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Sample records for cbm20 low-affinity starch-binding

  1. A new clan of CBM families based on bioinformatics of starch-binding domains from families CBM20 and CBM21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marhovic, M.; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. A.

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 10% of amylolytic enzymes are able to bind and degrade raw starch. Usually a distinct domain, the starch-binding domain (SBD), is responsible for this property. These domains have been classified into families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM). At present, there are six SBD...... that the original idea of the CBM20 module being at the C-terminus and the CBM21 module at the N-terminus of a protein should be modified. Although the CBM20 functionally important tryptophans were found to be substituted in several cases, these aromatics and the regions around them belong to the best conserved...

  2. Defining Starch Binding by Glucan Phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger, Kyle; Raththagala, Madushi; Wilkens, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Starch is a vital energy molecule in plants that has a wide variety of uses in industry, such as feedstock for biomaterial processing and biofuel production. Plants employ a three enzyme cyclic process utilizing kinases, amylases, and phosphatases to degrade starch in a diurnal manner. Starch...... is comprised of the branched glucan amylopectin and the more linear glucan amylose. Our lab has determined the first structures of these glucan phosphatases and we have defined their enzymatic action. Despite this progress, we lacked a means to quickly and efficiently quantify starch binding to glucan...

  3. Starch Binding Domain-containing Protein 1 Plays a Dominant Role in Glycogen Transport to Lysosomes in Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Yi, Haiqing; Yang, Chunyu; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-08-05

    A small portion of cellular glycogen is transported to and degraded in lysosomes by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) in mammals, but it is unclear why and how glycogen is transported to the lysosomes. Stbd1 has recently been proposed to participate in glycogen trafficking to lysosomes. However, our previous study demonstrated that knockdown of Stbd1 in GAA knock-out mice did not alter lysosomal glycogen storage in skeletal muscles. To further determine whether Stbd1 participates in glycogen transport to lysosomes, we generated GAA/Stbd1 double knock-out mice. In fasted double knock-out mice, glycogen accumulation in skeletal and cardiac muscles was not affected, but glycogen content in liver was reduced by nearly 73% at 3 months of age and by 60% at 13 months as compared with GAA knock-out mice, indicating that the transport of glycogen to lysosomes was suppressed in liver by the loss of Stbd1. Exogenous expression of human Stbd1 in double knock-out mice restored the liver lysosomal glycogen content to the level of GAA knock-out mice, as did a mutant lacking the Atg8 family interacting motif (AIM) and another mutant that contains only the N-terminal 24 hydrophobic segment and the C-terminal starch binding domain (CBM20) interlinked by an HA tag. Our results demonstrate that Stbd1 plays a dominant role in glycogen transport to lysosomes in liver and that the N-terminal transmembrane region and the C-terminal CBM20 domain are critical for this function. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. A starch-binding domain identified in α-amylase (AmyP) represents a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules that contribute to enzymatic hydrolysis of soluble starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Yunyun; Chen, Maojiao; Wang, Ying; Xiao, Yazhong; Gao, Yi

    2014-04-02

    A novel starch-binding domain (SBD) that represents a new carbohydrate-binding module family (CBM69) was identified in the α-amylase (AmyP) of the recently established alpha-amylase subfamily GH13_37. The SBD and its homologues come mostly from marine bacteria, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that they are closely related to the CBM20 and CBM48 families. The SBD exhibited a binding preference toward raw rice starch, but the truncated mutant (AmyPΔSBD) still retained similar substrate preference. Kinetic analyses revealed that the SBD plays an important role in soluble starch hydrolysis because different catalytic efficiencies have been observed in AmyP and the AmyPΔSBD. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The starch-binding domain family CBM41 - an in silico analysis of evolutionary relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Majzlová, Katarína; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Within the CAZy database, there are 81 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families. A CBM represents a non-catalytic domain in a modular arrangement of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). The present in silico study has been focused on starch-binding domains from the family CBM41 that are usually part...

  6. The raw starch binding domain of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans strain 251

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninga, Dirk; Veen, Bart A. van der; Knegtel, Ronald M.A.; Hijum, Sacha A.F.T. van; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J.; Kalk, Kor H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    1996-01-01

    The E-domain of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) (EC 2.4.1.19) from Bacillus circulans strain 251 is a putative raw starch binding domain. Analysis of the maltose-dependent CGTase crystal structure revealed that each enzyme molecule contained three maltose molecules, situated at contact

  7. Catalytic properties of two Rhizopus oryzae 99-880 glucoamylase enzymes without starch binding domains expressed in Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic properties of the two glucoamylases, AmyC and AmyD, without starch binding domains from Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 were heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. AmyC and AmyD demonstrate pH optima of 5.5 and 6.0, respectively, nearly 1 unit higher than most fungal glucoamy...

  8. Reduction of starch granule size by expression of an engineered tandem starch-binding domain in potato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Q.; Oomen, R.J.F.J.; Vincken, J.P.; Bolam, D.N.; Gilbert, H.J.; Suurs, L.C.J.M.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2004-01-01

    Granule size is an important parameter when using starch in industrial applications. An artificial tandem repeat of a family 20 starch-binding domain (SBD2) was engineered by two copies of the SBD derived from Bacillus circulans cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase via the Pro-Thr-rich linker peptice

  9. Crystal structure of the starch-binding domain of glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yousuke; Muraki, Norifumi; Kusunoki, Masami; Miyake, Hideo

    2017-10-01

    Glucoamylases are widely used commercially to produce glucose syrup from starch. The starch-binding domain (SBD) of glucoamylase from Aspergillus niger is a small globular protein containing a disulfide bond. The structure of A. niger SBD has been determined by NMR, but the conformation surrounding the disulfide bond was unclear. Therefore, X-ray crystal structural analysis was used to attempt to clarify the conformation of this region. The SBD was purified from an Escherichia coli-based expression system and crystallized at 293 K. The initial phase was determined by the molecular-replacement method, and the asymmetric unit of the crystal contained four protomers, two of which were related by a noncrystallographic twofold axis. Finally, the structure was solved at 2.0 Å resolution. The SBD consisted of seven β-strands and eight loops, and the conformation surrounding the disulfide bond was determined from a clear electron-density map. Comparison of X-ray- and NMR-determined structures of the free SBD showed no significant difference in the conformation of each β-strand, but the conformations of the loops containing the disulfide bond and the L5 loop were different. In particular, the difference in the position of the C α atom of Cys509 between the X-ray- and NMR-determined structures was 13.3 Å. In addition, the B factors of the amino-acid residues surrounding the disulfide bond are higher than those of other residues. Therefore, the conformation surrounding the disulfide bond is suggested to be highly flexible.

  10. Backbone and side-chain assignments for a novel CBM69 starch binding domain AmyP-SBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinxin; Yu, Jigang; Zhang, Jiahai; Sun, Hongbin; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2017-10-01

    Starch binding domains (SBDs) are important for the functions of glycoside hydrolysis enzymes such as α-amylases, they have great application potential in biotechnology and industries. AmyP is a newly identified α-amylase belonging to a new subfamily 37 of glycoside hydrolysis enzyme family 13. AmyP shows preferential degradation to soluble starch, in which its C-terminal starch binding domain, AmyP-SBD, plays an important role. AmyP-SBD shares very low sequence similarity with other biochemically characterized SBDs and was assigned to a new carbohydrate binding module family CBM69. Intriguingly, AmyP-SBD is unfolded in free form, and substrate analogue β-cyclodextrin may induce it to fold into a relatively rigid state. Structure determination for AmyP-SBD will be helpful for understanding its unique properties. Here, we report the backbone and side-chain 1 H, 13 C and 15 N resonance assignments of folded AmyP-SBD, as a basis for structure determination and further studies.

  11. The activity of barley alpha-amylase on starch granules is enhanced by fusion of a starch binding domain from Aspergillus niger glucoamylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juge, N.; Nøhr, J.; Le Gal-Coëffet, M.-F.

    2006-01-01

    High affinity for starch granules of certain amylolytic enzymes is mediated by a separate starch binding domain (SBD). In Aspergillus niger glucoamylase (GA-I), a 70 amino acid O-glycosylated peptide linker connects SBD with the catalytic domain. A gene was constructed to encode barley alpha-amylase...

  12. AFM images of complexes between amylose and Aspergillus niger glucoamylase mutants, native and mutant starch binding domains: a model for the action of glucoamylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, V. M.; Gunning, A. P.; Faults, C. B.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to investigate the complexes formed between high molecular weight amylose chains and Aspergillus niger glucoamylase mutants (E400Q and W52F), wild-type A. niger starch binding domains (SBDS), and mutant SBDs (W563K and W590K) lacking either of the two starch ...

  13. Fatty acid and drug binding to a low-affinity component of human serum albumin, purified by affinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Pedersen, A O; Honoré, B

    1992-01-01

    and drug binding abilities of the low-affinity component. The fatty acids decanoate, laurate, myristate and palmitate were bound with higher affinity to the mixture than to the low-affinity component. Diazepam was bound with nearly the same affinity to the low-affinity component as to the albumin mixture...... of two albumin components about 40% of the albumin having high affinity and about 60% having low affinity. By affinity chromatography we succeeded in purifying the low-affinity component from the mixture. The high-affinity component, however, could not be isolated. We further analyzed the fatty acid...

  14. Two unique ligand-binding clamps of Rhizopus oryzae starch binding domain for helical structure disruption of amylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21 members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs.

  15. Two Unique Ligand-Binding Clamps of Rhizopus oryzae Starch Binding Domain for Helical Structure Disruption of Amylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Ying; Ci, Yuan-Pei; Chou, Wei-I; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Wei-Yao; Li, Kun-Mou; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD) has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21) members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs. PMID:22815939

  16. Fatty acid and drug binding to a low-affinity component of human serum albumin, purified by affinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Pedersen, A O; Honoré, B

    1992-01-01

    Binding equilibria for decanoate to a defatted, commercially available human serum albumin preparation were investigated by dialysis exchange rate determinations. The binding isotherm could not be fitted by the general binding equation. It was necessary to assume that the preparation was a mixture...... of two albumin components about 40% of the albumin having high affinity and about 60% having low affinity. By affinity chromatography we succeeded in purifying the low-affinity component from the mixture. The high-affinity component, however, could not be isolated. We further analyzed the fatty acid...... and drug binding abilities of the low-affinity component. The fatty acids decanoate, laurate, myristate and palmitate were bound with higher affinity to the mixture than to the low-affinity component. Diazepam was bound with nearly the same affinity to the low-affinity component as to the albumin mixture...

  17. Low affinity hypothalamic [3H]mazindol binding: a probe for hypothalamic body weight regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiter, C H; Linnoila, M; Nutt, D J

    1989-04-01

    It has been previously suggested that low affinity [3H]mazindol binding in the hypothalamus correlates with body weight and obesity. Low affinity [3H]mazindol binding in hypothalamic crude synaptosome preparations was carried out in normoglycemic obese mice (C57 B1/6J ob/ob) as well as in their lean littermates (C57 B1/6J +/?). NIH Swiss mice were used as additional controls. Furthermore the effect on this binding site of repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS), a treatment known to change body weight gain, was studied in rats. Neither Bmax nor Kd were altered in obese mice compared with their lean littermates or NIH Swiss mice. The obese mice had a significantly greater body weight and weight gain than either control group. Once-daily ECS over 10 days (which significantly reduced weight gain in rats) did not change binding parameters for [3H]mazindol in hypothalami. The present data do not appear to support the hypothesis that this low affinity binding site has a physiological function in the control of body weight and obesity, at least in the examined paradigm.

  18. Streamlined circular proximity ligation assay provides high stringency and compatibility with low-affinity antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Roxana; Horecka, Joe; Swartz, James R; Davis, Ronald W; Persson, Henrik H J

    2018-01-30

    Proximity ligation assay (PLA) is a powerful tool for quantitative detection of protein biomarkers in biological fluids and tissues. Here, we present the circular proximity ligation assay (c-PLA), a highly specific protein detection method that outperforms traditional PLA in stringency, ease of use, and compatibility with low-affinity reagents. In c-PLA, two proximity probes bind to an analyte, providing a scaffolding that positions two free oligonucleotides such that they can be ligated into a circular DNA molecule. This assay format stabilizes antigen proximity probe complexes and enhances stringency by reducing the probability of random background ligation events. Circle formation also increases selectivity, since the uncircularized DNA can be removed enzymatically. We compare this method with traditional PLA on several biomarkers and show that the higher stringency for c-PLA improves reproducibility and enhances sensitivity in both buffer and human plasma. The limit of detection ranges from femtomolar to nanomolar concentrations for both methods. Kinetic analyses using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and biolayer interferometry (BLI) reveal that the variation in limit of detection is due to the variation in antibody affinity and that c-PLA outperforms traditional PLA for low-affinity antibodies. The lower background signal can be used to increase proximity probe concentration while maintaining a high signal-to-noise ratio, thereby enabling the use of low-affinity reagents in a homogeneous assay format. We anticipate that the advantages of c-PLA will be useful in a variety of clinical protein detection applications where high-affinity reagents are lacking.

  19. Low affinity PEGylated hemoglobin from Trematomus bernacchii, a model for hemoglobin-based blood substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Conjugation of human and animal hemoglobins with polyethylene glycol has been widely explored as a means to develop blood substitutes, a novel pharmaceutical class to be used in surgery or emergency medicine. However, PEGylation of human hemoglobin led to products with significantly different oxygen binding properties with respect to the unmodified tetramer and high NO dioxygenase reactivity, known causes of toxicity. These recent findings call for the biotechnological development of stable, low-affinity PEGylated hemoglobins with low NO dioxygenase reactivity. Results To investigate the effects of PEGylation on protein structure and function, we compared the PEGylation products of human hemoglobin and Trematomus bernacchii hemoglobin, a natural variant endowed with a remarkably low oxygen affinity and high tetramer stability. We show that extension arm facilitated PEGylation chemistry based on the reaction of T. bernacchii hemoglobin with 2-iminothiolane and maleimido-functionalyzed polyethylene glycol (MW 5000 Da) leads to a tetraPEGylated product, more homogeneous than the corresponding derivative of human hemoglobin. PEGylated T. bernacchii hemoglobin largely retains the low affinity of the unmodified tetramer, with a p50 50 times higher than PEGylated human hemoglobin. Moreover, it is still sensitive to protons and the allosteric effector ATP, indicating the retention of allosteric regulation. It is also 10-fold less reactive towards nitrogen monoxide than PEGylated human hemoglobin. Conclusions These results indicate that PEGylated hemoglobins, provided that a suitable starting hemoglobin variant is chosen, can cover a wide range of oxygen-binding properties, potentially meeting the functional requirements of blood substitutes in terms of oxygen affinity, tetramer stability and NO dioxygenase reactivity. PMID:22185675

  20. GABA agonist promoted formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the GABA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was tested using primary cultures of these neurons. Granule cells were exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 6 hr after......, respectively, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days in culture. It was found that THIP treatment of 4- and 7-day-old cultures led to formation of low affinity GABA receptors, whereas such receptors could not be detected after THIP treatment in the older cultures (10 and 14 days) in spite of the fact that these cultured granule...... cells expressed a high density of high affinity GABA receptors. It is concluded that the ability of THIP to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to an early developmental period....

  1. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Person Alexandra M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after

  2. Searching for the low affinity ubiquinone binding site in cytochrome bo3from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sylvia K; Lin, Myat T; Ouyang, Hanlin; Gennis, Robert B

    2017-05-01

    The cytochrome bo 3 ubiquinol oxidase is one of three respiratory oxygen reductases in the aerobic respiratory chain of Escherichia coli. The generally accepted model of catalysis assumes that cyt bo 3 contains two distinct ubiquinol binding sites: (i) a low affinity (Q L ) site which is the traditional substrate binding site; and (ii) a high affinity (Q H ) site where a "permanently" bound quinone acts as a cofactor, taking two electrons from the substrate quinol and passing them one-by-one to the heme b component of the enzyme which, in turn, transfers them to the heme o 3 /Cu B active site. Whereas the residues at the Q H site are well defined, the location of the Q L site remains unknown. The published X-ray structure does not contain quinone, and substantial amounts of the protein are missing as well. A recent bioinformatics study by Bossis et al. [Biochem J. (2014) 461, 305-314] identified a sequence motif G 163 EFX 3 GWX 2 Y 173 as the likely Q L site in the family of related quinol oxidases. In the current work, this was tested by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that these residues are not important for catalytic function and do not define the Q L substrate binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A possible mechanism for low affinity of silkworm Na+/K+-ATPase for K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homareda, Haruo; Otsu, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Ushimaru, Makoto; Ito, Sayaka; Fukutomi, Toshiyuki; Jo, Taeho; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Hara, Yukichi

    2017-12-01

    The affinity for K + of silkworm nerve Na + /K + -ATPase is markedly lower than that of mammalian Na + /K + -ATPase (Homareda 2010). In order to obtain clues on the molecular basis of the difference in K + affinities, we cloned cDNAs of silkworm (Bombyx mori) nerve Na + /K + -ATPase α and β subunits, and analyzed the deduced amino acid sequences. The molecular masses of the α and β subunits were presumed to be 111.5 kDa with ten transmembrane segments and 37.7 kDa with a single transmembrane segment, respectively. The α subunit showed 75% identity and 93% homology with the pig Na + /K + -ATPase α1 subunit. On the other hand, the amino acid identity of the β subunit with mammalian counterparts was as low as 30%. Cloned α and β cDNAs were co-expressed in cultured silkworm ovary-derived cells, BM-N cells, which lack endogenous Na + /K + -ATPase. Na + /K + -ATPase expressed in the cultured cells showed a low affinity for K + and a high affinity for Na + , characteristic of the silkworm nerve Na + /K + -ATPase. These results suggest that the β subunit is responsible for the affinity for K + of Na + /K + -ATPase.

  4. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  5. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Ming, Shonoi A

    2014-01-01

    of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide-protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, non...

  6. Development of a strategy to functionalize a dextrin-based hydrogel for animal cell cultures using a starch-binding module fused to RGD sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gama Miguel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several approaches can be used to functionalize biomaterials, such as hydrogels, for biomedical applications. One of the molecules often used to improve cells adhesion is the peptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD. The RGD sequence, present in several proteins from the extra-cellular matrix (ECM, is a ligand for integrin-mediated cell adhesion; this sequence was recognized as a major functional group responsible for cellular adhesion. In this work a bi-functional recombinant protein, containing a starch binding module (SBM and RGD sequence was used to functionalize a dextrin-based hydrogel. The SBM, which belongs to an α-amylase from Bacillus sp. TS-23, has starch (and dextrin, depolymerized starch affinity, acting as a binding molecule to adsorb the RGD sequence to the hydrogel surface. Results The recombinant proteins SBM and RGD-SBM were cloned, expressed, purified and tested in in vitro assays. The evaluation of cell attachment, spreading and proliferation on the dextrin-based hydrogel surface activated with recombinant proteins were performed using mouse embryo fibroblasts 3T3. A polystyrene cell culture plate was used as control. The results showed that the RGD-SBM recombinant protein improved, by more than 30%, the adhesion of fibroblasts to dextrin-based hydrogel. In fact, cell spreading on the hydrogel surface was observed only in the presence of the RGD-SBM. Conclusion The fusion protein RGD-SBM provides an efficient way to functionalize the dextrin-based hydrogel. Many proteins in nature that hold a RGD sequence are not cell adhesive, probably due to the conformation/accessibility of the peptide. We therefore emphasise the successful expression of a bi-functional protein with potential for different applications.

  7. New strategy for enhancement of microbial viability in simulated gastric conditions based on display of starch-binding domain on cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarahomjoo, Shirin; Katakura, Yoshio; Shioya, Suteaki

    2008-05-01

    The C-terminal region of the peptidoglycan hydrolase (CPH) of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 fused to the linker region and the starch-binding domain (SBD) of the *-amylase of Streptococcus bovis 148 was produced intracellularly in Escherichia coli. The fusion protein (CPH-SBD) was able to bind to the cell surface of Lactobacillus casei NRRL B-441 and to corn starch. Therefore, adhesion of cells to corn starch was mediated by the fusion protein. At a cell density of 10(9) cfu/ml and a starch concentration of 5 mg/ml, CPH-SBD-displaying L. casei cells aggregated with corn starch, whereas the free cells of L. casei did not form any aggregates with corn starch. After incubation in simulated gastric juice (pH 3.0, 1 h), the survival percentages of free cells, amylose-coated free cells, and free cells mixed with corn starch were 0.074%, 7.2%, and 3.1% respectively. When CPH-SBD-displaying bacteria aggregated with corn starch, their survival percentage was 8% higher than that of free cells mixed with corn starch. The survival of the amylose-coated CPH-SBD-displaying L. casei cells was comparable to that of amylose-coated free cells, whereas the survival percentage of amylose-coated aggregates of CPH-SBD-displaying bacteria with corn starch was 28% higher than that of amylose-coated mixture of free cells with corn starch. These results demonstrate the potential usefulness of the cell-surface display technique for enhancement of the delivery of viable microorganisms to the intestinal tract.

  8. Evidence that the low-affinity folate-binding protein in erythrocyte hemolysate is identical to hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Lyngbye, J.

    1981-01-01

    Gel filtration studies on erythrocyte hemolysate demonstrated the presence of a folate binding protein, apparently of the low-affinity type, that co-elutes with hemoglobin. Further, the folate binder eluted with a low salt concentration after DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B anion-exchange chromatography of erythrocyte hemolysate at pH 6.3. The chromatographic behavior of hemoglobin labeled with [3H]folate was so similar to that of the present binder as to suggest that the folate binder in erythrocytes is in fact hemoglobin

  9. Improved accuracy of low affinity protein-ligand equilibrium dissociation constants directly determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquillard, Lucie; Saab, Fabienne; Schoentgen, Françoise; Cadene, Martine

    2012-05-01

    There is continued interest in the determination by ESI-MS of equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) that accurately reflect the affinity of a protein-ligand complex in solution. Issues in the measurement of K(D) are compounded in the case of low affinity complexes. Here we present a K(D) measurement method and corresponding mathematical model dealing with both gas-phase dissociation (GPD) and aggregation. To this end, a rational mathematical correction of GPD (f(sat)) is combined with the development of an experimental protocol to deal with gas-phase aggregation. A guide to apply the method to noncovalent protein-ligand systems according to their kinetic behavior is provided. The approach is validated by comparing the K(D) values determined by this method with in-solution K(D) literature values. The influence of the type of molecular interactions and instrumental setup on f(sat) is examined as a first step towards a fine dissection of factors affecting GPD. The method can be reliably applied to a wide array of low affinity systems without the need for a reference ligand or protein.

  10. Identification of high- and low-affinity NGF receptors during development of the chicken central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escandon, E.; Chao, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    In order to study regulation of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor during embryogenesis in chick brain, we have used affinity crosslinking of tissues with 125 I-NGF. NGF interacts with high- and low-affinity receptors; high-affinity receptors are required for the majority of NGF's actions. Most measurements of receptor levels do not distinguish between high- and low-affinity forms of the receptor. We have used the lipophilic crosslinking agent HSAB to identify the high-affinity, functional receptor during development of the chicken central nervous system. A peak of expression during Embryonic Days 5-10 was detected in all regions of the chicken central nervous system, but, shortly after birth, only the cerebellar region displays significant levels of NGF receptor protein. The time course of expression confirms the dramatic regulation of the NGF receptor gene during defined embryonic periods. The detection of high-affinity NGF receptors in brain and neural retina provides strong evidence that NGF is involved in essential ontogenetic events in the development of the chicken central nervous system

  11. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  12. Antibody Stabilization of Peptide–MHC Multimers Reveals Functional T Cells Bearing Extremely Low-Affinity TCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tungatt, Katie; Bianchi, Valentina; Crowther, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    staining of tumor-specific, autoimmune, or MHC class II-restricted T cells can be particularly challenging, as these T cells tend to express relatively low-affinity TCRs. In this study, we attempted to improve staining using anti-fluorochrome unconjugated primary Abs followed by secondary staining......-, or FITC-based reagents. Importantly, when combined with protein kinase inhibitor treatment, Ab stabilization allowed pMHC tetramer staining of T cells even when the cognate TCR-pMHC affinity was extremely low (KD >1 mM) and produced the best results that we have observed to date. We find......Fluorochrome-conjugated peptide-MHC (pMHC) multimers are commonly used in combination with flow cytometry for direct ex vivo visualization and characterization of Ag-specific T cells, but these reagents can fail to stain cells when TCR affinity and/or TCR cell-surface density are low. pMHC multimer...

  13. Sequence-specific DNA binding by MYC/MAX to low-affinity non-E-box motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allevato, Michael; Bolotin, Eugene; Grossman, Mark; Mane-Padros, Daniel; Sladek, Frances M.

    2017-01-01

    The MYC oncoprotein regulates transcription of a large fraction of the genome as an obligatory heterodimer with the transcription factor MAX. The MYC:MAX heterodimer and MAX:MAX homodimer (hereafter MYC/MAX) bind Enhancer box (E-box) DNA elements (CANNTG) and have the greatest affinity for the canonical MYC E-box (CME) CACGTG. However, MYC:MAX also recognizes E-box variants and was reported to bind DNA in a “non-specific” fashion in vitro and in vivo. Here, in order to identify potential additional non-canonical binding sites for MYC/MAX, we employed high throughput in vitro protein-binding microarrays, along with electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and bioinformatic analyses of MYC-bound genomic loci in vivo. We identified all hexameric motifs preferentially bound by MYC/MAX in vitro, which include the low-affinity non-E-box sequence AACGTT, and found that the vast majority (87%) of MYC-bound genomic sites in a human B cell line contain at least one of the top 21 motifs bound by MYC:MAX in vitro. We further show that high MYC/MAX concentrations are needed for specific binding to the low-affinity sequence AACGTT in vitro and that elevated MYC levels in vivo more markedly increase the occupancy of AACGTT sites relative to CME sites, especially at distal intergenic and intragenic loci. Hence, MYC binds diverse DNA motifs with a broad range of affinities in a sequence-specific and dose-dependent manner, suggesting that MYC overexpression has more selective effects on the tumor transcriptome than previously thought. PMID:28719624

  14. Age-Related Yield of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Bearing the Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cuevas-Diaz Duran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs are a heterogeneous cell population that may be enriched by positive selection with antibodies against the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR or CD271, yielding a selective cell universe with higher proliferation and differentiation potential. This paper addresses the need for determining the quantity of ADSCs positive for the CD271 receptor and its correlation with donor's age. Mononuclear cells were harvested from the lower backs of 35 female donors and purified using magnetic beads. Multipotency capacity was tested by the expression of stemness genes and through differentiation into preosteoblasts and adipocytes. A significant statistical difference was found in CD271+ concentrations between defined age intervals. The highest yield was found within women on the 30–40-year-old age range. CD271+ ADSCs from all age groups showed differentiation capabilities as well as expression of typical multipotent stem cell genes. Our data suggest that the amount of CD271+ cells correlates inversely with age. However, the ability to obtain these cells was maintained through all age ranges with a yield higher than what has been reported from bone marrow. Our findings propose CD271+ ADSCs as the primary choice for tissue regeneration and autologous stem cell therapies in older subjects.

  15. A Low Affinity GCaMP3 Variant (GCaMPer for Imaging the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Store.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Henderson

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is critical for cellular functions and is disrupted in diverse pathologies including neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease. Owing to the high concentration of calcium within the ER, studying this subcellular compartment requires tools that are optimized for these conditions. To develop a single-fluorophore genetically encoded calcium indicator for this organelle, we targeted a low affinity variant of GCaMP3 to the ER lumen (GCaMPer (10.19. A set of viral vectors was constructed to express GCaMPer in human neuroblastoma cells, rat primary cortical neurons, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We observed dynamic changes in GCaMPer (10.19 fluorescence in response to pharmacologic manipulations of the ER calcium store. Additionally, periodic calcium efflux from the ER was observed during spontaneous beating of cardiomyocytes. GCaMPer (10.19 has utility in imaging ER calcium in living cells and providing insight into luminal calcium dynamics under physiologic and pathologic states.

  16. Expression of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 in spinal motoneurons in a transgenic mouse model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, JCVM; Jaarsma, D; Kust, BM; Bruggeman, RWG; Mantingh, [No Value; Brouwer, N; Boddeke, HWGM

    2003-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a lethal neurodegenerative disorder involving motoneuron loss in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord, resulting in progressive paralysis. Aberrant neurotrophin signalling via the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 has been suggested to be involved in the

  17. Characteristics of binding of a low affinity, noncooperative insulin [(LeuB25]insulin) to IM-9 lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, A.; Frank, B.H.; Rubenstein, A.; Tager, H.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    [Leu-B25]insulin is a low affinity insulin analog which does not increase the rate of dissociation of 125 I-insulin from insulin receptors (i.e. does not display negative cooperativity). We have studied the characteristics of binding of this analog to IM-9 cultured lymphocytes, in order to determine the contribution of negative cooperativity to the curvilinear nature of Scatchard plots typical of insulin binding data. The affinity of [LeuB25]insulin for receptors was approximately 1% that of insulin, as determined by its ability to inhibit 125 I-insulin binding. Monoiodinated preparations of insulin and of [LeuB25]insulin were produced, labeled in the tyrosine at position 14 of the A chain. These 125 I-TyrA14-labeled species were used in all studies. Both native insulin and a serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibodies were equally potent at inhibiting binding of 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin and 125 I-native insulin, suggesting that they bind to the same population of receptors. Native insulin (100 ng/ml) increased the rate of dissociation of both 125 I-insulin and 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin. However, [LeuB25]insulin (2.5 micrograms/ml) did not increase the rates of dissociation of either 125 I-insulin or 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin (i.e. it did not display negative cooperativity). Competition curves and Scatchard plots were constructed using 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin and unlabeled analog. Half-maximal inhibition of 125 I-[LeuB25]insulin binding was seen at a [LeuB25]insulin concentration of approximately 500 ng/ml. More importantly, the Scatchard plot of these binding data was markedly curvilinear, as is typical of insulin binding data

  18. YehZYXW of Escherichia coli Is a Low-Affinity, Non-Osmoregulatory Betaine-Specific ABC Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Shenhui; Cressatti, Marisa; Mendoza, Kris E; Coumoundouros, Chelsea N; Plater, Samantha M; Culham, Doreen E; Kimber, Matthew S; Wood, Janet M

    2015-09-22

    Transporter-mediated osmolyte accumulation stimulates the growth of Escherichia coli in high-osmolality environments. YehZYXW was predicted to be an osmoregulatory transporter because (1) osmotic and stationary phase induction of yehZYXW is mediated by RpoS, (2) the Yeh proteins are homologous to the components of known osmoregulatory ABC transporters (e.g., ProU of E. coli), and (3) YehZ models based on the structures of periplasmic betaine-binding proteins suggested that YehZ retains key betaine-binding residues. The betaines choline-O-sulfate, glycine betaine, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate bound YehZ and ProX with millimolar and micromolar affinities, respectively, as determined by equilibrium dialysis and isothermal titration calorimetry. The crystal structure of the YehZ apoprotein, determined at 1.5 Å resolution (PDB ID: 4WEP ), confirmed its similarity to other betaine-binding proteins. Small and nonpolar residues in the hinge region of YehZ (e.g., Gly223) pack more closely than the corresponding residues in ProX, stabilizing the apoprotein. Betaines bound YehZ-Gly223Ser an order of magnitude more tightly than YehZ, suggesting that weak substrate binding in YehZ is at least partially due to apo state stabilization. Neither ProX nor YehZ bound proline. Assays based on osmoprotection or proline auxotrophy failed to detect YehZYXW-mediated uptake of proline, betaines, or other osmolytes. However, transport assays revealed low-affinity glycine betaine uptake, mediated by YehZYXW, that was inhibited at high salinity. Thus, YehZYXW is a betaine transporter that shares substrate specificity, but not an osmoregulatory function, with homologues like E. coli ProU. Other work suggests that yehZYXW may be an antivirulence locus whose expression promotes persistent, asymptomatic bacterial infection.

  19. A Versatile Platform to Analyze Low-Affinity and Transient Protein-Protein Interactions in Living Cells in Real Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Cheng Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Protein-protein interactions (PPIs play central roles in orchestrating biological processes. While some PPIs are stable, many important ones are transient and hard to detect with conventional approaches. We developed ReBiL, a recombinase enhanced bimolecular luciferase complementation platform, to enable detection of weak PPIs in living cells. ReBiL readily identified challenging transient interactions between an E3 ubiquitin ligase and an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. ReBiL’s ability to rapidly interrogate PPIs in diverse conditions revealed that some stapled α-helical peptides, a class of PPI antagonists, induce target-independent cytosolic leakage and cytotoxicity that is antagonized by serum. These results explain the requirement for serum-free conditions to detect stapled peptide activity, and define a required parameter to evaluate for peptide antagonist approaches. ReBiL’s ability to expedite PPI analysis, assess target specificity and cell permeability, and reveal off-target effects of PPI modifiers should facilitate the development of effective, cell-permeable PPI therapeutics and the elaboration of diverse biological mechanisms. : Li et al. developed a recombinase-enhanced bimolecular luciferase complementation platform, termed ReBiL, to evaluate low-affinity protein-protein interactions (PPIs that are not detectable by other methods and to analyze PPI antagonists in living cells. ReBiL showed that small-molecule p53-Mdm2 antagonists disrupt their intended targets effectively in cells, whereas stapled peptides did not. Stapled peptides unexpectedly induced cell membrane disruption resulting in p53-independent death associated with cytoplasmic leakage. ReBiL is also valuable for high-throughput screening and for deciphering signaling mechanisms mediated by protein interactions.

  20. GintAMT3 – a low-affinity ammonium transporter of the arbuscular mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eCalabrese

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient acquisition and transfer are essential steps in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM symbiosis, which is formed by the majority of land plants. Mineral nutrients are taken up by AM fungi from the soil and transferred to the plant partner. Within the cortical plant root cells the fungal hyphae form tree-like structures (arbuscules where the nutrients are released to the plant-fungal interface, i.e. to the periarbuscular space, before being taken up by the plant. In exchange, the AM fungi receive valuable carbohydrates from the plant host. Besides the well-studied uptake of phosphorus (P, the uptake and transfer of nitrogen (N plays a crucial role in this mutualistic interaction. In the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly called Glomus intraradices, two ammonium transporters (AMT were previously described, namely GintAMT1 and GintAMT2. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a newly identified R. irregularis AMT, GintAMT3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high sequence similarity to previously identified AM fungal AMTs and a clear separation from other fungal AMTs. Topological analysis indicated GintAMT3 to be a membrane bound pore forming protein, and GFP tagging showed it to be highly expressed in the intraradical mycelium (IRM of a fully established AM symbiosis. Expression of GintAMT3 in yeast successfully complemented the yeast AMT triple deletion mutant (MATa ura3 mep1Δ mep2Δ::LEU2 mep3Δ::KanMX2. GintAMT3 is characterized as a low affinity transport system with an apparent Km of 1.8 mM and a Vmax of 240 nmol-1 min-1 108 cells-1, which is regulated by substrate concentration and carbon supply.

  1. Copper tolerance mediated by polyphosphate degradation and low-affinity inorganic phosphate transport system in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo-Puertas, Mariana; Schurig-Briccio, Lici Ariane; Rodríguez-Montelongo, Luisa; Rintoul, María Regina; Rapisarda, Viviana Andrea

    2014-03-19

    Metal tolerance in bacteria has been related to polyP in a model in which heavy metals stimulate the polymer hydrolysis, forming metal-phosphate complexes that are exported. As previously described in our laboratory, Escherichia coli cells grown in media containing a phosphate concentration >37 mM maintained an unusually high polyphosphate (polyP) level in stationary phase. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the influence of polyP levels as the involvement of low-affinity inorganic phosphate transport (Pit) system in E. coli copper tolerance. PolyP levels were modulated by the media phosphate concentration and/or using mutants in polyP metabolism. Stationary phase wild-type cells grown in high phosphate medium were significantly more tolerant to copper than those grown in sufficient phosphate medium. Copper addition to tolerant cells induced polyP degradation by PPX (an exopolyphosphatase), phosphate efflux and membrane polarization. ppk-ppx- (unable to synthesize/degrade polyP), ppx- (unable to degrade polyP) and Pit system mutants were highly sensitive to metal even in high phosphate media. In exponential phase, CopA and polyP-Pit system would act simultaneously to detoxify the metal or one could be sufficient to safeguard the absence of the other. Our results support a mechanism for copper detoxification in exponential and stationary phases of E. coli, involving Pit system and degradation of polyP. Data reflect the importance of the environmental phosphate concentration in the regulation of the microbial physiological state.

  2. GintAMT3 – a Low-Affinity Ammonium Transporter of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Rhizophagus irregularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Silvia; Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Ellerbeck, Matthias; Arnould, Christine; Chatagnier, Odile; Boller, Thomas; Schüßler, Arthur; Brachmann, Andreas; Wipf, Daniel; Ferrol, Nuria; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient acquisition and transfer are essential steps in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, which is formed by the majority of land plants. Mineral nutrients are taken up by AM fungi from the soil and transferred to the plant partner. Within the cortical plant root cells the fungal hyphae form tree-like structures (arbuscules) where the nutrients are released to the plant-fungal interface, i.e., to the periarbuscular space, before being taken up by the plant. In exchange, the AM fungi receive carbohydrates from the plant host. Besides the well-studied uptake of phosphorus (P), the uptake and transfer of nitrogen (N) plays a crucial role in this mutualistic interaction. In the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (formerly called Glomus intraradices), two ammonium transporters (AMT) were previously described, namely GintAMT1 and GintAMT2. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a newly identified R. irregularis AMT, GintAMT3. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high sequence similarity to previously identified AM fungal AMTs and a clear separation from other fungal AMTs. Topological analysis indicated GintAMT3 to be a membrane bound pore forming protein, and GFP tagging showed it to be highly expressed in the intraradical mycelium of a fully established AM symbiosis. Expression of GintAMT3 in yeast successfully complemented the yeast AMT triple deletion mutant (MATa ura3 mep1Δ mep2Δ::LEU2 mep3Δ::KanMX2). GintAMT3 is characterized as a low affinity transport system with an apparent Km of 1.8 mM and a Vmax of 240 nmol-1 min-1 108 cells-1, which is regulated by substrate concentration and carbon supply. PMID:27252708

  3. Role of H2O2 on the kinetics of low-affinity high-capacity Na+-dependent alanine transport in SHR proximal tubular epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Vanda; Pinho, Maria Joao; Jose, Pedro A.; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → H 2 O 2 in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na + -dependent [ 14 C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only. → It is suggested that Na + binding in renal ASCT2 may be regulated by ROS in SHR PTE cells. -- Abstract: The presence of high and low sodium affinity states for the Na + -dependent [ 14 C]-L-alanine uptake in immortalized renal proximal tubular epithelial (PTE) cells was previously reported (Am. J. Physiol. 293 (2007) R538-R547). This study evaluated the role of H 2 O 2 on the Na + -dependent [ 14 C]-L-alanine uptake of ASCT2 in immortalized renal PTE cells from Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Na + dependence of [ 14 C]-L-alanine uptake was investigated replacing NaCl with an equimolar concentration of choline chloride in vehicle- and apocynin-treated cells. Na + removal from the uptake solution abolished transport activity in both WKY and SHR PTE cells. Decreases in H 2 O 2 levels in the extracellular medium significantly reduced Na + -K m and V max values of the low-affinity high-capacity component in SHR PTE cells, with no effect on the high-affinity low-capacity state of the Na + -dependent [ 14 C]-L-alanine uptake. After removal of apocynin from the culture medium, H 2 O 2 levels returned to basal values within 1 to 3 h in both WKY and SHR PTE cells and these were found stable for the next 24 h. Under these experimental conditions, the Na + -K m and V max of the high-affinity low-capacity state were unaffected and the low-affinity high-capacity component remained significantly decreased 1 day but not 4 days after apocynin removal. In conclusion, H 2 O 2 in excess is required for the presence of a low-affinity high-capacity component for the Na + -dependent [ 14 C]-L-alanine uptake in SHR PTE cells only. It is suggested that Na + binding in renal ASCT2 may be regulated by ROS in SHR PTE cells.

  4. Low-affinity FcγR interactions can decide the fate of novel human IgG-sensitised red blood cells and platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Kathryn L; Smith, Cheryl S; Turner, Craig P; Kirton, Christopher M; Wilkes, Anthony M; Hadley, Andrew G; Ghevaert, Cedric; Williamson, Lorna M; Clark, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    G1Δnab is a mutant human IgG1 constant region with a lower ability to interact with FcγR than the natural IgG constant regions. Radiolabelled RBCs and platelets sensitised with specific G1Δnab Abs were cleared more slowly from human circulation than IgG1-sensitised counterparts. However, non-destructive splenic retention of G1Δnab-coated RBCs required investigation and plasma radioactivities now suggest this also occurred for platelets sensitised with an IgG1/G1Δnab mixture. In vitro assays with human cells showed that G1Δnab-sensitised RBCs did not cause FcγRI-mediated monocyte activation, FcγRIIIa-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or macrophage phagocytosis although they did adhere to macrophages. Thus, FcγRII was implicated in the adhesion despite the Δnab mutation reducing the already low-affinity binding to this receptor class. Additional contacts via P-selectin enhance the interaction of sensitised platelets with monocytes and this system provided evidence of FcγRII-dependent activation by G1Δnab. These results emphasise the physiological relevance of low-affinity interactions: It appears that FcγRII interactions of G1Δnab allowed splenic retention of G1Δnab-coated RBCs with inhibitory FcγRIIb binding preventing RBC destruction and that FcγRIIb engagement by G1Δnab on IgG1/G1Δnab-sensitised platelets overcame activation by IgG1. Considering therapeutic blocking Abs, G1Δnab offers lower FcγR binding and a greater bias towards inhibition than IgG2 and IgG4 constant regions. PMID:24285214

  5. Role of the low-affinity glucocorticoid receptor in the regulation of behavior and energy metabolism in the migratory red knot Calidris canutus islandica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landys, Meta M; Piersma, Theunis; Ramenofsky, Marilyn; Wingfield, John C

    2004-01-01

    Plasma corticosterone increases in association with migratory flight in the red knot Calidris canutus islandica, suggesting that corticosterone may promote migratory activity and/or energy mobilization in this species. This hypothesis is supported by general effects of glucocorticoids, which include stimulation of locomotion and the mobilization of energy depots. We experimentally examined the role of elevated corticosterone levels in the migratory red knot by comparing foraging behavior, flight frequency, and plasma metabolites between vehicle-injected controls and birds treated with RU486, an antagonist to the genomic low-affinity glucocorticoid receptor (GR). We predicted that RU486 treatment would interfere with energy mobilization. However, we expected no effects on flight activity because recent studies suggest that glucocorticoids affect locomotion through a nongenomic receptor. Finally, because glucocorticoids exert permissive effects on food intake, we postulated that RU486 treatment in the red knot would interfere with feeding. Results were consistent with the latter prediction, suggesting that the GR participates in the promotion of hyperphagia, the intense feeding state that is characteristic of the migratory condition. RU486 treatment did not affect flight frequency, suggesting that corticosterone may support migratory activity through a receptor other than the GR. Energy metabolism (as determined through plasma metabolites) was also unaffected by RU486, possibly because energetic demands experienced by captive birds were low.

  6. Activation of high and low affinity dopamine receptors generates a closed loop that maintains a conductance ratio and its activity correlate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulf-Dieter Christian Krenz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulators alter network output and have the potential to destabilize a circuit. The mechanisms maintaining stability in the face of neuromodulation are not well described. Using the pyloric network in the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system, we show that dopamine (DA does not simply alter circuit output, but activates a closed loop in which DA-induced alterations in circuit output consequently drive a change in an ionic conductance to preserve a conductance ratio and its activity correlate. DA acted at low affinity type 1 receptors (D1Rs to induce an immediate modulatory decrease in the transient potassium current (IA of a pyloric neuron. This, in turn, advanced the activity phase of that component neuron, which disrupted its network function and thereby destabilized the circuit. DA simultaneously acted at high affinity D1Rs on the same neuron to confer activity-dependence upon the hyperpolarization activated current (Ih such that the DA-induced changes in activity subsequently reduced Ih. This DA-enabled, activity-dependent, intrinsic plasticity exactly compensated for the modulatory decrease in IA to restore the IA:Ih ratio and neuronal activity phase, thereby closing an open loop created by the modulator. Activation of closed loops to preserve conductance ratios may represent a fundamental operating principle neuromodulatory systems use to ensure stability in their target networks.

  7. Structural Basis of Low-Affinity Nickel Binding to the Nickel-Responsive Transcription Factor NikR from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.; Schreiter, E.; Stultz, C.; Drennan, C.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli NikR regulates cellular nickel uptake by binding to the nik operon in the presence of nickel and blocking transcription of genes encoding the nickel uptake transporter. NikR has two binding affinities for the nik operon: a nanomolar dissociation constant with stoichiometric nickel and a picomolar dissociation constant with excess nickel (Bloom, S. L., and Zamble, D. B. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 10029-10038; Chivers, P. T., and Sauer, R. T. (2002) Chem. Biol. 9, 1141-1148). While it is known that the stoichiometric nickel ions bind at the NikR tetrameric interface (Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 794-799; Schreiter, E. R., et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 13676-13681), the binding sites for excess nickel ions have not been fully described. Here we have determined the crystal structure of NikR in the presence of excess nickel to 2.6 (angstrom) resolution and have obtained nickel anomalous data (1.4845 (angstrom)) in the presence of excess nickel for both NikR alone and NikR cocrystallized with a 30-nucleotide piece of double-stranded DNA containing the nik operon. These anomalous data show that excess nickel ions do not bind to a single location on NikR but instead reveal a total of 22 possible low-affinity nickel sites on the NikR tetramer. These sites, for which there are six different types, are all on the surface of NikR, and most are found in both the NikR alone and NikR-DNA structures. Using a combination of crystallographic data and molecular dynamics simulations, the nickel sites can be described as preferring octahedral geometry, utilizing one to three protein ligands (typically histidine) and at least two water molecules.

  8. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Pedersen, Martin H F; Rohde, Line A; Kastrup, Jette S; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Chebib, Mary; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2. While these are similar in many aspects, the (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry differs by harboring a third orthosteric acetylcholine binding site located at the α4-α4 interface. Interestingly, the third binding site has, so far, only been documented using electrophysiological assays, actual binding affinities of nicotinic receptor ligands to this site are not known. The present study was therefore aimed at determining binding affinities of nicotinic ligands to the α4-α4 interface. Given that epibatidine shows large functional potency differences at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces, biphasic binding properties would be expected at (α4)3(β2)2 receptors. However, standard saturation binding experiments with [(3)H]epibatidine did not reveal biphasic binding under the conditions utilized. Therefore, an engineered β2 construct (β2(HQT)), which converts the β(-) face to resemble that of an α4(-) face, was utilized to create (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptors harboring three α4-α4 interfaces. With this receptor, low affinity binding of epibatidine with a Kd of ∼5 nM was observed in sharp contrast to a Kd value of ∼10 pM observed for wild-type receptors. A strong correlation between binding affinities at the (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptor and functional potencies at the wild-type receptor of a range of nicotinic ligands highlighted the validity of using the mutational approach. Finally, large differences in activities at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces were observed for structurally related agonists underscoring the need for establishing all binding parameters of compounds at α4β2 receptors. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Backbone and side-chain ¹H, ¹⁵N, and ¹³C resonance assignments of the microtubule-binding domain of yeast cytoplasmic dynein in the high and low-affinity states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, Osamu; Nishida, Noritaka; Kikkawa, Masahide; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a motor protein that walks toward the minus end of microtubules (MTs) by utilizing the energy of ATP hydrolysis. The heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein contains the microtubule-binding domain (MTBD). Switching of MTBD between high and low affinity states for MTs is crucial for processive movement of cytoplasmic dynein. Previous biochemical studies demonstrated that the affinity of MTBD is regulated by the AAA+ family ATPase domain, which is separated by 15 nm long coiled-coil helix. In order to elucidate the structural basis of the affinity switching mechanism of MTBD, we designed two MTBD constructs, termed MTBD-High and MTBD-Low, which are locked in high and low affinity state for MTs, respectively, by introducing a disulfide bond between the coiled-coil helix. Here, we established the backbone and side-chain assignments of MTBD-High and MTBD-Low for further structural analyses.

  10. The GH5 1,4-β-mannanase from Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 possesses a low-affinity mannan-binding module and highlights the diversity of mannanolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrill, Johan; Kulcinskaja, Evelina; Sulewska, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    , we report the biochemical properties of the first family 5 subfamily 8 glycoside hydrolase (GH5_8) mannanase from the probiotic bacterium Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 (BlMan5_8). BlMan5_8 possesses a novel low affinity carbohydrate binding module (CBM) specific for soluble mannan...... properties to support specialization towards a preferred substrate, which is likely to confer an advantage in the adaptation to competitive ecological niches....

  11. The Rev1 interacting region (RIR) motif in the scaffold protein XRCC1 mediates a low-affinity interaction with polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP) during DNA single-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Claire; Mani, Rajam S; Fanta, Mesfin; Hoch, Nicolas; Weinfeld, Michael; Caldecott, Keith W

    2017-09-29

    The scaffold protein X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1) interacts with multiple enzymes involved in DNA base excision repair and single-strand break repair (SSBR) and is important for genetic integrity and normal neurological function. One of the most important interactions of XRCC1 is that with polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP), a dual-function DNA kinase/phosphatase that processes damaged DNA termini and that, if mutated, results in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 4 (AOA4) and microcephaly with early-onset seizures and developmental delay (MCSZ). XRCC1 and PNKP interact via a high-affinity phosphorylation-dependent interaction site in XRCC1 and a forkhead-associated domain in PNKP. Here, we identified using biochemical and biophysical approaches a second PNKP interaction site in XRCC1 that binds PNKP with lower affinity and independently of XRCC1 phosphorylation. However, this interaction nevertheless stimulated PNKP activity and promoted SSBR and cell survival. The low-affinity interaction site required the highly conserved Rev1-interacting region (RIR) motif in XRCC1 and included three critical and evolutionarily invariant phenylalanine residues. We propose a bipartite interaction model in which the previously identified high-affinity interaction acts as a molecular tether, holding XRCC1 and PNKP together and thereby promoting the low-affinity interaction identified here, which then stimulates PNKP directly. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. The carbohydrate-binding module family 20-diversity, structure, and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Camilla; Abou Hachem, Maher; Janecek, S.

    2009-01-01

    , laforins. The clear evolutionary relatedness of CBM20s to CBM21s, CBM48s and CBM53s suggests a common clan hosting most of the known SBDs. This review surveys the diversity within the CBM20 family, and makes an evolutionary comparison with CBM21s, CBM48s and CBM53s, discussing intrafamily and interfamily......Starch-active enzymes often possess starch-binding domains (SBDs) mediating attachment to starch granules and other high molecular weight substrates. SBDs are divided into nine carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families, and CBM20 is the earliest-assigned and best characterized family. High...... diversity characterizes CBM20s, which occur in starch-active glycoside hydrolase families 13, 14, 15, and 77, and enzymes involved in starch or glycogen metabolism, exemplified by the starch-phosphorylating enzyme glucan, water dikinase 3 from Arabidopsis thaliana and the mammalian glycogen phosphatases...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to equine CD23 identify the low-affinity receptor for IgE on subpopulations of IgM+ and IgG1+ B-cells in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Bettina; Hillegas, Julia M; Babasyan, Susanna

    2012-04-15

    CD23, also called FcεRII, is the low-affinity receptor for IgE and has first been described as a major receptor regulating IgE responses. In addition, CD23 also binds to CD21, integrins and MHC class II molecules and thus has a much wider functional role in immune regulation ranging from involvement in antigen-presentation to multiple cytokine-like functions of soluble CD23. The role of CD23 during immune responses of the horse is less well understood. Here, we expressed equine CD23 in mammalian cells using a novel IL-4 expression system. Expression resulted in high yield of recombinant IL-4/CD23 fusion protein which was purified and used for the generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to equine CD23. Seven anti-CD23 mAbs were further characterized. The expression of the low-affinity IgE receptor on equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed by flow cytometric analysis. Cell surface staining showed that CD23 is mainly expressed by a subpopulation of equine B-cells. Only a very few equine T-cells or monocytes expressed CD23. CD23(+) B-cells were either IgM(+) or IgG1(+) cells. All CD23(+) cells were also positive for cell surface IgE staining suggesting in vivo IgE binding by the receptor. Two of the CD23 mAbs detected either the complete extracellular region of CD23 or a 22kDa cleavage product of CD23 by Western blotting. The new anti-CD23 mAbs provide valuable reagents to further analyze the roles of CD23 during immune responses of the horse in health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of Starch Binding Domains for Improvement of Starch degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Camilla

    Dansk resume Stivelse er planternes primære energilager og et vigtigt næringsmiddel for pattedyr,svampe og bakterier. Stivelse deponeres i højt organiserede semi-krystallinske stivelseskorn i plastider: kloroplaster i blade (transitorisk stivelse) og amyloplaster i lagerorganer som knolde. Stivel...

  15. Characterization of conformational deformation-coupled interaction between immunoglobulin G1 Fc glycoprotein and a low-affinity Fcγ receptor by deuteration-assisted small-angle neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Yogo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A recently developed integrative approach combining varied types of experimental data has been successfully applied to three-dimensional modelling of larger biomacromolecular complexes. Deuteration-assisted small-angle neutron scattering (SANS plays a unique role in this approach by making it possible to observe selected components in the complex. It enables integrative modelling of biomolecular complexes based on building-block structures typically provided by X-ray crystallography. In this integrative approach, it is important to be aware of the flexible properties of the individual building blocks. Here we examine the ability of SANS to detect a subtle conformational change of a multidomain protein using the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G (IgG interacting with a soluble form of the low-affinity Fcγ receptor IIIb (sFcγRIIIb as a model system. The IgG-Fc glycoprotein was subjected to SANS in the absence and presence of 75%-deuterated sFcγRIIIb, which was matched out in D2O solution. This inverse contrast-matching technique enabled selective observation of SANS from IgG-Fc, thereby detecting its subtle structural deformation induced by the receptor binding. The SANS data were successfully interpreted by considering previously reported crystallographic data and an equilibrium between free and sFcγRIIIb-bound forms. Our SANS data thus demonstrate the applicability of SANS in the integrative approach dealing with biomacromolecular complexes composed of weakly associated building blocks with conformational plasticity.

  16. FigA, a putative homolog of low-affinity calcium system member Fig1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is involved in growth and asexual and sexual development in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shizhu; Zheng, Hailin; Long, Nanbiao; Carbó, Natalia; Chen, Peiying; Aguilar, Pablo S; Lu, Ling

    2014-02-01

    Calcium-mediated signaling pathways are widely employed in eukaryotes and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, at least two different calcium uptake systems have been identified: the high-affinity calcium influx system (HACS) and the low-affinity calcium influx system (LACS). Compared to the HACS, the LACS in fungi is not well known. In this study, FigA, a homolog of the LACS member Fig1 from S. cerevisiae, was functionally characterized in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Loss of figA resulted in retardant hyphal growth and a sharp reduction of conidial production. Most importantly, FigA is essential for the homothallic mating (self-fertilization) process; further, FigA is required for heterothallic mating (outcrossing) in the absence of HACS midA. Interestingly, in a figA deletion mutant, adding extracellular Ca(2+) rescued the hyphal growth defects but could not restore asexual and sexual reproduction. Furthermore, quantitative PCR results revealed that figA deletion sharply decreased the expression of brlA and nsdD, which are known as key regulators during asexual and sexual development, respectively. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagging at the C terminus of FigA (FigA::GFP) showed that FigA localized to the center of the septum in mature hyphal cells, to the location between vesicles and metulae, and between the junctions of metulae and phialides in conidiophores. Thus, our findings suggest that FigA, apart from being a member of a calcium uptake system in A. nidulans, may play multiple unexplored roles during hyphal growth and asexual and sexual development.

  17. Phage display selects for amylases with improved low pH starch-binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaert, RMD; Beekwilder, J; Olsthoorn, R; Quax, WJ; Duin, Jan van

    2002-01-01

    Directed evolution of secreted industrial enzymes is hampered by the lack of powerful selection techniques. We have explored surface display to select for enzyme variants with improved binding performance on complex polymeric substrates. By a combination of saturation mutagenesis and phage display

  18. Microbial starch-binding domains as a tool for targeting proteins to granules during starch biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Q.; Vincken, J.P.; Suurs, L.C.J.M.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2003-01-01

    Modification of starch biosynthesis pathways holds an enormous potential for tailoring granules or polymers with new functionalities. In this study, we explored the possibility of engineering artificial granule-bound proteins, which can be incorporated in the granule during biosynthesis. The

  19. Microbial starch binding domains as a tool for targeting protein to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jiq

    2013-10-09

    Oct 9, 2013 ... starch noodles, bakery foods and snack foods production. (Chen et al., 2003; Kitahara et al., 2007). The use of sweet potato starch is primarily determined by its physic- chemical properties. However, there are almost no natural starches with essential properties for a particular application. Thus, different ...

  20. Modification of potato starch granule structure and morphology in planta by expression of starch binding domain fusion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.

    2010-01-01

    Producing starches with altered composition, structure and novel physico-chemical properties in planta by manipulating the enzymes which are involved in starch metabolism or (over)expressing heterologous enzymes has huge advantages such as broadening the range of starch applications and reducing the

  1. New insight into structure/function relationships in plant alpha-amylase family GH13 members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Eun-Seong; Andersen, Joakim Mark; Nielsen, Morten Munch

    2010-01-01

    binding domains (SBDs) mediate binding to starch granules. SBDs are currently categorised into 9 carbohydrate binding module (CBM) families. A novel CBM20 subfamily encountered in regulatory enzymes possesses characteristically low affinity for β-CD. Although α-amylase is essential for starch mobilisation......Two carbohydrate binding surface sites (SBSs) on barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) of glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13) displayed synergy in interactions with starch granules, thus being pivotal for hydrolysis of supramolecular substrates. Mutational analysis showed that SBS1 is more critical...

  2. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca2+ Probe D4ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Greotti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER represents the major intracellular Ca2+ store and the free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+] within its lumen ([Ca2+]ER can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca2+ sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca2+ probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd for Ca2+, low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca2+] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca2+ affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca2+] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca2+]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca2+ homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer’s Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2. The lower Ca2+ affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca2+ content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls.

  3. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of dioxopyrrolopyrroles as potential low-affinity fluorescent Ca2+ indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesibe Avcıbaşi

    2004-01-01

    1,4-dihydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4-dione (DPP3 have been synthesized and evaluated for their Ca2+ binding properties via fluorimetric titrations. The in vitro dissociation constant Kd measured at 21 ∘C in 100 mM KCl buffered solution, pH 7.05, for the Ca2+ –DPP1 complex is 10 μM; for Ca2+ –DPP2 and Ca2+ –DPP3 a Kd value of 20 μM is found. All three indicators form 1 : 1 complexes with Ca2+. The fluorescence quantum yields of the uncomplexed forms of DPP1, DPP2 and DPP3 are 1.2×10−2, 3.4×10−2 and 3.6×10−2, respectively. After binding to Ca2+ these values increase to 4.8×10−2, 5.0×10−2 and 5.1×10−2, respectively.

  4. E2 enzyme inhibition by stabilization of a low-affinity interface with ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Ceccarelli, Derek F; Orlicky, Stephen; St-Cyr, Daniel J; Ziemba, Amy; Garg, Pankaj; Plamondon, Serge; Auer, Manfred; Sidhu, Sachdev; Marinier, Anne; Kleiger, Gary; Tyers, Mike; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Weak protein interactions between ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) enzymes that mediate its covalent attachment to substrates serve to position ubiquitin for optimal catalytic transfer. We show that a small-molecule inhibitor of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34A, called CC0651, acts by trapping a weak interaction between ubiquitin and the E2 donor ubiquitin-binding site. A structure of the ternary CC0651-Cdc34A-ubiquitin complex reveals that the inhibitor engages a composite binding pocket formed from Cdc34A and ubiquitin. CC0651 also suppresses the spontaneous hydrolysis rate of the Cdc34A-ubiquitin thioester without decreasing the interaction between Cdc34A and the RING domain subunit of the E3 enzyme. Stabilization of the numerous other weak interactions between ubiquitin and UPS enzymes by small molecules may be a feasible strategy to selectively inhibit different UPS activities.

  5. Radiochromatographic carbohydrate analyses of high and low affinity IgG antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.E.; Conrad, H.E.; Voss, E.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Rabbit and chicken IgG anti-fluorescyl antibodies were fractionated into subpopulations differing in their average intrinsic association constants. Each subpopulation was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively for its carbohydrate content by radiochromatographic assay. Results show that each affinity subpopulation derived from an individual animal varied significantly in carbohydrate composition. However, results from different species and/or individuals were not directly comparable. The data were discussed in terms of quantitative and qualitative differences in the carbohydrate moieties of each subpopulation. (author)

  6. The ancestral retinoic acid receptor was a low-affinity sensor triggering neuronal differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handberg-Thorsager, Mette; Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Arold, Stefan T.; Kumar Nadendla, Eswar; Bertucci, Paola Y.; Germain, Pierre; Tomançak, Pavel; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W.; Albalat, Ricard; Kane, Maureen A.; Bourguet, William; Laudet, Vincent; Arendt, Detlev; Schubert, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important intercellular signaling molecule in vertebrate development, with a well-established role in the regulation of hox genes during hindbrain patterning and in neurogenesis. However, the evolutionary origin of the RA signaling pathway remains elusive. To elucidate the evolution of the RA signaling system, we characterized RA metabolism and signaling in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii, a powerful model for evolution, development, and neurobiology. Binding assays and crystal structure analyses show that the annelid retinoic acid receptor (RAR) binds RA and activates transcription just as vertebrate RARs, yet with a different ligand-binding pocket and lower binding affinity, suggesting a permissive rather than instructive role of RA signaling. RAR knockdown and RA treatment of swimming annelid larvae further reveal that the RA signal is locally received in the medial neuroectoderm, where it controls neurogenesis and axon outgrowth, whereas the spatial colinear hox gene expression in the neuroectoderm remains unaffected. These findings suggest that one early role of the new RAR in bilaterian evolution was to control the spatially restricted onset of motor and interneuron differentiation in the developing ventral nerve cord and to indicate that the regulation of hox-controlled anterior-posterior patterning arose only at the base of the chordates, concomitant with a high-affinity RAR needed for the interpretation of a complex RA gradient. PMID:29492455

  7. The ancestral retinoic acid receptor was a low-affinity sensor triggering neuronal differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Handberg-Thorsager, Mette

    2018-02-22

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important intercellular signaling molecule in vertebrate development, with a well-established role in the regulation of hox genes during hindbrain patterning and in neurogenesis. However, the evolutionary origin of the RA signaling pathway remains elusive. To elucidate the evolution of the RA signaling system, we characterized RA metabolism and signaling in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii, a powerful model for evolution, development, and neurobiology. Binding assays and crystal structure analyses show that the annelid retinoic acid receptor (RAR) binds RA and activates transcription just as vertebrate RARs, yet with a different ligand-binding pocket and lower binding affinity, suggesting a permissive rather than instructive role of RA signaling. RAR knockdown and RA treatment of swimming annelid larvae further reveal that the RA signal is locally received in the medial neuroectoderm, where it controls neurogenesis and axon outgrowth, whereas the spatial colinear hox gene expression in the neuroectoderm remains unaffected. These findings suggest that one early role of the new RAR in bilaterian evolution was to control the spatially restricted onset of motor and interneuron differentiation in the developing ventral nerve cord and to indicate that the regulation of hox-controlled anterior-posterior patterning arose only at the base of the chordates, concomitant with a high-affinity RAR needed for the interpretation of a complex RA gradient.

  8. Low affinity of heterotrophic bacteria to loose deposits in drinking water distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poças, A.; Napier, V.; Neto, C.; Ferreira, E.; Benoliel, M.J.; Rietveld, L.C.; Vreeburg, J.; Menaia, J.

    2015-01-01

    Loose deposits (LD) accumulate in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) and may lead to tap water discoloration incidents upon resuspension. While inconvenient for the consumers and the water companies, discoloration may be accompanied by degradation of the microbiological quality of the

  9. A simple detection method for low-affinity membrane protein interactions by baculoviral display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiko Sakihama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane protein interactions play an important role in cell-to-cell recognition in various biological activities such as in the immune or neural system. Nevertheless, there has remained the major obstacle of expression of the membrane proteins in their active form. Recently, we and other investigators found that functional membrane proteins express on baculovirus particles (budded virus, BV. In this study, we applied this BV display system to detect interaction between membrane proteins important for cell-to-cell interaction in immune system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We infected Sf9 cells with recombinant baculovirus encoding the T cell membrane protein CD2 or its ligand CD58 and recovered the BV. We detected specific interaction between CD2-displaying BV and CD58-displaying BV by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Using this system, we also detected specific interaction between two other membrane receptor-ligand pairs, CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L, and glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related protein (GITR-GITR ligand (GITRL. Furthermore, we observed specific binding of BV displaying CD58, CD40L, or GITRL to cells naturally expressing their respective receptors by flowcytometric analysis using anti-baculoviral gp64 antibody. Finally we isolated CD2 cDNA from a cDNA expression library by magnetic separation using CD58-displaying BV and anti-gp64 antibody. CONCLUSIONS: We found the BV display system worked effectively in the detection of the interaction of membrane proteins. Since various membrane proteins and their oligomeric complexes can be displayed on BV in the native form, this BV display system should prove highly useful in the search for natural ligands or to develop screening systems for therapeutic antibodies and/or compounds.

  10. Selective κ opioid antagonists nor-BNI, GNTI and JDTic have low affinities for non-opioid receptors and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Munro

    Full Text Available Nor-BNI, GNTI and JDTic induce selective κ opioid antagonism that is delayed and extremely prolonged, but some other effects are of rapid onset and brief duration. The transient effects of these compounds differ, suggesting that some of them may be mediated by other targets.In binding assays, the three antagonists showed no detectable affinity (K(i≥10 µM for most non-opioid receptors and transporters (26 of 43 tested. There was no non-opioid target for which all three compounds shared detectable affinity, or for which any two shared sub-micromolar affinity. All three compounds showed low nanomolar affinity for κ opioid receptors, with moderate selectivity over μ and δ (3 to 44-fold. Nor-BNI bound weakly to the α(2C-adrenoceptor (K(i = 630 nM. GNTI enhanced calcium mobilization by noradrenaline at the α(1A-adrenoceptor (EC₅₀ = 41 nM, but did not activate the receptor, displace radioligands, or enhance PI hydrolysis. This suggests that it is a functionally-selective allosteric enhancer. GNTI was also a weak M₁ receptor antagonist (K(B = 3.7 µM. JDTic bound to the noradrenaline transporter (K(i = 54 nM, but only weakly inhibited transport (IC₅₀ = 1.1 µM. JDTic also bound to the opioid-like receptor NOP (K(i = 12 nM, but gave little antagonism even at 30 µM. All three compounds exhibited rapid permeation and active efflux across Caco-2 cell monolayers.Across 43 non-opioid CNS targets, only GNTI exhibited a potent functional effect (allosteric enhancement of α(1A-adrenoceptors. This may contribute to GNTI's severe transient effects. Plasma concentrations of nor-BNI and GNTI may be high enough to affect some peripheral non-opioid targets. Nonetheless, κ opioid antagonism persists for weeks or months after these transient effects dissipate. With an adequate pre-administration interval, our results therefore strengthen the evidence that nor-BNI, GNTI and JDTic are highly selective κ opioid antagonists.

  11. Further studies on Hb Canebière [β12(G4)Asn→His], a low affinity hemoglobin variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froelund, Ulf; Sandbakken, Erik; Szecsi, Pal Bela

    2010-01-01

    A case of Hb Canebière [β102(G4)Asn→His] was diagnosed in an otherwise healthy 21-year-old Danish woman. The clinical consequences were minor, since her only symptom consisted of transient cyanosis in lips and fingers when exposed to cold environments. Whole blood p50 was 59.9 mmHg. The Hb...... Canebière variant could not be separated from Hb A by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and isoelectric focusing (IEF), and it was thus missed by routine hemoglobin (Hb) fractionation techniques....

  12. Further studies on Hb Canebière [β12(G4)Asn→His], a low affinity hemoglobin variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froelund, Ulf; Sandbakken, Erik; Szecsi, Pal Bela

    2010-01-01

    A case of Hb Canebière [ß102(G4)Asn¿His] was diagnosed in an otherwise healthy 21-year-old Danish woman. The clinical consequences were minor, since her only symptom consisted of transient cyanosis in lips and fingers when exposed to cold environments. Whole blood p50 was 59.9 mmHg. The Hb...... Canebière variant could not be separated from Hb A by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and isoelectric focusing (IEF), and it was thus missed by routine hemoglobin (Hb) fractionation techniques....

  13. Evidence that the angiotensin at 2-receptor agonist compound 21 is also a low affinity thromboxane TXA2-receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredgart, M.; Leurgans, T.; Stenelo, M.

    2015-01-01

    AT2-receptor specificity, arteries were pre-incubated with the AT2-receptor antagonist PD123319 (10muM), or mesenteric arteries from AT2-receptor knock-out (AT2R-/y) mice were used. An inhibitory effect of C21 (100nM - 10muM) on U46619 (0,3muM) induced platelet aggregation was examined in whole human...

  14. Expression and cellular distribution of high- and low-affinity neurotrophin receptors in malformations of cortical development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Ozbas-Gerçeker, Filiz; Redeker, Sandra; Ramkema, Marja; Spliet, Wim G. M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Leenstra, Sieger; Gorter, Jan A.; Troost, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    An increasing number of observations suggests an important and complex role for both high- (tyrosine kinase receptor, trk) and low- (p75) affinity neurotrophin receptors (NTRs) during development in human brain. In the present study, the cell-specific distribution of NTRs was studied in different

  15. Refolding of a carboxypeptidase Y folding intermediate in vitro by low-affinity binding of the proregion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Jakob R.; Sørensen, P; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1994-01-01

    , soluble folding intermediate, which has been characterized in the present study. The inactive intermediate can be folded into the active enzyme at a low efficiency (5-10%) by the addition of 0.9 M ammonium sulfate. The refolding is accompanied by pronounced structural changes. As seen for other protease...... zymogens the isolated proregion from carboxypeptidase Y was found to stimulate refolding without covalent linkage to the mature part. However, the added proregion does not form a stable complex with the native enzyme and requires the presence of 0.9 M ammonium sulfate to exhibit its function. The proregion...

  16. Characterization of the transport activity of SGLT2/MAP17, the renal low-affinity Na+-glucose cotransporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Michael J; Wallendorff, Bernadette; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2017-08-01

    The cotransporter SGLT2 is responsible for 90% of renal glucose reabsorption, and we recently showed that MAP17 appears to work as a required β-subunit. We report in the present study a detailed functional characterization of human SGLT2 in coexpression with human MAP17 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Addition of external glucose generates a large inward current in the presence of Na, confirming an electrogenic transport mechanism. At a membrane potential of -50 mV, SGLT2 affinity constants for glucose and Na are 3.4 ± 0.4 and 18 ± 6 mM, respectively. The change in the reversal potential of the cotransport current as a function of external glucose concentration clearly confirms a 1:1 Na-to-glucose transport stoichiometry. SGLT2 is selective for glucose and α-methylglucose but also transports, to a lesser extent, galactose and 3- O -methylglucose. SGLT2 can be inhibited in a competitive manner by phlorizin ( K i = 31 ± 4 nM) and by dapagliflozin ( K i = 0.75 ± 0.3 nM). Similarly to SGLT1, SGLT2 can be activated by Na, Li, and protons. Pre-steady-state currents for SGLT2 do exist but are small in amplitude and relatively fast (a time constant of ~2 ms). The leak current defined as the phlorizin-sensitive current in the absence of substrate was extremely small in the case of SGLT2. In summary, in comparison with SGLT1, SGLT2 has a lower affinity for glucose, a transport stoichiometry of 1:1, very small pre-steady-state and leak currents, a 10-fold higher affinity for phlorizin, and an affinity for dapagliflozin in the subnanomolar range. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Dynamics of starch granule biogenesis - the role of redox-regulated enzymes and low-affinity carbohydrate-binding modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blennow, A.; Svensson, Birte

    2010-01-01

    The deposition and degradation of starch in plants is subject to extensive post-translational regulation. To permit degradation of B-type crystallites present in tuberous and leaf starch these starch types are phosphorylated by glucan, water dikinase (GWD). At the level of post-translational redo...

  18. Discovery of a low affinity thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-like peptide that exhibits potent inhibition of scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Chhuttan L; Ingole, Shubdha; Rajpoot, Satyendra; Thakur, Avinash; Nandeker, Prajwal P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Sharma, Shyam S; Jain, Rahul

    2015-06-23

    TRH-like peptides were synthesized in which the critical N -terminus residue L-pGlu was replaced with various heteroaromatic rings, and the central residue histidine with 1-alkyl-L-histidines. All synthesized TRH-like peptides were evaluated in vitro as agonists in HEK mTRH-R1 and HEK mTRH-R2 cell lines, an expressing receptor binding assay (IC 50 ), and cell signaling assay (EC 50 ). The analeptic potential of the synthesized peptides was evaluated in vivo by using the antagonism of a pentobarbital-induced sleeping time. The peptides 6a , 6c and 6e were found to activate TRH-R2 with potencies (EC 50 ) of 0.002 μM, 0.28 μM and 0.049 μM , respectively. In contrast, for signaling activation of TRH-R1, the same peptides required higher concentration of 0.414 μM, 50 μM and 19.1 μM, respectively in the FLIPR assay. The results showed that these peptides were 207, 178 and 389-fold selective towards TRH-R2 receptor subtype. In the antagonism of a pentobarbital-induced sleeping time assay, peptide 6c showed a 58.5% reduction in sleeping time. The peptide 6c exhibited high stability in rat blood plasma, a superior effect on the scopolamine-induced cognition impairment mice model, safe effects on the cardiovascular system, and general behavior using a functional observation battery (FOB).

  19. Murine CR1/2 targeted antigenized single-chain antibody fragments induce transient low affinity antibodies and negatively influence an ongoing immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József; Molnár, Eszter; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Isaák, Andrea; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Péter; Erdei, Anna

    2007-01-01

    We have generated a single-chain antibody which recognizes murine CR1/2 and carries a genetically fused influenza hemagglutinin derived peptide. Theoretically such a construct is able to crosslink the B cell antigen receptor and CR1/2 on peptide specific B cells. The construct was able to reach its CR1/2 positive target cells, yet intraperitoneal delivery of the construct elicited an IgM response only slightly exceeding that induced by the free peptide. Providing T cell help by the injection of peptide specific lymphocytes did not alter the response in essence, that is anti-peptide IgG was not detectable even after booster immunizations. When used as a booster vaccine following injection of the peptide in adjuvant, the construct even inhibited the development of IgG1 and IgG3 anti-peptide antibodies. These data indicate that although targeting of antigen to CR1/2 on B cells can enhance transient proliferation or differentiation of antigen specific B cells it cannot induce strong, longlasting humoral immune responses. Furthermore, CR1/2 targeting constructs may negatively influence an ongoing immune reaction.

  20. Insertion of Argos sequences into the B-loop of epidermal growth factor results in a low-affinity ligand with strong agonistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Poll, M L; van Vugt, M J; Lenferink, A E; van Zoelen, E J

    1997-06-17

    Recently, it has been shown that the activation of the Drosophila EGF receptor (DER) by its natural ligand Spitz is inhibited by Argos [Schweitzer, R., et al. (1995) Nature 376, 699-702]. Argos and Spitz both have an EGF-like domain which in the case of Argos differs from that of Spitz and other EGF receptor agonists in that it has an extended B-loop of 20 amino acids instead of 10 amino acids which in addition contains an unusual cluster of charged residues. To investigate whether B-loop sequences are an important determinant for receptor activation and play a causal role in the antagonistic activity of Argos, three human (h)EGF mutants were constructed in which amino acids derived from the Argos B-loop were introduced. In one mutant (E3A4E/B10), replacement of four amino acids in the B-loop of hEGF (123, E24, D27, and K28) by the corresponding Argos residues neither altered the binding affinity of the growth factor for the hEGF receptor nor did it change its ability to induce a mitogenic response. Insertion of 2 additional Argos residues (E3A4E/B12) or extension of the B-loop by 10 amino acids (E3A4E/B20) resulted, however, in a significant loss of binding affinity. In spite of this, both E3A4E/B12 and E3A4E/B20 appeared to be strong agonists for the hEGF receptor with similar dose-response curves for mitogenic activity and MAPK activation as wild-type hEGF. These data show that several nonconservative substitutions in the hEGF B-loop are tolerated without affecting receptor binding or activation. Furthermore, they show that receptor binding and receptor signaling efficiency can be uncoupled which is a prerequisite for the development of receptor antagonists.

  1. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Philip K.; Olsen, Jeppe A.; Nielsen, Elsebet O.

    2015-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 4 beta 2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (alpha 4)(2)(beta 2)(3) and (alpha 4)(3)(beta 2)(2). While these are similar in many aspects, the (alpha 4)(3)(beta 2)(2) stoichiometry di...

  2. Measurement of the Dissociation-Equilibrium Constants for Low Affinity Antibiotic Binding Interaction with Bacterial Ribosomes by the T2 (CPMG) and Line-Broadening Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, L.; Gharbi-Benarous, J.; Bertho, G.; Mauvais, P.; Girault, J.-P.

    1999-10-01

    In this study the dissociation constants of the low antibiotic-ribosomes interaction were determined by the T2 (CPMG), the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill spin-echo decay rate and the line-broadening methods. Three MLSB antibiotics were studied, a macrolide roxithromycin, a ketolide HMR 3647 and a lincosamide clindamycin for their weak interaction with three bacterial ribosomes, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus sensitive and resistant to erythromycin. Nous avons mesuré la constante de dissociation, Kd correspondant à l'interaction faible antibiotique-ribosome bactérien pour des antibiotiques de différentes classes, un macrolide (roxithromycine), un kétolide (HMR 3647) et une lincosamide (clindamycine) avec des ribosomes de différentes souches bactériennes (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus sensible ou résistant à l'erythromycin) par deux méthodes : l'une basée sur la variation des largeurs de raies et l'autre sur les temps de relaxation transversaux T2 en utilisant une séquence CPMG.

  3. High- and low-affinity binding of S-citalopram to the human serotonin transporter mutated at 20 putatively important amino acid positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Wiborg, Ove

    2005-01-01

    of presumed importance. Binding of S-citalopram, both to the high-affinity-binding site and to the allosteric binding site, was measured in these mutants with the purpose of investigating the connection between the two binding sites. The amino acid substitutions did not introduce large changes in the two...

  4. High- and low-affinity cre boxes for CcpA binding in Bacillus subtilis revealed by genome-wide analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marciniak, B.C.; Pabijaniak, M.; De Jong, A.; Dühring, R.; Seidel, G.; Hillen, W.; Kuipers, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Bacillus subtilis and its relatives carbon catabolite control, a mechanism enabling to reach maximal efficiency of carbon and energy sources metabolism, is achieved by the global regulator CcpA (carbon catabolite protein A). CcpA in a complex with HPr-Ser-P (seryl-phosphorylated form

  5. The CREC family, a novel family of multiple EF-hand, low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins localised to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H

    2000-01-01

    (2+)-regulated activities. Recent evidence has been obtained that some CREC family members are involved in pathological activities such as malignant cell transformation, mediation of the toxic effects of snake venom toxins and putative participation in amyloid formation. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-21...

  6. Structural Insight inot the low Affinity Between Thermotoga maritima CheA and CheB Compared to their Escherichia coli/Salmonella typhimurium Counterparts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Park; B Crane

    2011-12-31

    CheA-mediated CheB phosphorylation and the subsequent CheB-mediated demethylation of the chemoreceptors are important steps required for the bacterial chemotactic adaptation response. Although Escherichia coli CheB has been reported to interact with CheA competitively against CheY, we have observed that Thermotoga maritima CheB has no detectable CheA-binding. By determining the CheY-like domain crystal structure of T. maritima CheB, and comparing against the T. maritima CheY and Salmonella typhimurium CheB structures, we propose that the two consecutive glutamates in the {beta}4/{alpha}4 loop of T. maritima CheB that is absent in T. maritima CheY and in E. coli/S. typhimurium CheB may be one factor contributing to the low CheA affinity.

  7. Oxycodone is associated with dose-dependent QTc prolongation in patients and low-affinity inhibiting of hERG activity in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanoe, Søren; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Sjøgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    patients treated with methadone, oxycodone, morphine or tramadol were recruited in a cross-sectional study. The QTc was estimated from a 12-lead ECG. To examine hERG activity in the presence of oxycodone, electrophysiological testing was conducted using Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK293 cells expressing h......ERG channels. RESULTS: There were no differences in gender distribution or age between the treatment groups. The known association between methadone dose and QTc was confirmed (R(2) = 0.09; P = 0.02). Higher oxycodone dose was also associated with longer QTc (R(2) = 0.21; P = 0.02). A 100 mg higher oxycodone......). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients treated with methadone or oxycodone, higher doses were associated with longer QTc. Oxycodone is capable of inhibiting hERG channels in vitro....

  8. The CREC family, a novel family of multiple EF-hand, low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins localised to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Vorum, H

    2000-01-01

    The CREC family consists of a number of recently discovered multiple (up to seven) EF-hand proteins that localise to the secretory pathway of mammalian cells. At present, the family includes reticulocalbin, ERC-55/TCBP-49/E6BP, Cab45, calumenin and crocalbin/CBP-50. Similar proteins are found...... in quite diverse invertebrate organisms such as DCB-45 and SCF in Drosophila melanogaster, SCF in Bombyx mori, CCB-39 in Caenorhabditis elegans and Pfs40/PfERC in Plasmodium falciparum. The Ca(2+) affinity is rather low with dissociation constants around 10(-4)-10(-3) M. The proteins may participate in Ca......(2+)-regulated activities. Recent evidence has been obtained that some CREC family members are involved in pathological activities such as malignant cell transformation, mediation of the toxic effects of snake venom toxins and putative participation in amyloid formation. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-21...

  9. Cloning and characterization of brnQ, a gene encoding a low-affinity, branched chain amino acid carrier in Lactobacillus delbruckii subsp lactis DSM7290

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stucky, K; Hagting, A; Klein, J.R.; Matern, H; Henrich, B; Konings, WN; Plapp, R

    1995-01-01

    A gene (brnQ), encoding a carrier for branched-chain amino acids in Lactobacillus delbruckii subsp. lactis DSM7290 was cloned in the low-copy-number vector pLG339 by complementation of a transport-deficient Escherichia coli strain. The plasmid carrying the cloned gene restored growth of an E. coli

  10. Binding and degradation of 125I-insulin by isolated rat renal brush border membranes: evidence for low affinity, high capacity insulin recognition sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meezan, E.; Pillion, D.J.; Elgavish, A.

    1988-01-01

    The kidney plays a major role in the handling of circulating insulin in the blood, primarily via reuptake of filtered insulin at the luminal brush border membrane. 125I-insulin associated with rat renal brush border membrane vesicles (BBV) in a time- and temperature-dependent manner accompanied by degradation of the hormone to trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-soluble fragments. Both association and degradation of 125I-insulin were linearly proportional to membrane protein concentration with virtually all of the degradative activity being membrane associated. Insulin, proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin all inhibited the association and degradation of 125I-insulin by BBV, but these processes were not appreciably affected by the insulin-like growth factors IGF-I and IGF-II or by cytochrome c and lysozyme, low molecular weight, filterable, proteins, which are known to be reabsorbed in the renal tubules by luminal endocytosis. When the interaction of 125I-insulin with BBV was studied at various medium osmolarities (300-1100 mosM) to alter intravesicular space, association of the ligand with the vesicles was unaffected, but degradation of the ligand by the vesicles decreased progressively with increasing medium osmolarity. Therefore, association of 125I-insulin to BBV represented binding of the ligand to the membrane surface and not uptake of the hormone or its degradation products into the vesicles. Attempts to crosslink 125I-insulin to a high-affinity insulin receptor using the bifunctional reagent disuccinimidyl suberate revealed only trace amounts of an 125I-insulin-receptor complex in brush border membrane vesicles in contrast to intact renal tubules where this complex was readily observed. Both binding and degradation of 125I-insulin by brush border membranes did not reach saturation even at concentrations of insulin approaching 10(-5) M

  11. Activation of an essential calcium signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Kch1 and Kch2, putative low-affinity potassium transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Christopher P; Zhang, Nannan; Sokabe, Takaaki; Rivetta, Alberto; Slayman, Clifford L; Montell, Craig; Cunningham, Kyle W

    2013-02-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mating pheromones activate a high-affinity Ca(2+) influx system (HACS) that activates calcineurin and is essential for cell survival. Here we identify extracellular K(+) and a homologous pair of transmembrane proteins, Kch1 and Kch2 (Prm6), as necessary components of the HACS activation mechanism. Expression of Kch1 and especially Kch2 was strongly induced during the response to mating pheromones. When forcibly overexpressed, Kch1 and Kch2 localized to the plasma membrane and activated HACS in a fashion that depended on extracellular K(+) but not pheromones. They also promoted growth of trk1 trk2 mutant cells in low K(+) environments, suggesting they promote K(+) uptake. Voltage-clamp recordings of protoplasts revealed diminished inward K(+) currents in kch1 kch2 double-mutant cells relative to the wild type. Conversely, heterologous expression of Kch1 in HEK293T cells caused the appearance of inwardly rectifying K(+) currents. Collectively, these findings suggest that Kch1 and Kch2 directly promote K(+) influx and that HACS may electrochemically respond to K(+) influx in much the same way as the homologous voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in most animal cell types.

  12. New insight into structure/function relationships in plant alpha-amylase family GH13 members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Eun-Seong; Andersen, Joakim Mark; Nielsen, Morten Munch

    2010-01-01

    Two carbohydrate binding surface sites (SBSs) on barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) of glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13) displayed synergy in interactions with starch granules, thus being pivotal for hydrolysis of supramolecular substrates. Mutational analysis showed that SBS1 is more critical for the ......Two carbohydrate binding surface sites (SBSs) on barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) of glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13) displayed synergy in interactions with starch granules, thus being pivotal for hydrolysis of supramolecular substrates. Mutational analysis showed that SBS1 is more critical...... binding domains (SBDs) mediate binding to starch granules. SBDs are currently categorised into 9 carbohydrate binding module (CBM) families. A novel CBM20 subfamily encountered in regulatory enzymes possesses characteristically low affinity for β-CD. Although α-amylase is essential for starch mobilisation...... in germinating barley seeds, efficient degradation requires the concerted action of α-amylase, β-amylase, limit dextrinase (LD) and possibly α-glucosidase. Limit dextrinase (LD) is encoded by a single gene and represents the sole debranching activity during germination. Recent expression of functional LD...

  13. High- and low-affinity sites for sodium in delta-OR-G(i)1 alpha (Cys(351)-Ile(351)) fusion protein stably expressed in HEK293 cells; functional significance and correlation with biophysical state of plasma membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vošahlíková, Miroslava; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Roubalová, Lenka; Hof, Martin; Svoboda, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 387, č. 5 (2014), s. 487-502 ISSN 0028-1298 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/0919; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : delta - opioid receptor * monovalent ions * agonist and antagonist binding * [35S]GTPγS binding * membrane biophysics * Laurdan fluorescence Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.471, year: 2014

  14. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J. (Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid (3H)D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid (3H)D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid (3H)U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by (3H)U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan (3H)ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, (3H)ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of (3H)ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with (3H)U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid (3H)bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue).

  15. Quantitative analysis of multiple kappa-opioid receptors by selective and nonselective ligand binding in guinea pig spinal cord: Resolution of high and low affinity states of the kappa 2 receptors by a computerized model-fitting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberi, M.; Magnan, J.

    1990-01-01

    The binding characteristics of selective and nonselective opioids have been studied in whole guinea pig spinal cord, using a computer fitting method to analyze the data obtained from saturation and competition studies. The delineation of specific binding sites labeled by the mu-selective opioid [3H]D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.58 nM, R = 4.52 pmol/g of tissue) and by the delta-selective opioid [3H]D-Pen2, D-Pen5-enkephalin (Kd = 2.02 nM, R = 1.47 pmol/g of tissue) suggests the presence of mu and delta-receptors in the spinal cord tissue. The presence of kappa receptors was probed by the kappa-selective opioid [3H]U69593 (Kd = 3.31 nM, R = 2.00 pmol/g of tissue). The pharmacological characterization of the sites labeled by [3H]U69593 confirms the assumption that this ligand discriminates kappa receptors in guinea pig spinal cord. The benzomorphan [3H]ethylketazocine labels a population of receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.65 nM, R = 7.39 pmol/g of tissue). The total binding capacity of this ligand was not different from the sum of the binding capacities of mu, delta-, and kappa-selective ligands. Under mu- and delta-suppressed conditions, [3H]ethylketazocine still binds to receptors with one homogeneous affinity state (Kd = 0.45 nM, R = 1.69 pmol/g of tissue). Competition studies performed against the binding of [3H]ethylketazocine under these experimental conditions reveal that the pharmacological profile of the radiolabeled receptors is similar to the profile of the kappa receptors labeled with [3H]U69593. Saturation studies using the nonselective opioid [3H]bremazocine demonstrate that this ligand binds to spinal cord membranes with heterogeneous affinities (Kd1 = 0.28 nM, R1 = 7.91 pmol/g of tissue; Kd2 = 3.24 nM, R2 = 11.2 pmol/g of tissue)

  16. Conversion of the low affinity ouabain-binding site of non-gastric H,K-ATPase into a high affinity binding site by substitution of only five amino acids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, L.Y.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Tonk, E.C.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koenderink, J.B.; Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de

    2006-01-01

    P-type ATPases of the IIC subfamily exhibit large differences in sensitivity toward ouabain. This allows a strategy in which ouabain-insensitive members of this subfamily are used as template for mutational elucidation of the ouabain-binding site. With this strategy, we recently identified seven

  17. Fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases bind starch and β-cyclodextrin similarly to amylolytic hydrolases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nekiunaite, Laura; Isaksen, Trine; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    , the clustering of CBM20s from starch-targeting LPMOs and hydrolases was in accord with taxonomy and did not correlate to appended catalytic activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the CBM20-binding scaffold is retained in the evolution of hydrolytic and oxidative starch-degrading activities....

  18. Decision-Making Accuracy of CBM Progress-Monitoring Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, John M.; Wells, Craig S.; Marcotte, Amanda M.; Solomon, Benjamin G.

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the diagnostic accuracy associated with decision making as is typically conducted with curriculum-based measurement (CBM) approaches to progress monitoring. Using previously published estimates of the standard errors of estimate associated with CBM, 20,000 progress-monitoring data sets were simulated to model student reading…

  19. Plant α-glucan phosphatases SEX4 and LSF2 display different affinity for amylopectin and amylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Auger, Kyle D.; Anderson, Nolan T.

    2016-01-01

    The plant glucan phosphatases Starch EXcess 4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2) apply different starch binding mechanisms. SEX4 contains a carbohydrate binding module, and LSF2 has two surface binding sites (SBSs). We determined KDapp for amylopectin and amylose, and KD for β-cyclodextrin and vali......The plant glucan phosphatases Starch EXcess 4 (SEX4) and Like Sex Four2 (LSF2) apply different starch binding mechanisms. SEX4 contains a carbohydrate binding module, and LSF2 has two surface binding sites (SBSs). We determined KDapp for amylopectin and amylose, and KD for β...

  20. production of manual arc welding electrodes with local raw materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CHUKSSUCCESS 4 LOVE

    celluslose, starch and dextrin. Some special electrodes have metallic salts included in the flux to add alloying substances to the weld metal. A good flux ... is an interfacial adhesive one, which is a chemical bond across the interface between one component and another (Bosworth and. Deam, 2000). The starch binds the flux.

  1. Expression of an engineered granule-bound Escherichia coli glycogen branching enzyme in potato results in severe morphological changes in starch granules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.; Nazarian Firouzabadi, F.; Vincken, J.P.; Ji, Q.; Suurs, L.C.J.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Trindade, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli glycogen branching enzyme (GLGB) was fused to either the C- or N-terminus of a starch-binding domain (SBD) and expressed in two potato genetic backgrounds: the amylose-free mutant (amf) and an amylose-containing line (Kardal). Regardless of background or construct used, a large

  2. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 12, No 41 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of an engineered tandem-repeat starch-binding domain in sweet potato plants · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Yunfeng Zhang, Qin Ji, Yujun Xing, Qiang Li, Xin Wang, Chun Xu, Cuixiang Huang. http://dx.doi.org/10.5897/AJB11.3321 ...

  3. SusG: A Unique Cell-Membrane-Associated [alpha]-Amylase from a Prominent Human Gut Symbiont Targets Complex Starch Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Smith, Thomas J. (Danforth)

    2010-09-21

    SusG is an {alpha}-amylase and part of a large protein complex on the outer surface of the bacterial cell and plays a major role in carbohydrate acquisition by the animal gut microbiota. Presented here, the atomic structure of SusG has an unusual extended, bilobed structure composed of amylase at one end and an unprecedented internal carbohydrate-binding motif at the other. Structural studies further demonstrate that the carbohydrate-binding motif binds maltooligosaccharide distal to, and on the opposite side of, the amylase catalytic site. SusG has an additional starch-binding site on the amylase domain immediately adjacent to the active cleft. Mutagenesis analysis demonstrates that these two additional starch-binding sites appear to play a role in catabolism of insoluble starch. However, elimination of these sites has only a limited effect, suggesting that they may have a more important role in product exchange with other Sus components.

  4. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) using optimized systems for epicotyls and cotelydons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epicotyl and internodal stem segments provide the predominantly used explants for regeneration of transgenic citrus plants following co-cultivation with Agrobacterium. Previous reports using epicotyls segments from Mexican lime have shown low affinity for Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection which re...

  5. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  6. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg

    2016-01-01

    maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content......In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated...... and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers...

  7. Analysis of Carbohydrate-Carbohydrate Interactions Using Sugar-Functionalized Silicon Nanoparticles for Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chian-Hui; Hütter, Julia; Hsu, Chien-Wei; Tanaka, Hidenori; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; De Cola, Luisa; Lepenies, Bernd; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-01-13

    Protein-carbohydrate binding depends on multivalent ligand display that is even more important for low affinity carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Detection and analysis of these low affinity multivalent binding events are technically challenging. We describe the synthesis of dual-fluorescent sugar-capped silicon nanoparticles that proved to be an attractive tool for the analysis of low affinity interactions. These ultrasmall NPs with sizes of around 4 nm can be used for NMR quantification of coupled sugars. The silicon nanoparticles are employed to measure the interaction between the cancer-associated glycosphingolipids GM3 and Gg3 and the associated kD value by surface plasmon resonance experiments. Cell binding studies, to investigate the biological relevance of these carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions, also benefit from these fluorescent sugar-capped nanoparticles.

  8. Kindled seizures selectively reduce a subpopulation of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in rat dentate gyrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, D.D.; McNamara, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    Amygdala-kindled seizures reduced significantly the total number of [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in both dentate and hippocampal gyri compared to electrode implanted unstimulated controls. Both high and low affinity carbachol displaceable binding site populations were significantly reduced in hippocampal gyrus. By contrast, a selective decline of low affinity sites was found in dentate gyrus membranes. The selectivity of the decline in dentate but not hippocampus gyrus underscores the specificity of this molecular response to amygdala-kindled seizures. We suggest that these receptor alterations underlie adaptive mechanisms which antagonize kindled epileptogenesis

  9. Kindled seizures selectively reduce a subpopulation of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in rat dentate gyrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D.D.; McNamara, J.O.

    1982-09-01

    Amygdala-kindled seizures reduced significantly the total number of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding sites in both dentate and hippocampal gyri compared to electrode implanted unstimulated controls. Both high and low affinity carbachol displaceable binding site populations were significantly reduced in hippocampal gyrus. By contrast, a selective decline of low affinity sites was found in dentate gyrus membranes. The selectivity of the decline in dentate but not hippocampus gyrus underscores the specificity of this molecular response to amygdala-kindled seizures. We suggest that these receptor alterations underlie adaptive mechanisms which antagonize kindled epileptogenesis.

  10. Transitional states of central serotonin receptors in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienzl, E.; Riederer, P.; Jellinger, K.; Wesemann, W.; Marburg Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Crude membrane preparations from the frontal cortex of controls and pakinsonian patients were used to demonstrate affinity changes of the specific 3 H-5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) binding sites. Two such sites were noteable in controls, a finding consistent with earlier observations. In Parkinson's disease, both high- and low-affinity sites are significantly decreased. Additional experiments either with prolonged incubation times or pre-incubation with N-ethylmaleimide change the two affinities to a single high-affinity or low-affinity constant. The concept of transitional states of 5-HT receptors is discussed and seems to have important implications in the treatment of parkinsonism. (author)

  11. Starch Catabolism by a Prominent Human Gut Symbiont Is Directed by the Recognition of Amylose Helices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Martens, Eric C.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Smith, Thomas J. (WU); (Danforth)

    2009-01-12

    The human gut microbiota performs functions that are not encoded in our Homo sapiens genome, including the processing of otherwise undigestible dietary polysaccharides. Defining the structures of proteins involved in the import and degradation of specific glycans by saccharolytic bacteria complements genomic analysis of the nutrient-processing capabilities of gut communities. Here, we describe the atomic structure of one such protein, SusD, required for starch binding and utilization by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a prominent adaptive forager of glycans in the distal human gut microbiota. The binding pocket of this unique {alpha}-helical protein contains an arc of aromatic residues that complements the natural helical structure of starch and imposes this conformation on bound maltoheptaose. Furthermore, SusD binds cyclic oligosaccharides with higher affinity than linear forms. The structures of several SusD/oligosaccharide complexes reveal an inherent ligand recognition plasticity dominated by the three-dimensional conformation of the oligosaccharides rather than specific interactions with the composite sugars.

  12. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å

  13. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A. E., E-mail: schmidt@omrb.pnpi.spb.ru; Shvetsov, A. V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kuklin, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  14. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  15. Lithium transport across biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1990-01-01

    Li+ is actively transported out of cells, and across different epithelia of both mammalian and amphibian origin. Due to the low affinity of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase for Li+, the transport is most likely energized by exchange and/or cotransport processes. The detailed mechanism by which Li+ is reabsorbed...

  16. Downregulation of taurine uptake in multidrug resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, K A; Litman, Thomas; Eriksen, J

    2002-01-01

    In daunorubicin resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (DNR), the initial taurine uptake was reduced by 56% as compared to the parental, drug sensitive Ehrlich cells. Kinetic experiments indicated that taurine uptake in Ehrlich cells occurs via both high- and low-affinity transporters. The maximal...

  17. Electrochemical investigation of the effect of some organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    between a low-affinity deoxy T-state and a high-affinity oxy. R-state (Tsuneshige et al 2002). Organic phosphates and some heterotrophic effectors, such as protons, anions and carbon dioxide, although bound spatially at remote sites, could affect the oxygenation process and have been shown to do so (Faulkner et al 1994; ...

  18. In vitro and in vivo evidence for active brain uptake of the GHB analogue HOCPCA by the monocarboxylate transporter subtype 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiesen, Louise; Kehler, Jan; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2015-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a recreational drug, a clinically prescribed drug in narcolepsy and alcohol dependence, and an endogenous substance which binds to both high and low affinity sites in the brain. For studying the molecular mechanisms and the biological role of the GHB high...

  19. Mapping the Binding Site for Escitalopram and Paroxetine in the Human Serotonin Transporter Using Genetically Encoded Photo-Cross-Linkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Bang-Andersen, Benny

    2017-01-01

    amber codon suppression in hSERT to encode the photo-cross-linking unnatural amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine into the suggested high- and low-affinity binding sites. We then employ UV-induced cross-linking with azF to map the binding site of escitalopram and paroxetine, two prototypical selective...

  20. Effects of non-covalent interactions with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid) on the heat denaturation and solubility of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Koningsveld, G.A. van; Jong, G.A.H. de; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The non-covalent interactions between the monomeric phenolic compound chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin were characterized, and their effect on protein properties was examined. 5-CQA had a low affinity for all three proteins, and these interactions

  1. Evaluation of High-Throughput Genomic Assays for the Fc Gamma Receptor Locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hargreaves, Chantal E.; Iriyama, Chisako; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J. J.; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q.; Hussain, Khiyam; Ganderton, Rosalind; Lee, Charlotte; Machado, Lee R.; Hollox, Edward J.; Parker, Helen; Latham, Kate V.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Potter, Kathleen N.; Coupland, Sarah E.; Davies, Andrew; Stackpole, Michael; Oates, Melanie; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Glennie, Martin J.; Cragg, Mark S.; Strefford, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been revolutionised by the use monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that function through their interaction with Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). The low-affinity FcγR genes are highly homologous, map to a complex locus at 1p23 and harbour single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy

  2. Antigen-affinity controls pregerminal centser B cell selection by promoting Mcl-1 induction through BAFF receptor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensveen, Felix M.; Slinger, Erik; van Attekum, Martijn H. A.; Brink, Robert; Eldering, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen encounter, the responsive B cell pool undergoes stringent selection which eliminates cells with low B cell receptor (BCR) affinity. Already before formation of the germinal center, activated B cells of low-affinity are negatively selected in a process that is molecularly not well

  3. Conservation of PHO pathway in ascomycetes and the role of Pho84

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... a low-affinity transport system but it is localized onto the vacuoles and, thus, not involved in the uptake of phos- phate from the extracellular environment (Wykoff and. O'Shea 2001). These transporters, Pho87 and Pho90, have a Km of 1 mM and cater to the cellular phosphate require- ment when yeast cells ...

  4. Identification of cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the metabolism of paroxetine and estimation of their importance for human paroxetine metabolism using a population-based simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jornil, Jakob; Jensen, Klaus Gjervig; Larsen, Frank

    2010-01-01

    , Simcyp-estimated pharmacokinetic profiles were in good agreement with those reported in published in vivo studies. Considering the kinetic parameters, inhibition results, relative activity factor calculations, and Simcyp simulations, CYP2D6 (high affinity) and CYP3A4 (low affinity) are most likely...

  5. Reference: 133 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tsuhiko et al. 2004 Dec. Plant Physiol. 136(4):4198-204. Xylem transport of sulfate regulates distribution o...low-affinity sulfate transport system in the root vasculature. 4 4198-204 15531709 2004 Dec Plant physiology Hayashi Naomi|Kataoka Tatsuhiko|Takahashi Hideki|Yamaya Tomoyuki

  6. In vitro evaluation of N-(fluoro)isopropyl norephedrine as potential cardiac imaging agents for PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Tjibbe; Buitenhuis, CKM; Rutgers, M; vanWaarde, A; Visser, GM; Smets, LA; Brodde, OE; Vaalburg, W

    N-Isopropylnorephedrine (INE) and N-fluoroisopropylnorephedrine (FINE) were found to have a poor affinity for either P-adrenoceptors and the norepinephrine carrier protein. The low affinity of both compounds for Uptake-1 is probably due to the introduction of a bulky substituent on the nitrogen

  7. Effect of copper–sulphur bond on the DNA photo-cleavage activity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2.1 Materials. All reagents and chemicals were purchased from commercial sources and used without further purifi- cation. Solvents used for electrochemical and spectro- .... UVITEC Gel Documentation System. Due correc- tions were made for the trace of NC DNA present in the SC DNA sample and for the low affinity of EB.

  8. Capsazepine, a synthetic vanilloid that converts the Na,K-ATPase to Na-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmmoud, Yasser Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    of the membrane. Kinetic analyses showed that CPZ stabilized an enzyme species that constitutively occluded K+. Low-affinity ATP interaction with the enzyme was strongly reduced following CPZ treatment; in contrast, indirectly measured interaction with ADP was much increased, which suggests that composite...

  9. Association of variation in Fc gamma receptor 3B gene copy number with rheumatoid arthritis in Caucasian samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKinney, Cushla; Fanciulli, Manuela; Merriman, Marilyn E.; Phipps-Green, Amanda; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Dalbeth, Nicola; Gow, Peter J.; Harrison, Andrew A.; Highton, John; Jones, Peter B.; Stamp, Lisa K.; Steer, Sophia; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Franke, Barbara; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Vyse, Tim J.; Aitman, Tim J.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Merriman, Tony R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective There is increasing evidence that variation in gene copy number (CN) influences clinical phenotype. The low-affinity Fc gamma receptor 3B (FCGR3B) located in the FCGR gene cluster is a CN polymorphic gene involved in the recruitment to sites of inflammation and activation of

  10. Alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in the rat ventricular muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinami, J; Tsuchihashi, H; Baba, S; Mano, F; Maruyama, K; Nagatomo, T

    1992-02-01

    Scatchard analyses of [3H]prazosin binding in rat ventricular muscle membranes showed biphasic curves, which identified alpha 1High- and alpha 1Low-affinity sites. The alpha 1High-affinity site was completely inhibited by 1 microM phenoxybenzamine. The displacement potencies of alpha 1-adrenergic antagonists were characterized by [3H]prazosin binding to alpha 1High- and alpha 1Low-affinity sites in the absence and presence of 1 microM phenoxybenzamine. The affinities of most chemicals for alpha 1Low-affinity sites were significantly lower than those for alpha 1High-affinity sites, but WB-4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxy-phenoxyethyl)aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane), arotinolol, cinanserin, nifedipine, and p-aminoclonidine had the same affinities for both alpha 1Low- and alpha 1High-affinity sites. These results show that two alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes, alpha 1High- and alpha 1Low-affinity, are present in the rat heart, and that there are physical variations in alpha 1-adrenoceptor binding sites, based on their selectivity to antagonists.

  11. An engineered cryptic Hxt11 sugar transporter facilitates glucose-xylose co-consumption in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Hyun Yong; Nijland, Jeroen G; de Waal, Paul P; de Jong, René M; Klaassen, Paul; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to ferment pentose sugars like d-xylose. Through the introduction of the respective metabolic pathway, S. cerevisiae is able to ferment xylose but first utilizes d-glucose before the d-xylose can be transported and metabolized. Low affinity

  12. Design and synthesis of 1-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-5-carbonitrile (citalopram) analogues as novel probes for the serotonin transporter S1 and S2 binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banala, Ashwini K; Zhang, Peng; Plenge, Per

    2013-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is the primary target for antidepressant drugs. The existence of a high affinity primary orthosteric binding site (S1) and a low affinity secondary site (S2) has been described, and their relation to antidepressant pharmacology has been debated. Herein, structural...

  13. Discovery of a new class of potential multifunctional atypical antipsychotic agents targeting dopamine D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors: design, synthesis, and effects on behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Campiani, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    with a low affinity for dopamine D(2) receptors (to minimize extrapyramidal side effects), serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptors (to reduce the risk of obesity under chronic treatment), and for hERG channels (to reduce incidence of torsade des pointes). Pharmacological and biochemical data, including specific c...

  14. Lithium transport across biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1990-01-01

    Li+ is actively transported out of cells, and across different epithelia of both mammalian and amphibian origin. Due to the low affinity of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase for Li+, the transport is most likely energized by exchange and/or cotransport processes. The detailed mechanism by which Li+ is reabsorb...

  15. On the relationship between the dual specificity of the bovine brain phosphatidylinositol transfer protein and membrane phosphatidylinositol levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paridon, P.A. van; Gadella, T.W.J.; Somerharju, P.J.; Wirtz, K.W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol transfer protein from bovine brain has a remarkable specificity pattern with a distinct preference for phosphatidylinositol (PI) and a low affinity for phosphatidylcholine (PC). In this study we have determined the affinity of PI-transfer protein for PI relative to that for

  16. Recognition specificity of individual EH domains of mammals and yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paoluzi, S; Castagnoli, L; Lauro, I

    1998-01-01

    /SF) motif. Domains that have a low affinity for the majority of NPF peptides reveal some affinity for a third class of peptides that contains two consecutive amino acids with aromatic side chains (FW or WW). This is the case for the third EH domain of Eps15 and for the two N-terminal domains of YBL47c...

  17. Role of beta-lactamase in expression of resistance by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, J M; Medeiros, A A

    1987-01-01

    Of 27 unique clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, only 4 were homogeneously resistant, and all 4 produced little or no beta-lactamase. Among heterogeneously resistant strains, those most resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics produced the most beta-lactamase. Similar genes may regulate production of the low-affinity penicillin-binding protein and beta-lactamase.

  18. Allelic and copy-number variations of Fc gamma Rs affect granulocyte function and susceptibility for autoimmune blistering diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recke, Andreas; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ludwig, Ralf J.; Freitag, Miriam; Möller, Steffen; Vonthein, Reinhard; Schellenberger, Julia; Haase, Ozan; Görg, Siegfried; Nebel, Almut; Flachsbart, Friederike; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gläser, Regine; Benoit, Sandrine; Sárdy, Miklós; Eming, Rüdiger; Hertl, Michael; Zillikens, Detlef; König, Inke R.; Schmidt, Enno; Ibrahim, Saleh; Däschlein, Georg; Goebeler, Mattias; Goetze, Steven; Günther, Claudia; Hadaschik, Eva; Homey, Bernhard; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Andreas; Kunz, Manfred; Lippert, Undine; Ludwig-Peitsch, Wiebke; Pföhler, Claudia; Sticherling, Michael; Worm, Margitta

    2015-01-01

    Low-affinity Fc gamma receptors (Fc gamma R) bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. In many autoimmune diseases, these receptors act as key mediators of the pathogenic effects of autoantibodies. Genes encoding Fc gamma R exhibit frequent variations in sequence and gene copy number that

  19. Evaluation of WC-9Co-4Cr laser surface alloyed coatings on stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Obadele, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available and low affinity of tungsten for Carbon. Free Co and C in the meltpool formed intermetallic phases such as Co6W6C and M23C6 (M=Fe, Cr, W). A considerable increase in hardness value of the matrix 246 Hv0.1 compared to the coating 1331 Hv0.1 was achieved...

  20. Role of the T cell receptor ligand affinity in T cell activation by bacterial superantigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Geisler, C; Buus, S

    2001-01-01

    Similar to native peptide/MHC ligands, bacterial superantigens have been found to bind with low affinity to the T cell receptor (TCR). It has been hypothesized that low ligand affinity is required to allow optimal TCR signaling. To test this, we generated variants of Staphylococcus enterotoxin C3...

  1. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L

    2007-01-01

    activation, the full-length NK-1 receptor, but not a functional C-terminal tail-truncated receptor, is preassociated with GRK5 in a relatively low-affinity state. We demonstrate that GRK5 can compete for agonist induced GRK2 interaction with the NK-1 receptor, whereas GRK2 does not compete for receptor...

  2. Expression of leukaemia inhibitory factor at the conceptus-maternal interface during preimplantation development and in the endometrium during the oestrous cycle in the mare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ruijter-Villani, M.; Deelen, C.; Stout, T. A E

    2016-01-01

    Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) plays a critical role in blastocyst development and implantation in several species. The present study investigated mRNA and protein expression for LIF, as well as the low-affinity LIF receptor (LIFR) and interleukin-6 signal transducer (IL6ST), in equine

  3. In vivo and in vitro effect of Acacia nilotica seed proteinase inhibitors ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-05-04

    May 4, 2012 ... chymotrypsin activity of midgut of Helicoverpa armigera. The inhibition kinetics studies against H. armigera gut trypsin are of non-competitive type. AnPI had low affinity for H. armigera gut trypsin when compared to SBTI. The partially purified and purified PI proteins-incorporated test diets showed significant ...

  4. A new agonist of the erythropoietin receptor, Epobis, induces neurite outgrowth and promotes neuronal survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Gu, Bing; Kiryushko, Darya

    2012-01-01

    Apart from its hematopoietic activity, erythropoietin (EPO) is also known as a tissue-protective cytokine. In the brain, EPO and its receptor are up-regulated in response to insult and exert pro-survival effects. EPO binds to its receptor (EPOR) via high- and low-affinity binding sites (Sites 1 a...

  5. Interaction of epidermal growth factor receptors with the cytoskeleton is related to receptor clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belzen, N.; Spaargaren, M.; Verkleij, A. J.; Boonstra, J.

    1990-01-01

    Recently it has been established that cytoskeleton-associated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors are predominantly of the high-affinity class and that EGF induces a recruitment of low-affinity receptors to the cytoskeleton. The nature of this EGF-induced receptor-cytoskeleton interaction,

  6. High-capacity Ca2+ binding of human skeletal calsequestrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Emiliano J; Lewis, Kevin M; Danna, Benjamin R; Kang, Chulhee

    2012-03-30

    Calsequestrin, the major calcium storage protein in both cardiac and skeletal muscle, binds large amounts of Ca(2+) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and releases them during muscle contraction. For the first time, the crystal structures of Ca(2+) complexes for both human (hCASQ1) and rabbit (rCASQ1) skeletal calsequestrin were determined, clearly defining their Ca(2+) sequestration capabilities through resolution of high- and low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites. rCASQ1 crystallized in low CaCl(2) buffer reveals three high-affinity Ca(2+) sites with trigonal bipyramidal, octahedral, and pentagonal bipyramidal coordination geometries, along with three low-affinity Ca(2+) sites. hCASQ1 crystallized in high CaCl(2) shows 15 Ca(2+) ions, including the six Ca(2+) ions in rCASQ1. Most of the low-affinity sites, some of which are μ-carboxylate-bridged, are established by the rotation of dimer interfaces, indicating cooperative Ca(2+) binding that is consistent with our atomic absorption spectroscopic data. On the basis of these findings, we propose a mechanism for the observed in vitro and in vivo dynamic high-capacity and low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding activity of calsequestrin.

  7. High-capacity Ca2+ Binding of Human Skeletal Calsequestrin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Emiliano J.; Lewis, Kevin M.; Danna, Benjamin R.; Kang, ChulHee

    2012-01-01

    Calsequestrin, the major calcium storage protein in both cardiac and skeletal muscle, binds large amounts of Ca2+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and releases them during muscle contraction. For the first time, the crystal structures of Ca2+ complexes for both human (hCASQ1) and rabbit (rCASQ1) skeletal calsequestrin were determined, clearly defining their Ca2+ sequestration capabilities through resolution of high- and low-affinity Ca2+-binding sites. rCASQ1 crystallized in low CaCl2 buffer reveals three high-affinity Ca2+ sites with trigonal bipyramidal, octahedral, and pentagonal bipyramidal coordination geometries, along with three low-affinity Ca2+ sites. hCASQ1 crystallized in high CaCl2 shows 15 Ca2+ ions, including the six Ca2+ ions in rCASQ1. Most of the low-affinity sites, some of which are μ-carboxylate-bridged, are established by the rotation of dimer interfaces, indicating cooperative Ca2+ binding that is consistent with our atomic absorption spectroscopic data. On the basis of these findings, we propose a mechanism for the observed in vitro and in vivo dynamic high-capacity and low-affinity Ca2+-binding activity of calsequestrin. PMID:22337878

  8. Protein kinase Calpha contains two activator binding sites that bind phorbol esters and diacylglycerols with opposite affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Ho, C; Kelly, M B; Larkin, J D; Taddeo, F J; Yeager, M D; Stubbs, C D

    1996-03-01

    Based on marked differences in the enzymatic properties of diacylglycerols compared with phorbol ester-activated protein kinase C (PKC), we recently proposed that activation induced by these compounds may not be equivalent (Slater, S. J., Kelly, M. B., Taddeo, F. J., Rubin, E., and Stubbs, C. D. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 17160-17165). In the present study, direct evidence is provided showing that phorbol esters and diacylglycerols bind simultaneously to PKC alpha. Using a novel binding assay employing the fluorescent phorbol ester, sapintoxin-D (SAPD), evidence for two sites of high and low affinity was obtained. Thus, both binding and activation dose-response curves for SAPD were double sigmoidal, which was also observed for dose-dependent activation by the commonly used phorbol ester, 4beta-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). TPA removed high affinity SAPD binding and also competed for the low affinity site. By contrast with TPA, low affinity binding of SAPD was inhibited by sn-1,2-dioleoylglycerol (DAG), while binding to the high affinity site was markedly enhanced. Again contrasting with both TPA and DAG, the potent PKC activator, bryostatin-I (B-I), inhibited SAPD binding to its high affinity site, while low affinity binding was unaffected. Based on these findings, a model for PKC activation is proposed in which binding of one activator to the low affinity site allosterically promotes binding of a second activator to the high affinity site, resulting in an enhanced level of activity. Overall, the results provide direct evidence that PKCalpha contains two distinct binding sites, with affinities that differ for each activator in the order: DAG > phorbol ester > B-I and B-I > phorbol ester > DAG, respectively.

  9. Changes in dopamine transporter binding in nucleus accumbens following chronic self-administration cocaine: heroin combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Lindsey P; McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2014-10-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin (speedball) has been shown to exert synergistic effects on dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), as observed by significant increases in extracellular dopamine levels and compensatory elevations in the maximal reuptake rate of dopamine. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether chronic self-administration of cocaine, heroin or a combination of cocaine:heroin led to compensatory changes in the abundance and/or affinity of high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125) I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125) I]RTI-55) in rat NAc membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to two-site binding models, allowing calculation of dissociation constant (Kd ) and binding density (Bmax ) values corresponding to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding curves clearly demonstrate the presence of high- and low- affinity binding sites in the NAc, with low-affinity sites comprising 85 to 94% of the binding sites. DAT binding analyses revealed that self-administration of cocaine and a cocaine:heroin combination increased the affinity of the low-affinity site for the cocaine congener RTI-55 compared to saline. These results indicate that the alterations observed following chronic speedball self-administration are likely due to the cocaine component alone; thus further studies are necessary to elaborate upon the synergistic effect of cocaine:heroin combinations on the dopamine system in the NAc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. BcGs1, a glycoprotein from Botrytis cinerea, elicits defence response and improves disease resistance in host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yunhua; Qiu, Dewen; Zeng, Hongmei; Guo, Lihua; Yang, Xiufen

    2015-02-20

    In this study, a necrosis-inducing protein was purified from the culture filtrate of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea BC-98 strain. Secreted proteins were collected and fractionated by liquid chromatography. The fraction with the highest necrosis-inducing activity was further purified. A glycoprotein named BcGs1 was identified by 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The BcGs1 protein consisted of 672 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 70.487 kDa. Functional domain analysis indicated that BcGs1 was a glucan 1,4-alpha-glucosidase, a cell wall-degrading enzyme, with a Glyco_hydro_15 domain and a CBM20_glucoamylase domain. The BcGs1 protein caused necrotic lesions that mimicked a typical hypersensitive response and H2O2 production in tomato and tobacco leaves. BcGs1-treated plants exhibited resistance to B. cinerea, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and tobacco mosaic virus in systemic leaves. In addition, BcGs1 triggered elevation of the transcript levels of the defence-related genes PR-1a, TPK1b and Prosystemin. This is the first report of a Botrytis glucan 1,4-alpha-glucosidase triggering host plant immunity as an elicitor. These results lay a foundation for further study of the comprehensive interaction between plants and necrotrophic fungi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of Binding Affinities of Water-Soluble Calixarenes with the Organophosphorus Nerve Agent Soman (GD and Commonly-Used Nerve Agent Simulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne A. Ede

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of inclusion complexes of the water-soluble p-sulfonatocalix[n]arenes, where n = 4 or 6, with the Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA GD, or Soman, and commonly used dialkyl methylphosphonate simulants has been studied by experimental solution NMR methods and by Molecular Mechanics (MMFF and semi-empirical (PM6 calculations. Complex formation in non-buffered and buffered solutions is driven by the hydrophobic effect, and complex stoichiometry determined as 1:1 for all host:guest pairs. Low affinity complexes (Kassoc < 100 M−1 are observed for all guests, attributed to poor host–guest complementarity and the role of buffer cation species accounts for the low affinity of the complexes. Comparison of CWA and simulant behavior adds to understanding of CWA–simulant correlations and the challenges of simulant selection.

  12. Comparison of Binding Affinities of Water-Soluble Calixarenes with the Organophosphorus Nerve Agent Soman (GD) and Commonly-Used Nerve Agent Simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ede, Jayne A; Cragg, Peter J; Sambrook, Mark R

    2018-01-19

    The formation of inclusion complexes of the water-soluble p -sulfonatocalix[ n ]arenes, where n = 4 or 6, with the Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) GD, or Soman, and commonly used dialkyl methylphosphonate simulants has been studied by experimental solution NMR methods and by Molecular Mechanics (MMFF) and semi-empirical (PM6) calculations. Complex formation in non-buffered and buffered solutions is driven by the hydrophobic effect, and complex stoichiometry determined as 1:1 for all host:guest pairs. Low affinity complexes ( K assoc < 100 M -1 ) are observed for all guests, attributed to poor host-guest complementarity and the role of buffer cation species accounts for the low affinity of the complexes. Comparison of CWA and simulant behavior adds to understanding of CWA-simulant correlations and the challenges of simulant selection.

  13. Downregulation of taurine uptake in multidrug resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, K A; Litman, Thomas; Eriksen, J

    2002-01-01

    In daunorubicin resistant Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (DNR), the initial taurine uptake was reduced by 56% as compared to the parental, drug sensitive Ehrlich cells. Kinetic experiments indicated that taurine uptake in Ehrlich cells occurs via both high- and low-affinity transporters. The maximal...... rate constant for the initial taurine uptake was reduced by 45% (high-affinity system) and 49% (low affinity system) in the resistant subline whereas the affinity of the transporters to taurine was unchanged. By immunoblotting we identified 3 TauT protein bands in the 50-70 kDa region. A visible...... reduction in the intensity of the band with the lowest molecular weight was observed in resistant cells. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated a significant reduction in the amount of taurine transporter mRNA in the resistant cells. Drug resistance in DNR Ehrlich cells is associated with overexpression of the mdr1...

  14. Methods for quantifying T cell receptor binding affinities and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Gloor, Brian E.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide antigens bound and presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Recognition of a peptide/MHC complex is required for initiation and propagation of a cellular immune response, as well as the development and maintenance of the T cell repertoire. Here we discuss methods to quantify the affinities and thermodynamics of interactions between soluble ectodomains of TCRs and their peptide/MHC ligands, focusing on titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence anisotropy. As TCRs typically bind ligand with weak-to-moderate affinities, we focus the discussion on means to enhance the accuracy and precision of low affinity measurements. In addition to further elucidating the biology of the T cell mediated immune response, more reliable low affinity measurements will aid with more probing studies with mutants or altered peptides that can help illuminate the physical underpinnings of how TCRs achieve their remarkable recognition properties. PMID:21609868

  15. Guanine nucleotide regulation of dopamine receptor agonist affinity states in rat estradiol-induced pituitary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, T.; Falardeau, P.

    1987-08-31

    The authors have investigated dopamine (DA) receptor agonist high- and low-affinity states in female rate estradiol-induced prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary tumors and intact pituitary tissue. Estradiol treatment increased the anterior pituitary weight 9-fold and plasma prolactin levels 74-fold and these measures are correlated (R = 0.745, n = 73, p < 0.001). Competition for (/sup 3/H)-spiperone binding to the DA receptor by apomorphine was compared in normal and adenomatous pituitary tissue. The inhibition constants (Ki) and the proportions of the two apomorphine sites are unchanged in tumors compared to intact pituitary tissue. Guanosine 5'-(..beta..-..gamma..-imino)triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) causes complete conversion of the high into low affinity dopaminergic agonist site in normal pituitary and in tumors. These results suggest that rats with primary estradiol-induced pituitary tumors have normal and functional DA receptors. 9 references, 2 tables.

  16. Guanine nucleotide regulation of dopamine receptor agonist affinity states in rat estradiol-induced pituitary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Paolo, T.; Falardeau, P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have investigated dopamine (DA) receptor agonist high- and low-affinity states in female rate estradiol-induced prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary tumors and intact pituitary tissue. Estradiol treatment increased the anterior pituitary weight 9-fold and plasma prolactin levels 74-fold and these measures are correlated (R = 0.745, n = 73, p 3 H]-spiperone binding to the DA receptor by apomorphine was compared in normal and adenomatous pituitary tissue. The inhibition constants (Ki) and the proportions of the two apomorphine sites are unchanged in tumors compared to intact pituitary tissue. Guanosine 5'-[β-γ-imino]triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) causes complete conversion of the high into low affinity dopaminergic agonist site in normal pituitary and in tumors. These results suggest that rats with primary estradiol-induced pituitary tumors have normal and functional DA receptors. 9 references, 2 tables

  17. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Meier, E

    1990-01-01

    an intracellular and a plasma membrane localization of the receptors. In all experiments cultures treated with THIP alone served as controls. The inhibitors of protein synthesis totally abolished the ability of THIP to induce low-affinity GABA receptors. In contrast, the inhibitors of intracellular transport......The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, cycloheximide), proteases (leupeptin), and intracellular transport (colchicine, monensin) on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist [4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP)]-induced changes in morphological...... as well as the protease inhibitor did not affect this parameter. However, studies of effects of GABA on transmitter release from monensin-treated cultures showed that transmitter release could not be inhibited by GABA in these cells in spite of the presence of low-affinity GABA receptors in the membrane...

  18. Determination of the succinonitrile-benzene and succinonitrile-cyclohexanol phase diagrams by thermal and UV spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B.

    1984-01-01

    Equilibrium temperature-composition diagrams were determined for the two organic systems, succinonitrile-benzene and succinonitrile-cyclohexanol. Measurements were made using the common thermal analysis methods and UV spectrophotometry. Succinonitrile-benzene monotectic was chosen for its low affinity for water and because UV analysis would be simplified. Succinonitrile-cyclohexanol was chosen because both components are transparent models for metallic solidification, as opposed to the other known succinonitrile-based monotectics.

  19. An allosteric binding site at the human serotonin transporter mediates the inhibition of escitalopram by R-citalopram: kinetic binding studies with the ALI/VFL-SI/TT mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huailing; Hansen, Kasper B; Boyle, Noel J; Han, Kiho; Muske, Galina; Huang, Xinyan; Egebjerg, Jan; Sánchez, Connie

    2009-10-25

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) has primary and allosteric binding sites for escitalopram and R-citalopram. Previous studies have established that the interaction of these two compounds at a low affinity allosteric binding site of hSERT can affect the dissociation of [(3)H]escitalopram from hSERT. The allosteric binding site involves a series of residues in the 10th, 11th, and 12th trans-membrane domains of hSERT. The low affinity allosteric activities of escitalopram and R-citalopram are essentially eliminated in a mutant hSERT with changes in some of these residues, namely A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T, as measured in dissociation binding studies. We confirm that in association binding experiments, R-citalopram at clinically relevant concentrations reduces the association rate of [(3)H]escitalopram as a ligand to wild type hSERT. We demonstrate that the ability of R-citalopram to reduce the association rate of escitalopram is also abolished in the mutant hSERT (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T), along with the expected disruption the low affinity allosteric function on dissociation binding. This suggests that the allosteric binding site mediates both the low affinity and higher affinity interactions between R-citalopram, escitalopram, and hSERT. Our data add an additional structural basis for the different efficacies of escitalopram compared to racemic citalopram reported in animal studies and clinical trials, and substantiate the hypothesis that hSERT has complex allosteric mechanisms underlying the unexplained in vivo activities of its inhibitors.

  20. Profile of blonanserin for the treatment of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Tenjin, Tomomi; Miyamoto,Seiya; Ninomiya,; Kitajima,; Ogino,; Miyake,; Yamaguchi,

    2013-01-01

    Tomomi Tenjin, Seiya Miyamoto, Yuriko Ninomiya, Rei Kitajima, Shin Ogino, Nobumi Miyake, Noboru YamaguchiDepartment of Neuropsychiatry, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, JapanAbstract: Blonanserin was developed as an antipsychotic drug in Japan and approved for the treatment of schizophrenia. It belongs to a series of 4-phenyl-2-(1-piperazinyl)pyridines and acts as an antagonist at dopamine D2, D3, and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. Blonanserin has low affinity for 5...

  1. Stratification of Antibody-Positive Subjects by Antibody Level Reveals an Impact of Immunogenicity on Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A.; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J.; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic....

  2. An improved haemolytic plaque assay for the detection of cells secreting antibody to bacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Heilmann, C

    1992-01-01

    -polysaccharide AbSC of the IgG isotype, the increase was as high as 7.4-11.8 times. Evidence is presented that the pronounced improvement in the detection of the latter is due to the presence of aggregating anti-IgG antibody from the beginning of the assay. It is proposed that in the case of low affinity of anti...

  3. Gentamicin binds to the megalin receptor as a competitive inhibitor using the common ligand binding motif of complement type repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagil, Robert; O'Shea, Charlotte; Nykjær, Anders

    2013-01-01

    megalin and investigated its interaction with gentamicin. Using NMR titration data in HADDOCK, we have generated a three-dimensional model describing the complex between megalin and gentamicin. Gentamicin binds to megalin with low affinity and exploits the common ligand binding motif previously described...... to megalin is highly similar to gentamicin binding to calreticulin. We discuss the impact of this novel insight for the future structure-based design of gentamicin antagonists....

  4. Synthesis and testing of tetrodotoxin and batrachotoxin antagonists. Annual report, 1 February 1987-31 January 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toll, L.

    1988-06-06

    Compounds have been designed and synthesized as potential antagonists to the neurotoxin batrachotoxin. The compounds synthesized to date have moderate to low affinity for the batrachotoxin binding site. Their potential as antagonists of batrachotoxin or veratridine-induced Na-flux in neuroblastoma cells is currently under investigation. The synthesis of analogs which should have increased affinity for the batrachotoxin binding site is continuing. We have also begun the synthesis of potential antagonists to the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin.

  5. Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Downregulates Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Binding to the Cell Surface and Intracellular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassone, Evelyne; Valacca, Cristina; Mignatti, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP, MMP-14), a transmembrane proteinase with an extracellular catalytic domain and a short cytoplasmic tail, degrades extracellular matrix components and controls diverse cell functions through proteolytic and non-proteolytic interactions with extracellular, intracellular, and transmembrane proteins. Here we show that in tumor cells MT1-MMP downregulates fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) signaling by reducing the amount of FGF-2 bound to the cell surface with high and low affinity. FGF-2 induces weaker activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase in MT1-MMP expressing cells than in cells devoid of MT1-MMP. This effect is abolished in cells that express proteolytically inactive MT1-MMP but persists in cells expressing MT1-MMP mutants devoid of hemopexin-like or cytoplasmic domain, showing that FGF-2 signaling is downregulated by MT1-MMP proteolytic activity. MT1-MMP expression results in downregulation of FGFR-1 and -4, and in decreased amount of cell surface-associated FGF-2. In addition, MT1-MMP strongly reduces the amount of FGF-2 bound to the cell surface with low affinity. Because FGF-2 association with low-affinity binding sites is a prerequisite for binding to its high-affinity receptors, downregulation of low-affinity binding to the cell surface results in decreased FGF-2 signaling. Consistent with this conclusion, FGF-2 induction of tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro is stronger in cells devoid of MT1- MMP than in MT1-MMP expressing cells. Thus, MT1-MMP controls FGF-2 signaling by a proteolytic mechanism that decreases the cell's biological response to FGF-2. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Local anesthetic interaction with human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) channels: role of aromatic amino acids Y652 and F656

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebrands, Cornelia C; Schmitt, Nicole; Friederich, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channels constitute a potential target involved in cardiotoxic side effects of amino-amide local anesthetics. The molecular interaction site of these low-affinity blockers with HERG channels is currently unknown. The aim of this study...... (r > 0.9). CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that local anesthetics specifically but not exclusively interact with the aromatic residues Y652 and F656 in S6 of HERG channels....

  7. Glutamate and GABA uptake by cerebellar granule and glial cell enriched populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.L.; Shank, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a study on the uptake of glutamate and GABA by the granule and glial cell enriched populations are reported. They demonstrate that the granule cells vigorously accumulate glutamate but not GABA, whereas the glial cell enriched fraction takes up both amino acids quite rapidly. An unexpected and significant finding is that both cell populations take up glutamate by two distinct high-affinity transport systems as well as a low-affinity system. (Auth.)

  8. Neuroprotection by NMDA receptor antagonists in a variety of neuropathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, G C

    2001-09-01

    Because of adverse reactions, early efforts to introduce high affinity competitive or use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists into patients suffering from stroke, head trauma or epilepsy met with failure. Later it was discovered that both low affinity use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists and compounds with selective affinity for the NR2B receptor subunit met the criteria for safe administration into patients. Furthermore, these low affinity antagonists exhibit significant mechanistic differences from their higher affinity counterparts. Success of the latter is attested to the ability of the following low affinity compounds to be marketed: 1) Cough suppressant-dextromethorphan (available for decades); 2) Parkinson's disease--amantadine, memantine and budipine; 3) Dementia--memantine; and 4) Epilepsy--felbamate. Moreover, Phase III clinical trials are ongoing with remacemide for epilepsy and Huntington's disease and head trauma for HU-211. A host of compounds are or were under evaluation for the possible treatment of stroke, head trauma, hyperalgesia and various neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the fact that other drugs with associated NMDA receptor mechanisms have reached clinical status, this review focuses only on those competitive and use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists that reached clinical trails. The ensuing discussions link the in vivo pharmacological investigations that led to the success/mistakes/ failures for eventual testing of promising compounds in the clinic.

  9. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chandramohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower. Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD.

  10. Characterization of taurine binding, uptake, and release in the rat hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanretta, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    The neurotransmitter criteria of specific receptors, inactivation, and release were experimentally examined for taurine in the hypothalamus. Specific membrane binding and synaptosomal uptake of taurine both displayed high affinity and low affinity systems. The neurotransmitter criterion of release was studied in superfused synaptosomes. Exposure of synaptosomes which had been preloaded with a concentration of [ 3 H]taurine in the high affinity uptake range (1.5 μM) to either 56 mM K + or 100 μM veratridine evoked a Ca 2+ -independent release. Exposure of synaptosomes which had been preloaded with a concentration of [ 3 H]taurine in the low affinity uptake range (2 mM) to 56 mM K + induced a Ca 2+ -independent release, whereas 100 + M veratridine did not, either in the presence or absence of Ca 2+ . Based on these results, as well as other observations, a model is proposed in which the high affinity uptake system is located on neuronal membranes and the low affinity uptake system is located on glial membranes. The mechanisms of binding, uptake, and release in relation to the cellular location of each are discussed. We conclude that the neurotransmitter criterion of activation by re-uptake is satisfied for taurine in the hypothalamus. However, the failure to demonstrate both a specific taurine receptor site and a Ca 2+ -dependent evoked release, necessitates that we conclude that taurine appears not to function as a hypothalamic neurotransmitter, at least not in the classical sense

  11. Detection of carrier heterogeneity by rate of ligand dialysis: medium-chain fatty acid interaction with human serum albumin and competition with chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1988-01-01

    Binding equilibria for decanoate, octanoate, and hexanoate to defatted human serum albumin were investigated by dialysis exchange rate determinations in 66 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, 37 degrees C. The binding isotherms for decanoate and octanoate could not be fitted by the general bindin......(6) and 1.4 X 10(5) M-1 for decanoate, approximately 0.5 of the mercaptalbumin having high affinity. Udgivelsesdato: 1988-May-15...... equation. It was necessary to assume the presence of two albumin components, one with high affinity and one with low affinity, about 0.65 of the albumin having high binding affinity. The first stoichiometric binding constants for the high- and low-affinity albumin components were 1.1 X 10(7) and 1.4 X 10(5......) M-1, respectively, for decanoate; 1.6 X 10(6) and 3.5 X 10(4) for octanoate; and 7.1 X 10(4) and 8.0 X 10(2) M-1 for hexanoate. The high-affinity albumin component binds 1 mol decanoate, 1 mol octanoate, or 2 mol hexanoate more than is bound to the low-affinity component. Chloride ions compete...

  12. Effect of producer cell line on functional activity of anti-D monoclonal antibodies destined for prevention of rhesus sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olovnikova, N I; Ershler, M A; Belkina, E V; Nikolaeva, T L; Miterev, G Yu

    2009-04-01

    The ability of anti-D antibodies to cause antigen-specific immunosuppression depends on their interaction with low-affinity Fcgamma-receptors. Human monoclonal antibodies to D antigen of the rhesus system were investigated by antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay in order to estimate their ability to induce hemolysis mediated by low-affinity Fcgamma receptors. We demonstrate that affinity of monoclonal antibodies to receptors of this type does not depend on primary structure of Fc-fragment, but depends on the producer cell line which expresses the antibodies. Monoclonal IgG1 antibodies interacting with FcgammaRIIa and FcgammaRIII lost this property, if they were secreted by human-mouse heterohybridoma, but not by human B-cell line. On the opposite, monoclonal antibodies that could not activate low-affinity Fcgamma receptors were highly active after human cells fusion with rat myeloma YB2/0. Hemolytic activity of IgG3 remained unchanged after fusion of human cells with rodent cells.

  13. Detection of carrier heterogeneity by rate of ligand dialysis: medium-chain fatty acid interaction with human serum albumin and competition with chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1988-01-01

    Binding equilibria for decanoate, octanoate, and hexanoate to defatted human serum albumin were investigated by dialysis exchange rate determinations in 66 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, 37 degrees C. The binding isotherms for decanoate and octanoate could not be fitted by the general binding...... equation. It was necessary to assume the presence of two albumin components, one with high affinity and one with low affinity, about 0.65 of the albumin having high binding affinity. The first stoichiometric binding constants for the high- and low-affinity albumin components were 1.1 X 10(7) and 1.4 X 10......(5) M-1, respectively, for decanoate; 1.6 X 10(6) and 3.5 X 10(4) for octanoate; and 7.1 X 10(4) and 8.0 X 10(2) M-1 for hexanoate. The high-affinity albumin component binds 1 mol decanoate, 1 mol octanoate, or 2 mol hexanoate more than is bound to the low-affinity component. Chloride ions compete...

  14. Predicting the dynamics of bacterial growth inhibition by ribosome-targeting antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Philip; Doležal, Jakub; Scott, Matthew; Evans, Martin R.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding how antibiotics inhibit bacteria can help to reduce antibiotic use and hence avoid antimicrobial resistance—yet few theoretical models exist for bacterial growth inhibition by a clinically relevant antibiotic treatment regimen. In particular, in the clinic, antibiotic treatment is time-dependent. Here, we use a theoretical model, previously applied to steady-state bacterial growth, to predict the dynamical response of a bacterial cell to a time-dependent dose of ribosome-targeting antibiotic. Our results depend strongly on whether the antibiotic shows reversible transport and/or low-affinity ribosome binding (‘low-affinity antibiotic’) or, in contrast, irreversible transport and/or high affinity ribosome binding (‘high-affinity antibiotic’). For low-affinity antibiotics, our model predicts that growth inhibition depends on the duration of the antibiotic pulse, and can show a transient period of very fast growth following removal of the antibiotic. For high-affinity antibiotics, growth inhibition depends on peak dosage rather than dose duration, and the model predicts a pronounced post-antibiotic effect, due to hysteresis, in which growth can be suppressed for long times after the antibiotic dose has ended. These predictions are experimentally testable and may be of clinical significance.

  15. Location and effect of obesity on putative anorectic binding sites in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Meynell, A A; Levin, B E

    1997-05-01

    Anorectic drugs such as mazindol bind to a class of low-affinity, sodium-sensitive sites in the brain which are affected by ambient glucose concentrations and a predisposition to develop diet-induced obesity (DIO). This study used quantitative autoradiography of 10 nM 3H-mazindol binding to identify the cellular location of these putative anorectic binding sites in the brain and to assess the way in which the development of DIO affected their binding. We previously showed that chow-fed, obesity-prone rats have widespread increases in brain 3H-mazindol binding to these low-affinity sites as compared with diet-resistant (DR) rats. Here, low-affinity 3H-mazindol binding was assessed in the brains of eight rats which developed DIO vs. eight which were DR after three months on a high-energy diet. DIO rats gained 89% more weight and had 117% higher plasma insulin levels but no difference in plasma glucose levels compared with DR rats. Along with these differences, low-affinity 3H-mazindol binding in DIO rats was identical to that in DR rats in all of the 23 brain areas assessed. This suggested that this binding was downregulated by the development of obesity in DIO rats. In other chow-fed rats, stereotaxic injections of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine and 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA) to ablate serotonin and catecholamine nerve terminals in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN) had no effect on 3H-mazindol binding. However, ibotenic acid injected into the VMN, substantia nigra, pars reticulata, and pars compacta destroyed intrinsic neurons and/or their local processes and decreased low-affinity 3H-mazindol binding by 13%-22%. Destruction of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, pars compacta, and noradrenergic neurons in the locus ceruleus with 6OHDA also reduced 3H-mazindol binding in those areas by 9% and 12%, respectively. This suggested that up to 22% of putative anorectic binding sites may be located on the cell bodies of dopamine, norepinephrine, and other

  16. Mouse Stbd1 isN-myristoylated and affects ER-mitochondria association and mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriadou, Anthi; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Nearchou, Marianna; Baba, Otto; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Tate, Edward W; Drousiotou, Anthi; Petrou, Petros P

    2017-03-01

    Starch binding domain-containing protein 1 (Stbd1) is a carbohydrate-binding protein that has been proposed to be a selective autophagy receptor for glycogen. Here, we show that mouse Stbd1 is a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein with the capacity to induce the formation of organized ER structures in HeLa cells. In addition to bulk ER, Stbd1 was found to localize to mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which represent regions of close apposition between the ER and mitochondria. We demonstrate that N -myristoylation and binding of Stbd1 to glycogen act as major determinants of its subcellular targeting. Moreover, overexpression of non-myristoylated Stbd1 enhanced the association between ER and mitochondria, and further induced prominent mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering. Conversely, shRNA-mediated Stbd1 silencing resulted in an increase in the spacing between ER and mitochondria, and an altered morphology of the mitochondrial network, suggesting elevated fusion and interconnectivity of mitochondria. Our data unravel the molecular mechanism underlying Stbd1 subcellular targeting, support and expand its proposed function as a selective autophagy receptor for glycogen and uncover a new role for the protein in the physical association between ER and mitochondria. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. A CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Florideophyceae) has a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Peter R; Schindler, Michael; Howles, Paul; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2010-10-01

    Cellulose synthases form rosette terminal complexes in the plasma membranes of Streptophyta and various linear terminal complexes in other taxa. The sequence of a putative CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Floridiophyceae) was deduced using a cloning strategy involving degenerate primers, a cDNA library screen, and 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). RACE identified two alternative transcriptional starts and four alternative polyadenylation sites. The first translation start codon provided an open reading frame of 2610 bp encoding 870 amino acids and was PCR amplified without introns from genomic DNA. Southern hybridization indicated one strongly hybridizing gene with possible weakly related genes or pseudogenes. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) upstream of the protein's first predicted transmembrane domain. There are broad similarities in predicted 3D structures of the family 48 modules from CESA, from several glycogen- and starch-binding enzymes, and from protein kinases, but there are substitutions at some residues thought to be involved in ligand binding. The module in G. monilis CESA will be on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane so that it could potentially bind either low molecular weight ligands or starch which is cytosolic rather than inside membrane-bound plastids in red algae. Possible reasons why red algal CESAs have evolved family 48 modules perhaps as part of a system to regulate cellulose synthase activity in relation to cellular carbohydrate status are briefly discussed.

  18. A CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Florideophyceae) has a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Peter R.; Schindler, Michael; Howles, Paul; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose synthases form rosette terminal complexes in the plasma membranes of Streptophyta and various linear terminal complexes in other taxa. The sequence of a putative CESA from Griffithsia monilis (Rhodophyta, Floridiophyceae) was deduced using a cloning strategy involving degenerate primers, a cDNA library screen, and 5′ and 3′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). RACE identified two alternative transcriptional starts and four alternative polyadenylation sites. The first translation start codon provided an open reading frame of 2610 bp encoding 870 amino acids and was PCR amplified without introns from genomic DNA. Southern hybridization indicated one strongly hybridizing gene with possible weakly related genes or pseudogenes. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a family 48 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) upstream of the protein's first predicted transmembrane domain. There are broad similarities in predicted 3D structures of the family 48 modules from CESA, from several glycogen- and starch-binding enzymes, and from protein kinases, but there are substitutions at some residues thought to be involved in ligand binding. The module in G. monilis CESA will be on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane so that it could potentially bind either low molecular weight ligands or starch which is cytosolic rather than inside membrane-bound plastids in red algae. Possible reasons why red algal CESAs have evolved family 48 modules perhaps as part of a system to regulate cellulose synthase activity in relation to cellular carbohydrate status are briefly discussed. PMID:20702566

  19. Expression of an amylosucrase gene in potato results in larger starch granules with novel properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing-Feng; Nazarian-Firouzabadi, Farhad; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Ji, Qin; Visser, Richard G F; Trindade, Luisa M

    2014-08-01

    Expression of amylosucrase in potato resulted in larger starch granules with rough surfaces and novel physico-chemical properties, including improved freeze-thaw stability, higher end viscosity, and better enzymatic digestibility. Starch is a very important carbohydrate in many food and non-food applications. In planta modification of starch by genetic engineering has significant economic and environmental benefits as it makes the chemical or physical post-harvest modification obsolete. An amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea fused to a starch-binding domain (SBD) was introduced in two potato genetic backgrounds to synthesize starch granules with altered composition, and thereby to broaden starch applications. Expression of SBD-amylosucrase fusion protein in the amylose-containing potato resulted in starch granules with a rough surface, a twofold increase in median granule size, and altered physico-chemical properties including improved freeze-thaw stability, higher end viscosity, and better enzymatic digestibility. These effects are possibly a result of the physical interaction between amylosucrase and starch granules. The modified larger starches not only have great benefit to the potato starch industry by reducing losses during starch isolation, but also have an advantage in many food applications such as frozen food due to its extremely high freeze-thaw stability.

  20. Expression of an engineered granule-bound Escherichia coli maltose acetyltransferase in wild-type and amf potato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian Firouzabadi, Farhad; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Ji, Qin; Suurs, Luc C J M; Visser, Richard G F

    2007-01-01

    Starch is used in many industrial applications, but often requires chemical derivatization to enhance its properties before use. In particular, the stability of starch polymers in solution is improved by acetylation. A drawback of this treatment is the use of pollutant chemicals. A biological alternative to chemical derivatization was investigated by the expression of an amyloplast-targeted Escherichia coli maltose acetyltransferase (MAT) gene in tubers of wild-type (Kardal) and mutant amylose-free (amf) potato plants. MAT was expressed as such, or fused to the N- or C-terminus of a non-catalytic starch-binding domain (SBD) to target the starch granule. Starch granules derived from transgenic plants were found to contain acetyl groups, although their content was low, opening up an avenue to move away from the post-harvest chemical derivatization of starch. MAT inside starch granules was found to be active post-harvest when supplied with acetyl-coenzyme A and glucose or maltose, but it did not acetylate starch polymers in vitro. Starch granules from transformants in which MAT alone was expressed also showed MAT activity, indicating that MAT is accumulated in starch granules, and has affinity for starch by itself. Furthermore, starch granule morphology was altered, and fusion proteins containing MAT and SBD seemed to have a higher affinity for starch granules than two appended SBDs. These results are discussed against the background of the quaternary structure of MAT.

  1. Phylogenomic relationships between amylolytic enzymes from 85 strains of fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanping Chen

    Full Text Available Fungal amylolytic enzymes, including α-amylase, gluocoamylase and α-glucosidase, have been extensively exploited in diverse industrial applications such as high fructose syrup production, paper making, food processing and ethanol production. In this paper, amylolytic genes of 85 strains of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Zygomycota were annotated on the genomic scale according to the classification of glycoside hydrolase (GH from the Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZy Database. Comparisons of gene abundance in the fungi suggested that the repertoire of amylolytic genes adapted to their respective lifestyles. Amylolytic enzymes in family GH13 were divided into four distinct clades identified as heterologous α-amylases, eukaryotic α-amylases, bacterial and fungal α-amylases and GH13 α-glucosidases. Family GH15 had two branches, one for gluocoamylases, and the other with currently unknown function. GH31 α-glucosidases showed diverse branches consisting of neutral α-glucosidases, lysosomal acid α-glucosidases and a new clade phylogenetically related to the bacterial counterparts. Distribution of starch-binding domains in above fungal amylolytic enzymes was related to the enzyme source and phylogeny. Finally, likely scenarios for the evolution of amylolytic enzymes in fungi based on phylogenetic analyses were proposed. Our results provide new insights into evolutionary relationships among subgroups of fungal amylolytic enzymes and fungal evolutionary adaptation to ecological conditions.

  2. Utilización de Cromatografía Líquida de Alta Eficiencia (HPLC para determinar consumo de sustrato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostina Romero

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available La incorporación de diferentes tipos de desechos industriales y hogareños, y muy especialmente de agroquímicos, son los principales motivos que pueden originar la contaminación de los ambientes naturales, esencialmente los cursos y cuerpos de agua natural. Los efectos nocivos pueden minimizarse merced a la fotodegradación, proceso que puede favorecerse por la adsorción de los contaminantes a arcillas naturales o modificadas con nanopartículas. En este último caso, para el estudio y seguimiento de la cinética de degradación de los contaminantes una técnica normalmente empleada es la cromatografía. En el caso particular del fenol, es posible aplicar la cromatografía líquida de alta eficiencia (HPLC, High Performance Liquid Chromatography. El presente trabajo se enfocó en la optimización de una técnica para el seguimiento de la adsorción y degradación de compuestos orgánicos, en particular fenol, mediante HPLC. Empleando un equipo Shimadzu CBM-20A, se obtuvo la mayor eficiencia con una corrida isotérmica a 25ºC en columna Phenomenex Luna C18 (2 de 250 mm de longitud y 4,6mm de diámetro interno usando como fase móvil una mezcla 50/50 (V/V acetonitrilo y agua ultrapura con un flujo de 1mL/min. Se empleó un detector espectrofotométrico UV (270 nm. La aplicación de la técnica con estos parámetros permitirán estudiar convenientemente los mecanismos de la fotodegradación del fenol adsorbido a arcillas modificadas con nanopartículas.

  3. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-03-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -4/M), naloxone inhibited (p < .001) the release of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O/sub 2//sup -/ released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of /sup 3/H FMLP to HN. Using /sup 3/H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10/sup -5/) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED/sub 50/ for naloxone inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ (1 x 10/sup -5/M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D/sub 2/ or E/sub 2/. Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O/sub 2/ but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN.

  4. Low- and high-affinity phorbol ester and diglyceride interactions with protein kinase C: 1-O-alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycerol enhances phorbol ester- and diacylglycerol-induced activity but alone does not induce activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Seiz, J L; Stagliano, B A; Cook, A C; Milano, S K; Ho, C; Stubbs, C D

    2001-05-22

    Phorbol ester-induced conventional protein kinase C (PKCalpha, -betaIota/IotaIota, and -gamma) isozyme activities are potentiated by 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol. This has been attributed to a "cooperative" interaction of the two activators with two discrete sites termed the low- and high-affinity phorbol ester binding sites, respectively [Slater, S. J., Milano, S. K., Stagliano, B. A., Gergich, K. J., Ho, C., Mazurek, A., Taddeo, F. J., Kelly, M. B., Yeager, M. D., and Stubbs, C. D. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 3804-3815]. Here, we report that the 1-O-alkyl ether diglyceride, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (HAG), like its 1,2-diacyl counterpart, 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), also potentiated PKCalpha, -betaI/II, and -gamma activities induced by the phorbol ester 4beta-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Similar to OAG, HAG was found to bind to the low-affinity phorbol ester binding site and to enhance high-affinity phorbol ester binding, and to decrease the level of Ca(2+) required for phorbol ester-induced activity, while being without effect on the Ca(2+) dependence of membrane association. Thus, similar to OAG, HAG may also potentiate phorbol ester-induced activity by interacting with the low-affinity phorbol ester binding site, leading to a reduced level of Ca(2+) required for the activating conformational change. However, HAG was found not to behave like a 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol in that alone it did not induce PKC activity, and also in that it enhanced OAG-induced activity. The results reveal HAG to be a member of a new class of "nonactivating" compounds that modulate PKC activity by interacting with the low-affinity phorbol ester binding site.

  5. Interaction of alcohols and anesthetics with protein kinase Calpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Kelly, M B; Larkin, J D; Ho, C; Mazurek, A; Taddeo, F J; Yeager, M D; Stubbs, C D

    1997-03-07

    The key signal transduction enzyme protein kinase C (PKC) contains a hydrophobic binding site for alcohols and anesthetics (Slater, S. J., Cox, K. J. A., Lombardi, J. V., Ho, C., Kelly, M. B., Rubin, E., and Stubbs, C. D. (1993) Nature 364, 82-84). In this study, we show that interaction of n-alkanols and general anesthetics with PKCalpha results in dramatically different effects on membrane-associated compared with lipid-independent enzyme activity. Furthermore, the effects on membrane-associated PKCalpha differ markedly depending on whether activity is induced by diacylglycerol or phorbol ester and also on n-alkanol chain length. PKCalpha contains two distinct phorbol ester binding regions of low and high affinity for the activator, respectively (Slater, S. J., Ho, C., Kelly, M. B., Larkin, J. D., Taddeo, F. J., Yeager, M. D., and Stubbs, C. D. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 4627-4631). Short chain n-alkanols competed for low affinity phorbol ester binding to the enzyme, resulting in reduced enzyme activity, whereas high affinity phorbol ester binding was unaffected. Long chain n-alkanols not only competed for low affinity phorbol ester binding but also enhanced high affinity phorbol ester binding. Furthermore, long chain n-alkanols enhanced phorbol ester induced PKCalpha activity. This effect of long chain n-alkanols was similar to that of diacylglycerol, although the n-alkanols alone were weak activators of the enzyme. The cellular effects of n-alkanols and general anesthetics on PKC-mediated processes will therefore depend in a complex manner on the locality of the enzyme (e.g. cytoskeletal or membrane-associated) and activator type, apart from any isoform-specific differences. Furthermore, effects mediated by interaction with the region on the enzyme possessing low affinity for phorbol esters represent a novel mechanism for the regulation of PKC activity.

  6. Stereoselective sulfate conjugation of racemic 4-hydroxypropranolol by human and rat liver cytosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walle, T.; Walle, U.K. (Department of Cell and Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the stereochemistry of sulfoconjugation of a chiral phenolic amine drug, 4-hydroxypropranolol (HOP), by the human liver. The reaction was catalyzed by the 100,000 g cytosol as the phenolsulfotransferase (PST) enzyme source with PAP35S as the co-substrate. The enantiomers of the intact sulfate conjugate formed, (+)-HOP35S and (-)-HOP35S, were separated by HPLC and measured by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Complex velocity vs. substrate concentration curves were obtained with two peaks of activity, one at 3 microM (high affinity) and one at 500 microM (low affinity). The high-affinity reaction demonstrated a high degree of stereoselectivity. Whereas the affinity of the enantiomers for this reaction was identical, with a very low apparent KM value of 0.59 microM, the apparent Vmax value for (+)-HOPS formation was 4.6-fold higher than for (-)-HOPS. In sharp contrast, the low-affinity reaction, with an apparent KM of 65 microM, was not stereoselective. Inhibition of the high-affinity reaction by elevated temperature, but not by dichloronitrophenol, indicated that this activity was due to a monoamine form of PST. Inhibition of the low-affinity reaction by dichloronitrophenol, but not by elevated temperature, indicated that this activity was due to a phenol form of PST. As a comparison, experiments with the rat liver cytosol demonstrated only one activity, with apparent KM values of 50 microM for both enantiomers and opposite stereoselectivity in maximum velocity compared to humans, {plus minus}-HOPS ratio 0.72. The results of this study demonstrate stereoselectivity in human hepatic sulfation of a chiral phenolic amine, with clear differences between PST isoenzymes.

  7. Nickel and zinc isotope fractionation in hyperaccumulating and nonaccumulating plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Teng-Hao-Bo; Cloquet, Christophe; Tang, Ye-Tao; Sterckeman, Thibault; Echevarria, Guillaume; Estrade, Nicolas; Morel, Jean-Louis; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2014-10-21

    Until now, there has been little data on the isotope fractionation of nickel (Ni) in higher plants and how this can be affected by plant Ni and zinc (Zn) homeostasis. A hydroponic cultivation was conducted to investigate the isotope fractionation of Ni and Zn during plant uptake and translocation processes. The nonaccumulator Thlaspi arvense, the Ni hyperaccumulator Alyssum murale and the Ni and Zn hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens were grown in low (2 μM) and high (50 μM) Ni and Zn solutions. Results showed that plants were inclined to absorb light Ni isotopes, presumably due to the functioning of low-affinity transport systems across root cell membrane. The Ni isotope fractionation between plant and solution was greater in the hyperaccumulators grown in low Zn treatments (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.90 to -0.63‰) than that in the nonaccumulator T. arvense (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.21‰), thus indicating a greater permeability of the low-affinity transport system in hyperaccumulators. Light isotope enrichment of Zn was observed in most of the plants (Δ(66)Zn(plant-solution) = -0.23 to -0.10‰), but to a lesser extent than for Ni. The rapid uptake of Zn on the root surfaces caused concentration gradients, which induced ion diffusion in the rhizosphere and could result in light Zn isotope enrichment in the hyperaccumulator N. caerulescens. In high Zn treatment, Zn could compete with Ni during the uptake process, which reduced Ni concentration in plants and decreased the extent of Ni isotope fractionation (Δ(60)Ni(plant-solution) = -0.11 to -0.07‰), indicating that plants might take up Ni through a low-affinity transport system of Zn. We propose that isotope composition analysis for transition elements could become an empirical tool to study plant physiological processes.

  8. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors located on short noradrenergic neurons of the rat vas deferens: a pharmacological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark phase of the light-dark cycle, modulates neuronal acetylcholine receptors located presynaptically on nerve terminals of the rat vas deferens. Recently we showed the presence of high affinity nicotine-binding sites during the light phase, and low and high affinity binding sites during the dark phase. The appearance of the low affinity binding sites was due to the nocturnal melatonin surge and could be mimicked by exposure to melatonin in vitro. The aim of the present research was to identify the receptor subtypes responsible for the functional response during the light and the dark phase. The rank order of potency of agonists was dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP = cytisine > nicotine > carbachol and DMPP = nicotine = cytisine > carbachol, during the light and dark phase, respectively, due to an increase in apparent affinity for nicotine. Mecamylamine similarly blocked the DMPP response during the light and the dark phase, while the response to nicotine was more efficiently blocked during the light phase. In contrast, methyllycaconitine inhibited the nicotine-induced response only at 21:00 h. Since a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs have low affinity for nicotine in binding assays, we suggest that a mixed population composed of a3ß4 - plus a7-bearing nAChR subtypes is present at night. This plasticity in receptor subtypes is probably driven by melatonin since nicotine-induced contraction in organs from animals sacrificed at 15:00 h and incubated with melatonin (100 pg/ml, 4 h is not totally blocked by mecamylamine. Thus melatonin, by acting directly on the short adrenergic neurons that innervate the rat vas deferens, induces the appearance of the low affinity binding site, probably an a7 nAChR subtype.

  9. Naloxone inhibits superoxide but not enzyme release by human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, C.; Alailima, S.; Tate, E.

    1986-01-01

    The release of toxic oxygen metabolites and enzymes by phagocytic cells is thought to play a role in the multisystemic tissue injury of sepsis. Naloxone protects septic animals. We have found that at concentrations administered to animals (10 -7 to 10 -4 M), naloxone inhibited (p 2 - ) by human neutrophils (HN), stimulated with N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP). Naloxone had no effect on cell viability. Maximum inhibition was 65% of the total O 2 - released (13.1 nMoles/8 min/320,000 cells). FMLP-stimulated release of beta-glucoronidase or lysozyme was not altered by naloxone. Naloxone had no effect on the binding of 3 H FMLP to HN. Using 3 H naloxone and various concentrations of unlabeled naloxone higher affinity (K/sub D/ = 12nM) and lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 4.7 x 10 -5 ) binding sites were detected. The K/sub D/ of the low affinity site corresponded to the ED 50 for naloxone inhibition of O 2 - (1 x 10 -5 M). Binding to this low affinity site was decreased by (+) naloxone, beta-endorphin and N acetyl beta-endorphin, but not by leu-enkephalin, thyrotropin releasing factor, prostaglandin D 2 or E 2 . Conclusions: (1) naloxone inhibits FMLP-stimulated O 2 but not enzyme release, (2) this inhibition is not due to alteration of FMLP receptor binding, (3) naloxone may act via a low affinity binding site which is ligand specific, and (4) a higher affinity receptor is present on HN

  10. Selecting informative data for developing peptide-MHC binding predictors using a query by committee approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J.K.; Lamberth, K.; Nielsen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    methods to predict the binding affinity of peptides binding to the MHC class I molecule, HLA-A2. We show that the QBC strategy leads to a higher performance than a baseline strategy where new data points are selected at random from a pool of available data. Most peptides bind HLA-A2 with a low affinity...... algorithms to suggest new data points, which most rationally complement existing data, that is, they are the most informative data points. In order to evaluate this QBC approach on a real-world problem, we compared strategies for selecting new data points. We trained neural network algorithms to obtain...

  11. 18FDG-labeled LIKKPF. A PET tracer for apoptosis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepideh Khoshbakht; Davood Beiki; Parham Geramifar; Farzad Kobarfard; Omid Sabzevari; Mohsen Amini; Soraya Shahhosseini

    2016-01-01

    One of the early biochemical changes of apoptotic cells is exposure of phosphatidylserine on the external surface of the plasma membrane. The aim of current study is targeting Phosphatidyl serine (PS) using radiolabeled LIKKPF, which was functionalized with HYNIC and aminooxy, radiolabeled with 18 FDG and assessed in vitro and in vivo. Results showed LIKKPF has less affinity to PS compared to original phage peptide, but high enough for specific binding to apoptotic cells. It is concluded the low affinity of radiolabeled LIKKPF might be attributed to hydrophobicity of peptide, therefor peptides used in future studies should be more hydrophobic compared to LIKKPF. (author)

  12. Adverse events in children and adolescents treated with quetiapine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Klaus D; Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Bruhn, Christina H

    2017-01-01

    Quetiapine is a low-affinity dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, approved for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in children and adolescents by the Food and Drug Administration, but not by European Medicine Agency. Although knowledge of adverse drug reactions in children...... and adolescents is scarce, quetiapine is increasingly being used for youth in Denmark. The aim of this case study is to discuss adverse drug events (ADEs) spontaneously reported to the Danish Medicines Agency on quetiapine used in the pediatric population in relation to adversive drug reactions (ADRs) reported...

  13. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of polymer-bound heme complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Eishun; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hidenari; Shirai, Tsuneo.

    1984-01-01

    Moessbauer spectra were measured on the heme complexes of poly(1-vinyl- and 1-vinyl-2-methylimidazole)(PVI and PMI) and heme derivatives with covalently bound imidazoleligand (IH) and 2-methylimidazole-ligand (MIH) embedded in poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) film. Quadrupole splitting (ΔE sub(Q)) for the carbon monoxide adduct of PMI-heme indicated large electronic field gradient at the iron nucleus, probably due to steric hindrance of the polymer chain, and this behavior agreed with its low affinity with carbon monoxide. PMI-heme formed an oxygen adduct and its isomer shift and ΔE sub(Q) values were obtained. (author)

  14. The N2-Src neuronal splice variant of C-Src has altered SH3 domain ligand specificity and a higher constitutive activity than N1-Src

    OpenAIRE

    Keenan, Sarah; Lewis, Philip A.; Wetherill, Sarah J.; Dunning, Christopher J.R.; Evans, Gareth J.O.

    2015-01-01

    N2-Src is a poorly understood neuronal splice variant of the ubiquitous C-Src tyrosine kinase, containing a 17 amino acid insert in its Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. To characterise the properties of N2-Src we directly compared its SH3 domain specificity and kinase activity with C- and N1-Src in vitro. N2- and N1-Src had a similar low affinity for the phosphorylation of substrates containing canonical C-Src SH3 ligands and synaptophysin, an established neuronal substrate for C-Src. N2-Src also...

  15. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, Luke F.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Graham, Michelle T.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Eggel, Alexander; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab-Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the hig...

  16. Localisation and characteristics of bond sites of aldosterone along the nephron of an amphibian: Xenopus laevis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnionsahe, Daze Apollinaire

    1986-01-01

    The author reports an academic work which aimed at determining characteristics of the aldosterone bond along the kidney nephron of the Xenopus laevis by using auto-radiography on isolated tubular segments. The objective was to highlight tubular segments at the origin of A6 cells by comparing aldosterone bond characteristics in these cells and in different tubular segments of the kidney. Besides, the author compared the bond distribution between the two aldosterone bond sites: the high affinity type I bond site (so-called mineralocorticoids), and low affinity type II bond site (so-called glucocorticoids)

  17. First direct electron microscopic visualization of a tight spatial coupling between GABAA-receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, G H; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1992-01-01

    Using cerebellar granule neurons in culture it was demonstrated that exposure of the cells to the GABAA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) leads to an increase in the number of voltage-gated calcium channels as revealed by quantitative preembedding indirect imm...... of THIP-treated cultures. This suggests that primarily low affinity GABAA-receptors are closely associated with Ca2+ channels and this may be important for the ability of these receptors to mediate an inhibitory action on transmitter release even under extreme depolarizing conditions....

  18. Structure-activity relationships of constrained phenylethylamine ligands for the serotonin 5-ht2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isberg, Vignir; Paine, James; Leth-Petersen, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    showed that the 1,2-heterocyclized compounds can be accommodated in the binding site. Conformational analysis showed that 11 can only bind in a higher-energy conformation, which would explain its absent or low affinity. The amine and 2-oxygen interactions with D3.32 and S3.36, respectively, can form...... about the bioactive conformation of the amine functionality. However, combined 1,2-constriction by cyclization has only been tested with one compound. Here, we present three new 1,2-cyclized phenylethylamines, 9-11, and describe their synthetic routes. Ligand docking in the 5-HT2B crystal structure...

  19. Regional distribution of high affinity binding of 3H-adenosine in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traversa, U.; Puppini, P.; de Angelis, L.; Vertua, R.

    1984-06-01

    The high and low affinity adenosine binding sites with Kd values ranging respectively from 0.8 to 1.65 microM and from 3.1 to 13.86 microM were demonstrated in the following rat brain areas: cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, diencephalon, and pons-medulla. Adenosine receptors involved in the high affinity binding seem to be mainly Ra-type. The analysis of the regional distribution of 3H-Adenosine showed the highest levels of specific binding in striatum and hippocampus; somewhat smaller values in cortex, cerebellum, and diencephalon, and even lower in pons-medulla.

  20. Temporal development of GABA agonist induced alterations in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1987-01-01

    The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays...... exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 3 hr low affinity GABA receptors were induced. These findings show that the effect of THIP on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells may be interrelated and moreover it is likely that the turn-over of GABA receptors...

  1. New Techniques for Studying Calcium Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsien, R. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Improved techniques for detecting and manipulating spatial gradients of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentrations (Ca(2)) sub i and intracellular stores are discussed. Three areas of progress are: (1) development of new fluorescent indicators for Ca(2+) that are the first to be suitable for measuring Ca(2+)) sub i and its inhomogeneities in individual cells; (2) invention of photolabile chelators which shift irreversibly from high to low affinity for Ca(2+) upon illumination, permitting light-controlled jumps in (Ca(2+)) sub i; and (3) fixation methods to trap dynamic intraorganellar Ca stores in a form readily visible by electron microscopy.

  2. Revival of femtosecond laser plasma filaments in air by a nanosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing; Akturk, Selcuk; Prade, Bernard; André, Yves-Bernard; Houard, Aurélien; Liu, Yi; Franco, Michel; D'Amico, Ciro; Salmon, Estelle; Hao, Zuo-Qiang; Lascoux, Noelle; Mysyrowicz, André

    2009-07-06

    Short lived plasma channels generated through filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses in air can be revived after several milliseconds by a delayed nanosecond pulse. Electrons initially ionized from oxygen molecules and subsequently captured by neutral oxygen molecules provide the long-lived reservoir of low affinity allowing this process. A Bessel-like nanosecond-duration laser beam can easily detach these weakly bound electrons and multiply them in an avalanche process. We have experimentally demonstrated such revivals over a channel length of 50 cm by focusing the nanosecond laser with an axicon.

  3. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase Gln1;2 is the main isozyme contributing to GS1 activity and can be up-regulated to relieve ammonium toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Miao; de Bang, Thomas Christian; Pedersen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic GS1 (Gln synthetase) is central for ammonium assimilation in plants. High ammonium treatment enhanced the expression of the GS1 isogene Gln-1;2 encoding a low-affinity high-capacity GS1 protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) shoots. Under the same conditions, the expression of th...... and amino acid synthesis. We conclude that Gln-1;2 is the main isozyme contributing to shoot GS1 activity in vegetative growth stages and can be up-regulated to relieve ammonium toxicity. This reveals, to our knowledge, a novel shoot function of Gln-1;2 in Arabidopsis shoots....

  4. A Series of Potent CREBBP Bromodomain Ligands Reveals an Induced-Fit Pocket Stabilized by a Cation–π Interaction**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Timothy P C; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Fedorov, Oleg; Picaud, Sarah; Cortopassi, Wilian A; Hay, Duncan A; Martin, Sarah; Tumber, Anthony; Rogers, Catherine M; Philpott, Martin; Wang, Minghua; Thompson, Amber L; Heightman, Tom D; Pryde, David C; Cook, Andrew; Paton, Robert S; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan; Brennan, Paul E; Conway, Stuart J

    2014-01-01

    The benzoxazinone and dihydroquinoxalinone fragments were employed as novel acetyl lysine mimics in the development of CREBBP bromodomain ligands. While the benzoxazinone series showed low affinity for the CREBBP bromodomain, expansion of the dihydroquinoxalinone series resulted in the first potent inhibitors of a bromodomain outside the BET family. Structural and computational studies reveal that an internal hydrogen bond stabilizes the protein-bound conformation of the dihydroquinoxalinone series. The side chain of this series binds in an induced-fit pocket forming a cation–π interaction with R1173 of CREBBP. The most potent compound inhibits binding of CREBBP to chromatin in U2OS cells. PMID:24821300

  5. Novel method for detection of glycogen in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurat, Alexander V; Segvich, Dyann M; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    Glycogen, a branched polymer of glucose, functions as an energy reserve in many living organisms. Abnormalities in glycogen metabolism, usually excessive accumulation, can be caused genetically, most often through mutation of the enzymes directly involved in synthesis and degradation of the polymer leading to a variety of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). Microscopic visualization of glycogen deposits in cells and tissues is important for the study of normal glycogen metabolism as well as diagnosis of GSDs. Here, we describe a method for the detection of glycogen using a renewable, recombinant protein which contains the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) from starch-binding domain containing protein 1 (Stbd1). We generated a fusion protein containing g lutathione S-transferase, a cM c eptitope and the tbd1 BM (GYSC) for use as a glycogen-binding probe, which can be detected with secondary antibodies against glutathione S-transferase or cMyc. By enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we demonstrate that GYSC binds glycogen and two other polymers of glucose, amylopectin and amylose. Immunofluorescence staining of cultured cells indicate a GYSC-specific signal that is co-localized with signals obtained with anti-glycogen or anti-glycogen synthase antibodies. GYSC-positive staining inside of lysosomes is observed in individual muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase, a well-characterized model of GSD II (Pompe disease). Co-localized GYSC and glycogen signals are also found in muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in malin, a model for Lafora disease. These data indicate that GYSC is a novel probe that can be used to study glycogen metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Myocardial glycophagy - a specific glycogen handling response to metabolic stress is accentuated in the female heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, M E; Mellor, K M; Curl, C L; Stapleton, D; Delbridge, L M D

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac metabolic stress is a hallmark of many cardiac pathologies, including diabetes. Cardiac glycogen mis-handling is a frequent manifestation of various cardiopathologies. Diabetic females have a higher risk of heart disease than males, yet sex disparities in cardiac metabolic stress settings are not well understood. Oestrogen acts on key glycogen regulatory proteins. The goal of this study was to evaluate sex-specific metabolic stress-triggered cardiac glycogen handling responses. Male and female adult C57Bl/6J mice were fasted for 48h. Cardiac glycogen content, particle size, regulatory enzymes, signalling intermediates and autophagic processes were evaluated. Female hearts exhibited 51% lower basal glycogen content than males associated with lower AMP-activated-kinase (AMPK) activity (35% decrease in pAMPK:AMPK). With fasting, glycogen accumulated in female hearts linked with decreased particle size and upregulation of Akt and AMPK signalling, activation of glycogen synthase and inactivation of glycogen phosphorylase. Fasting did not alter glycogen content or regulatory proteins in male hearts. Expression of glycogen autophagy marker, starch-binding-protein-domain-1 (STBD1), was 63% lower in female hearts than males and increased by 69% with fasting in females only. Macro-autophagy markers, p62 and LC3BII:I ratio, increased with fasting in male and female hearts. This study identifies glycogen autophagy ('glycophagy') as a potentially important component of the response to cardiac metabolic stress. Glycogen autophagy occurs in association with a marked and selective accumulation of glycogen in the female myocardium. Our findings suggest that sex-specific differences in glycogen handling may have cardiopathologic consequences in various settings, including diabetic cardiomyopathy. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  8. The S-enantiomer of R, S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads; Sanchez, Connie

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  9. The S-enantiomer of R,S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism. Comparison with other serotonin transporter inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads Breum; Sánchez, Connie

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  10. High-Affinity Ligands Can Trigger T Cell Receptor Signaling Without CD45 Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ameen Al-Aghbar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available How T cell receptors (TCRs are triggered to start signaling is still not fully understood. It has been proposed that segregation of the large membrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 from engaged TCRs initiates signaling by favoring phosphorylation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs in the cytoplasmic domains of CD3 molecules. However, whether CD45 segregation is important to initiate triggering is still uncertain. We examined CD45 segregation from TCRs engaged to anti-CD3 scFv with high or low affinity and with defined molecular lengths on glass-supported lipid bilayers using total internal reflection microscopy. Both short and elongated high-affinity anti-CD3 scFv effectively induced similar calcium mobilization, Zap70 phosphorylation, and cytokine secretion in Jurkat T cells but CD45 segregated from activated TCR microclusters significantly less for elongated versus short anti-CD3 ligands. In addition, at early times, triggering cells with both high and low affinity elongated anti-CD3 scFv resulted in similar degrees of CD3 co-localization with CD45, but only the high-affinity scFv induced T cell activation. The lack of correlation between CD45 segregation and early markers of T cell activation suggests that segregation of CD45 from engaged TCRs is not mandatory for initial triggering of TCR signaling by elongated high-affinity ligands.

  11. Prolyl isomerization as a molecular memory in the allosteric regulation of the signal adapter protein c-CrkII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidpeter, Philipp A M; Schmid, Franz X

    2015-01-30

    c-CrkII is a central signal adapter protein. A domain opening/closing reaction between its N- and C-terminal Src homology 3 domains (SH3N and SH3C, respectively) controls signal propagation from upstream tyrosine kinases to downstream targets. In chicken but not in human c-CrkII, opening/closing is coupled with cis/trans isomerization at Pro-238 in SH3C. Here, we used advanced double-mixing experiments and kinetic simulations to uncover dynamic domain interactions in c-CrkII and to elucidate how they are linked with cis/trans isomerization and how this regulates substrate binding to SH3N. Pro-238 trans → cis isomerization is not a simple on/off switch but converts chicken c-CrkII from a high affinity to a low affinity form. We present a double-box model that describes c-CrkII as an allosteric system consisting of an open, high affinity R state and a closed, low affinity T state. Coupling of the T-R transition with an intrinsically slow prolyl isomerization provides c-CrkII with a kinetic memory and possibly functions as a molecular attenuator during signal transduction. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Neurotrophins and their receptors in human lingual tonsil: an immunohistochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Bronzetti, Elena; Felici, Laura M; Alicino, Valentina; Ionta, Brunella; Bronzetti, Benedetto; Magliulo, Giuseppe; Grande, Claudia; Zamai, Loris; Pasquantonio, Guido; De Vincentiis, Marco

    2008-11-01

    Lymphoid organs are supplied by many nerve endings associated with different kinds of cells and macrophages. The role of this innervation on the release of locally active molecules is still unclear. Lingual tonsils belong to Waldeyer's Ring, in close association with palatine tonsils and nasopharyngeal (adenoids) tonsils, thus constituting part of NALT (nasal-associated lymphoid tissue) together with the tubal tonsils and lateral pharyngeal bands. In this study, we focused our attention on the expression of some neurotrophins (NTs) and their high- and low-affinity receptors in human lingual tonsils. Light immunohistochemistry showed that human tonsillar samples were generally positive for all the NTs investigated (NGF, BDNF, NT-3, NT-4) and their receptors (TrKA, TrKB, TrKC and p75) with some different expression levels. NGF and TrKC were strongly expressed in macrophages, but weakly in lymphocytes. However, BDNF and TrKB was highly expressed in lymphocytes and weaker in macrophages. The low-affinity receptor for NGF, p75, was mainly moderately expressed in the analysed samples. These results suggest the presence of a pattern of neurotrophin innervation in the human lingual tonsil which may play a role in sustaining inflammatory conditions and in modulating a close interaction between the nervous system and the different immune cellular subtypes.

  13. Guanylpirenzepine distinguishes between neuronal ml and m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monferini, E.; Cereda, E.; Ladinsky, H.; Donetti, A.; Giraldo, E.

    1990-01-01

    Guanylpirenzepine, a polar, non-quaternary analog of pirenzepine, exhibited a novel binding behavior in rat brain regions: in competition binding experiments against [3H]pirenzepine labeling the M1 receptor in membranes from cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum, the compound, differently from pirenzepine, displayed heterogeneous binding curves. Computer assisted analysis of these curves, evidenced the existence of two populations of binding sites: a large proportion (84-89%) of high affinity receptors (KH = 64-92 nM) and a remainder with very low affinity (KL = 19-28 microM). Like pirenzepine, guanylpirenzepine showed low affinity for the glandular M3 and the cardiac M2 receptors when [3H]N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors in membranes from these two tissues; affinity values for guanylpirenzepine were 1336 and 5790 nM respectively, vs 323 and 683 nM for pirenzepine. We conclude that guanylpirenzepine is able to discriminate between m1 and m4 receptor subtypes and may represent a new tool for deeper studies on muscarinic receptors classification

  14. L-Asp is a useful tool in the purification of the ionotropic glutamate receptor A2 ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Christian; Frydenvang, Karla; Ceravalls de Rabassa, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In purification of the ionotropic glutamate receptor A2 (GluA2) ligand-binding domain (LBD), L-Glu supplemented buffers have previously been used for protein stabilization during the procedure. This sometimes hampers structural studies of low affinity ligands because L-Glu is difficult to displace...... crystallized as a mixed dimer with L-Glu present in one subunit while neither L-Asp nor L-Glu were found in the other subunit. Thus, residual L-Glu is still present from the expression. On the other hand, only L-Asp was found at the binding site when using 50 mM or 250 mM L-Asp for crystallization. The binding...... mode observed for L-Asp at the GluA2 LBD is very similar to that described for L-Glu. Taken together, we have shown that L-Asp can be used instead of L-Glu for ligand-dependent stabilization of the GluA2 LBD during purification. This will enable structural studies of low affinity ligands for lead...

  15. Direct antiglobulin ("Coombs") test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel, George B; Lichtman, Marshall A

    2014-04-01

    We have reviewed the literature to identify and characterize reports of warm-antibody type, autoimmune hemolytic anemia in which the standard direct antiglobulin reaction was negative but a confirmatory test indicated that the red cells were opsonized with antibody. Three principal reasons account for the absence of a positive direct antiglobulin test in these cases: a) IgG sensitization below the threshold of detection by the commercial antiglobulin reagent, b) low affinity IgG, removed by preparatory washes not conducted at 4°C or at low ionic strength, and c) red cell sensitization by IgA alone, or rarely (monomeric) IgM alone, but not accompanied by complement fixation, and thus not detectable by a commercial antiglobulin reagent that contains anti-IgG and anti-C3. In cases in which the phenotype is compatible with warm-antibody type, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the direct antiglobulin test is negative, an alternative method to detect low levels of IgG sensitization, use of 4°C, low ionic strength washes to prepare the cells for the direct antiglobulin test reaction to permit retention and identification of low affinity IgG antibodies, and, if the latter are uninformative, testing for sensitization with an anti-IgA, and, if necessary, an anti-IgM reagent identifies cases of warm-antibody type, immune hemolysis not verified by a commercial reagent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression, receptor binding, and biophysical characterization of guinea pig insulin desB30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ebbe; Hansen, Thomas Hesselhøj; Johansson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Here we report, for the first time, the heterologous expression of desB30 guinea pig insulin (GI desB30) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The affinities of GI desB30 for the insulin receptor A and the IGF-I receptor were also quantified for the first time. Small-angle X-ray scattering...... and analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed that GI desB30 did not form dimers or hexamers, in contrast to human insulin. Sizeexclusion chromatography connected to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that GI desB30 has affinity towards several divalent metal ions. These studies did...... not indicate the formation of any larger structures of GI desB30 in the presence of various divalent metal ions, but did indicate that GI desB30 has an affinity towards Mn, Co, and Cu ions. Finally, the low affinity for the insulin receptor and the very low affinity for the IGF-I receptor by GI desB30 were...

  17. An NMR-based scoring function improves the accuracy of binding pose predictions by docking by two orders of magnitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orts, Julien [EMBL, Structure and Computational Biology Unit (Germany); Bartoschek, Stefan [Industriepark Hoechst, Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH, R and D LGCR/Parallel Synthesis and Natural Products (Germany); Griesinger, Christian [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Monecke, Peter [Industriepark Hoechst, Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH, R and D LGCR/Structure, Design and Informatics (Germany); Carlomagno, Teresa, E-mail: teresa.carlomagno@embl.de [EMBL, Structure and Computational Biology Unit (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Low-affinity ligands can be efficiently optimized into high-affinity drug leads by structure based drug design when atomic-resolution structural information on the protein/ligand complexes is available. In this work we show that the use of a few, easily obtainable, experimental restraints improves the accuracy of the docking experiments by two orders of magnitude. The experimental data are measured in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and consist of protein-mediated NOEs between two competitively binding ligands. The methodology can be widely applied as the data are readily obtained for low-affinity ligands in the presence of non-labelled receptor at low concentration. The experimental inter-ligand NOEs are efficiently used to filter and rank complex model structures that have been pre-selected by docking protocols. This approach dramatically reduces the degeneracy and inaccuracy of the chosen model in docking experiments, is robust with respect to inaccuracy of the structural model used to represent the free receptor and is suitable for high-throughput docking campaigns.

  18. Two stage binding of glucagon to receptors in rat liver plasma membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyborski, R.J.; Horwitz, E.M.; Gurd, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    A homogeneous class of noncooperative receptors in isolated rat hepatocytes undergoes a time- and temperature-dependent conformation change with glucagon binding. A comparable system exists in rat liver plasma membranes. Dissociation assays (30 0 C) quantify the number of receptors in each conformational state. Membranes incubated without GTP demonstrated two dissociation rates. The fraction of hormone bound to the high affinity state increases with incubation time to a limiting value. With isolated membranes and a concentration of 0.2 nM [( 125 I)Iodotyrosyl 10 ]glucagon, the fraction of the high affinity form is significantly greater than that found in isolated hepatocytes. Previous work without GTP indicated that a lack of cooperativity characterized the liver membrane system. Incubation of membranes with 0.1 mM GTP increases the K/sub D/ as determined by competition assays while the slope factor (.98 +/- 0.04) indicated noncooperativity. Furthermore, in the presence of GTP a significantly greater proportion of receptors is in the low affinity state while in the absence of GTP more are in the high affinity state. The data are consistent with a mechanism by which GTP diminishes the conversion of the low affinity state to the high affinity state

  19. Dual aminergic regulation of central beta adrenoceptors. Effect of atypical antidepressants and 5-hydroxytryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manier, D.H.; Gillespie, D.D.; Sulser, F.

    1989-06-01

    Nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding curves reveals that the (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol-labeled receptor population with low affinity for isoproterenol is increased by p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and this increase is abolished by 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in vivo. Desipramine (DMI) decreased the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity to the same degree in PCPA-treated animals as in control animals, thus explaining the reported discrepancy between beta adrenoceptor number and responsiveness of the beta adrenoceptor-coupled adenylate cyclase system. Mianserin also selectively reduced the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity in membrane preparations of normal animals, whereas fluoxetine selectively abolished the upregulation of the low affinity sites in reserpinized animals and had no effect on either receptor population from brain of normal animals. The results emphasize the importance of nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding for the interpretation of drug action and encourage the pursuit of the molecular neurobiology of the serotonin (5-HT)/norepinephrine (NE) link in brain.

  20. High-Affinity Glucose Transport in Aspergillus nidulans Is Mediated by the Products of Two Related but Differentially Expressed Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Luisa; González, Ramón; Ramón, Daniel; MacCabe, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Independent systems of high and low affinity effect glucose uptake in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Low-affinity uptake is known to be mediated by the product of the mstE gene. In the current work two genes, mstA and mstC, have been identified that encode high-affinity glucose transporter proteins. These proteins' primary structures share over 90% similarity, indicating that the corresponding genes share a common origin. Whilst the function of the paralogous proteins is little changed, they differ notably in their patterns of expression. The mstC gene is expressed during the early phases of germination and is subject to CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression whereas mstA is expressed as a culture tends toward carbon starvation. In addition, various pieces of genetic evidence strongly support allelism of mstC and the previously described locus sorA. Overall, our data define MstC/SorA as a high-affinity glucose transporter expressed in germinating conidia, and MstA as a high-affinity glucose transporter that operates in vegetative hyphae under conditions of carbon limitation. PMID:24751997

  1. Dual aminergic regulation of central beta adrenoceptors. Effect of atypical antidepressants and 5-hydroxytryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manier, D.H.; Gillespie, D.D.; Sulser, F.

    1989-01-01

    Nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding curves reveals that the [ 3 H]-dihydroalprenolol-labeled receptor population with low affinity for isoproterenol is increased by p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and this increase is abolished by 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in vivo. Desipramine (DMI) decreased the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity to the same degree in PCPA-treated animals as in control animals, thus explaining the reported discrepancy between beta adrenoceptor number and responsiveness of the beta adrenoceptor-coupled adenylate cyclase system. Mianserin also selectively reduced the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity in membrane preparations of normal animals, whereas fluoxetine selectively abolished the upregulation of the low affinity sites in reserpinized animals and had no effect on either receptor population from brain of normal animals. The results emphasize the importance of nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding for the interpretation of drug action and encourage the pursuit of the molecular neurobiology of the serotonin (5-HT)/norepinephrine (NE) link in brain

  2. Structure-activity relationship studies of citalopram derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M Andreas B; Plenge, Per; Andersen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    . The antidepressant drug citalopram displays high-affinity S1 binding and low-affinity S2 binding. To elucidate a possible therapeutic role of allosteric inhibition of SERT a drug that specifically targets the allosteric site is required. The purpose of this study was to find a compound bearing higher selectivity......-activity relationship study revealed a di-methyl citalopram, which binds to the S1 site with an affinity of 6.4 [4.7;8.8] μM (mean[SEM interval]) and shows an allosteric potency of 3.6 [3.3;3.8] μM, thus bearing ~2-fold selectivity for the allosteric site relative to the S1 site in SERT. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS...... towards the S2 site. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: We performed a systematic structure-activity relationship study based on the scaffold of citalopram and the structurally closely related congener, talopram, that shows low-affinity S1 binding in SERT. The role of the four chemical substituents, which distinguish...

  3. Structural Basis for the Recognition of Mutant Self by a Tumor-Specific, MHC Class II-Restricted T Cell Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng,L.; Langley, R.; Brown, P.; Xu, G.; Teng, L.; Wang, Q.; Gonzales, M.; Callender, G.; Nishimura, M.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Structural studies of complexes of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have focused on TCRs specific for foreign antigens or native self. An unexplored category of TCRs includes those specific for self determinants bearing alterations resulting from disease, notably cancer. We determined here the structure of a human melanoma-specific TCR (E8) bound to the MHC molecule HLA-DR1 and an epitope from mutant triosephosphate isomerase. The structure had features intermediate between 'anti-foreign' and autoimmune TCR-peptide-MHC class II complexes that may reflect the hybrid nature of altered self. E8 manifested very low affinity for mutant triosephosphate isomerase-HLA-DR1 despite the highly tumor-reactive properties of E8 cells. A second TCR (G4) had even lower affinity but underwent peptide-specific formation of dimers, suggesting this as a mechanism for enhancing low-affinity TCR-peptide-MHC interactions for T cell activation.

  4. Two classes of ouabain binding sites in ferret heart and two forms of Na+-K+-ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.C.; Akera, T.

    1987-05-01

    In partially purified Na+-K+-adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) obtained from ferret heart, ouabain produced a monophasic inhibition curve; however, the curve spanned over 5 logarithmic units, indicating the presence of more than one classes of enzyme. (/sup 3/H)ouabain binding studies revealed high-and low-affinity binding sites in approximately equal abundance, with apparent dissociation constants of 10 and 230 nM, respectively. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of phosphoenzyme formed from (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP showed two distinct K+-sensitive bands of approximately 100,000 molecular weight. Phosphoenzyme formation from the high-molecular-weight alpha(+) form was selectively inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide. Ouabain caused a 50% inhibition of phosphorylation of the alpha(+) form at 40 nM and the lower-molecular-weight alpha form at 300 nM. In papillary muscle preparations, 1-30 nM ouabain produced a modest positive inotropic effect that reached an apparent plateau at 30 nM. Further increases in ouabain concentrations, however, produced additional and prominent inotropic effects at 0.1-10 microM. These results indicate for the first time in cardiac muscle that the high- and low-affinity ouabain binding sites are associated with the alpha(+) and alpha forms of the Na+-K+-ATPase, respectively, and that binding of ouabain to either of these sites causes enzyme inhibition and the positive inotropic effect.

  5. Guanine nucleotide regulatory protein co-purifies with the D2-dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senogles, S.E.; Caron, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The D 2 -dopamine receptor from bovine anterior pituitary was purified ∼1000 fold by affinity chromatography on CMOS-Sepharose. Reconstitution of the affinity-purified receptor into phospholipid vesicles revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist sites as detected by N-n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) competition experiments with 3 H-spiperone. High affinity agonist binding could be converted to the low affinity form by guanine nucleotides, indicating the presence of an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein (N protein) in the affinity-purified D 2 receptor preparations. Furthermore, this preparation contained an agonist-sensitive GTPase activity which was stimulated 2-3 fold over basal by 10 μM NPA. 35 S-GTPγS binding to these preparations revealed a stoichiometry of 0.4-0.7 mole N protein/mole receptor, suggesting the N protein may be specifically coupled with the purified D 2 -dopamine receptor and not present as a contaminant. Pertussis toxin treatment of the affinity purified receptor preparations prevented high affinity agonist binding, as well as agonist stimulation of the GTPase activity, presumably by inactivating the associated N protein. Pertussis toxin lead to the ADP-ribosylation of a protein of 39-40K on SDS-PAGE. These findings indicate that an endogenous N protein, N/sub i/ or N/sub o/, co-purifies with the D 2 -dopamine receptor which may reflect a precoupling of this receptor with an N protein within the membranes

  6. Quinine enhances the behavioral stimulant effect of cocaine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Adriana; Wessinger, William D; Kucheryavykh, Yuri V; Sanabria, Priscila; Eaton, Misty J; Skatchkov, Serguei N; Rojas, Legier V; Maldonado-Martínez, Gerónimo; Inyushin, Mikhail Y

    2015-02-01

    The Na(+)-dependent dopamine transporter (DAT) is primarily responsible for regulating free dopamine (DA) concentrations in the brain by participating in the majority of DA uptake; however, other DA transporters may also participate, especially if cocaine or other drugs of abuse compromise DAT. Recently, such cocaine-insensitive low-affinity mono- and poly-amine OCT transporters were described in astrocytes which use DA as a substrate. These transporters are from a different transporter family and while insensitive to cocaine, they are specifically blocked by quinine and some steroids. Quinine is inexpensive and is often found in injected street drugs as an "adulterant". The present study was designed to determine the participation of OCTs in cocaine dependent behavioral and physiological changes in mice. Using FVB mice we showed, that daily single injections of quinine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) co-administered with cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) for 10 days significantly enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor behavioral sensitization. Quinine had no significant effect on the time course of behavioral activation. In astrocytes from the ventral tegmental area of mice, transporter currents of quinine-sensitive monoamine transporters were also augmented after two weeks of cocaine administration. The importance of low-affinity high-capacity transporters for DA clearance is discussed, explaining the known ability of systemically administered DAT inhibitors to anomalously increase DA clearance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural basis for phosphodependent substrate selection and orientation by the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlicky, Steve; Tang, Xiaojing; Willems, Andrew; Tyers, Mike; Sicheri, Frank

    2010-12-01

    Cell cycle progression depends on precise elimination of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors by the ubiquitin system. Elimination of the CDK inhibitor Sic1 by the SCF{sup Cdc4} ubiquitin ligase at the onset of S phase requires phosphorylation of Sic1 on at least six of its nine Cdc4-phosphodegron (CPD) sites. A 2.7 {angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of a Skp1-Cdc4 complex bound to a high-affinity CPD phosphopeptide from human cyclin E reveals a core CPD motif, Leu-Leu-pThr-Pro, bound to an eight-bladed WD40 propeller domain in Cdc4. The low affinity of each CPD motif in Sic1 reflects structural discordance with one or more elements of the Cdc4 binding site. Reengineering of Cdc4 to reduce selection against Sic1 sequences allows ubiquitination of lower phosphorylated forms of Sic1. These features account for the observed phosphorylation threshold in Sic1 recognition and suggest an equilibrium binding mode between a single receptor site in Cdc4 and multiple low-affinity CPD sites in Sic1.

  8. A novel peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine of human telomerase reverse transcriptase induces a potent cytotoxic T-cell response in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hong; Hao, Jia; Wu, Chao; Shi, Yun; Zhao, Xiao-yan; Fang, Dian-chun

    2007-01-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is highly expressed in over 85% of human cancers, which makes it a broadly applicable molecular target for cancer therapy. Several groups have demonstrated that hTERT can efficiently evoke specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses for malignant tumors. In the present study, we developed a novel virus-like particulate peptide-nucleotide dual vaccine (PNDV) of hTERT, which was composed of a low-affinity epitope variant with encoding full-length gene in the same virus-size particulate. We verified the formation of PNDV by DNA retarding assay, DNase I protection assay and transmission electron microscopy, and confirmed its immunogenicity and transfection activities in mammalian cells. Furthermore, in vivo immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice generated efficient IFN-γ secretion and hTERT-specific CTLs which are known to cause selective cell death of telomerase positive gastrointestinal cancer cells. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on collocating a low-affinity epitope variant with a full-length hTERT gene for anti-cancer vaccine design. This novel strategy for vaccine design not only enables enhanced immunity to a universal tumor antigen, but also has the potential to generate CTLs effective in telomerase-positive tumor cells of diverse tissue origins. Therefore, our findings bear significant implications for immunotherapy of human cancers

  9. Triiodothyronine (T3)-associated upregulation and downregulation of nuclear T3 binding in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5)--stimulation of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase, and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase by insulin, but not by T3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The specific nuclear binding of triiodothyronine (T3) (NBT3) and the activity of malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD), and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase (6PGD) were studied in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5). The overall apparent binding affinity (Ka) was 2.7 x 10(9) L...... and a low-affinity binding site with Ka2 2.9 +/- 1.1 x 10(8) L.mol-1 and MBC2 124.7 +/- 22.1 fmol/mg DNA (n = 6). Incubation of cells with 6 nmol/L T3 for 20 hours reduced NBT3 to 62.2% +/- 15.7% (P less than .01, n = 11). The Ka estimated from kinetic studies was reduced to 6.7 x 10(7) L.mol-1......, and the scatchard plots were linear, with Ka 4.5 +/- 1.6 x 10(8) L.mol-1 and MBC 137.0 +/- 44.6 fmol/mg DNA (n = 3) of the same magnitude as the low-affinity binding site in cells incubated without T3 (NS). The reduction in NBT3 was reversible and maximal at T3 concentrations saturating the high-affinity binding...

  10. Inhibition of membrane lipid-independent protein kinase Calpha activity by phorbol esters, diacylglycerols, and bryostatin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Taddeo, F J; Mazurek, A; Stagliano, B A; Milano, S K; Kelly, M B; Ho, C; Stubbs, C D

    1998-09-04

    The activity of membrane-associated protein kinase C (PKC) has previously been shown to be regulated by two discrete high and low affinity binding regions for diacylglycerols and phorbol esters (Slater, S. J., Ho, C., Kelly, M. B., Larkin, J. D., Taddeo, F. J., Yeager, M. D., and Stubbs, C. D. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 4627-4631). PKC is also known to interact with both cytoskeletal and nuclear proteins; however, less is known concerning the mode of activation of this non-membrane form of PKC. By using the fluorescent phorbol ester, sapintoxin D (SAPD), PKCalpha, alone, was found to possess both low and high affinity phorbol ester-binding sites, showing that interaction with these sites does not require association with the membrane. Importantly, a fusion protein containing the isolated C1A/C1B (C1) domain of PKCalpha also bound SAPD with low and high affinity, indicating that the sites may be confined to this domain rather than residing elsewhere on the enzyme molecule. Both high and low affinity interactions with native PKCalpha were enhanced by protamine sulfate, which activates the enzyme without requiring Ca2+ or membrane lipids. However, this "non-membrane" PKC activity was inhibited by the phorbol ester 4beta-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and also by the fluorescent analog, SAPD, opposite to its effect on membrane-associated PKCalpha. Bryostatin-1 and the soluble diacylglycerol, 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol, both potent activators of membrane-associated PKC, also competed for both low and high affinity SAPD binding and inhibited protamine sulfate-induced activity. Furthermore, the inactive phorbol ester analog 4alpha-TPA (4alpha-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) also inhibited non-membrane-associated PKC. In keeping with these observations, although TPA could displace high affinity SAPD binding from both forms of the enzyme, 4alpha-TPA was only effective at displacing high affinity SAPD binding from non-membrane-associated PKC. 4alpha-TPA also

  11. Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of starch regulatory enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, Thomas W. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2016-05-11

    ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and the plastidial starch phosphorylase1 (Pho1) are two regulatory enzymes whose catalytic activities are essential for starch granule synthesis. Conversion of the pre-starch granule to the mature form is dependent on AGPase, which produces ADPglucose, the substrate used by starch synthases. The catalytic activity of AGPase is controlled by small effector molecules and a prime goal of this project was to decipher the role of the two subunit types that comprise the heterotetrameric enzyme structure. Extensive genetic and biochemical studies showed that catalysis was contributed mainly by the small subunit although the large subunit was required for maximum activity. Both subunits were needed for allosteric regulatory properties. We had also demonstrated that the AGPase catalyzed reaction limits the amount of starch accumulation in developing rice seeds and that carbon flux into rice seed starch can be increased by expression of a cytoplasmic-localized, up-regulated bacterial AGPase enzyme form. Results of subsequent physiological and metabolite studies showed that the AGPase reaction is no longer limiting in the AGPase transgenic rice lines and that one or more downstream processes prevent further increases in starch biosynthesis. Further studies showed that over-production of ADPglucose dramatically alters the gene program during rice seed development. Although the expression of nearly all of the genes are down-regulated, levels of a starch binding domain containing protein (SBDCP) are elevated. This SBDCP was found to bind to and inhibit the catalytic activity of starch synthase III and, thereby preventing maximum starch synthesis from occurring. Surprisingly, repression of SBDCP elevated expression of starch synthase III resulting in increasing rice grain weight. A second phase of this project examined the structure-function of Pho1, the enzyme required during the initial phase of pre-starch granule formation and its

  12. Substrate specificity of an aflatoxin-metabolizing aldehyde reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, E M; Hayes, J D

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme from rat liver that reduces aflatoxin B1-dialdehyde exhibits a unique catalytic specificity distinct from that of other aldo-keto reductases. This enzyme, designated AFAR, displays high activity towards dicarbonyl-containing compounds with ketone groups on adjacent carbon atoms; 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, acenaphthenequinone and camphorquinone were found to be good substrates. Although AFAR can also reduce aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes such as succinic semialdehyde, it is inactive with glucose, galactose and xylose. The enzyme also exhibits low activity towards alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds. Determination of the apparent Km reveals that AFAR has highest affinity for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and succinic semialdehyde, and low affinity for glyoxal and DL-glyceraldehyde. PMID:8526867

  13. Potassium Tethered Carbons with Unparalleled Adsorption Capacity and Selectivity for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Zhongzheng; Luo, Xiaona; Zhang, Lina; Shen, Qun; Li, Shenggang; Zhang, Haijiao; Sun, Nannan; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2018-01-31

    Carbons are considered less favorable for postcombustion CO 2 capture because of their low affinity toward CO 2 , and nitrogen doping was widely studied to enhance CO 2 adsorption, but the results are still unsatisfactory. Herein, we report a simple, scalable, and controllable strategy of tethering potassium to a carbon matrix, which can enhance carbon-CO 2 interaction effectively, and a remarkable working capacity of ca. 4.5 wt % under flue gas conditions was achieved, which is among the highest for carbon-based materials. More interestingly, a high CO 2 /N 2 selectivity of 404 was obtained. Density functional theory calculations evidenced that the introduced potassium carboxylate moieties are responsible for such excellent performances. We also show the effectiveness of this strategy to be universal, and thus, cheaper precursors can be used, holding great promise for low-cost carbon capture from flue gas.

  14. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straub

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  15. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Harriet; Ebert, Bjarke; Jensen, Henrik S.

    2015-01-01

    by the 1,4-benzodiazepine clonazepam. All three compounds potentiated GABA EC20-evoked responses through the α1,2,3,5β2γ2S GABAARs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with each displaying similar EC50 values at the four subtypes. Furthermore, the degrees of potentiation of the GABA EC20...... for novel modulators targeting this low-affinity binding site in GABAARs. In conclusion, the non-selective modulation exerted by clobazam, N-desmethylclobazam and clonazepam at the α1β2γ2S, α2β2γ2S, α3β2γ2S and α5β2γ2S GABAARs indicate that the observed clinical differences between clobazam and 1...

  16. [Blonanserin in the treatment of schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenjin, Tomomi; Miyamoto, Seiya

    2013-04-01

    Blonanserin was developed in Japan in 2008 as an antipsychotic drug. It has high affinity for dopamine D2/3 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors, but shows low affinity for adrenergic alpha1, histamine H1, and muscarinic M1 receptors. Several short-term double-blind trials demonstrated that blonanserin was well tolerated and had equal efficacy to haloperidol and risperidone in terms of positive symptoms and depressive symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia. It was also superior to haloperidol in improving negative symptoms. We have recently reported that blonanserin may improve some types of cognitive function associated with the frontal lobe activity in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. Taken together, blonanserin may be a promising candidate for a first-line antipsychotic for patients with first-episode and chronic schizophrenia.

  17. WAVE regulatory complex activation by cooperating GTPases Arf and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koronakis, Vassilis; Hume, Peter J; Humphreys, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) is a critical element in the control of actin polymerization at the eukaryotic cell membrane, but how WRC is activated remains uncertain. While Rho GTPase Rac1 can bind and activate WRC in vitro, this interaction is of low affinity, suggesting other factors may...... be important. By reconstituting WAVE-dependent actin assembly on membrane-coated beads in mammalian cell extracts, we found that Rac1 was not sufficient to engender bead motility, and we uncovered a key requirement for Arf GTPases. In vitro, Rac1 and Arf1 were individually able to bind weakly to recombinant...... be central components in WAVE signalling, acting directly, alongside Rac1....

  18. Dissecting plant iron homeostasis under short and long-term iron fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz Darbani; Briat, Jean-Francois; Holm, Preben Bach

    2013-01-01

    A wealth of information on the different aspects of iron homeostasis in plants has been obtained during the last decade. However, there is no clear road-map integrating the relationships between the various components. The principal aim of the current review is to fill this gap. In this context we...... discuss the lack of low affinity iron uptake mechanisms in plants, the utilization of a different uptake mechanism by graminaceous plants compared to the others, as well as the roles of riboflavin, ferritin isoforms, nitric oxide, nitrosylation, heme, aconitase, and vacuolar pH. Cross-homeostasis between...... elements is also considered, with a specific emphasis on the relationship between iron homeostasis and phosphorus and copper deficiencies. As the environment is a crucial parameter for modulating plant responses, we also highlight how diurnal fluctuations govern iron metabolism. Evolutionary aspects...

  19. Structure of the mouse galectin-4 N-terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain reveals the mechanism of oligosaccharide recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krejciríková, Veronika; Pachl, Petr; Fábry, Milan; Malý, Petr; Rezácová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jirí (Czech Academy)

    2011-11-18

    Galectin-4, a member of the tandem-repeat subfamily of galectins, participates in cell-membrane interactions and plays an important role in cell adhesion and modulation of immunity and malignity. The oligosaccharide specificity of the mouse galectin-4 carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) has been reported previously. In this work, the structure and binding properties of the N-terminal domain CRD1 were further investigated and the crystal structure of CRD1 in complex with lactose was determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. The lactose-binding affinity was characterized by fluorescence measurements and two lactose-binding sites were identified: a high-affinity site with a K{sub d} value in the micromolar range (K{sub d1} = 600 {+-} 70 {mu}M) and a low-affinity site with K{sub d2} = 28 {+-} 10 mM.

  20. Thallium in the hydrosphere of south west England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sin; Turner, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Thallium is a highly toxic metal whose environmental concentrations, distributions and behaviour are not well understood. In the present study we measure the concentrations of Tl in filtered and unfiltered samples of rain, tap, river, estuarine and waste waters collected from south west England. Dissolved Tl was lowest (metal mining was historically important, and the highest concentration (~1400 ng L(-1)) was measured in water abstracted directly from an abandoned mine. Compared with other trace metals measured (e.g. As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn), Tl has a low affinity for suspended particles and undergoes little removal by conventional (hydroxide precipitation) treatment of mine water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis of a tetracyclic, conformationally constrained analogue of delta8-THC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J W; Yu, S

    1998-12-01

    A tetracyclic, conformationally constrained analogue of delta8-THC (2) has been synthesized in which a two carbon bridge exists between C2 and C2'. Two conceptually related syntheses of 2 are described, both of which employ 5,7-dimethoxy-4-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthoic acid (11) as starting material. This substrate was converted to 5,7dimethoxy-2-propyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (7) and its 4-keto derivative (18). Demethylation of 11 and 18 provided the corresponding resorcinols, which were condensed with trans-p-menthadienol to afford cannabinoid 2, and a keto derivative (20). LiA1H4/A1C1(3) reduction of 20 provided 2. Cannabinoid 2 has relatively low affinity for the cannabinoid brain receptor (Ki = 703+/-98 nM).

  2. (-)PPAP: a new and selective ligand for sigma binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, R A; Battaglia, G; Smith, J D

    1990-11-01

    Most agents employed for the investigation of sigma (sigma) binding sites display relatively low affinity for these sites, bind both at sigma sites and at either phencyclidine (PCP) sites or dopamine receptors with similar affinity, and/or produce some dopaminergic activity in vivo. We describe a new agent, (-)PPAP or R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-n-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, that binds with high affinity and selectivity at sigma (IC50 = 24 nM) versus either PCP sites (IC50 greater than 75,000 nM) or D1 and D2 dopamine receptors (IC50 greater than 5,000 nM). The sigma affinity of this agent is comparable to that of the standard ligands (+)-3-PPP and DTG. Furthermore, although (-)PPAP is structurally related to amphetamine, it neither produces nor antagonizes amphetamine-like stimulus effect in rats trained to discriminate 1 mg/kg of S(+)amphetamine from saline.

  3. Silver nanocluster films for glucose sensing by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Botta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The detection of glucose by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS is a challenging problem because glucose molecules have a small Raman scattering cross-section and they have a low affinity for adsorption on metal nanoparticle surfaces. In this study we used 2-Thienylboronic acid (2-TBA as a bridge or linker molecule between the metal surface and the glucose molecule and observed an intense Raman line at 986 cm−1 that was used to quantify the glucose concentration in the molar concentration range 1 μM–500 μM. A good correlation was observed between the intensity of this line and molar concentration of glucose. These results would find applications in the development of a non-invasive glucose sensor for diabetic patients using saliva as the body fluid instead of blood serum. Keywords: SERS, Nanoclusters, Raman Spectroscopy, 2-Thienylboronic acid, d-Glucose

  4. Effect of high density lipoproteins on permeability of rabbit aorta to low density lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, A.N.; Popov, V.A.; Nagornev, V.A.; Pleskov, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on the effect of high density lipoproteins (HDL) on the permeability of rabbit aorta to low density lipoproteins (LDL) after intravenous administration of human HDL and human ( 125 I)LDL to normal and hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Evaluation of radioactivity in plasma and aorta has shown that the administration of a large dose of HDL decreased the aorta permeability rate for ( 125 I)LDL on an average by 19% in normal rabbits, and by 45% in rabbits with moderate hypercholesterolemia. A historadiographic study showed that HDL also decreased the vessel wall permeability to ( 125 I)LDL in normal and particularly in hypercholesterolemic animals. The suggestion was made that HDL at very high molar concentration can hamper LDL transportation through the intact endothelial layer into the intima due to the ability of HDL to compete with LDL in sites of low affinity on the surface of endothelial cells. (author)

  5. Curcumin induces human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene expression through a vitamin D receptor-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Chunxiao; Rosoha, Elena; Lowry, Malcolm B

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) mediates the pleiotropic biologic effects of 1α,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D(3). Recent in vitro studies suggested that curcumin and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) also bind to VDR with low affinity. As potential ligands for the VDR, we hypothesized that curcumin...... cancer cell line HT-29 and keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. We demonstrated that PUFAs failed to induce CAMP or CYP24A1 mRNA expression in all three cell lines, but curcumin up-regulated CAMP mRNA and protein levels in U937 cells. Curcumin treatment induced CAMP promoter activity from a luciferase reporter...... construct lacking the VDR binding site and did not increase binding of the VDR to the CAMP promoter as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. These findings indicate that induction of CAMP by curcumin occurs through a vitamin D receptor-independent manner. We conclude that PUFAs and curcumin do...

  6. 3D model of amphioxus steroid receptor complexed with estradiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Michael E.; Chang, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The origins of signaling by vertebrate steroids are not fully understood. An important advance was the report that an estrogen-binding steroid receptor [SR] is present in amphioxus, a basal chordate with a similar body plan as vertebrates. To investigate the evolution of estrogen-binding to steroid receptors, we constructed a 3D model of amphioxus SR complexed with estradiol. This 3D model indicates that although the SR is activated by estradiol, some interactions between estradiol and human ERα are not conserved in the SR, which can explain the low affinity of estradiol for the SR. These differences between the SR and ERα in the steroid-binding domain are sufficient to suggest that another steroid is the physiological regulator of the SR. The 3D model predicts that mutation of Glu-346 to Gln will increase the affinity of testosterone for amphioxus SR and elucidate the evolution of steroid-binding to nuclear receptors.

  7. 3D model of amphioxus steroid receptor complexed with estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Michael E., E-mail: mbaker@ucsd.edu [Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0693 (United States); Chang, David J. [Department of Biology, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0693 (United States)

    2009-08-28

    The origins of signaling by vertebrate steroids are not fully understood. An important advance was the report that an estrogen-binding steroid receptor [SR] is present in amphioxus, a basal chordate with a similar body plan as vertebrates. To investigate the evolution of estrogen-binding to steroid receptors, we constructed a 3D model of amphioxus SR complexed with estradiol. This 3D model indicates that although the SR is activated by estradiol, some interactions between estradiol and human ER{alpha} are not conserved in the SR, which can explain the low affinity of estradiol for the SR. These differences between the SR and ER{alpha} in the steroid-binding domain are sufficient to suggest that another steroid is the physiological regulator of the SR. The 3D model predicts that mutation of Glu-346 to Gln will increase the affinity of testosterone for amphioxus SR and elucidate the evolution of steroid-binding to nuclear receptors.

  8. SCA 40: studies of the relaxant effects on cryopreserved human airway and vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schweinitzer, E; Fozard, J R

    1997-04-01

    1. 6-Bromo-8-methylaminoimidazol[1,2-a]pyrazine-2carbonitrile (SCA 40) has been claimed to induce relaxation in guinea-pig trachea by opening high conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels. The mechanism of action of SCA 40 has now been further investigated in ring preparations from cryopreserved human airway and vascular smooth muscle preparations in vitro. 2. Human bronchi with spontaneous tone relaxed in response to SCA 40 in a biphasic way. A high affinity component (pD2 8.61 +/- 0.21; mean +/- s.e.mean) accounted for 30% of the response and a low affinity component (pD2 6.53 +/- 0.14) for the remaining 70%. In contrast, in bronchi contracted with carbachol, 1 microM, the concentration-response curve to SCA 40 was monophasic and yielded a pD2 of 6.31 +/- 0.29. 3. SCA 40 relaxed pulmonary and mesenteric arteries and peripheral veins which had been precontracted by 10 nM U46619 nearly completely and in a monophasic way; the pD2 values were 6.37 +/- 0.08, 6.17 +/- 0.15 and 5.45 +/- 0.25, respectively. 4. Lemakalim, an opener of ATP-dependent potassium (KATP) channels, also relaxed human bronchi under spontaneous tone and the vascular tissues. NS 1619, a recognised opener of BKca channels, was inactive up to 10 microM on bronchial and vascular tissues. 5. The SCA 40-induced relaxation of human bronchi was reduced concentration-dependently in the presence of high potassium chloride (20 and 80 mM). However, in the presence of 80 mM KCl and nifedipine, 30 nM, SCA 40 fully relaxed the remaining contractile response with pD2 values of 8.08 +/- 0.13 and 5.27 +/- 0.13 for the high and low affinity component, respectively. 6. Relaxation responses to SCA 40 in human bronchi were resistant to blockade by glibenclamide at concentrations up to 10 microM (which blocked the relaxant response to lemakalim), quinine (30 microM), apamin (100 nM), tetraethylammonium (0.1-1 mM) and charybdotoxin (10-100 nM), thus excluding the involvement of a variety of K+ channels

  9. Role of germinal centers for the induction of broadly-reactive memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2017-04-01

    Virus-specific memory B cells (B mem ) play a crucial role in protecting against variant viruses. The ability to recognize these variant viruses, defined as antibody breadth, is achieved in B mem populations by two very different pathways, germline-encoded cross-reactivity and affinity-driven, somatic evolution in germinal centers (GCs) for conserved viral epitopes. The latter class of broadly-reactive B mem cells are not cross-reactive per se, but bind epitopes crucial for viral fitness. Although these conserved epitopes are often weakly immunogenic, the GC reaction is surprisingly permissive for the continued survival/proliferation of B cells that bind with low affinity or react to cryptic epitopes, increasing their chance of memory recruitment. In this review, we discuss the adaptive strategies of B-cell memory to viral antigenic variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [14C]-Sucrose uptake by guard cell protoplasts of pisum sativum, argenteum mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrig, K.; Raschke, K.

    1991-01-01

    Guard cells rely on import for their supply with reduced carbon. The authors tested by silicone oil centrifugation the ability of guard cell protoplasts to accumulated [ 14 C]-sucrose. Uptake rates were corrected after measurement of 14 C-sorbitol and 3 H 2 O spaces. Sucrose uptake followed biphasic kinetics, with a high-affinity component below 1 mM external sucrose (apparent K m 0.8 mM at 25C) and a low-affinity nonsaturable component above. Uptake depended on pH (optimum at pH 5.0). Variations in the concentrations of external KCl, CCCP, and valinomycin indicated that about one-half of the sucrose uptake rate could be related to an electrochemical gradient across the plasmalemma. Total uptake rates measured at 5 mM external sucrose seem to be sufficient to replenish emptied plastids with starch within a few hours

  11. Structure and Biological Activity of a Turripeptide from Unedogemmula bisaya Venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omaga, Carla A; Carpio, Louie D; Imperial, Julita S; Daly, Norelle L; Gajewiak, Joanna; Flores, Malem S; Espino, Samuel S; Christensen, Sean; Filchakova, Olena M; López-Vera, Estuardo; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Olivera, Baldomero M; Concepcion, Gisela P

    2017-11-14

    The turripeptide ubi3a was isolated from the venom of the marine gastropod Unedogemmula bisaya, family Turridae, by bioassay-guided purification; both native and synthetic ubi3a elicited prolonged tremors when injected intracranially into mice. The sequence of the peptide, DCCOCOAGAVRCRFACC-NH 2 (O = 4-hydroxyproline) follows the framework III pattern for cysteines (CC-C-C-CC) in the M-superfamily of conopeptides. The three-dimensional structure determined by NMR spectroscopy indicated a disulfide connectivity that is not found in conopeptides with the cysteine framework III: C 1 -C 4, C 2 -C 6 , C 3 -C 5 . The peptide inhibited the activity of the α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with relatively low affinity (IC 50 , 10.2 μM). Initial Constellation Pharmacology data revealed an excitatory activity of ubi3a on a specific subset of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

  12. Globular and disordered – the non-identical twins in protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare eTeilum

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In biology proteins from different structural classes interact across and within classes in ways that are optimized to achieve balanced functional outputs. The interactions between intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs and other proteins rely on changes in flexibility and this is seen as a strong determinant for their function. This has fostered the notion that IDP’s bind with low affinity but high specificity. Here we have analyzed available detailed thermodynamic data for protein-protein interactions to put to the test if the thermodynamic profiles of IDP interactions differ from those of other protein-protein interactions. We find that ordered proteins and the disordered ones act as non identical twins operating by similar principles but where the disordered proteins complexes are on average less stable by 2.5 kcal mol-1.

  13. Evolution of the concepts of the molecular mechanism of the action of antidepressants (survey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashkovskii, M.D.; Andreeva, N.I.

    1986-01-01

    The authors discuss investigation devoted to the study of the mechanisms of the action of antidepressants. Under the conditions of an acute experiment, antidepressants exhibit high affinity for the binding sites of [ 3 H] WB 4101, [ 3 H] LSD, and [ 3 H] spiroperiodol (alpha 1 - and S 2 -receptors). Certain antidepressants also have a high affinity for the binding sites of [ 3 H] clonidine and [ 3 H] S (alpha 2 - and S 1 -receptors). When the method of binding of radioligands was used to study the receptors, it was found that stimulation of cAMP synthesis, induced by norepinephrine, is primarily a beta-adrenergic response. Investigations of the influence of antidepressants in the case of their acute action in vitro on serotonin receptors showed that they inhibit the binding of [ 3 H] LSD and [ 3 H] spiroperiodol in the rat brain with high affinity and the binding of [ 3 H] S with low affinity

  14. Effects of antidepressant drugs on different receptors in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, H.; Oegren, S.-O.

    1981-01-01

    Radioligand receptor binding techniques were used to characterize the effects of different structural types of antidepressant drugs on neurotransmitter receptors. The tricyclic antidepressants more or less potently inhibited the binding to rat brain preparations of several different radiolabelled ligands ([ 3 H]WB4101, [ 3 H]QNB, [ 3 H]d-LSD, [ 3 H]mepyramine). The potency of the nontricyclic antidepressants varied greatly. Mianserin, potently displaced [ 3 H]mepyramine, [ 3 H]d-LSD and [ 3 H]WB4101 while it was very weak on [ 3 H]QNB-binding. Nomifensine and the specific 5-HT uptake inhibitors zimelidine and alaproclate had very low affinity for these receptors. All the antidepressants tested were practically devoid of activity on [ 3 H]DHA binding, [ 3 H]spiroperidol binding, [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding, [ 3 H]muscimol binding and [ 3 H]naloxone binding. The implications of these findings for biogenic amine theories of affective disorders are discussed. (Auth.)

  15. Characterization of the Ornithine Hydroxylation Step in Albachelin Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra Bufkin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available N-Hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs are involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Siderophores are high affinity iron chelators composed of catechol and hydroxamate functional groups that are synthesized and secreted by microorganisms and plants. Recently, a new siderophore named albachelin was isolated from a culture of Amycolatopsis alba growing under iron-limiting conditions. This work focuses on the expression, purification, and characterization of the NMO, abachelin monooxygenase (AMO from A. alba. This enzyme was purified and characterized in its holo (FAD-bound and apo (FAD-free forms. The apo-AMO could be reconstituted by addition of free FAD. The two forms of AMO hydroxylate ornithine, while lysine increases oxidase activity but is not hydroxylated and display low affinity for NADPH.

  16. Presence of dopamine D-2 receptors in human tumoral cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokoloff, P.; Riou, J.F.; Martres, M.P.; Schwartz, J.C. (Centre Paul Broca, Paris (France))

    1989-07-31

    ({sup 125}I) Iodosulpride binding was examined on eight human cell lines derived from lung, breast and digestive tract carcinomas, neuroblastomas and leukemia. Specific binding was detected in five of these cell lines. In the richest cell line N417, derived from small cell lung carcinoma, ({sup 125}I) iodosulpride bound with a high affinity (Kd = 1.3 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding site (Bmax = 1,606 sites per cell). These sites displayed a typical D-2 specificity, established with several dopaminergic agonists and antagonists selective of either D-1 or D-2 receptor subtypes. In addition, dopamine, apomorphine and RU 24926 distinguished high- and low-affinity sites, suggesting that the binding sites are associated with a G-protein. The biological significance and the possible diagnostic implication of the presence of D-2 receptors on these cell lines are discussed.

  17. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    GABA has been shown to exert a neurotrophic like activity by enhancing the morphological and functional maturation of neurons. Mechanisms involved in this effect of GABA are largely unknown but since GABA has been shown to mediate a hyperpolarizing action on neurons it can be assumed...... that this action might be important. In order to investigate this possibility, the ability to mimic the trophic actions of GABA of different agents known to influence the membrane potential or the GABA gated chloride channels was studied. Hence, GABA receptor expression as well as the ultrastructure of cerebellar...... granule cells were monitored after exposure of the cells in culture to either bromide, valinomycin or picrotoxin. It was found that cells which at early developmental stages (4 days in culture) were exposed to bromide or valinomycin expressed low affinity GABA receptors similar to cells treated...

  18. Development and use of IgM/J-chain fusion proteins for characterization of immunoglobulin superfamily ligand-receptor interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Johannes U; Trowsdale, John

    2014-02-03

    Discovery of binding partners for immunoglobulin molecules expressed by cells of the immune system is an important topic of current research. However, many ligand-receptor interactions are of low affinity, and hence detection is refractory to most established protocols. We evaluated fusion proteins based on human IgM as high avidity probes to screen for ligand-receptor binding. We describe methods for cloning, expression, and quantification of IgM fusion proteins with J-chain. Furthermore, we outline protocols to assess binding of IgM fusion proteins to cells and to plate-bound proteins. Compared to standard IgG-fusion proteins, IgM + J chain increased binding of a test interaction, PD-L1 to PD-1, up to 1000-fold. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Neutron diffraction reveals hydrogen bonds critical for cGMP-selective activation: insights for cGMP-dependent protein kinase agonist design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gilbert Y; Gerlits, Oksana O; Blakeley, Matthew P; Sankaran, Banumathi; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; Kim, Choel

    2014-11-04

    High selectivity of cyclic-nucleotide binding (CNB) domains for cAMP and cGMP are required for segregating signaling pathways; however, the mechanism of selectivity remains unclear. To investigate the mechanism of high selectivity in cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), we determined a room-temperature joint X-ray/neutron (XN) structure of PKG Iβ CNB-B, a domain 200-fold selective for cGMP over cAMP, bound to cGMP (2.2 Å), and a low-temperature X-ray structure of CNB-B with cAMP (1.3 Å). The XN structure directly describes the hydrogen bonding interactions that modulate high selectivity for cGMP, while the structure with cAMP reveals that all these contacts are disrupted, explaining its low affinity for cAMP.

  20. Functional and structural characterization of plastidic starch phosphorylase during barley endosperm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Ruzanski, Christian; Krucewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    (HvPho1) for starch biosynthesis in barley endosperm, we analyzed HvPho1 protein production and enzyme activity levels throughout barley endosperm development and characterized structure-function relationships of HvPho1. The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of starch granule biosynthesis......,4-glucans using HvPho1 from G1P as the sole substrate. The structural properties of HvPho1 provide insights into the low affinity of HvPho1 for large polysaccharides like starch or amylopectin. Our results suggest that HvPho1 may play a role during the initiation of starch biosynthesis in barley.......The production of starch is essential for human nutrition and represents a major metabolic flux in the biosphere. The biosynthesis of starch in storage organs like barley endosperm operates via two main pathways using different substrates: starch synthases use ADP-glucose to produce amylose...

  1. Uptake of [N-Me-3H]-choline by synaptosomes from the central nervous system of Locusta migratoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The accumulation of 3H-choline by isolated synaptosomes from the central nervous system of locust was studied at concentrations varying from 0.05 to 40 microM. Kinetic analysis of the saturable process revealed a high-affinity and a low-affinity system. The high-affinity uptake was competitively inhibited by hemicholinium-3 and was absolutely dependent on external sodium. Elevated potassium concentrations inhibited choline uptake. The choline uptake by insect synaptosomes was found to be remarkably resistant to a variety of metabolic inhibitors. The reduced choline uptake under depolarizing conditions (high potassium concentration or veratridine) in the absence of calcium implies that electrochemical gradients are important for high-affinity choline uptake. Depolarization of preloaded synaptosomes under appropriate conditions resulted in a significant release of newly accumulated choline radioactivity

  2. Stereocontrolled synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of azetidine-2,3-dicarboxylic acids at NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivaprakasam, Mangaleswaran; Hansen, Kasper Bø; David, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    azetidinic amino acids were characterized in a radioligand binding assay ([(3)H]CGP39653) at native NMDA receptors: L-trans-ADC showed the highest affinity (K(i)=10 microM) followed by the D-cis-ADC stereoisomer (21 microM). In contrast, the two analogues L-cis-ADC and D-trans-ADC were low-affinity ligands...... (>100 and 90 microM, respectively). Electrophysiological characterization of the ADC compounds at the four NMDA receptor subtypes NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, NR1/NR2C, and NR1/NR2D expressed in Xenopus oocytes showed that L-trans-ADC displayed the highest agonist potency at NR1/NR2D (EC(50)=50 microM), which...

  3. Steric hindrance mutagenesis in the conserved extracellular vestibule impedes allosteric binding of antidepressants to the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Per; Shi, Lei; Beuming, Thijs

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) controls synaptic serotonin levels and is the primary target for antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (e.g. (S)-citalopram) and tricyclic antidepressants (e.g. clomipramine). In addition to a high affinity binding site, SERT possesses...... a low affinity allosteric site for antidepressants. Binding to the allosteric site impedes dissociation of antidepressants from the high affinity site, which may enhance antidepressant efficacy. Here we employ an induced fit docking/molecular dynamics protocol to identify the residues that may...... effects of Zn(2+) binding in an engineered site and the covalent attachment of benzocaine-methanethiosulfonate to a cysteine introduced in the extracellular vestibule. The data provide a mechanistic explanation for the allosteric action of antidepressants at SERT and suggest that the role of the vestibule...

  4. Resolution, configurational assignment, and enantiopharmacology at glutamate receptors of 2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA) and demethyl-ACPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Stensbøl, T B; Nielsen, B

    2001-01-01

    We have previously described (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA) as a potent agonist at the (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor subtype of (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) receptors. We now report the chromatographic resolution...... of ACPA and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (demethyl-ACPA) using a Sumichiral OA-5000 column. The configuration of the enantiomers of both compounds have been assigned based on X-ray crystallographic analyses, supported by circular dichroism spectra and elution orders on chiral HPLC...... columns. Furthermore, the enantiopharmacology of ACPA and demethyl-ACPA was investigated using radioligand binding and cortical wedge electrophysiological assay systems and cloned metabotropic Glu receptors. (S)-ACPA showed high affinity in AMPA binding (IC(50) = 0.025 microM), low affinity in kainic acid...

  5. The competitive advantage of a dual-transporter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Sagi; Kafri, Moshe; Carmi, Miri; Barkai, Naama

    2011-12-09

    Cells use transporters of different affinities to regulate nutrient influx. When nutrients are depleted, low-affinity transporters are replaced by high-affinity ones. High-affinity transporters are helpful when concentrations of nutrients are low, but the advantage of reducing their abundance when nutrients are abundant is less clear. When we eliminated such reduced production of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae high-affinity transporters for phosphate and zinc, the elapsed time from the initiation of the starvation program until the lack of nutrients limited growth was shortened, and recovery from starvation was delayed. The latter phenotype was rescued by constitutive activation of the starvation program. Dual-transporter systems appear to prolong preparation for starvation and to facilitate subsequent recovery, which may optimize sensing of nutrient depletion by integrating internal and external information about nutrient availability.

  6. Research Techniques Made Simple: Emerging Methods to Elucidate Protein Interactions through Spatial Proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yonglu; Khavari, Paul A

    2017-12-01

    Interactions between proteins are essential for fundamental cellular processes, and the diversity of such interactions enables the vast variety of functions essential for life. A persistent goal in biological research is to develop assays that can faithfully capture different types of protein interactions to allow their study. A major step forward in this direction came with a family of methods that delineates spatial proximity of proteins as an indirect measure of protein-protein interaction. A variety of enzyme- and DNA ligation-based methods measure protein co-localization in space, capturing novel interactions that were previously too transient or low affinity to be identified. Here we review some of the methods that have been successfully used to measure spatially proximal protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Are ex vivo neutralising antibodies against IFN-beta always detrimental to therapeutic efficacy in multiple sclerosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, P S; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Bendtzen, K

    2007-01-01

    Neutralising antibodies (NAbs) against interferon (IFN)-beta reduce the treatment effect in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, data from pivotal trials of IFN-beta in MS suggest that NAb-positive patients may have a reduced relapse rate during the first six to 12 months of therapy. We collected...... significantly fewer relapses compared to patients who maintained the NAb-negative status, whereas the opposite was observed after month 6. This is in accordance with observations in randomised studies of the three different IFN-beta preparations, showing that patients who become NAb-positive have lower relapse...... rates during the first six or 12 months of therapy. We hypothesise that low affinity NAbs, present early after the start of IFN-beta therapy, though neutralising in vitro in sensitive assays increase the half-life of IFN-beta in vivo and, thereby, enhance the therapeutic effect. With affinity maturation...

  8. Crystal structure of a TAPBPR–MHC I complex reveals the mechanism of peptide editing in antigen presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiansheng; Natarajan, Kannan; Boyd, Lisa F.; Morozov, Giora I.; Mage, Michael G.; Margulies, David H. (NIH); (Hebrew)

    2017-10-12

    Central to CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity is the recognition of peptide–major histocompatibility complex class I (p–MHC I) proteins displayed by antigen-presenting cells. Chaperone-mediated loading of high-affinity peptides onto MHC I is a key step in the MHC I antigen presentation pathway. However, the structure of MHC I with a chaperone that facilitates peptide loading has not been determined. We report the crystal structure of MHC I in complex with the peptide editor TAPBPR (TAP-binding protein–related), a tapasin homolog. TAPBPR remodels the peptide-binding groove of MHC I, resulting in the release of low-affinity peptide. Changes include groove relaxation, modifications of key binding pockets, and domain adjustments. This structure captures a peptide-receptive state of MHC I and provides insights into the mechanism of peptide editing by TAPBPR and, by analogy, tapasin.

  9. Biliary excretion of phenolphthalein glucuronide in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, T; Takikawa, H

    2001-06-01

    To examine the substrate specificity of an ATP-dependent organic anion transporter, the multidrug resistance protein 2, we examined the effects of various bile acid conjugates and organic anions on the biliary excretion of phenolphthalein glucuronide, a hydrophilic glucuronide conjugate, in rats. Biliary phenolphthalein glucuronide excretion was markedly inhibited by taurolithocholate-3-sulfate and ursodeoxycholate-3-O-glucuronide. In contrast, ursodeoxycholate-3,7-disulfate and pravastatin only slightly inhibited and cefpiramide did not inhibit biliary phenolphthalein glucuronide excretion. Biliary excretion of sulfobromophthalein, leukotriene C(4) and pravastatin was inhibited by phenolphthalein glucuronide infusion to some extent. These findings suggest that phenolphthalein glucuronide is a relatively low affinity substrate for the multidrug resistance protein 2.

  10. A series of potent CREBBP bromodomain ligands reveals an induced-fit pocket stabilized by a cation-π interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Timothy P C; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Fedorov, Oleg; Picaud, Sarah; Cortopassi, Wilian A; Hay, Duncan A; Martin, Sarah; Tumber, Anthony; Rogers, Catherine M; Philpott, Martin; Wang, Minghua; Thompson, Amber L; Heightman, Tom D; Pryde, David C; Cook, Andrew; Paton, Robert S; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan; Brennan, Paul E; Conway, Stuart J

    2014-06-10

    The benzoxazinone and dihydroquinoxalinone fragments were employed as novel acetyl lysine mimics in the development of CREBBP bromodomain ligands. While the benzoxazinone series showed low affinity for the CREBBP bromodomain, expansion of the dihydroquinoxalinone series resulted in the first potent inhibitors of a bromodomain outside the BET family. Structural and computational studies reveal that an internal hydrogen bond stabilizes the protein-bound conformation of the dihydroquinoxalinone series. The side chain of this series binds in an induced-fit pocket forming a cation-π interaction with R1173 of CREBBP. The most potent compound inhibits binding of CREBBP to chromatin in U2OS cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Classification of a Haemophilus influenzae ABC Transporter HI1470/71 through Its Cognate Molybdate Periplasmic Binding Protein, MolA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Lee, Allen; Rees, Douglas C.; Pinkett, Heather W. (CIT); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    molA (HI1472) from H. influenzae encodes a periplasmic binding protein (PBP) that delivers substrate to the ABC transporter MolB{sub 2}C{sub 2} (formerly HI1470/71). The structures of MolA with molybdate and tungstate in the binding pocket were solved to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The MolA-binding protein binds molybdate and tungstate, but not other oxyanions such as sulfate and phosphate, making it the first class III molybdate-binding protein structurally solved. The {approx}100 {mu}M binding affinity for tungstate and molybdate is significantly lower than observed for the class II ModA molybdate-binding proteins that have nanomolar to low micromolar affinity for molybdate. The presence of two molybdate loci in H. influenzae suggests multiple transport systems for one substrate, with molABC constituting a low-affinity molybdate locus.

  12. Beta adrenoreceptors in the rabbit bladder detrusor muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, G.F.; Marks, B.H.

    1984-02-01

    This study examines the beta adrenergic receptors of the rabbit detrusor smooth muscle, employing (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) as a ligand for the binding of beta adrenergic receptors. Saturation binding experiments on the isolated membrane fraction yielded a KD for ICYP of 14.7 pM and a maximum binding of 147.6 fmol/mg of protein. Displacement of labeled ICYP by a series of beta adrenergic agents yielded the following KD values for the combined high and low affinity binding sites: I-propranolol, 0.76 nM; ICI 118,551, 1.7 nM; zinterol, 38.0 nM; metoprolol, 3.5 microM; and practolol, 61.4 microM. When these displacement experimental results were compared to KD values from other reported binding studies with ICYP for beta adrenoreceptors, both the order of potency and the KD values indicated primarily beta-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes. Computer program Scatfit analysis of the displacement curves indicated a single slope and affinity constant for all five beta adrenergic agents. Hofstee plots for zinterol, ICI 118,551 and metoprolol, however, were not linear and indicated that minor populations of beta-1 adrenoreceptors were also present as both high and low affinity binding sites could be defined. It is concluded that the primary receptor population is beta-2 and that this tissue is heterogenous with a small population of beta-1 adrenoreceptors representing approximately 13 to 23% of the total beta adrenoreceptor population.

  13. Functional, spectroscopic and structural properties of haemoglobin from chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) and steinbock (Capra hircus ibex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, P; Clementi, M E; Condò, S G; Coletta, M; Petruzzelli, R; Polizio, F; Rizzi, M; Giunta, C; Peracino, V; Giardina, B

    1993-01-01

    The functional and spectroscopic properties of chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) and steinbock (Capra hircus ibex) haemoglobin (Hb) have been studied with special reference to the action of allosteric effectors and temperature. Moreover, the amino acid sequences of the N-terminal segments of the alpha- and beta-chains have been determined. The present results indicate that chamois and steinbock Hbs display a low affinity for O2, which appears to be modulated in vivo by Cl- ions rather than 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate. The Bohr effect for O2 binding to chamois and steinbock Hb is higher than for reindeer and bovine Hbs, being similar to that of human Hb. Moreover, the temperature-dependence of oxygenation appears intermediate between that of human and reindeer Hbs. E.p.r. and absorption spectroscopic properties of the ferrous nitrosylated derivative of chamois and steinbock Hbs suggest that both haemoproteins are in a low-affinity conformation even in the absence of InsP6. The reduced effect of polyphosphates on the functional and spectroscopic properties of chamois and steinbock Hb agree with amino acid differences in the N-terminal segment of the beta-chains (i.e. the deletion of Val(NA1) and the replacement of His(NA2), present in human Hb, and Gln(NA2), present in horse Hb, by Met). The molecular mechanism modulating the basic reaction of O2 with chamois and steinbock Hb may be linked to specific physiological needs related to the high-altitude habitats of these two animals. PMID:8257425

  14. Functional analysis of human aromatic amino acid transporter MCT10/TAT1 using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Satoshi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Kurosaka, Goyu; Hashimoto, Takanori; Masukawa, Yuki; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid in humans and an important serotonin and melatonin precursor. Monocarboxylate transporter MCT10 is a member of the SLC16A family proteins that mediates low-affinity tryptophan transport across basolateral membranes of kidney, small intestine, and liver epithelial cells, although the precise transport mechanism remains unclear. Here we developed a simple functional assay to analyze tryptophan transport by human MCT10 using a deletion mutant for the high-affinity tryptophan permease Tat2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. tat2Δtrp1 cells are defective in growth in YPD medium because tyrosine present in the medium competes for the low-affinity tryptophan permease Tat1 with tryptophan. MCT10 appeared to allow growth of tat2Δtrp1 cells in YPD medium, and accumulate in cells deficient for Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase. These results suggest that MCT10 is functional in yeast, and is subject to ubiquitin-dependent quality control. Whereas growth of Tat2-expressing cells was significantly impaired by neutral pH, that of MCT10-expressing cells was nearly unaffected. This property is consistent with the transport mechanism of MCT10 via facilitated diffusion without a need for pH gradient across the plasma membrane. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are known to occur in the human MCT10 coding region. Among eight SNP amino acid changes in MCT10, the N81K mutation completely abrogated tryptophan import without any abnormalities in the expression or localization. In the MCT10 modeled structure, N81 appeared to protrude into the putative trajectory of tryptophan. Plasma membrane localization of MCT10 and the variant proteins was also verified in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Biogenic Amine-binding Proteins in Soft Ticks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M.C.; Andersen, John F. (NIH)

    2008-08-19

    Two highly abundant lipocalins, monomine and monotonin, have been isolated from the salivary gland of the soft tick Argas monolakensis and shown to bind histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), respectively. The crystal structures of monomine and a paralog of monotonin were determined in the presence of ligands to compare the determinants of ligand binding. Both the structures and binding measurements indicate that the proteins have a single binding site rather than the two sites previously described for the female-specific histamine-binding protein (FS-HBP), the histamine-binding lipocalin of the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The binding sites of monomine and monotonin are similar to the lower, low affinity site of FS-HBP. The interaction of the protein with the aliphatic amine group of the ligand is very similar for the all of the proteins, whereas specificity is determined by interactions with the aromatic portion of the ligand. Interestingly, protein interaction with the imidazole ring of histamine differs significantly between the low affinity binding site of FS-HBP and monomine, suggesting that histamine binding has evolved independently in the two lineages. From the conserved features of these proteins, a tick lipocalin biogenic amine-binding motif could be derived that was used to predict biogenic amine-binding function in other tick lipocalins. Heterologous expression of genes from salivary gland libraries led to the discovery of biogenic amine-binding proteins in soft (Ornithodoros) and hard (Ixodes) tick genera. The data generated were used to reconstruct the most probable evolutionary pathway for the evolution of biogenic amine-binding in tick lipocalins.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus host cell invasion and virulence in sepsis is facilitated by the multiple repeats within FnBPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Edwards

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Entry of Staphylococcus aureus into the bloodstream can lead to metastatic abscess formation and infective endocarditis. Crucial to the development of both these conditions is the interaction of S. aureus with endothelial cells. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that the staphylococcal invasin FnBPA triggers bacterial invasion of endothelial cells via a process that involves fibronectin (Fn bridging to alpha(5beta(1 integrins. The Fn-binding region of FnBPA usually contains 11 non-identical repeats (FnBRs with differing affinities for Fn, which facilitate the binding of multiple Fn molecules and may promote integrin clustering. We thus hypothesized that multiple repeats are necessary to trigger the invasion of endothelial cells by S. aureus. To test this we constructed variants of fnbA containing various combinations of FnBRs. In vitro assays revealed that endothelial cell invasion can be facilitated by a single high-affinity, but not low-affinity FnBR. Studies using a nisin-inducible system that controlled surface expression of FnBPA revealed that variants encoding fewer FnBRs required higher levels of surface expression to mediate invasion. High expression levels of FnBPA bearing a single low affinity FnBR bound Fn but did not invade, suggesting that FnBPA affinity for Fn is crucial for triggering internalization. In addition, multiple FnBRs increased the speed of internalization, as did higher expression levels of FnBPA, without altering the uptake mechanism. The relevance of these findings to pathogenesis was demonstrated using a murine sepsis model, which showed that multiple FnBRs were required for virulence. In conclusion, multiple FnBRs within FnBPA facilitate efficient Fn adhesion, trigger rapid bacterial uptake and are required for pathogenesis.

  17. The amino acid exchange R28E in ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) abrogates interleukin-6 receptor-dependent but retains CNTF receptor-dependent signaling via glycoprotein 130 (gp130)/leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Eva-Maria; Aurich, Matthias; Aparicio-Siegmund, Samadhi; Floss, Doreen M; Garbers, Christoph; Breusing, Kati; Rabe, Björn; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2014-06-27

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a neurotrophic factor with therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, therapeutic application of CNTF reduced body weight in mice and humans. CNTF binds to high or low affinity receptor complexes consisting of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR or IL-6R·gp130·LIFR, respectively. Clinical studies of the CNTF derivative Axokine revealed intolerance at higher concentrations, which may rely on the low-affinity binding of CNTF to the IL-6R. Here, we aimed to generate a CNTFR-selective CNTF variant (CV). CV-1 contained the single amino acid exchange R28E. Arg(28) is in close proximity to the CNTFR binding site. Using molecular modeling, we hypothesized that Arg(28) might contribute to IL-6R/CNTFR plasticity of CNTF. CV-2 to CV-5 were generated by transferring parts of the CNTFR-binding site from cardiotrophin-like cytokine to CNTF. Cardiotrophin-like cytokine selectively signals via the CNTFR·gp130·LIFR complex, albeit with a much lower affinity compared with CNTF. As shown by immunoprecipitation, all CNTF variants retained the ability to bind to CNTFR. CV-1, CV-2, and CV-5, however, lost the ability to bind to IL-6R. Although all variants induced cytokine-dependent cellular proliferation and STAT3 phosphorylation via CNTFR·gp130·LIFR, only CV-3 induced STAT3 phosphorylation via IL-6R·gp130·LIFR. Quantification of CNTF-dependent proliferation of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR expressing cells indicated that only CV-1 was as biologically active as CNTF. Thus, the CNTFR-selective CV-1 will allow discriminating between CNTFR- and IL-6R-mediated effects in vivo. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. The Amino Acid Exchange R28E in Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) Abrogates Interleukin-6 Receptor-dependent but Retains CNTF Receptor-dependent Signaling via Glycoprotein 130 (gp130)/Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIFR)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Eva-Maria; Aurich, Matthias; Aparicio-Siegmund, Samadhi; Floss, Doreen M.; Garbers, Christoph; Breusing, Kati; Rabe, Björn; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a neurotrophic factor with therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, therapeutic application of CNTF reduced body weight in mice and humans. CNTF binds to high or low affinity receptor complexes consisting of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR or IL-6R·gp130·LIFR, respectively. Clinical studies of the CNTF derivative Axokine revealed intolerance at higher concentrations, which may rely on the low-affinity binding of CNTF to the IL-6R. Here, we aimed to generate a CNTFR-selective CNTF variant (CV). CV-1 contained the single amino acid exchange R28E. Arg28 is in close proximity to the CNTFR binding site. Using molecular modeling, we hypothesized that Arg28 might contribute to IL-6R/CNTFR plasticity of CNTF. CV-2 to CV-5 were generated by transferring parts of the CNTFR-binding site from cardiotrophin-like cytokine to CNTF. Cardiotrophin-like cytokine selectively signals via the CNTFR·gp130·LIFR complex, albeit with a much lower affinity compared with CNTF. As shown by immunoprecipitation, all CNTF variants retained the ability to bind to CNTFR. CV-1, CV-2, and CV-5, however, lost the ability to bind to IL-6R. Although all variants induced cytokine-dependent cellular proliferation and STAT3 phosphorylation via CNTFR·gp130·LIFR, only CV-3 induced STAT3 phosphorylation via IL-6R·gp130·LIFR. Quantification of CNTF-dependent proliferation of CNTFR·gp130·LIFR expressing cells indicated that only CV-1 was as biologically active as CNTF. Thus, the CNTFR-selective CV-1 will allow discriminating between CNTFR- and IL-6R-mediated effects in vivo. PMID:24802752

  19. [3H]-DOB(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenylisopropylamine) and [3H] ketanserin label two affinity states of the cloned human 5-hydroxytryptamine2 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branchek, T.; Adham, N.; Macchi, M.; Kao, H.T.; Hartig, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    The binding properties of the 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (5-HT2) receptor have been the subject of much interest and debate in recent years. The hallucinogenic amphetamine derivative 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenylisopropylamine (DOB) has been shown to bind to a small number of binding sites with properties very similar to [3H]ketanserin-labeled 5-HT2 receptors, but with much higher agonist affinities. Some researchers have interpreted this as evidence for the existence of a new subtype of 5-HT2 receptor (termed 5-HT2A), whereas others have interpreted these data as indicative of agonist high affinity and agonist low affinity states for the 5-HT2 receptor. In this investigation, a cDNA clone encoding the serotonin 5-HT2 receptor was transiently transfected into monkey kidney Cos-7 cells and stably transfected into mouse fibroblast L-M(TK-) cells. In both systems, expression of this single serotonin receptor cDNA led to the appearance of both [3H]DOB and [3H]ketanserin binding sites with properties that matched their binding characteristics in mammalian brain homogenates. Addition of guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido) triphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] to this system caused a rightward shift and steepening of agonist competition curves for [3H] ketanserin binding, converting a two-site binding curve to a single low affinity binding state. Gpp(NH)p addition also caused a 50% decrease in the number of high affinity [3H]DOB binding sites, with no change in the dissociation constant of the remaining high affinity states. These data on a single human 5-HT2 receptor cDNA expressed in two different transfection host cells indicate that [3H]DOB and [3H]ketanserin binding reside on the same gene product, apparently interacting with agonist and antagonist conformations of a single human 5-HT2 receptor protein

  20. Sequences Flanking the Gephyrin-Binding Site of GlyRβ Tune Receptor Stabilization at Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Nora; Jan, Audric; Salvatico, Charlotte; Kress, Vanessa; Renner, Marianne; Triller, Antoine; Specht, Christian G; Schwarz, Guenter

    2018-01-01

    The efficacy of synaptic transmission is determined by the number of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses. Their recruitment depends upon the availability of postsynaptic scaffolding molecules that interact with specific binding sequences of the receptor. At inhibitory synapses, gephyrin is the major scaffold protein that mediates the accumulation of heteromeric glycine receptors (GlyRs) via the cytoplasmic loop in the β-subunit (β-loop). This binding involves high- and low-affinity interactions, but the molecular mechanism of this bimodal binding and its implication in GlyR stabilization at synapses remain unknown. We have approached this question using a combination of quantitative biochemical tools and high-density single molecule tracking in cultured rat spinal cord neurons. The high-affinity binding site could be identified and was shown to rely on the formation of a 3 10 -helix C-terminal to the β-loop core gephyrin-binding motif. This site plays a structural role in shaping the core motif and represents the major contributor to the synaptic confinement of GlyRs by gephyrin. The N-terminal flanking sequence promotes lower affinity interactions by occupying newly identified binding sites on gephyrin. Despite its low affinity, this binding site plays a modulatory role in tuning the mobility of the receptor. Together, the GlyR β-loop sequences flanking the core-binding site differentially regulate the affinity of the receptor for gephyrin and its trapping at synapses. Our experimental approach thus bridges the gap between thermodynamic aspects of receptor-scaffold interactions and functional receptor stabilization at synapses in living cells.

  1. Active site of Zn2+-dependent sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Suk Han

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gro1PDH, EC 1.1.1.261 is key to the formation of the enantiomeric configuration of the glycerophosphate backbone (sn-glycerol-1-phosphate of archaeal ether lipids. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible conversion between dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glycerol-1-phosphate. To date, no information about the active site and catalytic mechanism of this enzyme has been reported. Using the sequence and structural information for glycerol dehydrogenase, we constructed six mutants (D144N, D144A, D191N, H271A, H287A and D191N/H271A of Gro1PDH from Aeropyrum pernix K1 and examined their characteristics to clarify the active site of this enzyme. The enzyme was found to be a zinc-dependent metalloenzyme, containing one zinc ion for every monomer protein that was essential for activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of D144 increased the activity of the enzyme. Mutants D144N and D144A exhibited low affinity for the substrates and higher activity than the wild type, but their affinity for the zinc ion was the same as that of the wild type. Mutants D191N, H271A and H287A had a low affinity for the zinc ion and a low activity compared with the wild type. The double mutation, D191N/ H271A, had no enzyme activity and bound no zinc. From these results, it was clarified that residues D191, H271 and H287 participate in the catalytic activity of the enzyme by binding the zinc ion, and that D144 has an effect on substrate binding. The structure of the active site of Gro1PDH from A. pernix K1 seems to be similar to that of glycerol dehydrogenase, despite the differences in substrate specificity and biological role.

  2. Utilization of Mechanistic Enzymology to Evaluate the Significance of ADP Binding to Human Lon Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Fishovitz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lon, also known as Protease La, is one of the simplest ATP-dependent proteases. It is a homooligomeric enzyme comprised of an ATPase domain and a proteolytic domain in each enzyme subunit. Despite sharing about 40% sequence identity, human and Escherichia coli Lon proteases utilize a highly conserved ATPase domain found in the AAA+ family to catalyze ATP hydrolysis, which is needed to activate protein degradation. In this study, we utilized mechanistic enzymology techniques to show that despite comparable kcat and Km parameters found in the ATPase activity, human and E. coli Lon exhibit significantly different susceptibility to ADP inhibition. Due to the low affinity of human Lon for ADP, the conformational changes in human Lon generated from the ATPase cycle are also different. The relatively low affinity of human Lon for ADP cannot be accounted for by reversibility in ATP hydrolysis, as a positional isotope exchange experiment demonstrated both E. coli Lon and human Lon catalyzed ATP hydrolysis irreversibly. A limited tryptic digestion study however indicated that human and E. coli Lon bind to ADP differently. Taken together, the findings reported in this research article suggest that human Lon is not regulated by a substrate-promoted ADP/ATP exchange mechanism as found in the bacterial enzyme homolog. The drastic difference in structural changes associated with ADP interaction with the two protease homologs offer potential for selective inhibitor design and development through targeting the ATPase sites. In addition to revealing unique mechanistic differences that distinguish human vs. bacterial Lon, this article underscores the benefit of mechanistic enzymology in deciphering the physiological mechanism of action of Lon proteases and perhaps other closely related ATP-dependent proteases in the future.

  3. Dominant Alcohol-Protein Interaction via Hydration-Enabled Enthalpy-Driven Binding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Tang, Pei; Xu, Yan; Wu, Yue

    2015-04-30

    Water plays an important role in weak associations of small drug molecules with proteins. Intense focus has been on binding-induced structural changes in the water network surrounding protein binding sites, especially their contributions to binding thermodynamics. However, water is also tightly coupled to protein conformations and dynamics, and so far little is known about the influence of water-protein interactions on ligand binding. Alcohols are a type of low-affinity drugs, and it remains unclear how water affects alcohol-protein interactions. Here, we present alcohol adsorption isotherms under controlled protein hydration using in situ NMR detection. As functions of hydration level, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding were determined from the temperature dependence of isotherms. Two types of alcohol binding were found. The dominant type is low-affinity nonspecific binding, which is strongly dependent on temperature and the level of hydration. At low hydration levels, this nonspecific binding only occurs above a threshold of alcohol vapor pressure. An increased hydration level reduces this threshold, with it finally disappearing at a hydration level of h ≈ 0.2 (g water/g protein), gradually shifting alcohol binding from an entropy-driven to an enthalpy-driven process. Water at charged and polar groups on the protein surface was found to be particularly important in enabling this binding. Although further increase in hydration has smaller effects on the changes of binding enthalpy and entropy, it results in a significant negative change in Gibbs free energy due to unmatched enthalpy-entropy compensation. These results show the crucial role of water-protein interplay in alcohol binding.

  4. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations

  5. Fast kinetic studies on the allosteric interactions between acetylcholine receptor and local anesthetic binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, T; Changeux, J P

    1979-02-15

    Preincubation of receptor-rich membrane fragments from Torpedo marmorata with tertiary amine local anesthetics and several toxins such as histrionicotoxin, crotoxin and cerulotoxin, modifies the amplitude and time course of the relaxation processes monitored upon rapid mixing of the membrane fragments with the fluorescent agonist, Dns-C6-Cho. In particular, the amplitude of the rapid relaxation process, which is proportional to the fraction of acetylcholine receptor sites in a high-affinity state, increases; accordingly, the rate constant of the 'slow' and 'intermediate' relaxation processes also increases up to ten times (except with histrionicotoxin) whereas in a higher range of local anesthetic concentrations the rate constant of the 'rapid' relaxation process decreases. The data are accounted for by a two-state model of the acetylcholine regulator, assuming distinct binding sites for cholinergic agonists and local anesthetics and allosteric interactions between these two classes of sites; local anesthetics stabilize the regulator in a high-affinity state for agonists even in the absence of agonist, and modify the rate constants for th interconversions between the low-affinity and high-affinity states. The model accounts for the 'slow' fluorescence increase monitored upon addition of local anesthetics to a suspension of receptor-rich membranes supplemented with trace amounts of Dns-C6-Cho. The effect of local anesthetics on the apparent rate constant of the 'rapid' relaxation process can be accounted for on the basis of an additional low-affinity binding of local anesthetics to the acetylcholine receptor site. Finally the increase of the apparent rate constant of the 'intermediate' relaxation process can be simply accounted for by assuming the existence of a third state, corresponding to the 'active' state, to which local anesthetics bind and block ionic transport.

  6. Identification of cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the metabolism of paroxetine and estimation of their importance for human paroxetine metabolism using a population-based simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornil, Jakob; Jensen, Klaus Gjervig; Larsen, Frank; Linnet, Kristian

    2010-03-01

    We identify here for the first time the low-affinity cytochrome P450 (P450) isoforms that metabolize paroxetine, using cDNA-expressed human P450s measuring substrate depletion and paroxetine-catechol (product) formation by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 were identified as paroxetine-catechol-forming P450 isoforms, and CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 were identified as metabolizing P450 isoforms by substrate depletion. Michaelis-Menten constants K(m) and V(max) were determined by product formation and substrate depletion. Using selective inhibitory studies and a relative activity factor approach for pooled and single-donor human liver microsomes, we confirmed involvement of the identified P450 isoforms for paroxetine-catechol formation at 1 and 20 muM paroxetine. In addition, we used the population-based simulator Simcyp to estimate the importance of the identified paroxetine-metabolizing P450 isoforms for human metabolism, taking mechanism-based inhibition into account. The amount of active hepatic CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 (not inactivated by mechanism-based inhibition) was also estimated by Simcyp. For extensive and poor metabolizers of CYP2D6, Simcyp-estimated pharmacokinetic profiles were in good agreement with those reported in published in vivo studies. Considering the kinetic parameters, inhibition results, relative activity factor calculations, and Simcyp simulations, CYP2D6 (high affinity) and CYP3A4 (low affinity) are most likely to be the major contributors to paroxetine metabolism in humans. For some individuals CYP1A2 could be of importance for paroxetine metabolism, whereas the importance of CYP2C19 and CYP3A5 is probably limited.

  7. Thermodynamics and binding mechanism of polyphenon-60 with human lysozyme elucidated by calorimetric and spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmeen, Shama; Riyazuddeen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics of the binding of Lys with polypenone-60 were studied. • The binding was found to be exothermic. • Polyphenon-60 quenches the fluorescence of Lys through static quenching. • Polyphenon-60 binds to Lys through hydrogen binding. • Conformational changes of Lys were studied using circular dichorism. - Abstract: Protein-drug interaction offer information of the structural features that determine the therapeutic effectiveness of drug and have become an attractive research field in life science, chemistry, and clinical medicine. Interaction of pharmacologically important antioxidant drug polyphenon-60 with human lysozyme (Lys) at physiological pH 7.4 has been studied by using calorimetric and various spectroscopic techniques. UV–visible spectroscopy results indicate the complex formation between Lys and polyphenon-60. The binding constant, quenching mechanism and the number of binding sites were determined by the fluorescence quenching spectra of Lys in presence of polyphenon-60. Fluorescence data indicate that the polyphenon-60 interact with Lys through static quenching mechanism with binding affinity of 2.9 × 10 4 M −1 . The average binding distance between drug and Lys was found to be 2.89 nm on the basis of the theory of Förster's energy transfer. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data reveals the thermodynamic investigations which suggest that the interaction of Lys and polyphenon-60 through exothermic process and enthalpy driven and also explore that the polyphenon-60 binds in both sites of Lys with high and low affinity. Hydrogen bonding (high affinity) and hydrophobic interactions (low affinity) are the major forces in stabilizing the drug protein complex. Far-UV CD and FTIR results deciphere the conformational alterations in the secondary structure of Lys.

  8. Heterogeneity of alpha 2-adrenoceptors in rat cortex but not human platelets can be defined by 8-OH-DPAT, RU 24969 and methysergide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. M.; MacKinnon, A. C.; McGrath, J. C.; Spedding, M.; Kilpatrick, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    1. Saturation experiments indicated that [3H]-yohimbine binding was specific, saturable and labelled a single population of sites in rat cerebral cortex (Kd 5.3 +/- 0.9 nM, Bmax 121 +/- 10 fmol mg-1 protein) and human platelets (Kd 0.7 +/- 0.1 nM, Bmax 152 +/- 10 fmol mg-1 protein). 2. The alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists, yohimbine, rauwolscine, WY 26703, idazoxan and BDF 6143 displaced [3H]-yohimbine binding to each tissue in a simple manner, with high affinity and Hill slopes close to unity. 3. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist, oxymetazoline and the antagonist prazosin inhibited the binding of [3H]-yohimbine to rat in a complex manner consistent with an interaction at more than one site. However, indoramin and WB 4101 only appeared to interact with one site. In contrast, in human platelets, all antagonists gave rise to monophasic displacement curves with Hill slopes close to unity suggesting a single site of interaction. 4. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor ligands, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), RU 24969, and methysergide inhibited the binding of [3H]-yohimbine to rat cortex with high and low affinity, consistent with an interaction with two populations of binding sites. However, inhibition of [3H]-yohimbine binding to human platelets suggested a single site of interaction. The low affinity of 5-HT, 5-carboxyamidotryptamine (5-CT) and dipropyl-5-CT indicated that [3H]-yohimbine was not labelling a 5-HT1-like site in rat cortex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1970497

  9. Staphylococcus aureus keratinocyte invasion is dependent upon multiple high-affinity fibronectin-binding repeats within FnBPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Edwards

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal organism and a frequent cause of skin and soft tissue infections, which can progress to serious invasive disease. This bacterium uses its fibronectin binding proteins (FnBPs to invade host cells and it has been hypothesised that this provides a protected niche from host antimicrobial defences, allows access to deeper tissues and provides a reservoir for persistent or recurring infections. FnBPs contain multiple tandem fibronectin-binding repeats (FnBRs which bind fibronectin with varying affinity but it is unclear what selects for this configuration. Since both colonisation and skin infection are dependent upon the interaction of S. aureus with keratinocytes we hypothesised that this might select for FnBP function and thus composition of the FnBR region. Initial experiments revealed that S. aureus attachment to keratinocytes is rapid but does not require FnBRs. By contrast, invasion of keratinocytes was dependent upon the FnBR region and occurred via similar cellular processes to those described for endothelial cells. Despite this, keratinocyte invasion was relatively inefficient and appeared to include a lag phase, most likely due to very weak expression of α(5β(1 integrins. Molecular dissection of the role of the FnBR region revealed that efficient invasion of keratinocytes was dependent on the presence of at least three high-affinity (but not low-affinity FnBRs. Over-expression of a single high-affinity or three low-affinity repeats promoted invasion but not to the same levels as S. aureus expressing an FnBPA variant containing three high-affinity repeats. In summary, invasion of keratinocytes by S. aureus requires multiple high-affinity FnBRs within FnBPA, and given the importance of the interaction between these cell types and S. aureus for both colonisation and infection, may have provided the selective pressure for the multiple binding repeats within FnBPA.

  10. Beta-lactam antibiotic-induced platelet dysfunction: Evidence for irreversible inhibition of platelet activation in vitro and in vivo after prolonged exposure to penicillin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burroughs, S.F.; Johnson, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    beta-Lactam antibiotics cause platelet dysfunction with bleeding complications. Previous in vitro studies documented reversible inhibition of agonist-receptor interaction. This mechanism is inadequate to explain the effect of beta-lactam antibiotics in vivo. Platelet function does not return to normal immediately after drug treatment, implying irreversible inhibition of platelet function. We report here evidence of irreversible platelet functional and biochemical abnormalities after in vitro and in vivo exposure to beta-lactam antibiotics. Irreversible binding of [14C]-penicillin (Pen) occurred in vitro. After 24 hours' in vitro incubation with 10 to 20 mmol/L Pen, or ex vivo after antibiotic treatment, irreversible functional impairment occurred; but no irreversible inhibition of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors, measured with [3H]-yohimbine, or high-affinity thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) receptors, measured with agonist [3H]-U46619 and antagonist [3H]-SQ29548, occurred. However, low-affinity platelet TXA2/PGH2 receptors were decreased 40% after Pen exposure in vitro or in vivo, indicating irreversible membrane alteration. Two postreceptor biochemical events were irreversibly inhibited in platelets incubated with Pen for 24 hours in vitro or ex vivo after antibiotic treatment. Thromboxane synthesis was inhibited 28.3% to 81.7%. Agonist-induced rises in cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) were inhibited 40.1% to 67.5% in vitro and 26.6% to 52.2% ex vivo. Therefore, Pen binds to platelets after prolonged exposure, resulting in irreversible dysfunction attributable to inhibition of TXA2 synthesis and impairment of the rise in [Ca2+]i. The loss of low-affinity TXA2/PGH2 receptors suggests that the primary site of action of these drugs is on the platelet membrane

  11. Pertussis toxin modifies the characteristics of both the inhibitory GTP binding proteins and the somatostatin receptor in anterior pituitary tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahy, N.; Woolkalis, M.; Thermos, K.; Carlson, K.; Manning, D.; Reisine, T.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of somatostatin receptors in the anterior pituitary tumor cell line AtT-20 were examined. Pertussis toxin selectively catalyzed the ADP ribosylation of the alpha subunits of the inhibitory GTP binding proteins in AtT-20 cells. Toxin treatment abolished somatostatin inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity and somatostatin stimulation of GTPase activity. To examine the effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of the somatostatin receptor, the receptor was labeled by the somatostatin analog [125I]CGP 23996. [125I]CGP 23996 binding to AtT-20 cell membranes was saturable and within a limited concentration range was to a single high affinity site. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced the apparent density of the high affinity [125I]CGP 23996 binding sites in AtT-20 cell membranes. Inhibition of [125I]CGP 23996 binding by a wide concentration range of CGP 23996 revealed the presence of two binding sites. GTP predominantly reduced the level of high affinity sites in control membranes. Pertussis toxin treatment also diminished the amount of high affinity sites. GTP did not affect [125I]CGP 23996 binding in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. The high affinity somatostatin receptors were covalently labeled with [125I] CGP 23996 and the photoactivated crosslinking agent n-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate. No high affinity somatostatin receptors, covalently bound to [125I]CGP 23996, were detected in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. These results are most consistent with pertussis toxin uncoupling the inhibitory G proteins from the somatostatin receptor thereby converting the receptor from a mixed population of high and low affinity sites to only low affinity receptors

  12. Kinetics of the acid pump in the stomach. Proton transport and hydrolysis of ATP and p-nitrophenyl phosphate by the gastric H,K-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungstroem, M.M.; Mardh, S.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrolysis of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and p-nitrophenyl phosphate by the hydrogen ion-transporting potassium-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase (H,K-ATPase) was investigated. Hydrolysis of ATP was studied at pH 7.4 in vesicles treated with the ionophore nigericin. The kinetic analysis showed negative cooperativity with one high affinity and one low affinity site for ATP. The rate of hydrolysis decreased at 2000 microM ATP indicating a third site for ATP. When the pH was decreased to 6.5 the experimental results followed Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics with one low affinity site. Higher concentrations than 750 microM ATP were inhibitory. Proton transport was measured as accumulation of acridine orange in vesicles equilibrated with 150 mM KCl. The transport at various concentrations of ATP in the pH interval from 6.0 to 8.0 correlated well with the Hill equation with a Hill coefficient between 1.5-1.9. The concentration of ATP resulting in half-maximal transport rate increased from 5 microM at pH 6.0 to 420 microM at pH 8.0. At acidic pH the rate of proton transport decreased at 1000 microM ATP. The K+-stimulated p-nitrophenylphosphatase (pNPPase) activity resulted in a Hill coefficient close to 2 indicating cooperative binding of substrate. These kinetic results are used for a further development of the reaction scheme of the H,K-ATPase

  13. Dominant Alcohol-Protein Interaction via Hydration-Enabled Enthalpy-Driven Binding Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yuan; Kleinhammes, Alfred; Tang, Pei; Xu, Yan; Wu, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Water plays an important role in weak associations of small drug molecules with proteins. Intense focus has been on binding-induced structural changes in the water network surrounding protein binding sites, especially their contributions to binding thermodynamics. However, water is also tightly coupled to protein conformations and dynamics, and so far little is known about the influence of water-protein interactions on ligand binding. Alcohols are a type of low-affinity drugs, and it remains unclear how water affects alcohol-protein interactions. Here, we present alcohol adsorption isotherms under controlled protein hydration using in-situ NMR detection. As functions of hydration level, Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding were determined from the temperature dependence of isotherms. Two types of alcohol binding were found. The dominant type is low-affinity nonspecific binding, which is strongly dependent on temperature and the level of hydration. At low hydration levels, this nonspecific binding only occurs above a threshold of alcohol vapor pressure. An increased hydration level reduces this threshold, with it finally disappearing at a hydration level of h~0.2 (g water/g protein), gradually shifting alcohol binding from an entropy-driven to an enthalpy-driven process. Water at charged and polar groups on the protein surface was found to be particularly important in enabling this binding. Although further increase in hydration has smaller effects on the changes of binding enthalpy and entropy, it results in significant negative change in Gibbs free energy due to unmatched enthalpy-entropy compensation. These results show the crucial role of water-protein interplay in alcohol binding. PMID:25856773

  14. Direct demonstration of D1 dopamine receptors in the bovine parathyroid gland using the D1 selective antagonist [125I]-SCH 23982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Sibley, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of D1 dopamine receptors in the parathyroid gland has been proposed based on the demonstration of dopaminergic regulation of adenylate cyclase activity and parathyroid hormone release in dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Using a radioiodinated D1 selective antagonist [125I]-SCH 23982, we have now directly labeled and characterized the D1 dopamine receptors in bovine parathyroid gland membranes. [125I]-SCH 23982 binds in a saturable manner with high affinity and low nonspecific binding to membranes prepared from bovine parathyroid glands. D1 dopamine receptors are present in this preparation at a concentration of approximately 130 fMoles/mg protein and [125I]-SCH 23982 binding increases with increasing protein concentration in a linear fashion. Determination of the Kd using the association (k1) and dissociation (k-1) rate constants revealed good agreement with the Kd determined by saturation analysis (390 pM vs. 682 pM, respectively). Inhibition of 0.3 nM [125I]-SCH 23982 binding by a series of dopaminergic antagonists verified the D1 nature of this binding site, exhibiting appropriate affinities and rank order of potency. The competition curves of all antagonists exhibited Hill coefficients that were not significantly different from 1. Inhibition of [125I]-SCH 23982 binding by dopamine and other dopaminergic agonists revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist binding sites. Addition of 200 microM GppNHp effected a complete conversion of high affinity dopamine binding sites to a homogeneous population of low affinity dopamine sites. The D1 receptors identified in the parathyroid gland with [125I]-SCH 23982 appear to be pharmacologically identical with those previously characterized in the central nervous system

  15. HIV-1 exploits CCR5 conformational heterogeneity to escape inhibition by chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Philippe; Bénureau, Yann; Staropoli, Isabelle; Wang, Yongjin; Gonzalez, Nuria; Alcami, Jose; Hartley, Oliver; Brelot, Anne; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard

    2013-06-04

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Chemokines exert anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro, both by displacing the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 from binding to CCR5 and by promoting CCR5 endocytosis, suggesting that they play a protective role in HIV infection. However, we showed here that different CCR5 conformations at the cell surface are differentially engaged by chemokines and gp120, making chemokines weaker inhibitors of HIV infection than would be expected from their binding affinity constants for CCR5. These distinct CCR5 conformations rely on CCR5 coupling to nucleotide-free G proteins ((NF)G proteins). Whereas native CCR5 chemokines bind with subnanomolar affinity to (NF)G protein-coupled CCR5, gp120/HIV-1 does not discriminate between (NF)G protein-coupled and uncoupled CCR5. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of chemokines is G protein independent, suggesting that "low-chemokine affinity" (NF)G protein-uncoupled conformations of CCR5 represent a portal for viral entry. Furthermore, chemokines are weak inducers of CCR5 endocytosis, as is revealed by EC50 values for chemokine-mediated endocytosis reflecting their low-affinity constant value for (NF)G protein-uncoupled CCR5. Abolishing CCR5 interaction with (NF)G proteins eliminates high-affinity binding of CCR5 chemokines but preserves receptor endocytosis, indicating that chemokines preferentially endocytose low-affinity receptors. Finally, we evidenced that chemokine analogs achieve highly potent HIV-1 inhibition due to high-affinity interactions with internalizing and/or gp120-binding receptors. These data are consistent with HIV-1 evading chemokine inhibition by exploiting CCR5 conformational heterogeneity, shed light into the inhibitory mechanisms of anti-HIV-1 chemokine analogs, and provide insights for the development of unique anti-HIV molecules.

  16. Characterization of a novel variant of amino acid transport system asc in erythrocytes from Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalskii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincham, D A; Ellory, J C; Young, J D

    1992-08-01

    In thoroughbred horses, red blood cell amino acid transport activity is Na(+)-independent and controlled by three codominant genetic alleles (h, l, s), coding for high-affinity system asc1 (L-alanine apparent Km for influx at 37 degrees C congruent to 0.35 mM), low-affinity system asc2 (L-alanine Km congruent to 14 mM), and transport deficiency, respectively. The present study investigated amino acid transport mechanisms in red cells from four wild species: Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalskii), Hartmann's zebra (Zebra hartmannae), Grevy's zebra (Zebra grevyi), and onager (Equus hemonius). Red blood cell samples from different Przewalski's horses exhibited uniformly high rates of L-alanine uptake, mediated by a high-affinity asc1-type transport system. Mean apparent Km and Vmax values (+/- SE) for L-alanine influx at 37 degrees C in red cells from 10 individual animals were 0.373 +/- 0.068 mM and 2.27 +/- 0.11 mmol (L cells.h), respectively. As in thoroughbreds, the Przewalski's horse transporter interacted with dibasic as well as neutral amino acids. However, the Przewalski asc1 isoform transported L-lysine with a substantially (6.4-fold) higher apparent affinity than its thoroughbred counterpart (Km for influx 1.4 mM at 37 degrees C) and was also less prone to trans-stimulation effects. The novel high apparent affinity of the Przewalski's horse transporter for L-lysine provides additional key evidence of functional and possible structural similarities between asc and the classical Na(+)-dependent system ASC and between these systems and the Na(+)-independent dibasic amino acid transport system y+. Unlike Przewalski's horse, zebra red cells were polymorphic with respect to L-alanine transport activity, showing high-affinity or low-affinity saturable mechanisms of L-alanine uptake. Onager red cells transported this amino acid with intermediate affinity (apparent Km for influx 3.0 mM at 37 degrees C). Radiation inactivation analysis was used to estimate the target

  17. A systematic study of the effect of low pH acid treatment on anti-drug antibodies specific for a domain antibody therapeutic: Impact on drug tolerance, assay sensitivity and post-validation method assessment of ADA in clinical serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavita, Uma; Duo, Jia; Crawford, Sean M; Liu, Rong; Valcin, Joan; Gleason, Carol; Dong, Huijin; Gadkari, Snaehal; Dodge, Robert W; Pillutla, Renuka C; DeSilva, Binodh S

    2017-09-01

    We developed a homogeneous bridging anti-drug antibody (ADA) assay on an electro chemiluminescent immunoassay (ECLIA) platform to support the immunogenicity evaluation of a dimeric domain antibody (dAb) therapeutic in clinical studies. During method development we evaluated the impact of different types of acid at various pH levels on polyclonal and monoclonal ADA controls of differing affinities and on/off rates. The data shows for the first time that acids of different pH can have a differential effect on ADA of various affinities and this in turn impacts assay sensitivity and drug tolerance as defined by these surrogate controls. Acid treatment led to a reduction in signal of intermediate and low affinity ADA, but not high affinity or polyclonal ADA. We also found that acid pretreatment is a requisite for dissociation of drug bound high affinity ADA, but not for low affinity ADA-drug complexes. Although we were unable to identify an acid that would allow a 100% retrieval of ADA signal post-treatment, use of glycine pH3.0 enabled the detection of low, intermediate and high affinity antibodies (Abs) to various extents. Following optimization, the ADA assay method was validated for clinical sample analysis. Consistencies within various parameters of the clinical data such as dose dependent increases in ADA rates and titers were observed, indicating a reliable ADA method. Pre- and post-treatment ADA negative or positive clinical samples without detectable drug were reanalyzed in the absence of acid treatment or presence of added exogenous drug respectively to further assess the effectiveness of the final acid treatment procedure. The overall ADA results indicate that assay conditions developed and validated based on surrogate controls sufficed to provide a reliable clinical data set. The effect of low pH acid treatment on possible pre-existing ADA or soluble multimeric target in normal human serum was also evaluated, and preliminary data indicate that acid type and

  18. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miletti Luiz C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. Results We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Conclusion Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by

  19. Study of crotoxin mechanism of action to mammary carcinomas and evaluation of its potential as a radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Marina Bicalho

    2010-01-01

    Crotoxin, the main component of Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom, has been studied since 1938. It is a natural polypeptidic complex with pharmacological potential because of its antitumoral properties which has attracted great interest for diagnosis and therapy of oncological diseases. However, Crotoxin mechanism of action and sites of specific interaction on tumor cells are still misunderstood. Breast cancer is the second most frequent type in the world and the most common cancer in women. About 30 to 60% of mammary tumors overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a transmembrane protein related to cell proliferation. Since literature has reported that Crotoxin antitumoral effect is more potent on cells with EGFR overexpression the objectives of this work were to evaluate Crotoxin cytotoxic effects on mammary tumor cells human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) and Ehrlich tumor cells (murine ascitics carcinoma), and to investigate the specific molecular interaction of Crotoxin on Ehrlich tumor cells. Initially, Crotoxin was radiolabelled with iodine-125 ( 125 I-Crotoxin) and iodine-131 ( 131 I-Crotoxin). Saturation and competition assay were carried out to characterize Crotoxin in vitro interaction; Crotoxin biodistribution studies and singlephoton emission computed tomography (SPECT) of mice bearing Ehrlich tumor have been evaluated to describe in vivo interaction. Our results showed that Crotoxin presented cytotoxic effect against Ehrlich with DL 50 in vitro (concentration of compound which is lethal for 50% of cells) of about one micromolar, but did not present significant effect against MCF-7. Morphological alterations characteristic of apoptosis suggests programmed cell death. 125 I-Crotoxin interaction with Ehrlich tumor cells was saturable with approximately 70% specificity, and presented K d =24.98 nmol/L and B max =16,570 sites/cell for low affinity binding sites and K d =0.06 nmol/L and B max =210 sites/cell high affinity binding sites

  20. Binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine (AV-133) to the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, H.-H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Juang, J.-H. [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Chung Gung University and Chung Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel M. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wey, S.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kungmp@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2010-05-15

    The vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) is highly expressed in pancreatic {beta}-cells and thus has been proposed to be a potential target for measuring {beta}-cell mass (BCM) by molecular imaging. C-11- and F-18-labeled tetrabenazine derivatives targeting VMAT2 have shown some promising results as potential biomarkers for BCM. In the present study, we examined the binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine ([{sup 18}F]AV-133), a potential PET tracer for BCM imaging, in rat pancreas and rat brain. Methods: Pancreatic exocrine cells and pancreatic islet cells were isolated and purified from Sprague-Dawley rats. Membrane homogenates, prepared from both pancreatic exocrine and islet cells as well as from brain striatum and hypothalamus regions, were used for in vitro binding studies. In vitro and ex vivo autoradiography studies with [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were performed on rat brain and rat pancreas sections. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed to confirm the distribution of VMAT2 on islet {beta}-cells. Results: Excellent binding affinities of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were observed in rat striatum and hypothalamus homogenates with K{sub d} values of 0.19 and 0.25 nM, respectively. In contrast to single-site binding observed in rat striatum homogenates, rat islet cell homogenates showed two saturable binding sites (site A: K{sub d}=6.76 nM, B{sub max}=60 fmol/mg protein; site B: K{sub d}=241 nM, B{sub max}=1500 fmol/mg protein). Rat exocrine pancreas homogenates showed only a single low-affinity binding site (K{sub d}=209 nM), which was similar to site B in islet cells. In vitro autoradiography of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 using frozen sections of rat pancreas showed specific labeling of islets, as evidenced by co-localization with anti-insulin antibody. Ex vivo VMAT2 pancreatic autoradiography in the rat, however, was not successful, in contrast to the excellent ex vivo autoradiography of VMAT2 binding sites in the brain. In vivo/ex vivo islet

  1. Predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Lin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptides binding to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class II molecules are crucial for initiation and regulation of immune responses. Predicting peptides that bind to a specific MHC molecule plays an important role in determining potential candidates for vaccines. The binding groove in class II MHC is open at both ends, allowing peptides longer than 9-mer to bind. Finding the consensus motif facilitating the binding of peptides to a MHC class II molecule is difficult because of different lengths of binding peptides and varying location of 9-mer binding core. The level of difficulty increases when the molecule is promiscuous and binds to a large number of low affinity peptides. In this paper, we propose two approaches using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEA for predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. One uses the information from both binders and non-binders for self-discovery of motifs. The other, in addition, uses information from experimentally determined motifs for guided-discovery of motifs. Results The proposed methods are intended for finding peptides binding to MHC class II I-Ag7 molecule – a promiscuous binder to a large number of low affinity peptides. Cross-validation results across experiments on two motifs derived for I-Ag7 datasets demonstrate better generalization abilities and accuracies of the present method over earlier approaches. Further, the proposed method was validated and compared on two publicly available benchmark datasets: (1 an ensemble of qualitative HLA-DRB1*0401 peptide data obtained from five different sources, and (2 quantitative peptide data obtained for sixteen different alleles comprising of three mouse alleles and thirteen HLA alleles. The proposed method outperformed earlier methods on most datasets, indicating that it is well suited for finding peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. Conclusion We present two MOEA-based algorithms for finding motifs

  2. 5'-Carbamoyl derivatives of 2'-C-methyl-purine nucleosides as selective A1 adenosine receptor agonists: affinity, efficacy, and selectivity for A1 receptor from different species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Vita, Patrizia; Petrelli, Riccardo; Lavecchia, Antonio; Costa, Barbara; Spinetti, Francesca; Martini, Claudia; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Grifantini, Mario

    2008-01-01

    A series of 5'-carbamoyl and 5'-thionocarbamoyl derivatives of 2'-C-methyl analogues of the A(1) adenosine receptor (A(1)AR) full agonists N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), N(6)-[3-(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl]adenosine (tecadenoson), and 2-chloro analogue (2-Cl-tecadenoson) was synthesized and evaluated for their affinity for adenosine receptor subtypes from bovine, porcine, and human species. In the N(6)-cyclopentylamino series, the 5'-substituted derivatives showed a reduced affinity at the bovine A(1)AR compared to the parent compounds; however, the selectivity for A(1) versus A(2A) receptor was retained or increased. The corresponding N(6)-3-(R)-tetrahydrofuranylamino analogues displayed a very low affinity toward the bovine A(1)AR. The 5'-methylthionocarbamoyl derivative of 2'-Me-CCPA showed the best affinity at porcine A(1)AR with a K(i) value of 13 nM. At human AR subtypes tecadenoson derivatives showed 2.3- to 5-fold lower affinity at A(1)AR and very low affinity at the other subtypes (A(2A), A(2B), and A(3)) compared to the corresponding N(6)-cyclopentyl analogues. The 5'-carbamoyl and 5'-thionocarbamoyl derivatives of 2'-Me-CCPA 3, 4, 7 and tecadenoson derivative 12 were found to be partial A(1) agonists at the porcine receptor. Docking studies explained the lower affinity of N(6)-3-(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl-substituted compounds at bovine A(1)AR compared to that of N(6)-cyclopentyl analogues, showing that the oxygen of the tetrahydrofuranyl ring establishes unfavorable electrostatic interactions with the CO oxygen of Asn254. The low binding affinity of the 2'-C-methyl-N(6)-3-(R)-tetrahydrofuranyl adenosine analogues at human A(1)AR may be ascribed to the presence of unfavorable interactions between the hydrophilic tetrahydrofuranyl ring and the surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu250 (TM6) and Ile274 (TM7).

  3. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikeska, Ruth [Institute of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, University of Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, Building 22a, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Wacker, Roland [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University of Tübingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 4, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Arni, Raghuvir [Department of Physics, IBILCE/UNESP, São Jose do Rio Preto, São Paul (Brazil); Singh, Tej P. [Department of Biophysics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat [Institute of Crystallography of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 59, 117333 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voelter, Wolfgang [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University of Tübingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 4, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Betzel, Christian, E-mail: betzel@unisgi1.desy.de [Institute of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, University of Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, Building 22a, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I in complex with lactose and galactose reveal differences in binding by the two known sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 and suggest the presence of a third low-affinity site in subdomain β1. The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R{sub free} = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R{sub free} = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound.

  4. Comparison of [11C]cocaine binding at tracer and pharmacological doses of baboon brain: A PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Logan, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    In vitro studies have shown that cocaine (C) binds to both high and low affinity sites on the dopamine transporter (DAT). We have previously characterized the binding of tracer doses of [{sup 11}C]cocaine (C*)to a high affinity site on the DAT. To assess if in vivo C also binds to low affinity sites we used PET to compare binding of tracer doses (17.8{plus_minus}12.2 {mu}g C) of C* to pharmacological doses (8 mg of C coadministered with C*). Sixteen paired studies were done to assess test/retest variability, specific versus non specific binding and to characterize binding profile. Dynamic scans were started immediately after injection of C* (5-8 mCi) for 50 min on the CTI-931 (6 x 6 x 6.5 mm FWHM). Time activity curves for tissue concentration and for unchanged tracer in plasma were used to calculate the transport constant between plasma and tissue (K1) and to obtain the distribution volume (DV). The ratio of the DV in striatum (ST) to that in cerebellum (CB) (which corresponds to Bmax/Kd-1) was used as model parameter. Peak brain uptake of C* was significantly higher for tracer than for pharmacological doses (0.041 versus 0.033 % dose/cc), as were the values for K1 (1.07{plus_minus}0.21 versus 0.68{plus_minus}0.26 (t=3.0 p<0.01)). Repeated measures were reproducible for tracer ({plus_minus}2%) and pharmacological doses of C* ({plus_minus}4%). Tracer dose C* showed highest binding and slowest clearance in ST which was reduced by C (0.5-2.0 mg/kg iv, -25 to -30%) and by drugs that inhibit DAT (2mg/kg nomifensine - 21%, 0.5 mg/kg methylphenidate -12%) and was increased by serotonin transporter inhibitors (5HT-Ti) (2 mg/kg citalopram +11%, 0.5 mg/kg fluoxetine +6%) and not changed by NE transporter inhibitors (0.5 mg/kg desipramine or 2 mg/kg tomoxetine). The increase with (5HT-Ti) may reflect neurotransmitter interactions or changes in bioavailability. At pharmacological doses C* showed homogeneous distribution and was not changed by C nor by any of the above drugs.

  5. The insulin-like growth factor system in chronic kidney disease: Pathophysiology and therapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngman Oh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The growth hormone–insulin-like growth factor–insulin-like growth factor binding protein (GH–IGF–IGFBP axis plays a critical role in the maintenance of normal renal function and the pathogenesis and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Serum IGF-I and IGFBPs are altered with different stages of CKD, the speed of onset, the amount of proteinuria, and the potential of remission. Recent studies demonstrate that growth failure in children with CKD is due to a relative GH insensitivity and functional IGF deficiency. The functional IGF deficiency in CKD results from either IGF resistance due to increased circulating levels of IGFBPs or IGF deficiency due to increased urinary excretion of serum IGF–IGFBP complexes. In addition, not only GH and IGFs in circulation, but locally produced IGFs, the high-affinity IGFBPs, and low-affinity insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related proteins (IGFBP-rPs may also affect the kidney. With respect to diabetic kidney disease, there is growing evidence suggesting that GH, IGF-I, and IGFBPs are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN. Thus, prevention of GH action by blockade either at the receptor level or along its signal transduction pathway offers the potential for effective therapeutic opportunities. Similarly, interrupting IGF-I and IGFBP actions also may offer a way to inhibit the development or progression of DN. Furthermore, it is well accepted that the systemic inflammatory response is a key player for progression of CKD, and how to prevent and treat this response is currently of great interest. Recent studies demonstrate existence of IGF-independent actions of high-affinity and low-affinity-IGFBPs, in particular, antiinflammatory action of IGFBP-3 and profibrotic action of IGFBP-rP2/CTGF. These findings reinforce the concept in support of the clinical significance of the IGF-independent action of IGFBPs in the assessment of pathophysiology of kidney disease and its

  6. The insulin-like growth factor system in chronic kidney disease: Pathophysiology and therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youngman

    2012-03-01

    The growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-insulin-like growth factor binding protein (GH-IGF-IGFBP) axis plays a critical role in the maintenance of normal renal function and the pathogenesis and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Serum IGF-I and IGFBPs are altered with different stages of CKD, the speed of onset, the amount of proteinuria, and the potential of remission. Recent studies demonstrate that growth failure in children with CKD is due to a relative GH insensitivity and functional IGF deficiency. The functional IGF deficiency in CKD results from either IGF resistance due to increased circulating levels of IGFBPs or IGF deficiency due to increased urinary excretion of serum IGF-IGFBP complexes. In addition, not only GH and IGFs in circulation, but locally produced IGFs, the high-affinity IGFBPs, and low-affinity insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related proteins (IGFBP-rPs) may also affect the kidney. With respect to diabetic kidney disease, there is growing evidence suggesting that GH, IGF-I, and IGFBPs are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Thus, prevention of GH action by blockade either at the receptor level or along its signal transduction pathway offers the potential for effective therapeutic opportunities. Similarly, interrupting IGF-I and IGFBP actions also may offer a way to inhibit the development or progression of DN. Furthermore, it is well accepted that the systemic inflammatory response is a key player for progression of CKD, and how to prevent and treat this response is currently of great interest. Recent studies demonstrate existence of IGF-independent actions of high-affinity and low-affinity-IGFBPs, in particular, antiinflammatory action of IGFBP-3 and profibrotic action of IGFBP-rP2/CTGF. These findings reinforce the concept in support of the clinical significance of the IGF-independent action of IGFBPs in the assessment of pathophysiology of kidney disease and its therapeutic potential for

  7. The two C-terminal tyrosines stabilize occluded Na/K pump conformations containing Na or K ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedovato, Natascia; Gadsby, David C

    2010-07-01

    Interactions of the three transported Na ions with the Na/K pump remain incompletely understood. Na/K pump crystal structures show that the extended C terminus of the Na,K-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) alpha subunit directly contacts transmembrane helices. Deletion of the last five residues (KETYY in almost all Na/K pumps) markedly lowered the apparent affinity for Na activation of pump phosphorylation from ATP, a reflection of cytoplasmic Na affinity for forming the occluded E1P(Na3) conformation. ATPase assays further suggested that C-terminal truncations also interfere with low affinity Na interactions, which are attributable to extracellular effects. Because extracellular Na ions traverse part of the membrane's electric field to reach their binding sites in the Na/K pump, their movements generate currents that can be monitored with high resolution. We report here electrical measurements to examine how Na/K pump interactions with extracellular Na ions are influenced by C-terminal truncations. We deleted the last two (YY) or five (KESYY) residues in Xenopus laevis alpha1 Na/K pumps made ouabain resistant by either of two kinds of point mutations and measured their currents as 10-mM ouabain-sensitive currents in Xenopus oocytes after silencing endogenous Xenopus Na/K pumps with 1 microM ouabain. We found the low affinity inhibitory influence of extracellular Na on outward Na/K pump current at negative voltages to be impaired in all of the C-terminally truncated pumps. Correspondingly, voltage jump-induced transient charge movements that reflect pump interactions with extracellular Na ions were strongly shifted to more negative potentials; this signals a several-fold reduction of the apparent affinity for extracellular Na in the truncated pumps. Parallel lowering of Na affinity on both sides of the membrane argues that the C-terminal contacts provide important stabilization of the occluded E1P(Na3) conformation, regardless of the route of Na ion entry into the

  8. Identification of amino acids essential for estrone-3-sulfate transport within transmembrane domain 2 of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Li

    Full Text Available As an important structure in membrane proteins, transmembrane domains have been found to be crucial for properly targeting the protein to cell membrane as well as carrying out transport functions in transporters. Computer analysis of OATP sequences revealed transmembrane domain 2 (TM2 is among those transmembrane domains that have high amino acid identities within different family members. In the present study, we identify four amino acids (Asp70, Phe73, Glu74, and Gly76 that are essential for the transport function of OATP1B1, an OATP member that is specifically expressed in the human liver. A substitution of these four amino acids with alanine resulted in significantly reduced transport activity. Further mutagenesis showed the charged property of Asp70 and Glu74 is critical for proper function of the transporter protein. Comparison of the kinetic parameters indicated that Asp70 is likely to interact with the substrate while Glu74 may be involved in stabilizing the binding site through formation of a salt-bridge. The aromatic ring structure of Phe73 seems to play an important role because substitution of Phe73 with tyrosine, another amino acid with a similar structure, led to partially restored transport function. On the other hand, replacement of Gly76 with either alanine or valine could not recover the function of the transporter. Considering the nature of a transmembrane helix, we proposed that Gly76 may be important for maintaining the proper structure of the protein. Interestingly, when subjected to transport function analysis of higher concentration of esteone-3-sulfate (50 µM that corresponds to the low affinity binding site of OATP1B1, mutants of Phe73, Glu74, and Gly76 all showed a transport function that is comparable to that of the wild-type, suggesting these amino acids may have less impact on the low affinity component of esteone-3-sulfate within OATP1B1, while Asp 70 seems to be involved in the interaction of both sites.

  9. An Extracellular Cell-Attached Pullulanase Confers Branched α-Glucan Utilization in Human Gut Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Marie S; Goh, Yong Jun; Rasmussen, Kasper Bøwig; Cypryk, Wojciech; Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Svensson, Birte; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2017-06-15

    Of the few predicted extracellular glycan-active enzymes, glycoside hydrolase family 13 subfamily 14 (GH13_14) pullulanases are the most common in human gut lactobacilli. These enzymes share a unique modular organization, not observed in other bacteria, featuring a catalytic module, two starch binding modules, a domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal surface layer association protein (SLAP) domain. Here, we explore the specificity of a representative of this group of pullulanases, Lactobacillus acidophilus Pul13_14 ( La Pul13_14), and its role in branched α-glucan metabolism in the well-characterized Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, which is widely used as a probiotic. Growth experiments with L. acidophilus NCFM on starch-derived branched substrates revealed a preference for α-glucans with short branches of about two to three glucosyl moieties over amylopectin with longer branches. Cell-attached debranching activity was measurable in the presence of α-glucans but was repressed by glucose. The debranching activity is conferred exclusively by La Pul13_14 and is abolished in a mutant strain lacking a functional La Pul13_14 gene. Hydrolysis kinetics of recombinant La Pul13_14 confirmed the preference for short-branched α-glucan oligomers consistent with the growth data. Curiously, this enzyme displayed the highest catalytic efficiency and the lowest K m reported for a pullulanase. Inhibition kinetics revealed mixed inhibition by β-cyclodextrin, suggesting the presence of additional glucan binding sites besides the active site of the enzyme, which may contribute to the unprecedented substrate affinity. The enzyme also displays high thermostability and higher activity in the acidic pH range, reflecting adaptation to the physiologically challenging conditions in the human gut. IMPORTANCE Starch is one of the most abundant glycans in the human diet. Branched α-1,6-glucans in dietary starch and glycogen are nondegradable by human enzymes and constitute a

  10. Radioreceptor assay for analysis of fentanyl and its analogs in biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alburges, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The assay is based on the competition of these drugs with ({sup 3}H) fentanyl for opioid receptors in membrane preparations of rat forebrain in vitro. The binding in stereospecific, reversible and saturable. Scatchard plots of saturation suggest the presence of high and low affinity binding sites. Morphine and hydromorphone complete with ({sup 3}H)fentanyl for the opioid receptor, but other morphine-like compounds were relatively weak displacers of ({sup 3}H)fentanyl. Many other commonly abused drugs do not compete with ({sup 3}H)fentanyl for the opioid receptors. Urine samples from animals injected with fentanyl, ({plus minus})-cis-3-methylfentanyl, alpha-methylfentanyl, butyrylfentanyl and benzylfentanyl were analyzed by radioreceptor assay, radioimmunoassay, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Urinary analysis of fentanyl showed a good correlation with these three methods; however, discrepancies were observed in the analysis of fentanyl analogs. This radioreceptor assay is well-suited as an initial assay for the detection of active analogs of fentanyl in urine with good correlation with other techniques in the analysis of fentanyl; however, there is substantial disagreement between techniques in the quantitation of fentanyl analogs. The implications of these discrepancies are discussed.

  11. Crystal structure of the sodium-potassium pump (Na+,K+-ATPase) with bound potassium and ouabain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Haruo; Shinoda, Takehiro; Cornelius, Flemming; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2009-01-01

    The sodium-potassium pump (Na+,K+-ATPase) is responsible for establishing Na+ and K+ concentration gradients across the plasma membrane and therefore plays an essential role in, for instance, generating action potentials. Cardiac glycosides, prescribed for congestive heart failure for more than 2 centuries, are efficient inhibitors of this ATPase. Here we describe a crystal structure of Na+,K+-ATPase with bound ouabain, a representative cardiac glycoside, at 2.8 Å resolution in a state analogous to E2·2K+·Pi. Ouabain is deeply inserted into the transmembrane domain with the lactone ring very close to the bound K+, in marked contrast to previous models. Due to antagonism between ouabain and K+, the structure represents a low-affinity ouabain-bound state. Yet, most of the mutagenesis data obtained with the high-affinity state are readily explained by the present crystal structure, indicating that the binding site for ouabain is essentially the same. According to a homology model for the high affinity state, it is a closure of the binding cavity that confers a high affinity. PMID:19666591

  12. Comparative distribution of nicotinic receptor subtypes during development, adulthood and aging: an autoradiographic study in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribollet, E; Bertrand, D; Marguerat, A; Raggenbass, M

    2004-01-01

    The distribution in the rat brain of high affinity nicotinic heteromeric acetylcholine receptors and of low affinity nicotinic, alpha7-containing, homomeric receptors was studied using in vitro light microscopic autoradiography. As ligands, we used [3H]epibatidine, or [125I]epibatidine, and [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin, respectively. In adult animals, the two types of binding sites were widely distributed in many different brain structures, including the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic structures, limbic system and cortex, but their anatomical distribution differed markedly. Only in rare instances could a co-localization be observed, for example in the superficial layer of the superior colliculus. In developing animals, both types of labeling were strongly expressed during embryonic and postnatal phases. Their distributions were qualitatively similar to those observed in adult animals, with a few noticeable exceptions in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. In aging animals, neither the distribution nor the density of nicotinic binding sites was significantly altered. Our conclusions are the following. (a) There is little overlap in the distribution of heteromeric and alpha7-containing homomeric nicotinic receptors in the rat brain. (b) The abundance of neuronal nicotinic receptors during embryonic and postnatal development suggests that they may play a role in the establishment of neuronal connectivity. (c) The expression of neuronal nicotinic receptors is unaltered in middle aged animals, suggesting that in the rat these receptors do not play any major role in aging process.

  13. Neonicotinoid Insecticides Alter the Gene Expression Profile of Neuron-Enriched Cultures from Neonatal Rat Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura-Kuroda, Junko; Nishito, Yasumasa; Yanagisawa, Hiroko; Kuroda, Yoichiro; Komuta, Yukari; Kawano, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2016-10-04

    Neonicotinoids are considered safe because of their low affinities to mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) relative to insect nAChRs. However, because of importance of nAChRs in mammalian brain development, there remains a need to establish the safety of chronic neonicotinoid exposures with regards to children's health. Here we examined the effects of longterm (14 days) and low dose (1 μM) exposure of neuron-enriched cultures from neonatal rat cerebellum to nicotine and two neonicotinoids: acetamiprid and imidacloprid. Immunocytochemistry revealed no differences in the number or morphology of immature neurons or glial cells in any group versus untreated control cultures. However, a slight disturbance in Purkinje cell dendritic arborization was observed in the exposed cultures. Next we performed transcriptome analysis on total RNAs using microarrays, and identified significant differential expression (p neonicotinoid exposure alters the transcriptome of the developing mammalian brain in a similar way to nicotine exposure. Our results highlight the need for further careful investigations into the effects of neonicotinoids in the developing mammalian brain.

  14. A review of perchlorate (ClO4-) occurrence in fruits and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, R; Godoy, F; Escudey, M; Palma, P

    2017-02-01

    Since the 1990s, a large number of studies around the world have reported the presence of perchlorate in different types of environmental matrices. In view of their inherent characteristics, such as high solubility, mobility, persistence, and low affinity for the surface of soil, perchlorates are mobilized through the water-soil system and accumulate in edible plant species of high human consumption. However, the ingestion of food products containing perchlorate represents a potential health risk to people due to their adverse effects on thyroid, hormone, and neuronal development, mainly in infants and fetuses. At present, research has been centered on determining sources, fates, and remediation methods and not on its real extension in vegetables under farming conditions. This review presents a comprehensive overview and update of the frequent detection of perchlorate in fruits and vegetables produced and marketed around the world. Additionally, the impact of fertilizer on the potential addition of perchlorate to soil and its mobility in the water-soil-plant system is discussed. This review is organized into the following sections: sources of perchlorate, mobility in the water-soil system, presence in fruits and vegetables in different countries, international regulations, and toxicological studies. Finally, recommendations for future studies concerning perchlorate in fruits and vegetables are presented.

  15. Stepwise increase of resveratrol biosynthesis in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yechun; Halls, Coralie; Zhang, Juan; Matsuno, Michiyo; Zhang, Yansheng; Yu, Oliver

    2011-09-01

    Resveratrol is a unique, natural polyphenolic compound with diverse health benefits. In the present study, we attempted to improve resveratrol biosynthesis in yeast by different methods of metabolic engineering. We first mutated and then re-synthesized tyrosine ammonia lyase (TAL) by replacing the bacteria codons with yeast-preferred codons, which increased translation and improved p-coumaric acid and resveratrol biosynthesis drastically. We then demonstrated that low-affinity, high-capacity bacterial araE transporter could enhance resveratrol accumulation, without transporting resveratrol directly. Yeast cells carrying the araE gene produced up to 2.44-fold higher resveratrol than control cells. For commercial applications, resveratrol biosynthesis was detected in sucrose medium and fresh grape juice using our engineered yeast cells. In collaboration with the Chaumette Winery of Missouri, we were able to produce resveratrol-containing white wines, with levels comparable to the resveratrol levels found in most red wines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Calretinin: from a simple Ca2+ buffer to a multifunctional protein implicated in many biological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat eSchwaller

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The hexa-EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein calretinin (CR is predominantly expressed in specific neurons of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, CR expression is also observed in non-neuronal cells, e.g. during embryonic development and in mesothelioma cells. Of the 6 EF-hand domains, 5 are functional; the first 4 domains form 2 pairs showing high cooperativity within a pair that results in non-linear modulation of intracellular Ca2+ signals by CR. EF-hand domain 5 has a low affinity and represents the identified interaction site with CR-binding partners present in mouse cerebellar granule cells. CR binding to other targets including the pore-forming α1 subunit of the Ca2+ channel CaV2.1, as well as to huntingtin indicates additional Ca2+ sensor functions besides the well-known Ca2+-buffering functions. The absence of CR in cerebellar granule cells of CR-/- mice results in increased excitability and altered firing of Purkinje cells and promotes cerebellar 160-Hz oscillations impairing motor coordination. The putative role of CR in neuroprotection is still highly discussed. Altogether, CR emerges as a multi-functional protein also associated with development, i.e. cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death.

  17. Thiazide diuretic receptors: Autoradiographic localization in rat kidney with [3H]metolazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumont, K.; Vaughn, D.A.; Healy, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The localization of binding sites for [ 3 H]metolazone, a quinazolinesulfonamide diuretic with thiazide-like actions, was determined by in vitro autoradiography. [ 3 H]Metolazone bound saturably to rat kidney sections incubated in vitro with a dissociation constant (Kd) = 3.4 nM and binding site density = 0.14 pmol/mg of protein. Incubation conditions were used that excluded binding to low affinity sites and carbonic anhydrase. Pharmacological specificity of binding was consistent with labeling of physiologically relevant thiazide diuretic receptors, as identified in previous studies of [ 3 H]metolazone binding to renal membranes. Autoradiographs obtained with tritium-sensitive film demonstrated that binding sites were limited to the renal cortex and were relatively sparsely distributed. Higher resolution autoradiography indicated that [ 3 H] metolazone binding sites were localized in a highly specific manner over short lengths of tubular segments, which by their morphology and distribution most likely represented distal convoluted tubules. In the short sections of tubule that contained receptors, labeling was very dense and appeared to be more prevalent over luminal than peritubular surfaces. The intrarenal distribution of [ 3 H]metolazone binding sites provides further evidence for their identity as thiazide diuretic receptors. These results are consistent with physiological studies demonstrating that the early distal tubule is the location of thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransport

  18. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Azidoblebbistatin, a photoreactive myosin inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Képiró, Miklós; Várkuti, Boglárka H.; Bodor, Andrea; Hegyi, György; Drahos, László; Kovács, Mihály; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2012-01-01

    Photoreactive compounds are important tools in life sciences that allow precisely timed covalent crosslinking of ligands and targets. Using a unique technique we have synthesized azidoblebbistatin, which is a derivative of blebbistatin, the most widely used myosin inhibitor. Without UV irradiation azidoblebbistatin exhibits identical inhibitory properties to those of blebbistatin. Using UV irradiation, azidoblebbistatin can be covalently crosslinked to myosin, which greatly enhances its in vitro and in vivo effectiveness. Photo-crosslinking also eliminates limitations associated with the relatively low myosin affinity and water solubility of blebbistatin. The wavelength used for photo-crosslinking is not toxic for cells and tissues, which confers a great advantage in in vivo tests. Because the crosslink results in an irreversible association of the inhibitor to myosin and the irradiation eliminates the residual activity of unbound inhibitor molecules, azidoblebbistatin has a great potential to become a highly effective tool in both structural studies of actomyosin contractility and the investigation of cellular and physiological functions of myosin II. We used azidoblebbistatin to identify previously unknown low-affinity targets of the inhibitor (EC50 ≥ 50 μM) in Dictyostelium discoideum, while the strongest interactant was found to be myosin II (EC50 = 5 μM). Our results demonstrate that azidoblebbistatin, and potentially other azidated drugs, can become highly useful tools for the identification of strong- and weak-binding cellular targets and the determination of the apparent binding affinities in in vivo conditions. PMID:22647605

  20. Impact of manure-related DOM on sulfonamide transport in arable soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dan; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Arenz-Leufen, Martina Gesine; Jacques, Diederik; Lichtner, Peter; Engelhardt, Irina

    2016-09-01

    Field application of livestock manure introduces colloids and veterinary antibiotics, e.g. sulfonamides (SAs), into farmland. The presence of manure colloids may potentially intensify the SAs-pollution to soils and groundwater by colloid-facilitated transport. Transport of three SAs, sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfamethoxypyridazine (SMPD), and sulfamoxole (SMOX), was investigated in saturated soil columns with and without manure colloids from sows and farrows, weaners, and fattening pigs. Experimental results showed that colloid-facilitated transport of SMOX was significant in the presence of manure colloids from fattening pigs with low C/N ratio, high SUVA280 nm and protein C, while manure colloids from sows and farrows and weaners had little effect on SMOX transport. In contrast, only retardation was observed for SDZ and SMPD when manure colloids were present. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of colloids and SAs were replicated well by a newly developed numerical model that considers colloid-filtration theory, competitive kinetic sorption, and co-transport processes. Model results demonstrate that mobile colloids act as carriers for SMOX, while immobile colloids block SMOX from sorbing onto the soil. The low affinity of SMOX to sorb on immobile colloids prevents aggregation and also promotes SMOX's colloid-facilitated transport. Conversely, the high affinity of SDZ and SMPD to sorb on all types of immobile colloids retarded their transport. Thus, manure properties play a fundamental role in increasing the leaching risk of hydrophobic sulfonamides.

  1. Plasma clearance, metabolism, and tissue accumulation of 3H-labeled catecholamines in trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekvasil, N.P.; Olson, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma clearance, metabolism, and tissue accumulation of [3H]norepinephrine (NE) and [3H]epinephrine (E) were measured after injection into the dorsal aorta of chronically catheterized trout, Salmo gairdneri. Sucrose, an inert volume marker, was injected with the catecholamines (CAs). Ion-exchange chromatography was used to separate unmetabolized CAs from deaminated and O-methylated metabolites in plasma. Both CAs are cleared from plasma at an exponential two-component rate. By 10 min postinjection, CA-specific extraction lowered plasma [3H]NE by 65% and [3H]E by 50%. Over 80% of the 3H remaining in plasma 10 min after injection was metabolized to O-methylated and deaminated products. Thus trout are able to quickly and efficiently lower circulating CA levels through tissue accumulation and metabolism. Kidney, liver, spleen, and atrium accumulate more CA than other tissues, although most tissues bind CA to some extent. Gills preferentially accumulate CAs over sucrose. Skeletal muscle has a low affinity for CAs but by virtue of its large mass may be an important organ in CA metabolism. NE is removed from the circulation faster, and more NE is bound to tissues than E. A blood-brain barrier for E but not NE was observed

  2. Comparative Effects of Triflusal, S-Adenosylmethionine, and Dextromethorphan over Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Cámara-Lemarroy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R is a condition that stimulates an intense inflammatory response. No ideal treatment exists. Triflusal is an antiplatelet salicylate derivative with anti-inflammatory effects. S-adenosylmethionine is a metabolic precursor for glutathione, an endogenous antioxidant. Dextromethorphan is a low-affinity N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor inhibitor. There is evidence that these agents modulate some of the pathways involved in I/R physiopathology. Intestinal I/R was induced in rats by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 60 minutes, followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion. Rats either received saline or the drugs studied. At the end of the procedure, serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, malonaldehyde (MDA, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC were determined and intestinal morphology analyzed. I/R resulted in tissue damage, serum TNF-alpha and MDA elevations, and depletion of TAC. All drugs showed tissue protection. Only triflusal reduced TNF-alpha levels. All drugs lowered MDA levels, but only triflusal and S-adenosylmethionine maintained the serum TAC.

  3. Weak Links The Universal Key to the Stability of Networks and Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter

    2009-01-01

    How can our societies be stabilized in a crisis? Why can we enjoy and understand Shakespeare? Why are fruitflies uniform? How do omnivorous eating habits aid our survival? What makes the Mona Lisa’s smile beautiful? How do women keep our social structures intact? – Could there possibly be a single answer to all these questions? This book shows that the statement: "weak links stabilize complex systems" provides the key to understanding each of these intriguing puzzles, and many others too. The author (recipient of several distinguished science communication prizes) uses weak (low affinity, low probability) interactions as a thread to introduce a vast variety of networks from proteins to economics and ecosystems. Many people, from Nobel Laureates to high-school students have helped to make the book understandable to all interested readers. This unique book and the ideas it develops will have a significant impact on many, seemingly diverse, fields of study. A very personal, engaging, and unique book that wil...

  4. The kinetics of specific [3H]flunitrazepam ([3H]FNZ) binding in the brain of the epaulette shark (hemiscyllium ocellatum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, G.; Renshaw, G.M.C.; Dodd, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: We have previously established that the epaulette shark is tolerant to hypoxia and that the resulting brain hypometabolism appears to be correlated with increased levels of GABA. It is of interest to determine whether there is a change in GABA A receptor number and/or binding characteristics in response to hypoxia. The focus of this initial study is to determine the kinetics of [ 3 H]FNZ binding to the benzodiazapine binding site on the GABA A receptor in the brain, so that the effect of hypoxia on GABA A receptors can be determined. Adult epaulette sharks were anaesthetised with 80mg/L of MS222 and the brain was dissected and rapidly frozen. Membranes were prepared at 4 deg C by homogenising the dissected tissue in 0.32M sucrose and centrifuging the homogenate for 10 min at 6 000g. The supernatant was layered onto an aliquat of 0.8M sucrose then centrifuged for 30 min at 40 000g. After washing the membranes, the binding characteristics of [ 3 H]FNZ were examined using in vitro centrifugation assays. This method revealed that [ 3 H]FNZ bound specifically to low-affinity binding sites in an elasmobranch brain. This finding is in contrast with previous reports of little to no specific binding of [ 3 H]FNZ in elasmobranchs, which precluded an estimation of binding parameters. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  5. Relationships among morphine metabolism, pain and side effects during long-term treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gertrud; Christrup, Lona Louring; Sjøgren, Per

    2003-01-01

    The two metabolites of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), have been studied intensively in animals and humans during the past 30 years in order to elucidate their precise action and possible contribution to the desired effects and side effects seen after...... morphine administration. M3G and M6G are formed by morphine glucuronidation, mainly in the liver, and are excreted by the kidneys. The metabolites are found in the cerebrospinal fluid after single as well as multiple doses of morphine. M6G binds to opioid receptors, and animal studies have demonstrated...... of the studies have used lower doses of M6G than of morphine. M3G displays very low affinity for opioid receptors and has no analgesic activity. Animal studies have shown that M3G may antagonize the analgesic effect of morphine and M6G, but no human studies have demonstrated this. M3G has also been connected...

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapts its iron uptake strategies in function of the type of infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre eCornelis

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative -Proteobacterium which is known for its capacity to colonize various niches, including some invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, making it one of the most frequent bacteria causing opportunistic infections. P. aeruginosa is able to cause acute as well as chronic infections and it uses different colonization and virulence factors to do so. Infections range from septicemia, urinary infections, burn wound colonization, and chronic colonization of the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Like the vast majority of organisms, P. aeruginosa needs iron to sustain growth. P. aeruginosa utilizes different strategies to take up iron, depending on the type of infection it causes. Two siderophores are produced by this bacterium, pyoverdine and pyochelin, characterized by high and low affinities for iron respectively. P. aeruginosa is also able to utilize different siderophores from other microorganisms (siderophore piracy. It can also take up heme from hemoproteins via two different systems. Under microaerobic or anaerobic conditions, P. aeruginosa is also able to take up ferrous iron via its Feo system using redox-cycling phenazines. Depending on the type of infection, P. aeruginosa can therefore adapt by switching from one iron uptake system to another as we will describe in this short review.

  7. Adaptive Assembly: Maximizing the Potential of a Given Functional Peptide with a Tailor-Made Protein Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hideki; Honda, Shinya

    2015-09-17

    Protein engineering that exploits known functional peptides holds great promise for generating novel functional proteins. Here we propose a combinatorial approach, termed adaptive assembly, which provides a tailor-made protein scaffold for a given functional peptide. A combinatorial library was designed to create a tailor-made scaffold, which was generated from β hairpins derived from a 10-residue minimal protein "chignolin" and randomized amino acid sequences. We applied adaptive assembly to a peptide with low affinity for the Fc region of human immunoglobulin G, generating a 54-residue protein AF.p17 with a 40,600-fold enhanced affinity. The crystal structure of AF.p17 complexed with the Fc region revealed that the scaffold fixed the active conformation with a unique structure composed of a short α helix, β hairpins, and a loop-like structure. Adaptive assembly can take full advantage of known peptides as assets for generating novel functional proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. p75 Neurotrophin receptor differentiates between morphoeic basal cell carcinoma and desmoplastic trichoepithelioma: insights into the histogenesis of adnexal tumours based on embryology and hair follicle biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahl, D; Sellheyer, K

    2010-07-01

    Tumour development is frequently described in the basic pathology literature as a recapitulation of embryogenesis. However, a link between the embryology of the skin and the histogenesis of adnexal tumours has been largely overlooked. The low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) has a profound role in hair follicle biology. We therefore speculated that it is involved in the histogenesis of follicular adnexal tumours. One of the most challenging diagnoses in dermatopathology is differentiating morphoeic basal cell carcinoma from desmoplastic trichoepithelioma. To describe the expression pattern of p75NTR during cutaneous embryogenesis, in the adult hair follicle and in morphoeic basal cell carcinoma and desmoplastic trichoepithelioma. Evaluation of the staining pattern for p75NTR was performed using standard immunohistochemical techniques. For comparison, we examined staining for cytokeratin 20 which highlights Merkel cells. All 17 desmoplastic trichoepitheliomas were immunoreactive with > 80% of the cells stained, whereas 12 of the 14 (86%) morphoeic basal cell carcinomas were p75NTR negative. In the two positive cases of morphoeic basal cell carcinoma basal cell carcinoma favours a concept of this tumour as a more primitive follicular lesion with the characteristics of a carcinoma and not a hamartoma. We suggest including p75NTR as a tool in the differential diagnosis between morphoeic basal cell carcinoma and desmoplastic trichoepithelioma.

  9. EPR spectral changes of nitrosil hemes and their relation to the hemoglobin T-R transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louro, S.R.W.; Ribeiro, P.C.; Bemski, G.

    1980-09-01

    EPR spectra of nitrosil-hemes were used to study the quaternary structure of hemoglobin. Human adult hemoglobin has been titrated with nitric oxide at pH 7.0 and 25 0 C. After the equilibration of NO among the α and β subunits the samples were frozen for EPR measurements. The spectra were fitted by linear combinations of three standard signals: the first arising from NO - β hemes and the other two arising from NO - α hemes of molecules in the high and low affinity conformations. The fractional amounts of α subunits exhibiting the high affinity spectrum fitted the two-state model with L = 7 x 10 6 , and csup(α) sub(NO) and csup(β) sub(NO) approximately 0.01. Hemoglobin has been marked with nitric oxide at one chain using low-saturation amounts of nitric oxide. The EPR spectra were studied as a function of oxygen saturation. Linear combinations of the three standard signals above fitted these spectra. The fractions of molecules exhibiting the high affinity spectrum fitted the two-state model with L = 7 x 10 6 , csub(O 2 ) = 0.0033 and csup(α) sub(NO) = 0.08, instead of csup(α) sub(NO) = 0.01.Thus, the two state model is not adequate to describe the conformational transition of these hybrids. The results are evidence of the nonequivalence between oxygen and nitric oxide as ligands. (Author) [pt

  10. Enzymatic activities associated with arm regeneration and calcification in the starfish Asterias forbesi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donachy, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The enzymes studied include Ka + , K + -ATPase, Ca 2+ -ATPase, Mg 2+ -ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase. Each enzyme was examined for change in specific activity during salinity acclimation and arm regeneration. The effect of enzyme inhibition on 45 Ca deposition onto the calcified ossicles was examined and the enzymes were localized at the electron microscopic level. A. forbesi lacks a ouabain sensitive, Mg 2+ -dependent Ka + , K + -ATPase but possesses Mg 2+ -ATPase. Mg 2+ -ATPase was not affected by salinity and did not change during arm regeneration. A high affinity Ca 2+ -ATPase is also lacking in this starfish, but a low affinity form is present. Ca 2+ -ATPase is not involved in salinity acclimation of calcification, but may be involved in the would healing phase of arm regeneration. Alkaline phosphatase activity is not affected by salinity. Inhibition of this enzyme results in a significant increase in 45 Ca deposition onto the ossicles. During the early phase of arm regeneration, alkaline phosphatase activity increased significantly but gradually returned to control levels by 60 days post-autotomy

  11. Erythrocyte membrane ATPase and calcium pumping activities in porcine malignant hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatte, H.S.; Mickelson, J.R.; Addis, P.B.; Louis, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate possible abnormalities in erythrocyte membrane enzyme activities in the pharmacogenetic disorder MH, membrane ATPase activities have been examined in erythrocyte ghosts prepared from red blood cells of MHS and normal swine. While no differences were noted in Mg2+-ATPase activities, the (Na+, K+)-ATPase activity of MHS erythrocyte ghosts was less than that of normal ghosts. Ca2+-ATPase activity exhibited low- and high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites in both types of erythrocyte ghost. While the Km for Ca2+ was greater for normal than for MHS erythrocyte ghosts at the high-affinity Ca2+-binding site, the reverse was true at the low-affinity Ca2+-binding site. Irrespective of the type of calcium binding site occupied, the Vmax for normal erythrocyte ghost Ca2+-ATPase activity was greater than that for MHS ghosts. In the presence of calmodulin, there was now no difference between MHS and normal erythrocyte ghosts in either the Km for Ca2+ or the Vmax of the Ca2+-ATPase activity. To determine if the calcium pumping activity of intact MHS and normal pig erythrocytes differed, calcium efflux from the 45 Ca-loaded erythrocytes was determined; this activity was significantly greater for MHS than for normal erythrocytes. Thus, the present study confirms that there are abnormalities in the membranes of MHS pig red blood cells. However, we conclude that these abnormalities are unlikely to result in an impaired ability of MHS erythrocytes to regulate their cytosolic Ca2+ concentration

  12. Conformational Plasticity in the Transsynaptic Neurexin-Cerebellin-Glutamate Receptor Adhesion Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shouqiang; Seven, Alpay B.; Wang, Jing; Skiniotis, Georgios; Özkan, Engin (UC); (Michigan)

    2016-12-01

    Synaptic specificity is a defining property of neural networks. In the cerebellum, synapses between parallel fiber neurons and Purkinje cells are specified by the simultaneous interactions of secreted protein cerebellin with pre-synaptic neurexin and post-synaptic delta-type glutamate receptors (GluD). Here, we determined the crystal structures of the trimeric C1q-like domain of rat cerebellin-1, and the first complete ectodomain of a GluD, rat GluD2. Cerebellin binds to the LNS6 domain of α- and β-neurexin-1 through a high-affinity interaction that involves its highly flexible N-terminal domain. In contrast, we show that the interaction of cerebellin with isolated GluD2 ectodomain is low affinity, which is not simply an outcome of lost avidity when compared with binding with a tetrameric full-length receptor. Rather, high-affinity capture of cerebellin by post-synaptic terminals is likely controlled by long-distance regulation within this transsynaptic complex. Altogether, our results suggest unusual conformational flexibility within all components of the complex.

  13. Tethered ribozyme ligation enables detection of molecular proximity in homogeneous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Bella; Vyazmensky, Maria; Press, Olga; Volokita, Micha; Engel, Stanislav

    2015-03-01

    In contemporary drug discovery, bulk selection represents an important alternative to time consuming and expensive high-throughput screening. The selection methods, however, generally rely on affinity separation, a step that limits overall selection process efficiency. To overcome common drawbacks of conventional methods, we exploited the unique catalytic properties of an artificial enzyme, ribozyme ligase, to develop a selection methodology in which the entire detection process takes place in a homogeneous solution, thus eliminating the need for affinity separation. A molecular target is associated with the ribozyme, and library compounds are attached to a barcoded oligonucleotide that is a substrate for the ribozyme ligase. Spatial proximity resulting from specific target-compound interactions increases the probability of ribozyme ligation to the oligo-substrate, thus differentiating the interacting species from the bulk mixture. The covalent link formed between the ribozyme and target-interacting compounds diminishes the mass-action effect on the efficiency with which low-affinity and rare active species are detected. In addition, the magnitude of the detection signal associated with the interaction event renders the methodology an efficient platform for identifying inhibitors of intermolecular interactions. The proposed solution-based tethered ribozyme-ligation proximity detection method may facilitate the discovery of target-interacting compounds using both library selection and high-throughput screening approaches. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Selector function of MHC I molecules is determined by protein plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Alistair; Dalchau, Neil; Carter, Rachel; Emmott, Stephen; Phillips, Andrew; Werner, Jörn M.; Elliott, Tim

    2015-10-01

    The selection of peptides for presentation at the surface of most nucleated cells by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC I) is crucial to the immune response in vertebrates. However, the mechanisms of the rapid selection of high affinity peptides by MHC I from amongst thousands of mostly low affinity peptides are not well understood. We developed computational systems models encoding distinct mechanistic hypotheses for two molecules, HLA-B*44:02 (B*4402) and HLA-B*44:05 (B*4405), which differ by a single residue yet lie at opposite ends of the spectrum in their intrinsic ability to select high affinity peptides. We used in vivo biochemical data to infer that a conformational intermediate of MHC I is significant for peptide selection. We used molecular dynamics simulations to show that peptide selector function correlates with protein plasticity, and confirmed this experimentally by altering the plasticity of MHC I with a single point mutation, which altered in vivo selector function in a predictable way. Finally, we investigated the mechanisms by which the co-factor tapasin influences MHC I plasticity. We propose that tapasin modulates MHC I plasticity by dynamically coupling the peptide binding region and α3 domain of MHC I allosterically, resulting in enhanced peptide selector function.

  15. Soluble Moringa oleifera leaf extract reduces intracellular cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Tatip, Supinda; Kosasih, Sattawat; Auesukaree, Choowong

    2016-05-01

    Moringa oleifera leaves are a well-known source of antioxidants and traditionally used for medicinal applications. In the present study, the protective action of soluble M. oleifera leaf extract (MOLE) against cadmium toxicity was investigated in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that this extract exhibited a protective effect against oxidative stress induced by cadmium and H2O2 through the reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, not only the co-exposure of soluble MOLE with cadmium but also pretreatment of this extract prior to cadmium exposure significantly reduced the cadmium uptake through an inhibition of Fet4p, a low-affinity iron(II) transporter. In addition, the supplementation of soluble MOLE significantly reduced intracellular iron accumulation in a Fet4p-independent manner. Our findings suggest the potential use of soluble extract from M. oleifera leaves as a dietary supplement for protection against cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure characteristics for intestinal uptake of flavonoids in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yajing; Liang, Fuqiang; Liu, Kunyuan; Qaiser, Shakeel; Pan, Siyi; Xu, Xiaoyun

    2018-03-01

    Flavonoids are a large group of polyphenols and widely distributed in plant foods. Flavonoids exhibit various biological activities, such as anti-cancer, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory while poor oral bioavailability has been considered as a major hurdle in their use as functional foods. Cellular uptake and efflux of flavonoid implicates their bioavailability. To investigate the cellular uptake and efflux of flavonoids, 27 flavonoids were measured for their cellular uptake in Caco-2 cells with (CUV) and without (CU) the inhibitor of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) verapamil. Then, a quantitative structure-absorption relationship (QSAR) model containing 21 compounds as training set was obtained from their corresponding CU. The model showed good robustness and predictivity with a high cross-validation coefficient (Q 2 ) value of 0.809 and Log of the octanol/water partition coefficient (SlogP) and atomic charge on carbon 5 (Q C5 ) were related to flavonoid uptake. The CUV of some flavonoids were significantly (ppumped out by P-gp. The structure-affinity relationship of flavonoids as substrates of P-gp was determined with the presence of 4'-OCH 3 , 3'-OCH 3 and the absence of 3'-OH, 3-OH and 4'-OH favorable for the affinity of flavonoids. These results provide valuable information for screening flavonoids with good absorption and low affinity with transporters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Fluorine NMR-based screening on cell membrane extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Marina; Romeo, Elisa; Lambruschini, Chiara; Piomelli, Daniele; Bandiera, Tiziano; Scarpelli, Rita; Garau, Gianpiero; Dalvit, Claudio

    2014-02-01

    The possibility of measuring the action of inhibitors of specific enzymatic reactions in intact cells, cell lysates or membrane preparations represents a major advance in the lead discovery process. Despite the relevance of assaying in physiological conditions, only a small number of biophysical techniques, often requiring complex set-up, are applicable to these sample types. Here, we demonstrate the first application of n-fluorine atoms for biochemical screening (n-FABS), a homogeneous and versatile assay based on (19) F NMR spectroscopy, to the detection of high- and low-affinity inhibitors of a membrane enzyme in cell extracts and determination of their IC50 values. Our approach can allow the discovery of novel binding fragments against targets known to be difficult to purify or where membrane-association is required for activity. These results pave the way for future applications of the methodology to these relevant and complex biological systems. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Potassium transport at the plasma membrane of the food spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidchik, Vadim; Macpherson, Neil; Davies, Julia M

    2005-01-15

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii is a commercially important spoilage yeast capable of growth at low pH in the presence of weak organic acid preservatives, such as benzoic acid. A patch-clamp electrophysiological analysis of plasma membrane K+ transport revealed a high conductance pathway for low-affinity K+ uptake. In contrast to the equivalent K+ transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this system remained operative at low extracellular pH and may therefore facilitate K+ uptake in K(+)-rich and acidic beverages. Benzoate inhibited growth, increased intracellular K+ content, yet decreased the magnitude of the K+ uptake conductance; specifically, the hyperpolarization-activated inwardly-rectifying component was reduced. It is proposed that this adaptation helps maintain a hyperpolarized membrane voltage to effect continued ATPase-mediated H+ extrusion and so combat preservative-induced cytosolic acidosis. Again in contrast to S. cerevisiae, the K+ conductance was relatively insensitive to increased extracellular Ca2+. Paradoxically (and unlike S. cerevisiae) increasing extracellular Ca2+ inhibited growth, suggesting a simple expedient to limit spoilage by Z. bailii.

  19. Amyloid- and FDG-PET in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Correlation with pathological prion protein in neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Guerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Romeral, María; Mayo, Diego; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-05-04

    The role of positron emission tomography (PET) in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is less defined than in other neurodegenerative diseases. We studied the correlation between the uptake of 18 F-florbetaben and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose with pathological prion protein deposition in histopathology in a case. A patient with 80 y old with a rapid neurological deterioration with a confirmed diagnosis of CJD was studied. PET and MRI studies were performed between 13-20 d before the death. A region of interest analysis was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping. MRI showed atrophy with no other alterations. FDG-PET showed extensive areas of hypometabolism including left frontoparietal lobes as well as bilateral thalamus. Correlation between uptake of 18 F-florbetaben and pathological prion protein deposition was r = 0.786 (p < 0.05). Otherwise, correlation between uptake of 18 F-FDG and pathological prion protein was r = 0.357 (p = 0.385). Immunohistochemistry with β-amyloid did not show amyloid deposition or neuritic plaques. Our study supports the use of FDG-PET in the assessment of CJD. FDG-PET may be especially useful in cases of suspected CJD and negative MRI. Furthermore, this case report provides more evidence about the behavioral of amyloid tracers, and the possibility of a low-affinity binding to other non-amyloid proteins, such as the pathological prion protein, is discussed.

  20. [Kinetic characteristics of extracellular catalase from Penicillium piceum F-648 and variants of fungi, adapted to hydrogen peroxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I; Moroz, I V; Pavlovskaia, Zh I; Mikhaĭlova, R V

    2002-01-01

    A comparative kinetic study of extracellular catalases produced by Penicillium piceum F-648 and their variants adapted to H2O2 was performed in culture liquid filtrates. The specific activity of catalase, the maximum rate of catalase-induced H2O2 degradation (Vmax),Vmax/KM ratio, and the catalase inactivation rate constant in the enzymatic reaction (kin, s-1) were estimated in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 30 degrees C. The effective constant representing the rate of catalase thermal inactivation (kin*, s-1) was determined at 45 degrees C. In all samples, the specific activity and KM for catalase were maximum at a protein concentration in culture liquid filtrates of 2.5-3.5 x 10(-4) mg/ml. The effective constants describing the rate of H2O2 degradation (k, s-1) were similar to that observed in the initial culture. These values reflected a twofold decrease in catalase activity in culture liquid filtrates. We hypothesized that culture liquid filtrates contain two isoforms of extracellular catalase characterized by different activities and affinities for H2O2. Catalases from variants 5 and 3 with high and low affinities for H2O2, respectively, had a greater operational stability than the enzyme from the initial culture. The method of adaptive selection for H2O2 can be used to obtain fungal variants producing extracellular catalases with improved properties.

  1. Plasma clearance, metabolism, and tissue accumulation of 3H-labeled catecholamines in trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekvasil, N.P.; Olson, K.R.

    1986-03-01

    Plasma clearance, metabolism, and tissue accumulation of (3H)norepinephrine (NE) and (3H)epinephrine (E) were measured after injection into the dorsal aorta of chronically catheterized trout, Salmo gairdneri. Sucrose, an inert volume marker, was injected with the catecholamines (CAs). Ion-exchange chromatography was used to separate unmetabolized CAs from deaminated and O-methylated metabolites in plasma. Both CAs are cleared from plasma at an exponential two-component rate. By 10 min postinjection, CA-specific extraction lowered plasma (3H)NE by 65% and (3H)E by 50%. Over 80% of the 3H remaining in plasma 10 min after injection was metabolized to O-methylated and deaminated products. Thus trout are able to quickly and efficiently lower circulating CA levels through tissue accumulation and metabolism. Kidney, liver, spleen, and atrium accumulate more CA than other tissues, although most tissues bind CA to some extent. Gills preferentially accumulate CAs over sucrose. Skeletal muscle has a low affinity for CAs but by virtue of its large mass may be an important organ in CA metabolism. NE is removed from the circulation faster, and more NE is bound to tissues than E. A blood-brain barrier for E but not NE was observed.

  2. Epac and the high affinity rolipram binding conformer of PDE4 modulate neurite outgrowth and myelination using an in vitro spinal cord injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomkamp, S D; McGrath, M A; Houslay, M D; Barnett, S C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose cAMP and pharmacological inhibition of PDE4, which degrades it, are promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Using our previously described in vitro SCI model, we studied the mechanisms by which cAMP modulators promote neurite outgrowth and myelination using enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram and other modulators of downstream signalling effectors. Experimental Approach Rat mixed neural cell myelinating cultures were cut with a scalpel and treated with enantiomers of the PDE4-specific inhibitor rolipram, Epac agonists and PKA antagonists. Neurite outgrowth, density and myelination were assessed by immunocytochemistry and cytokine levels analysed by qPCR. Key Results Inhibition of the high-affinity rolipram-binding state (HARBS), rather than the low-affinity rolipram binding state (LARBS) PDE4 conformer promoted neurite outgrowth and myelination. These effects were mediated through the activation of Epac and not through PKA. Expression of the chemokine CXCL10, known to inhibit myelination, was markedly elevated in astrocytes after Rho inhibition and this was blocked by inhibition of Rho kinase or PDE4. Conclusions and Implications PDE4 inhibitors targeted at the HARBS conformer or Epac agonists may provide promising novel targets for the treatment of SCI. Our study demonstrates the differential mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as the benefit of a combined pharmacological approach and highlighting potential promising targets for the treatment of SCI. These findings need to be confirmed in vivo. PMID:24467222

  3. 6-Formylindolo[3,2-b]Carbazole Accelerates Skin Wound Healing via Activation of ERK, but Not Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino-Koga, Saori; Uchi, Hiroshi; Mitoma, Chikage; Wu, Zhouwei; Kiyomatsu, Mari; Fuyuno, Yoko; Nagae, Konosuke; Yasumatsu, Mao; Suico, Mary Ann; Kai, Hirofumi; Furue, Masutaka

    2017-10-01

    Wound healing is an elaborate process composed of overlapping phases, such as proliferation and remodeling, and is delayed in several circumstances, including diabetes. Although several treatment strategies for chronic wounds, such as growth factors, have been applied, further alternatives are required. The skin, especially keratinocytes, is continually exposed to UV rays, which impairs wound healing. 6-Formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) is a tryptophan photoproduct formed by UV exposure, indicating that FICZ might be one of the effectors of UV radiation. In contrast, treatment with tryptophan, the precursor for FICZ, promoted wound closure in keratinocytes. Therefore, the aim of our study was to determine the role of FICZ in wound healing. Here we showed that FICZ enhanced keratinocyte migration through mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, and promoted wound healing in various mouse models, including db/db mice, which exhibit wound healing impairments because of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, FICZ, the endogenous ligand of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor, accelerated migration even in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor knockdown condition and also promoted wound healing in DBA/2 mice, bearing a low-affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor, suggesting that FICZ enhanced keratinocyte migration in a mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent, but aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent, manner. The function of FICZ might indicate the possibility of its clinical use for intractable chronic wounds. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. AgCad2 cadherin in Anopheles gambiae larvae is a putative receptor of Cry11Ba toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Gang; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Rui; Abdullah, Amir M; Linser, Paul J; Adang, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    In an effort to study the mode of action of Cry11Ba, we identified toxin binding proteins in Anopheles gambiae larval midgut and investigated their receptor roles. Previously, an aminopeptidase (AgAPN2) and an alkaline phosphatase (AgALP1) were identified as receptors for Cry11Ba toxin in A. gambiae. However, an A. gambiae cadherin (AgCad1) that bound Cry11Ba with low affinity (K(d) = 766 nM) did not support a receptor role of AgCad1 for Cry11Ba. Here, we studied a second A. gambiae cadherin (AgCad2) that shares 14% identity to AgCad1. Immunohistochemical study showed that the protein is localized on A. gambiae larval midgut apical membranes. Its cDNA was cloned and the protein was analyzed as a transmembrane protein containing 14 cadherin repeats. An Escherichia coli expressed CR14MPED fragment of AgCad2 bound Cry11Ba with high affinity (K(d) = 11.8 nM), blocked Cry11Ba binding to A. gambiae brush border vesicles and reduced Cry11Ba toxicity in bioassays. Its binding to Cry11Ba could be completely competed off by AgCad1, but only partially competed by AgALP1. The results are evidence that AgCad2 may function as a receptor for Cry11Ba in A. gambiae larvae. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Structure of a TCR with High Affinity for Self-antigen Reveals Basis for Escape from Negative Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Yin; Y Li; M Kerzic; R Martin; R Mariuzza

    2011-12-31

    The failure to eliminate self-reactive T cells during negative selection is a prerequisite for autoimmunity. To escape deletion, autoreactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) may form unstable complexes with self-peptide-MHC by adopting suboptimal binding topologies compared with anti-microbial TCRs. Alternatively, escape can occur by weak binding between self-peptides and MHC. We determined the structure of a human autoimmune TCR (MS2-3C8) bound to a self-peptide from myelin basic protein (MBP) and the multiple sclerosis-associated MHC molecule HLA-DR4. MBP is loosely accommodated in the HLA-DR4-binding groove, accounting for its low affinity. Conversely, MS2-3C8 binds MBP-DR4 as tightly as the most avid anti-microbial TCRs. MS2-3C8 engages self-antigen via a docking mode that resembles the optimal topology of anti-foreign TCRs, but is distinct from that of other autoreactive TCRs. Combined with a unique CDR3 conformation, this docking mode compensates for the weak binding of MBP to HLA-DR4 by maximizing interactions between MS2-3C8 and MBP. Thus, the MS2-3C8-MBP-DR4 complex reveals the basis for an alternative strategy whereby autoreactive T cells escape negative selection, yet retain the ability to initiate autoimmunity.

  6. Serum or breast milk immunoglobulins mask the self-reactivity of human natural IgG antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Manoylov, Iliyan; Dimitrov, Jordan D; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2014-04-01

    B cells producing IgG antibodies specific to a variety of self- or foreign antigens are a normal constituent of the immune system of all healthy individuals. These naturally occurring IgG antibodies are found in the serum, external secretions, and pooled human immunoglobulin preparations. They bind with low affinity to antigens, which can also be targets for pathologic autoantibodies. An enhancement of naturally occurring IgG autoantibody activity was observed after treatment of human IgG molecules with protein-destabilizing agents. We have investigated the interactions of human immunoglobulins that were obtained from serum or from breast milk of healthy individuals or IVIg with human liver antigens. Proteins from an individual serum or milk were isolated by two methods, one of which included exposure to low pH and the other did not. Purified serum, mucosal IgM, IgA, and the fraction containing immunoglobulin G F(ab')2 fragments each inhibited the binding of a single donor or pooled IgG to human liver antigens. Our study presents findings regarding the role of the breast milk or serum antibodies in blocking the self-reactivity of IgG antibodies. It supports the suggestion that not IVIg only, but also the pooled human IgM and IgA might possess a potent beneficial immunomodulatory activity in autoimmune patients. © 2013 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Differences in the dynamics of serotonin reuptake transporter occupancy may explain superior clinical efficacy of escitalopram versus citalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Siegfried; Sacher, Julia; Klein, Nikolas; Mossaheb, Nilufar; Attarbaschi-Steiner, Trawat; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Spindelegger, Christoph; Asenbaum, Susanne; Holik, Alexander; Dudczak, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Escitalopram the S-enantiomer of the racemate citalopram, is clinically more effective than citalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder. However, the precise mechanism by which escitalopram achieves superiority over citalopram is yet to be determined. It has been hypothesized that the therapeutically inactive R-enantiomer competes with the serotonin-enhancing S-enantiomer at a low-affinity allosteric site on serotonin reuptake transporters (SERTs), and reduces the effectiveness of the S-enantiomer at the primary, high-affinity serotonin-binding site. This study summarizes the results of two recent single-photon emission computerized tomography studies measuring SERT occupancy in citalopram-treated and escitalopram-treated healthy volunteers, after a single dose and multiple doses (i.e. under steady-state conditions). The single-dose study showed no attenuating effect of R-citalopram. After multiple dosing, however, SERT occupancy was significantly reduced in the presence of R-citalopram. Under steady-state conditions, R-enantiomer concentrations were greater than for the S-enantiomer because of slower clearance of R-citalopram. A pooled analysis suggests that build-up of the R-enantiomer after repeated citalopram dosing may lead to increased inhibition of S-enantiomer occupancy of SERT. This review adds to the growing body of evidence regarding differences in the dynamics of SERT occupancy, that is, molecular mechanisms underlying the often-observed superior clinical efficacy of escitalopram compared with citalopram in major depressive disorder.

  8. Profile of blonanserin for the treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenjin, Tomomi; Miyamoto, Seiya; Ninomiya, Yuriko; Kitajima, Rei; Ogino, Shin; Miyake, Nobumi; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    Blonanserin was developed as an antipsychotic drug in Japan and approved for the treatment of schizophrenia. It belongs to a series of 4-phenyl-2-(1-piperazinyl)pyridines and acts as an antagonist at dopamine D2, D3, and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. Blonanserin has low affinity for 5-HT2C, adrenergic α1, histamine H1, and muscarinic M1 receptors, but displays relatively high affinity for 5-HT6 receptors. In several short-term double-blind clinical trials, blonanserin had equal efficacy as haloperidol and risperidone for positive symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia and was also superior to haloperidol for improving negative symptoms. Blonanserin is generally well tolerated and has a low propensity to cause metabolic side effects and prolactin elevation. We recently reported that blonanserin can improve some types of cognitive function associated with prefrontal cortical function in patients with first-episode and chronic schizophrenia. Taken together, these results suggest that blonanserin may be a promising candidate for a first-line antipsychotic for acute and maintenance therapy for schizophrenia. Further comparative studies are warranted to clarify the benefit/risk profile of blonanserin and its role in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  9. Effects of clozapine on adipokine secretions/productions and lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubai, Tomomi; Yoshimi, Akira; Hamada, Yoji; Nakao, Makoto; Arima, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka; Noda, Yukihiro

    2017-02-01

    Clozapine, a second-generation antipsychotic (SGA), is a cause of side effects related to metabolic syndrome. The participation of serotonin 5-HT 2C and histamine H 1 receptors in the central nervous system has been reported as a mechanism of the weight gain caused by clozapine. In the present study, we investigated the direct pharmacological action of clozapine on the 3T3-L1 adipocytes and compared it to that of blonanserin, an SGA with low affinity for both receptors. Short-term exposure to clozapine decreased secretion and mRNA expression of leptin. Long-term exposure decreased leptin as well as adiponectin secretion, and further increased lipid droplets accumulation. However, short- and long-term exposures to blonanserin did not affect these parameters. A selective serotonin 5-HT 2C , but not a histamine H 1 , receptor antagonist enhanced the decreased secretion of leptin induced by short-term exposure to clozapine, but did not affect the increased accumulation of lipid droplets. Our findings indicate that clozapine, but not blonanserin, strongly and directly affected the secretion of adipokines, such as leptin, in adipocytes and caused adipocyte enlargement. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Profile of blonanserin for the treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenjin T

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tomomi Tenjin, Seiya Miyamoto, Yuriko Ninomiya, Rei Kitajima, Shin Ogino, Nobumi Miyake, Noboru YamaguchiDepartment of Neuropsychiatry, St Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, JapanAbstract: Blonanserin was developed as an antipsychotic drug in Japan and approved for the treatment of schizophrenia. It belongs to a series of 4-phenyl-2-(1-piperazinylpyridines and acts as an antagonist at dopamine D2, D3, and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors. Blonanserin has low affinity for 5-HT2C, adrenergic α1, histamine H1, and muscarinic M1 receptors, but displays relatively high affinity for 5-HT6 receptors. In several short-term double-blind clinical trials, blonanserin had equal efficacy as haloperidol and risperidone for positive symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia and was also superior to haloperidol for improving negative symptoms. Blonanserin is generally well tolerated and has a low propensity to cause metabolic side effects and prolactin elevation. We recently reported that blonanserin can improve some types of cognitive function associated with prefrontal cortical function in patients with first-episode and chronic schizophrenia. Taken together, these results suggest that blonanserin may be a promising candidate for a first-line antipsychotic for acute and maintenance therapy for schizophrenia. Further comparative studies are warranted to clarify the benefit/risk profile of blonanserin and its role in the treatment of schizophrenia.Keywords: blonanserin, schizophrenia, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety

  11. Intramolecular Immunological Signal Hypothesis Revived - Structural Background of Signalling Revealed by Using Congo Red as a Specific Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagusiak, A.; Konieczny, L.; Król, M.; Marszałek, P.; Piekarska, B.; Piwowar, P.; Roterman, I.; Rybarska, J.; Stopa, B.; Zemanek, G.

    2014-01-01

    Micellar structures formed by self-assembling Congo red molecules bind to proteins penetrating into functionrelated unstable packing areas. Here, we have used Congo red - a supramolecular protein ligand to investigate how the intramolecular structural changes that take place in antibodies following antigen binding lead to complement activation. According to our findings, Congo red binding significantly enhances the formation of antigen-antibody complexes. As a result, even low-affinity transiently binding antibodies can participate in immune complexes in the presence of Congo red, although immune complexes formed by these antibodies fail to trigger the complement cascade. This indicates that binding of antibodies to the antigen may not, by itself, fulfill the necessary conditions to generate the signal which triggers effector activity. These findings, together with the results of molecular dynamics simulation studies, enable us to conclude that, apart from the necessary assembling of antibodies, intramolecular structural changes generated by strains which associate high- affinity bivalent antibody fitting to antigen determinants are also required to cross the complement activation threshold. PMID:25429660

  12. Intramolecular immunological signal hypothesis revived--structural background of signalling revealed by using Congo Red as a specific tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagusiak, A; Konieczny, L; Krol, M; Marszalek, P; Piekarska, B; Piwowar, P; Roterman, I; Rybarska, J; Stopa, B; Zemanek, G

    2015-01-01

    Micellar structures formed by self-assembling Congo red molecules bind to proteins penetrating into function-related unstable packing areas. Here, we have used Congo red--a supramolecular protein ligand--to investigate how the intramolecular structural changes that take place in antibodies following antigen binding lead to complement activation. According to our findings, Congo red binding significantly enhances the formation of antigen-antibody complexes. As a result, even low-affinity transiently binding antibodies can participate in immune complexes in the presence of Congo red, although immune complexes formed by these antibodies fail to trigger the complement cascade. This indicates that binding of antibodies to the antigen may not, by itself, fulfill the necessary conditions to generate the signal which triggers effector activity. These findings, together with the results of molecular dynamics simulation studies, enable us to conclude that, apart from the necessary assembling of antibodies, intramolecular structural changes generated by strains which associate high- affinity bivalent antibody fitting to antigen determinants are also required to cross the complement activation threshold.

  13. Convulxin binding to platelet receptor GPVI: competition with collagen related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedergang, F; Alcover, A; Knight, C G; Farndale, R W; Barnes, M J; Francischetti, I M; Bon, C; Leduc, M

    2000-06-24

    Convulxin (CVX), a potent platelet aggregating protein from the venom of the snake Crotalus durissus terrificus, is known to bind to the platelet collagen receptor, glycoprotein VI (GPVI). CVX binding to human platelets was investigated by flow cytometry, using fluorescein labeled convulxin (FITC-CVX). Scatchard analysis indicated high and low affinity binding sites with Kd values of 0.6 and 4 nM and Bmax values of 1200 and 2000 binding sites per platelet. FITC-CVX binding was inhibited by collagen related peptides (CRPs) comprising a repeated GPO sequence, namely GCO(GPO)(10)GCOGNH(2) and GKO(GPO)(10)GKOGNH(2), which also bind to receptor GPVI. These peptides (monomeric or cross-linked forms) gave a high affinity inhibition of 10-20% for concentrations between 10 ng/ml and 5 microg/ml, followed by a second phase of inhibition at concentrations greater than 5 microg/ml. It was shown also that the inhibition of FITC-CVX binding by CRPs was independent on the time of preincubation of platelets with CRPs, and the same percentage of inhibition was seen with various concentrations of convulxin. Confocal microscopy of the distribution of FITC-CVX binding sites on platelets showed an homogeneous distribution of FITC-CVX bound to GPVI, although some limited clustering may exist. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. A new tumor marker: CA125 for ovarian carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakajima, K.

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate CA125 as a tumor marker for ovarian carcinomas, CA125 concentrations were measured by the simultaneous immunoradiometric assay. The binding of I-125 labeled monoclonal antibody to the bead-bound antigen was greatly influenced by many factors, such as the incubation time, pH, IgG concentrations of samples, the sequence of addition of the tracer and samples and so on. By applying the forward two-step assay, diminished binding was observed than in the simultaneous assay, probably due to the relatively low affinity of the antibody. This simultaneous immunoradiometric assay resulted in the ''prozone'' or ''hook'' effect at high CA125 samples and proper dilution was necessary to determine the accurate CA125 values. All 72 normal control subjects had low concentrations of under 35 U/ml. Elevated serum CA125 was observed in 43% (9/21) cases with malignant ovarian tumors, depending on the stage and the histopathological findings. All 4 serous cystadenocarcinomas and 2 of 3 endometrioid carcinomas were positive and the measurement of serum CA125 was useful in the sequential monitoring of these cases. In contrast, 51 benign gynecological diseases, none had elevated serum CA125 except one with follicular cyst. Among 75 cases with non-gynecological benign and malignant diseases, only 1 of 12 gastric carcinomas and 2 of 13 pancreatic carcinomas had elevated CA125 levels. In summary, CA125 is a promising and relatively specific marker for ovarian carcinomas

  15. VPS29 is not an active metallo-phosphatase but is a rigid scaffold required for retromer interaction with accessory proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Swarbrick

    Full Text Available VPS29 is a key component of the cargo-binding core complex of retromer, a protein assembly with diverse roles in transport of receptors within the endosomal system. VPS29 has a fold related to metal-binding phosphatases and mediates interactions between retromer and other regulatory proteins. In this study we examine the functional interactions of mammalian VPS29, using X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. We find that although VPS29 can coordinate metal ions Mn(2+ and Zn(2+ in both the putative active site and at other locations, the affinity for metals is low, and lack of activity in phosphatase assays using a putative peptide substrate support the conclusion that VPS29 is not a functional metalloenzyme. There is evidence that structural elements of VPS29 critical for binding the retromer subunit VPS35 may undergo both metal-dependent and independent conformational changes regulating complex formation, however studies using ITC and NMR residual dipolar coupling (RDC measurements show that this is not the case. Finally, NMR chemical shift mapping indicates that VPS29 is able to associate with SNX1 via a conserved hydrophobic surface, but with a low affinity that suggests additional interactions will be required to stabilise the complex in vivo. Our conclusion is that VPS29 is a metal ion-independent, rigid scaffolding domain, which is essential but not sufficient for incorporation of retromer into functional endosomal transport assemblies.

  16. Arsonic acid as a robust anchor group for the surface modification of Fe3O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jihoon; Moon, Doo-Sik; Lee, Jin-Kyu

    2013-12-03

    In order to use iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4) in various applications, a surface modification that provides colloidal stability and additional functionality to the nanoparticles is necessary. For the modification of the nanoparticle surface with ligand molecules, the ligand molecule should contain an anchor group that has a strong affinity for the surface. However, currently used anchor groups have shown some problems such as low affinity and stability as well as reactivity with the surface. In this study, arsonic acid (RAsO(OH)2) was investigated as a novel anchor group. It was possible to introduce azide groups on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles using 4-azidophenylarsonic acid, and the desired functional molecules could be chemically attached to the surface via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry). By quantifying and comparing the amount of attached anchors on the surface, it was found that arsonic acid displays better affinity than other currently used anchors (catechol, carboxylic acid). Furthermore, we examined the binding reversibility, long-term anchoring stability, and anchoring stability at various pH values. It was revealed that arsonic acid is a stable anchor in various conditions.

  17. Adenosine Monophosphate Binding Stabilizes the KTN Domain of the Shewanella denitrificans Kef Potassium Efflux System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliotas, Christos; Grayer, Samuel C; Ekkerman, Silvia; Chan, Anthony K N; Healy, Jess; Marius, Phedra; Bartlett, Wendy; Khan, Amjad; Cortopassi, Wilian A; Chandler, Shane A; Rasmussen, Tim; Benesch, Justin L P; Paton, Robert S; Claridge, Timothy D W; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R; Naismith, James H; Conway, Stuart J

    2017-08-15

    Ligand binding is one of the most fundamental properties of proteins. Ligand functions fall into three basic types: substrates, regulatory molecules, and cofactors essential to protein stability, reactivity, or enzyme-substrate complex formation. The regulation of potassium ion movement in bacteria is predominantly under the control of regulatory ligands that gate the relevant channels and transporters, which possess subunits or domains that contain Rossmann folds (RFs). Here we demonstrate that adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is bound to both RFs of the dimeric bacterial Kef potassium efflux system (Kef), where it plays a structural role. We conclude that AMP binds with high affinity, ensuring that the site is fully occupied at all times in the cell. Loss of the ability to bind AMP, we demonstrate, causes protein, and likely dimer, instability and consequent loss of function. Kef system function is regulated via the reversible binding of comparatively low-affinity glutathione-based ligands at the interface between the dimer subunits. We propose this interfacial binding site is itself stabilized, at least in part, by AMP binding.

  18. Polychaetes from Aysen Fjord, Chile: distribution, abundance and biogeographical comparison with the shallow soft-bottom polychaete fauna from Antarctica and the Magellan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Cañete

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the composition, abundance and biogeographical relationship of the benthic polychaetes collected in three shallow subtidal locations (mouth of Cuervo and Condor rivers and Acantilada Bay from Aysen Fjord, AF, Chile (45ºS, 73ºW, and provides a comparison with data on shallow soft-bottom polychaetes from Antarctica and other locations of the Magellan Province: Dalcahue Channel, DC (42º22´S, 73º39´W, Puerto Cisnes, Puyuhuapi Channel, PC (44º43´S, 72º42´W and Magellan Straits, MS. AF polychaete fauna comprises 38 species, the macrobenthic taxon being most representative in terms of abundance and species richness. The importance of polychaetes seems to be higher in fjords than in channels. Low numbers of common species were detected among DC, PC, MS and AF, indicating differences along the influence area of the Cape Horn Current or along the Magellan Province. The polychaetes from AF show low affinities with Antarctica; maximum number of common species was observed with the Antarctic Peninsula, whereas the lowest values were recorded from locations in the Ross and Weddell Seas. Coincidence in some ecological attributes between AF and Antarctica indicate that polychaetes may play an important and similar ecological role in both environments.

  19. Interaction of phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin in rheumatoid therapy: 1H NMR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-09-01

    The monitoring of drug concentration in blood serum is necessary in multi-drug therapy. Mechanism of drug binding with serum albumin (SA) is one of the most important factors which determine drug concentration and its transport to the destination tissues. In rheumatoid diseases drugs which can induce various adverse effects are commonly used in combination therapy. Such proceeding may result in the enhancement of those side effects due to drug interaction. Interaction of phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin and competition between them in gout has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1H NMR) technique. The aim of the study was to determine the low affinity binding sites, the strength and kind of interaction between serum albumin and drugs used in combination therapy. The study of competition between phenylbutazone and colchicine in binding to serum albumin points to the change of their affinity to serum albumin in the ternary systems. This should be taken into account in multi-drug therapy. This work is a subsequent part of the spectroscopic study on Phe-COL-SA interactions [A. Sułkowska, et al., J. Mol. Struct. 881 (2008) 97-106].

  20. Stratification of antibody-positive subjects by antibody level reveals an impact of immunogenicity on pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic. The antibody responses displayed a wide range of relative concentrations (30 ng/mL to >13 μg/mL) and peaked at various times during the study. To evaluate the impact of immunogenicity on PK, AMG 317 concentration data were analyzed following stratification by dose group, time point, antibody status (positive or negative), and antibody level (relative concentration). With dose group as a stratifying variable, a moderate reduction in AMG 317 levels (AMG 317 levels was revealed when antibody data was stratified by both time point and antibody level. In general, high ADA concentrations (>500 ng/mL) and later time points (week 12) were associated with significantly (up to 97%) lower trough AMG 317 concentrations. The use of quasi-quantitative antibody data and appropriate statistical methods was critical for the most comprehensive evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity on PK.

  1. Improving the physical and moisture barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum biodegradable film with stearic and palmitic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedi, Samira; Koocheki, Arash; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Zahedi, Younes

    2015-01-01

    Stearic and palmitic fatty acids (10%, 20% and 30%, W/W gum) were used to improve the barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum (LPSG) film. The impact of the incorporation of fatty acids into the film matrix was studied by investigating the physical, mechanical, and barrier properties of the films. Addition of stearic and palmitic fatty acids to LPSG films reduced their water vapor permeability (WVP), moisture content, water solubility and water adsorption. Increasing fatty acid concentration from 10% to 30%, reduced the elongation at break (EB). Lower values of tensile strength (TS) and elastic modulus (EM) were obtained in the presence of higher fatty acids concentrations. Incorporation of fatty acids led to production of opaque films and the opacity increased as function of fatty acids concentration. Results showed that moisture content, water solubility and WVP decreased as the chain length of fatty acid increased. Therefore, LPSG-fatty acids composite film could be used for packaging in which a low affinity toward water is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Atrazine Molecular Imprinted Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Far-Infrared and Ultraviolet Induced Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrazine molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs were comparatively synthesized using identical polymer formulation by far-infrared (FIR radiation and ultraviolet (UV-induced polymerization, respectively. Equilibrium binding experiments were carried out with the prepared MIPs; the results showed that MIPuv possessed specific binding to atrazine compared with their MIPFIR radiation counterparts. Scatchard plot’s of both MIPs indicated that the affinities of the binding sites in MIPs are heterogeneous and can be approximated by two dissociation-constants corresponding to the high- and low-affinity binding sites. Moreover, several common pesticides including atrazine, cyromazine, metamitron, simazine, ametryn, terbutryn were tested to determine their specificity, similar imprinting factor (IF and different selectivity index (SI for both MIPs. Physical characterization of the polymers revealed that the different polymerization methods led to slight differences in polymer structures and performance by scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR, and mercury analyzer (MA. Finally, both MIPs were used as selective sorbents for solid phase extraction (SPE of atrazine from lake water, followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis. Compared with commercial C18 SPE sorbent (86.4%–94.8%, higher recoveries of atrazine in spiked lake water were obtained in the range of 90.1%–97.1% and 94.4%–101.9%, for both MIPs, respectively.

  3. Determination of affinity constants and response factors of the noncovalent dimer of gramicidin by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitta, Raghu K; Rempel, Don L; Gross, Michael L

    2005-07-01

    The dimerization of gramicidin, a 15-residue membrane peptide, in solution can be viewed as a model for protein-protein interactions. We reported previously that the dimer can be observed when electrosprayed from organic solvents and that the abundances of the dimer depends on the dielectric constant of the solvent. Here, we report an effort to determine an affinity constant for the dimerization of gramicidin by using gas-phase abundance. Two issues affecting the determination are the electrospray-induced dissociation of the dimer and discrimination in the electrospray of the dimer compared with the monomer. Other methods developed for the purpose of determining affinity from mass spectral abundance do not address the dissociation of the complex in the gas phase or can not be applied for cases of low affinity constant, K(a). We present a mathematical model that uses the ratio of the signal intensities of the dimer and the monomer during a titration. The model also incorporates the dissociation and an electrospray ionization-response factor of the dimer for extracting the affinity constant for the dimerization of gramicidin. The dimerization constants from the new method agree within a factor of two with values reported in the literature.

  4. Rapid and transient stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by melatonin in normal and tumor leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radogna, Flavia; Paternoster, Laura; De Nicola, Milena; Cerella, Claudia; Ammendola, Sergio; Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio; Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria; Ghibelli, Lina

    2009-01-01

    Melatonin is a modified tryptophan with potent biological activity, exerted by stimulation of specific plasma membrane (MT1/MT2) receptors, by lower affinity intracellular enzymatic targets (quinone reductase, calmodulin), or through its strong anti-oxidant ability. Scattered studies also report a perplexing pro-oxidant activity, showing that melatonin is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that on U937 human monocytes melatonin promotes intracellular ROS in a fast (< 1 min) and transient (up to 5-6 h) way. Melatonin equally elicits its pro-radical effect on a set of normal or tumor leukocytes; intriguingly, ROS production does not lead to oxidative stress, as shown by absence of protein carbonylation, maintenance of free thiols, preservation of viability and regular proliferation rate. ROS production is independent from MT1/MT2 receptor interaction, since a) requires micromolar (as opposed to nanomolar) doses of melatonin; b) is not contrasted by the specific MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole; c) is not mimicked by a set of MT1/MT2 high affinity melatonin analogues. Instead, chlorpromazine, the calmodulin inhibitor shown to prevent melatonin-calmodulin interaction, also prevents melatonin pro-radical effect, suggesting that the low affinity binding to calmodulin (in the micromolar range) may promote ROS production.

  5. Melatonin promotes Bax sequestration to mitochondria reducing cell susceptibility to apoptosis via the lipoxygenase metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Radogna, Flavia

    2015-03-01

    Extra-neurological functions of melatonin include control of the immune system and modulation of apoptosis. We previously showed that melatonin inhibits the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in leukocytes via stimulation of high affinity MT1/MT2 receptors, thereby promoting re-localization of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein to mitochondria. Here we show that Bcl-2 sequesters pro-apoptotic Bax into mitochondria in an inactive form after melatonin treatment, thus reducing cell propensity to apoptosis. Bax translocation and the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin are strictly dependent on the presence of Bcl-2, and on the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which we have previously shown to be produced as a consequence of melatonin binding to its low affinity target calmodulin. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin requires the simultaneous, independent interaction with high (MT1/MT2) and low (calmodulin) affinity targets, eliciting two independent signal transduction pathways converging into Bax sequestration and inactivation. MT1/MT2 vs. lipoxygenase pathways are activated by 10-9 vs. 10-5M melatonin, respectively; the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin is achieved at 10-5M, but drops to 10-9M upon addition of exogenous 5-HETE, revealing that lipoxygenase activation is the rate-limiting pathway. Therefore, in areas of inflammation with increased 5-HETE levels, physiological nanomolar concentrations of melatonin may suffice to maintain leukocyte viability.

  6. Human interleukin 2 receptor β-chain gene: Chromosomal localization and identification of 5' regulatory sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnarra, J.R.; Otani, Hiroki; Wang, M.G.; McBride, O.W.; Sharon, M.; Leonard, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) binds to and stimulates activated T cells through high-affinity IL-2 receptors (IL-2Rs). Such receptors represent a complex consisting of at least two proteins, the 55-kDa IL-2Rα chain and the 70-kDa IL-2Rβ chain. The low-affinity, IL-2Rα chain cannot by itself transduce a mitogenic signal, whereas IL-2 stimulates resting lymphocytes through the intermediate-affinity, IL-2Rβ receptor. The authors report here identification of the genomic locus for IL-2Rβ. The exons are contained on four EcoRI fragments of 1.1, 9.2, 7.2, and 13.7 kilobases. The 1.1-kilobase EcoRI fragment lies at the 5'-most end of the genomic locus and contains promoter sequences. The promoter contains no TATA box-like elements but does contain the d(GT) n class of middle repetitive elements, which may play an interesting regulatory role. The IL-2Rβ gene is localized to chromosome 22q11.2-q12, a region that is the locus for several lymphoid neoplasias

  7. Effects of dietary bread crust Maillard reaction products on calcium and bone metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncero-Ramos, Irene; Delgado-Andrade, Cristina; Haro, Ana; Ruiz-Roca, Beatriz; Morales, Francisco J; Navarro, María Pilar

    2013-06-01

    Maillard reaction products (MRP) consumption has been related with the development of bone degenerative disorders, probably linked to changes in calcium metabolism. We aimed to investigate the effects of MRP intake from bread crust on calcium balance and its distribution, and bone metabolism. During 88 days, rats were fed control diet or diets containing bread crust as source of MRP, or its soluble high molecular weight, soluble low molecular weight or insoluble fractions (bread crust, HMW, LMW and insoluble diets, respectively). In the final week, a calcium balance was performed, then animals were sacrified and some organs removed to analyse calcium levels. A second balance was carried out throughout the experimental period to calculate global calcium retention. Biochemical parameters and bone metabolism markers were measured in serum or urine. Global calcium bioavailability was unmodified by consumption of bread crust or its isolate fractions, corroborating the previously described low affinity of MRP to bind calcium. Despite this, a higher calcium concentration was found in femur due to smaller bones having a lower relative density. The isolate consumption of the fractions altered some bone markers, reflecting a situation of increased bone resorption or higher turnover; this did not take place in the animals fed the bread crust diet. Thus, the bread crust intake does not affect negatively calcium bioavailability and bone metabolism.

  8. The effects of prolonged growth in elevated CO[sub 2] concentrations in the field on the amounts of different leaf proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, G.Y.; Long, S.P. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) Essex Univ., Colchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biology)

    1992-09-01

    Atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration (Ca) is expected to rise to double pre-industrial concentrations within the next century. Increased Ca may stimulate photosynthetic CO[sub 2] uptake (A) in C[sub 3] species because of the low affinity of Rubisco for CO[sub 2] and by inhibition of RubP oxygentation. Several controlled environment studies have suggested that this potential stimulation may be offset by decreased Rubisco contents and activities in leaves developed at elevated C[sub a], which can be related to decreased photosynthetic capacity in these leaves. This decreased capacity may be an artifact of restriction of below-ground organ development, and hence sink-capacity, imposed by pot size. Four species grown over two or more years in elevated C[sub a] in the field are used to address when changes in Rubisco content are also observed when plants are grown with elevated Ca in the field without restriction on rooting volume and whether Rubisco is the only major leaf protein to show change in quantity in plants grown in elevated ca over prolonged periods.

  9. The effects of prolonged growth in elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations in the field on the amounts of different leaf proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, G.Y.; Long, S.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Essex Univ., Colchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biology

    1992-09-01

    Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (Ca) is expected to rise to double pre-industrial concentrations within the next century. Increased Ca may stimulate photosynthetic CO{sub 2} uptake (A) in C{sub 3} species because of the low affinity of Rubisco for CO{sub 2} and by inhibition of RubP oxygentation. Several controlled environment studies have suggested that this potential stimulation may be offset by decreased Rubisco contents and activities in leaves developed at elevated C{sub a}, which can be related to decreased photosynthetic capacity in these leaves. This decreased capacity may be an artifact of restriction of below-ground organ development, and hence sink-capacity, imposed by pot size. Four species grown over two or more years in elevated C{sub a} in the field are used to address when changes in Rubisco content are also observed when plants are grown with elevated Ca in the field without restriction on rooting volume and whether Rubisco is the only major leaf protein to show change in quantity in plants grown in elevated ca over prolonged periods.

  10. Resonant-Gravimetric Identification of Competitive Adsorption of Environmental Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengcheng; Xu, Tao; Yu, Haitao; Li, Xinxin

    2017-07-05

    Understanding competitive adsorption relationship among various ambient gases is important in adsorbing-material development for capturing environmentally harmful gas. For example, environmental interfering factors (e.g., moisture) can affect the competitive gas-molecule adsorption that needs to be clarified. Due to a lack of method to quantitatively study the dynamic adsorbing process (e.g., real-time-counting adsorbed molecule number), it is difficult to reveal the competitive adsorption mechanism. Still using conventional "trial-and-error" method hinders the development of high-performance adsorbing materials; thereby new technology is in high demand to address the issue. This study opens up a three-step resonant-gravimetric analysis method by using ultrasensitive resonant cantilevers. The three experimental steps are sequentially for qualitative analysis, quantitative determination, and thermodynamic-level identification about the competitive adsorption relationship among the environmental gas molecules. Previous studies indicate that the zeolitic-imidazolate framework (ZIF) of ZIF-8 nanocrystals has a low affinity to environmental CO 2 . This conclusion is confirmed in this study by evaluating ZIF-8 with the three experimental steps, sequentially for qualitative judgment of adsorbability, quantitative determination of hydrous molecule structure in real air, and quantitative extraction of thermodynamic enthalpy, ΔH°. By figuring out the competitive interface-adsorption relationship, we verified that ZIF-8 cannot adsorb CO 2 in real air. However, for the first time, ZIF-8 is identified as an excellent adsorbent to environmental NO 2 .

  11. Computational Selection of RNA Aptamer against Angiopoietin-2 and Experimental Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Pin Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis plays a decisive role in the growth and spread of cancer and angiopoietin-2 (Ang2 is in the spotlight of studies for its unique role in modulating angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to introduce a computational simulation approach to screen aptamers with high binding ability for Ang2. We carried out computational simulations of aptamer-protein interactions by using ZDOCK and ZRANK functions in Discovery Studio 3.5 starting from the available information of aptamers generated through the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX in the literature. From the best of three aptamers on the basis of ZRANK scores, 189 sequences with two-point mutations were created and simulated with Ang2. Then, we used a surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor to test 3 mutant sequences of high ZRANK scores along with a high and a low affinity binding sequence as reported in the literature. We found a selected RNA aptamer has a higher binding affinity and SPR response than a reported sequence with the highest affinity. This is the first study of in silico selection of aptamers against Ang2 by using the ZRANK scoring function, which should help to increase the efficiency of selecting aptamers with high target-binding ability.

  12. Conformational disorder in phosphopeptides: solution studies by CD and NMR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leone Marilisa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs have received great attention from the scientific community as they participate in several important biological processes and diseases. The intrinsic disorder and flexibility of IDPs grant them a number of advantages with respect to ordered proteins, such as conformational plasticity to bind several targets, a large interaction surface, involvement in high specificity/low affinity interactions, enhanced binding kinetics. It is assumed that post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation can stimulate structural rearrangement in IDPs and facilitate their binding to partners. To better understand at a structural level the multifaceted mechanisms that govern molecular recognition processes involving IDPs, we designed, synthesized by solid phase methods, and structurally characterized unstructured peptides. These molecules contain a putative disordered module, flanked at either the N- or C-terminal ends by a different phosphorylated amino acid (serine or threonine to mimick the effects of phosphorylation. The absence of an ordered state in the designed peptides was proved experimentally by CD and NMR conformational studies that were carried out under different solution conditions

  13. Changing the insulin receptor to possess insulin-like growth factor I ligand specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, A.S.; Kjeldsen, T.; Wiberg, F.C.; Christensen, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Norris, K.; Moeller, K.B.; Moeller, N.P.H.

    1990-01-01

    To examine the role of the N-terminal part of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor and insulin receptor in determining ligand specificity, the authors prepared an expression vector encoding a hybrid receptor where exon 1 (encoding the signal peptide and seven amino acids of the α-subunit), exon 2, and exon 3 of the insulin receptor were replaced with the corresponding IGF-I receptor cDNA (938 nucleotides). To allow direct quantitative comparison of the binding capabilities of this hybrid receptor with those of the human IGF-I receptor and the insulin receptor, all three receptors were expressed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells as soluble molecules and partially purified before characterization. The hybrid IGF-I/insulin receptor bound IGF-I with an affinity comparable to that of the wild-type IGF-I receptor. In contrast, the hybrid receptor no longer displayed high-affinity binding of insulin. These results directly demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of the insulin receptor to that of the IGF-I receptor and, furthermore, that the binding specificity for IGF-I is encoded within the nucleotide sequence from 135 to 938 of the IGF-I receptor cDNA. Since the hybrid receptor only bound insulin with low affinity, the insulin binding region is likely to be located within exons 2 and 3 of the insulin receptor

  14. Neurotrophin Receptor p75NTR Regulates Immune Function of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Bandoła

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Neurotrophins and their receptors control the function of neuronal tissue. In addition, they have been demonstrated to be part of the immune response but little is known about the effector immune cells involved. We report, for the first time, the expression and immune-regulatory function of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR by the antigen-presenting pDCs, mediated by toll-like receptor (TLR 9 activation and differential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 and 7. The modulation of p75NTR on pDCs significantly influences disease progression of asthma in an ovalbumin-induced mouse model mediated by the TLR9 signaling pathway. p75NTR activation of pDCs from patients with asthma increased allergen-specific T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in nerve growth factor concentration-dependent manner. Further, p75NTR activation of pDCs delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in RIP-CD80GP mice and aggravated graft-versus-host disease in a xenotransplantation model. Thus, p75NTR signaling on pDCs constitutes a new and critical mechanism connecting neurotrophin signaling and immune response regulation with great therapeutic potential for a variety of immune disorders.

  15. Structure of a cation-bound multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiao; Szewczyk, Paul; Karyakin, Andrey; Evin, Mariah; Hong, Wen-Xu; Zhang, Qinghai; Chang, Geoffrey (Scripps)

    2010-10-26

    Transporter proteins from the MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) family are vital in metabolite transport in plants, directly affecting crop yields worldwide. MATE transporters also mediate multiple-drug resistance (MDR) in bacteria and mammals, modulating the efficacy of many pharmaceutical drugs used in the treatment of a variety of diseases. MATE transporters couple substrate transport to electrochemical gradients and are the only remaining class of MDR transporters whose structure has not been determined. Here we report the X-ray structure of the MATE transporter NorM from Vibrio cholerae determined to 3.65 {angstrom}, revealing an outward-facing conformation with two portals open to the outer leaflet of the membrane and a unique topology of the predicted 12 transmembrane helices distinct from any other known MDR transporter. We also report a cation-binding site in close proximity to residues previously deemed critical for transport. This conformation probably represents a stage of the transport cycle with high affinity for monovalent cations and low affinity for substrates.

  16. Modafinil as a replacement for dextroamphetamine for sustaining alertness in military helicopter pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Arthur; Kelley, Amanda M; Webb, Catherine M; Athy, Jeremy R; Crowley, John S

    2012-06-01

    Successful military aviation operations depend on maintaining continuous day-night operations. Stimulants are easy to use and popular for sustaining performance because their utility is not dependent upon environmental or scheduling modifications. Dextroamphetamine is authorized for use by the aircrews of all U.S. military services, but its potential for abuse and subsequent addiction is of aeromedical concern. Finding an alternative stimulant, such as modafinil, that displays a low affinity for dopamine uptake binding sites would prove extremely beneficial. This study sought to establish the efficacy and safety of modafinil during actual flying operations, thus providing the operational validity desired to approve the use of modafinil for helicopter flight operations. During two, 40-h periods of sustained wakefulness, 18 helicopter pilots (17 men, 1 woman, mean years of age = 29.5) each completed 15 flights and other evaluations, during which they received 2 of 3 experimental conditions: 3 doses at 4-h intervals of modafinil (100 mg), dextroamphetamine (5 mg), or placebo. Statistical results showed that modafinil, like dextroamphetamine, maintained alertness, feelings of well-being, cognitive function, judgment, risk perception, and situation awareness of sleep-deprived aviators consistently better than placebo and without side effects of aeromedical concern. Like previous research, this study strongly suggests that both drugs can maintain acceptable levels of mood and performance during sleep deprivation. The results also confirm that modafinil is well tolerated and appears to be a good alternative to dextroamphetamine for countering the debilitating mood and cognitive effects of sleep loss during sustained operations.

  17. Crystal Structure of Inhibitor-Bound P450BM-3 Reveals Open Conformation of Substrate Access Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, Donovan C.; Chen, Baozhi; Tomchick, Diana R.; Bondlela, Muralidhar; Hegde, Amita; Machius, Mischa; Peterson, Julian A. (Texas); (UTSMC)

    2008-08-19

    P450BM-3 is an extensively studied P450 cytochrome that is naturally fused to a cytochrome P450 reductase domain. Crystal structures of the heme domain of this enzyme have previously generated many insights into features of P450 structure, substrate binding specificity, and conformational changes that occur on substrate binding. Although many P450s are inhibited by imidazole, this compound does not effectively inhibit P450BM-3. {omega}-Imidazolyl fatty acids have previously been found to be weak inhibitors of the enzyme and show some unusual cooperativity with the substrate lauric acid. We set out to improve the properties of these inhibitors by attaching the {omega}-imidazolyl fatty acid to the nitrogen of an amino acid group, a tactic that we used previously to increase the potency of substrates. The resulting inhibitors were significantly more potent than their parent compounds lacking the amino acid group. A crystal structure of one of the new inhibitors bound to the heme domain of P450BM-3 reveals that the mode of interaction of the amino acid group with the enzyme is different from that previously observed for acyl amino acid substrates. Further, required movements of residues in the active site to accommodate the imidazole group provide an explanation for the low affinity of imidazole itself. Finally, the previously observed cooperativity with lauric acid is explained by a surprisingly open substrate-access channel lined with hydrophobic residues that could potentially accommodate lauric acid in addition to the inhibitor itself.

  18. Dense Bicoid hubs accentuate binding along the morphogen gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Mustafa; Reimer, Armando; Haines, Jenna E; Li, Xiao-Yong; Stadler, Michael; Garcia, Hernan; Eisen, Michael B; Darzacq, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    Morphogen gradients direct the spatial patterning of developing embryos; however, the mechanisms by which these gradients are interpreted remain elusive. Here we used lattice light-sheet microscopy to perform in vivo single-molecule imaging in early Drosophila melanogaster embryos of the transcription factor Bicoid that forms a gradient and initiates patterning along the anteroposterior axis. In contrast to canonical models, we observed that Bicoid binds to DNA with a rapid off rate throughout the embryo such that its average occupancy at target loci is on-rate-dependent. We further observed Bicoid forming transient "hubs" of locally high density that facilitate binding as factor levels drop, including in the posterior, where we observed Bicoid binding despite vanishingly low protein levels. We propose that localized modulation of transcription factor on rates via clustering provides a general mechanism to facilitate binding to low-affinity targets and that this may be a prevalent feature of other developmental transcription factors. © 2017 Mir et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. → These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. → The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  20. Isolation of Endogenously Assembled RNA-Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification Based on Streptavidin Aptamer S1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangchao Dong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficient isolation of endogenously assembled viral RNA-protein complexes is essential for understanding virus replication mechanisms. We have developed an affinity purification strategy based on an RNA affinity tag that allows large-scale preparation of native viral RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. The streptavidin-binding aptamer S1 sequence was inserted into the 3′ end of dengue virus (DENV 5′–3′ UTR RNA, and the DENV RNA UTR fused to the S1 RNA aptamer was expressed in living mammalian cells. This allowed endogenous viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP assembly and isolation of RNPs from whole cell extract, through binding the S1 aptamer to streptavidin magnetic beads. Several novel host DENV RBPs were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, including RPS8, which we further implicate in DENV replication. We proposed efficient S1 aptamer-based isolation of viral assembled RNPs from living mammalian cells will be generally applicable to the purification of high- and low-affinity RBPs and RNPs under endogenous conditions.

  1. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal neurons against excitotoxicity by enhancing glial glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Beurrier

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA was significantly reduced (by approximately 75% in CNTF-treated animals. In striatal slices, acute QA application dramatically inhibited corticostriatal field potentials (FPs, whose recovery was significantly higher in CNTF rats compared to controls (approximately 40% vs. approximately 7%, confirming an enhanced resistance to excitotoxicity. The GT inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate greatly reduced FP recovery in CNTF rats, supporting the role of GT in CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from striatal medium spiny neurons showed no alteration of basic properties of striatal glutamatergic transmission in CNTF animals, but the increased effect of a low-affinity competitive glutamate receptor antagonist (gamma-D-glutamylglycine also suggested an enhanced GT function. These data strongly support our hypothesis that CNTF is neuroprotective via an increased function of glial GTs, and further confirms the therapeutic potential of CNTF for the clinical treatment of progressive neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate overflow.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of coagulation factor IX-binding protein from habu snake venom at pH 6.5 and 4.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro [Institute of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Department of Biochemisty, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Shikamoto, Yasuo; Fujimoto, Zui [Department of Biochemisty, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Morita, Takashi [Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan); Mizuno, Hiroshi, E-mail: mizuno@affrc.go.jp [Department of Biochemisty, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Institute of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    Crystals of habu coagulation factor IX-binding protein have been obtained at pH 6.5 and 4.6 and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Coagulation factor IX-binding protein isolated from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (IX-bp) is a C-type lectin-like protein. It is an anticoagulant protein consisting of homologous subunits A and B. The subunits both contain a Ca{sup 2+}-binding site with differing affinity (K{sub d} values of 14 and 130 µM at pH 7.5). These binding characteristics are pH-dependent; under acidic conditions, the affinity of the low-affinity site was reduced considerably. In order to identify which site has high affinity and also to investigate the Ca{sup 2+}-releasing mechanism, IX-bp was crystallized at pH 6.5 and 4.6. The crystals at pH 6.5 and 4.6 diffracted to 1.72 and 2.29 Å resolution, respectively; the former crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.7, b = 63.5, c = 66.9 Å, β = 117.0°, while the latter belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with a = 134.1, b = 37.8, c = 55.8 Å, β = 110.4°.

  3. Phagocytic activity of three Naegleria strains in the presence of erythrocytes of various types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, P; Zubiaur, E

    1985-11-01

    The phagocytic activities of N. lovaniensis (Aq/9/1/45D) and N. gruberi (1518/1f and 1518/1e) were studied in the presence of erythrocytes of various species: chicken, rabbit, goat, and human (A+, B+, and AB+ were tested). The percentage of amoebae with ingested red cells, the phagocytic index (PhI), can be considered as an expression of phagocytic activity. Under given conditions (erythrocyte concentration, incubation time, age of amoebic cultures) each strain of Naegleria prefers one erythrocyte type. Thus, for 72-h cultures, N. lovaniensis ingested more A+ type erythrocytes than did N. gruberi strains but had very low affinity for rabbit red cells except when very high concentrations were tested. Naegleria gruberi 1f was the most active of the three strains towards rabbit and B+ and AB+ human erythrocytes, but very low PhIs were obtained with goat erythrocytes. Naegleria gruberi 1e exhibited high phagocytic activity for every erythrocyte type except for rabbit red cells.

  4. Zirconia dental implants: where are we now, and where are we heading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cionca, Norbert; Hashim, Dena; Mombelli, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Despite decades of titanium as the gold standard in oral implantology, the search for alternatives has been growing. High esthetic standards and increasing incidence of titanium allergies, along with a rising demand for metal-free reconstructions, have led to the proposal of ceramics as potential surrogates. Following numerous experimental studies, zirconium dioxide (zirconia) has earned its place as a potential substitute for titanium in implantology. Yet, despite zirconia's excellent biocompatibility and tissue integration, low affinity to plaque and favorable biomechanical properties, early failures were significantly higher for zirconia implants than for titanium implants. Technical failure as a result of fracture of the material is also a major concern. So far, zirconia implants have been mainly manufactured as one-piece implant systems because of the material's limitations. Nevertheless, various two-piece systems have been progressively emerging with promising results. Screw-retained abutments are desirable but present a major technical challenge. Innovation and technical advances will undoubtedly lead to further improvement in the reliability and strength of zirconia implants, allowing for novel designs, connections and reconstructions. Additional clinical studies are required to identify all relevant technical and biological factors affecting implant success and patients' satisfaction. However, the evidence for a final verdict is, at present, still incomplete. © 2016 The Authors. Periodontology 2000 published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A HLA-A2 restricted human CTL line recognizes a novel tumor cell expressed p53 epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, Peter A; Claesson, Mogens H

    2002-01-01

    , the CTL line, which expressed relatively low affinity for the HLA-A2/peptide complex, was able to kill 3 different HLA-A2(+) p53 mutated tumor cell lines. The present and our previous observations expand the number of p53-derived peptides suitable for vaccination protocols for cancer patients with p53......A p53 peptide-specific CTL line was generated through stimulation with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with wild-type HLA-A2 binding p53 derived peptides. A p53 peptide-specific CD8(+) CTL line was established from a healthy HLA-A2 positive donor. The CTL line...... was characterized with respect to specificity, affinity and killing of cell lines derived from p53 mutated spontaneous tumors. The CTL line demonstrated lysis of p53(139-147) pulsed target cells and cold target inhibition experiments as well as antibody blocking confirmed that the killing was epitope-specific, HLA...

  6. A Minimum Epitope Overlap between Infections Strongly Narrows the Emerging T Cell Repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne G. Oberle

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many infections are caused by pathogens that are similar, but not identical, to previously encountered viruses, bacteria, or vaccines. In such re-infections, pathogens introduce known antigens, which are recognized by memory T cells and new antigens that activate naive T cells. How preexisting memory T cells impact the repertoire of T cells responding to new antigens is still largely unknown. We demonstrate that even a minimum epitope overlap between infections strongly increases the activation threshold and narrows the diversity of T cells recruited in response to new antigens. Thus, minimal cross-reactivity between infections can significantly impact the outcome of a subsequent immune response. Interestingly, we found that non-transferrable memory T cells are most effective in raising the activation threshold. Our findings have implications for designing vaccines and suggest that vaccines meant to target low-affinity T cells are less effective when they contain a strong CD8 T cell epitope that has previously been encountered.

  7. High-affinity memory B cells induced by conjugate vaccines against weak tumor antigens are vulnerable to nonconjugated antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Natalia; Shipton, Michael; Suchacki, Amy; Babbage, Gavin; Stevenson, Freda K

    2011-07-21

    Induction of antibody-mediated immunity against hematologic malignancies requires CD4(+) T-cell help, but weak tumor antigens generally fail to induce adequate T-cell responses, or to overcome tolerance. Conjugate vaccines can harness alternative help to activate responses, but memory B cells may then be exposed to leaking tumor-derived antigen without CD4(+) T-cell support. We showed previously using lymphoma-derived idiotypic antigen that exposure to "helpless" antigen silences the majority of memory IgG(+) B cells. Transfer experiments now indicate that silencing is permanent. In marked contrast to IgG, most coexisting IgM(+) memory B cells exposed to "helpless" antigen survive. Confirmation in a hapten (NP) model allowed measurement of affinity, revealing this, rather than isotype, as the determinant of survival. IgM(+) B cells had Ig variable region gene usage similar to IgG but with fewer somatic mutations. Survival of memory B cells appears variably controlled by affinity for antigen, allowing a minority of low affinity IgG(+), but most IgM(+), memory B cells to escape deletion in the absence of T-cell help. The latter remain, but the majority fail to undergo isotype switch. These findings could apply to other tumor antigens and are relevant for vaccination strategies aimed to induce long-term antibody.

  8. Cooperative inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activities by hexachlorophene in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, H; Matsuoka, M; Igisu, H; Ikeda, M

    1997-01-01

    Hexachlorophene (HCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) all hemolyzed washed human erythrocytes and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activities in erythrocyte membrane. HCP was much more potent in either effect than any other compound examined. The inhibition of AchE activities by HCP was reversed on adding albumin. The dose-response curves by HCP and PCP were sigmoidal, indicating cooperative inhibition, while those by 2,4,5-TCP and 2,4,6-TCP were not. Furthermore, the cooperativity of the inhibition by HCP was greater than by PCP. Differing from that by PCP, the cooperativity of inhibition increased depending on the temperature (13, 25, 37 degrees C) and decreased when the membrane was treated with Triton X-100. The cooperativity was also decreased in the presence of albumin. On a Scatchard plot analysis, erythrocyte membranes appeared to have multiple binding sites of different affinities for HCP; binding of HCP to the low affinity site [dissociation constant (Kd) 4.7 x 10(-5) M] seemed to be responsible for the observed cooperative inhibition of AchE activities. Neither neostigmine nor fenitrothion altered the cooperativity. HCP seems to be the most potent cooperative inhibitor of AchE in human erythrocyte membranes known to date. HCP may be useful to examine AchE and milieu in human erythrocyte membranes.

  9. Neuroimaging of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter by a novel 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-benzoyl derivative of 7-hydroxy-6-(4-phenyl-piperidin-1-yl)-octahydro-benzo[1,4]oxazines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorger, Dietlind [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig 04103 (Germany)], E-mail: sord@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Scheunemann, Matthias; Vercouillie, Johnny [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig 04318 (Germany); Grossmann, Udo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig 04103 (Germany); Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Wenzel, Barbara [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig 04318 (Germany); Roghani, Ali [Department of Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock TX 39430 (United States); Schliebs, Reinhard [Paul Flechsig Institute of Brain Research, University of Leipzig, Leipzig 04109 (Germany); Steinbach, Joerg; Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig 04318 (Germany); Sabri, Osama [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig 04103 (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Phenylpiperidinyl-octahydro-benzo[1,4]oxazines represent a new class of conformationally restrained vesamicol analogues. Derived from this morpholine-fused vesamicol structure, a new fluorine-18-labeled 4-fluorobenzoyl derivative ([{sup 18}F]FBMV) was synthesized with an average specific activity of 75 GBq/{mu}mol and a radiochemical purity of 99%. The radiolabeling method included an exchange reaction of a 4-nitro group of the precursor by fluorine-18, a reduction procedure to eliminate excess of the nitro compound, followed by a high-performance liquid chromatography purification. [{sup 18}F]FBMV demonstrates (i) a moderate lipophilic character with a logD{sub pH7.0} 1.8{+-}0.10; (ii) a considerable binding affinity to the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) (K{sub i}=27.5 nM), as determined using PC12 cells transfected with a VAChT cDNA, and a low affinity to {sigma}{sub 1,2} receptors (K{sub i} >3000 nM); (iii) a good uptake into the rat and pig brains; (iv) a typical accumulation in the VAChT-containing brain regions; and (v) an approximately 20% reduction in cortical tracer binding after a specific cholinergic lesion using 192IgG-saporin. [{sup 18}F]FBMV exhibits another PET marker within the group of vesamicol derivatives that demonstrates potentials in imaging brain cholinergic deficits, while its usefulness in clinical practice must await further investigation.

  10. MHC class I ligation of human T cells activates the ZAP70 and p56lck tyrosine kinases, leads to an alternative phenotype of the TCR/CD3 zeta-chain, and induces apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1997-01-01

    Cross-linking of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules on human T cells induces signal-transduction events, including activation of tyrosine kinases, tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1, and elevation of the intracellular free calcium concentration. In this study, we demonstrate...... that the ZAP70 tyrosine kinase is tyrosine phosphorylated in Jurkat T cells and in purified peripheral T cells after MHC-I ligation. The tyrosine-phosphorylated ZAP70 kinase exhibits a particular phenotype with low affinities for proteins at 21, 40, 60, and 120 kDa, proteins normally co-precipitated with ZAP70...... after TCR/CD3 stimulation. The phosphorylation of ZAP70 after MHC-I ligation was dependent on TCR/CD3 surface expression. One of the natural substrates for ZAP70 is the zeta-chain dimer of the TCR/CD3 complex. MHC-I cross-linking induces a phosphorylated zeta-protein that migrates as a dimer at 42 k...

  11. Afinidad Limnológica del Sistema Lagunar Costero del estado de Guerrero, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Guzmán Arroyo

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available The coastal lagoons are system in which many factors interact in complex w ys. The objective of this study is to establish a caracterization of the Guerrero coas­tal lagoons in four variable groups: 1 Morphometrics; among others, area, total volume, perimeter, relative depth, middle depth, max, depth and development of the coastal line and volume among other variables. 2 Hidroclimate: rainfall, mean environmental temperature, weather, basin area and fluvial discharge. 3 Physico–Chemical: salinity, temperature and dissolved oxigen. 4 Biological: presence of pisces, crustacea and mollusca. To establish any relationship between the lagoon for each variable group, the data were processes by means of a multivariate analysis (Cluster. The first variable group showed two affinity blocks; Mitla and Tres Palos on the first and Potosi, Nuxco and Coyuca on the other. Chautengo displays a low affinity arrangement with Mitla, Tres Palos on one block and Potosi, Nuxco, Salinas de Apozahualco and Chautengo on the other. This type of analysis permit regionalized the lagoons of the Coastal Plain of Guerrero for a better understanding and classification.

  12. Discovery of Peptidomimetic Ligands of EED as Allosteric Inhibitors of PRC2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnash, Kimberly D.; The, Juliana; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline L.; Cholensky, Stephanie H.; Worley, Beau M.; Li, Fengling; Stuckey, Jacob I.; Brown, Peter J.; Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Frye, Stephen V.; James, Lindsey I. (UNC); (Toronto)

    2017-02-06

    The function of EED within polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is mediated by a complex network of protein–protein interactions. Allosteric activation of PRC2 by binding of methylated proteins to the embryonic ectoderm development (EED) aromatic cage is essential for full catalytic activity, but details of this regulation are not fully understood. EED’s recognition of the product of PRC2 activity, histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), stimulates PRC2 methyltransferase activity at adjacent nucleosomes leading to H3K27me3 propagation and, ultimately, gene repression. By coupling combinatorial chemistry and structure-based design, we optimized a low-affinity methylated jumonji, AT-rich interactive domain 2 (Jarid2) peptide to a smaller, more potent peptidomimetic ligand (Kd = 1.14 ± 0.14 μM) of the aromatic cage of EED. Our strategy illustrates the effectiveness of applying combinatorial chemistry to achieve both ligand potency and property optimization. Furthermore, the resulting ligands, UNC5114 and UNC5115, demonstrate that targeted disruption of EED’s reader function can lead to allosteric inhibition of PRC2 catalytic activity.

  13. Self-class I MHC molecules support survival of naive CD8 T cells, but depress their functional sensitivity through regulation of CD8 expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kensuke; Jameson, Stephen C

    2009-09-28

    Previous studies have suggested that naive CD8 T cells require self-peptide-major histocompatability complex (MHC) complexes for maintenance. However, interpretation of such studies is complicated because of the involvement of lymphopenic animals, as lymphopenia drastically alters naive T cell homeostasis and function. In this study, we explored naive CD8 T cell survival and function in nonlymphopenic conditions by using bone marrow chimeric donors and hosts in which class I MHC expression is absent or limited to radiosensitive versus radioresistant cells. We found that long-term survival of naive CD8 T cells (but not CD4 T cells) was impaired in the absence of class I MHC. However, distinct from this effect, class I MHC deprivation also enhanced naive CD8 T cell responsiveness to low-affinity (but not high-affinity) peptide-MHC ligands. We found that this improved sensitivity was a consequence of up-regulated CD8 levels, which was mediated through a transcriptional mechanism. Hence, our data suggest that, in a nonlymphopenic setting, self-class I MHC molecules support CD8 T cell survival, but that these interactions also attenuate naive T cell sensitivity by dynamic tuning of CD8 levels.

  14. Emerging functions of natural IgM and its Fc receptor FCMR in immune homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Most natural IgM antibodies are encoded by germline Ig sequences and are produced in large quantities by both mice and humans in the absence of intentional immunization. Natural IgM are reactive with many conserved epitopes, including those shared by microorganisms and autoantigens. As a result, these antibodies play important roles in clearing intruding pathogens, as well as apoptotic/necrotic cells and otherwise damaged tissues. While natural IgM binds to target structures with low affinity due to a lack of significant selection by somatic hypermutation, its pentameric structure with 10 antigen binding sites enables these antibodies to bind multivalent target antigens with high avidity. Opsonization of antigen complexed with IgM is mediated by cell surface Fc receptors. While the existence of Fc alpha/mu receptor has been known for some time, only recently has the Fc receptor specific for IgM (FCMR been identified. In this review, we focus on our current understandings of how natural IgM and FCMR regulate the immune system and maintain homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Evidence of Reduced CBG Cleavage in Abdominal Obesity: A Potential Factor in Development of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenke, M A; Lewis, J G; Rankin, W; Torpy, D J

    2016-08-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is involved in the regulation of cortisol delivery. Neutrophil elastase-mediated cleavage of high to low affinity CBG (haCBG to laCBG) induces cortisol release at inflammatory sites. Past studies have shown reduced CBG in obesity, an inflammatory state, particularly in central adiposity/metabolic syndrome. We performed an observational, cross-sectional study of the effects of obesity, age and sex on ha/laCBG in 100 healthy volunteers. Total and haCBG levels were 11% higher in women but did not vary with age or menopausal status. Total CBG levels were lower with increased body weight and waist circumference; laCBG levels were lower with increased body weight, waist circumference, body mass index and body fat; higher haCBG levels were seen with increased body fat. The relation between CBG and adiposity appeared to be driven predominantly by the metabolic syndrome group. The results suggest reduced CBG cleavage in central obesity, possibly contributing to the characteristic inflammatory phenotype of the central obesity and metabolic syndrome. The mechanism of gender differences in CBG levels is unclear. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. The effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and species on tissue and blood levels of benzene metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.F.; Sabourin, P.J.; Bechtold, W.E.; Griffith, W.C.; Medinsky, M.A.; Birnbaum, L.S.; Lucier, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Studies were completed in F344/N rats and B6C3F 1 mice to determine the effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and rodent species on formation of total and individual benzene metabolites. Oral doses of 50 mg/kg or higher saturated the capacity for benzene metabolism in both rats and mice, resulting in an increased proportion of the administered dose being exhaled as benzene. The saturating air concentration for benzene metabolism during 6-hr exposures was between 130 and 900 ppm. At the highest exposure concentration, rats exhaled approximately half of the internal dose retained at the end of the 6-hr exposure as benzene; mice exhaled only 15% as benzene. Mice were able to convert more of the inhaled benzene to metabolites than were rats. In addition, mice metabolized more of the benzene by pathways leading to the putative toxic metabolites, benzoquinone and muconaldehyde, than did rats. In both rats and mice, the effect of increasing dose, administered orally or by inhalation, was to increase the proportion of the total metabolites that were the products of detoxification pathways relative to the products of pathways leading to putative toxic metabolites. This indicates low-affinity, high-capacity pathways for detoxification and high-affinity, low-capacity pathways leading to putative toxic metabolites. If the results of rodent studied performed at high doses were used to assess the health risk at low-dose exposures to benzene, the toxicity of benzene would be underestimated

  17. Copper-Carbon Nanoforms Composites – Processing, Microstructure and Thermal Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrzak K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main current of publication is focused around the issues and problems associated with the formation of composite materials with Cu matrix and reinforcing phases in the various carbon nanoforms. The core of the research has been focused on thermal conductivity of these composites types. This parameter globally reflects the state of the structure, quality of raw materials and the technology used during the formation of composite materials. Vanishingly low affinity of copper for carbon, multilayered forms of graphene, the existence of critical values of graphene volume in the composite are not conducive to the classic procedures of composites designing. As a result, the expected, significant increase in thermal conductivity of composites is not greater than for pure copper matrix. Present paper especially includes: (i data of obtaining procedure of copper/graphene mixtures, (ii data of sintering process, (iii the results of structure investigations and of thermal properties. Structural analysis revealed the homogenous distribution of graphene in copper matrix, the thermal analysis indicate the existence of carbon phase critical concentration, where improvement of thermal diffusivity to pure copper can occur.

  18. The Pharmacological Basis of Cannabis Therapy for Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba; Golub, Victoria M

    2016-04-01

    Recently, cannabis has been suggested as a potential alternative therapy for refractory epilepsy, which affects 30% of epilepsy, both adults and children, who do not respond to current medications. There is a large unmet medical need for new antiepileptics that would not interfere with normal function in patients with refractory epilepsy and conditions associated with refractory seizures. The two chief cannabinoids are Δ-9-tetrahyrdrocannabinol, the major psychoactive component of marijuana, and cannabidiol (CBD), the major nonpsychoactive component of marijuana. Claims of clinical efficacy in epilepsy of CBD-predominant cannabis or medical marijuana come mostly from limited studies, surveys, or case reports. However, the mechanisms underlying the antiepileptic efficacy of cannabis remain unclear. This article highlights the pharmacological basis of cannabis therapy, with an emphasis on the endocannabinoid mechanisms underlying the emerging neurotherapeutics of CBD in epilepsy. CBD is anticonvulsant, but it has a low affinity for the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2; therefore the exact mechanism by which it affects seizures remains poorly understood. A rigorous clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical CBD products is needed to establish the safety and efficacy of their use in the treatment of epilepsy. Identification of mechanisms underlying the anticonvulsant efficacy of CBD is also critical for identifying other potential treatment options. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Efficacy and safety of omalizumab in paediatric age: an update of literature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matin, N; Tabatabaie, O; Falsaperla, R; Pavone, P; Serra, A; Cocuzza, S; Di Mauro, P; Licciardello, L; Lubrano, R; Vitaliti, G

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) was discovered in 1966 and was found responsible for immune defense against helminths, type I hypersensitivity and allergic diseases. IgE mediates allergic responses by binding to Fc receptors (the high affinity Fc-epsilon receptor I and the low affinity Fc-epsilon receptor II or CD23) expressed on tissue mast cells and blood basophils. This binding leads to degranulation and release of pro-inflammatory mediators. Considering the pivotal role of IgE in allergic diseases, antibodies against IgE potentiate an array of new therapeutic strategies and in this regard omalizumab (rhuMAb-E25, Xolair) has been developed as a monoclonal biologic drug to block serum IgEs. Although the use of omalizumab has been studied vigorously in many adult populations with allergic diseases, there are few heterogenous studies on children. There are very few ongoing clinical trials with omalizumab exclusively on children, although some adult studies have concluded pediatric patients as a part of their studies. Nevertheless, in pediatric clinical trials omalizumab has been demonstrated to be effective and safe also in this age group. Herein, the authors present a systematic review of extensive literature data on the use of omalizumab in children and adolescents.

  20. Structural basis of omalizumab therapy and omalizumab-mediated IgE exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Luke F.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana; Brigger, Daniel; Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Graham, Michelle T.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Eggel, Alexander; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Omalizumab is a widely used therapeutic anti-IgE antibody. Here we report the crystal structure of the omalizumab–Fab in complex with an IgE-Fc fragment. This structure reveals the mechanism of omalizumab-mediated inhibition of IgE interactions with both high- and low-affinity IgE receptors, and explains why omalizumab selectively binds free IgE. The structure of the complex also provides mechanistic insight into a class of disruptive IgE inhibitors that accelerate the dissociation of the high-affinity IgE receptor from IgE. We use this structural data to generate a mutant IgE-Fc fragment that is resistant to omalizumab binding. Treatment with this omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragment, in combination with omalizumab, promotes the exchange of cell-bound full-length IgE with omalizumab-resistant IgE-Fc fragments on human basophils. This combination treatment also blocks basophil activation more efficiently than either agent alone, providing a novel approach to probe regulatory mechanisms underlying IgE hypersensitivity with implications for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27194387

  1. Batrachotoxin Changes the Properties of the Muscarinic Receptor in Rat Brain and Heart: Possible Interaction(s) between Muscarinic Receptors and Sodium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Armon, Malca; Kloog, Yoel; Henis, Yoav I.; Sokolovsky, Mordechai

    1985-05-01

    The effects of Na+-channel activator batrachotoxin (BTX) on the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in homogenates of rat brain and heart were studied. BTX enhanced the affinity for the binding of the agonists carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine to the muscarinic receptors in brainstem and ventricle, but not in the cerebral cortex. Analysis of the data according to a two-site model for agonist binding indicated that the effect of BTX was to increase the affinity of the agonists to the high-affinity site. Guanyl nucleotides, known to induce interconversion of high-affinity agonist binding sites to the low-affinity state, canceled the effect of BTX on carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine binding. BTX had no effect on the binding of the agonist oxotremorine or on the binding of the antagonist [3H]-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate. The local anesthetics dibucaine and tetracaine antagonized the effect of BTX on the binding of muscarinic agonists at concentrations known to inhibit the activation of Na+ channels by BTX. On the basis of these findings, we propose that in specific tissues the muscarinic receptors may interact with the BTX binding site (Na+ channels).

  2. Kinetic parameters of silicon uptake by rice cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Oliveira Martins

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Silicon is considered an important chemical element for rice, because it can improve tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress. However, in many situations no positive effect of silicon was observed, probably due to genetic factors. The objective of this research was to monitor Si uptake kinetics and identify responses of rice cultivars in terms of Si uptake capacity and use. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse of the São Paulo State University (UNESP, Brazil. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized, factorial design with three replications. that consisted of two rice cultivars and two Si levels. Kinetic parameters (Vmax, Km, and Cmin, root morphology variables, dry matter yield, Si accumulation and levels in shoots and roots, uptake efficiency, utilization efficiency, and root/shoot ratio were evaluated. Higher Si concentrations in the nutrient solution did not increase rice dry matter. The development of the low-affinity silicon uptake system of the rice cultivar 'Caiapó' was better than of 'Maravilha'.

  3. Radiochemical and radioecological studies of natural and artificial alpha-emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.; Persson, B.

    1980-01-01

    Transuranium elements, including uranium and thorium, were analyzed in both marine and terrestrial samples. Vertical profiles of 239+240 Pu, 241 Am, 230 Th, and 238 U, in the Pacific, the Mediterranean, and the Atlantic, measured by different investigators, were compared. Uptake of the fallout isotopes 241 Pu, 240+239 Pu, 238 Pu, and 241 Am in the lichen - reindeer food chain was studied. Americium and thorium exhibited similar biophysical behavior in the environment and in the water column, although the settling velocity for thorium was somewhat higher. Plutonium showed similar distribution in the water columns in different waters. The fraction of ingested plutonium which was retained in the body of reindeer was in good agreement with the value of 3 x 10 -5 predicted for man. Uranium showed a constant concentration in the water column, with a low affinity to particles in the water. The high concentration of uranium in reindeer tissues depended on high intake from drinking water and foodstuffs other than lichens

  4. The Drug Vehicle and Solvent N-Methylpyrrolidone Is an Immunomodulator and Antimyeloma Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Shortt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP is a common solvent and drug vehicle. We discovered unexpected antineoplastic and immunomodulatory activity of NMP in a cMYC-driven myeloma model. Coincident to this, NMP was identified as an acetyllysine mimetic and candidate bromodomain ligand. Accordingly, NMP-treated cells demonstrated transcriptional overlap with BET-bromodomain inhibition, including downregulation of cMYC and IRF4. NMP’s immunomodulatory activity occurred at sub-BET inhibitory concentrations, and, despite phenotypic similarities to lenalidomide, its antimyeloma activity was independent of the IMiD targets cereblon and Ikaros-1/3. Thus, low-affinity yet broad-spectrum bromodomain inhibition by NMP mediates biologically potent, cereblon-independent immunomodulation and at higher doses targets malignant cells directly via BET antagonism. These data reveal that NMP is a functional acetyllysine mimetic with pleotropic antimyeloma and immunomodulatory activities. Our studies highlight the potential therapeutic benefits of NMP, the consequences of current human NMP exposures, and the need for reassessment of scientific literature where NMP was used as an “inert” drug-delivery vehicle.

  5. Diel variation in gene expression of the CO2-concentrating mechanism during a harmful cyanobacterial bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eSandrini

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dense phytoplankton blooms in eutrophic waters often experience large daily fluctuations in environmental conditions. We investigated how this diel variation affects in situ gene expression of the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM and other selected genes of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. Photosynthetic activity of the cyanobacterial bloom depleted the dissolved CO2 concentration, raised pH to 10, and caused large diel fluctuations in the bicarbonate and O2 concentration. The Microcystis population consisted of three Ci uptake genotypes that differed in the presence of the low-affinity and high-affinity bicarbonate uptake genes bicA and sbtA. Expression of the bicarbonate uptake genes bicA, sbtA and cmpA (encoding a subunit of the high-affinity bicarbonate uptake system BCT1, the CCM transcriptional regulator gene ccmR and the photoprotection gene flv4 increased at first daylight and was negatively correlated with the bicarbonate concentration. In contrast, genes of the two CO2 uptake systems were constitutively expressed, whereas expression of the RuBisCO chaperone gene rbcX, the carboxysome gene ccmM, and the photoprotection gene isiA was highest at night and down-regulated during daytime. In total, our results show that the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis is very responsive to the large diel variations in carbon and light availability often encountered in dense cyanobacterial blooms.

  6. Comparative investigation of the pharmacology of fish and mammalian neuromuscular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gant, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Neuromuscular pharmacology has been extensively studied in mammals but there have been few investigations examining the neuromuscular systems of fish. In situ experiments have shown that the basic cholinergic characteristics of fish neuromuscular junctions are different from those of mammals. In order to further understand the nature of these differences, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) of rat and buffalo sculpin (Enophrys bison) neuromuscular junctions and the AChR of electric ray (Torpedo california) electroplax, were investigated using receptor binding analysis. A rapid filtration assay was utilized to measure [ 125 I]α-BGT binding to tissue membranes. Scatchard analysis of [ 175 I]α-BGT binding was performed on sculpin pectoral muscle rat gastrocnemius, rat denervated gastrocnemius, and Torpedo electroplax. The affinity constant was similar for all tissues studied. In competition studies, d-tubocurarine had the highest affinity for the [ 125 I]-α-BGT binding site in all tissues, illustrating the nicotinic nature of the binding sites. Acetylcholine had high affinity for the rat gastrocnemius binding site and low affinity for the sculpin pectoral muscle and Torpedo electroplax binding site. Atropine had high affinity for the sculpin pectoral muscle binding site when compared to the rate gastrocnemius and Torpedo electroplax binding site, indicating that the sculpin pectoral site may have some mixed muscarinic-nicitinic characteristics. These results indicate that there are definite qualitative as well as quantitative differences between the fish skeletal muscle nicotinic receptor and the nicotinic receptor of fish electroplax and rat skeletal muscle

  7. Modulatory effects of peroxovanadates on insulin receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, D W; Leung, W N; Xu, M; Zhu, S Q; Cheng, C H

    1996-11-15

    The insulin-mimetic effects exhibited by vanadate, hydrogen peroxide, and some peroxovanadates have recently been shown to occur, at least in part, through an activation of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity. In this study, we examine the effects of these compounds on insulin receptor binding using receptor preparations from human placental membranes. Among the 16 vanadium(V)-peroxo complexes studied, the [VO(O2)2(bipy)]- ion, where bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, was found to increase insulin receptor binding by 24%, whereas the [VO(O2)2(en)]- ion, where en = ethylenediamine, was found to reduce insulin receptor binding by about the same amount under steady-state conditions. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicates that the observed effect of the [VO(O2)2(bipy)]- ion on insulin receptor binding is exerted mainly at the high-capacity low-affinity sites. Furthermore, this modulatory effect is reversible and requires a continuous presence of the compound. By perturbing the membrane environment of the insulin receptor, we have shown that an intact membrane structure is essential for an observable effect. The observed modulation of insulin receptor binding by peroxovanadates is interpreted in terms of a ternary complex model in which the peroxovanadate acts as an allosteric effector modulating the binding equilibrium between insulin and its receptor.

  8. Ganciclovir uptake in human mammary carcinoma cells expressing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberkorn, Uwe; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Morr, Iris; Altmann, Annette; Mueller, Markus; Kaick, Gerhard van

    1998-01-01

    Assessment of suicide enzyme activity would have considerable impact on the planning and the individualization of suicide gene therapy of malignant tumors. This may be done by determining the pharmacokinetics of specific substrates. We generated ganciclovir (GCV)-sensitive human mammary carcinoma cell lines after transfection with a retroviral vector bearing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene. Thereafter, uptake measurements and HPLC analyses were performed up to 48 h in an HSV-tk-expressing cell line and in a wild-type cell line using tritiated GCV. HSV-tk-expressing cells showed higher GCV uptake and phosphorylation than control cells, whereas in wild-type MCF7 cells no phosphorylated GCV was detected. In bystander experiments the total GCV uptake was related to the amount of HSV-tk-expressing cells. Furthermore, the uptake of GCV correlated closely with the growth inhibition (r=0.92). Therefore, the accumulation of specific substrates may serve as an indicator of the HSV-tk activity and of therapy outcome. Inhibition and competition experiments demonstrated slow transport of GCV by the nucleoside carriers. The slow uptake and low affinity to HSV-tk indicate that GCV is not an ideal substrate for the nucleoside transport systems or for HSV-tk. This may be the limiting factor for therapy success, necessitating the search for better substrates of HSV-tk

  9. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, and In Vivo Antinociceptive Effects of Selective A1Adenosine Receptor Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Scortichini, Mirko; Belardo, Carmela; Boccella, Serena; Luongo, Livio; Capone, Fabio; Kachler, Sonja; Vita, Patrizia; Del Bello, Fabio; Maione, Sabatino; Lavecchia, Antonio; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Cappellacci, Loredana

    2018-01-11

    Our previous work discovered that combining the appropriate 5'- and N 6 -substitution in adenosine derivatives leads to the highly selective human A 1 adenosine receptor (hA 1 AR) agonists or highly potent dual hA 1 AR agonists and hA 3 AR antagonists. In order to explore novel dual adenosine receptor ligands, a series of N 6 -substituted-5'-pyrazolyl-adenosine and 2-chloro-adenosine derivatives were synthesized and assayed in vitro at all ARs. The N 6 -(±)-endo-norbornyl derivative 12 was the most potent and selective at A 1 AR and effective as an analgesic in formalin test in mice, but none of the 5'-pyrazolyl series compounds showed a dual behavior at hA 1 and hA 3 AR. Molecular modeling studies rationalized the structure-activity relationships and the selectivity profiles of the new series of A 1 AR agonists. Interestingly, an unexpected inverted binding mode of the N 6 -tetrahydrofuranyl derivative 14 was hypothesized to explain its low affinity at A 1 AR.

  10. [Effect of steroid biosynthesis modificators on the progesterone biotransformation by a recombinant yeasts expressing cytochrome P450c17].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkumatov, V M; Usova, E V; Frolova, N S; Barth, G; Mauersberger, S

    2006-01-01

    Using the recombinant microorganisms S. cerevisiae GRF18 YEp5117alpha, expressing cytochrome P450c17 from bovine adrenal cortex, we investigated the influence of the various modificators of steroids biosynthesis on the relationship between the 17alpha-hydroxylation of progesterone and 20alpha-reduction. Dexamethasone and metirapon had no effect on the reaction of progesterone 17alpha-hydroxylation and on the reaction of 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone 20alpha-reduction. Mifepriston and danazol did not covalently modify amino acid residues of the cytochrome P450c17 or its heme group under the conditions of the biotransformation of progesterone by recombinant yeasts. Ketokonazol, mifepriston and danazol acted as low-affinity competitive inhibitors, but the 20-dihydro derivatives of progesterone were mixed type inhibitors for the cytochrome P450c17. All modifiers that we used did not influence the functional properties of the yeast analog of 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. According to the influence on the catalytic parameters of the cytochrome P450c17, the modifiers used can be arranged in the following order: 20beta-dihydroprogesterone (maximum effect) > mifepriston = ketokonazol > 20alpha-dihydroprogesteron > danazol > dexamethasone, metirapon (without effect).

  11. Chain inequivalence in bovine methemoglobin. Progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilan, Y.A.; Ilan, Y.; Chevion, M.; Czapski, G.

    1980-01-01

    Using pulse-radiolysis, a single-heme in the tetramer of bovine methemoglobin was reduced to the ferro state, producing a valence hybrid (VH). The kinetics of oxygen binding to the VH as well as the re-oxidation of the ferro-heme to the ferric state were studied as a function of pH. The kinetics of the oxygenation revealed the existence of two species, characterized by high and low affinities for oxygen that are associated with two quaternary structures (R and T, respectivey). Above pH 7.7 only the R state could be observed, while below pH 6.5 the T state was dominant. The reaction between the VH and ferricyanide at pH 7.75 (R state) consisted of two equal contributions attributed to the β and α subunits within the tetramer, respectively. At pH 6.3 (T state) a similar phenomenon was observed indicating chain inequivalences both in the T and the R states of methemoglobin. In the presence of inositol hexaphosphate, the T → R transition was shifted up by about 0.35 pH units. Yet similar rate constants exhibiting similar chain inequivalences have been measured

  12. Characterization of nicotine binding in mouse brain and comparison with the binding of alpha-bungarotoxin and quinuclidinyl benzilate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, M.J.; Collins, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The binding of [ 3 H]nicotine to mouse brain has been measured and subsequently compared with the binding of [ 125 I]alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) and L-[ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). The binding of nicotine was saturable, reversible, and stereospecific. The average KD and Bmax were 59 nM and 88 fmoles/mg of protein, respectively. Although the rates of association and dissociation of nicotine were temperature-dependent, the incubation temperature had no effect on either KD or Bmax. When measured at 20 degrees or 37 degrees, nicotine appeared to bind to a single class of binding sites, but a second, very low-affinity, binding site was observed at 4 degrees. Nicotine binding was unaffected by the addition of NaCl, KCl, CaCl 2 , or MgSO 4 to the incubation medium. Nicotinic cholinergic agonists were potent inhibitors of nicotine binding; however, nicotinic antagonists were poor inhibitors. The regional distribution of binding was not uniform: midbrain and striatum contained the highest number of receptors, whereas cerebellum had the fewest. Differences in site densities, regional distribution, inhibitor potencies, and thermal denaturation indicated that nicotine binding was not the same as either QNB or alpha-BTX binding, and therefore that receptors for nicotine may represent a unique population of cholinergic receptors

  13. The tRNA-modifying function of MnmE is controlled by post-hydrolysis steps of its GTPase cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Silvia; Villarroya, Magda; Medina, Milagros; Armengod, M.-Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    MnmE is a homodimeric multi-domain GTPase involved in tRNA modification. This protein differs from Ras-like GTPases in its low affinity for guanine nucleotides and mechanism of activation, which occurs by a cis, nucleotide- and potassium-dependent dimerization of its G-domains. Moreover, MnmE requires GTP hydrolysis to be functionally active. However, how GTP hydrolysis drives tRNA modification and how the MnmE GTPase cycle is regulated remains unresolved. Here, the kinetics of the MnmE GTPase cycle was studied under single-turnover conditions using stopped- and quench-flow techniques. We found that the G-domain dissociation is the rate-limiting step of the overall reaction. Mutational analysis and fast kinetics assays revealed that GTP hydrolysis, G-domain dissociation and Pi release can be uncoupled and that G-domain dissociation is directly responsible for the ‘ON’ state of MnmE. Thus, MnmE provides a new paradigm of how the ON/OFF cycling of GTPases may regulate a cellular process. We also demonstrate that the MnmE GTPase cycle is negatively controlled by the reaction products GDP and Pi. This feedback mechanism may prevent inefficacious GTP hydrolysis in vivo. We propose a biological model whereby a conformational change triggered by tRNA binding is required to remove product inhibition and initiate a new GTPase/tRNA-modification cycle. PMID:23630314

  14. Reactivation of organophosphate-inhibited human, Cynomolgus monkey, swine and guinea pig acetylcholinesterase by MMB-4: A modified kinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worek, Franz; Wille, Timo; Aurbek, Nadine; Eyer, Peter; Thiermann, Horst

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of poisoning by highly toxic organophosphorus compounds (OP, nerve agents) is a continuous challenge. Standard treatment with atropine and a clinically used oxime, obidoxime or pralidoxime is inadequate against various nerve agents. For ethical reasons testing of oxime efficacy has to be performed in animals. Now, it was tempting to investigate the reactivation kinetics of MMB-4, a candidate oxime to replace pralidoxime, with nerve agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from human and animal origin in order to provide a kinetic basis for the proper assessment of in vivo data. By applying a modified kinetic approach, allowing the use of necessary high MMB-4 concentrations, it was possible to determine the reactivation constants with sarin-, cyclosarin-, VX-, VR- and tabun-inhibited AChE. MMB-4 exhibited a high reactivity and low affinity towards OP-inhibited AChE, except of tabun-inhibited enzyme where MMB-4 had an extremely low reactivity. Species differences between human and animal AChE were low (Cynomolgus) to moderate (swine, guinea pig). Due to the high reactivity of MMB-4 a rapid reactivation of inhibited AChE can be anticipated at adequate oxime concentrations which are substantially higher compared to HI-6. Additional studies are necessary to determine the in vivo toxicity, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of MMB-4 in humans in order to enable a proper assessment of the value of this oxime as an antidote against nerve agent poisoning.

  15. Detection of Epstein-Barr virus infection subtype in patients with multiple sclerosis by indirect immunofluorescence assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Chao Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to investigate the infectious conditions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 20 patients with MS and 20 with other neurological diseases (OND were tested with indirect immunofluorescence for anti-EBV capsid antigen (EBV-CA immunoglobulin G (IgG, IgG affinity for anti-EBV-CA, anti-EBV-CA immunoglobulin M (IgM, anti-EBV early antigen (EBV-EA IgG and anti-EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA IgG. According to the pattern of antibodies in CSF, infection rates of acute, chronic, primary, recurrent, and past infections were analyzed in the two groups of patients. Results: There were no significant differences in anti-EBV-CA, anti-EBC-EA, and anti-EBNA antigen IgG in CSF between MS and OND patients (P > 0.05. The positive rate of low affinity for anti-EBV-CA IgG in MS patients was significantly higher than that for OND patients (75% vs. 40%, P < 0.05. Furthermore, significant differences in the positive rate of anti-EBV-CA IgM were found between MS and OND patients (70% vs. 25%, P < 0.05. Of the MS patients, 75% were in an EBV acute infection state compared with 40% of OND patients (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Acute infection of EBV closely correlates with the occurrence of MS.

  16. Effects of clozapine on adipokine secretions/productions and lipid droplets in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Tsubai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine, a second-generation antipsychotic (SGA, is a cause of side effects related to metabolic syndrome. The participation of serotonin 5-HT2C and histamine H1 receptors in the central nervous system has been reported as a mechanism of the weight gain caused by clozapine. In the present study, we investigated the direct pharmacological action of clozapine on the 3T3-L1 adipocytes and compared it to that of blonanserin, an SGA with low affinity for both receptors. Short-term exposure to clozapine decreased secretion and mRNA expression of leptin. Long-term exposure decreased leptin as well as adiponectin secretion, and further increased lipid droplets accumulation. However, short- and long-term exposures to blonanserin did not affect these parameters. A selective serotonin 5-HT2C, but not a histamine H1, receptor antagonist enhanced the decreased secretion of leptin induced by short-term exposure to clozapine, but did not affect the increased accumulation of lipid droplets. Our findings indicate that clozapine, but not blonanserin, strongly and directly affected the secretion of adipokines, such as leptin, in adipocytes and caused adipocyte enlargement.

  17. Labeling by ( sup 3 H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine of two high affinity binding sites in guinea pig brain: Evidence for allosteric regulation by calcium channel antagonists and pseudoallosteric modulation by sigma ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, R.B.; Reid, A.; Mahboubi, A.; Kim, C.H.; De Costa, B.R.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Equilibrium binding studies with the sigma receptor ligand ({sup 3}H)1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (({sup 3}H)DTG) demonstrated two high affinity binding sites in membranes prepared from guinea pig brain. The apparent Kd values of DTG for sites 1 and 2 were 11.9 and 37.6 nM, respectively. The corresponding Bmax values were 1045 and 1423 fmol/mg of protein. Site 1 had high affinity for (+)-pentazocine, haloperidol, (R)-(+)-PPP, carbepentane, and other sigma ligands, suggesting a similarity with the dextromethorphan/sigma 1 binding site described by Musacchio et al. (Life Sci. 45:1721-1732 (1989)). Site 2 had high affinity for DTG and haloperidol (Ki = 36.1 nM) and low affinity for most other sigma ligands. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that ({sup 3}H)DTG dissociated in a biphasic manner from both site 1 and site 2. DTG and haloperidol increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 1 and site 2, demonstrating the presence of pseudoallosteric interactions. Inorganic calcium channel blockers such as Cd2+ selectively increased the dissociation rate of ({sup 3}H)DTG from site 2, suggesting an association of this binding site with calcium channels.

  18. Characterization of kappa 1 and kappa 2 opioid binding sites in frog (Rana esculenta) brain membrane preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benyhe, S.; Varga, E.; Hepp, J.; Magyar, A.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1990-09-01

    The distribution and properties of frog brain kappa-opioid receptor subtypes differ not only from those of the guinea pig brain, but also from that of the rat brain. In guinea pig cerebellum the kappa 1 is the dominant receptor subtype, frog brain contains mainly the kappa 2 subtype, and the distribution of the rat brain subtypes is intermediate between the two others. In competition experiments it has been established that ethylketocyclazocine and N-cyclopropylmethyl-norazidomorphine, which are nonselective kappa-ligands, have relatively high affinities to frog brain membranes. The kappa 2 ligands (Met5)enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and etorphine also show high affinities to the frog brain. Kappa 1 binding sites measured in the presence of 5 microM/D-Ala2-Leu5/enkephalin represent 25-30% of (3H)ethylketocyclazocine binding in frog brain membranes. The kappa 2 subtype in frog brain resembles more to the mu subtype than the delta subtype of opioid receptors, but it differs from the mu subtype in displaying low affinity toward beta-endorphin and /D-Ala2-(Me)Phe4-Gly5-ol/enkephalin (DAGO). From our data it is evident that the opioid receptor subtypes are already present in the amphibian brain but the differences among them are less pronounced than in mammalian brain.

  19. Cholecystokinin-8 suppressed /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to rat brain opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.J.; Fan, S.G.; Ren, M.F.; Han, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) was adopted to analyze the influence of CCK-8 on /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to opiate receptors in rat brain synaptosomal membranes (P2). In the competition experiment CCK-8 suppressed the binding of /sup 3/H-etorphine. This effect was completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Rosenthal analysis for saturation revealed two populations of /sup 3/H-etorphine binding sites. CCK-8 inhibited /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to the high affinity sites by an increase in Kd and decrease in Bmax without significant changes in the Kd and Bmax of the low affinity sites. This effect of CCK-8 was also completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Unsulfated CCK-8 produced only a slight increase in Kd of the high affinity sites without affecting Bmax. The results suggest that CCK-8 might be capable of suppressing the high affinity opioid binding sites via the activation of CCK receptor.

  20. Oxidation of Cr(III) on birnessite surfaces: The effect of goethite and kaolinite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Laiyuan; Yang, Jiewen; Liu, Liming; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of Cr(III) by manganese oxides may pose a potential threat to environments due to the formation of toxic Cr(VI) species. At present, it was still unclear whether the extent of Cr(III) oxidation and fate of Cr(VI) would be changed when manganese oxides co-exist with other minerals, the case commonly occurring in soils. This study investigated the influence of goethite and kaolinite on Cr(III) oxidation by birnessite under acidic pH condition (pH3.5) and background electrolyte of 0.01mol/L NaCl. Goethite was found not to affect Cr(III) oxidation, which was interpreted as the result of overwhelming adsorption of cationic Cr(III) onto the negatively-charged birnessite (point of zero charge (PZC)kaolinite (PZC<3.0), indicating its low affinity for Cr species. Reactions occurring in the present mixed systems were suggested, which could be partly representative of those in the soils and further indicates that the mobility and risk of Cr(VI) would be decreased if goethite was present. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Neonicotinoid Insecticides Alter the Gene Expression Profile of Neuron-Enriched Cultures from Neonatal Rat Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Kimura-Kuroda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoids are considered safe because of their low affinities to mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs relative to insect nAChRs. However, because of importance of nAChRs in mammalian brain development, there remains a need to establish the safety of chronic neonicotinoid exposures with regards to children’s health. Here we examined the effects of longterm (14 days and low dose (1 μM exposure of neuron-enriched cultures from neonatal rat cerebellum to nicotine and two neonicotinoids: acetamiprid and imidacloprid. Immunocytochemistry revealed no differences in the number or morphology of immature neurons or glial cells in any group versus untreated control cultures. However, a slight disturbance in Purkinje cell dendritic arborization was observed in the exposed cultures. Next we performed transcriptome analysis on total RNAs using microarrays, and identified significant differential expression (p < 0.05, q < 0.05, ≥1.5 fold between control cultures versus nicotine-, acetamiprid-, or imidacloprid-exposed cultures in 34, 48, and 67 genes, respectively. Common to all exposed groups were nine genes essential for neurodevelopment, suggesting that chronic neonicotinoid exposure alters the transcriptome of the developing mammalian brain in a similar way to nicotine exposure. Our results highlight the need for further careful investigations into the effects of neonicotinoids in the developing mammalian brain.

  2. Agp2, a Member of the Yeast Amino Acid Permease Family, Positively Regulates Polyamine Transport at the Transcriptional Level

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2013-06-03

    Agp2 is a plasma membrane protein of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transporter family, involved in high-affinity uptake of various substrates including L-carnitine and polyamines. The discovery of two high affinity polyamine permeases, Dur3 and Sam3, prompted us to investigate whether Agp2 directly transports polyamines or acts instead as a regulator. Herein, we show that neither dur3? nor sam3? single mutant is defective in polyamine transport, while the dur3? sam3? double mutant exhibits a sharp decrease in polyamine uptake and an increased resistance to polyamine toxicity similar to the agp2? mutant. Studies of Agp2 localization indicate that in the double mutant dur3? sam3?, Agp2-GFP remains plasma membrane-localized, even though transport of polyamines is strongly reduced. We further demonstrate that Agp2 controls the expression of several transporter genes including DUR3 and SAM3, the carnitine transporter HNM1 and several hexose, nucleoside and vitamin permease genes, in addition to SKY1 encoding a SR kinase that positively regulates low-affinity polyamine uptake. Furthermore, gene expression analysis clearly suggests that Agp2 is a strong positive regulator of additional biological processes. Collectively, our data suggest that Agp2 might respond to environmental cues and thus regulate the expression of several genes including those involved in polyamine transport. © 2013 Aouida et al.

  3. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) [ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor

  4. INDOLEAMINE 2,3-DIOXYGENASE INDUCES EXPRESSION OF A NOVEL TRYPTOPHAN TRANSPORTER IN MOUSE AND HUMAN TUMOR CELLS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Jonathan D.; Lakhal, Samira; Laynes, Robert; Vallius, Laura; Karydis, Ioannis; Marcea, Cornelius; Boyd, C. A. Richard; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, catabolizing tryptophan to kynurenine. Tryptophan depletion by IDO expressing tumors is a common mechanism of immune evasion inducing regulatory T cells and inhibiting effector T cells. As mammalian cells cannot synthesize tryptophan, it remains unclear how IDO positive tumor cells overcome the detrimental effects of local tryptophan depletion. We demonstrate that IDO positive tumor cells express a novel amino acid transporter, which accounts for approximately 50% of the tryptophan uptake. The induced transporter is biochemically distinguished from the constitutively expressed tryptophan transporter System L by increased resistance to inhibitors of System L, resistance to inhibition by high concentrations of most amino acids tested, and high substrate specificity for tryptophan. Under conditions of low extracellular tryptophan, expression of this novel transporter significantly increases tryptophan entry into IDO positive tumors relative to tryptophan uptake through the low affinity System L alone, and further decreases tryptophan levels in the microenvironment. Targeting this additional tryptophan transporter could be a way of pharmacological inhibition of IDO mediated tumor escape. These findings highlight the ability of IDO-expressing tumor cells to thrive in a tryptophan depleted microenvironment by expressing a novel, highly tryptophan-specific transporter, which is resistant to inhibition by most other amino acids. The additional transporter allows tumor cells to strike the ideal balance between supply of tryptophan essential for their own proliferation and survival, and depleting the extracellular milieu of tryptophan to inhibit T cell proliferation. PMID:21742973

  5. Atrazine Molecular Imprinted Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Far-Infrared and Ultraviolet Induced Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Bai, Lian-Yang; Liu, Kun-Feng; Liu, Run-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) were comparatively synthesized using identical polymer formulation by far-infrared (FIR) radiation and ultraviolet (UV)-induced polymerization, respectively. Equilibrium binding experiments were carried out with the prepared MIPs; the results showed that MIPuv possessed specific binding to atrazine compared with their MIPFIR radiation counterparts. Scatchard plot’s of both MIPs indicated that the affinities of the binding sites in MIPs are heterogeneous and can be approximated by two dissociation-constants corresponding to the high-and low-affinity binding sites. Moreover, several common pesticides including atrazine, cyromazine, metamitron, simazine, ametryn, terbutryn were tested to determine their specificity, similar imprinting factor (IF) and different selectivity index (SI) for both MIPs. Physical characterization of the polymers revealed that the different polymerization methods led to slight differences in polymer structures and performance by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR), and mercury analyzer (MA). Finally, both MIPs were used as selective sorbents for solid phase extraction (SPE) of atrazine from lake water, followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Compared with commercial C18 SPE sorbent (86.4%–94.8%), higher recoveries of atrazine in spiked lake water were obtained in the range of 90.1%–97.1% and 94.4%–101.9%, for both MIPs, respectively. PMID:24398982

  6. EPOR2/βcR2-independendent effects of low-dose epoetin-αin porcine liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebschull, Linus; Theilmann, Leon Franz Christoph; Mohr, Annika; Uennigmann, Wencke; Stoeppeler, Sandra; Heitplatz, Barbara; Spiegel, Hans-Ullrich; Bahde, Ralf; Palmes, Daniel Michael; Becker, Felix

    2017-12-22

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) remains a key component of graft damage during transplantation. Erythropoietin (EPO) induces anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects via the EPOR 2 /βcR 2 complex, with a potential risk of thrombosis. Previous work indicates that EPO has EPOR 2 /βcR 2 -independent protective effects via direct effects on the endothelium. As the EPOR 2 /βcR 2 receptor has a very low affinity for EPO, we aimed to test the hypothesis that EPO doses below the level that stimulate this receptor elicit cytoprotective effects via endothelial stimulation in a porcine liver transplantation model. Landrace pigs underwent allogenic liver transplantation (follow-up: 6 h) with a portojugular shunt. Animals were divided into two groups: donor and recipient treatment with low-dose EPO (65 IU/kg) or vehicle, administered 6 h before cold perfusion and 30 min after warm reperfusion. Fourteen of 17 animals (82.4%) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. No differences were noted in operative values between the groups including hemoglobin, cold or warm ischemic time. EPO-treated animals showed a significantly lower histopathology score, reduced apoptosis, oxidative stress, and most important a significant up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). Donor and recipient treatment with low-dose EPO reduces the hepatic IRI via EPOR 2 /βcR 2 -independent cytoprotective mechanisms and represents a clinically applicable way to reduce IRI. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. MC148 encoded by human molluscum contagiosum poxvirus is an antagonist for human but not murine CCR8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Gerstoft, J; Schwartz, T W

    2001-01-01

    The viral CC chemokines MC148, encoded by the poxvirus molluscum contagiosum, and viral macrophage inflammatory protein (vMIP)-I and vMIP-II, encoded by human herpesvirus 8, were probed on the murine CC receptor (CCR) 8 in parallel with human CCR8. In calcium mobilization assays, vMIP-I acted...... as a high-affinity agonist, whereas vMIP-II acted as a low-affinity antagonist on the murine CCR8 as well as the human CCR8. MC148 was found to bind and block responses through the human CCR8 with high affinity, but surprisingly MC148 was unable to bind and block responses through the murine CCR8. Because...... MC148 is the only high-affinity antagonist known to target and be selective for CCR8, MC148 is a valuable tool to decipher the role played by CCR8 in the immune system. This study shows that MC148 could not be used in murine inflammatory models; however, it will be interesting to see whether it can...

  8. Molecular dissection of step 2 catalysis of yeast pre-mRNA splicing investigated in a purified system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Thomas; Odenwälder, Peter; Dannenberg, Julia; Prior, Mira; Warkocki, Zbigniew; Schmitzová, Jana; Karaduman, Ramazan; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2013-07-01

    Step 2 catalysis of pre-mRNA splicing entails the excision of the intron and ligation of the 5' and 3' exons. The tasks of the splicing factors Prp16, Slu7, Prp18, and Prp22 in the formation of the step 2 active site of the spliceosome and in exon ligation, and the timing of their recruitment, remain poorly understood. Using a purified yeast in vitro splicing system, we show that only the DEAH-box ATPase Prp16 is required for formation of a functional step 2 active site and for exon ligation. Efficient docking of the 3' splice site (3'SS) to the active site requires only Slu7/Prp18 but not Prp22. Spliceosome remodeling by Prp16 appears to be subtle as only the step 1 factor Cwc25 is dissociated prior to step 2 catalysis, with its release dependent on docking of the 3'SS to the active site and Prp16 action. We show by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy that Slu7/Prp18 and Prp16 bind early to distinct, low-affinity binding sites on the step-1-activated B* spliceosome, which are subsequently converted into high-affinity sites. Our results shed new light on the factor requirements for step 2 catalysis and the dynamics of step 1 and 2 factors during the catalytic steps of splicing.

  9. Resolution, configurational assignment, and enantiopharmacology of 2-amino-3-[3-hydroxy-5-(2-methyl-2H- tetrazol-5-yl)isoxazol-4-yl]propionic acid, a potent GluR3- and GluR4-preferring AMPA receptor agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, S B; Jensen, H S; Stensbøl, T B

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-3-[3-hydroxy-5-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)isoxazol -4-yl] propionic acid (2-Me-Tet-AMPA) is a selective agonist at (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors, markedly more potent than AMPA itself, whereas the isomeric...... compound 1-Me-Tet-AMPA is essentially inactive. We here report the enantiopharmacology of 2-Me-Tet-AMPA in radioligand binding and cortical wedge electrophysiological assay systems, and using cloned AMPA (GluR1-4) and kainic acid (KA) (GluR5, 6, and KA2) receptor subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 2-Me...... tested showed detectable affinity for N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor sites, and (R)-2-Me-Tet-AMPA was essentially inactive in all of the test systems used. Whereas (S)-2-Me-Tet-AMPA showed low affinity (IC(50) = 11 microM) in the [(3)H]KA binding assay, it was significantly more potent (IC(50...

  10. New non detrimental DNA binding mutants of the Escherichia coli initiator protein DnaA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asklund, Marlene; Atlung, Tove

    2004-01-01

    The initiator protein DnaA has several unique DNA-binding features. It binds with high affinity as a monomer to the nonamer DnaA box. In the ATP form, DnaA binds cooperatively to the low-affinity ATP-DnaA boxes, and to single-stranded DNA in the 13mer region of the origin. We have carried out...... an extensive mutational analysis of the DNA-binding domain of the Escherichia coli DnaA protein using mutagenic PCR. We analyzed mutants exhibiting more or less partial activity by selecting for complementation of a dnaA(Ts) mutant strain at different expression levels of the new mutant proteins. The selection...... gave rise to 30 single amino acid substitutions and, including double substitutions, more than 100 mutants functional in initiation of chromosome replication were characterized. The analysis indicated that all regions of the DNA-binding domain are involved in DNA binding, but the most important amino...

  11. Nerve growth factor actions on the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effect of the trophic protein, nerve growth factor (NGF), on cultures of fetal rat neostriatum and basal forebrain-medial septal area (BF-MS) to define its role in brain development. Treatment of cultures with NGF resulted in an increase in the specific activity of the cholinergic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (CAT) in both brain areas. CAT was immunocytochemically localized to neurons. In the BF-MS, NGF treatment elicited a marked increase in staining intensity and an apparent increase in the number of CAT-positive neurons. Moreover, treatment of BF-MS cultures with NGF increased the activity of acetylcholinesterase, suggesting that the cholinergic neuron as a whole was affected. To begin defining mechanisms of action of NGF in the BF-MS, we detected NGF receptors by two independent methods. Receptors were localized to two different cellular populations: neuron-like cells, and non-neuron-like cells. Dissociation studies with [ 125 I]NGF suggested that high affinity receptors were localized to the neuron-like population. Only low-affinity receptors were localized to the non-neuron-like cells. Moreover, employing combined immunocytochemistry and [ 125 I]NGF autoradiography, we detected a subpopulation of CAT-containing neutrons that exhibited high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell group also expressed high affinity binding. However, only subsets of cholinergic or GABA neurons expressed high-affinity biding, suggesting that these transmitter populations are composed of differentially response subpopulations

  12. Asymmetric ring structure of Vps4 required for ESCRT-III disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillat, Christophe; Macheboeuf, Pauline; Wu, Yuanfei; McCarthy, Andrew A.; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Effantin, Gregory; Göttlinger, Heinrich G.; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Renesto, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    The vacuolar protein sorting 4 AAA-ATPase (Vps4) recycles endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-III) polymers from cellular membranes. Here we present a 3.6-Å X-ray structure of ring-shaped Vps4 from Metallosphera sedula (MsVps4), seen as an asymmetric pseudohexamer. Conserved key interface residues are shown to be important for MsVps4 assembly, ATPase activity in vitro, ESCRT-III disassembly in vitro and HIV-1 budding. ADP binding leads to conformational changes within the protomer, which might propagate within the ring structure. All ATP-binding sites are accessible and the pseudohexamer binds six ATP with micromolar affinity in vitro. In contrast, ADP occupies one high-affinity and five low-affinity binding sites in vitro, consistent with conformational asymmetry induced on ATP hydrolysis. The structure represents a snapshot of an assembled Vps4 conformation and provides insight into the molecular motions the ring structure undergoes in a concerted action to couple ATP hydrolysis to ESCRT-III substrate disassembly.

  13. Photophysical Study of DPPTT-T/PC70 BM Blends and Solar Devices as a Function of Fullerene Loading: An Insight into EQE Limitations of DPP-Based Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Collado-Fregoso, Elisa

    2016-12-27

    Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-based polymers have been consistently used for the fabrication of solar cell devices and transistors due to the existence of intermolecular short contacts, resulting in high electron and hole mobilities. However, they also often show limited external quantum efficiencies (EQEs). In this contribution, the authors analyze the limitations on EQE by a combined study of exciton dissociation efficiency, charge separation, and recombination kinetics in thin films and solar devices of a DPP-based donor polymer, DPPTT-T (thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-diketopyrrolopyrrole copolymer) blended with varying weight fractions of the fullerene acceptor PCBM. From the correlations between photoluminescence quenching, transient absorption studies, and EQE measurements, it is concluded that the main limitation of photon-to-charge conversion in DPPTT-T/PCBM devices is poor exciton dissociation. This exciton quenching limit is related not only to the low affinity/miscibility of the materials, as confirmed by wide angle X-ray diffraction diffraction and transmission electron microscopy data, but also to the relatively short DPPTT-T singlet exciton lifetime, possibly associated with high nonradiative losses. A further strategy to improve EQE in this class of polymers without sacrificing the good extraction properties in optimized blends is therefore to limit those nonradiative decay processes.

  14. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié, Stéphane C.

    2012-02-15

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs affect the formation of the BNCs, and ultimately control the activity of the bound enzymes. Smaller MNPs form small clusters with a low affinity for the HRP. While the turnover for the bound fraction is drastically increased, there is no difference in the H 2O 2 inhibitory concentration. Larger MNPs with a higher magnetization aggregate in larger clusters and have a higher affinity for the enzyme and a lower substrate inhibition. All of the BNCs are more active than the free enzyme or the MNPs (BNCs > HRP ≤laquo; MNPs). Since the BNCs show surprising resilience in various reaction conditions, they may pave the way towards new hybrid biocatalysts with increased activities and unique catalytic properties for magnetosensitive enzymatic reactions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Forward genetics screen coupled with whole-genome resequencing identifies novel gene targets for improving heterologous enzyme production in Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Morgann C. [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Joonhoon [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lynn, Jed [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA (United States); Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH (United States); Simmons, Blake A. [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gladden, John M. [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Magnuson, Jon K. [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2018-01-06

    Plant biomass, once reduced to its composite sugars, can be converted to fuel substitutes. One means of overcoming the recalcitrance of lignocellulose is pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. However, currently available commercial enzyme cocktails are inhibited in the presence of residual pretreatment chemicals. Recent studies have identified a number of cellulolytic enzymes from bacteria that are tolerant to pretreatment chemicals such as ionic liquids. The challenge now is generation of these enzymes in copious amounts, an arena where fungal organisms such as Aspergillus niger have proven efficient. Fungal host strains still need to be engineered to increase production titers of heterologous protein over native enzymes, which has been a difficult task. Here, we developed a forward genetics screen coupled with whole-genome resequencing to identify specific lesions responsible for a protein hyper-production phenotype in A. niger. This strategy successfully identified novel targets, including a low-affinity glucose transporter, MstC, whose deletion significantly improved secretion of recombinant proteins driven by a glucoamylase promoter.

  16. Different endothelin receptor affinities in dog tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, B.M.L.; Loehrer, W.

    1991-01-01

    Endothelin (ET) is a long-lasting potent vasoconstrictor-peptide. Here the authors report different binding affinities of endothelin-1 (ET-1) to ET-receptors of various dog tissues. Crude microsomal fractions were prepared after homogenisation of dog tissues in 50 mM Tris/HCl, 20 mM MnCl2, 1 mM EDTA, pH 7.4 by differential centrifugation. Aliquots of microsomal fractions (70 micrograms of protein) were incubated at 25 degrees C for 180 min in the presence of 20 pM 125I-ET-1 and various concentrations of cold ET-1. Four different ET-1 receptor binding affinities were found: adrenals, cerebrum, liver, heart, skeletal muscle and stomach microsomal membranes contained high affinity binding sites (Kd 50 - 80 pM, Bmax 60 - 250 fmol/mg). In cerebellum and spleen medium affinity ET-1 receptors (Kd 350 pM, Bmax 880 and 1200 fmol/mg respectively) were present. In comparison lung and kidney microsomes contained a low affinity ET-1 receptor (Kd 800 and 880 pM, Bmax 1600 and 350 fmol/mg). Receptors of even lower affinity were present in heart, intestine and liver microsomes with Kd values of 3 - 6 nM

  17. Mechanisms of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and methods for laboratory detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, J H

    1991-01-01

    Three distinctly different mechanisms of methicillin resistance have been described in Staphylococcus aureus. The best-documented and probably most important mechanism is production of a unique, low affinity penicillin-binding protein, PBP 2a. Strains possessing PBP 2a are resistant to methicillin, oxacillin, and probably all other currently available beta-lactam antibiotics. Two additional mechanisms of reduced susceptibility to methicillin have been described. Borderline resistance (BORSA) to the semi-synthetic penicillins has been attributed to the hyperproduction of normal staphylococcal beta-lactamase. A third mechanism has recently been advanced that describes an intermediate level of resistance to methicillin due to production of modified, normal PBPs with reduced affinity for beta-lactams (MODSA). Little is known regarding the prevalence or clinical significance of the BORSA and MODSA strains. The most reliable in vitro susceptibility test methods for detecting MRSA (strains possessing PBP 2a) include the microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test (with 2% NaCl supplemented broth), the oxacillin agar screen plate test (incorporating 6 micrograms/ml oxacillin in 4% NaCl supplemented agar), and the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) disk diffusion test with oxacillin. All three methods use direct inoculum preparation and incubation of tests at 35 degrees C for a full 24 hours.

  18. Diffusive spreading and mixing of fluid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, M N; Dietrich, S; Oshanin, G

    2005-01-01

    The use of ultra-thin, i.e. monolayer, films plays an important role in the emerging field of nano-fluidics. Since the dynamics of such films is governed by the interplay between substrate-fluid and fluid-fluid interactions, the transport of matter in nanoscale devices may eventually be efficiently controlled by substrate engineering. For such films, the dynamics is expected to be captured by two-dimensional lattice-gas models with interacting particles. Using a lattice-gas model and the non-linear diffusion equation derived from the microscopic dynamics in the continuum limit, we study two problems of relevance in the context of nano-fluidics. The first one is the case in which along the spreading direction of a monolayer a mesoscopic-sized obstacle is present, with a particular focus on the relaxation of the fluid density profile upon encountering and passing the obstacle. The second one is the mixing of two monolayers of different particle species which spread side by side following the merger of two chemical lanes, here defined as domains of high affinity for fluid adsorption surrounded by domains of low affinity for fluid adsorption

  19. Functional characterization of the chloroplast ferric chelate oxidoreductase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solti, Adám; Müller, Brigitta; Czech, Viktória; Sárvári, Éva; Fodor, Ferenc

    2014-05-01

    Iron (Fe) has an essential role in the biosynthesis of chlorophylls and redox cofactors, and thus chloroplast iron uptake is a process of special importance. The chloroplast ferric chelate oxidoreductase (cFRO) has a crucial role in this process but it is poorly characterized. To study the localization and mechanism of action of cFRO, sugar beet (Beta vulgaris cv Orbis) chloroplast envelope fractions were isolated by gradient ultracentrifugation, and their purity was tested by western blotting against different marker proteins. The ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity of envelope fractions was studied in the presence of NAD(P)H (reductants) and FAD coenzymes. Reduction of Fe(III)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was monitored spectrophotometrically by the Fe(II)-bathophenanthroline disulfonate complex formation. FCR activity, that is production of free Fe(II) for Fe uptake, showed biphasic saturation kinetics, and was clearly associated only to chloroplast inner envelope (cIE) vesicles. The reaction rate was > 2.5 times higher with NADPH than with NADH, which indicates the natural coenzyme preference of cFRO activity and its dependence on photosynthesis. FCR activity of cIE vesicles isolated from Fe-deficient plants also showed clear biphasic kinetics, where the KM of the low affinity component was elevated, and thus this component was down-regulated. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Multiple serotonin receptors: regional distribution and effect of raphe lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackshear, M.A.; Sanders-Bush, E.; Steranka, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    These studies confirm and extend the recent work suggesting that [ 3 H]lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) labels two distinct binding sites in rat brain resembling serotonin (5HT) receptors. Although Scatchard analyses of [ 3 H]LSD binding to membranes prepared from cortex/hippocampus were linear, the heterogeneity of the [ 3 H]LSD binding sites was clearly demonstrated in displacement studies. The displacement curves for both 5HT and spiperone were bisigmoidal with the concentration required to saturate the high affinity components nearly 3 orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations necessary to saturate the low affinity components. Additivity studies suggested that the sites with high affinity for 5HT and spiperone are different, independent sites. These sites are referred to as 5HT 1 and 5HT 2 respectively. Regional analyses showed, that in the frontal cortex, the density of the 5HT 2 site was slightly greater than the 5HT 1 site whereas the 5HT 1 site was predominant in all other brain areas, including the spinal cord. The pharmacological properties of the two sites have features in common with 5HT receptors; however, electrolytic lesions of the midbrain raphe nuclei did not change the densities or binding constants of the two apparent 5HT receptor subtypes, even though the number of high affinity 5HT uptake sites was markedly reduced. (Auth.)

  1. Characterization of cholecystokinin receptors on guinea pig gastric chief cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matozaki, T.; Sakamoto, C.; Nagao, M.; Nishisaki, H.; Konda, Y.; Nakano, O.; Matsuda, K.; Wada, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kasuga, M.

    1991-01-01

    The binding of cholecystokinin (CCK) to its receptors on guinea pig gastric chief cell membranes were characterized by the use of 125 I-CCK-octapeptide (CCK8). At 30 degrees C optimal binding was obtained at acidic pH in the presence of Mg2+, while Na+ reduced the binding. In contrast to reports on pancreatic and brain CCK receptors, scatchard analysis of CCK binding to chief cell membranes revealed two classes of binding sites. Whereas, in the presence of a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog, GTP gamma S, only a low affinity site of CCK binding was observed. Chief cell receptors recognized CCK analogs, with an order of potency of: CCK8 greater than gastrin-I greater than CCK4. Although all CCK receptor antagonists tested (dibutyryl cyclic GMP, L-364718 and CR1409) inhibited labeled CCK binding to chief cell membranes, the relative potencies of these antagonists in terms of inhibiting labeled CCK binding were different from those observed in either pancreatic membranes or brain membranes. The results indicate, therefore, that on gastric chief cell membranes there exist specific CCK receptors, which are coupled to G protein. Furthermore, chief cell CCK receptors may be distinct from pancreatic or brain type CCK receptors

  2. Identification of four areas each enriched in a unique muscarinic receptor subtype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoss, W.; Ellerbrock, B.R.; Goldman, P.S.; Collins, D.A.; Messer, W.S. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The affinities of muscarinic agonists and antagonists were determined by autoradiography and image analysis in selected areas of the rat brain. IC 50 values and Hill coefficients for the inhibition of the binding of 0.2 nM [ 3 H]-QNB to dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, rhomboid thalamus and substantia nigra were measured in coronal sections. Pirenzepine displayed a high affinity for receptors in the dentate gyrus and AF-DX 116, the superior colliculus. Both pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 had high affinities for the substantia nigra and low affinities for the rhomboid thalamus. Gallamine displayed a 50-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Amitriptyline was less selective, showing a modest preference for substantia nigra receptors and 4-DAMP was essentially nonselective. Carbachol was the most selective agonist with a 4000-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Other agonists except RS 86 were also selective for superior colliculus receptors in the order carbachol >> arecoline > bethanechol > McN A343 = oxotremorine = pilocarpine

  3. Antifolate resistance and its circumvention by new analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Y; Kobayashi, H; Miyachi, H

    2001-09-01

    We have established human leukemia cell lines made resistant to various antifolate drugs and analyzed resistance mechanisms developed in these cells at the cellular and molecular levels. The cells acquired resistance to antifolate drug(s) through: (1) impaired drug uptake via the reduced folate carrier, (2) increased activity of the target enzymes[dihydrofolate reductase(DHFR) or thymidylate synthase(TS)] resulted from a concomitant amplification and overexpression of their gene, (3) induction of a variant DHFR with a low affinity for antifolate drug(s) used for the selection of resistance, and (4) defective polyglutamation. Each resistance mechanism was not necessarily induced at random, but appeared to relate to the biochemical and pharmacological properties of the drug exposed, biological dispositions of the cells, drug-exposure manners to, or culture conditions of the cells. Since it has been shown that a minor modification at the specified position of the folate structure resulted in a drastic change in its pharmacological properties, many new compounds have been rationally designed on the basis of the knowledge of relationships between structure modifications and pharmacological properties. The step-by-step approach to the development of new analogues led to the discoveries of several promising antifolate drugs such as trimetrexate and raltitrexed, which can overcome the acquired and natural resistance to methotrexate, a classical antifolate, and clinical trials of these newer classes of antifolate compounds are currently underway.

  4. Conformational changes affect binding and catalysis by ester-hydrolysing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, A B; Eshhar, Z; Tawfik, D S

    1999-01-08

    D2.3, D2.4 and D2.5 are ester-hydrolysing antibodies raised against a phosphonate transition state analogue (TSA). All three antibody-TSA binding kinetics, as monitored by fluorescence quenching, indicate an "induced-fit" mechanism: fast bimolecular association followed by a unimolecular isomerisation (k=1-7 s-1). Isomerisation leads to a 30-170-fold increase in affinity towards the TSA and, consequently, to higher catalytic rates. Antibody D2.3 exhibits a complex three-step binding mechanism, in which the last step is a "very slow" isomerisation (knether-active" (low affinity) and "active" (high affinity) antibody conformers (prior to ligand addition) as well as induced-fit, i.e. isomerisation of the nether-active ligand-antibody complex to give the active complex. Crystal structures of these antibodies, free and complexed, have previously indicated that their conformation does not change upon binding. Here, we show that the buffer used to crystallise the antibodies, and in particular its polyethylene glycol component, alters the pre-equilibrium in favour of the active conformer, leading to its crystallisation both in the presence and in the absence of the TSA. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.; Ihan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  6. The C-terminal domain of Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase holoenzyme protein p65 induces multiple structural changes in telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Loper, John; Najarro, Kevin; Stone, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The unique cellular activity of the telomerase reverse transcriptase ribonucleoprotein (RNP) requires proper assembly of protein and RNA components into a functional complex. In the ciliate model organism Tetrahymena thermophila, the La-domain protein p65 is required for in vivo assembly of telomerase. Single-molecule and biochemical studies have shown that p65 promotes efficient RNA assembly with the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein, in part by inducing a bend in the conserved stem IV region of telomerase RNA (TER). The domain architecture of p65 consists of an N-terminal domain, a La-RRM motif, and a C-terminal domain (CTD). Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET), we demonstrate the p65CTD is necessary for the RNA remodeling activity of the protein and is sufficient to induce a substantial conformational change in stem IV of TER. Moreover, nuclease protection assays directly map the site of p65CTD interaction to stem IV and reveal that, in addition to bending stem IV, p65 binding reorganizes nucleotides that comprise the low-affinity TERT binding site within stem–loop IV. PMID:22315458

  7. Alteration of methotrexate binding to human serum albumin induced by oxidative stress. Spectroscopic comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M; Sułkowska, A; Równicka-Zubik, J

    2016-01-05

    Changes of oxidative modified albumin conformation by comparison of non-modified (HSA) and modified (oHSA) human serum albumin absorption spectra, Red Edge Excitation Shift (REES) effect and fluorescence synchronous spectra were investigated. Studies of absorption spectra indicated that changes in the value of absorbance associated with spectral changes in the region from 200 to 250nm involve structural alterations related to variations in peptide backbone conformation. Analysis of the REES effect allowed for the observation of changes caused by oxidation in the region of the hydrophobic pocket containing the tryptophanyl residue. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed changes of the position of the tryptophanyl and tyrosil residues fluorescent band. Effect of oxidative stress on binding of methotrexate (MTX) was investigated by spectrofluorescence, UV-VIS and (1)HNMR spectroscopy. MTX caused the fluorescence quenching of non-modified (HSA) and modified (oHSA) human serum albumin molecule. The values of binding constants, Hill's coefficients and a number of binding sites in the protein molecule in the high affinity binding site were calculated for the binary MTX-HSA and MTX-oHSA systems. For these systems, qualitative analysis in the low affinity binding sites was performed with the use of the (1)HNMR technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of a blood-meal-responsive proton-dependent amino acid transporter in the disease vector, Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Amy M.; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary After anautogenous mosquitoes ingest the required blood meal, proteins in it are rapidly cleaved, yielding a large pool of amino acids. Transport of these amino acids into gut epithelial cells and their subsequent translocation into other tissues is critical for oogenesis and other physiological processes. We have identified a proton amino acid transporter (PAT) in Aedes aegypti (AaePAT1, AAEL007191) which facilitates this transport and is expressed in epithelial cell membranes of larval caecae and the adult midgut. AaePAT1 encodes a 475 amino acid protein showing high similarity to Anopheles gambiae AGAP009896, Culex pipiens CPIJ011438 and Drosophila melanogaster CG7888. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes the transport kinetics showed AaePAT1 is a low affinity transporter with low substrate specificity, having Km and Vmax values of about 7.2 mmol l–1 and 69 pmol oocyte–1 min–1, respectively, for glutamine. A number of other amino acids are also transported by this PAT. In female adult midgut, AaePAT1 transcript levels were induced after ingestion of a blood meal. PMID:19801431

  9. Nicotinic Receptors in the Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus Differentially Modulate Contextual Fear Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Justin W.; Raybuck, Jonathan D.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotine administration alters various forms of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Increasing work has found that the dorsal and ventral hippocampus differentially contribute to multiple behaviors. Thus, the present study examined whether the effects of nicotine in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus have distinct influences on contextual fear learning in male C57BL/6J mice. Direct infusion of nicotine into the dorsal hippocampus resulted in an enhancement of contextual fear learning, whereas nicotine infused into the ventral hippocampus resulted in deficits. Nicotine infusions into the ventral hippocampus did not alter hippocampus-independent cued fear conditioning or time spent in the open arm of the elevated plus maze, a measure of anxiety, suggesting the effects are due to alterations in contextual learning and not other general processes. Finally, results from using direct infusions of MLA, a low-affinity α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, in conjunction with systemic nicotine, provide evidence that α7-nAChRs in the ventral hippocampus mediate the detrimental effect of ventral hippocampal nicotine on contextual fear learning. These results suggest that with systemic nicotine administration, competition exists between the dorsal and ventral hippocampus for behavioral control over contextual learning. PMID:22271264

  10. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-01-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 μM/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na + and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with 14 C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 μM, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet

  11. Absence of association of FCGR2A gene polymorphism rs1801274 with Kawasaki disease in Greek patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikyriakidou, Anthoula; Aidinidou, Louiza; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Papadopoulou-Legbelou, Kyriaki; Kalinderi, Kallirhoe; Fidani, Liana

    2015-04-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, febrile syndrome in infancy, characterised by vasculitis of medium-sized arteries, and affects predominantly young children. Family-based studies on Kawasaki disease supports the contribution of genetic factors in disorder manifestation. In a recent genome-wide association study, the polymorphism rs1801274 of FCGR2A [Fc fragment of immunoglobulin G, low-affinity IIa, receptor] gene has been implicated in disease pathogenesis. The aim of the present study was to explore the association of this variant, for the first time, in a group of Kawasaki-diseased patients of Greek origin. A total of 47 Kawasaki-diseased children and 50 control subjects were enrolled in the study. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was performed in rs1801274 genotyping. No association was observed between this polymorphism genotypes' or alleles' distribution between Kawasaki-diseased patients and controls. Furthermore, no association was revealed between this polymorphism and cardiovascular complications in Kawasaki-diseased patients. In the literature, the reported data over this polymorphism association with Kawasaki disease in Caucasian patients are contradictory. In addition, the disease shows low prevalence in the Caucasian populations. Therefore, the independent genetic association studies on rs1801274 with Kawasaki disease in various Caucasian groups increase the amount of genetic data, which could be used in a future meta-analysis, increasing the statistical power of the resultant conclusions.

  12. Sulfate uptake in photosynthetic Euglena gracilis. Mechanisms of regulation and contribution to cysteine homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Jorge Donato; Olin-Sandoval, Viridiana; Saavedra, Emma; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández, Georgina; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Sulfate uptake was analyzed in photosynthetic Euglena gracilis grown in sulfate sufficient or sulfate deficient media, or under Cd(2+) exposure or Cys overload, to determine its regulatory mechanisms and contribution to Cys homeostasis. In control and sulfate deficient or Cd(2+)-stressed cells, one high affinity and two low affinity sulfate transporters were revealed, which were partially inhibited by photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors and ionophores, as well as by chromate and molybdate; H(+) efflux also diminished in presence of sulfate. In both sulfate deficient and Cd(2+)-exposed cells, the activity of the sulfate transporters was significantly increased. However, the content of thiol-metabolites was lower in sulfate-deficient cells, and higher in Cd(2+)-exposed cells, in comparison to control cells. In cells incubated with external Cys, sulfate uptake was strongly inhibited correlating with 5-times increased intracellular Cys. Re-supply of sulfate to sulfate deficient cells increased the Cys, γ-glutamylcysteine and GSH pools, and to Cys-overloaded cells resulted in the consumption of previously accumulated Cys. In contrast, in Cd(2+) exposed cells none of the already elevated thiol-metabolites changed. (i) Sulfate transport is an energy-dependent process; (ii) sulfate transporters are over-expressed under sulfate deficiency or Cd(2+) stress and their activity can be inhibited by high internal Cys; and (iii) sulfate uptake exerts homeostatic control of the Cys pool. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative proteomics of nutrient limitation in the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrickson Erik L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanogenic Archaea play key metabolic roles in anaerobic ecosystems, where they use H2 and other substrates to produce methane. Methanococcus maripaludis is a model for studies of the global response to nutrient limitations. Results We used high-coverage quantitative proteomics to determine the response of M. maripaludis to growth-limiting levels of H2, nitrogen, and phosphate. Six to ten percent of the proteome changed significantly with each nutrient limitation. H2 limitation increased the abundance of a wide variety of proteins involved in methanogenesis. However, one protein involved in methanogenesis decreased: a low-affinity [Fe] hydrogenase, which may dominate over a higher-affinity mechanism when H2 is abundant. Nitrogen limitation increased known nitrogen assimilation proteins. In addition, the increased abundance of molybdate transport proteins suggested they function for nitrogen fixation. An apparent regulon governed by the euryarchaeal nitrogen regulator NrpR is discussed. Phosphate limitation increased the abundance of three different sets of proteins, suggesting that all three function in phosphate transport. Conclusion The global proteomic response of M. maripaludis to each nutrient limitation suggests a wider response than previously appreciated. The results give new insight into the function of several proteins, as well as providing information that should contribute to the formulation of a regulatory network model.

  14. Quantitative proteomics of nutrient limitation in the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qiangwei; Wang, Tiansong; Hendrickson, Erik L; Lie, Thomas J; Hackett, Murray; Leigh, John A

    2009-07-23

    Methanogenic Archaea play key metabolic roles in anaerobic ecosystems, where they use H2 and other substrates to produce methane. Methanococcus maripaludis is a model for studies of the global response to nutrient limitations. We used high-coverage quantitative proteomics to determine the response of M. maripaludis to growth-limiting levels of H2, nitrogen, and phosphate. Six to ten percent of the proteome changed significantly with each nutrient limitation. H2 limitation increased the abundance of a wide variety of proteins involved in methanogenesis. However, one protein involved in methanogenesis decreased: a low-affinity [Fe] hydrogenase, which may dominate over a higher-affinity mechanism when H2 is abundant. Nitrogen limitation increased known nitrogen assimilation proteins. In addition, the increased abundance of molybdate transport proteins suggested they function for nitrogen fixation. An apparent regulon governed by the euryarchaeal nitrogen regulator NrpR is discussed. Phosphate limitation increased the abundance of three different sets of proteins, suggesting that all three function in phosphate transport. The global proteomic response of M. maripaludis to each nutrient limitation suggests a wider response than previously appreciated. The results give new insight into the function of several proteins, as well as providing information that should contribute to the formulation of a regulatory network model.

  15. Different modes of diaminopimelate synthesis and their role in cell wall integrity: a study with Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmann, A; Phillipp, B; Sahm, H; Eggeling, L

    1998-06-01

    In eubacteria, there are three slightly different pathways for the synthesis of m-diaminopimelate (m-DAP), which is one of the key linking units of peptidoglycan. Surprisingly, for unknown reasons, some bacteria use two of these pathways together. An example is Corynebacterium glutamicum, which uses both the succinylase and dehydrogenase pathways for m-DAP synthesis. In this study, we clone dapD and prove by enzyme experiments that this gene encodes the succinylase (M(r) = 24082), initiating the succinylase pathway of m-DAP synthesis. By using gene-directed mutation, dapD, as well as dapE encoding the desuccinylase, was inactivated, thereby forcing C. glutamicum to use only the dehydrogenase pathway of m-DAP synthesis. The mutants are unable to grow on organic nitrogen sources. When supplied with low ammonium concentrations but excess carbon, their morphology is radically altered and they are less resistant to mechanical stress than the wild type. Since the succinylase has a high affinity toward its substrate and uses glutamate as the nitrogen donor, while the dehydrogenase has a low affinity and incorporates ammonium directly, the m-DAP synthesis is another example of twin activities present in bacteria for access to important metabolites such as the well-known twin activities for the synthesis of glutamate or for the uptake of potassium.

  16. The overexpression of nuclear envelope protein Lap2β induces endoplasmic reticulum reorganisation via membrane stacking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina G. Volkova

    2012-06-01

    Some nuclear envelope proteins are localised to both the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum; therefore, it seems plausible that even small amounts of these proteins can influence the organisation of the endoplasmic reticulum. A simple method to study the possible effects of nuclear envelope proteins on endoplasmic reticulum organisation is to analyze nuclear envelope protein overexpression. Here, we demonstrate that Lap2β overexpression can induce the formation of cytoplasmic vesicular structures derived from endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Correlative light and electron microscopy demonstrated that these vesicular structures were composed of a series of closely apposed membranes that were frequently arranged in a circular fashion. Although stacked endoplasmic reticulum cisternae were highly ordered, Lap2β could readily diffuse into and out of these structures into the surrounding reticulum. It appears that low-affinity interactions between cytoplasmic domains of Lap2β can reorganise reticular endoplasmic reticulum into stacked cisternae. Although the effect of one protein may be insignificant at low concentrations, the cumulative effect of many non-specialised proteins may be significant.

  17. Structure-function relationships for the interleukin 2 receptor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Robb

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptors for interleukin 2 (IL-2 esit in at least three forms which differ in their subunit compositio, their affinity for ligand and their ability to mediate a cellular reponse. Type I receptors occur following cellular acitivation and consist of the 55,000 m. w. glycoprotein Tac. These receptors bind IL-2 with a low affinity, do not internalize ligand and have not been definitively associated with any response. Type II receptors, on the other hand, conssit of one or more glycoproteins of 70,000 m. w. which have been termed "beta ([beta] chains." They bind IL-2 with an intermediate affinity and rapidly internalize the ligand. [Beta] proteins mediate many cellular IL-2-dependent reponses, including the short-term activation of natural killer cells and the induction of Tac protein expression. Type III receptors consist of a ternary complex of the Tac protein, the [beta] chain(s and IL-2. They are characterized by a paricularly high affinity for ligand association. Type III receptors also internalize ligand and mediate IL-2-dependent responses at low factor concentrations. The identification of two independent IL-2-binding molecules, Tac and [beta], thus provides the elusive molecular explanation for the differences in IL-2 receptor affinity and suggests the potential for selective therapeutic manipulation of IL-2 reponses.

  18. Phasic dopamine release drives rapid activation of striatal D2-receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcott, Pamela F; Mamaligas, Aphroditi A; Ford, Christopher P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal dopamine transmission underlies numerous goal-directed behaviors. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are a major target of dopamine in the striatum. However, as dopamine does not directly evoke a synaptic event in MSNs, the time course of dopamine signaling in these cells remains unclear. To examine how dopamine release activates D2-receptors on MSNs, G-protein activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK2; Kir 3.2) channels were virally overexpressed in the striatum and the resulting outward currents were used as a sensor of D2-receptor activation. Electrical and optogenetic stimulation of dopamine terminals evoked robust D2-receptor inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in GIRK2-expressing MSNs that occurred in under a second. Evoked D2-IPSCs could be driven by repetitive stimulation and were not occluded by background dopamine tone. Together, the results indicate that D2-receptors on MSNs exhibit functional low affinity and suggest that striatal D2-receptors can encode both tonic and phasic dopamine signals. PMID:25242218

  19. Preferential binding of growth inhibitory prostaglandins by the target protein of a carcinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.H.; Sorof, S. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1990-12-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is the principal target protein of the hepatic carcinogen N-(2-fluorenyl)acetamide (2-acetylaminofluorene) in rat liver. In addition, the cyclopentenone prostaglandins (PG), PGA, PGJ{sub 2}, and {Delta}{sup 12}-PGJ{sub 2}, inhibit the growth of many cell types in vitro. This report describes the preferential binding of the growth inhibitory prostaglandins by L-FABP and the reversible inhibition of thymidine incorporation into DNA by PGA{sub 2} and {Delta}{sup 12}-PGJ{sub 2} in primary cultures of purified rat hepatocytes. As a model ligand, ({sup 3}H)PGA{sub 1} bound to L-FABP specifically, reversibly, rapidly, and with high affinity. Its dissociation constants were 134 nM (high affinity) and 3.6 {mu}M (low affinity). The high-affinity finding of ({sup 3}H)PGA{sup 1} correlated with their growth inhibitory activities reported previously and here. The in vitro actions of L-FABP are compatible with those of a specific and dissociable carrier of growth inhibitory prostaglandins in rat hepatocytes and suggest that the carcinogen may usurp the cellular machinery of the growth inhibitory prostaglandins.

  20. Molecular dynamics and binding selectivity of nucleotides and polynucleotide substrates with EIF2C2/Ago2 PAZ domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Kitade, Yukio

    2018-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) constitutes a major target in drug discovery. Recently, we reported that the Argonaute protein 2 (Ago2) PAZ domain selectively binds with all ribonucleotides except adenine and poorly recognizes deoxyribonucleotides. The binding properties of the PAZ domain with polynucleotides and the molecular mechanisms of substrates' selectivity remains unclear. In this study, the binding potencies of polynucleotides and the associated conformational and dynamic changes in PAZ domain are investigated. Coinciding with nucleotides' binding profile with the PAZ domain, polyuridylate (PolyU) and polycytidylate (PolyC) were potent binders. However, K dPolyU and K dPolyC were 15.8 and 9.3μM, respectively. In contrast, polyadenylate (PolyA) binding was not detectable. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation revealed the highest change in root mean square deviation (RMSD) with ApoPAZ or PAZ domain bound with experimentally approved, low affinity substrates, whereas stronger binding substrates such as UMP or PolyU showed minimal RMSD changes. The loop between α3 and β5 in the β-hairpin subdomain showed the most responsive change in RMSD, being highly movable in the ApoPAZ and PAZ-AMP complex. Favorable substrate recognition was associate with moderate change in secondary structure content. In conclusion, the PAZ domain retains differential substrate selectivity associated with corresponding dynamic and structural changes upon binding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Voltammetric and Mathematical Evidence for Dual Transport Mediation of Serotonin Clearance In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin M.; Zeqja, Anisa; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin underlies many of the brain’s functions. Understanding serotonin neurochemistry is important for improving treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Antidepressants commonly target serotonin clearance via serotonin transporters (SERTs) and have variable clinical effects. Adjunctive therapies, targeting other systems including serotonin autoreceptors, also vary clinically and carry adverse consequences. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is particularly well suited for studying antidepressant effects on serotonin clearance and autoreceptors by providing real-time chemical information on serotonin kinetics in vivo. However, the complex nature of in vivo serotonin responses makes it difficult to interpret experimental data with established kinetic models. Here, we electrically stimulated the mouse medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to provoke and detect terminal serotonin in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr). In response to MFB stimulation we found three dynamically distinct serotonin signals. To interpret these signals we developed a computational model that supports two independent serotonin reuptake mechanisms (high affinity, low efficiency reuptake mechanism and low affinity, high efficiency reuptake system) and bolsters an important inhibitory role for the serotonin autoreceptors. Our data and analysis, afforded by the powerful combination of voltammetric and theoretical methods, gives new understanding of the chemical heterogeneity of serotonin dynamics in the brain. This diverse serotonergic matrix likely contributes to clinical variability of antidepressants. PMID:24702305

  2. Role of sterol 3-ketoreductase sensitivity in susceptibility to the fungicide fenhexamid in Botrytis cinerea and other phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debieu, Danièle; Bach, Jocelyne; Montesinos, Emeline; Fillinger, Sabine; Leroux, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    The narrow-spectrum fungicide fenhexamid was introduced into French vineyards in 2000 to control grey mould caused by a complex of two cryptic species: Botrytis cinerea, the predominant species sensitive to fenhexamid, and Botrytis pseudocinerea, naturally resistant. Fenhexamid was suggested to inhibit the 3-ketoreductase involved at C-4 demethylation steps during ergosterol biosynthesis, as revealed by its effects on the B. cinerea sterol profile. Resistance monitoring studies have hitherto identified two B. cinerea fenhexamid-resistant phenotypes, both resulting from mutations in the erg27 gene encoding 3-ketoreductase. The role of 3-ketoreductase sensitivity in fungal susceptibility to fenhexamid was investigated by studying sterol profiles and microsomal 3-ketoreductase in various fungal strains. Fenhexamid does inhibit B. cinerea 3-ketoreductase activity. Erg27 mutations causing amino acid substitutions in or near the transmembrane domain strongly decrease the affinity of fenhexamid for 3-ketoreductase. Fenhexamid has very low affinities for 3-ketoreductase in inherently resistant species, whether closely related to B. cinerea, like B. pseudocinerea, or more distantly related, like Nectria haematococca. erg27 mutation and erg27 polymorphism may therefore contribute to the unfavourable binding of fenhexamid to its target, 3-ketoreductase, explaining the acquisition of fenhexamid resistance in B. cinerea and the narrow spectrum of this fungicide. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Structural basis of activation-dependent binding of ligand-mimetic antibody AL-57 to integrin LFA-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Jin-huan; Yang, Wei; Springer, Timothy; Shimaoka, Motomu; Wang, Jia-huai; (CH-Boston); (DFCI)

    2010-09-21

    The activity of integrin LFA-1 ({alpha}{sub L}{beta}{sub 2}) to its ligand ICAM-1 is regulated through the conformational changes of its ligand-binding domain, the I domain of {alpha}{sub L} chain, from an inactive, low-affinity closed form (LA), to an intermediate-affinity form (IA), and then finally, to a high-affinity open form (HA). A ligand-mimetic human monoclonal antibody AL-57 (activated LFA-1 clone 57) was identified by phage display to specifically recognize the affinity-upregulated I domain. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the Fab fragment of AL-57 in complex with IA, as well as in its unligated form. We discuss the structural features conferring AL-57's strong selectivity for the high affinity, open conformation of the I domain. The AL-57-binding site overlaps the ICAM-1 binding site on the I domain. Furthermore, an antibody Asp mimics an ICAM Glu by forming a coordination to the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). The structure also reveals better shape complementarity and a more hydrophobic interacting interface in AL-57 binding than in ICAM-1 binding. The results explain AL-57's antagonistic mimicry of LFA-1's natural ligands, the ICAM molecules.

  4. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veggiani, Gianluca; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Marisa; Cavallaro, Ugo [IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milano (Italy); Marco, Ario de, E-mail: ario.demarco@ung.si [IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milano (Italy); Dept. Environmental Sciences, University of Nova Gorica (UNG), Vipavska 13, P.O. Box 301-SI-5000, Rozna Dolina, Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. {yields} These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. {yields} The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  5. Iron uptake by human reticulocytes at physiologic and sub-physiologic concentrations of iron transferrin: The effect of interaction with aluminum transferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, M.; Chawtur, V.; Jones, M.E.; Marshall, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have studied the interaction, in vitro, between diferric transferrin (FeTr), aluminum transferrin (AlTr), and human reticulocytes harvested from human placental blood. In particular, we aimed to determine the extent to which the kinetics of AlTr and FeTr differed. Using transferrin labeled with either 59Fe or 125I, the association of radiotracer with reticulocytes, as a function both of time and of transferrin concentration, was examined. Under the conditions of the experiments, the data are consistent with a mechanism involving at least three processes. Two early processes acting in parallel behave as a high-affinity saturable receptor and a low-affinity non-saturable receptor, neither of which distinguish between AlTr and FeTr. In a subsequent process, AlTr and FeTr exhibit different kinetics. This third process may be saturated by FeTr but not by AlTr. Interpreted in terms of a current conventional view of metallo-transferrin uptake, we conjecture that the early parallel processes involve cell surface phenomena including classical transferrin-receptor binding, and that the subsequent process represents events, possibly intracellular, involved in metallo-transferrin dissociation or further iron transport. The extent to which AlTr influences the interaction of FeTr with reticulocytes offers insight into both the normal physiology of iron uptake and the potential for toxicity by aluminum

  6. The use of a modified [3H]4-DAMP radioligand binding assay with increased selectivity for muscarinic M3 receptor shows that cortical CHRM3 levels are not altered in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Won Je; Gibbons, Andrew S; Dean, Brian

    2013-12-02

    [(3)H]4-DAMP is a radioligand that has been used to quantify levels of the muscarinic receptor CHRM3 protein in situ. However, in addition to high affinity binding to CHRM3, [(3)H]4-DAMP binds with low affinity to CHRM1 confounding the potential to discriminate between changes in these two muscarinic receptors. We have developed a [(3)H]4-DAMP binding assay, optimised for measuring CHRM3 protein levels in the cortex, with minimal selectivity towards CHRM1. The selectivity of our assay towards CHRM3 was confirmed using recombinant receptor-expressing, cell lysate preparations. [(3)H]4-DAMP binding levels were similar between wildtype and CHRM1 knockout mice, confirming that the amount of [(3)H]4-DAMP binding to CHRM1 was negligible. We used this assay to measure CHRM3 protein levels in the frontal pole, obtained post-mortem from subjects with bipolar disorder (n = 15), major depressive disorder (n = 15) and matched controls (n = 20) and showed that [(3)H]4-DAMP binding was not altered in either bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder. Western blotting confirmed that CHRM3 protein levels were unchanged in these subjects. © 2013.

  7. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na + , Cl - and K + to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na + . Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na + and Cl - , the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na + binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl - . Cl - enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na + . At concentrations in the range of its K M for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na + -independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both [ 3 H]imipramine binding and [ 3 H]serotonin transport

  8. Dietary Broccoli Impacts Microbial Community Structure and Attenuates Chemically Induced Colitis in Mice in an Ah receptor dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Troy D; Murray, Iain A; Nichols, Robert G; Cassel, Kaitlyn; Podolsky, Michael; Kuzu, Guray; Tian, Yuan; Smith, Phillip; Kennett, Mary J; Patterson, Andrew D; Perdew, Gary H

    2017-10-01

    Consumption of broccoli mediates numerous chemo-protective benefits through the intake of phytochemicals, some of which modulate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) activity. Whether AHR activation is a critical aspect of the therapeutic potential of dietary broccoli is not known. Here we administered isocaloric diets, with or without supplementation of whole broccoli (15% w/w), to congenic mice expressing the high-affinity Ahr b/b or low-affinity Ahr d/d alleles , for 24 days and examined the effects on AHR activity, intestinal microbial community structure, inflammatory status, and response to chemically induced colitis. Cecal microbial community structure and metabolic potential were segregated according to host dietary and AHR status. Dietary broccoli associated with heightened intestinal AHR activity, decreased microbial abundance of the family Erysipelotrichaceae , and attenuation of colitis. In summary, broccoli consumption elicited an enhanced response in ligand-sensitive Ahr b/b mice, demonstrating that in part the beneficial aspects of dietary broccoli upon intestinal health are associated with heightened AHR activity.

  9. Identification of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a protein receptor for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A.

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    Birgitte P S Jacky

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A causes transient muscle paralysis by entering motor nerve terminals (MNTs where it cleaves the SNARE protein Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25206 to yield SNAP25197. Cleavage of SNAP25 results in blockage of synaptic vesicle fusion and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine. The specific uptake of BoNT/A into pre-synaptic nerve terminals is a tightly controlled multistep process, involving a combination of high and low affinity receptors. Interestingly, the C-terminal binding domain region of BoNT/A, HC/A, is homologous to fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, making it a possible ligand for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs. Here we present data supporting the identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a high affinity receptor for BoNT/A in neuronal cells. HC/A binds with high affinity to the two extra-cellular loops of FGFR3 and acts similar to an agonist ligand for FGFR3, resulting in phosphorylation of the receptor. Native ligands for FGFR3; FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 compete for binding to FGFR3 and block BoNT/A cellular uptake. These findings show that FGFR3 plays a pivotal role in the specific uptake of BoNT/A across the cell membrane being part of a larger receptor complex involving ganglioside- and protein-protein interactions.

  10. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa, (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  11. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine

  12. The Molecular Bases of the Dual Regulation of Bacterial Iron Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis by CyaY and IscX

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    Salvatore Adinolfi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IscX (or YfhJ is a protein of unknown function which takes part in the iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery, a highly specialized and essential metabolic pathway. IscX binds to iron with low affinity and interacts with IscS, the desulfurase central to cluster assembly. Previous studies have suggested a competition between IscX and CyaY, the bacterial ortholog of frataxin, for the same binding surface of IscS. This competition could suggest a link between the two proteins with a functional significance. Using a hybrid approach based on nuclear magnetic resonance, small angle scattering and biochemical methods, we show here that IscX is a modulator of the inhibitory properties of CyaY: by competing for the same site on IscS, the presence of IscX rescues the rates of enzymatic cluster formation which are inhibited by CyaY. The effect is stronger at low iron concentrations, whereas it becomes negligible at high iron concentrations. These results strongly suggest the mechanism of the dual regulation of iron sulfur cluster assembly under the control of iron as the effector.

  13. Contribution of the organic anion transporter OAT2 to the renal active tubular secretion of creatinine and mechanism for serum creatinine elevations caused by cobicistat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepist, Eve-Irene; Zhang, Xuexiang; Hao, Jia; Huang, Jane; Kosaka, Alan; Birkus, Gabriel; Murray, Bernard P; Bannister, Roy; Cihlar, Tomas; Huang, Yong; Ray, Adrian S

    2014-01-01

    Many xenobiotics including the pharmacoenhancer cobicistat increase serum creatinine by inhibiting its renal active tubular secretion without affecting the glomerular filtration rate. This study aimed to define the transporters involved in creatinine secretion, applying that knowledge to establish the mechanism for xenobiotic-induced effects. The basolateral uptake transporters organic anion transporter OAT2 and organic cation transporters OCT2 and OCT3 were found to transport creatinine. At physiologic creatinine concentrations, the specific activity of OAT2 transport was over twofold higher than OCT2 or OCT3, establishing OAT2 as a likely relevant creatinine transporter and further challenging the traditional view that creatinine is solely transported by a cationic pathway. The apical multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters MATE1 and MATE2-K demonstrated low-affinity and high-capacity transport. All drugs known to affect creatinine inhibited OCT2 and MATE1. Similar to cimetidine and ritonavir, cobicistat had the greatest effect on MATE1 with a 50% inhibition constant of 0.99 μM for creatinine transport. Trimethoprim potently inhibited MATE2-K, whereas dolutegravir preferentially inhibited OCT2. Cimetidine was unique, inhibiting all transporters that interact with creatinine. Thus, the clinical observation of elevated serum creatinine in patients taking cobicistat is likely a result of OCT2 transport, facilitating intracellular accumulation, and MATE1 inhibition. PMID:24646860

  14. O-Alkyl Hydroxamates as Metaphors of Enzyme-Bound Enolate Intermediates in Hydroxy Acid Dehydrogenases. Inhibitors of Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase, Isocitrate Dehydrogenase, and Tartrate Dehydrogenase(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrung, Michael C.; Han, Hyunsoo; Chen, Jrlung

    1996-07-12

    The inhibition of Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase by O-methyl oxalohydroxamate was studied for comparison to earlier results of Schloss with the Salmonella enzyme. It is a fairly potent (1.2 &mgr;M), slow-binding, uncompetitive inhibitor against isopropylmalate and is far superior to an oxamide (25 mM K(i) competitive) that is isosteric with the ketoisocaproate product of the enzyme. This improvement in inhibition was attributed to its increased NH acidity, which presumably is due to the inductive effect of the hydroxylamine oxygen. This principle was extended to the structurally homologous enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase from E. coli, for which the compound O-(carboxymethyl) oxalohydroxamate is a 30 nM inhibitor, uncompetitive against isocitrate. The pH dependence of its inhibition supports the idea that it is bound to the enzyme in the anionic form. Another recently discovered homologous enzyme, tartrate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida, was studied with oxalylhydroxamate. It has a relatively low affinity for the enzyme, though it is superior to tartrate. On the basis of these leads, squaric hydroxamates with increased acidity compared to squaric amides directed toward two of these enzymes were prepared, and they also show increased inhibitory potency, though not approaching the nanomolar levels of the oxalylhydroxamates.

  15. The down-regulation of the mitogenic fibrinogen receptor (MFR) in serum-containing medium does not occur in defined medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, J P; Hatzfeld, A; Domart, I; Hatzfeld, J

    1990-02-01

    Normal human hemopoietic cells such as early bone marrow progenitors, or lymphoma-derived cell lines such as Raji or JM cells, possess a low-affinity receptor specific for fibrinogen. This receptor triggers a mitogenic effect. It differs from the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa which is involved in fibrinogen-induced platelet aggregation. We demonstrate here that this mitogenic fibrinogen receptor (MFR) can be internalized or reexpressed, depending on culture conditions. Internalization was temperature-dependent. At 37 degrees C in the presence of cycloheximide or actinomycin D, the half-life of cell surface MFRs was 2 h, independent of receptor occupancy. Binding of fibrinogen to the MFR resulted in a down-regulation which was fibrinogen dose-dependent. This occurred in serum-supplemented medium but not in defined medium supplemented with fatty acids. Reexpression of MFRs could be induced in 28 to 42 h by serum removal. The down-regulation of mitogenic receptors in plasma or serum could explain why normal cells do not proliferate in the peripheral blood.

  16. Identification, production, and use of polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies for immunoaffinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nancy E; Foley, Katherine M; Stalder, Elizabeth S; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-01-01

    Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful tool for purification of proteins and protein complexes. The availability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized the field of immunoaffinity chromatography by providing a continuous supply of highly uniform antibody. Before the availability of mAbs, the recovery of the target protein from immobilized polyclonal antibodies usually required very harsh, often denaturing conditions. Although harsh conditions are often still used to disrupt the antigen-antibody interaction when using a mAb, various methods have been developed to exploit the uniformity of the antigen-antibody reaction in order to identify agents or conditions that gently disrupt this interaction and thus result in higher recovery of active protein from immunoaffinity chromatography. We discuss here the use of a specific type of monoclonal antibody that we have designated "polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies" (PR-mAbs). These are naturally occurring mAbs that have high affinity for the antigen under binding conditions, but have low affinity in the presence of a combination of low molecular weight hydroxylated compounds (polyols) and nonchaotropic salts. Therefore, these PR-mAbs can be used for gentle immunoaffinity chromatography. PR-mAbs can be easily identified and adapted to a powerful protein purification method for a target protein.

  17. Involvement of both protein kinase C and G proteins in superoxide production after IgE triggering in guinea pig eosinophils

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    Toshiya Aizawa

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the function and mechanism of eosinophils via the low affinity IgE receptor (FceRII, we examined the production of 02 metabolites by measuring the luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (LDCL response and the generation of cysteinyl leukotrienes. Eosinophils obtained from guinea pig peritoneal fluid sensitized with horse serum were purified. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence was induced by stimulation with monoclonal anti-CD23 antibody, but not by mouse serum (controls. The mean (±SEM value of LDCL was 20.6±1.3X103 c.p.m. This reaction consisted of an initial rapid phase and a propagation phase and ended within lOmin. Guinea pig eosinophils were histochemically stained with monoclonal anti-CD23 antibody. The major product generated in the LDCL response was superoxide, as determined by the measurement of superoxide by cytochrome c reduction and the complete inhibitory effect of superoxide dismutase on the LDCL response. Pretreatment with either pertussis toxin or cholera toxin inhibited the LDCL reaction. Depletion of bivalent ions by EDTA inhibited this response and the protein kinase C inhibitor D-sphingosin inhibited both 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol-induced and FcϵRII-mediated LDCL. These findings suggest that the NADPH-protein kinase C pathway may be involved in the FceRII-mediated LDCL response in guinea pig eosinophils.

  18. Proline Rich Motifs as Drug Targets in Immune Mediated Disorders

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    Mythily Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current version of the human immunome network consists of nearly 1400 interactions involving approximately 600 proteins. Intermolecular interactions mediated by proline-rich motifs (PRMs are observed in many facets of the immune response. The proline-rich regions are known to preferentially adopt a polyproline type II helical conformation, an extended structure that facilitates transient intermolecular interactions such as signal transduction, antigen recognition, cell-cell communication and cytoskeletal organization. The propensity of both the side chain and the backbone carbonyls of the polyproline type II helix to participate in the interface interaction makes it an excellent recognition motif. An advantage of such distinct chemical features is that the interactions can be discriminatory even in the absence of high affinities. Indeed, the immune response is mediated by well-orchestrated low-affinity short-duration intermolecular interactions. The proline-rich regions are predominantly localized in the solvent-exposed regions such as the loops, intrinsically disordered regions, or between domains that constitute the intermolecular interface. Peptide mimics of the PRM have been suggested as potential antagonists of intermolecular interactions. In this paper, we discuss novel PRM-mediated interactions in the human immunome that potentially serve as attractive targets for immunomodulation and drug development for inflammatory and autoimmune pathologies.

  19. Changing the insulin receptor to possess insulin-like growth factor I ligand specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, A.S.; Kjeldsen, T.; Wiberg, F.C.; Christensen, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Norris, K.; Moeller, K.B.; Moeller, N.P.H. (Biopharmaceuticals Div., Bagsvaerd (Denmark))

    1990-08-14

    To examine the role of the N-terminal part of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor and insulin receptor in determining ligand specificity, the authors prepared an expression vector encoding a hybrid receptor where exon 1 (encoding the signal peptide and seven amino acids of the {alpha}-subunit), exon 2, and exon 3 of the insulin receptor were replaced with the corresponding IGF-I receptor cDNA (938 nucleotides). To allow direct quantitative comparison of the binding capabilities of this hybrid receptor with those of the human IGF-I receptor and the insulin receptor, all three receptors were expressed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells as soluble molecules and partially purified before characterization. The hybrid IGF-I/insulin receptor bound IGF-I with an affinity comparable to that of the wild-type IGF-I receptor. In contrast, the hybrid receptor no longer displayed high-affinity binding of insulin. These results directly demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of the insulin receptor to that of the IGF-I receptor and, furthermore, that the binding specificity for IGF-I is encoded within the nucleotide sequence from 135 to 938 of the IGF-I receptor cDNA. Since the hybrid receptor only bound insulin with low affinity, the insulin binding region is likely to be located within exons 2 and 3 of the insulin receptor.

  20. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A new mannose-specific lectin from daylily (Hemerocallis fulva L. rhizome: purification and properties

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    V. O. Antonyuk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A new lectin was purified from the daylily (Hemerocallis fulva L. with the yield of approximately 10 mg per kg of fresh plant rhizome. The purification procedure was based on application of the affinity chromathography on the column with yeast mannan and the ion-exchange chromatography on the column with DEAE-Toyopearl. The lectin possessed low affinity for α-methyl-D-mannopyranoside, D-fructose, D-turanose and 2-acetamido-D-galactopyranose and hight affinity for the yeast mannan. The lectin bound with greatly less affinity for the mannose-containig glycoproteins, such as ovoalbumin, ovomucoid and horseradish peroxidase. According to the results of electrophoresis in 20% DSNa-PAGE, the lectin consists of subunits of 12 kDa molecular weight. According to the results of gel-chromatography on the Toyopearl HW-55, the lectin’s molecular weight is 48 kDa. It agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes very well, while rat and guinea-pig erythrocytes were agglutinated worse, and human erythrocytes were not agglutinated at all. Lectin’s dialysis against 1% EDTA or heating to 60 ºC for 60 min did not stop its hemagglutinating activity.

  2. Isolation of dental pulp stem cells with high osteogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takazumi; Mabuchi, Yo; Morikawa, Satoru; Onizawa, Katsuhiro; Akazawa, Chihiro; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Okano, Hideyuki; Matsuzaki, Yumi

    2017-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells/progenitor cells (DPSCs) can be easily obtained and can have excellent proliferative and mineralization potentials. Therefore, many studies have investigated the isolation and bone formation of DPSCs. In most previous reports, human DPSCs were traditionally isolated by exploiting their ability to adhere to plastic tissue culture dishes. DPSCs isolated by plastic adherence are frequently contaminated by other cells, which limits the ability to investigate their basic biology and regenerative properties. Additionally, the proliferative and osteogenic potentials vary depending on the isolated cells. It is very difficult to obtain cells of a sufficient quality to elicit the required effect upon transplantation. Considering clinical applications, stem cells used for regenerative medicine need to be purified in order to increase the efficiency of bone regeneration, and a stable supply of these cells must be generated. Here, we review the purification of DPSCs and studies of cranio-maxillofacial bone regeneration using these cells. Additionally, we introduce the prospective isolation of DPSCs using specific cell surface markers: low-affinity nerve growth factor and thymocyte antigen 1.

  3. Exploring monovalent and multivalent peptides for the inhibition of FBP21-tWW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Maria Henning

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of peptides to polyglycerol carriers represents an important route towards the multivalent display of protein ligands. In particular, the inhibition of low affinity intracellular protein–protein interactions can be addressed by this design. We have applied this strategy to develop binding partners for FBP21, a protein which is important for the splicing of pre-mRNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Firstly, by using phage display the optimized sequence WPPPPRVPR was derived which binds with KDs of 80 μM and 150 µM to the individual WW domains and with a KD of 150 μM to the tandem-WW1–WW2 construct. Secondly, this sequence was coupled to a hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG that allowed for the multivalent display on the surface of the dendritic polymer. This novel multifunctional hPG-peptide conjugate displayed a KD of 17.6 µM which demonstrates that the new carrier provides a venue for the future inhibition of proline-rich sequence recognition by FBP21 during assembly of the spliceosome.

  4. The Affinity of Elongated Membrane-Tethered Ligands Determines Potency of T Cell Receptor Triggering

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    Bing-Mae Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes are important mediators of adoptive immunity but the mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR triggering remains uncertain. The interspatial distance between engaged T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs is believed to be important for topological rearrangement of membrane tyrosine phosphatases and initiation of TCR signaling. We investigated the relationship between ligand topology and affinity by generating a series of artificial APCs that express membrane-tethered anti-CD3 scFv with different affinities (OKT3, BC3, and 2C11 in addition to recombinant class I and II pMHC molecules. The dimensions of membrane-tethered anti-CD3 and pMHC molecules were progressively increased by insertion of different extracellular domains. In agreement with previous studies, elongation of pMHC molecules or low-affinity anti-CD3 scFv caused progressive loss of T cell activation. However, elongation of high-affinity ligands (BC3 and OKT3 scFv did not abolish TCR phosphorylation and T cell activation. Mutation of key amino acids in OKT3 to reduce binding affinity to CD3 resulted in restoration of topological dependence on T cell activation. Our results show that high-affinity TCR ligands can effectively induce TCR triggering even at large interspatial distances between T cells and APCs.

  5. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

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    Giovanna Calabrese

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR, also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate.

  6. Cooperativity, Specificity, and Evolutionary Stability of Polycomb Targeting in Drosophila

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    Bernd Schuettengruber

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Metazoan genomes are partitioned into modular chromosomal domains containing active or repressive chromatin. In flies, Polycomb group (PcG response elements (PREs recruit PHO and other DNA-binding factors and act as nucleation sites for the formation of Polycomb repressive domains. The sequence specificity of PREs is not well understood. Here, we use comparative epigenomics and transgenic assays to show that Drosophila domain organization and PRE specification are evolutionarily conserved despite significant cis-element divergence within Polycomb domains, whereas cis-element evolution is strongly correlated with transcription factor binding divergence outside of Polycomb domains. Cooperative interactions of PcG complexes and their recruiting factor PHO stabilize PHO recruitment to low-specificity sequences. Consistently, PHO recruitment to sites within Polycomb domains is stabilized by PRC1. These data suggest that cooperative rather than hierarchical interactions among low-affinity sequences, DNA-binding factors, and the Polycomb machinery are giving rise to specific and strongly conserved 3D structures in Drosophila. : Schuettengruber et al. present an extensive comparative epigenomics data set, providing new insights into cis-driven versus buffered evolution of Polycomb recruitment and Polycomb domain specificity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and transgenic assays, they demonstrate an extremely high conservation of Polycomb repressive domains in five Drosophila species. Using Hi-C and knockout experiments, they challenge the standard hierarchical Polycomb recruitment model and demonstrate that cooperative rather than hierarchical interactions among DNA motifs, transcription factors, and Polycomb group complexes define Polycomb domains.

  7. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Lo Furno, Debora; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Forte, Stefano; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Schinocca, Luciana Rita; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2015-07-09

    The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR), also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate.

  8. Biochemical Properties of Human D-Amino Acid Oxidase

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    Giulia Murtas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available D-amino acid oxidase catalyzes the oxidative deamination of D-amino acids. In the brain, the NMDA receptor coagonist D-serine has been proposed as its physiological substrate. In order to shed light on the mechanisms regulating D-serine concentration at the cellular level, we biochemically characterized human DAAO (hDAAO in greater depth. In addition to clarify the physical-chemical properties of the enzyme, we demonstrated that divalent ions and nucleotides do not affect flavoenzyme function. Moreover, the definition of hDAAO substrate specificity demonstrated that D-cysteine is the best substrate, which made it possible to propose it as a putative physiological substrate in selected tissues. Indeed, the flavoenzyme shows a preference for hydrophobic amino acids, some of which are molecules relevant in neurotransmission, i.e., D-kynurenine, D-DOPA, and D-tryptophan. hDAAO shows a very low affinity for the flavin cofactor. The apoprotein form exists in solution in equilibrium between two alternative conformations: the one at higher affinity for FAD is favored in the presence of an active site ligand. This may represent a mechanism to finely modulate hDAAO activity by substrate/inhibitor presence. Taken together, the peculiar properties of hDAAO seem to have evolved in order to use this flavoenzyme in different tissues to meet different physiological needs related to D-amino acids.

  9. Phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A Maintains Spindle Pole Integrity during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, En-Ju; Hung, Liang-Yi; Tang, Chieh-Ju C; Hsu, Wen-Bin; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Pao-Chi; Tang, Tang K

    2016-03-29

    CPAP is required for centriole elongation during S/G2 phase, but the role of CPAP in mitosis is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CPAP maintains spindle pole integrity through its phosphorylation by Aurora-A during mitosis. Depletion of CPAP induced a prolonged delay in mitosis, pericentriolar material (PCM) dispersion, and multiple mitotic abnormalities. Further studies demonstrated that CPAP directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Aurora-A at serine 467 during mitosis. Interestingly, the dispersal of the PCM was effectively rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type CPAP or a phospho-mimic CPAP-S467D mutant, but not a non-phosphorylated CPAP-S467A mutant. Finally, we found that CPAP-S467D has a low affinity for microtubule binding but a high affinity for PCM proteins. Together, our results support a model wherein CPAP is required for proper mitotic progression, and phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A is essential for maintaining spindle pole integrity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of pulmonary fibrosis by IL-13Rα2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Robert V; Worrell, Julie C; Boylan, Denise; Walsh, Sinead M; Cramton, Jennifer; Counihan, Ian; O'Beirne, Sarah; Medina, Maria Fe; Gauldie, Jack; Fabre, Aurelie; Donnelly, Seamas C; Kane, Rosemary; Keane, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal disease that involves the remodeling of the distal airspace and the lung parenchyma, which results in compromised gas exchange. The median survival time once diagnosed is less than three years. Interleukin (IL)-13 has been shown to play a role in a number of inflammatory and fibrotic diseases. IL-13 modulates its effector functions via a complex receptor system that includes the IL-4 receptor (R) α, IL-13Rα1, and the IL-13Rα2. IL-13Rα1 binds IL-13 with low affinity, yet, when it forms a complex with IL-4α, it binds with much higher affinity, inducing the effector functions of IL-13. IL-13Rα2 binds IL-13 with high affinity but has a short cytoplasmic tail and has been shown to act as a nonsignaling decoy receptor. Transfection of fibroblasts and epithelial cells with IL-13Rα2 inhibited the IL-13 induction of soluble collagen, TGF-β, and CCL17. Adenoviral overexpression of IL-13Rα2 in the lung reduced bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Our work shows that overexpression of IL-13Rα2 inhibits the IL-13 induction of fibrotic markers in vitro and inhibits bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In summary our study highlights the antifibrotic nature of IL-13Ra2. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Evolution of regulatory complexes: a many-body system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouemohammad, Armita; Laessig, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In eukaryotes, many genes have complex regulatory input, which is encoded by multiple transcription factor binding sites linked to a common function. Interactions between transcription factors and site complexes on DNA control the production of protein in cells. Here, we present a quantitative evolutionary analysis of binding site complexes in yeast. We show that these complexes have a joint binding phenotype, which is under substantial stabilizing selection and is well conserved within Saccharomyces paradoxus populations and between three species of Saccharomyces. At the same time, individual low-affinity sites evolve near-neutrally and show considerable affinity variation even within one population. Thus, functionality of and selection on regulatory complexes emerge from the entire cloud of sites, but cannot be pinned down to individual sites. Our method is based on a biophysical model, which determines site occupancies and establishes a joint affinity phenotype for binding site complexes. We infer a fitness landscape depending on this phenotype using yeast whole-genome polymorphism data and a new method of quantitative trait analysis. Our fitness landscape predicts the amount of binding phenotype conservation, as well as ubiquitous compensatory changes between sites in the cloud. Our results open a new avenue to understand the regulatory ``grammar'' of eukaryotic genomes based on quantitative evolution models. Carl-Icahn Laboratory, Washington Road, Princeton 08544 NJ

  12. Development of broadleaved woodland on colliery and open pit coal mines in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, R.N.; McQuire, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    Broadleaved woodland is an important land use and vegetation type in the United Kingdom (UK), and potentially the most effective landscape and restoration treatment for colliery waste tips and open pit coal sites. A field-based national survey of collieries in England and Wales in 1986 and 1987 showed that establishment was satisfactory in only half of the schemes, and growth was deemed satisfactory in less than one-fifth. There are standard forestry practices whereby stock quality can be assured, and herbaceous vegetation controlled or eliminated by the use of herbicides. During the restoration of the site, depending on choice of species, adequate soil water can be provided by the selection of appropriate soil types and thicknesses, and adoption of appropriate soil handling and decompaction practices. The low affinity of the plantations with local and regional types was partly due to the planting of non-native species and partly due to the failure to match species with site and soil characteristics. There is no reason why woodlands of a local and regional character cannot be established by planting the associated species. A matrix of fast-growing tree and/or shrub species should be used to promote early woodland development. These would be removed during normal management which is essential for the ultimate success of the woodland. Planting schemes should also incorporate woodland structural elements and understory and ground flora species. Provided that these measures are fully implemented, significant improvements in establishment, growth, and woodland development on restored sites should be achieved

  13. Thallium in the hydrosphere of south west England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Sin; Turner, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Thallium is a highly toxic metal whose environmental concentrations, distributions and behaviour are not well understood. In the present study we measure the concentrations of Tl in filtered and unfiltered samples of rain, tap, river, estuarine and waste waters collected from south west England. Dissolved Tl was lowest ( -1 ) in tap water, rain water, treated sewage and landfill effluents, estuarine waters, and rivers draining catchments of sandstones and shales. Concentrations up to about 450 ng L -1 were observed in rivers whose catchments are partly mineralized and where metal mining was historically important, and the highest concentration (∼1400 ng L -1 ) was measured in water abstracted directly from an abandoned mine. Compared with other trace metals measured (e.g. As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn), Tl has a low affinity for suspended particles and undergoes little removal by conventional (hydroxide precipitation) treatment of mine water. - Highlights: → Thallium concentrations have been measured in natural and waste waters from south west England. → Dissolved concentrations spanned three orders of magnitude and were highest in water from an abandoned mine. → Inputs associated with historical metal mine workings are the most important to the regional hydrosphere. - Concentrations of dissolved thallium in waters of south west England span two orders of magnitude and are greatest in water from an abandoned mine.

  14. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-06-09

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca(2+) signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca(2+) buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca(2+) signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca(2+)-binding ratio (∼ 15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca(2+) from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca(2+) signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca(2+) buffering enables fast active zone Ca(2+) signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca(2+) buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission.

  15. Development of New Drugs for an Old Target — The Penicillin Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luxen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of β-lactam antibiotics has led to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to β-lactams by two main mechanisms: the production of β-lactamases, sometimes accompanied by a decrease of outer membrane permeability, and the production of low-affinity, drug resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs. PBPs remain attractive targets for developing new antibiotic agents because they catalyse the last steps of the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which is unique to bacteria, and lies outside the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we summarize the “current state of the art” of non-β-lactam inhibitors of PBPs, which have being developed in an attempt to counter the emergence of β-lactam resistance. These molecules are not susceptible to hydrolysis by β-lactamases and thus present a real alternative to β-lactams. We present transition state analogs such as boronic acids, which can covalently bind to the active serine residue in the catalytic site. Molecules containing ring structures different from the β-lactam-ring like lactivicin are able to acylate the active serine residue. High throughput screening methods, in combination with virtual screening methods and structure based design, have allowed the development of new molecules. Some of these novel inhibitors are active against major pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and thus open avenues new for the discovery of novel antibiotics.

  16. Protein intrinsic disorder in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Florencio; Pietrosemoli, Natalia; García-Martín, Juan A; Solano, Roberto

    2013-09-12

    To some extent contradicting the classical paradigm of the relationship between protein 3D structure and function, now it is clear that large portions of the proteomes, especially in higher organisms, lack a fixed structure and still perform very important functions. Proteins completely or partially unstructured in their native (functional) form are involved in key cellular processes underlain by complex networks of protein interactions. The intrinsic conformational flexibility of these disordered proteins allows them to bind multiple partners in transient interactions of high specificity and low affinity. In concordance, in plants this type of proteins has been found in processes requiring these complex and versatile interaction networks. These include transcription factor networks, where disordered proteins act as integrators of different signals or link different transcription factor subnetworks due to their ability to interact (in many cases simultaneously) with different partners. Similarly, they also serve as signal integrators in signaling cascades, such as those related to response to external stimuli. Disordered proteins have also been found in plants in many stress-response processes, acting as protein chaperones or protecting other cellular components and structures. In plants, it is especially important to have complex and versatile networks able to quickly and efficiently respond to changing environmental conditions since these organisms cannot escape and have no other choice than adapting to them. Consequently, protein disorder can play an especially important role in plants, providing them with a fast mechanism to obtain complex, interconnected and versatile molecular networks.

  17. Radioreceptor assay for analysis of fentanyl and its analogs in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alburges, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    The assay is based on the competition of these drugs with [ 3 H] fentanyl for opioid receptors in membrane preparations of rat forebrain in vitro. The binding in stereospecific, reversible and saturable. Scatchard plots of saturation suggest the presence of high and low affinity binding sites. Morphine and hydromorphone complete with [ 3 H]fentanyl for the opioid receptor, but other morphine-like compounds were relatively weak displacers of [ 3 H]fentanyl. Many other commonly abused drugs do not compete with [ 3 H]fentanyl for the opioid receptors. Urine samples from animals injected with fentanyl, (±)-cis-3-methylfentanyl, alpha-methylfentanyl, butyrylfentanyl and benzylfentanyl were analyzed by radioreceptor assay, radioimmunoassay, and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Urinary analysis of fentanyl showed a good correlation with these three methods; however, discrepancies were observed in the analysis of fentanyl analogs. This radioreceptor assay is well-suited as an initial assay for the detection of active analogs of fentanyl in urine with good correlation with other techniques in the analysis of fentanyl; however, there is substantial disagreement between techniques in the quantitation of fentanyl analogs. The implications of these discrepancies are discussed

  18. Identification of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmi, S.M.; Mishra, R.K.

    1989-02-15

    The existence of specific alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites has been shown in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SH5Y) cells using direct radioligand binding. (/sup 3/H)Rauwolscine, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, exhibited high affinity, saturable binding to both Y-79 and SH-SY5Y cell membranes. The binding of alpha 1 specific antagonist, (/sup 3/H)Prazocine, was not detectable in either cell type. Competition studies with antagonists yielded pharmacological characteristics typical of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors: rauwolscine greater than yohimbine greater than phentolamine greater than prazocine. Based on the affinity constants of prazocine and oxymetazoline, it appears that Y-79 cells contain alpha 2A receptor, whereas SH-SY5Y cells probably represent a mixture of alpha 2A and alpha 2B receptors. alpha 2-agonists clonidine and (-)epinephrine inhibition curves yielded high and low affinity states of the receptor in SH-SY5Y cells. Gpp(NH)p and sodium ions reduced the proportion of high affinity sites of alpha 2 receptors. These two neuronal cell lines of human origin would prove useful in elucidating the action and regulation of human alpha 2-adrenergic receptors and their interaction with other receptor systems.

  19. Identification of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in chicken pineal gland using (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bylund, D.B.; Rudeen, P.K.; Petterborg, L.J.; Ray-Prenger, C.

    1988-07-01

    The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of avian pineal N-acetyltransferase activity appears to be mediated by alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. In this study, alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the chicken pineal gland were directly identified by radioligand binding. Membrane preparations of pineal glands from chickens from 1 to 6 weeks of age were examined using (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, to characterize the binding sites. The results indicate no ontological change in either the affinity (KD) or density of receptor binding sites (Bmax) during the time span examined. The binding was saturable and of high affinity with a mean KD of 0.27 +/- 0.01 nM and a mean Bmax of 242 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein. Further characterization of these binding sites indicated that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor is of the alpha 2A subtype, since prazosin and ARC-239 bound with low affinities and oxymetazoline bound with high affinity.

  20. Biophysical Characterization of Nucleophosmin Interactions with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Rev and Herpes Simplex Virus US11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Nouri

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin (NPM1, also known as B23, numatrin or NO38 is a pentameric RNA-binding protein with RNA and protein chaperon functions. NPM1 has increasingly emerged as a potential cellular factor that directly associates with viral proteins; however, the significance of these interactions in each case is still not clear. In this study, we have investigated the physical interaction of NPM1 with both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Rev and Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 US11, two functionally homologous proteins. Both viral proteins show, in mechanistically different modes, high affinity for a binding site on the N-terminal oligomerization domain of NPM1. Rev, additionally, exhibits low-affinity for the central histone-binding domain of NPM1. We also showed that the proapoptotic cyclic peptide CIGB-300 specifically binds to NPM1 oligomerization domain and blocks its association with Rev and US11. Moreover, HIV-1 virus production was significantly reduced in the cells treated with CIGB-300. Results of this study suggest that targeting NPM1 may represent a useful approach for antiviral intervention.