog - MicrobeDB.jp | LSDB Archive ...

  14. Taxon (Viridiplantae) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Taxon (Viridiplantae) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive ... ...List Contact us PGDBj - Ortholog DB Taxon (Viridiplantae) Data detail Data name Taxon (Viridiplantae) DOI 10...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data

  15. Download - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

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    Full Text Available e Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Download - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive ... ...List Contact us PGDBj - Ortholog DB Download First of all, please read the license of this database. Data na...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

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  17. Taxon (Cyanobacteria) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ase Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Protein (Viridiplantae) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive ... ...List Contact us PGDBj - Ortholog DB Protein (Viridiplantae) Data detail Data name Protein (Viridiplantae) DO...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data

  19. Advances in Measuring Culturally Competent Care: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of CAHPS-CC in a Safety-net Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, RJ; Fernandez, A; Jacobs, EA; Neilands, TB; Weech-Maldonado, R; Quan, J; Carle, A; Seligman, HK

    2012-01-01

    Background Providing culturally competent care shows promise as a mechanism to reduce healthcare inequalities. Until the recent development of the CAHPS Cultural Competency Item Set (CAHPS-CC), no measures capturing patient-level experiences with culturally competent care have been suitable for broad-scale administration. Methods We performed confirmatory factor analysis and internal consistency reliability analysis of CAHPS-CC among patients with type 2 diabetes (n=600) receiving primary care in safety-net clinics. CAHPS-CC domains were also correlated with global physician ratings. Results A 7-factor model demonstrated satisfactory fit (χ2(231)=484.34, p<.0001) with significant factor loadings at p<.05. Three domains showed excellent reliability – Doctor Communication- Positive Behaviors (α=.82), Trust (α=.77), and Doctor Communication- Health Promotion (α=.72). Four domains showed inadequate reliability either among Spanish speakers or overall (overall reliabilities listed): Doctor Communication- Negative Behaviors (α=.54), Equitable Treatment (α=.69), Doctor Communication- Alternative Medicine (α=.52), and Shared Decision-Making (α=.51). CAHPS-CC domains were positively and significantly correlated with global physician rating. Conclusions Select CAHPS-CC domains are suitable for broad-scale administration among safety-net patients. Those domains may be used to target quality-improvement efforts focused on providing culturally competent care in safety-net settings. PMID:22895231

  20. Molecular characterization of a prevalent ribocluster of methicillin-sensitiveStaphylococcus aureus from orthopedic implant infections. Correspondencewith MLST CC30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio eMontanaro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTStaphylococcus aureus is the leading etiologic agent of orthopedic implant infections. Here a ribocluster of 27 S. aureus strains underwent further molecular characterization and subtyping by multilocus sequence typing (MLST and spa-typing. This cluster had been detected by automated ribotyping (with EcoRI as restriction enzyme of 200 S. aureus isolates from periprosthetic infections come for revision at the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute. The ribocluster, consisting of agr type III isolates, with a 74% co-presence of bone sialoprotein-binding (bbp and collagen-binding (cna genes, turned out devoid of mecA and IS256 and exhibited a high prevalence of toxic shock syndrome toxin gene (tst, 85%. Sequences achieved by spa typing and MLST were analyzed by BURP and goeBURST. Two predominant spa types, t012 (32% and t021 (36%, and one predominant sequence type, ST30 (18/27, 67%, a Staphylococcus aureus lineage spread worldwide and regarded as the ancestor of MLST CC30, were identified. Two new sequence types (ST2954, ST2960 and one new spa type (t13129 were detected for the first time. BURP clustered the isolates into two spa clonal complexes, CC021/012 (22/27, 81% and CC166 (4/27, 15%, plus one singleton, while goeBURST recognized solely MLST CC30. Interestingly, the 27-strains cluster detected by ribotyping corresponded exactly to CC30.

  1. Predominant Dissemination of PVL-Negative CC89 MRSA with SCCmec Type II in Children with Impetigo in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kikuta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The ratio of CA-MRSA in children with impetigo has been increasing in Japan. Methods. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of 136 S. aureus isolates from children with impetigo were studied. Furthermore, molecular epidemiological analysis and virulence gene analysis were performed. Results. Of the 136 S. aureus isolates, 122 (89.7% were MSSA and 14 (10.3% were MRSA. Of the 14 MRSA strains, 11 belonged to CC89 (ST89, ST91, and ST2117 and carried diverse types of SCCmec: type II (IIb: 3 strains; unknown subtype: 4 strains, type IVa (2 strains, and unknown type (2 strains. The remaining three strains exhibited CC8 (ST-8-SCCmec type VIa, CC121 (ST121-SCCmec type V, and CC5 (ST5-nontypeable SCCmec element, respectively. None were lukS-PV-lukF-PV gene positive. Gentamicin- and clarithromycin-resistant strains were frequently found in both MRSA and MSSA. Conclusions. PVL-negative CC89-SCCmec type II strains are the most predominant strains among the CA-MRSA strains circulating in the community in Japan.

  2. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) annual technical report, fiscal year 1984 with fiscal year 1985 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1985-07-01

    The Department of Energy funded about 374 million dollars of materials science and technology activities in both fiscal years 1984 and 1985. These funds and the commensurate program management responsibilities resided in 21 DOE program offices, each of which has its own mission and responsibilities. The Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) provides a formal mechanism to insure coordinated planning and maximum programmatic effectiveness for the Department's 374 million dollar per year materials effort. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research who in turn has oversight responsibilities for proper coordination of the technical programs of the Department. In carrying out this responsibility, EMaCC hosts meetings, organizes working groups, and publishes an annual technical report. This report is mandated by the EMaCC Terms of Reference. Its purpose is to disseminate information on the DOE materials programs for more effective coordination. It describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department for FY 1984, contains funding information for FYs 1984 and 1985, and summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1985.

  3. The Clinical Study on Acupuncture Sensation in CC, CF and BV Herbal Acupuncture -The Basic Study on Placebo Herbal Acupuncture-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Jung-Chul

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was designed to find out whether NS(normal saline is able to be constituted as an appropriate control group for CC(Cervi Cornu Parvum herbal acupuncture, CF(Carthami-Flos herbal acupuncture and BV(bee venom herbal acupuncture. Methods : NS and three herbal acupuncture were inserted into Quchi(LI 11 of the subjects. After 5 minutes the subjects completed a questionnaire rating the intensity of 21 kinds of acupuncture sensation; hurting, penetrating, sharp, aching, intense, spreading, radiating, tingling, pricking, stinging, pulling, heavy, dull, numb, electric, shocking, hot, burning, cool, pulsing, and throbbing. We compared subjective evaluations of acupuncture sensation between or among the groups. Results : As for CC half items of the acupuncture sensation were significantly different from NS. As for CF all items were not significantly different from NS. As for CC all items were significantly different from NS except one item. In general the score of CF acupuncture sensation was lower than the others and the score of BV acupuncture sensation was higher than the others from comparison of sensation among herbal acupunctures(CC, CF, BV. Conclusion : We found that NS is able to be an appropriate placebo herbal acupuncture for CF. Further study is needed for new placebo herbal acupuncture for CC and BV.

  4. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) annual technical report, fiscal year 1984 with fiscal year 1985 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The Department of Energy funded about 374 million dollars of materials science and technology activities in both fiscal years 1984 and 1985. These funds and the commensurate program management responsibilities resided in 21 DOE program offices, each of which has its own mission and responsibilities. The Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) provides a formal mechanism to insure coordinated planning and maximum programmatic effectiveness for the Department's 374 million dollar per year materials effort. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research who in turn has oversight responsibilities for proper coordination of the technical programs of the Department. In carrying out this responsibility, EMaCC hosts meetings, organizes working groups, and publishes an annual technical report. This report is mandated by the EMaCC Terms of Reference. Its purpose is to disseminate information on the DOE materials programs for more effective coordination. It describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department for FY 1984, contains funding information for FYs 1984 and 1985, and summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1985

  5. Commercial Biocides Induce Transfer of Prophage Φ13 from Human Strains of Staphylococcus aureus to Livestock CC398

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyue Tang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus commonly carry the bacteriophage ΦSa3 that encodes immune evasion factors. Recently, this prophage has been found in livestock-associated, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA CC398 strains where it may promote human colonization. Here, we have addressed if exposure to biocidal products induces phage transfer, and find that during co-culture, Φ13 from strain 8325, belonging to ΦSa3 group, is induced and transferred from a human strain to LA-MRSA CC398 when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of commercial biocides containing hydrogen peroxide. Integration of ΦSa3 in LA-MRSA CC398 occurs at multiple positions and the integration site influences the stability of the prophage. We did not observe integration in hlb encoding β-hemolysin that contains the preferred ΦSa3 attachment site in human strains, and we demonstrate that this is due to allelic variation in CC398 strains that disrupts the phage attachment site, but not the expression of β-hemolysin. Our results show that hydrogen peroxide present in biocidal products stimulate transfer of ΦSa3 from human to LA-MRSA CC398 strains and that in these strains prophage stability depends on the integration site. Knowledge of ΦSa3 transfer and stability between human and livestock strains may lead to new intervention measures directed at reducing human infection by LA-MRSA strains.

  6. Quantitative GC-MS assay of citric acid from humans and db/db mice blood serum to assist the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haoxue; Yu, Xiaoyi; Sun, Runbin; Yang, Na; He, Jun; Tao, Mingxue; Gu, Huilin; Yan, Caixia; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2018-03-01

    The early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) is rather challenging. Our previous study suggested that citric acid is a potential marker for the early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy in db/db mice. For the first time, in this study, a surrogate analyte of 13 C 6 -citric acid was employed to generate calibration curves for the quantitative measurement of the endogenous citric acid in the sera of db/db mice and diabetic nephropathy patients by GC/MS after the analytes were extracted, methoximated and trimethylsilylated. The constant response factor of 13 C 6 -citric acid versus citric acid over the linear range indicated the identical ionization efficiency of these two compounds. The full validation assessments suggested that the method is sensitive, specific, reliable, reproducible and has acceptable parameters. Statistical analysis revealed cut-off citric acid concentrations of 29.24 μg/mL with a 95% confidence interval between 32.75 and 39.16 μg/mL in the diabetic nephropathy patients and 16.74 and 22.57 μg/mL in the normal controls. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves indicated accuracies of over 90% for the diagnoses of early diabetic nephropathy in both humans and db/db mice, which suggests that the serum citric acid level is potentially a biomarker that could assist in the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Extract of Litsea japonica Reduced the Development of Diabetic Nephropathy via the Inhibition of Advanced Glycation End Products Accumulation in db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunjin Sohn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that advanced glycation end products (AGEs contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of L. japonica extract (LJE against renal damage in the db/db mouse. LJE (100 or 250 mg/kg per day was given to diabetic mice for 12 weeks. Body weight, blood glucose levels, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels, and proteinuria were examined. In in vitro assay of the inhibition of AGE formation, immunohistochemical analysis of podocyte loss and AGE accumulations were performed. In 20-week-old db/db mice, severe hyperglycemia developed, and proteinuria was significantly increased. Diabetes induced markedly morphological alterations to the renal glomerular cells. AGE accumulations and podocyte loss were detected in renal glomeruli. LJE treatment significantly reduced proteinuria and AGE accumulations in diabetic mice. Moreover, the loss of nephrin, an important slit diaphragm component in the kidneys, was restored by LJE treatment. Our studies suggest that LJE might be beneficial for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. The ability of LJE to attenuate proteinuria and podocyte dysfunction may be mediated by the inhibition of AGE accumulation in the context of diabetic nephropathy in db/db mice.

  8. Serotonin- and Dopamine-Related Gene Expression in db/db Mice Islets and in MIN6 β-Cells Treated with Palmitate and Oleate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Cataldo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High circulating nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs concentration, often reported in diabetes, leads to impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS through not yet well-defined mechanisms. Serotonin and dopamine might contribute to NEFA-dependent β-cell dysfunction, since extracellular signal of these monoamines decreases GSIS. Moreover, palmitate-treated β-cells may enhance the expression of the serotonin receptor Htr2c, affecting insulin secretion. Additionally, the expression of monoamine-oxidase type B (Maob seems to be lower in islets from humans and mice with diabetes compared to nondiabetic islets, which may lead to increased monoamine concentrations. We assessed the expression of serotonin- and dopamine-related genes in islets from db/db and wild-type (WT mice. In addition, the effect of palmitate and oleate on the expression of such genes, 5HT content, and GSIS in MIN6 β-cell was determined. Lower Maob expression was found in islets from db/db versus WT mice and in MIN6 β-cells in response to palmitate and oleate treatment compared to vehicle. Reduced 5HT content and impaired GSIS in response to palmitate (−25%; p<0.0001 and oleate (−43%; p<0.0001 were detected in MIN6 β-cells. In conclusion, known defects of GSIS in islets from db/db mice and MIN6 β-cells treated with NEFAs are accompanied by reduced Maob expression and reduced 5HT content.

  9. A PPARγ, NF-κB and AMPK-dependent mechanism may be involved in the beneficial effects of curcumin in the diabetic db/db mice liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Flores, Lizbeth M; López-Briones, Sergio; Macías-Cervantes, Maciste H; Ramírez-Emiliano, Joel; Pérez-Vázquez, Victoriano

    2014-06-18

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family which has been used to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, rheumatism, cancer, sinusitis, hepatic disorders, hyperglycemia, obesity, and diabetes in both Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Suggested mechanisms of action include the modulation of signal transduction cascades and effects on gene expression, however they remain to be elucidated. In this study, the expression of some proteins responsible for transcription factors, inflammation, and metabolic control were evaluated by western blot in 15-week-old db/db mice livers treated with curcumin 0.75% mixed in their diet for 8 weeks. In addition, nitrosative stress was evaluated. Curcumin increased the expression of AMPK and PPARγ, and diminished NF-κB protein in db/db mice. However, it did not modify the expression of PGC-1α or SIRT1. Nitrosative stress present in db/db mice livers was determined by a unique nitrotyrosylated protein band (75 kDa) and was not reverted with curcumin. In conclusion, curcumin regulates the expression of AMPK, PPARγ, and NF-κB; suggesting a beneficial effect for treatment of T2DM complications. In order to observe best beneficial effects it is desirable to administer curcumin in the earlier states of T2DM.

  10. A PPARγ, NF-κB and AMPK-Dependent Mechanism May Be Involved in the Beneficial Effects of Curcumin in the Diabetic db/db Mice Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizbeth M. Jiménez-Flores

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Turmeric (Curcuma longa is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family which has been used to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, rheumatism, cancer, sinusitis, hepatic disorders, hyperglycemia, obesity, and diabetes in both Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Suggested mechanisms of action include the modulation of signal transduction cascades and effects on gene expression, however they remain to be elucidated. In this study, the expression of some proteins responsible for transcription factors, inflammation, and metabolic control were evaluated by western blot in 15-week-old db/db mice livers treated with curcumin 0.75% mixed in their diet for 8 weeks. In addition, nitrosative stress was evaluated. Curcumin increased the expression of AMPK and PPARγ, and diminished NF-κB protein in db/db mice. However, it did not modify the expression of PGC-1α or SIRT1. Nitrosative stress present in db/db mice livers was determined by a unique nitrotyrosylated protein band (75 kDa and was not reverted with curcumin. In conclusion, curcumin regulates the expression of AMPK, PPARγ, and NF-κB; suggesting a beneficial effect for treatment of T2DM complications. In order to observe best beneficial effects it is desirable to administer curcumin in the earlier states of T2DM.

  11. DB2 9 for Linux, Unix, and Windows database administration upgrade certification study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Roger E

    2007-01-01

    Written by one of the world's leading DB2 authors who is an active participant in the development of the DB2 certification exams, this resource covers everything a database adminstrator needs to know to pass the DB2 9 for Linux, UNIX, and Windows Database Administration Certification Upgrade exam (Exam 736). This comprehensive study guide discusses all exam topics: server management, data placement, XML concepts, analyzing activity, high availability, database security, and much more. Each chapter contains an extensive set of practice questions along with carefully explained answers. Both information-technology professionals who have experience as database administrators and have a current DBA certification on version 8 of DB2 and individuals who would like to learn the new features of DB2 9 will benefit from the information in this reference guide.

  12. Potential Hazards Relating to Pyrolysis of c-C4F8O, n-C4F10 and c-C4F8 in selected gaseous diffusion plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    As part of a program intended to replace the present evaporative coolant at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) with a non-ozone-depleting alternate, a series of investigations of the suitability of candidate substitutes is under way. This report summarizes studies directed at estimating the chemical and thermal stability of three candidate coolants, c-C 4 F 8 O, n-C 4 F 10 and c-C 4 4F 8 , in a few specific environments to be found in gaseous diffusion plant operations

  13. IntegromeDB: an integrated system and biological search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitaluk, Michael; Kozhenkov, Sergey; Dubinina, Yulia; Ponomarenko, Julia

    2012-01-19

    With the growth of biological data in volume and heterogeneity, web search engines become key tools for researchers. However, general-purpose search engines are not specialized for the search of biological data. Here, we present an approach at developing a biological web search engine based on the Semantic Web technologies and demonstrate its implementation for retrieving gene- and protein-centered knowledge. The engine is available at http://www.integromedb.org. The IntegromeDB search engine allows scanning data on gene regulation, gene expression, protein-protein interactions, pathways, metagenomics, mutations, diseases, and other gene- and protein-related data that are automatically retrieved from publicly available databases and web pages using biological ontologies. To perfect the resource design and usability, we welcome and encourage community feedback.

  14. Doubling the number of pulsating DB white dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Atsuko; Kleinman, S J; Krzenski, J; Kepler, S O; Metcalfe, T S; Mukadam, Anjum S; Mullally, F; Nather, R E; Winget, D E; Sullivan, D; Thompson, Susan E

    2009-01-01

    We are searching for new pulsating DB white dwarf stars (DBVs) based on the newly found white dwarf stars from the spectra obtained by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. DBVs pulsate at hotter temperature ranges than their better known cousins, DAVs or ZZ Ceti stars. Since the evolution of white dwarf stars is characterized by cooling, asteroseismological studies of DBVs give us opportunities to study white dwarf structure at a different evolutionary stage than the DAVs. The hottest DBVs are thought to have neutrino luminosities exceeding their photon luminosities (Winget et al. 2004), a quantity measurable through asteroseismology. Therefore, they can also be used to study neutrino physics in the stellar interior. At the time of the meeting, we reported on the nine new DBVs, doubling the number of previously known DBVs. Here we report the new nine pulsators' lightcurves and power spectra.

  15. Scientific Data Bases at Scale and SciDB

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: As a general rule, scientists have shunned relational data management systems (RDBMS), choosing instead to “roll their own” on top of file system technology.  We first discuss why file systems are a poor choice for science data storage, especially as data volumes become large and scalability becomes important.   Then, we continue with the reasons why RDBMSs work poorly on most science applications.  These include a data model “impedance mismatch” and missing features. We discuss array DBMSs, and why they are a much better choice for science applications, and use SciDB as an exemplar of this new class of DBMSs.   Most science applications require a mix of data management and complex analytics.  In most cases, the analytics entail a sequence of linear algebra computations.  We discuss the possible ways of integrating a DBMS with statistical calculations, and conclude with the mechanism being used by S...

  16. Evaluation of Effects of Chinese Prescription Kangen-karyu on Diabetes-Induced Alterations such as Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in the Liver of Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Hum Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to examine whether Kangen-karyu has an ameliorative effect on diabetes-induced alterations such as oxidative stress and apoptosis in the liver of type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Kangen-karyu (100 or 200 mg/kg body weight/day, p.o. was administered every day for 18 weeks to db/db mice and its effect was compared with vehicle-treated db/db and m/m mice. The administration of Kangen-karyu decreased the elevated serum glucose and leptin concentrations in db/db mice, and reduced the increased oxidative biomarkers including the generation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation in the liver. The db/db mice exhibited the upregulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits, NF-E2-related factor 2, heme oxygenase-1, nuclear factor-kappa B, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the liver; however, Kangen-karyu treatment significantly reduced those expressions. Moreover, the augmented expressions of apoptosis-related proteins, Bax, cytochrome c, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, phosphor-JNK, AP-1, and caspase-3, were downregulated by Kangen-karyu administration. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that the increased hepatocellular damage in the liver of db/db mice improved by Kangen-karyu administration. Our findings support the therapeutic evidence for Kangen-karyu ameliorating the development of diabetic hepatic complications via regulating oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  17. SoyDB: a knowledge database of soybean transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valliyodan Babu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors play the crucial rule of regulating gene expression and influence almost all biological processes. Systematically identifying and annotating transcription factors can greatly aid further understanding their functions and mechanisms. In this article, we present SoyDB, a user friendly database containing comprehensive knowledge of soybean transcription factors. Description The soybean genome was recently sequenced by the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI and is publicly available. Mining of this sequence identified 5,671 soybean genes as putative transcription factors. These genes were comprehensively annotated as an aid to the soybean research community. We developed SoyDB - a knowledge database for all the transcription factors in the soybean genome. The database contains protein sequences, predicted tertiary structures, putative DNA binding sites, domains, homologous templates in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, protein family classifications, multiple sequence alignments, consensus protein sequence motifs, web logo of each family, and web links to the soybean transcription factor database PlantTFDB, known EST sequences, and other general protein databases including Swiss-Prot, Gene Ontology, KEGG, EMBL, TAIR, InterPro, SMART, PROSITE, NCBI, and Pfam. The database can be accessed via an interactive and convenient web server, which supports full-text search, PSI-BLAST sequence search, database browsing by protein family, and automatic classification of a new protein sequence into one of 64 annotated transcription factor families by hidden Markov models. Conclusions A comprehensive soybean transcription factor database was constructed and made publicly accessible at http://casp.rnet.missouri.edu/soydb/.

  18. MiR-138 promotes smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration in db/db mice through down-regulation of SIRT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Juan [Department of Gynecology, Changzhou Maternity and Children Health Hospital, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213003 (China); Li, Li; Yun, Hui-fang [Department of Anesthesiology, Changzhou No. 2 People' s Hospital, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213003 (China); Han, Ye-shan, E-mail: yeshanhan123@163.com [Department of Anesthesiology, Changzhou No. 2 People' s Hospital, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213003 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Background: Diabetic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exhibit significantly increased rates of proliferation and migration, which was the most common pathological change in atherosclerosis. In addition, the study about the role for miRNAs in the regulation of VSMC proliferation is just beginning to emerge and additional miRNAs involved in VSMC proliferation modulation should be identified. Methods: The expression of miR-138 and SIRT1 were examined in SMCs separated from db/db mice and in SMC lines C-12511 exposed to high glucose with qRT-PCR and western blot. The regulation of miR-138 on the expression of SMCs was detected with luciferase report assay. VSMCs proliferation and migration assays were performed to examine the effect of miR-138 inhibitor on VSMCs proliferation and migration. Results: We discovered that higher mRNA level of miR-138 and reduced expression of SIRT1 were observed in SMCs separated from db/db mice and in SMC lines C-12511. Moreover, luciferase report assay showed that the activity of SIRT1 3′-UTR was highly increased by miR-138 inhibitor and reduced by miR-138 mimic. In addition, we examined that the up-regulation of NF-κB induced by high glucose in SMCs was reversed by resveratrol and miR-138 inhibitor. MTT and migration assays showed that miR-138 inhibitor attenuated the proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells. Conclusion: In this study, we revealed that miR-138 might promote proliferation and migration of SMC in db/db mice through suppressing the expression of SIRT1. - Highlights: • Higher mRNA level of miR-138 was observed in SMCs from db/db mice. • The mRNA and protein level of SIRT1 in SMCs from db/db mice were greatly reduced. • miR-138 could regulate the expression of SIRT1 in SMCs. • SIRT1 overexpression reversed the up-regulation of acetylized p65 and NF-κB induced by high glucose. • MiR-138 inhibitor reversed VSMCs proliferation and migration induced by high glucose.

  19. Radiation dose to the operator during vertebroplasty: prospective comparison of the use of 1-cc syringes versus an injection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallmes, David F; O, Erwin; Roy, Soma Sinha; Piccolo, Richard G; Marx, William F; Lee, Jae K; Jensen, Mary E

    2003-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty procedures require relatively long durations of fluoroscopic guidance, which might lead to substantial radiation dose to operators. Specialized injection devices have been proposed to limit operator exposure. Our purpose was to compare the radiation dose to the operator's hands during vertebroplasty when using 1-cc syringes versus that when using an injection device. Radiation dosimeters were worn on the left wrist during 39 vertebroplasty injection procedures in 25 patients. Cases were alternated between the use of 1-cc syringes (19 procedures) and the use of an injection device (20 procedures). For each procedure, one dosimeter was worn throughout the procedure, both during needle placement and injection, and a second dosimeter was worn during the injection phase only. Mean doses for the whole case and mean doses for the injection procedure alone were compared between groups. Mean whole case dose was 128 +/- 161 mrem (range, 0-660 mrem) for the 1-cc syringe group versus 98 +/- 90 mrem (range, 0-340 mrem) for the injection device group (P =.23). Mean dose during injection was 100 +/- 145 mrem (range, 0-660 mrem) for the 1-cc syringe group versus 55 +/- 43 mrem (range, 0-130 mrem) for the injection device group (P =.09). Three of 19 1-cc syringe cases yielded zero dose, compared with four of 20 injection device cases. Duration of injection was markedly different between groups, with mean injection times of 4.2 and 7.5 min for 1-cc syringe and injection device cases, respectively (P device groups, respectively (P =.002). The use of an injection device significantly decreased the radiation dose to the operator's extremity per unit time of injection. However, total dose per injection was equivalent between groups because of significantly longer injection duration for the injection device cohort.

  20. Impact of bacteriophage Saint3 carriage on the immune evasion capacity and hemolytic potential of Staphylococcus aureus CC398.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Philipp; Abdelbary, Mohamed M H; Kraushaar, Britta; Fetsch, Alexandra; Geisel, Jürgen; Herrmann, Mathias; Witte, Wolfgang; Cuny, Christiane; Bischoff, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of clonal complex 398 (CC398) are frequently found in Europe, and recent studies highlighted the importance of mobile genetic element (MGE) exchange for host adaptation of this lineage. Of note, one of the MGEs commonly found in human S. aureus isolates, the immune evasion cluster (IEC) harboring bacteriophage Saint3, is very rarely found in LA-MRSA CC398 isolates obtained from farm animals, but more frequently found in LA-MRSA CC398 that were retransmitted to humans. Here, we analyzed with a set of S. aureus CC398 isolates harboring/lacking φSaint3 how this MGE affects (i) phagocytosis of CC398 isolates by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), and (ii) hemolysis of human and livestock-derived erythrocytes. Isolates lacking φSaint3 were more efficiently phagocytosed by human PMNs in whole blood phagocytosis assays than isolates harboring this bacteriophage, irrespective of their origin. Notably, a similar effect was observed when equine blood was utilized, but not detected with porcine blood. Integration of φSaint3 into LA-MRSA CC398 strains lacking this MGE confirmed these findings, as φSaint3-harboring recipients were again less efficiently ingested by PMNs in equine and human blood than their parental strains. Integration of φSaint3 strongly reduced the hemolytic potential of the culture supernatants against human-derived erythrocytes, and to a smaller extent also against porcine-derived erythrocytes, while φSaint3 integration only slightly affected the hemolytic capacities against equine-derived red blood cells. The significant protective effect of φSaint3 against phagocytosis by equine PMNs suggests that the host specificity of the IEC components might be broader than currently assumed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cytosolic activation of cell death and stem rust resistance by cereal MLA-family CC-NLR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, Stella; Moore, John; Chen, Chunhong; Webb, Daryl; Periyannan, Sambasivam; Mago, Rohit; Bernoux, Maud; Lagudah, Evans S; Dodds, Peter N

    2016-09-06

    Plants possess intracellular immune receptors designated "nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat" (NLR) proteins that translate pathogen-specific recognition into disease-resistance signaling. The wheat immune receptors Sr33 and Sr50 belong to the class of coiled-coil (CC) NLRs. They confer resistance against a broad spectrum of field isolates of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, including the Ug99 lineage, and are homologs of the barley powdery mildew-resistance protein MLA10. Here, we show that, similarly to MLA10, the Sr33 and Sr50 CC domains are sufficient to induce cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana Autoactive CC domains and full-length Sr33 and Sr50 proteins self-associate in planta In contrast, truncated CC domains equivalent in size to an MLA10 fragment for which a crystal structure was previously determined fail to induce cell death and do not self-associate. Mutations in the truncated region also abolish self-association and cell-death signaling. Analysis of Sr33 and Sr50 CC domains fused to YFP and either nuclear localization or nuclear export signals in N benthamiana showed that cell-death induction occurs in the cytosol. In stable transgenic wheat plants, full-length Sr33 proteins targeted to the cytosol provided rust resistance, whereas nuclear-targeted Sr33 was not functional. These data are consistent with CC-mediated induction of both cell-death signaling and stem rust resistance in the cytosolic compartment, whereas previous research had suggested that MLA10-mediated cell-death and disease resistance signaling occur independently, in the cytosol and nucleus, respectively.

  2. Impairment of endothelium-dependent ACh-induced relaxation in aorta of diabetic db/db mice--possible dysfunction of receptor and/or receptor-G protein coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miike, Tomohiro; Kunishiro, Kazuyoshi; Kanda, Mamoru; Azukizawa, Satoru; Kurahashi, Kazuyoshi; Shirahase, Hiroaki

    2008-06-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor of ischemic heart disease, cerebral ischemia, and atherosclerosis, in which endothelial dysfunction plays a role in the pathogenesis. We examined vascular responses in the aorta of pre-diabetic db/db mice with normoglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperinsulinemia (6 weeks old), and diabetic db/db mice with hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hyperinsulinemia (11 weeks old) in comparison with age-matched non-diabetic db/+ mice. Prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha)-induced contraction was significantly enhanced in the aorta of diabetic but not pre-diabetic db/db mice compared to age-matched non-diabetic db/+ mice. Acetylcholine (ACh), adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP), NaF, a G protein activator and A-23187, a Ca-ionophore, caused endothelium-dependent and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated relaxation, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, caused endothelium-independent relaxation in the pre-contracted aorta of db/db mice. Maximal endothelium-dependent ACh-induced relaxation was reduced in diabetic but not pre-diabetic db/db mice compared to age-matched db/+ mice, while maximal SNP-induced relaxation was not different between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. ACh-induced relaxation in diabetic db/db mice was not affected by ozagrel, a thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthetase inhibitor, or acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, suggesting no involvement of endogenous TXA2 or prostanoids in the reduction of relaxation. Maximal endothelium-dependent ADP-, A-23187-, and NaF-induced relaxation was not reduced in diabetic db/db mice. EC50 values for ACh- and SNP-induced relaxation were increased in diabetic but not pre-diabetic db/db mice, suggesting decreases in sensitivity to NO in diabetic mice. Two-week treatment with KV-5070, a PPARgamma agonist, lowered plasma glucose, triglyceride (TG), and insulin but not cholesterol, and reversed the reduced ACh-induced relaxation. In conclusion, ACh-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation is impaired

  3. Recognition and repair of the CC-1065-(N3-Adenine)-DNA adduct by the UVRABC nuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, M.; Lee, C.S.; Doisy, R.; Ross, L.; Needham-VanDevanter, D.R.; Hurley, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    The recognition and repair of the helix-stabilizing and relatively nondistortive CC-1065-(N3-adenine)-DNA adduct by UVRABC nuclease has been investigated both in vivo with phi X174RFI DNA by a transfection assay and in vitro by a site-directed adduct in a 117 base pair fragment from M13mp1. CC-1065 is a potent antitumor antibiotic produced by Streptomyces zelensis which binds within the minor groove of DNA through N3 of adenine. In contrast to the helix-destabilizing and distortive modifications of DNA caused by ultraviolet light or N-acetoxy-2-(acetylamino)fluorene, CC-1065 increases the melting point of DNA and decreases the S1 nuclease activity. Using a viral DNA-Escherichia coli transfection system, the authors have found that the uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC genes, which code for the major excision repair proteins for UV- and NAAAF-induced DNA damage, are also involved in the repair of CC-1065-DNA adducts. In contrast, the uvrD gene product, which has been found to be involved in the repair of UV damage, has no effect in repairing CC-1065-DNA adducts. Purified UVRA, UVRB, and UVRC proteins must work in concert to incise the drug-modified phi X174RFI DNA. Using a site-directed and multiple CC-1065 modified (MspI-BstNI) 117 base pair fragment from M13mp1, they have found that UVRABC nuclease incises at the eight phosphodiester bond on the 5' side of the CC-1065-DNA adduct on the drug-modified strand. The enzymes do not cut the noncovalently modified strand. The DNA sequence and/or helix-stabilizing effect of multiple adducts may determine the recognition and/or incision of the drug-DNA adduct by UVRABC nuclease. These results are discussed in relation to the structure of the CC-1065-DNA adduct and the effect of drug binding on local DNA structure

  4. Phosphodiesterase activity is regulated by CC2D1A that is implicated in non-syndromic intellectual disability

    KAUST Repository

    Altawashi, Azza

    2013-07-04

    Background: Cyclic adenosine 3?5?-monophosphate (cAMP) is a key regulator of many cellular processes, including in the neuronal system, and its activity is tuned by Phosphodiesterase (PDE) activation. Further, the CC2D1A protein, consisting of N-Terminal containing four DM14 domains and C-terminal containing C2 domain, was shown to regulate the cAMP-PKA pathway. A human deletion mutation lacking the fourth DM14 and the adjacent C2 domain results in Non Syndromic Intellectual Disability (NSID) also referred to as Non Syndromic Mental Retardation (NSMR). Findings. Here we demonstrate that in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts (MEF) CC2D1A co-localizes with PDE4D in the cytosol before cAMP stimulation and on the periphery after stimulation, and that the movement to the periphery requires the full-length CC2D1A. In CC2D1A mouse mutant cells, the absence of three of the four DM14 domains abolishes migration of the complex to the periphery and causes constitutive phosphorylation of PDE4D Serine 126 (Sssup126esup) via the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) resulting in PDE4D hyperactivity. Suppressing PDE4D activity with Rolipram in turn restores the down-stream phosphorylation of the "cAMP response element-binding protein" (CREB) that is defective in mouse mutant cells. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CC2D1A is a novel regulator of PDE4D. CC2D1A interacts directly with PDE4D regulating its activity and thereby fine-tuning cAMP-dependent downstream signaling. Based on our in vitro evidence we propose a model which links CC2D1A structure and function to cAMP homeostasis thereby affecting CREB phosphorylation. We speculate that CC2D1A and/or PDE4D may be promising targets for therapeutic interventions in many disorders with impaired PDE4D function such as NSID. 2013 Al-Tawashi and Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  5. C/C composites for rocket chamber applications. Part 2: Fabrication and evaluation tests of rocket chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masahiro; Tadano, Makoto; Ueda, Shuichi; Kuroda, Yukio; Kusaka, Kazuo; Suemitsu, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Kude, Yukinori

    1995-05-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon matrix (C/C) composites coated with SiC are promising candidates for use in the main structural materials of the body of spaceplanes and combustion chambers of rocket engines, because of their superior properties of high specific strength, specific modulus, and fracture strength at high temperatures. However, C/C composite has poor resistance to oxidation, and protection from the oxidating environment is crucial. Conventional C/C composites for use in the high-temperature components of rocket engines are coated with SiC. However, due to the difference in the thermal expansion rates of the SiC coating layer and the base materials, cracks occur in the SiC coating layer during the coating process, and oxygen diffuses to the base material through the cracks during repeated temperature cycling in the rocket combustion environment. To protect the base materials from oxidation at high temperatures, we have employed SiC C/C-coated composites with a modified matrix and also developed SiC C/C functionally gradient materials (FGM's). In this test series, three kinds of combustion chambers were constructed for the Reaction Control System (RCS) subscale engine of H-II Orbiting Plane (HOPE): (1) Conventional C/C composites, (2) SiC C/C-coated composites with a modified matrix, and (3) SiC C/C FGM's. Firing tests were performed at sea level at a temperature around 2000 K using nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) propellant to evaluate the durability of these chambers. This test series showed that conventional C/C composite developed no microcracks and delamination in the coating layer at 1940 K. Modified matrix C/C composite also did not suffer microcracks and delamination at the boundary between the SiC and the base materials when the inner surface temperature was 1875 K. However, microcracks were observed at injector flange surface after these test cycles. In the test series of FGM's chamber, it was shown that coating with FGM

  6. Pd(II)-catalyzed ortho-hydroxylation and intramolecular oxidative C-C coupling of N- benzylbenzene sulfonamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Eun Joo; Jo, Yoon Hyung; Jang, Min Jung; Youn, So Won [Dept. of Chemistry and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Center for New Directions in Organic Synthesis, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    We reported highly effective Pd-catalyzed C-C and/or C-N bond formations via C-H activation of aniline derivatives. Considering the lack of regioselective C(sp{sup 2}) H hydroxylation of benzylamines, our continued interest in Pd-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization prompted us to investigate the possibility of a Pd-catalyzed ortho-hydroxylation of NH-containing benzylamines. We have developed the Pd-catalyzed ortho-hydroxylation and/or intramolecular oxidative C-C coupling of N-benzyl sulfonamides, which operate through two different postulated mechanistic routes, as depicted in Scheme 2, depending on the reaction conditions.

  7. Oxygen blast furnace and combined cycle (OBF-CC) - an efficient iron-making and power generation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianwei, Y.; Guolong, S.; Cunjiang, K.; Tianjun, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A new iron and power generating process, oxygen blast furnace and combined cycle (OBF-CC), is presented. In order to support the opinion, the features of the oxygen blast furnace and integrated coal gasification and combined cycle (IGCC) are summarized. The relation between the blasting parameters and the output gas quantity, as well as caloric value is calculated based on mass and energy balance. Analysis and calculation indicate that the OBF-CC will be an efficient iron-making and power generation process with higher energy efficiency and less pollution

  8. CC8 MRSA Strains Harboring SCCmec Type IVc are Predominant in Colombian Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, J. Natalia; Ocampo, Ana M.; Vanegas, Johanna M.; Rodriguez, Erika A.; Mediavilla, José R.; Chen, Liang; Muskus, Carlos E.; A. Vélez, Lázaro; Rojas, Carlos; Restrepo, Andrea V.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Garcés, Carlos; Franco, Liliana; Bifani, Pablo; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Correa, Margarita M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent reports highlight the incursion of community-associated MRSA within healthcare settings. However, knowledge of this phenomenon remains limited in Latin America. The aim of this study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of MRSA in three tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted from 2008–2010. MRSA infections were classified as either community-associated (CA-MRSA) or healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA), with HA-MRSA further classified as hospital-onset (HAHO-MRSA) or community-onset (HACO-MRSA) according to standard epidemiological definitions established by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Genotypic analysis included SCCmec typing, spa typing, PFGE and MLST. Results Out of 538 total MRSA isolates, 68 (12.6%) were defined as CA-MRSA, 243 (45.2%) as HACO-MRSA and 227 (42.2%) as HAHO-MRSA. The majority harbored SCCmec type IVc (306, 58.7%), followed by SCCmec type I (174, 33.4%). The prevalence of type IVc among CA-, HACO- and HAHO-MRSA isolates was 92.4%, 65.1% and 43.6%, respectively. From 2008 to 2010, the prevalence of type IVc-bearing strains increased significantly, from 50.0% to 68.2% (p = 0.004). Strains harboring SCCmec IVc were mainly associated with spa types t1610, t008 and t024 (MLST clonal complex 8), while PFGE confirmed that the t008 and t1610 strains were closely related to the USA300-0114 CA-MRSA clone. Notably, strains belonging to these three spa types exhibited high levels of tetracycline resistance (45.9%). Conclusion CC8 MRSA strains harboring SCCmec type IVc are becoming predominant in Medellín hospitals, displacing previously reported CC5 HA-MRSA clones. Based on shared characteristics including SCCmec IVc, absence of the ACME element and tetracycline resistance, the USA300-related isolates in this study are most likely related to USA300-LV, the recently-described ‘Latin American variant’ of USA300. PMID:22745670

  9. Past and future of the Austrian snow cover - results from the CC-Snow project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Ulrich; Marke, Thomas; Hanzer, Florian; Ragg, Hansjörg; Kleindienst, Hannes; Wilcke, Renate; Gobiet, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    relevant for technical snow production. Using an empirical snow production strategy as applied by practitioners, AMUNDSEN is used to estimate the costs of compensating the effect of climate change on the natural snow cover by tracking the consumption of water and energy to maintain good skiing conditions all over the winter seasen. At both scales we make an attempt to validate the simulations with observed recordings of the snow height and snow coverage. The presented outcomes represent the final results of the CC-Snow project which was funded by ACRP (Austrian Climate Research Programme). These results are used to support the investigation of the effects of the future snow conditions on tourism and economy in the two regions in the follow-up project CC-Snow II.

  10. Influences of obese (ob/ob and diabetes (db/db genotype mutations on lumber vertebral radiological and morphometric indices: Skeletal deformation associated with dysregulated systemic glucometabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garris David R

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both diabetes and obesity syndromes are recognized to promote lumbar vertebral instability, premature osteodegeneration, exacerbate progressive osteoporosis and increase the propensity towards vertebral degeneration, instability and deformation in humans. Methods The influences of single-gene missense mutations, expressing either diabetes (db/db or obese (ob/ob metabolic syndromes on vertebral maturation and development in C57BL/KsJ mice were evaluated by radiological and macro-morphometric analysis of the resulting variances in osteodevelopment indices relative to control parameters between 8 and 16 weeks of age (syndrome onset @ 4 weeks, and the influences of low-dose 17-B-estradiol therapy on vertebral growth expression evaluated. Results Associated with the indicative genotypic obesity and hyper-glycemic/-insulinemic states, both db/db and ob/ob mutants demonstrated a significant (P ≤ 0.05 elongation of total lumbar vertebrae column (VC regional length, and individual lumbar vertebrae (LV1-5 lengths, relative to control VC and LV parameters. In contrast, LV1-5 width indices were suppressed in db/db and ob/ob mutants relative to control LV growth rates. Between 8 and 16 weeks of age, the suppressed LV1-5 width indices were sustained in both genotype mutant groups relative to control osteomaturation rates. The severity of LV1-5 width osteosuppression correlated with the severe systemic hyperglycemic and hypertriglyceridemic conditions sustained in ob/ob and db/db mutants. Low-dose 17-B-estradiol therapy (E2-HRx: 1.0 ug/ 0.1 ml oil s.c/3.5 days, initiated at 4 weeks of age (i.e., initial onset phase of db/db and ob/ob expressions re-established control LV 1–5 width indices without influencing VC or LV lengths in db/db groups. Conclusion These data demonstrate that the abnormal systemic endometabolic states associated with the expression of db/db and ob/ob genomutation syndromes suppress LV 1–5 width osteomaturation

  11. Similarity transformed coupled cluster response (ST-CCR) theory--a time-dependent similarity transformed equation-of-motion coupled cluster (STEOM-CC) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Arie

    2013-07-07

    This paper presents a new method for calculating spectroscopic properties in the framework of response theory utilizing a sequence of similarity transformations (STs). The STs are preformed using the coupled cluster (CC) and Fock-space coupled cluster operators. The linear and quadratic response functions of the new similarity transformed CC response (ST-CCR) method are derived. The poles of the linear response yield excitation-energy (EE) expressions identical to the ones in the similarity transformed equation-of-motion coupled cluster (STEOM-CC) approach. ST-CCR and STEOM-CC complement each other, in analogy to the complementarity of CC response (CCR) and equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOM-CC). ST-CCR/STEOM-CC and CCR/EOM-CC yield size-extensive and size-intensive EEs, respectively. Other electronic-properties, e.g., transition dipole strengths, are also size-extensive within ST-CCR, in contrast to STEOM-CC. Moreover, analysis suggests that in comparison with CCR, the ST-CCR expressions may be confined to a smaller subspace, however, the precise scope of the truncation can only be determined numerically. In addition, reformulation of the time-independent STEOM-CC using the same parameterization as in ST-CCR, as well as an efficient truncation scheme, is presented. The shown convergence of the time-dependent and time-independent expressions displays the completeness of the presented formalism.

  12. First report of a thioredoxin homologue in jellyfish: molecular cloning, expression and antioxidant activity of CcTrx1 from Cyanea capillata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Ruan

    Full Text Available Thioredoxins (Trx proteins are a family of small, highly-conserved and ubiquitous proteins that play significant roles in the resistance of oxidative damage. In this study, a homologue of Trx was identified from the cDNA library of tentacle of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata and named CcTrx1. The full-length cDNA of CcTrx1 was 479 bp with a 312 bp open reading frame encoding 104 amino acids. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the putative CcTrx1 protein harbored the evolutionarily-conserved Trx active site 31CGPC34 and shared a high similarity with Trx1 proteins from other organisms analyzed, indicating that CcTrx1 is a new member of Trx1 sub-family. CcTrx1 mRNA was found to be constitutively expressed in tentacle, umbrella, oral arm and gonad, indicating a general role of CcTrx1 protein in various physiological processes. The recombinant CcTrx1 (rCcTrx1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3, and then purified by affinity chromatography. The rCcTrx1 protein was demonstrated to possess the expected redox activity in enzymatic analysis and protection against oxidative damage of supercoiled DNA. These results indicate that CcTrx1 may function as an important antioxidant in C. capillata. To our knowledge, this is the first Trx protein characterized from jellyfish species.

  13. Modulation of hyperglycemia and TNFα-mediated inflammation by helichrysum and grapefruit extracts in diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Ana Laura; Etxeberria, Usune; Palacios-Ortega, Sara; Haslberger, Alexander G; Aumueller, Eva; Milagro, Fermín I; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2014-09-01

    Type-2 diabetes is associated with a chronic low-grade systemic inflammation accompanied by an increased production of adipokines/cytokines by obese adipose tissue. The search for new antidiabetic drugs with different mechanisms of action, such as insulin sensitizers, insulin secretagogues and α-glucosidase inhibitors, has directed the focus on the potential use of flavonoids in the management of type-2 diabetes. Thirty six diabetic male C57BL/6J db/db mice were fed a standard diet and randomly assigned into four experimental groups: non-treated control, (n = 8); acarbose (5 mg per kg bw, n = 8); helichrysum (1 g per kg bw, n = 10) and grapefruit (0.5 g per kg bw, n = 10) for 6 weeks. The mRNA expression in pancreas, liver and epididymal adipose tissue was determined by RT-PCR. DNA methylation was quantified in epididymal fat using pyrosequencing. Mice supplemented with helichrysum and grapefruit extracts showed a significant decrease in fasting glucose levels (p < 0.05). A possible mechanism of action could be the up-regulation of liver glucokinase (p < 0.05). The antihyperglycemic effect of both extracts was accompanied by decreased mRNA expression of some proinflammatory genes (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor-kappaB) in the liver and epididymal adipose tissue. The CpG3 site of TNFα, located 5 bp downstream of the transcription start site, showed increased DNA methylation in the grapefruit group compared with the non-treated group (p < 0.01). In conclusion, helichrysum and grapefruit extracts improved hyperglycemia through the regulation of glucose metabolism in the liver and reduction of the expression of proinflammatory genes in the liver and visceral fat. The hypermethylation of TNFα in adipose tissue may contribute to reduce the inflammation associated with diabetes and obesity.

  14. Celastrol, an NF-κB inhibitor, improves insulin resistance and attenuates renal injury in db/db mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Eun Kim

    Full Text Available The NF-κB pathway plays an important role in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Recently, NF-κB has also been suggested as an important mechanism linking obesity, inflammation, and metabolic disorders. However, there is no current evidence regarding the mechanism of action of NF-κB inhibition in insulin resistance and diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic animal models. We investigated the effects of the NF-κB inhibitor celastrol in db/db mice. The treatment with celastrol for 2 months significantly lowered fasting plasma glucose (FPG, HbA1C and homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR levels. Celastrol also exhibited significant decreases in body weight, kidney/body weight and adiposity. Celastrol reduced insulin resistance and lipid abnormalities and led to higher plasma adiponectin levels. Celastrol treatment also significantly mitigated lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in organs including the kidney, liver and adipose tissue. The treated group also exhibited significantly lower creatinine levels and urinary albumin excretion was markedly reduced. Celastrol treatment significantly lowered mesangial expansion and suppressed type IV collagen, PAI-1 and TGFβ1 expressions in renal tissues. Celastrol also improved abnormal lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine activity in the kidney. In cultured podocytes, celastrol treatment abolished saturated fatty acid-induced proinflammatory cytokine synthesis. Taken together, celastrol treatment not only improved insulin resistance, glycemic control and oxidative stress, but also improved renal functional and structural changes through both metabolic and anti-inflammatory effects in the kidney. These results suggest that targeted therapy for NF-κB may be a useful new therapeutic approach for the management of type II diabetes and diabetic nephropathy.

  15. P =/=NP Category-Semantics(C-S) TRIVIAL Proof: EUCLID!!! [(So Miscalled) Computational-Complexity(CC) Jargonial-Obfuscation(J-O); (Which???) MillenniumED-ProblemED(M-P): NO CC, CS; Feet of Clay!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    P=/=NP M-P proof is by C-S J-O elimination! C-S P=(?)=NP MEANS (Deterministic).(P-C)=(?)=(NON-Deterministic).(P-C)=(NP). C-S P=(?)=NP MEANS (Deterministic).(P-C)=(?)=(Non-Deterministic).(P-C) i.e. D.(P)=(?)= N.(P). For inclusion(equality) vs. EXclusion(INequality), IRrelevant(P) simply cancels! (Equally any other CC IF both sides identical). Crucial question left (D)=(?)=(N-D), i.e. D =(?)= N. Algorithmics: Deterministic (D) serial vs. NON-deterministic (N) NON-serial, branch fork forms a triangle, its vertices a plane. Menger Dimension-Theory: Dimensionality: D serial is one-dimensional, dim(D) = 1 (definition), VS. dim(N= NON-serial) =/= one-dimensional; dim(N) = [2(branching; fork; triangle; plane)+ E(probabilistic)] > 2 [ Sipser [ Intro . Thy . Comp . (1997) - p . 49 ; Fig . 1.15 ! ! ! ] ] . Hence (Euclid [ ~ - 350 BCE ]) simpleformativegeometry , dim (D) = 1 = / = dim (N) = [ 2 (branching) + E (probabilistic) ] > 2 , Left - to - RightINclusionVS . Right - to - LeftEXclusion . HenceP = / = NP ! ! ! QED , i . e . D = / = N , i . e . dim (D) = 1 = / = dim (N) > 2 by first millennium BCE, before CS J-O of CC!!! Harder doable C-S J-O analysis proofs: any combinations of DIS-similar CCs: LHS and D with low CC and/or RHS and N-D=N with high CC!

  16. Thermoeconomic analysis of Biomass Integrated Gasification Gas Turbine Combined Cycle (BIG GT CC) cogeneration plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrieta, Felipe Raul Ponce; Lora, Electo Silva [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, MG (Brazil). Nucleo de Estudos de Sistemas Termicos]. E-mails: aponce@iem.efei.br; electo@iem.efei.br; Perez, Silvia Azucena Nebra de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia]. E-mail: sanebra@fem. unicamp.br

    2000-07-01

    Using thermoeconomics as a tool to identify the location and magnitude of the real thermodynamic losses (energy waste, or exergy destruction and exergy losses) it is possible to assess the production costs of each product (electric power and heat) and the exergetic and exergoeconomic cost of each flow in a cogeneration plant to assist in decision-marketing procedures concerning to plant design, investment, operation and allocations of research funds. Thermo economic analysis of Biomass Integrated Gasification Gas Turbine Combined Cycle (BIG GT CC) cogeneration plant for its applications in sugar cane mills brings the following results: the global exergetic efficiency is low; the highest irreversibilities occur in the following equipment, by order: scrubber (38%), gas turbine (16%), dryer (12%), gasifier and HRSG (6%); due to the adopted cost distribution methodology, the unit exergetic cost of the heat (4,11) is lower than electricity (4,71); the lower market price of biomass is one of the most sensible parameter in the possible implementation of BIG-GT technology in sugar cane industry; the production costs are 31 US$/MWh and 32 US$/MWh for electricity and heat, respectively. The electricity cost is, after all, competitive with the actual market price. The electricity and heat costs are lower or almost equal than other values reported for actual Rankine cycle cogeneration plants. (author)

  17. Determination of Gel Content (C-C Crosslink in Polybutadiene Rubber by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Taghvaei Ganjali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the gel formation in polybutadiene and some of the problems raised in rubber industry such as groove cracking in products, quantification of the gel content and identification of the microstructure of butadiene elastomer is extremely important. In this paper, the gel content in polybutadiene rubber was identified by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal decomposition of the polybutadiene rubber was studied by thermal analysis methods in 0-650°C. The thermal decomposition, in the same temperature range, of the polymer with different gel contents under the similar conditions showed that the oxidation and decomposition of the samples occur in three steps. The thermal analysis curves showed that the cis-trans isomerization occurs by increases in the gel content at lower temperatures of a wider thermal range with rising trans isomer and decreases in cis isomer contents, respectively. Also, with the increase in the gel content there is a tendency in lowering double bond density and there is higher energy release in oxidation and decomposition regions due to the breakage in crosslink density of polymer networks. According to the values resulting from enthalpy and heat flow rate, the thermal index was obtained for samples at two maximum temperatures related to two processes of cis-trans isomerization and the cyclization reaction. The gel content (C-C crosslink in polybutadiene rubber is determined by the interconnection between the ratio of heat flow index and gel content from the differential scanning calorimetry curves.

  18. Migrating C/C++ Software to Mobile Platforms in the ADM Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Martinez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Software technology is constantly evolving and therefore the development of applications requires adapting software components and applications in order to be aligned to new paradigms such as Pervasive Computing, Cloud Computing and Internet of Things. In particular, many desktop software components need to be migrated to mobile technologies. This migration faces many challenges due to the proliferation of different mobile platforms. Developers usually make applications tailored for each type of device expending time and effort. As a result, new programming languages are emerging to integrate the native behaviors of the different platforms targeted in development projects. In this direction, the Haxe language allows writing mobile applications that target all major mobile platforms. Novel technical frameworks for information integration and tool interoperability such as Architecture-Driven Modernization (ADM proposed by the Object Management Group (OMG can help to manage a huge diversity of mobile technologies. The Architecture-Driven Modernization Task Force (ADMTF was formed to create specifications and promote industry consensus on the modernization of existing applications. In this work, we propose a migration process from C/C++ software to different mobile platforms that integrates ADM standards with Haxe. We exemplify the different steps of the process with a simple case study, the migration of “the Set of Mandelbrot” C++ application. The proposal was validated in Eclipse Modeling Framework considering that some of its tools and run-time environments are aligned with ADM standards.

  19. PLAStiCC: Predictive Look-Ahead Scheduling for Continuous dataflows on Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumbhare, Alok [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Simmhan, Yogesh [Indian Inst. of Technology (IIT), Bangalore (India); Prasanna, Viktor K. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-05-27

    Scalable stream processing and continuous dataflow systems are gaining traction with the rise of big data due to the need for processing high velocity data in near real time. Unlike batch processing systems such as MapReduce and workflows, static scheduling strategies fall short for continuous dataflows due to the variations in the input data rates and the need for sustained throughput. The elastic resource provisioning of cloud infrastructure is valuable to meet the changing resource needs of such continuous applications. However, multi-tenant cloud resources introduce yet another dimension of performance variability that impacts the application’s throughput. In this paper we propose PLAStiCC, an adaptive scheduling algorithm that balances resource cost and application throughput using a prediction-based look-ahead approach. It not only addresses variations in the input data rates but also the underlying cloud infrastructure. In addition, we also propose several simpler static scheduling heuristics that operate in the absence of accurate performance prediction model. These static and adaptive heuristics are evaluated through extensive simulations using performance traces obtained from public and private IaaS clouds. Our results show an improvement of up to 20% in the overall profit as compared to the reactive adaptation algorithm.

  20. Distal metal effects in cobalt porphyrins related to CcO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collman, James P; Berg, Katja E; Sunderland, Christopher J; Aukauloo, Ally; Vance, Michael A; Solomon, Edward I

    2002-12-16

    Cobalt(II) porphyrins were studied to determine the influence of distal site metalation and superstructure upon dioxygen reactivity in active site models of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). Monometallic, Co(II)(P) complexes when ligated by an axial imidazole react with dioxygen to form reversible Co-superoxide adducts, which were characterized by EPR and resonance Raman (RR). Unexpectedly, certain Co porphyrins with Cu(I) metalated imidazole pickets do not form mu-peroxo Co(III)/Cu(II) products even though the calculated intermetallic distance suggests this is possible. Instead, cobalt-porphyrin-superoxide complexes are obtained with the distal copper remaining as Cu(I). Moreover, distal metals (Cu(I) or Zn(II)) greatly enhance the stability of the dioxygen adduct, such that Co superoxides of bimetallic complexes demonstrate minimal reversibility. The "trapping" of dioxygen by a second metal is attributed to structural and electrostatic changes within the distal pocket upon metalation. EPR evidence suggests that the terminal oxygen in these bimetallic Co-superoxide systems is H-bonded to the NH of an imidazole picket amide linker, which may contribute to enthalpic stabilization of the dioxygen adduct. Stabilization of the dioxygen adduct in these bimetallic systems suggests one possible role for the distal copper in the Fe/Cu bimetallic active site of terminal oxidases, which form a heme-superoxide/copper(I) adduct upon oxygenation.

  1. Aeroacoustic Simulation for NASA CC3 Centrifugal Compressor Operating at off Design Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alqaradawi Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers the characterization of the acoustic noise and the unsteady flow field of a high speed centrifugal compressor NASA CC3. In order to accurately predict the noise, all analyses are carried out through the use of Large Eddy Simulation and Ffowcs Williams–Hawkings model for noise prediction. The relative effect of hub cavity on flow characteristics and sound levels is investigated, for a compressor stage with a total pressure ratio equal to 4, working from surge to near choke condition. In comparison with the experimental results from literature, the predicted compressor performance and flow field are predicted well. The hub cavity flow effect on the compressor aeroacoustic generated noise is shown in the paper. The unsteady static pressure and sound pressure levels are compared not only at different location but also for design and off design operating points. The internal flow results inside the hub cavity are presented at surge, design and near choke points. The conclusion is that the cavity effect of the centrifugal compressor cannot be ignored in the numerical prediction of aerodynamic generated noise. The impeller back plate of the rotor experiences a strong pressure fluctuation, which is maxima at the impeller outer radius for all operating point, but higher pressure values at the surge point.

  2. Dissemination of high-level mupirocin-resistant CC22-MRSA-IV in Saxony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Thürmer, Alexander; Shore, Anna C; Coleman, David C; Ehricht, Ralf; Jatzwauk, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    Mupirocin is used for eradicating methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in nasal colonization. A plasmid-borne gene, mupA , is associated with high-level mupirocin resistance. Despite the fact that, among all MRSA from a tertiary care center in the German state of Saxony, the prevalence of mupA , encoding high-level mupirocin resistance, was approximately 1% over a 15-year period from 2000-2015, a sharp increase to nearly 20% was observed in 2016/2017. DNA microarray profiling revealed that this was due to the dissemination of a variant of CC22-MRSA-IV ("Barnim Epidemic Strain" or "UK-EMRSA-15"), which, in addition to mecA , harbors mupA , aacA-aphD , qacA , and - in most isolates - erm (C). In order to prevent therapy failures and a further spread of this strain, the use of mupirocin should be more stringently controlled as well as guided by susceptibility testing. In addition, MRSA decolonization regimens that rely on other substances, such as betaisodona, polyhexanide or octenidine, should be considered.

  3. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5(-/-) mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Novel anti-diabetic effect of SCM-198 via inhibiting the hepatic NF-κB pathway in db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Xin, Hong; Liu, Xinhua; Xu, Yajun; Wen, Danyi; Zhang, Yahua; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2012-04-01

    There are reports of early evidence that suggest the involvement of chronic low-grade inflammation in the pathogenesis of Type 2 diabetes. Thus, substances that have effects in reducing inflammation could be potential drugs for Type 2 diabetes. Leonurine (4-guanidino-n-butyl syringate; SCM-198) is an alkaloid in HL (Herba leonuri), which was reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesize that SCM-198 may have beneficial effects on Type 2 diabetes. In the present study, we attempted to test this hypothesis by evaluating the anti-diabetic effect of SCM-198 and the possible underlying mechanisms of its effects in db/db mice. SCM-198 (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of body weight), pioglitazone (50 mg/kg of body weight, as a positive control) or 1% CMC-Na (sodium carboxymethylcellulose) were administered to the db/db or db/m mice once daily for 3 weeks. After 3 weeks, SCM-198 (200 mg/kg of body weight) treatment significantly reduced the fasting blood glucose level and increased the plasma insulin concentration in the db/db mice, meanwhile it significantly lowered the plasma TAG (triacylglycerol) concentration and increased the HDL (high-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol concentration. Moreover, the dysregulated transcription of the hepatic glucose metabolic enzymes, including GK (glucokinase), G6Pase (glucose-6-phosphatase) and PEPCK (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase), was recovered by an Akt-dependent pathway. The pro-inflammatory mediators {such as TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α), IL (interleukin)-6, IL-1β, degradation of IκB [inhibitor of NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB)] α and thereafter activation of NF-κB} were reversed by SCM-198 treatment in the db/db mice. The present study provides first evidence that SCM-198 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity and has an ameliorating effect on diabetic symptoms via inhibiting of NF-κB/IKK (IκB kinase) pathway. Consequently, we suggest that SCM-198 may be a prospective agent for prevention and

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus CC398 Reveals a Sub-Lineage Epidemiologically Associated with Infections in Horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdelbary, Mohamed M. H.; Wittenberg, Anne; Cuny, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    -allelic polymorphisms, and phylogenetic analyses revealed that an epidemic sub-clone within CC398 (dubbed 'clade (C)') has spread within and between equine hospitals, where it causes nosocomial infections in horses and colonises the personnel. While clade (C) was strongly associated with S. aureus from horses...

  6. Nickel-catalyzed cyclization of alpha, omega-dienes: formation vs. cleavage of C-C bonds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečas, D.; Turský, M.; Tišlerová, I.; Kotora, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2006), s. 671-674 ISSN 1144-0546 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA ČR GD203/03/H140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : catalysis * nickel * cyclization * diene * cyclopentane Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.647, year: 2006

  7. Commercial biocides induce transfer of prophage Φ13 from human strains of Staphylococcus aureus to livestock CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Hvitved, Annemette

    2017-01-01

    Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus commonly carry the bacteriophage ΦSa3 that encodes immune evasion factors. Recently, this prophage has been found in livestock-associated, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) CC398 strains where it may promote human colonization. Here, we have addressed...

  8. Role of CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, RANTES) in acute lung injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bless, N M; Huber-Lang, M; Guo, R F

    2000-01-01

    The role of the CC chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1 beta), monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (MCP-1), and RANTES, in acute lung inflammatory injury induced by intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes injury in rats was determined. Rat MIP-1 beta, MCP-1, and RANTES w...

  9. Synthesis and systematic evaluation of symmetric sulfonated centrally C-C bonded cyanine near-infrared dyes for protein labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, Van Der Steffen; Kuil, Joeri; Valentijn, A.R.P.M.; Leeuwen, Van Fijs W.B.

    2016-01-01

    The most commonly used near-infrared cyanine dyes contain an aryl ether that is not fully stable towards nucleophiles. Replacement of the aryl ether by a more stable carbon-carbon bond can improve the stability. In this work we have synthesized a series of four negatively-charged symmetrical C-C

  10. University of Idaho's low-speed flex fuel direct-injected 797cc two-stroke rear drive snowmobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The University of Idahos entry into the 2012 SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge uses a Ski-Doo XP chassis with a low-speed 797 cc direct-injection two-stroke powered snowmobile modified for flex fuel use on blended ethanol fuel. A battery-less direct ...

  11. Decreased susceptibility to zinc chloride is associated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC398 in Danish swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Cavaco, Lina; Hasman, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    A total of 31 MRSA and 60 MSSA isolated from different swine farms in Denmark were examined for their susceptibility to zinc chloride, erythromycin, penicillin and tetracycline, as well as their spa-type. mecA positive isolates were examined for their SCCmec type. The isolates were assigned to a CC...

  12. Excited States of Xanthene Analogues: Photofragmentation and Calculations by CC2 and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Alexander Jan; Titov, Evgenii; Daly, Steven; Włodarczyk, Radosław; Megow, Jörg; Saalfrank, Peter; Choi, Chang Min; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-10-05

    Action spectroscopy has emerged as an analytical tool to probe excited states in the gas phase. Although comparison of gas-phase absorption properties with quantum-chemical calculations is, in principle, straightforward, popular methods often fail to describe many molecules of interest-such as xanthene analogues. We, therefore, face their nano- and picosecond laser-induced photofragmentation with excited-state computations by using the CC2 method and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Whereas the extracted absorption maxima agree with CC2 predictions, the TDDFT excitation energies are blueshifted. Lowering the amount of Hartree-Fock exchange in the DFT functional can reduce this shift but at the cost of changing the nature of the excited state. Additional bandwidth observed in the photofragmentation spectra is rationalized in terms of multiphoton processes. Observed fragmentation from higher-lying excited states conforms to intense excited-to-excited state transitions calculated with CC2. The CC2 method is thus suitable for the comparison with photofragmentation in xanthene analogues. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Commercial biocides induce transfer of prophage Φ13 from human strains of Staphylococcus aureus to livestock CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Hvitved, Annemette

    2017-01-01

    Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus commonly carry the bacteriophage ΦSa3 that encodes immune evasion factors. Recently, this prophage has been found in livestock-associated, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) CC398 strains where it may promote human colonization. Here, we have addressed ...

  14. Identification and quantitation of lipid C=C location isomers: A shotgun lipidomics approach enabled by photochemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoxiao; Chong, Leelyn; Tian, Ran; Shi, Riyi; Hu, Tony Y; Ouyang, Zheng; Xia, Yu

    2016-03-08

    The field of lipidomics has been significantly advanced by mass spectrometric analysis. The distinction and quantitation of the unsaturated lipid isomers, however, remain a long-standing challenge. In this study, we have developed an analytical tool for both identification and quantitation of lipid C=C location isomers from complex mixtures using online Paternò-Büchi reaction coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The potential of this method has been demonstrated with an implementation into shotgun lipid analysis of animal tissues. Among 96 of the unsaturated fatty acids and glycerophospholipids identified from rat brain tissue, 50% of them were found as mixtures of C=C location isomers; for the first time, to our knowledge, the quantitative information of lipid C=C isomers from a broad range of classes was obtained. This method also enabled facile cross-tissue examinations, which revealed significant changes in C=C location isomer compositions of a series of fatty acids and glycerophospholipid (GP) species between the normal and cancerous tissues.

  15. PhilDB: the time series database with built-in change logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew MacDonald

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available PhilDB is an open-source time series database that supports storage of time series datasets that are dynamic; that is, it records updates to existing values in a log as they occur. PhilDB eases loading of data for the user by utilising an intelligent data write method. It preserves existing values during updates and abstracts the update complexity required to achieve logging of data value changes. It implements fast reads to make it practical to select data for analysis. Recent open-source systems have been developed to indefinitely store long-period high-resolution time series data without change logging. Unfortunately, such systems generally require a large initial installation investment before use because they are designed to operate over a cluster of servers to achieve high-performance writing of static data in real time. In essence, they have a ‘big data’ approach to storage and access. Other open-source projects for handling time series data that avoid the ‘big data’ approach are also relatively new and are complex or incomplete. None of these systems gracefully handle revision of existing data while tracking values that change. Unlike ‘big data’ solutions, PhilDB has been designed for single machine deployment on commodity hardware, reducing the barrier to deployment. PhilDB takes a unique approach to meta-data tracking; optional attribute attachment. This facilitates scaling the complexities of storing a wide variety of data. That is, it allows time series data to be loaded as time series instances with minimal initial meta-data, yet additional attributes can be created and attached to differentiate the time series instances when a wider variety of data is needed. PhilDB was written in Python, leveraging existing libraries. While some existing systems come close to meeting the needs PhilDB addresses, none cover all the needs at once. PhilDB was written to fill this gap in existing solutions. This paper explores existing time

  16. DB2 9 for zOS Database Administration Certification Study Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In order to become an IBM Certified Database Administrator - DB2 9 DBA for z/OS, you must pass two exams: DB2 9 Fundamentals Exam (Exam 730), and DB2 9 Database Administrator for z/OS (Exam 732)-the primary focus focus of this book. Written by two members of the team who participated in the actual writing of the exam, this specialized study guide covers every topic that you will need to know to pass Exam 732, including database design and implementation, operation and recovery, security and auditing, performance, as well as installation and migration/upgrade. But that is only the beginning.

  17. MongoDB and Python Patterns and processes for the popular document-oriented database

    CERN Document Server

    O'Higgins, Niall

    2011-01-01

    Learn how to leverage MongoDB with your Python applications, using the hands-on recipes in this book. You get complete code samples for tasks such as making fast geo queries for location-based apps, efficiently indexing your user documents for social-graph lookups, and many other scenarios. This guide explains the basics of the document-oriented database and shows you how to set up a Python environment with it. Learn how to read and write to MongoDB, apply idiomatic MongoDB and Python patterns, and use the database with several popular Python web frameworks. You'll discover how to model your

  18. Stratification of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes by gene-directed copy number alteration (CNA) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesen, H-J; Steinbeck, F; Maruschke, M; Koczan, D; Ziems, B; Hakenberg, O W

    2017-01-01

    Tumorigenic processes are understood to be driven by epi-/genetic and genomic alterations from single point mutations to chromosomal alterations such as insertions and deletions of nucleotides up to gains and losses of large chromosomal fragments including products of chromosomal rearrangements e.g. fusion genes and proteins. Overall comparisons of copy number alterations (CNAs) presented in 48 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) genomes resulted in ratios of gene losses versus gene gains between 26 ccRCC Fuhrman malignancy grades G1 (ratio 1.25) and 20 G3 (ratio 0.58). Gene losses and gains of 15762 CNA genes were mapped to 795 chromosomal cytoband loci including 280 KEGG pathways. CNAs were classified according to their contribution to Fuhrman tumour gradings G1 and G3. Gene gains and losses turned out to be highly structured processes in ccRCC genomes enabling the subclassification and stratification of ccRCC tumours in a genome-wide manner. CNAs of ccRCC seem to start with common tumour related gene losses flanked by CNAs specifying Fuhrman grade G1 losses and CNA gains favouring grade G3 tumours. The appearance of recurrent CNA signatures implies the presence of causal mechanisms most likely implicated in the pathogenesis and disease-outcome of ccRCC tumours distinguishing lower from higher malignant tumours. The diagnostic quality of initial 201 genes (108 genes supporting G1 and 93 genes G3 phenotypes) has been successfully validated on published Swiss data (GSE19949) leading to a restricted CNA gene set of 171 CNA genes of which 85 genes favour Fuhrman grade G1 and 86 genes Fuhrman grade G3. Regarding these gene sets overall survival decreased with the number of G3 related gene losses plus G3 related gene gains. CNA gene sets presented define an entry to a gene-directed and pathway-related functional understanding of ongoing copy number alterations within and between individual ccRCC tumours leading to CNA genes of prognostic and predictive value.

  19. Stratification of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC genomes by gene-directed copy number alteration (CNA analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H-J Thiesen

    Full Text Available Tumorigenic processes are understood to be driven by epi-/genetic and genomic alterations from single point mutations to chromosomal alterations such as insertions and deletions of nucleotides up to gains and losses of large chromosomal fragments including products of chromosomal rearrangements e.g. fusion genes and proteins. Overall comparisons of copy number alterations (CNAs presented in 48 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC genomes resulted in ratios of gene losses versus gene gains between 26 ccRCC Fuhrman malignancy grades G1 (ratio 1.25 and 20 G3 (ratio 0.58. Gene losses and gains of 15762 CNA genes were mapped to 795 chromosomal cytoband loci including 280 KEGG pathways. CNAs were classified according to their contribution to Fuhrman tumour gradings G1 and G3. Gene gains and losses turned out to be highly structured processes in ccRCC genomes enabling the subclassification and stratification of ccRCC tumours in a genome-wide manner. CNAs of ccRCC seem to start with common tumour related gene losses flanked by CNAs specifying Fuhrman grade G1 losses and CNA gains favouring grade G3 tumours. The appearance of recurrent CNA signatures implies the presence of causal mechanisms most likely implicated in the pathogenesis and disease-outcome of ccRCC tumours distinguishing lower from higher malignant tumours. The diagnostic quality of initial 201 genes (108 genes supporting G1 and 93 genes G3 phenotypes has been successfully validated on published Swiss data (GSE19949 leading to a restricted CNA gene set of 171 CNA genes of which 85 genes favour Fuhrman grade G1 and 86 genes Fuhrman grade G3. Regarding these gene sets overall survival decreased with the number of G3 related gene losses plus G3 related gene gains. CNA gene sets presented define an entry to a gene-directed and pathway-related functional understanding of ongoing copy number alterations within and between individual ccRCC tumours leading to CNA genes of prognostic and

  20. Genotypic and Phenotypic Markers of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC9 in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaohua; Wang, Xiaolin; Fan, Yanping; Peng, Yang; Li, Ling; Li, Shunming; Huang, Jingya; Yao, Zhenjiang; Chen, Sidong

    2016-07-01

    Use of antimicrobials in industrial food animal production is associated with the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals and humans. The livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 9 (CC9) is associated with animals and related workers in Asia. This study aimed to explore the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA CC9 in humans. We conducted a cross-sectional study of livestock workers and controls in Guangdong, China. The study participants responded to a questionnaire and provided a nasal swab for S. aureus analysis. The resulting isolates were assessed for antibiotic susceptibility, multilocus sequence type, and immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes. Livestock workers had significantly higher rates of S. aureus CC9 (odds ratio [OR] = 30.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.06 to 236.39) and tetracycline-resistant S. aureus (OR = 3.26; 95% CI, 2.12 to 5.00) carriage than controls. All 19 S. aureus CC9 isolates from livestock workers were MRSA isolates and also exhibited the characteristics of resistance to several classes of antibiotics and absence of the IEC genes. Notably, the interaction analyses indicated phenotype-phenotype (OR = 525.7; 95% CI, 60.0 to 4,602.1) and gene-environment (OR = 232.3; 95% CI, 28.7 to 1,876.7) interactions associated with increased risk for livestock-associated S. aureus CC9 carriage. These findings suggest that livestock-associated S. aureus and MRSA (CC9, IEC negative, and tetracycline resistant) in humans are associated with occupational livestock contact, raising questions about the potential for occupational exposure to opportunistic S. aureus This study adds to existing knowledge by giving insight into the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA. Our findings suggest that livestock-associated S. aureus and MRSA (CC9, IEC negative, and tetracycline resistant) in humans are associated with occupational livestock contact. Future studies should direct more

  1. Identification of a PVL-negative SCCmec-IVa sub-lineage of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC80 lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edslev, Sofie Marie; Westh, Henrik Torkil; Andersen, Paal Skytt

    2018-01-01

    of the CC80 S. aureus lineage was conducted from whole-genome sequences of 217 isolates (23 MSSA and 194 MRSA) from 22 countries. All isolates were further genetically characterized in regard to resistance determinants and PVL carriage, and epidemiological data was obtained for selected isolates. RESULTS....... CONCLUSIONS: This study reports the emergence of a novel CC80 CA-MRSA sub-lineage, showing that the CC80 lineage is more diverse than previously assumed....

  2. Examination of C/C flat tile mock-ups with hypervapotron cooling after high heat flux testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedler, B.; Friedrich, T.; Traxler, H.; Eidenberger, E.; Scheu, C.; Clemens, H.; Pippan, R.; Escourbiac, F.

    2007-01-01

    Two C/C flat tile mock-ups with a hypervapotron cooling concept, have been successfully tested beyond ITER specification (3000 cycles at 15 MW/m 2 , 300 cycles at 20 MW/m 2 and 800-1000 cycles at 25 MW/m 2 ) in two electron beam testing facilities [F. Escourbiac, et al., Experimental simulation of cascade failure effect on tungsten and CFC flat tile armoured HHF components, Fusion Eng. Des., submitted for publication; F. Escourbiac, et al., A mature industrial solution for ITER divertor plasma facing components: hypervapotron cooling concept adapted to Tore Supra flat tile technology, Fusion Eng. Des. 75-79 (2005) 387-390]. Both mock-ups provide a SNECMA SEPCARB NS31 armour, which has been joined onto the CuCrZr heat sink by active metal casting (AMC) and electron beam welding (EBW). No tile detachment or sudden loss of single tiles has been observed; a cascade-like failure of flat tile armours was impossible to generate. At the maximum cyclic heat flux load of 25 MW/m 2 all tested tiles performed well except one, which revealed already a clear indication in the thermographic examination at the end of the manufacture. Visual examination and analysis of metallographic cuts of the remaining tiles demonstrated that the interface has not been altered. In addition, the shear strength of the C/C to copper joints measured after the high heat flux (HHF) test has been found to be still above the interlamellar shear strength of the used C/C material. The high resistance of the interface is explained by a modification of the C/C to copper joint interface due to silicon originating from the used C/C material

  3. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC398 is an increasing cause of disease in people with no livestock contact in Denmark, 1999 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.; Petersen, A.; Sørum, M.

    2015-01-01

    a serious public health challenge in countries with intensive livestock production. To retrace the history of human colonisation and infection with MRSA CC398-IIa in Denmark, we conducted a nationwide, retrospective study of MRSA isolates collected from 1999 to 2011. Among 7,429 MRSA isolates screened, we...... identified 416 MRSA CC398-IIa isolates. Of these, 148 were from people with infections, including 51 from patients reporting no livestock exposure. The first cases of MRSA CC398-IIa infection in Denmark occurred in 2004. Subsequently, the incidence of MRSA CC398-IIa infection showed a linear annual increase...

  4. Annulus fibrosus cells express and utilize C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) for migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weijun; Liu, David; Zheng, Justin; Shi, Peng; Chou, Po-Hsin; Oh, Chundo; Chen, Di; An, Howard S; Chee, Ana

    2017-05-01

    Disc degeneration is associated with the progressive loss of the proteoglycan content of the intervertebral disc, decreased matrix synthesis, higher concentrations of proteolytic enzymes, and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines. In previous studies, we have shown that C-C chemokine ligand (CCL)2, CCL3, and CCL5 are highly expressed by cultured nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells that have been treated by interleukin-1. The major function of these chemokines is to recruit immune cells into the disc. It is unclear if disc cells can respond to these chemokines. Recent studies by Phillips et al. (2015) showed that NP cells express a number of cytokines and chemokine receptors. The purpose of this study is to determine the gene and protein expression of C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)1, CCR2, and CCR5 in NP and AF cells, and to test if these receptors can respond to their ligands in these cells by cell signaling and migration. This is an in vitro study. For RNA, surface expression, and cell signaling studies, human cells were isolated from the NP and AF tissues collected after spine surgery or from donated spine segments (Gift of Hope Human Donor & Tissue Network of Illinois) and cultured in monolayer. The gene expression of human CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The surface expression of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 was analyzed using flow cytometry and fluorescently tagged antibodies specific for these proteins. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation was analyzed from the cell lysates of NP and AF cells treated with CCL2 and CCL5 for 1 hour using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Migration of primary rabbit AF cells was assayed using 8-µm Corning Transwell inserts in the presence or absence of CCL5. This study was partially funded by a North American Spine Society 2014 Basic Research Grant Award ($50,000). RNA analysis showed that gene expression of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 was evident in

  5. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentini, Vincenzo; Aristei, Cynthia; Glimelius, Bengt; Minsky, Bruce D.; Beets-Tan, Regina; Borras, Jose M.; Haustermans, Karin; Maingon, Philippe; Overgaard, Jens; Pahlman, Lars; Quirke, Phil; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Taylor, Irving; Van Cutsem, Eric; Velde, Cornelius Van de; Cellini, Numa; Latini, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). Methods: Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. The document was available to all Committee members as a web-based document customized for the consensus process. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by a topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each member commented and voted, sentence by sentence thrice. Sentences upon which an agreement was not reached after voting round no. 2 were openly debated during a Consensus Conference in Perugia (Italy) from 11 December to 13 December 2008. A hand-held televoting system collected the opinions of both the Committee members and the audience after each debate. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', and 'minimum consensus'. Results: The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only 3 (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of the members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Conclusions: This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines

  6. C-C chemokine receptor-7 mediated endocytosis of antibody cargoes into intact cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eCharest-Morin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7 is a G protein coupled receptor that has a role in leukocyte homing, but that is also expressed in aggressive tumor cells. Preclinical research supports that CCR7 is a valid target in oncology. In view of the increasing availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that carry cytotoxic cargoes, we studied the feasibility of forcing intact cells to internalize known monoclonal antibodies by exploiting the cycle of endocytosis and recycling triggered by the CCR7 agonist CCL19. Firstly, an anti-CCR7 antibody (CD197; clone 150503 labeled surface recombinant CCR7 expressed in intact HEK 293a cells and the fluorescent antibody was internalized following CCL19 treatment. Secondly, a recombinant myc-tagged CCL19 construction was exploited along the anti-myc monoclonal antibody 4A6. The myc-tagged ligand was produced as a conditioned medium of transfected HEK 293a cells that contained the equivalent of 430 ng/ml of immunoreactive CCL19 (average value, ELISA determination. CCL19-myc, but not authentic CCL19, carried the fluorophore-labeled antibody 4A6 into other recipient cells that expressed recombinant CCR7 (microscopy, cytofluorometry. The immune complexes were apparent in endosomal structures, colocalized well with the small GTPase Rab5 and progressed toward Rab7-positive endosomes. A dominant negative form of Rab5 (GDP-locked inhibited this endocytosis. Further, endosomes in CCL19-myc- or CCL19-stimulated cells were positive for β-arrestin2, but rarely for β-arrestin1. Following treatment with CCL19-myc and the 4A6 antibody, the melanoma cell line A375 that expresses endogenous CCR7 was specifically stained using a secondary peroxidase-conjugated antibody. Agonist-stimulated CCR7 can transport antibody-based cargoes, with possible therapeutic applications in oncology.

  7. Pengaruh Penggunaan Frekuensi Listrik Terhadap Performa Generator HHO Dan Unjuk Kerja Engine Honda Kharisma 125CC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky Akbar Pratama

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Energi yang dihasilkan oleh engine merupakan hasil dari proses pembakaran campuran bahan bakar dengan udara (oksigen. Secara praktis  pembakaran  menghasilkan gas yang sangat berbahaya bagi kesehatan. Salah satu perkembangan teknologi adalah dengan brown gas, atau sering disebut Generator HHO, dimana alat ini akan  menghasilkan gas HHO (2 unsur gas hydrogen dan 1 unsur gas oksigen dari proses elektrolisa air murni yang di hubungkan dengan arus listrik. Pengujian dilakukan secara eksperimental dengan menggunakan Generator HHO pada engine Honda Kharisma  berkapasitas 125cc. Generator HHO tersebut menggunakan Elektroda jenis pipa Stainless steel AISI 316L dengan ukuran Ø21mm x 101mm, Ø34mm x 101mm, Ø48mm x 101mm dan Ø61mm x 101mm dengan tebal 3mm, larutan elektrolit 2liter aquades dan 1,4 KOH. Variasi yang diberikan pada generator HHO adalah besar frekuensi listriknya. Untuk pengujian, perubahan kecepatan dilakukan dengan full open throttle menggunakan chasis water brake dynamometer. Pengujian dilakukan pada putaran engine dengan kelipatan 500 rpm, dimulai dari 3500 rpm sampai dengan 8500 rpm. Hasil yang didapatkan dari penelitian ini adalah frekuensi untuk generator dengan effisiensi thermal terbaik adalah pada 10Hz sebesar 20,06%. Dengan daya generator 118,74 Watt, debit 13,13 L/jam, kenaikan temperature 0.7°C/menit, torsi maksimal pada engine 27.09 Nm, daya efektif  6114,651 Watt, bmep 860,627 Pa, SFC 9.608E-08 kg/watt.s, effisiensi thermal engine 23,22% serta pengurangan emisi CO 1,17% dan HC 83ppm.

  8. The Role of Natural Antibodies to CC Chemokine Receptor 5 in HIV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assunta Venuti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 is responsible for immune and inflammatory responses by mediation of chemotactic activity in leukocytes, although it is expressed on different cell types. It has been shown to act as co-receptor for the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV. Natural reactive antibodies (Abs recognizing first loop (ECL1 of CCR5 have been detected in several pools of immunoglobulins from healthy donors and from several cohorts of either HIV-exposed but uninfected subjects (ESN or HIV-infected individuals who control disease progression (LTNP as well. The reason of development of anti-CCR5 Abs in the absence of autoimmune disease is still unknown; however, the presence of these Abs specific for CCR5 or for other immune receptors and mediators probably is related to homeostasis maintenance. The majority of anti-CCR5 Abs is directed to HIV binding site (N-terminus and ECL2 of the receptor. Conversely, it is well known that ECL1 of CCR5 does not bind HIV; thus, the anti-CCR5 Abs directed to ECL1 elicit a long-lasting internalization of CCR5 but not interfere with HIV binding directly; these Abs block HIV infection in either epithelial cells or CD4+ T lymphocytes and the mechanism differs from those ones described for all other CCR5-specific ligands. The Ab-mediated CCR5 internalization allows the formation of a stable signalosome by interaction of CCR5, β-arrestin2 and ERK1 proteins. The signalosome degradation and the subsequent de novo proteins synthesis determine the CCR5 reappearance on the cell membrane with a very long-lasting kinetics (8 days. The use of monoclonal Abs to CCR5 with particular characteristics and mode of action may represent a novel mode to fight viral infection in either vaccinal or therapeutic strategies.

  9. The Kepler DB, a Database Management System for Arrays, Sparse Arrays and Binary Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauliff, Sean; Cote, Miles T.; Girouard, Forrest R.; Middour, Christopher; Klaus, Todd C.; Wohler, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Science Operations Center stores pixel values on approximately six million pixels collected every 30-minutes, as well as data products that are generated as a result of running the Kepler science processing pipeline. The Kepler Database (Kepler DB) management system was created to act as the repository of this information. After one year of ight usage, Kepler DB is managing 3 TiB of data and is expected to grow to over 10 TiB over the course of the mission. Kepler DB is a non-relational, transactional database where data are represented as one dimensional arrays, sparse arrays or binary large objects. We will discuss Kepler DB's APIs, implementation, usage and deployment at the Kepler Science Operations Center.

  10. Protective effects of SGLT2 inhibitor luseogliflozin on pancreatic β-cells in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okauchi, Seizo; Shimoda, Masashi; Obata, Atsushi; Kimura, Tomohiko; Hirukawa, Hidenori; Kohara, Kenji; Mune, Tomoatsu; Kaku, Kohei; Kaneto, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that Sodium-Glucose Co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, new hypoglycemic agents, improve glycemic control by increasing urine glucose excretion, but it remained unclear how they exert protective effects on pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of SGLT2 inhibitor luseogliflozin on β-cell function and mass using obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Ten-week-old male diabetic db/db mice were treated with luseogliflozin 0.0025% or 0.01% in chow (Luse 0.0025% or Luse 0.01%) or vehicle (control) for 4 weeks. Urinary glucose excretion was increased in Luse groups (0.0025% and 0.01%) compared to control mice 3 days after the intervention. Fasting blood glucose levels were significantly lower in mice treated with Luse compared to control mice. Fasting serum insulin concentrations were significantly higher in mice treated with Luse compared to control mice. Triglyceride levels tended to be lower in Luse groups compared to control mice. In immunohistochemical study using pancreas tissues, β-cell mass was larger in Luse groups compared to control group which was due to the increase of β-cell proliferation and decrease of β-cell apoptosis. Furthermore, in gene analysis using isolated islets, insulin 1, insulin 2, MafA, PDX-1 and GLUT2 gene expression levels were significantly higher in Luse groups compared to control group. In contrast, expression levels of fibrosis-related gene such as TGFβ, fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III were significantly lower in Luse groups. In conclusion, SGLT2 inhibitor luseogliflozin ameliorates glycemic control and thus exerts protective effects on pancreatic β-cell mass and function. - Highlights: • SGLT2 inhibitor luseogliflozin ameliorates glycemic control in db/db mice. • Luseogliflozin increases β-cell proliferation and decreases β-cell apoptosis. • Luseogliflozin preserves various β-cell-specific gene expression. • Luseogliflozin decreases various fibrosis-related factors in db/db

  11. Protective effects of SGLT2 inhibitor luseogliflozin on pancreatic β-cells in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okauchi, Seizo, E-mail: okauchi@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp; Shimoda, Masashi; Obata, Atsushi; Kimura, Tomohiko; Hirukawa, Hidenori; Kohara, Kenji; Mune, Tomoatsu; Kaku, Kohei; Kaneto, Hideaki

    2016-02-12

    It is well known that Sodium-Glucose Co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, new hypoglycemic agents, improve glycemic control by increasing urine glucose excretion, but it remained unclear how they exert protective effects on pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of SGLT2 inhibitor luseogliflozin on β-cell function and mass using obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Ten-week-old male diabetic db/db mice were treated with luseogliflozin 0.0025% or 0.01% in chow (Luse 0.0025% or Luse 0.01%) or vehicle (control) for 4 weeks. Urinary glucose excretion was increased in Luse groups (0.0025% and 0.01%) compared to control mice 3 days after the intervention. Fasting blood glucose levels were significantly lower in mice treated with Luse compared to control mice. Fasting serum insulin concentrations were significantly higher in mice treated with Luse compared to control mice. Triglyceride levels tended to be lower in Luse groups compared to control mice. In immunohistochemical study using pancreas tissues, β-cell mass was larger in Luse groups compared to control group which was due to the increase of β-cell proliferation and decrease of β-cell apoptosis. Furthermore, in gene analysis using isolated islets, insulin 1, insulin 2, MafA, PDX-1 and GLUT2 gene expression levels were significantly higher in Luse groups compared to control group. In contrast, expression levels of fibrosis-related gene such as TGFβ, fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III were significantly lower in Luse groups. In conclusion, SGLT2 inhibitor luseogliflozin ameliorates glycemic control and thus exerts protective effects on pancreatic β-cell mass and function. - Highlights: • SGLT2 inhibitor luseogliflozin ameliorates glycemic control in db/db mice. • Luseogliflozin increases β-cell proliferation and decreases β-cell apoptosis. • Luseogliflozin preserves various β-cell-specific gene expression. • Luseogliflozin decreases various fibrosis-related factors in db/db

  12. GenMapDB: a database of mapped human BAC clones

    OpenAIRE

    Morley, Michael; Arcaro, Melissa; Burdick, Joshua; Yonescu, Raluca; Reid, Thomas; Kirsch, Ilan R.; Cheung, Vivian G.

    2001-01-01

    GenMapDB (http://genomics.med.upenn.edu/genmapdb) is a repository of human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones mapped by our laboratory to sequence-tagged site markers. Currently, GenMapDB contains over 3000 mapped clones that span 19 chromosomes, chromosomes 2, 4, 5, 9–22, X and Y. This database provides positional information about human BAC clones from the RPCI-11 human male BAC library. It also contains restriction fragment analysis data and end sequen...

  13. Cluster (Viridiplantae) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0”. This cluster ID is uniquely-assigned by the PGDBj Ortholog Database. Cluster size Number of proteins aff...r About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Cluster (Viridiplantae) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive ... ...List Contact us PGDBj - Ortholog DB Cluster (Viridiplantae) Data detail Data name Cluster (Viridiplantae) DO...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data

  14. Cluster (Cyanobacteria) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3090”. This cluster ID is uniquely-assigned by the PGDBj Ortholog Database. Cluster size Number of proteins ...ster About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Cluster (Cyanobacteria) - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive ... ...List Contact us PGDBj - Ortholog DB Cluster (Cyanobacteria) Data detail Data name Cluster (Cyanobacteria) DO...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data

  15. Determination of DB10B values of single and mixed cultures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The survi-ving fraction of isolates decreased with increased irradiation doses. DB10B values of E. coli, S. aureus and S. parat-hyphi B were respectively 0.27, 0.33 and 0.44 kGy when inoculated as single cultures, and 0.24, 0.28 and 0.32 kGy respectively when inoculated as mixed cultures. DB10B values were lower for ...

  16. A novel triculture system (CC3 for simultaneous enzyme production and hydrolysis of common grasses through submerged fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Vineeth Leo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The perennial grasses are considered as a rich source of lignocellulosic biomass, making it a second generation alternative energy source and can diminish the use of fossil fuels. In this work, four perennial grasses Saccharum arundinaceum, Panicum antidotale, Thysanolaena latifolia and Neyraudia reynaudiana were selected to verify their potential as a substrate to produce hydrolytic enzymes and to evaluate them as second generation energy biomass. Here, cellulase and hemi-cellulase producing three endophytic bacteria (Burkholderia cepacia BPS-GB3, Alcaligenes faecalis BPS-GB5 and Enterobacter hormaechei BPS-GB8 recovered from N. reynaudiana and S. arundinaceum were selected to develop a triculture (CC3 consortium. During 12 days of submerged cultivation, a 55-70% loss in dry weight was observed and the maximum activity of β-glucosidase (5.36 to 12.34 IU and Xylanase (4.33 to 10.91 IU were observed on 2nd and 6th day respectively, whereas FPase (0.26 to 0.53 IU and CMCase (2.31 to 4.65 IU showed maximum activity on 4th day. Around 15-30% more enzyme activity was produced in CC3 as compared to monoculture (CC1 and coculture (CC2 treatments, suggested synergetic interaction among the selected three bacterial strains. Further, the biomass was assessed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The FTIR analysis provides important insights into the reduction of cellulose and hemicellulose moieties in CC3 treated biomass and SEM studies shed light into the disruption of surface structure leading to access of cellulose or hemicelluloses microtubules. The hydrolytic potential of the CC3 system was further enhanced due to reduction in lignin as evidenced by 1-4% lignin reduction in biomass compositional analysis. Additionally, laccase gene was detected from A. faecalis and E. hormaechei which further shows the laccase production potential of the isolates. To our knowledge, first time we develop an

  17. AutDB: a platform to decode the genetic architecture of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereanu, Wayne; Larsen, Eric C; Das, Ishita; Estévez, Marcel A; Sarkar, Anjali A; Spring-Pearson, Senanu; Kollu, Ravi; Basu, Saumyendra N; Banerjee-Basu, Sharmila

    2018-01-04

    AutDB is a deeply annotated resource for exploring the impact of genetic variations associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). First released in 2007, AutDB has evolved into a multi-modular resource of diverse types of genetic and functional evidence related to ASD. Current modules include: Human Gene, which annotates all ASD-linked genes and their variants; Animal Model, which catalogs behavioral, anatomical and physiological data from rodent models of ASD; Protein Interaction (PIN), which builds interactomes from direct relationships of protein products of ASD genes; and Copy Number Variant (CNV), which catalogs deletions and duplications of chromosomal loci identified in ASD. A multilevel data-integration strategy is utilized to connect the ASD genes to the components of the other modules. All information in this resource is manually curated by expert scientists from primary scientific publications and is referenced to source articles. AutDB is actively maintained with a rigorous quarterly data release schedule. As of June 2017, AutDB contains detailed annotations for 910 genes, 2197 CNV loci, 1060 rodent models and 38 296 PINs. With its widespread use by the research community, AutDB serves as a reference resource for analysis of large datasets, accelerating ASD research and potentially leading to targeted drug treatments. AutDB is available at http://autism.mindspec.org/autdb/Welcome.do. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. InnateDB: systems biology of innate immunity and beyond—recent updates and continuing curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Karin; Foroushani, Amir K.; Laird, Matthew R.; Chen, Carol; Sribnaia, Anastasia; Lo, Raymond; Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Lynn, David J.

    2013-01-01

    InnateDB (http://www.innatedb.com) is an integrated analysis platform that has been specifically designed to facilitate systems-level analyses of mammalian innate immunity networks, pathways and genes. In this article, we provide details of recent updates and improvements to the database. InnateDB now contains >196 000 human, mouse and bovine experimentally validated molecular interactions and 3000 pathway annotations of relevance to all mammalian cellular systems (i.e. not just immune relevant pathways and interactions). In addition, the InnateDB team has, to date, manually curated in excess of 18 000 molecular interactions of relevance to innate immunity, providing unprecedented insight into innate immunity networks, pathways and their component molecules. More recently, InnateDB has also initiated the curation of allergy- and asthma-related interactions. Furthermore, we report a range of improvements to our integrated bioinformatics solutions including web service access to InnateDB interaction data using Proteomics Standards Initiative Common Query Interface, enhanced Gene Ontology analysis for innate immunity, and the availability of new network visualizations tools. Finally, the recent integration of bovine data makes InnateDB the first integrated network analysis platform for this agriculturally important model organism. PMID:23180781

  19. InnateDB: systems biology of innate immunity and beyond--recent updates and continuing curation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Karin; Foroushani, Amir K; Laird, Matthew R; Chen, Carol; Sribnaia, Anastasia; Lo, Raymond; Winsor, Geoffrey L; Hancock, Robert E W; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Lynn, David J

    2013-01-01

    InnateDB (http://www.innatedb.com) is an integrated analysis platform that has been specifically designed to facilitate systems-level analyses of mammalian innate immunity networks, pathways and genes. In this article, we provide details of recent updates and improvements to the database. InnateDB now contains >196 000 human, mouse and bovine experimentally validated molecular interactions and 3000 pathway annotations of relevance to all mammalian cellular systems (i.e. not just immune relevant pathways and interactions). In addition, the InnateDB team has, to date, manually curated in excess of 18 000 molecular interactions of relevance to innate immunity, providing unprecedented insight into innate immunity networks, pathways and their component molecules. More recently, InnateDB has also initiated the curation of allergy- and asthma-related interactions. Furthermore, we report a range of improvements to our integrated bioinformatics solutions including web service access to InnateDB interaction data using Proteomics Standards Initiative Common Query Interface, enhanced Gene Ontology analysis for innate immunity, and the availability of new network visualizations tools. Finally, the recent integration of bovine data makes InnateDB the first integrated network analysis platform for this agriculturally important model organism.

  20. A MongoDB-Based Management of Planar Spatial Data with a Flattened R-Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longgang Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses how to manage planar spatial data using MongoDB, a popular NoSQL database characterized as a document-oriented, rich query language and high availability. The core idea is to flatten a hierarchical R-tree structure into a tabular MongoDB collection, during which R-tree nodes are represented as collection documents and R-tree pointers are expressed as document identifiers. By following this strategy, a storage schema to support R-tree-based create, read, update, and delete (CRUD operations is designed and a module to manage planar spatial data by consuming and maintaining flattened R-tree structure is developed. The R-tree module is then seamlessly integrated into MongoDB, so that users could manipulate planar spatial data with existing command interfaces oriented to geodetic spatial data. The experimental evaluation, using real-world datasets with diverse coverage, types, and sizes, shows that planar spatial data can be effectively managed by MongoDB with our flattened R-tree and, therefore, the application extent of MongoDB will be greatly enlarged. Our work resulted in a MongoDB branch with R-tree support, which has been released on GitHub for open access.

  1. A 60-dB linear VGA with novel exponential gain approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jiaye; Tan Xi; Wang Junyu; Tang Zhangwen; Min Hao

    2009-01-01

    A CMOS variable gain amplifier (VGA) that adopts a novel exponential gain approximation is presented. No additional exponential gain control circuit is required in the proposed VGA used in a direct conversion receiver. A wide gain control voltage from 0.4 to 1.8 V and a high linearity performance are achieved. The three-stage VGA with automatic gain control (AGC) and DC offset cancellation (DCOC) is fabricated in a 0.18-μm CMOS technology and shows a linear gain range of more than 58-dB with a linearity error less than ±1 dB. The 3-dB bandwidth is over 8 MHz at all gain settings. The measured input-referred third intercept point (IIP3) of the proposed VGA varies from -18.1 to 13.5 dBm, and the measured noise figure varies from 27 to 65 dB at a frequency of 1 MHz. The dynamic range of the closed-loop AGC exceeds 56 dB, where the output signal-to-noise-and-distortion ratio (SNDR) reaches 20 dB. The whole circuit, occupying 0.3 mm 2 of chip area, dissipates less than 3.7 mA from a 1.8-V supply.

  2. The Gypsy Database (GyDB) of mobile genetic elements: release 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Carlos; Futami, Ricardo; Covelli, Laura; Domínguez-Escribá, Laura; Viu, Jose M; Tamarit, Daniel; Aguilar-Rodríguez, Jose; Vicente-Ripolles, Miguel; Fuster, Gonzalo; Bernet, Guillermo P; Maumus, Florian; Munoz-Pomer, Alfonso; Sempere, Jose M; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andres

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the second release of the Gypsy Database of Mobile Genetic Elements (GyDB 2.0): a research project devoted to the evolutionary dynamics of viruses and transposable elements based on their phylogenetic classification (per lineage and protein domain). The Gypsy Database (GyDB) is a long-term project that is continuously progressing, and that owing to the high molecular diversity of mobile elements requires to be completed in several stages. GyDB 2.0 has been powered with a wiki to allow other researchers participate in the project. The current database stage and scope are long terminal repeats (LTR) retroelements and relatives. GyDB 2.0 is an update based on the analysis of Ty3/Gypsy, Retroviridae, Ty1/Copia and Bel/Pao LTR retroelements and the Caulimoviridae pararetroviruses of plants. Among other features, in terms of the aforementioned topics, this update adds: (i) a variety of descriptions and reviews distributed in multiple web pages; (ii) protein-based phylogenies, where phylogenetic levels are assigned to distinct classified elements; (iii) a collection of multiple alignments, lineage-specific hidden Markov models and consensus sequences, called GyDB collection; (iv) updated RefSeq databases and BLAST and HMM servers to facilitate sequence characterization of new LTR retroelement and caulimovirus queries; and (v) a bibliographic server. GyDB 2.0 is available at http://gydb.org.

  3. PhenoDB: an integrated client/server database for linkage and population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, K H; Nadkarni, P; Silverstein, S; Kidd, J R; Pakstis, A J; Miller, P; Kidd, K K

    1996-08-01

    In this paper we describe PhenoDB, an Internet-accessible client/server database application for population and linkage genetics. PhenoDB stores genetic marker data on pedigrees and populations. A database for population and linkage genetics requires two core functions: data management tasks, such as interactive validation during data entry and editing, and data analysis tasks, such as generating summary population statistics and performing linkage analyses. In PhenoDB we attempt to make these tasks as easy as possible. The client/server architecture allows efficient management and manipulation of large datasets via an easy-to-use graphical interface. PhenoDB data (73 populations, 34 pedigrees, approximately 4200 individuals, and close to 80,000 typings) are stored in a generic format that can be readily exported to (or imported from) the file formats required by various existing analysis programs such as LIPED and Lathrop and Lalouel's Multipoint Linkage. PhenoDB allows performance of complex ad-hoc queries and can generate reports for use in project management. Finally, PhenoDB can produce statistical summaries such as allele frequencies, phenotype frequencies, and Chi-square tests of Hardy-Weinberg ratios of population/pedigree data.

  4. Versión Transcultural del Cuestionario de Personalidad de Zuckerman- Kuhlman (ZKPQ-50-CC en Población Argentina (Transcultural Version of the Zuckerman Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ-50-CC in the Argentinean Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Daniel Ledesma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to provide evidence of the validity of the ZKPQ-50-CC in the Argentinean population.The ZKPQ-50-CC is a brief personality measure to assess Zuckerman's Alternative Five-Factor Model. Thisinstrument was simultaneously developed in different countries and languages, which makes it of special interestto cross-cultural research. The sample consisted of 895 adults selected from the general population in the city ofMar del Plata (Argentina. Psychometric analysis included dimensional validity, reliability and differences due togender and age. The results yielded a five-factor structure which was consistent with the model, acceptable degreesof internal consistency, and age and gender differences for the scales. Overall, the results were consistent with theoriginal instrument, although there were some slight differences. The findings provide evidence of the validity of theZKPQ-50-CC in a cultural context different from those in which the instrument was developed. Further psychometricresearch is needed to assess the validity of the questionnaire, such as its convergent validity, test-re-test reliability androbustness against social desirability bias.

  5. Characteristics of hospital patients colonized with livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) CC398 versus other MRSA clones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köck, R; Siam, K; Al-Malat, S; Christmann, J; Schaumburg, F; Becker, K; Friedrich, A W

    2011-01-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) associated with the clonal complex (CC) 398 has emerged among livestock and humans exposed to these animals. MRSA CC398 has so far contributed relatively little to spread of MRSA and the burden of disease in the healthcare setting. This study aimed

  6. First Report of a Peroxiredoxin Homologue in Jellyfish: Molecular Cloning, Expression and Functional Characterization of CcPrx4 from Cyanea capillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We first identified and characterized a novel peroxiredoxin (Prx, designated as CcPrx4, from the cDNA library of the tentacle of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata. The full-length cDNA sequence of CcPrx4 consisted of 884 nucleotides with an open reading frame encoding a mature protein of 247 amino acids. It showed a significant homology to peroxiredoxin 4 (Prx4 with the highly conserved F-motif (93FTFVCPTEI101, hydrophobic region (217VCPAGW222, 140GGLG143 and 239YF240, indicating that it should be a new member of the Prx4 family. The deduced CcPrx4 protein had a calculated molecular mass of 27.2 kDa and an estimated isoelectric point of 6.3. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that CcPrx4 mRNA could be detected in all the jellyfish tissues analyzed. CcPrx4 protein was cloned into the expression vector, pET-24a, and expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3 pLysS. Recombinant CcPrx4 protein was purified by HisTrap High Performance chelating column chromatography and analyzed for its biological function. The results showed that the purified recombinant CcPrx4 protein manifested the ability to reduce hydrogen peroxide and protect supercoiled DNA from oxidative damage, suggesting that CcPrx4 protein may play an important role in protecting jellyfish from oxidative damage.

  7. Utility of urinary Clara cell protein (CC16) to demonstrate increased lung epithelial permeability in non-smokers exposed to outdoor secondhand smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Helen, Gideon; Holland, Nina T; Balmes, John R; Hall, Daniel B; Bernert, J Thomas; Vena, John E; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Naeher, Luke P

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the utility of urinary Clara cell protein (CC16) as a biomarker of increased lung epithelial permeability in non-smokers exposed to outdoor secondhand smoke. Twenty-eight healthy non-smoking adults visited outdoor patios of a restaurant and a bar where non-participants smoked and an open-air control with no smokers on three weekend days in a crossover study; subjects visited each site once for 3 h. Urine samples were collected at baseline, immediately post exposure and next morning, and analyzed for CC16. Changes in CC16 across location types or with cigarette count were analyzed using mixed-effect models, which included all subjects and stratified by gender. Urinary CC16 was higher in males (n=9) compared with females (n=18) at all measurement occasions (P<0.002), possibly reflecting prostatic contamination. Urinary CC16 from pre-exposure to post-exposure was higher following visits to restaurant and bar sites compared with the control among females but this increase did not reach statistical significance. Post-exposure to pre-exposure urinary CC16 ratios among females increased with cigarette count (P=0.048). Exposure-related increases in urinary CC16 were not seen among males. In conclusion, urinary CC16 may be a useful biomarker of increased lung epithelial permeability among female non-smokers; further work will be required to evaluate its applicability to males.

  8. Relation between circulating CC16 concentrations, lung function, and development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease across the lifespan: a prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra, S.; Halonen, M.; Vasquez, M.M.; Spangenberg, A.; Stern, D.A.; Morgan, W.J.; Wright, A.L.; Tares, L.; Carsin, A.E.; Dobano, C.; Zock, J.P.; Martinez-Moratalla, J.; Urrutia, I.; Sunyer, J.; Keidel, D.; Imboden, M.; Probst-Hensch, N.; Halberg, J.; Wichman, M.; Bousquet, J.; Belgrave, D.C.M.; Singer, E.; Custovic, A.; Anto, J.; Martinez, F.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low concentrations of the anti-inflammatory protein CC16 (approved symbol SCGB1A1) in serum have been associated with accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We investigated whether low circulating CC16

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of SiC on C-C composites as plasma facing materials for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W. J.; Lee, M. Y.; Park, J. Y.; Hong, G. W.; Kim, J. I.; Choi, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the low activation and excellent mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, carbon-fiber reinforced carbon(C-C) composites have received much attention for plasma facing materials for fusion reactor and high-temperature structural applications such as aircrafts and space vehicles. These proposed applications have been frustrated by the lack of resistance to hydrogen erosion and oxidation on exposure to ambient oxidizing conditions at high temperature. Although Silicon Carbide (SiC) has shown excellent properties as an effective erosion-and oxidation-protection coating, many cracks are developed during fabrication and thermal cycles in use due to the Coefficients of Thermal Expansion(CTE) mismatch between SiC and C-C composite. In this study, we adopted a pyrolitic carbon as an interlayer between SiC and C-C substrate in order to minimize the CTE mismatch. The oxidation-protection performance of this composite was investigated as well

  10. Emerging role of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 related mechanisms in diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2016-08-24

    Chemokines are critical components in pathology. The roles of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 (CCL4) and its receptor are associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) and atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases. However, due to the complexity of these diseases, the specific effects of CCL4 remain unclear, although recent reports have suggested that multiple pathways are related to CCL4. In this review, we provide an overview of the role and potential mechanisms of CCL4 and one of its major receptors, fifth CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), in DM and cardiovascular diseases. CCL4-related mechanisms, including CCL4 and CCR5, might provide potential therapeutic targets in DM and/or atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Diode laser spectra of CC12F2 near 10.8 microns; air-broadening effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer with resolution of about 0.0001/cm was used to record air-broadened spectra of CC12F2 in two regions near 922.8/cm and 921.7/cm. In the 922.8/cm region the structure shows good intensity contrast at pressures corresponding to upper atmospheric pressures. The absorption features have a spacing of 0.014/cm, which is sufficiently wide to retain spectral structure at pressures as high as 48 torr or altitudes as low as 19 km. The apparent broadening is 2 MHz/torr. The single-line broadening coefficient for CC12F2 can be estimated to be 8 + or - 2 MHz/torr FWHM. In the 921.7/cm region the high-resolution structure is discernible up to 24 torr, but the intensity contrast is not sufficiently strong to be of use in analysis of stratospheric spectra.

  12. Tvorba vs. štěpení C-C vazeb katalyzované komplexy niklu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečas, D.; Turský, M.; Kotora, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 11 (2005), s. 861 ISSN 0009-2770. [Pokroky v organické, bioorganické a farmaceutické chemii /40./. 18.11.2005-20.11.2005, Nymburk] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0508; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/03/H140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : bipyridine * cyclotrimerization * asymmetric synthesis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  13. Study of Command and Control (C&C) Structures on the Employment of Collaborative Engagement Capability (CEC) on Land Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    from various nodes of a network-centric engagement . With at least two ships tracking a common air threat, these ships communicate and 13 share real...computed to be engaged by the anti-air weapon in a single salvo, which may or may not be realistic due to the scale of resources that are to be committed ...CONTROL (C&C) STRUCTURES ON THE EMPLOYMENT OF COLLABORATIVE ENGAGEMENT CAPABILITY (CEC) ON LAND SYSTEMS by Chong Siong Lim September 2012

  14. Search for the weak decays J/psi -> D-s(()*()-) e(+)nu(e) + c.c.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Chu, Y. P.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Moeini, H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of 2.25 x 10(8) J/psi events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we search for the J/psi semileptonic weak decay J/psi -> D-s(-) e(+)nu(e) +c.c. with a much higher sensitivity than previous searches. We also perform the first search for J/psi -> D-s(*-) e(+)

  15. Activation of Propane C-H and C-C Bonds by Gas-Phase Pt Atom: A Theoretical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Wei Hu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The reaction mechanism of the gas-phase Pt atom with C3H8 has been systematically investigated on the singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces at CCSD(T//BPW91/6-311++G(d, p, Lanl2dz level. Pt atom prefers the attack of primary over secondary C-H bonds in propane. For the Pt + C3H8 reaction, the major and minor reaction channels lead to PtC3H6 + H2 and PtCH2 + C2H6, respectively, whereas the possibility to form products PtC2H4 + CH4 is so small that it can be neglected. The minimal energy reaction pathway for the formation of PtC3H6 + H2, involving one spin inversion, prefers to start at the triplet state and afterward proceed along the singlet state. The optimal C-C bond cleavages are assigned to C-H bond activation as the first step, followed by cleavage of a C-C bond. The C-H insertion intermediates are kinetically favored over the C-C insertion intermediates. From C-C to C-H oxidative insertion, the lowering of activation barrier is mainly caused by the more stabilizing transition state interaction ΔEint, which is the actual interaction energy between the deformed reactants in the transition state.

  16. Suggestion for search of ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) in a cosmic object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, M.; Chandra, S.

    2018-05-01

    Ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O) and its isomer acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) are important organic molecules because of their potential role in the formation of amino acids. The c-C2H4O molecule is a b-type asymmetric top molecule and owing to half-spin of each of the four hydrogen atoms, it has two distinct ortho (nuclear spin one) and para (nuclear spin zero and two) species. It has been detected in the Sgr B2N. Using the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants along with the electric dipole moment, we have calculated energies of 100 rotational levels of each of the ortho and para species of c-C2H4O molecule and the Einstein A-coefficients for radiative transitions between the levels. The values of Einstein A-coefficients along with the scaled values for the collisional rate coefficients are used for solving a set of statistical equilibrium equations coupled with the equations of radiative transfer. Brightness-temperatures of five rotational transitions of each of the ortho and para species of c-C2H4O molecule are investigated. Out of these ten transitions, three transitions are found to show the anomalous absorption and rest seven are found to show the emission feature. We have also investigated seven transitions observed unblended in the Sgr B2(N). We have found that the transitions 3_{3 0} - 3_{2 1} (23.134 GHz), 2_{2 0} - 2_{1 1} (15.603 GHz), 3_{3 1} - 3_{2 2} (39.680 GHz) and 1_{1 1} - 0_{0 0} (39.582 GHz) may play important role for the identification of ethylene oxide in a cosmic object.

  17. Extrusion of CO from aryl ketones: rhodium(I)-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage directed by a pyridine group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhi-Quan; Li, Hu; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xi-Sha; Chen, Kang; Wang, Xin; Sun, Jian; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2012-03-12

    Snipping tool: the rhodium(I)-catalyzed extrusion of carbon monoxide from biaryl ketones and alkyl/alkenyl aryl ketones was developed to produce biaryls and alkyl/alkenyl arenes, respectively, in high yields. A wide range of functionalities are tolerated. Not only does this method provide an alternative pathway to construct useful scaffolds, but also offers a new strategy for C-C bond activation. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The use of ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Vinciane; Wendt, Bianca; Werkmeister, Svenja; Junge, Kathrin; Beller, Matthias; Chaudret, Bruno

    2013-04-28

    The performance of well-defined ultrasmall iron(0) nanoparticles (NPs) as catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of unsaturated C-C and C=X bonds is reported. Monodisperse iron nanoparticles of about 2 nm size are synthesized by the decomposition of {Fe(N[Si(CH3)3]2)2}2 under dihydrogen. They are found to be active for the hydrogenation of various alkenes and alkynes under mild conditions and weakly active for C=O bond hydrogenation.

  19. Synthesis of Aromatic Compounds by Catalytic C-C Bond Activation of Biphenylene or Angular [3]Phenylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korotvička, A.; Císařová, I.; Roithová, J.; Kotora, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 14 (2012), s. 4200-4207 ISSN 0947-6539 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) SVV 263205/2011; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0338; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : arenes * cleavage reactions * iridium * reaction mechanisms * rhodium Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.831, year: 2012

  20. ZiBuPiYin recipe protects db/db mice from diabetes-associated cognitive decline through improving multiple pathological changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    Full Text Available Multiple organ systems, including the brain, which undergoes changes that may increase the risk of cognitive decline, are adversely affected by diabetes mellitus (DM. Here, we demonstrate that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM db/db mice exhibited hippocampus-dependent memory impairment, which might associate with a reduction in dendritic spine density in the pyramidal neurons of brain, Aβ1-42 deposition in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus, and a decreased expression of neurostructural proteins including microtubule-associated protein (MAP2, a marker of dendrites, and postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95, a marker of excitatory synapses. To investigate the effects of the ZiBuPiYin recipe (ZBPYR, a traditional Chinese medicine recipe, on diabetes-related cognitive decline (DACD, db/db mice received daily administration of ZBPYR over an experimental period of 6 weeks. We then confirmed that ZBPYR rescued learning and memory performance impairments, reversed dendritic spine loss, reduced Aβ1-42 deposition and restored the expression levels of MAP2 and PSD95. The present study also revealed that ZBPYR strengthened brain leptin and insulin signaling and inhibited GSK3β overactivity, which may be the potential mechanism or underlying targets of ZBPYR. These findings conclude that ZBPYR prevents DACD, most likely by improving dendritic spine density and attenuating brain leptin and insulin signaling pathway injury. Our findings provide further evidence for the effects of ZBPYR on DACD.

  1. Effect of Long-Term Dietary Arginyl-Fructose (AF on Hyperglycemia and HbA1c in Diabetic db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Hyoung Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that Amadori compounds exert anti-diabetic effects by lowering sucrose-induced hyperglycemia in normal Sprague-Dawley rats. In the present study we extended our recent findings to evaluate whether α-glucosidase inhibitor arginyl-fructose (AF lowers blood glucose level in diabetic db/db mice, a genetic model for type 2 diabetes. The db/db mice were randomly assigned to high-carbohydrate diets (66.1% corn starch with and without AF (4% in the diet for 6 weeks. Changes in body weight, blood glucose level, and food intake were measured daily for 42 days. Dietary supplementation of AF resulted in a significant decrease of blood glucose level (p < 0.001 and body weight (p < 0.001. The level of HbA1c, a better indicator of plasma glucose concentration over prolonged periods of time, was also significantly decreased for 6-week period (p < 0.001. Dietary treatment of acarbose® (0.04% in diet, a positive control, also significantly alleviated the level of blood glucose, HbA1c, and body weight. These results indicate that AF Maillard reaction product improves postprandial hyperglycemia by suppressing glucose absorption as well as decreasing HbA1c level.

  2. Red raspberry decreases heart biomarkers of cardiac remodeling associated with oxidative and inflammatory stress in obese diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noratto, Giuliana; Chew, Boon P; Ivanov, Ivan

    2016-12-07

    Early diagnosis of risks of heart disease can be critical to fight cardiovascular diseases (CVD) associated with obesity and diabetes and for the implementation of nutritional interventions. The objective of this study was to investigate the cardioprotective effects of red raspberry consumption in the obese diabetic (db/db) mice using proteomic analysis as a tool. Hearts harvested from db/db mice fed an isocaloric diet (AIN-93G, control group) or AIN-93G supplemented with freeze-dried raspberry (raspberry group) for eight weeks were analyzed for changes in protein expression. Bioinformatics and pathway analysis of proteomic data detected in >50% samples were scrutinized with Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Histologic analysis, adipokines and lipid quantification in heart tissues were assessed as end points for disease biomarkers. Results from proteomic data identified five proteins unique to the control group involved in cardiac remodeling and one involved in stress response. Twenty-five proteins expressed in both groups were differentially downregulated in the raspberry group (p raspberry and control groups were detected in heart lipid composition, adipokines, and morphology within the study timeframe. In conclusion, raspberry consumption may be effective in decreasing the levels of oxidative and inflammatory stress that promote morphological changes in the heart at an older age, thus preventing or delaying heart diseases.

  3. Z80 based voltage and temperature monitor for the Main Ring control crate: the CC48 card

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, K.

    1982-06-01

    Several years ago, there seemed to be a need to monitor the power supply voltages and temperatures in the three bay racks of the Main Ring service buildings. A few years ago, another engineer seemed to have done a preliminary design using analog voltage comparators. In late 1979, it was proposed to use a microprocessor instead of analog voltage comparators. It was dramatic that all the people at a meeting were excited about the idea and unanimously approved the project. The author can remember some of the reasons why they were so enthusiastic about the idea at the time, i.e., (1) it was new to have microprocessor based cards on the Main Ring control system, (2) programmable alarm limits were preferred to resistor dividers or potentiometers with analog voltage comparators, (3) it was the first to try the communication between a host computer and distributed intelligent cards. The author started the design on the CC48 in January, 1980 and completed in April, 1980. We had the prototype card working in July, 1980 and tested the card on the system in September, 1980. Seven CC48s of the pilot production were installed in July, 1981. We mass-produced 35 more cards and finished installing them around the Main Ring in May, 1982. The author talks about the hardware, software and operation on the CC48 card, and he will make some remarks on his experience on the project

  4. Using an optimal CC-PLSR-RBFNN model and NIR spectroscopy for the starch content determination in corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Lu, Jiangang

    2018-05-05

    Corn starch is an important material which has been traditionally used in the fields of food and chemical industry. In order to enhance the rapidness and reliability of the determination for starch content in corn, a methodology is proposed in this work, using an optimal CC-PLSR-RBFNN calibration model and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The proposed model was developed based on the optimal selection of crucial parameters and the combination of correlation coefficient method (CC), partial least squares regression (PLSR) and radial basis function neural network (RBFNN). To test the performance of the model, a standard NIR spectroscopy data set was introduced, containing spectral information and chemical reference measurements of 80 corn samples. For comparison, several other models based on the identical data set were also briefly discussed. In this process, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and coefficient of determination (Rp 2 ) in the prediction set were used to make evaluations. As a result, the proposed model presented the best predictive performance with the smallest RMSEP (0.0497%) and the highest Rp 2 (0.9968). Therefore, the proposed method combining NIR spectroscopy with the optimal CC-PLSR-RBFNN model can be helpful to determine starch content in corn. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Using an optimal CC-PLSR-RBFNN model and NIR spectroscopy for the starch content determination in corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Lu, Jiangang

    2018-05-01

    Corn starch is an important material which has been traditionally used in the fields of food and chemical industry. In order to enhance the rapidness and reliability of the determination for starch content in corn, a methodology is proposed in this work, using an optimal CC-PLSR-RBFNN calibration model and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The proposed model was developed based on the optimal selection of crucial parameters and the combination of correlation coefficient method (CC), partial least squares regression (PLSR) and radial basis function neural network (RBFNN). To test the performance of the model, a standard NIR spectroscopy data set was introduced, containing spectral information and chemical reference measurements of 80 corn samples. For comparison, several other models based on the identical data set were also briefly discussed. In this process, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and coefficient of determination (Rp2) in the prediction set were used to make evaluations. As a result, the proposed model presented the best predictive performance with the smallest RMSEP (0.0497%) and the highest Rp2 (0.9968). Therefore, the proposed method combining NIR spectroscopy with the optimal CC-PLSR-RBFNN model can be helpful to determine starch content in corn.

  6. Una Alternativa para Regular los Buses de CC en un Filtro Activo Paralelo con Inversor de 5 Niveles en Cascada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homero Miranda

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: En este artículo se explora un método para regular las tensiones en los buses de CC en un filtro activo de corriente. El inversor es un convertidor multinivel de cinco niveles y está formado por dos celdas en configuración puente H con enlace capacitivo. Mediante la medición del bus de CC de una celda, se controla la tensión en la otra reduciendo así el número de sensores de tensión. Para llevar a cabo la regulación del bus de CC y la corriente de salida, se utiliza un controlador PI para cada lazo de control. Se presentan una serie de análisis, simulaciones y resultados experimentales del sistema de potencia con el fin de validar la propuesta de este trabajo. Palabras clave: Filtro Activo, Inversores, Armónicos, Potencia reactiva, Controlador PI

  7. Investigation of C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (ccr4 gene polymorphism in patients with Gestational Trophoblastic diseases (GTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Naeimi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD consists of a spectrum of disorders that are characterized by an abnormal proliferation of trophoblastic tissue, following an abnormal fertilization. CCR4 is one chemo-attractant receptors preferentially expressed on Th2 cells, and therefore, is likely to participate in the recruitment of antigen-specific Th2 cells to sites of allergen exposure. Variations in CCR4 have been reported. In this study we intended to investigate the relationship between polymorphism of this particular gene at the site of 1014 C/T and GTD. Materials & Methods: In the present study, the polymorphisms of the CCR4 gene at the sites of 1014 C/T was investigated in 100 patients at in 2010 with proved GTD and 120 age-sex matched healthy individuals. Polymorphysm of CC chemokine 4 were investigated in these two groups by PCR-RFLP.These two groups were compared in respect their genotypes and alleles. Results: Frequency of genotype TT, CT, CC patients were 34%, 62% and 4% while the frequency of the control group, were 46.7%, 35.8% and 17.5% respectively. A significant difference was seen in genotype prevalence of 1014 C/T in ccr4 gene in the two mentioned groups (P0.05(. Conclusion: Regarding the relationship between The C-C chemokine receptor type 4 and gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD, it might be possible to use this gene as a prognostic marker in identifying the susceptible patients.

  8. Genetic diversity and striatal gene networks: focus on the heterogeneous stock-collaborative cross (HS-CC mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belknap John

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study focused on the extent genetic diversity within a species (Mus musculus affects gene co-expression network structure. To examine this issue, we have created a new mouse resource, a heterogeneous stock (HS formed from the same eight inbred strains that have been used to create the collaborative cross (CC. The eight inbred strains capture > 90% of the genetic diversity available within the species. For contrast with the HS-CC, a C57BL/6J (B6 × DBA/2J (D2 F2 intercross and the HS4, derived from crossing the B6, D2, BALB/cJ and LP/J strains, were used. Brain (striatum gene expression data were obtained using the Illumina Mouse WG 6.1 array, and the data sets were interrogated using a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA. Results Genes reliably detected as expressed were similar in all three data sets as was the variability of expression. As measured by the WGCNA, the modular structure of the transcriptome networks was also preserved both on the basis of module assignment and from the perspective of the topological overlap maps. Details of the HS-CC gene modules are provided; essentially identical results were obtained for the HS4 and F2 modules. Gene ontology annotation of the modules revealed a significant overrepresentation in some modules for neuronal processes, e.g., central nervous system development. Integration with known protein-protein interactions data indicated significant enrichment among co-expressed genes. We also noted significant overlap with markers of central nervous system cell types (neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Using the Allen Brain Atlas, we found evidence of spatial co-localization within the striatum for several modules. Finally, for some modules it was possible to detect an enrichment of transcription binding sites. The binding site for Wt1, which is associated with neurodegeneration, was the most significantly overrepresented. Conclusions Despite the marked

  9. Genetic diversity and striatal gene networks: focus on the heterogeneous stock-collaborative cross (HS-CC) mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Ovidiu D; Darakjian, Priscila; Walter, Nicole A R; Malmanger, Barry; Oberbeck, Denesa; Belknap, John; McWeeney, Shannon; Hitzemann, Robert

    2010-10-19

    The current study focused on the extent genetic diversity within a species (Mus musculus) affects gene co-expression network structure. To examine this issue, we have created a new mouse resource, a heterogeneous stock (HS) formed from the same eight inbred strains that have been used to create the collaborative cross (CC). The eight inbred strains capture > 90% of the genetic diversity available within the species. For contrast with the HS-CC, a C57BL/6J (B6) × DBA/2J (D2) F2 intercross and the HS4, derived from crossing the B6, D2, BALB/cJ and LP/J strains, were used. Brain (striatum) gene expression data were obtained using the Illumina Mouse WG 6.1 array, and the data sets were interrogated using a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Genes reliably detected as expressed were similar in all three data sets as was the variability of expression. As measured by the WGCNA, the modular structure of the transcriptome networks was also preserved both on the basis of module assignment and from the perspective of the topological overlap maps. Details of the HS-CC gene modules are provided; essentially identical results were obtained for the HS4 and F2 modules. Gene ontology annotation of the modules revealed a significant overrepresentation in some modules for neuronal processes, e.g., central nervous system development. Integration with known protein-protein interactions data indicated significant enrichment among co-expressed genes. We also noted significant overlap with markers of central nervous system cell types (neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes). Using the Allen Brain Atlas, we found evidence of spatial co-localization within the striatum for several modules. Finally, for some modules it was possible to detect an enrichment of transcription binding sites. The binding site for Wt1, which is associated with neurodegeneration, was the most significantly overrepresented. Despite the marked differences in genetic diversity, the transcriptome

  10. Portability, Salary and Asset Price Risk: A Continuous-Time Expected Utility Comparison of DB and DC Pension Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares two different types of private retirement plans from the perspective of a representative beneficiary: a defined benefit (DB and a defined contribution (DC plan. While salary risk is the main common risk factor in DB and DC pension plans, one of the key differences is that DB plans carry portability risks, whereas DC plans bear asset price risk. We model these tradeoffs explicitly in this paper and compare these two plans in a utility-based framework. Our numerical analysis focuses on answering the question of when the beneficiary is indifferent between the DB and DC plan. Most of our results confirm the findings in the existing literature, among which, e.g., portability losses considerably reduce the relative attractiveness of the DB plan. However, we also find that the attractiveness of the DB plan can decrease in the level of risk aversion, which is inconsistent with the existing literature.

  11. A Response Surface Methodology Approach to Investigate the Effect of Sulfur Dioxide, pH, and Ethanol on DbCD and DbVPR Gene Expression and on the Volatile Phenol Production in Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis CBS2499

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Valdetara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis, the main spoilage yeast in barrel-aged wine, metabolize hydroxycinnamic acids into off-flavors, namely ethylphenols. Recently, both the enzymes involved in this transformation, the cinnamate decarboxylase (DbCD and the vinylphenol reductase (DbVPR, have been identified. To counteract microbial proliferation in wine, sulfur dioxide (SO2 is used commonly to stabilize the final product, but limiting its use is advised to preserve human health and boost sustainability in winemaking. In the present study, the influence of SO2 was investigated in relation with pH and ethanol factors on the expression of DbCD and DbVPR genes and volatile phenol production in D. bruxellensis CBS2499 strain under different model wines throughout a response surface methodology (RSM. In order to ensure an exact quantification of DbCD and DbVPR expression, an appropriate housekeeping gene was sought among DbPDC, DbALD, DbEF, DbACT, and DbTUB genes by GeNorm and Normfinder algorithms. The latter gene showed the highest expression stability and it was chosen as the reference housekeeping gene in qPCR assays. Even though SO2 could not be commented as main factor because of its statistical irrelevance on the response of DbCD gene, linear interactions with pH and ethanol concurred to define a significant effect (p < 0.05 on its expression. The DbCD gene was generally downregulated respect to a permissive growth condition (0 mg/L mol. SO2, pH 4.5 and 5% v/v ethanol; the combination of the factor levels that maximizes its expression (0.83-fold change was calculated at 0.25 mg/L mol. SO2, pH 4.5 and 12.5% (v/v ethanol. On the contrary, DbVPR expression was not influenced by main factors or by their interactions; however, its expression is maximized (1.80-fold change at the same conditions calculated for DbCD gene. While no linear interaction between factors influenced the off-flavor synthesis, ethanol and pH produced a significant effect as

  12. Portability, Salary and Asset Price Risk: A Continuous-Time Expected Utility Comparison of DB and DC Pension Plans

    OpenAIRE

    An Chen; Filip Uzelac

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares two different types of private retirement plans from the perspective of a representative beneficiary: a defined benefit (DB) and a defined contribution (DC) plan. While salary risk is the main common risk factor in DB and DC pension plans, one of the key differences is that DB plans carry portability risks, whereas DC plans bear asset price risk. We model these tradeoffs explicitly in this paper and compare these two plans in a utility-based framework. Our numerical analys...

  13. CartoDB: Una base de datos geoespacial para el desarrollo fácil de aplicaciones web

    OpenAIRE

    Torre Alonso, Javier de la; Álvarez Leiva, Sergio; Santana, Javier

    2012-01-01

    CartoDB es una base de datos geoespacial Open Source. Internamente funciona con PostGIS, Node.js y Mapnik. CartoDB proporciona una interfaz para importar y visualizar datos geoespaciales y una serie de APIs para acceder a los datos mediante sentencias SQL y Tiles. CartoDB puede ser utilizado para múltiples tipos de aplicaciones y visualizaciones online, desde aplicaciones móviles, visualizaciones online, portales geoespaciales y prácticamente cualquier tipo de aplicación geoespacial. CartoDB ...

  14. MicrobiomeDB: a systems biology platform for integrating, mining and analyzing microbiome experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Francislon S; Brestelli, John; Cade, Shon; Zheng, Jie; Iodice, John; Fischer, Steve; Aurrecoechea, Cristina; Kissinger, Jessica C; Brunk, Brian P; Stoeckert, Christian J; Fernandes, Gabriel R; Roos, David S; Beiting, Daniel P

    2018-01-04

    MicrobiomeDB (http://microbiomeDB.org) is a data discovery and analysis platform that empowers researchers to fully leverage experimental variables to interrogate microbiome datasets. MicrobiomeDB was developed in collaboration with the Eukaryotic Pathogens Bioinformatics Resource Center (http://EuPathDB.org) and leverages the infrastructure and user interface of EuPathDB, which allows users to construct in silico experiments using an intuitive graphical 'strategy' approach. The current release of the database integrates microbial census data with sample details for nearly 14 000 samples originating from human, animal and environmental sources, including over 9000 samples from healthy human subjects in the Human Microbiome Project (http://portal.ihmpdcc.org/). Query results can be statistically analyzed and graphically visualized via interactive web applications launched directly in the browser, providing insight into microbial community diversity and allowing users to identify taxa associated with any experimental covariate. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Clone DB: an integrated NCBI resource for clone-associated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Valerie A.; Chen, Hsiu-Chuan; Clausen, Cliff; Meric, Peter A.; Zhou, Zhigang; Bouk, Nathan; Husain, Nora; Maglott, Donna R.; Church, Deanna M.

    2013-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Clone DB (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/clone/) is an integrated resource providing information about and facilitating access to clones, which serve as valuable research reagents in many fields, including genome sequencing and variation analysis. Clone DB represents an expansion and replacement of the former NCBI Clone Registry and has records for genomic and cell-based libraries and clones representing more than 100 different eukaryotic taxa. Records provide details of library construction, associated sequences, map positions and information about resource distribution. Clone DB is indexed in the NCBI Entrez system and can be queried by fields that include organism, clone name, gene name and sequence identifier. Whenever possible, genomic clones are mapped to reference assemblies and their map positions provided in clone records. Clones mapping to specific genomic regions can also be searched for using the NCBI Clone Finder tool, which accepts queries based on sequence coordinates or features such as gene or transcript names. Clone DB makes reports of library, clone and placement data on its FTP site available for download. With Clone DB, users now have available to them a centralized resource that provides them with the tools they will need to make use of these important research reagents. PMID:23193260

  16. dbEM: A database of epigenetic modifiers curated from cancerous and normal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Nanda, Jagpreet; Kumar, Rahul; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-18

    We have developed a database called dbEM (database of Epigenetic Modifiers) to maintain the genomic information of about 167 epigenetic modifiers/proteins, which are considered as potential cancer targets. In dbEM, modifiers are classified on functional basis and comprise of 48 histone methyl transferases, 33 chromatin remodelers and 31 histone demethylases. dbEM maintains the genomic information like mutations, copy number variation and gene expression in thousands of tumor samples, cancer cell lines and healthy samples. This information is obtained from public resources viz. COSMIC, CCLE and 1000-genome project. Gene essentiality data retrieved from COLT database further highlights the importance of various epigenetic proteins for cancer survival. We have also reported the sequence profiles, tertiary structures and post-translational modifications of these epigenetic proteins in cancer. It also contains information of 54 drug molecules against different epigenetic proteins. A wide range of tools have been integrated in dbEM e.g. Search, BLAST, Alignment and Profile based prediction. In our analysis, we found that epigenetic proteins DNMT3A, HDAC2, KDM6A, and TET2 are highly mutated in variety of cancers. We are confident that dbEM will be very useful in cancer research particularly in the field of epigenetic proteins based cancer therapeutics. This database is available for public at URL: http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/dbem.

  17. PharmDB-K: Integrated Bio-Pharmacological Network Database for Traditional Korean Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hyun Lee

    Full Text Available Despite the growing attention given to Traditional Medicine (TM worldwide, there is no well-known, publicly available, integrated bio-pharmacological Traditional Korean Medicine (TKM database for researchers in drug discovery. In this study, we have constructed PharmDB-K, which offers comprehensive information relating to TKM-associated drugs (compound, disease indication, and protein relationships. To explore the underlying molecular interaction of TKM, we integrated fourteen different databases, six Pharmacopoeias, and literature, and established a massive bio-pharmacological network for TKM and experimentally validated some cases predicted from the PharmDB-K analyses. Currently, PharmDB-K contains information about 262 TKMs, 7,815 drugs, 3,721 diseases, 32,373 proteins, and 1,887 side effects. One of the unique sets of information in PharmDB-K includes 400 indicator compounds used for standardization of herbal medicine. Furthermore, we are operating PharmDB-K via phExplorer (a network visualization software and BioMart (a data federation framework for convenient search and analysis of the TKM network. Database URL: http://pharmdb-k.org, http://biomart.i-pharm.org.

  18. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC398 is an increasing cause of disease in people with no livestock contact in Denmark, 1999 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jesper; Petersen, Andreas; Sørum, Marit; Stegger, Marc; van Alphen, Lieke; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Knudsen, Lisbet Krause; Larsen, Lars Stehr; Feingold, Beth; Price, Lance Bradley; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Larsen, Anders Rhod; Skov, Robert Leo

    2015-01-01

    Livestock constitutes a potential reservoir of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates belonging to a recently derived lineage within clonal complex 398 (MRSA CC398-IIa). Since its discovery in the early 2000s, this lineage has become a major cause of human disease in Europe, posing a serious public health challenge in countries with intensive livestock production. To retrace the history of human colonisation and infection with MRSA CC398-IIa in Denmark, we conducted a nationwide, retrospective study of MRSA isolates collected from 1999 to 2011. Among 7,429 MRSA isolates screened, we identified 416 MRSA CC398-IIa isolates. Of these, 148 were from people with infections, including 51 from patients reporting no livestock exposure. The first cases of MRSA CC398-IIa infection in Denmark occurred in 2004. Subsequently, the incidence of MRSA CC398-IIa infection showed a linear annual increase of 66% from 2004 to 2011 (from 0.09 to 1.1 per 100,000 person-years). There were clear temporal and spatial relationships between MRSA CC398-IIa-infected patients with and without livestock exposure. These findings suggest substantial dissemination of MRSA CC398-IIa from livestock or livestock workers into the Danish community and underscore the need for strategies to control its spread both on and off the farm.

  19. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC398 is an increasing cause of disease in people with no livestock contact in Denmark, 1999 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, J; Petersen, A; Sørum, M; Stegger, M; van Alphen, L; Valentiner-Branth, P; Knudsen, LK; Larsen, LS; Feingold, B; Price, LB; Andersen, PS; Larsen, AR; Skov, RL

    2016-01-01

    Livestock constitutes a potential reservoir of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates belonging to a recently derived lineage within clonal complex 398 (MRSA CC398-IIa). Since its discovery in the early 2000s, this lineage has become a major cause of human disease in Europe, posing a serious public health challenge in countries with intensive livestock production. To retrace the history of human colonisation and infection with MRSA CC398-IIa in Denmark, we conducted a nationwide, retrospective study of MRSA isolates collected from 1999 to 2011. Among 7,429 MRSA isolates screened, we identified 416 MRSA CC398-IIa isolates. Of these, 148 were from people with infections, including 51 from patients reporting no livestock exposure. The first cases of MRSA CC398-IIa infection in Denmark occurred in 2004. Subsequently, the incidence of MRSA CC398-IIa infection showed a linear annual increase of 66% from 2004 to 2011 (from 0.09 to 1.1 per 100,000 person-years). There were clear temporal and spatial relationships between MRSA CC398-IIa-infected patients with and without livestock exposure. These findings suggest substantial dissemination of MRSA CC398-IIa from livestock or livestock workers into the Danish community and underscore the need for strategies to control its spread both on and off the farm. PMID:26535590

  20. Novel Preclinical and Radiopharmaceutical Aspects of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC: A New PET Tracer for Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Eder

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The detection of prostate cancer lesions by PET imaging of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA has gained highest clinical impact during the last years. 68Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC represents a successful novel PSMA inhibitor radiotracer which has recently demonstrated its suitability in individual first-in-man studies. The radiometal chelator HBED-CC used in this molecule represents a rather rarely used acyclic complexing agent with chemical characteristics favourably influencing the biological functionality of the PSMA inhibitor. The simple replacement of HBED-CC by the prominent radiometal chelator DOTA was shown to dramatically reduce the in vivo imaging quality of the respective 68Ga-labelled PSMA-targeted tracer proving that HBED-CC contributes intrinsically to the PSMA binding of the Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx pharmacophore. Owing to the obvious growing clinical impact, this work aims to reflect the properties of HBED-CC as acyclic radiometal chelator and presents novel preclinical data and relevant aspects of the radiopharmaceutical production process of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC.

  1. Structural Correlation of the Neck Coil with the Coiled-coil (CC1)-Forkhead-associated (FHA) Tandem for Active Kinesin-3 KIF13A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinqi; Huo, Lin; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Wei; Lou, Jizhong; Xu, Tao; Feng, Wei

    2016-02-12

    Processive kinesin motors often contain a coiled-coil neck that controls the directionality and processivity. However, the neck coil (NC) of kinesin-3 is too short to form a stable coiled-coil dimer. Here, we found that the coiled-coil (CC1)-forkhead-associated (FHA) tandem (that is connected to NC by Pro-390) of kinesin-3 KIF13A assembles as an extended dimer. With the removal of Pro-390, the NC-CC1 tandem of KIF13A unexpectedly forms a continuous coiled-coil dimer that can be well aligned into the CC1-FHA dimer. The reverse introduction of Pro-390 breaks the NC-CC1 coiled-coil dimer but provides the intrinsic flexibility to couple NC with the CC1-FHA tandem. Mutations of either NC, CC1, or the FHA domain all significantly impaired the motor activity. Thus, the three elements within the NC-CC1-FHA tandem of KIF13A are structurally interrelated to form a stable dimer for activating the motor. This work also provides the first direct structural evidence to support the formation of a coiled-coil neck by the short characteristic neck domain of kinesin-3. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Structural Correlation of the Neck Coil with the Coiled-coil (CC1)-Forkhead-associated (FHA) Tandem for Active Kinesin-3 KIF13A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinqi; Huo, Lin; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Wei; Lou, Jizhong; Xu, Tao; Feng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Processive kinesin motors often contain a coiled-coil neck that controls the directionality and processivity. However, the neck coil (NC) of kinesin-3 is too short to form a stable coiled-coil dimer. Here, we found that the coiled-coil (CC1)-forkhead-associated (FHA) tandem (that is connected to NC by Pro-390) of kinesin-3 KIF13A assembles as an extended dimer. With the removal of Pro-390, the NC-CC1 tandem of KIF13A unexpectedly forms a continuous coiled-coil dimer that can be well aligned into the CC1-FHA dimer. The reverse introduction of Pro-390 breaks the NC-CC1 coiled-coil dimer but provides the intrinsic flexibility to couple NC with the CC1-FHA tandem. Mutations of either NC, CC1, or the FHA domain all significantly impaired the motor activity. Thus, the three elements within the NC-CC1-FHA tandem of KIF13A are structurally interrelated to form a stable dimer for activating the motor. This work also provides the first direct structural evidence to support the formation of a coiled-coil neck by the short characteristic neck domain of kinesin-3. PMID:26680000

  3. High temperature in-situ synchrotron-based XRD study on the crystal structure evolution of C/C composite impregnated by FLiNaK molten salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shanglei; Yang, Yingguo; Li, Li; Zhang, Dongsheng; Yang, Xinmei; Xia, Huihao; Yan, Long; Tsang, Derek K L; Huai, Ping; Zhou, Xingtai

    2017-09-06

    An in-situ real-time synchrotron-based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was systematically used to investigate the crystal structural evolution of carbon fiber reinforced carbon matrix (C/C) composite impregnated with FLiNaK molten salt during the heat-treatment process. It was found that the crystallographic thermal expansion and contraction rate of interlayer spacing d 002 in C/C composite with FLiNaK salt impregnation is smaller than that in the virgin sample, indicating the suppression on interlayer spacing from FLiNaK salt impregnated. Meanwhile the crystallite size L C002 of C/C composite with FLiNaK salt impregnation is larger than the virgin one after whole heat treatment process, indicating that FLiNaK salt impregnation could facilitate the crystallization of C/C composite after heat treatment process. This improved crystallization in C/C composite with FLiNaK salt impregnation suggests the synthetic action of the salt squeeze effect on crooked carbon layer and the release of internal residual stress after heating-cooling process. Thus, the present study not only contribute to reveal the interaction mechanism between C/C composite and FLiNaK salt in high temperature environment, but also promote the design of safer and more reliable C/C composite materials for the next generation molten salt reactor.

  4. The influence of gestation and mechanical ventilation on serum clara cell secretory protein (CC10) concentrations in ventilated and nonventilated newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran-Fowlds, Alison; Oei, Julee; Wang, He; Xu, Hongxiu; Wimalasundera, Neil; Egan, Claire; Henry, Richard; Lui, Kei

    2006-07-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC10) is an important anti-inflammatory mediator in the adult lung, but its role in newborn pulmonary protection is uncertain. We examined the early postnatal behavior of CC10 in newborn serum and tracheal fluid and hypothesized that CC10 production is positively influenced by gestation. Blood from 165 infants from the first, third/fourth, and seventh days of life (gestational ages: 23-29 wk, 30-36 wk, >36 wk) and tracheal fluid (TF) from the first day of life from 32 ventilated infants were analyzed for CC10. Surfactant proteins A (SPA) and B (SPB) were also analyzed from the blood of a subgroup of infants. Serum CC10 on day 1 was highest in term infants (69.4 ng/mL), followed by moderately preterm (55.8 ng/mL), and then extremely preterm infants (median 42.1 ng/mL). Term infants also had higher tracheal fluid CC10 than preterm infants. (20.152 ng/mL versus 882 ng/mL). Mechanical ventilation increased serum CC10 only in moderately preterm infants, and only on d 1 [68.4 ng/mL versus 42.1 ng/mL (nonventilated moderately preterm infants)]. Serum CC10 decreased progressively by the end of the first week in all infants, in contrast to SPA and SPB, which increased. Our results show that CC10 is detectable in the blood of newborn infants and that a production surge occurs at birth. This surge is more pronounced in term infants and may confer them with superior extrauterine pulmonary protection compared with preterm infants.

  5. ccML, a new mark-up language to improve ISO/EN 13606-based electronic health record extracts practical edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-de-Madariaga, Ricardo; Muñoz, Adolfo; Cáceres, Jesús; Somolinos, Roberto; Pascual, Mario; Martínez, Ignacio; Salvador, Carlos H; Monteagudo, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a new language called ccML, designed to provide convenient pragmatic information to applications using the ISO/EN13606 reference model (RM), such as electronic health record (EHR) extracts editors. EHR extracts are presently built using the syntactic and semantic information provided in the RM and constrained by archetypes. The ccML extra information enables the automation of the medico-legal context information edition, which is over 70% of the total in an extract, without modifying the RM information. ccML is defined using a W3C XML schema file. Valid ccML files complement the RM with additional pragmatics information. The ccML language grammar is defined using formal language theory as a single-type tree grammar. The new language is tested using an EHR extracts editor application as proof-of-concept system. Seven ccML PVCodes (predefined value codes) are introduced in this grammar to cope with different realistic EHR edition situations. These seven PVCodes have different interpretation strategies, from direct look up in the ccML file itself, to more complex searches in archetypes or system precomputation. The possibility to declare generic types in ccML gives rise to ambiguity during interpretation. The criterion used to overcome ambiguity is that specificity should prevail over generality. The opposite would make the individual specific element declarations useless. A new mark-up language ccML is introduced that opens up the possibility of providing applications using the ISO/EN13606 RM with the necessary pragmatics information to be practical and realistic.

  6. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of ω-TRTX-Cc1a, a novel tarantula venom peptide that selectively targets L-type Cav channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klint, Julie K; Berecki, Géza; Durek, Thomas; Mobli, Mehdi; Knapp, Oliver; King, Glenn F; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2014-05-15

    Spider venoms are replete with peptidic ion channel modulators, often with novel subtype selectivity, making them a rich source of pharmacological tools and drug leads. In a search for subtype-selective blockers of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels, we isolated and characterized a novel 39-residue peptide, ω-TRTX-Cc1a (Cc1a), from the venom of the tarantula Citharischius crawshayi (now Pelinobius muticus). Cc1a is 67% identical to the spider toxin ω-TRTX-Hg1a, an inhibitor of CaV2.3 channels. We assembled Cc1a using a combination of Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. Oxidative folding yielded two stable, slowly interconverting isomers. Cc1a preferentially inhibited Ba(2+) currents (IBa) mediated by L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3) CaV channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 825nM and 2.24μM, respectively. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Cc1a inhibited IBa mediated by high voltage-activated CaV channels but did not affect low voltage-activated T-type CaV channels. Cc1a exhibited weak activity at NaV1.5 and NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels stably expressed in mammalian HEK or CHO cells, respectively. Experiments with modified Cc1a peptides, truncated at the N-terminus (ΔG1-E5) or C-terminus (ΔW35-V39), demonstrated that the N- and C-termini are important for voltage-gated ion channel modulation. We conclude that Cc1a represents a novel pharmacological tool for probing the structure and function of L-type CaV channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Platelet-derived growth factor CC-mediated neuroprotection against HIV Tat involves TRPC-mediated inactivation of GSK 3beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuwang Peng

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC is the third member of the PDGF family, and has been implicated both in embryogenesis and development of the CNS. The biological function of this isoform however, remains largely unexplored in the context of HIV-associated dementia (HAD. In the present study, we demonstrate that exposure of human neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y to HIV transactivator protein Tat resulted in decreased intrinsic expression of PDGF-CC as evidenced by RT-PCR and western blot assays. Reciprocally, pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with PDGF-CC abrogated Tat-mediated neurotoxicity by mitigating apoptosis and neurite & MAP-2 loss. Using pharmacological and loss of function approaches we identified the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling in PDGF-CC-mediated neuroprotection. We report herein a novel role about the involvement of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC channel 1 in modulation of calcium transients in PDGF-CC-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore we also demonstrated PDGF-CC-mediated inactivation of the downstream mediator--glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β evidenced by its phosphorylation at Ser-9. This was further validated by gain and loss of function studies using cells transfected with either the wild type or mutant GSK3β constructs. Intriguingly, pretreatment of cells with either the PI3K inhibitor or TRPC blocker resulted in failure of PDGF-CC to inactivate GSK3β, thereby suggesting the intersection of PI3K and TRPC signaling at GSK3β. Taken together our findings lead to the suggestion that PDGF-CC could be developed as a therapeutic target to reverse Tat-mediated neurotoxicity with implications for HAD.

  8. Solution structure of the complex between poxvirus-encoded CC chemokine inhibitor vCCI and human MIP-1β

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li; DeRider, Michele; McCornack, Milissa A.; Jao, Chris; Isern, Nancy G.; Ness, Traci; Moyer, Richard; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2006-09-19

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) comprise a large family of proteins that recruit and activate leukocytes, giving chemokines a major role in both the immune response and inflammation-related diseases. The poxvirus-encoded viral CC chemokine inhibitor (vCCI) binds to many CC chemokines with high affinity, acting as a potent inhibitor of chemokine action. We have used heteronuclear multidimensional NMR to determine the first structure of an orthopoxvirus vCCI in complex with a human CC chemokine MIP-1β. vCCI binds to the chemokine with 1:1 stoichiometry, using residues from its β-sheet II to interact with the a surface of MIP-1β that includes the N-terminus, the following residues in the so-called N-loop20’s region, and the 40’s loop. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding, as vCCI appears to interact most stronglyinteracts most directly with residues that are conserved among a subset of CC chemokines, but are not conservednot among the other chemokine subfamilies. This structure reveals a general strategy of vCCI for selective chemokine binding. Chemokines play critical roles in the immune system, causing chemotaxis of a variety of cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as mediating cell homing and immune system development 1(Baggiolini 2001). To date, about 50 chemokines have been identified, and these small proteins (7-14 kDa) are believed to function by binding with endothelial or matrix glycosaminoglycans to form a concentration gradient that is then sensed by high affinity, 7-transmembrane domain G-protein coupled chemokine receptors on the surface of immune cells surface. The chemokine system is critical for host defense in healthy individuals, butand can also lead to diseases including asthma, arthritis, and atherosclerosis in the case of malfunction, often due to inappropriate inflammation and subsequent tissue damage 2(Gerard and Rollins 2001). There are four subfamilies of chemokines, CC

  9. Patient-Specific Dosimetry of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using CC49 Fusion Protein in Patients with Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Shang; Forero, Andres; LoBuglio, Albert F.; Breitz, H.; Khazaeli, M. B.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wang, W. Q.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2005-01-01

    Patient-Specific Dosimetry of Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using CC49 Fusion Protein in Patients with Gastrointestinal Malignancies. Shen S, Forero A, Lobuglio AF, Breitz H, Khazaeli MB, Fisher DR, Wang W, Meredith RF. Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, and Radioisotopes Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using CC49 fusion protein, comprised of CC49-(scFv)(4) and streptavidin, in conjunction with (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin (DOTA = dodecanetetraacetic acid) provides a new opportunity to improve efficacy by increasing the tumor-to-normal tissue dose ratio. To our knowledge, the patient-specific dosimetry of pretargeted (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin after CC49 fusion protein in patients has not been reported previously. METHODS: Nine patients received 3-step pretargeted RIT: (a) 160 mg/m(2) of CC49 fusion protein, (b) synthetic clearing agent (sCA) at 48 or 72 h later, and (c) (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin 24 h after the sCA administration. Sequential whole-body (111)In images were acquired immediately and at 2-144 h after injection of (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin. Geometric-mean quantification with background and attenuation correction was used for liver and lung dosimetry. Effective point source quantification was used for spleen, kidneys, and tumors. Organ and tumor (90)Y doses were calculated based on (111)In imaging data and the MIRD formalism using patient-specific organ masses determined from CT images. Patient-specific marrow doses were determined based on radioactivity concentration in the blood. RESULTS: The (90)Y/(111)In-DOTA-biotin had a rapid plasma clearance, which was biphasic with <10% residual at 8 h. Organ masses ranged from 1,263 to 3,855 g for liver, 95 to 1,009 g for spleen, and 309 to 578 g for kidneys. The patient-specific mean (90)Y dose (cGy/37 MBq, or rad/mCi) was 0.53 (0.32-0.78) to whole body

  10. From ISIS to CouchDB: Databases and Data Models for Bibliographic Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ramalho

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For decades bibliographic data has been stored in non-relational databases, and thousands of libraries in developing countries still use ISIS databases to run their OPACs. Fast forward to 2010 and the NoSQL movement has shown that non-relational databases are good enough for Google, Amazon.com and Facebook. Meanwhile, several Open Source NoSQL systems have appeared. This paper discusses the data model of one class of NoSQL products, semistructured, document-oriented databases exemplified by Apache CouchDB and MongoDB, and why they are well-suited to collective cataloging applications. Also shown are the methods, tools, and scripts used to convert, from ISIS to CouchDB, bibliographic records of LILACS, a key Latin American and Caribbean health sciences index operated by the Pan-American Health Organization.

  11. HippDB: a database of readily targeted helical protein–protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergey, Christina M.; Watkins, Andrew M.; Arora, Paramjit S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: HippDB catalogs every protein–protein interaction whose structure is available in the Protein Data Bank and which exhibits one or more helices at the interface. The Web site accepts queries on variables such as helix length and sequence, and it provides computational alanine scanning and change in solvent-accessible surface area values for every interfacial residue. HippDB is intended to serve as a starting point for structure-based small molecule and peptidomimetic drug development. Availability and implementation: HippDB is freely available on the web at http://www.nyu.edu/projects/arora/hippdb. The Web site is implemented in PHP, MySQL and Apache. Source code freely available for download at http://code.google.com/p/helidb, implemented in Perl and supported on Linux. Contact: arora@nyu.edu PMID:23958730

  12. HippDB: a database of readily targeted helical protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergey, Christina M; Watkins, Andrew M; Arora, Paramjit S

    2013-11-01

    HippDB catalogs every protein-protein interaction whose structure is available in the Protein Data Bank and which exhibits one or more helices at the interface. The Web site accepts queries on variables such as helix length and sequence, and it provides computational alanine scanning and change in solvent-accessible surface area values for every interfacial residue. HippDB is intended to serve as a starting point for structure-based small molecule and peptidomimetic drug development. HippDB is freely available on the web at http://www.nyu.edu/projects/arora/hippdb. The Web site is implemented in PHP, MySQL and Apache. Source code freely available for download at http://code.google.com/p/helidb, implemented in Perl and supported on Linux. arora@nyu.edu.

  13. Enhancement of single mode operation in coaxial optical waveguide using DB boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohia, Pooja; Prajapati, Y.; Saini, J. P.; Rai, B. S.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, a competent numerical strategy to compute the dispersion of optical waveguides is presented and propagation of electromagnetic waves in a coaxial optical waveguide with DB boundary conditions is instigated. For this intend, cylindrical coordinates are here being used to derive the DB boundary conditions and to obtain field components for the modes. The propagation constant for the waveguide to be studied is determined by solving the Bessel and the modified Bessel functions. The cutoff frequencies for various lower order modes have been calculated and their dispersion characteristics are plotted correspondingly. The behavior of the coaxial optical waveguide under DB boundary conditions is shown to be significantly different from that of coaxial optical waveguide and conventional optical waveguide under traditional or tangential boundary conditions. Finally, the effect of waveguide dimensions on the mode cutoff frequencies and fabrication issues are also addressed.

  14. BioPepDB: an integrated data platform for food-derived bioactive peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qilin; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Hongjun; Xue, Jitong; Guo, Xiaolei; Liang, Ming; Chen, Ming

    2018-03-12

    Food-derived bioactive peptides play critical roles in regulating most biological processes and have considerable biological, medical and industrial importance. However, a large number of active peptides data, including sequence, function, source, commercial product information, references and other information are poorly integrated. BioPepDB is a searchable database of food-derived bioactive peptides and their related articles, including more than four thousand bioactive peptide entries. Moreover, BioPepDB provides modules of prediction and hydrolysis-simulation for discovering novel peptides. It can serve as a reference database to investigate the function of different bioactive peptides. BioPepDB is available at http://bis.zju.edu.cn/biopepdbr/ . The web page utilises Apache, PHP5 and MySQL to provide the user interface for accessing the database and predict novel peptides. The database itself is operated on a specialised server.

  15. Top-level DB design for Big Data in ATLAS Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, Gancho; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This presentation describes a system that accumulates a set of key quantities for a very large number of particle collision events recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) at CERN. The main project requirements are the handling of tens of billions of rows per year with minimal DB resources, and providing outstanding performance for the fundamental use cases. Various challenges were faced in the process of project development, such as large data volume, large transactions (tens to hundreds of million of rows per transaction) requiring significant amount of undo, row duplication checks, adequate table statistics gathering, and SQL execution plan stability. Currently the system hosts about 120 billion rows as the data ingestion rate has gone beyond the initially foreseen 30 billion rows per year. The crucial DB schema design decisions and the Oracle DB features and techniques will be shared with the audience. By attending this session you will learn how big physics data can be organize...

  16. Nasal colonization of humans with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA CC398 with and without exposure to pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Cuny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies in several European countries and in North America revealed a frequent nasal colonization of livestock with MRSA CC398 and also in humans with direct professional exposure to colonized animals. The study presented here addresses the question of further transmission to non exposed humans. METHODS: After selecting 47 farms with colonized pigs in different regions of Germany we sampled the nares of 113 humans working daily with pigs and of their 116 non exposed family members. The same was performed in 18 veterinarians attending pig farms and in 44 of their non exposed family members. For investigating transmission beyond families we samples the nares of 462 pupils attending a secondary school in a high density pig farming area. MRSA were detected by direct culture on selective agar. The isolates were typed by means of spa-sequence typing and classification of SCCmec elements. For attribution of spa sequence types to clonal lineages as defined by multi locus sequence typing we used the BURP algorithm. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by microbroth dilution assay. RESULTS: At the farms investigated 86% of humans exposed and only 4.3% of their family members were found to carry MRSA exhibiting spa-types corresponding to clonal complex CC398. Nasal colonization was also found in 45% of veterinarians caring for pig farms and in 9% of their non exposed family members. Multivariate analysis revealed that antibiotic usage prior to sampling beard no risk with respect to colonization. From 462 pupils only 3 were found colonized, all 3 were living on pig farms. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that so far the dissemination of MRSA CC398 to non exposed humans is infrequent and probably does not reach beyond familial communities.

  17. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC and C/C for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for use as lightweight hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a carbon/carbon (C/C) and a carbon/carbon-silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) material fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) 8, a joint Australia / Air Force Research Laboratory hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kilopascals. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and C/C-SiC materials were installed downstream of a hydrogen-fueled, dual-mode scramjet combustor and tested for several minutes at conditions simulating flight at Mach 5 and Mach 6. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used during some of the tests to reduce heat loss from the back surface and thus increase the heated surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel approximately 177 C (350 F). The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for three cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  18. CerealsDB 3.0: expansion of resources and data integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Paul A; Winfield, Mark O; Barker, Gary L A; Tyrrell, Simon; Bian, Xingdong; Allen, Alexandra M; Burridge, Amanda; Coghill, Jane A; Waterfall, Christy; Caccamo, Mario; Davey, Robert P; Edwards, Keith J

    2016-06-24

    The increase in human populations around the world has put pressure on resources, and as a consequence food security has become an important challenge for the 21st century. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one of the most important crops in human and livestock diets, and the development of wheat varieties that produce higher yields, combined with increased resistance to pests and resilience to changes in climate, has meant that wheat breeding has become an important focus of scientific research. In an attempt to facilitate these improvements in wheat, plant breeders have employed molecular tools to help them identify genes for important agronomic traits that can be bred into new varieties. Modern molecular techniques have ensured that the rapid and inexpensive characterisation of SNP markers and their validation with modern genotyping methods has produced a valuable resource that can be used in marker assisted selection. CerealsDB was created as a means of quickly disseminating this information to breeders and researchers around the globe. CerealsDB version 3.0 is an online resource that contains a wide range of genomic datasets for wheat that will assist plant breeders and scientists to select the most appropriate markers for use in marker assisted selection. CerealsDB includes a database which currently contains in excess of a million putative varietal SNPs, of which several hundreds of thousands have been experimentally validated. In addition, CerealsDB also contains new data on functional SNPs predicted to have a major effect on protein function and we have constructed a web service to encourage data integration and high-throughput programmatic access. CerealsDB is an open access website that hosts information on SNPs that are considered useful for both plant breeders and research scientists. The recent inclusion of web services designed to federate genomic data resources allows the information on CerealsDB to be more fully integrated with the WheatIS network and

  19. AtomDB: Expanding an Accessible and Accurate Atomic Database for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall

    Since its inception in 2001, the AtomDB has become the standard repository of accurate and accessible atomic data for the X-ray astrophysics community, including laboratory astrophysicists, observers, and modelers. Modern calculations of collisional excitation rates now exist - and are in AtomDB - for all abundant ions in a hot plasma. AtomDB has expanded beyond providing just a collisional model, and now also contains photoionization data from XSTAR as well as a charge exchange model, amongst others. However, building and maintaining an accurate and complete database that can fully exploit the diagnostic potential of high-resolution X-ray spectra requires further work. The Hitomi results, sadly limited as they were, demonstrated the urgent need for the best possible wavelength and rate data, not merely for the strongest lines but for the diagnostic features that may have 1% or less of the flux of the strong lines. In particular, incorporation of weak but powerfully diagnostic satellite lines will be crucial to understanding the spectra expected from upcoming deep observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton, as well as the XARM and Athena satellites. Beyond incorporating this new data, a number of groups, both experimental and theoretical, have begun to produce data with errors and/or sensitivity estimates. We plan to use this to create statistically meaningful spectral errors on collisional plasmas, providing practical uncertainties together with model spectra. We propose to continue to (1) engage the X-ray astrophysics community regarding their issues and needs, notably by a critical comparison with other related databases and tools, (2) enhance AtomDB to incorporate a large number of satellite lines as well as updated wavelengths with error estimates, (3) continue to update the AtomDB with the latest calculations and laboratory measurements, in particular velocity-dependent charge exchange rates, and (4) enhance existing tools, and create new ones as needed to

  20. MorusDB: a resource for mulberry genomics and genome biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian; Qi, Xiwu; Zeng, Qiwei; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2014-01-01

    Mulberry is an important cultivated plant that has received the attention of biologists interested in sericulture and plant-insect interaction. Morus notabilis, a wild mulberry species with a minimal chromosome number is an ideal material for whole-genome sequencing and assembly. The genome and transcriptome of M. notabilis were sequenced and analyzed. In this article, a web-based and open-access database, the Morus Genome Database (MorusDB), was developed to enable easy-to-access and data mining. The MorusDB provides an integrated data source and an easy accession of mulberry large-scale genomic sequencing and assembly, predicted genes and functional annotations, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), transposable elements (TEs), Gene Ontology (GO) terms, horizontal gene transfers between mulberry and silkworm and ortholog and paralog groups. Transcriptome sequencing data for M. notabilis root, leaf, bark, winter bud and male flower can also be searched and downloaded. Furthermore, MorusDB provides an analytical workbench with some built-in tools and pipelines, such as BLAST, Search GO, Mulberry GO and Mulberry GBrowse, to facilitate genomic studies and comparative genomics. The MorusDB provides important genomic resources for scientists working with mulberry and other Moraceae species, which include many important fruit crops. Designed as a basic platform and accompanied by the SilkDB, MorusDB strives to be a comprehensive platform for the silkworm-mulberry interaction studies. Database URL: http://morus.swu.edu.cn/morusdb. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.