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Sample records for cbg corticosteroid binding

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to the reactive centre loop (RCL) of human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) can protect against proteolytic cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G; Elder, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) binds most of the cortisol in circulation and is a non-functional member of the family of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) with an exposed elastase sensitive reactive centre loop (RCL). The RCL can be cleaved by human neutrophil elastase, released from activated neutrophils, and can also be cleaved at nearby site(s) by elastase released by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and at two further sites, also within the RCL, by bovine chymotrypsin. Cleavage of the RCL results in a conformational change accompanied by a marked decrease in affinity for cortisol and hence its release at the site of proteolysis. These cleavages are irreversible and the similar half-lives of cleaved and intact CBG could mean that there may be some advantage in slowing the rate of CBG cleavage in acute inflammation thereby increasing the proportion of intact CBG in circulation. Here we show, for the first time, that pre-incubation of tethered human CBG with two monoclonal antibodies to the RCL of CBG protects against cleavage by all three enzymes. Furthermore, in plasma, pre-incubation with both RCL monoclonal antibodies delays neutrophil elastase cleavage of the RCL and one of these RCL monoclonal antibodies also delays bovine chymotrypsin cleavage of the RCL. These findings may provide a basis and rationale for the concept of the use of RCL antibodies as therapeutic agents to effectively increase the proportion of intact CBG in circulation which may be of benefit in acute inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Isolation, characterization and radioimmunoassay of corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) in human serum - clinical significance and comparison to thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernutz, C.; Haensle, W.O.; Horn, K.; Pickardt, C.R.; Scriba, P.C.; Fink, E.; Kolb, H.; Tschesche, H.

    1979-01-01

    Isolation of the corticosteroid-binding globulin CBG was achieved by 5 chromatographical steps on cortisol Sepharose, QAE-Sephadex A-50, Con A-Sepharose and hydroxylapatite. The purity of the isolated CBG was demonstrated in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, SDS electrophoresis, immunodiffusion and ultracentrifugation. Microheterogeneity was shown in isoeletric focusing by 5 bands in the pH range of 3.7-4.2, which could be reduced to one major band after neuraminidase treatment. The equimolar binding of cortisol to CBG was demonstrated by binding studies. The association constant for cortisol was 2.8 x 10 8 M -1 , for progesterone 1.7 x 10 6 M -1 . From analytical ultracentrifugation, the molecular weight was calculated on 50 700; the sedimentation coefficient was 3.6 S, the partial specific volume 0.690 ml/g, the Stokes radius 38 A and the frictional coefficient ratio 1.5. A specific radioimmunoassay for CBG was established using the purified CBG for immunization, radioiodination and for calibration standards. The normal range of CBG levels in human serum was 2.4-4.4 mg/100 ml (mean +- 2SD). Studies were performed to compare the levels of CBG and thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG). No sex differences but a significant biphasic age dependence were observed for both proteins. In pregnancy and under oestrogen treatment of women and men, CBG was demonstrated to be the more distinct indicator of oestrogenic activity as compared with TBG, whereas the sensitivity of TBG was more pronounced to supposedly antioestrogenic substances like Danazol, and in severe disease. No coincidence of genetic CBG and TBG deficiencies have been found so far. (author)

  3. Inhibition of corticosteroid-binding globulin gene expression by glucocorticoids involves C/EBPβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Verhoog

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG, a negative acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, is responsible for the transport of glucocorticoids (GCs. It also modulates the bioavailability of GCs, as only free or unbound steroids are biologically active. Fluctuations in CBG levels therefore can directly affect GC bioavailability. This study investigates the molecular mechanism whereby GCs inhibit the expression of CBG. GCs regulate gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which either directly binds to DNA or acts indirectly via tethering to other DNA-bound transcription factors. Although no GC-response elements (GRE are present in the Cbg promoter, putative binding sites for C/EBPβ, able to tether to the GR, as well as HNF3α involved in GR signaling, are present. C/EBPβ, but not HNF3α, was identified as an important mediator of DEX-mediated inhibition of Cbg promoter activity by using specific deletion and mutant promoter reporter constructs of Cbg. Furthermore, knockdown of C/EBPβ protein expression reduced DEX-induced repression of CBG mRNA, confirming C/EBPβ's involvement in GC-mediated CBG repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP after DEX treatment indicated increased co-recruitment of C/EBPβ and GR to the Cbg promoter, while C/EBPβ knockdown prevented GR recruitment. Together, the results suggest that DEX repression of CBG involves tethering of the GR to C/EBPβ.

  4. Role of corticosteroid binding globulin in the fast actions of glucocorticoids on the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, M P; Minni, A M; Dominguez, G; Helbling, J C; Foury, A; Henkous, N; Dorey, R; Béracochéa, D

    2014-03-01

    Corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) is a glycoprotein synthesized in liver and secreted in the blood where it binds with a high affinity but low capacity glucocorticoid hormones, cortisol in humans and corticosterone in laboratory rodents. In mammals, 95% of circulating glucocorticoids are bound to either CBG (80%) or albumin (15%) and only the 5% free fraction is able to enter the brain. During stress, the concentration of glucocorticoids rises significantly and the free fraction increases even more because CBG becomes saturated. However, glucocorticoids unbound to CBG are cleared from the blood more quickly. Our studies on mice totally devoid of CBG (Cbg k.o.) showed that during stress these mutant mice display a lower rise of glucocorticoids than the wild-type controls associated with altered emotional reactivity. These data suggested that CBG played a role in the fast actions of glucocorticoids on behavior. Further analyses demonstrated that stress-induced memory retrieval impairment, an example of the fast action of glucocorticoids on the brain is abolished in the Cbg k.o. mice. This effect of stress on memory retrieval could be restored in the Cbg k.o. mice by infusing corticosterone directly in the hippocampus. The mechanisms explaining these effects involved an increased clearance but no difference in corticosterone production. Thus, CBG seems to have an important role in maintaining in blood a glucocorticoid pool that will be able to access the brain for the fast effects of glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pyrexia's effect on the CBG-cortisol thermocouple, rather than CBG cleavage, elevates the acute free cortisol response to TNF-α in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nenke, Marni Anne; Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Lehrskov, Louise Lang

    2017-01-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) cleavage promotes local cortisol delivery in inflammation. Enzymatic cleavage of high-affinity CBG to low-affinity CBG (haCBG to laCBG) occurs at inflammatory sites and is now measurable in vivo; however, the time kinetics of haCBG depletion following...... an inflammatory stimulus is unknown. Hence our aim was to determine the immediate effect of the key pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α on CBG levels and cleavage. We performed a crossover study of 12 healthy males receiving a TNF-α versus saline infusion, measuring total CBG, haCBG, laCBG and free and total cortisol...... hourly for 6 h. There was no change in total CBG or haCBG levels in the first 6 h of inflammation between the groups, suggesting that CBG cleavage is not activated nor is hepatic CBG production affected by TNF-α in this time frame. There was an early increase in the ratio of free:total cortisol...

  6. Emerging Role of Corticosteroid Binding Globulin in Glucocorticoid-driven Metabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre Moisan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs are critical for survival since they ensure energy supply necessary to the body in an ever challenging environment. GCs are known to act on appetite, glucose metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and storage. However, in order to be beneficial to the body, GC levels should be maintained in an optimal window of concentrations. Not surprisingly, conditions of GC excess or deficiency, e.g. Cushing’s syndrome or Addison’s disease are associated with severe alterations of energy metabolism. Corticosteroid Binding Globulin (CBG, through its high specific affinity for GCs, plays a critical role in regulating plasma GC levels. Genetic studies in various species including humans have revealed that CBG is the major factor influencing inter-individual genetic variability of plasma GC levels, both in basal and stress conditions. Some, but not all of these genetic studies have also provided data linking CBG levels to body composition. The examination of CBG-deficient mice submitted to hyperlipidic diets unveiled specific roles for CBG in lipid storage and metabolism. The importance of CBG is even more striking when animals are submitted to high-fat diet combined to chronic stress, mimicking our occidental lifestyle. An influence of CBG on appetite has not been reported but remains to be more finely analyzed. Overall, a role of CBG in GC-driven metabolic disorders is emerging in recent studies. Although subtle, the influence of CBG in these diseases could open the way to new therapeutic interventions since CBG is easily accessible in the blood.

  7. Evidence of Reduced CBG Cleavage in Abdominal Obesity: A Potential Factor in Development of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenke, M A; Lewis, J G; Rankin, W; Torpy, D J

    2016-08-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is involved in the regulation of cortisol delivery. Neutrophil elastase-mediated cleavage of high to low affinity CBG (haCBG to laCBG) induces cortisol release at inflammatory sites. Past studies have shown reduced CBG in obesity, an inflammatory state, particularly in central adiposity/metabolic syndrome. We performed an observational, cross-sectional study of the effects of obesity, age and sex on ha/laCBG in 100 healthy volunteers. Total and haCBG levels were 11% higher in women but did not vary with age or menopausal status. Total CBG levels were lower with increased body weight and waist circumference; laCBG levels were lower with increased body weight, waist circumference, body mass index and body fat; higher haCBG levels were seen with increased body fat. The relation between CBG and adiposity appeared to be driven predominantly by the metabolic syndrome group. The results suggest reduced CBG cleavage in central obesity, possibly contributing to the characteristic inflammatory phenotype of the central obesity and metabolic syndrome. The mechanism of gender differences in CBG levels is unclear. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Endocrine disruption: In silico interactions between phthalate plasticizers and corticosteroid binding globulin.

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    Sheikh, Ishfaq A; Beg, Mohd A

    2017-12-01

    Endocrine disruption is a phenomenon when a man-made or natural compound interferes with normal hormone function in human or animal body systems. Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) have assumed considerable importance as a result of industrial activity, mass production of synthetic chemicals and environmental pollution. Phthalate plasticizers are a group of chemicals used widely and diversely in industry especially in the plastic industry, and many of the phthalate compounds have endocrine-disrupting properties. Increasing evidence indicates that steroid nuclear receptors and steroid binding proteins are the main targets of endocrine disruption. Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a steroid binding protein that binds and transports cortisol in the blood circulation and is a potential target for endocrine disruption. An imbalance of cortisol in the body leads to many health problems. Induced fit docking of nine important and environmentally relevant phthalate plasticizers (DMP, BBP, DBP, DIBP, DnHP, DEHP, DINP, DnOP, DIDP) showed interactions with 10-19 amino acid residues of CBG. Comparison of the interacting residues of CBG with phthalate ligands and cortisol showed an overlapping of the majority (53-82%) of residues for each phthalate. Five of nine phthalate compounds and cortisol shared a hydrogen bonding interaction with the Arg-252 residue of CBG. Long-chain phthalates, such as DEHP, DINP, DnOP and DIDP displayed a higher binding affinity and formed a number of interactions with CBG in comparison to short-chain phthalates. The similarity in structural binding characteristics of phthalate compounds and native ligand cortisol suggested potential competitive conflicts in CBG-cortisol binding function and possible disruption of cortisol and progesterone homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Serum corticosteroid binding globulin expression is modulated by fasting in polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Obbard, Martyn E; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2011-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from several subpopulations undergo extended fasting during the ice-free season. However, the animals appear to conserve protein despite the prolonged fasting, though the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. We hypothesized that elevated concentrations of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary cortisol binding protein in circulation, lead to cortisol resistance and provide a mechanism for protein conservation during extended fasting. The metabolic state (feeding vs. fasting) of 16 field sampled male polar bears was determined based on their serum urea to creatinine ratio (>25 for feeding vs. polar bears sampled. Serum CBG expression was greater in lactating females relative to non-lactating females and males. CBG expression was significantly higher in fasting males when compared to non-fasting males. This leads us to suggest that CBG expression may serve as a mechanism to conserve protein during extended fasting in polar bears by reducing systemic free cortisol concentrations. This was further supported by a lower serum glucose concentration in the fasting bears. As well, a lack of an enhanced adrenocortical response to acute capture stress supports our hypothesis that chronic hunger is not a stressor in this species. Overall, our results suggest that elevated serum CBG expression may be an important adaptation to spare proteins by limiting cortisol bioavailability during extended fasting in polar bears. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome wide association identifies common variants at the SERPINA6/SERPINA1 locus influencing plasma cortisol and corticosteroid binding globulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Bolton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Variation in plasma levels of cortisol, an essential hormone in the stress response, is associated in population-based studies with cardio-metabolic, inflammatory and neuro-cognitive traits and diseases. Heritability of plasma cortisol is estimated at 30-60% but no common genetic contribution has been identified. The CORtisol NETwork (CORNET consortium undertook genome wide association meta-analysis for plasma cortisol in 12,597 Caucasian participants, replicated in 2,795 participants. The results indicate that <1% of variance in plasma cortisol is accounted for by genetic variation in a single region of chromosome 14. This locus spans SERPINA6, encoding corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG, the major cortisol-binding protein in plasma, and SERPINA1, encoding α1-antitrypsin (which inhibits cleavage of the reactive centre loop that releases cortisol from CBG. Three partially independent signals were identified within the region, represented by common SNPs; detailed biochemical investigation in a nested sub-cohort showed all these SNPs were associated with variation in total cortisol binding activity in plasma, but some variants influenced total CBG concentrations while the top hit (rs12589136 influenced the immunoreactivity of the reactive centre loop of CBG. Exome chip and 1000 Genomes imputation analysis of this locus in the CROATIA-Korcula cohort identified missense mutations in SERPINA6 and SERPINA1 that did not account for the effects of common variants. These findings reveal a novel common genetic source of variation in binding of cortisol by CBG, and reinforce the key role of CBG in determining plasma cortisol levels. In turn this genetic variation may contribute to cortisol-associated degenerative diseases.

  11. Elevation of corticosteroid-binding globulin in Obese strain (OS) chickens: possible implications for the disturbed immunoregulation and the development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faessler, R.; Schauenstein, K.; Kroemer, G.; Schwarz, S.; Wick, G.

    1986-01-01

    Basal plasma levels of corticosterone and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) have been investigated in Obese strain (OS) chickens afflicted with spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT). Corticosterone was determined radioimmunologically, and CBG by using a highly sensitive radioligand saturation assay. OS chickens displayed total corticosterone levels not different from healthy normal White Leghorn (NWL) chickens. CBG, however, was found to be twice as high in OS chickens as compared with their healthy counterparts, irrespective of sex or age. This quantitative difference in the CBG level is not compensated for by either altered affinity or specificity of the molecule. Furthermore, no differences were found in the response of OS and NWL lymphocytes to the suppressive effect of glucocorticoids in vitro. It was therefore assumed that OS animals are deficient in free, hormonally active corticosterone. An additional indication for such a diminished glucocorticoid tonus was that in vivo treatment of OS chickens with glucocorticoid hormones, thus increasing the free and active hormone fraction, normalizes the T cell hyperreactivity and significantly reduces thyroid infiltration. Possible pathophysiological implications of a diminished glucocorticoid tonus for spontaneous autoimmunity, as well as possible explanations for the beneficial effects of glucocorticoid treatment on the development of SAT, are discussed

  12. Altered lipid partitioning and glucocorticoid availability in CBG-deficient male mice with diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulfo, José; Ledda, Angelo; Serra, Elisabet; Cabot, Cristina; Esteve, Montserrat; Grasa, Mar

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate how deficiency in corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), the specific carrier of glucocorticoids, affects glucocorticoid availability and adipose tissue in obesity. C57BL/6 (WT) and CBG-deficient (KO) male mice were fed during 12 weeks with standard or hyperlipidic diet (HL). Glucocorticoid availability and metabolic parameters were assessed. Body weight and food intake were increased in KO compared with WT mice fed a standard diet and were similar when fed a HL diet. Expression of CBG was found in white adipose tissue by immunochemistry, real-time PCR, and Western blot. In obesity, the subcutaneous depot developed less in KO mice compared with WT, which was associated with a minor adipocyte area and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ expression. Conversely, the epididymal depot displayed higher weight and adipocyte area in KO than in WT mice. CBG deficiency caused a fall of hepatic 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression and an increase in epidymal adipose tissue, particularly in HL mice. Deficiency in CBG drives lipid partitioning from subcutaneous to visceral adipose depot under a context of lipid excess and differentially modulates 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 expression. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  13. TeBG- and CBG-bound steroid hormones in rabbits are available for influx into uterus in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, G.; Steingold, K.A.; Pardridge, W.M.; Judd, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    The metabolic clearance rate (MCR) of gonadal or adrenal steroid hormones in rabbits often does not bear the expected inverse relationship with hormone binding to testosterone-binding globulin (TeBG) or corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). This suggests TeBG or CBG may not impede steroid hormone delivery to tissues. The effects of rabbit plasma proteins on the influxes of 3 H-labeled steroids from the circulation into the rabbit uterus were measured in vivo using a tissue sampling single-injection technique. In the absence of plasma proteins, estradiol (E 2 ) and testosterone (T) were freely diffusible through the uterine microvasculature (i.e., extraction >80%). The extractions of dihydrostestosterone (DHT) and corticosterone (B) ranged from 60 to 72%, while that of cortisol (F) was reduced at 40%. Rabbit serum exerted no inhibition of the influxes of the steroids tested. The influxes of T and B greatly exceeded the rates that would be expected if only the free and albumin-bound fractions estimated in vitro were diffusible in vivo. However, the extraction of [ 3 H]corticosteroid-binding globulin or bovine [ 3 H]albumin were low, consistent with little, if any, extravascular uptake of the plasma proteins. The results indicate both albumin-bound and globulin-bound steroid hormone are available for transport into the uterus in the rabbit in vivo without significant exodus of the plasma protein, per se

  14. Corticosteroids

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    ... control and prevention of asthma. They can reduce asthma symptoms, and your child may not need to take as many other ... restart the medicine and continue using it. Your Child's Growth Recent studies have shown that inhaled corticosteroids for asthma may slow down growth in some children during ...

  15. Massive weight loss decreases corticosteroid-binding globulin levels and increases free cortisol in healthy obese patients: an adaptive phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Melania; Fernández-Real, José M; Valera-Mora, Maria E; Déchaud, Henri; Nanni, Giuseppe; Tondolo, Vincenzo; Calvani, Menotti; Castagneto, Marco; Pugeat, Michel; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2007-06-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and weight loss have been associated with changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. So far, no conclusive data relating to this association are available. In this study, we aim to investigate the effects of massive weight loss on cortisol suppressibility, cortisol-binding globulin (CBG), and free cortisol index (FCI) in formerly obese women. Ten glucose-normotolerant, fertile, obese women (BMI >40 kg/m2, aged 38.66 +/- 13.35 years) were studied before and 2 years after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) when stable weight was achieved and were compared with age-matched healthy volunteers. Cortisol suppression was evaluated by a 4-mg intravenous dexamethasone suppression test (DEX-ST). FCI was calculated as the cortisol-to-CBG ratio. Insulin sensitivity was measured by an euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, and insulin secretion was measured by a C-peptide deconvolution method. No difference was found in cortisol suppression after DEX-ST before or after weight loss. A decrease in ACTH was significantly greater in control subjects than in obese (P = 0.05) and postobese women (P obese subjects, an increase of free cortisol was associated with a simultaneous decrease in CBG levels, which might be an adaptive phenomenon relating to environmental changes. This topic, not addressed before, adds new insight into the complex mechanisms linking HPA activity to obesity.

  16. Community responses to CBG experiences in BC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, M. [British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Coalbed gas (CBG) is expected to play a prominent role in British Columbia in the future, and the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines is looking to generate $20 billion of cumulative investment in the oil and gas sector by 2008 through the identification, stimulation, and facilitation of development opportunities for under-developed and unconventional resources. A brief overview of CBG potential in the province was provided. The common concerns that have been expressed by diverse communities throughout the province include jobs, economic growth opportunities, and environmental impact. These communities are composed of landowners, business people, other resource owners, municipal and regional governments, general public, environmental interest groups, and First Nations. The government's approach to communities involves consultation with First Nations, which are key to resource development and have very diverse interests and approaches. The approach includes real communication, real information, and real issues. Good community relations should lead to reduced uncertainty for development, better resource development through the identification of issues, and increased confidence in government, regulators and industry by communities. The roles of the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines and the Oil and Gas Commission were described, as they relate to community relations in the province. Lessons learned on topics such as water, land disturbance, and baseline studies while working with First Nations were reviewed, . figs.

  17. Effects of obesity, total fasting and re-alimentation on L-thyroxine (T4), 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine (T3), 3,3',5'-L-triiodothyronine (rT3), thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), cortisol, thyrotrophin, cortisol binding globulin (CBG), transferrin, alpha 2-haptoglobin and complement C'3 in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, P C; Bauer, M; Emmert, D; Fateh-Moghadam, A; Hofmann, G G; Horn, K; Pickardt, C R

    1979-08-01

    The effects of total fasting for 31 +/- 10 days followed by re-alimentation with an 800 calorie diet on thyroid function, i.e. T4,T3,rT3,RT3U (resin T3 uptake), and TSH, and on TBG levels in serum were studied sequentially in obese hospitalized patients (N=18). Additionally, cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin, parathyrin and free fatty acids were followed as hormonal and metabolic parameters, respectively. Further, CBG, transferrin, alpha 2-haptoglobin and complement C'3 were measured as representatives of other serum proteins. Results before fasting: T4, T3, TBG, cortisol, CBG, alpha 2-haptoglobin and complement C'3 of the obese patients were elevated when compared with healthy normal weight controls, whereas rT3, T4/TBG ratio, T3/TBG ratio, TSH, coritsol/cbg ratio, growth hormone, prolactin, parathyrin and transferrin of the obese group were normal. RT3U and fT4 index were decreased in the obese patients. Results during fasting: Significant decreases were observed during fasting for the following parameters -- T3, TBG, T3/TBG ratio, transferrin, alpha 2-haptoglobin complement C'3. rT3, T4/TBG ratio, RT3U, fT4 index and FFA increased. T4, tsh response to TRH stimulation, cortisol, CBG, cortisol/cbg ratio, parathyrin, growth hormone and prolactin did not change. Results during re-alimentation: T3, TBG, T3/TBG ratio, TSH response to TRH, transferrin, alpha 2-haptoglobin and complement C'3 increased. Conversely, fT3, RT3U, FFA, cortisol and cortisol/cbg ratio decreased whereas the other parameters did not change. 1) There is no evidence for primary hypothyroidism in obese patients during prolonged fasting and re-alimentation. 2) The rapid decrease of T3 and increase of RT3U after initiation of fasting are not fully explained by the observed slower decreases in TBG. 3) The alterations of T3, rT3 and RT3U resemble in their kinetics the changes in FFA levels. 4) Fasting reduced the levels of only certain serum proteins, interestingly TBG, transferrin, alpha 2

  18. Acute stress enhances heterodimerization and binding of corticosteroid receptors at glucocorticoid target genes in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifsud, Karen R; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2016-10-04

    A stressful event results in secretion of glucocorticoid hormones, which bind to mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the hippocampus to regulate cognitive and affective responses to the challenge. MRs are already highly occupied by low glucocorticoid levels under baseline conditions, whereas GRs only become substantially occupied by stress- or circadian-driven glucocorticoid levels. Currently, however, the binding of MRs and GRs to glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs) within hippocampal glucocorticoid target genes under such physiological conditions in vivo is unknown. We found that forced swim (FS) stress evoked increased hippocampal RNA expression levels of the glucocorticoid-responsive genes FK506-binding protein 5 (Fkbp5), Period 1 (Per1), and serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (Sgk1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that this stressor caused substantial gene-dependent increases in GR binding and surprisingly, also MR binding to GREs within these genes. Different acute challenges, including novelty, restraint, and FS stress, produced distinct glucocorticoid responses but resulted in largely similar MR and GR binding to GREs. Sequential and tandem ChIP analyses showed that, after FS stress, MRs and GRs bind concomitantly to the same GRE sites within Fkbp5 and Per1 but not Sgk1 Thus, after stress, MRs and GRs seem to bind to GREs as homo- and/or heterodimers in a gene-dependent manner. MR binding to GREs at baseline seems to be restricted, whereas after stress, GR binding may facilitate cobinding of MR. This study reveals that the interaction of MRs and GRs with GREs within the genome constitutes an additional level of complexity in hippocampal glucocorticoid action beyond expectancies based on ligand-receptor interactions.

  19. Cortisol-binding globulin and meat quality in five European lines of pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geverink, N.A.; Foury, A.; Plastow, G.S.; Gil, L.; Gispert, M.; Hortós, M.; Font I Furnols, M.; Gort, G.; Moisan, M.P.; Mormède, P.

    2006-01-01

    The gene (Cbg) encoding cortisol-binding globulin (CBG) has been proposed as a candidate gene to explain genetic variation in cortisol secretion and carcass composition in pigs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between CBG and pork quality in 5 European breeding lines,

  20. Corticosteroids overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson JK. Corticosteroids-glucocorticoids. In: Aronson JK, ed. Meyler's Side Effects of Drugs . 16th ed. Waltham, MA: Elsevier; 2016:594-657. Meehan TJ. Approach to the poisoned patient. In: Walls ...

  1. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins in active Crohn's disease treated with omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids and corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eivindson, Martin; Grønbaek, Henning; Nielsen, Jens Nederby

    2005-01-01

    of the present study was to examine the effects of enteral nutrition, Impact Powder, as adjuvant therapy to corticosteroid treatment on changes in the GH/IGF-I axis in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The patients were randomized to 3-IP (omega-3-fatty acid (FA), 3 g/day) or 6-IP (omega......-6-FA, 9 g/day). Changes in total IGF-I (tIGF-I) and total IGF-II (tIGF-II), free IGF-I (fIGF-I), IGF binding proteins (IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3), IGFBP-3 protease activity and insulin levels were examined in 31 patients with active CD (CDAI: 186-603) during treatment with prednisolone (40 mg for 1 week...

  2. Corticosterone binding to tissues of adrenalectomized lean and obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasa, M M; Cabot, C; Balada, F; Virgili, J; Sanchis, D; Monserrat, C; Fernández-López, J A; Remesar, X; Alemany, M

    1998-12-01

    The binding of corticosterone, dexamethasone and aldosterone was investigated in plasma and in homogenates of liver, kidney, brain, brown adipose tissue and visceral (periovaric) and subcutaneous white adipose tissues of Zucker lean and obese rats: intact controls, adrenalectomized and sham-operated. Corticosterone-binding globulin (CBG) accounted for most of the binding, whereas that of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors was much lower. Plasma corticosterone levels increased in sham-operated and obviously decreased in the adrenalectomized animals. Sham-operated and adrenalectomized lean rats showed decreased plasma CBG; in the obese, CBG levels were lower than in controls and were not affected by either surgery. No variation with obesity or surgery was observed either in dexamethasone or aldosterone binding, the latter being practically zero in most samples. When expressed per unit of tissue protein, CBG activity was maximal in adipose tissues, with lowest values in brain and liver. In lean rats, tissue CBG activity decreased with either surgical treatment; no changes were observed in the obese, which also had lower CBG tissue levels. The relative lack of changes in CBG of obese rats suggests that they have lost -- at least in part -- the ability to counter-modulate the changes in glucocorticoid levels through CBG modulation, thus relying only on the control of corticosterone levels. This interpretation agrees with the postulated role of CBG modulating the availability of glucocorticoids to target cells.

  3. Synthesis of the constrained glutamate analogues (2S,1 ' R,2 ' R)- and (2S,1 ' S,2 ' S)-2- (2 'carboxycyclobutyl)glycines L-CBG-II and L-CBG-I by enzymatic transamination

    OpenAIRE

    Gu , Xin; Xian , Mo; Roy-Faure , Sophie; Bolte , Jean; Aitken , David J; Gefflaut , Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Optically pure trans-cyclobutane analogues of glutamic acid are prepared by highly selective enzymatic transamination of a single racemic trans-cyclobutane α-ketoglutaric acid derivative 5, which is synthesized in five steps from maleic anhydride. (2S,1′R,2′R)- and (2S,1′S,2′S)-2-(2′-carboxycyclobutyl)glycines L-CBG-II and L-CBG-I are obtained using aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and branched chain aminotransferase (BCAT), respectively.

  4. Insights into the 1.59-Mbp largest plasmid of Azospirillum brasilense CBG497.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Cruz, Erika; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Rouy, Zoé; Barbe, Valérie; Valdés, María; Mavingui, Patrick

    2012-09-01

    The plant growth-promoting proteobacterium Azospirillum brasilense enhances growth of many economically important crops, such as wheat, maize, and rice. The sequencing and annotation of the 1.59-Mbp replicon of A. brasilense CBG497, a strain isolated from a maize rhizosphere grown on an alkaline soil in the northeast of Mexico, revealed a GC content of 68.7 % and the presence of 1,430 potential protein-encoding genes, 1,147 of them classified into clusters of orthologous groups categories, and 16 tRNA genes representing 11 tRNA species. The presence of sixty-two genes representatives of the minimal gene set and chromid core genes suggests its importance in bacterial survival. The phaAB → G operon, reported as involved in the bacterial adaptation to alkaline pH in the presence of K(+), was also found on this replicon and detected in several Azospirillum strains. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that it was laterally acquired. We were not able to show its inference on the adaptation to basic pH, giving a hint about the presence of an alternative system for adaptation to alkaline pH.

  5. Corticosteroids for pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Anat; Skalsky, Keren; Avni, Tomer; Carrara, Elena; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2017-12-13

    Pneumonia is a common and potentially serious illness. Corticosteroids have been suggested for the treatment of different types of infection, however their role in the treatment of pneumonia remains unclear. This is an update of a review published in 2011. To assess the efficacy and safety of corticosteroids in the treatment of pneumonia. We searched the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS on 3 March 2017, together with relevant conference proceedings and references of identified trials. We also searched three trials registers for ongoing and unpublished trials. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed systemic corticosteroid therapy, given as adjunct to antibiotic treatment, versus placebo or no corticosteroids for adults and children with pneumonia. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We estimated risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and pooled data using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model when possible. We included 17 RCTs comprising a total of 2264 participants; 13 RCTs included 1954 adult participants, and four RCTs included 310 children. This update included 12 new studies, excluded one previously included study, and excluded five new trials. One trial awaits classification.All trials limited inclusion to inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), with or without healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). We assessed the risk of selection bias and attrition bias as low or unclear overall. We assessed performance bias risk as low for nine trials, unclear for one trial, and high for seven trials. We assessed reporting bias risk as low for three trials and high for the remaining 14 trials.Corticosteroids significantly reduced mortality in adults with severe pneumonia (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40 to 0

  6. Corticosteroids for Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Hong, Kevin C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Lee, Salena M.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is a benefit in clinical outcomes with the use of topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Methods Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, multicenter clinical trial comparing prednisolone sodium phosphate, 1.0%, to placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and received topical moxifloxacin for at least 48 hours before randomization. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) at 3 months from enrollment. Secondary outcomes included infiltrate/scar size, reepithelialization, and corneal perforation. Results Between September 1, 2006, and February 22, 2010, 1769 patients were screened for the trial and 500 patients were enrolled. No significant difference was observed in the 3-month BSCVA (−0.009 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]; 95% CI, −0.085 to 0.068; P = .82), infiltrate/scar size (P = .40), time to reepithelialization (P = .44), or corneal perforation (P > .99). A significant effect of corticosteroids was observed in subgroups of baseline BSCVA (P = .03) and ulcer location (P = .04). At 3 months, patients with vision of counting fingers or worse at baseline had 0.17 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (95% CI, −0.31 to −0.02; P = .03) compared with placebo, and patients with ulcers that were completely central at baseline had 0.20 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (−0.37 to −0.04; P = .02). Conclusions We found no overall difference in 3-month BSCVA and no safety concerns with adjunctive corticosteroid therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Application to Clinical Practice Adjunctive topical corticosteroid use does not improve 3-month vision in patients with bacterial corneal ulcers. PMID:21987582

  7. Cannabinoid receptor 1 binding activity and quantitative analysis of Cannabis sativa L. smoke and vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischedick, Justin; Van Der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Cannabis sativa L. (cannabis) extracts, vapor produced by the Volcano vaporizer and smoke made from burning cannabis joints were analyzed by GC-flame ionization detecter (FID), GC-MS and HPLC. Three different medicinal cannabis varieties were investigated Bedrocan, Bedrobinol and Bediol. Cannabinoids plus other components such as terpenoids and pyrolytic by-products were identified and quantified in all samples. Cannabis vapor and smoke was tested for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) binding activity and compared to pure Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC). The top five major compounds in Bedrocan extracts were Delta(9)-THC, cannabigerol (CBG), terpinolene, myrcene, and cis-ocimene in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBG, cannabichromene (CBC), and camphene in Bediol cannabidiol (CBD), Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBC, and CBG. The major components in Bedrocan vapor (>1.0 mg/g) were Delta(9)-THC, terpinolene, myrcene, CBG, cis-ocimene and CBD in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, myrcene and CBD in Bediol CBD, Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBC and terpinolene. The major components in Bedrocan smoke (>1.0 mg/g) were Delta(9)-THC, cannabinol (CBN), terpinolene, CBG, myrcene and cis-ocimene in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, CBN and myrcene in Bediol CBD, Delta(9)-THC, CBN, myrcene, CBC and terpinolene. There was no statistically significant difference between CB1 binding of pure Delta(9)-THC compared to cannabis smoke and vapor at an equivalent concentration of Delta(9)-THC.

  8. Corticosteroids for acute bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C; McIntyre, Peter; Prasad, Kameshwar; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-09-12

    In experimental studies, the outcome of bacterial meningitis has been related to the severity of inflammation in the subarachnoid space. Corticosteroids reduce this inflammatory response. To examine the effect of adjuvant corticosteroid therapy versus placebo on mortality, hearing loss and neurological sequelae in people of all ages with acute bacterial meningitis. We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 4, 2015), EMBASE (1974 to February 2015), Web of Science (2010 to February 2015), CINAHL (2010 to February 2015) and LILACS (2010 to February 2015). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of corticosteroids for acute bacterial meningitis. We scored RCTs for methodological quality. We collected outcomes and adverse effects. We performed subgroup analyses for children and adults, causative organisms, low-income versus high-income countries, time of steroid administration and study quality. We included 25 studies involving 4121 participants (2511 children and 1517 adults; 93 mixed population). Four studies were of high quality with no risk of bias, 14 of medium quality and seven of low quality, indicating a moderate risk of bias for the total analysis. Nine studies were performed in low-income countries and 16 in high-income countries.Corticosteroids were associated with a non-significant reduction in mortality (17.8% versus 19.9%; risk ratio (RR) 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80 to 1.01, P value = 0.07). A similar non-significant reduction in mortality was observed in adults receiving corticosteroids (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.05, P value = 0.09). Corticosteroids were associated with lower rates of severe hearing loss (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.88), any hearing loss (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.87) and neurological sequelae (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.00).Subgroup analyses for causative organisms showed that corticosteroids reduced mortality in Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) meningitis (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.98), but not in

  9. Corticosteroids for parasitic eosinophilic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanaviratananich, Sikawat; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Ngamjarus, Chetta

    2015-02-17

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is the major cause of infectious eosinophilic meningitis. Dead larvae of this parasite cause inflammation and exacerbate symptoms of meningitis. Corticosteroids are drugs used to reduce the inflammation caused by this parasite. To assess the efficacy and safety of corticosteroids for the treatment of eosinophilic meningitis. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1950 to November Week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to December 2014), Scopus (1960 to December 2014), Web of Science (1955 to December 2014), LILACS (1982 to December 2014) and CINAHL (1981 to December 2014). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of corticosteroids versus placebo for eosinophilic meningitis. Two review authors (SiT, SaT) independently collected and extracted study data. We graded the methodological quality of the RCTs. We identified and analysed outcomes and adverse effects. We did not identifiy any new trials for inclusion or exclusion in this 2014 update. One study involving 110 participants (55 participants in each group) met our inclusion criteria. The corticosteroid (prednisolone) showed a benefit in shortening the median time to resolution of headaches (five days in the treatment group versus 13 days in the control group, P value treatment (9.1% versus 45.5%, P value treatment group (12.7% versus 40%, P value = 0.002). There was a reduction in the median time of analgesic use in participants receiving corticosteroids (10.5 versus 25.0, P value = 0.038). There were no reported adverse effects from prednisolone in the treatment group. Corticosteroids significantly help relieve headache in patients with eosinophilic meningitis, who have a pain score of four or more on a visual analogue scale. However, there is only one RCT supporting this benefit and this trial did not clearly mention allocation concealment and stratification. Therefore, we agreed to grade our included study as a moderate quality trial. Future well-designed RCTs are necessary.

  10. Concentrations, metabolic clearance rates, production rates and plasma binding of cortisol in Antarctic phocid seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggins, G C; France, J T; Schneider, R C; Knox, B S; Zapol, W M

    1993-10-01

    We have reported previously that plasma of the Weddell seal, a member of the phocid family, contains a very high concentration of cortisol. The present study was undertaken to determine whether high cortisol levels were common to seals in the Antarctic environment, or to other phocidae, and to determine the mechanism of the hypercortisolaemia. High levels of cortisol (0.82-2.38 mumol/l) were found in 4 phocidae (Weddell, crabeater, leopard and Southern elephant seals), whereas levels in a member of the otariid family (Antarctic fur seal) were similar to human values. Metabolic clearance rates (MCR) and production rates (PR) of cortisol were determined in the field in Weddell (N = 1), crabeater (N = 3) and leopard (N = 3) seals following bolus injections of [3H] cortisol. The MCR and PR did not differ between the three phocids, but whereas the MCR of 410-590 1/day was twice that of human values, the PR of 460-1180 mumol.m-2 x d-1 was up to 40-fold greater. The binding capacity of corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) was equal to or greater than the plasma concentrations of cortisol, resulting in relatively low concentrations of free cortisol. We conclude that hypercortisolaemia is maintained in phocid seals mainly by a high production rate--the highest (corrected for surface area) reported in any species. The relatively low cortisol levels in otariid seals studied in the same environment suggest that the high PR in phocidae is unrelated to the harsh climatic conditions, but may be part of their adaptation for diving to extreme depths.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Systemic corticosteroid therapy for acute sinusitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venekamp, Roderick P.; Thompson, Matthew J.; Rovers, Maroeska M.

    2015-01-01

    CLINICAL QUESTION: Are oral or parenteral corticosteroids associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with acute sinusitis compared with placebo or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)? BOTTOM LINE: Oral corticosteroids combined with antibioticsmay be associated with modest

  12. Systemic corticosteroid therapy for acute sinusitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venekamp, R.P.; Thompson, M.J.; Rovers, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    CLINICAL QUESTION: Are oral or parenteral corticosteroids associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with acute sinusitis compared with placebo or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)? BOTTOM LINE: Oral corticosteroids combined with antibiotics may be associated with modest

  13. Interaction between non-psychotropic cannabinoids in marihuana: effect of cannabigerol (CBG) on the anti-nausea or anti-emetic effects of cannabidiol (CBD) in rats and shrews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Erin M; Goodwin, Jennifer M; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Breuer, Aviva; Pertwee, Roger G; Mechoulam, Raphael; Parker, Linda A

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between two non-psychotropic cannabinoids, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG), which have been reported to act as a 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT(1A)) agonist and antagonist, respectively, was evaluated. To evaluate the potential of CBG to reverse the anti-nausea, anti-emetic effects of CBD. In experiment 1, rats were pre-treated with CBG (0.0, 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg, ip), 15 min prior to being treated with CBD (experiment 1a: VEH or 5 mg/kg, ip) or 8-OH-DPAT (experiment 1b: VEH or 0.01 mg/kg, ip). Thirty minutes later, all rats received a pairing of 0.1% saccharin solution and LiCl (20 ml/kg of 0.15 M, ip). Seventy-two hours later, the rats received a drug-free taste reactivity test with saccharin to evaluate the effects of the treatments on the establishment of conditioned gaping reactions (a model of nausea). As well, conditioned saccharin avoidance was measured. In experiment 2, Suncus murinus were injected with CBG (5 mg/kg, ip) or VEH 15 min prior to CBD (5 mg/kg) or VEH and 30 min later were injected with LiCl (60 ml/kg of 0.15 M, i.p.), and the number of vomiting episodes were measured. CBD (5 mg/kg) suppressed conditioned gaping in rats and vomiting in shrews, which were reversed by pre-treatment with all doses of CBG. CBG also prevented the anti-nausea effects of 8-OH-DPAT. Interactions between moderate doses of CBG and CBD may oppose one another at the 5-HT(1A) receptor in the regulation of nausea and vomiting.

  14. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Adesh; Bahna, Sami L

    2015-09-01

    To review the literature on immediate hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids and classify them according to manifestations, routes of exposure, causative preparations, diagnostic tests, and management. PubMed search for English-language publications from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2014 using search terms corticosteroid, glucocorticoid, or steroid combined with hypersensitivity, allergy, or anaphylaxis. Only reports of immediate hypersensitivity reactions that occurred sooner than 24 hours after administration of a corticosteroid were included. Excluded were reports on patients with delayed reactions, including contact dermatitis. Forty-eight articles fulfilled the criteria, reporting 120 reactions in 106 patients 2 to 90 years of age (55 male and 51 female). The most commonly reported manifestation was anaphylaxis in 60.8% (73 of 120) followed by urticaria and/or angioedema in 26.7%. Exposure to corticosteroid was through any route, with intravenous being the most common (44.2%, 53 of 120), followed by oral in 25.8% and intra-articular in 11.7%. Methylprednisolone was the most commonly implicated (40.8%) followed by prednisolone (20.0%). Some reacted to more than 1 preparation. Pharmacologically-inactive ingredients were implicated in 28.3%. Diagnosis was based primarily on medical history and in most cases was confirmed by challenge testing. Skin tests were positive in 74.1%. The vast majority of patients tolerated at least 1 alternative preparation, and very rarely desensitization was required. Corticosteroids seem to be rare causes of immediate hypersensitivity reactions but possibly are misdiagnosed or under-reported relative to their worldwide use. Physicians should be cognizant of this entity and identify safe alternative preparations. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity to corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basedow, Sarah; Eigelshoven, Sibylle; Homey, Bernhard

    2011-11-01

    Corticosteroids are therapeutic agents used in cases of allergy and intolerance. Due to the antiinflammatory effects of the corticosteroids, hypersensitivity reactions often are considered to be a paradox. However, delayed-type reaction to corticosteroids is a frequent phenomenon in the daily routine. Non-responding eczema, development of subacute contact eczema, systemic contact dermatitis or maculopapular exanthemas can be a clinical symptom of a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to corticosteroids. Immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids remain uncommon. Nevertheless, they can take a severe clinical course. Patients react with anaphylaxis after systemic administration or with aggravation of an allergic reaction under therapy with corticosteroids. Allergologic testing is necessary for diagnosis and providing alternative corticosteroids in case of an emergency. © The Authors • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  16. Inhaled corticosteroids for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour-Lynn, Ian M; Welch, Karen

    2016-08-23

    Reduction of lung inflammation is one of the goals of cystic fibrosis therapy. Inhaled corticosteroids are often used to treat children and adults with cystic fibrosis. The rationale for this is their potential to reduce lung damage arising from inflammation, as well as their effect on symptomatic wheezing. It is important to establish the current level of evidence for the risks and benefits of inhaled corticosteroids, especially in the light of their known adverse effects on growth. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess the effectiveness of taking regular inhaled corticosteroids, compared to not taking them, in children and adults with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We requested information from pharmaceutical companies manufacturing inhaled corticosteroids and authors of identified trials.Date of most recent search of the Group's Trials Register: 15 August 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials, published and unpublished, comparing inhaled corticosteroids to placebo or standard treatment in individuals with cystic fibrosis. Two independent authors assessed methodological quality and risk of bias in trials using established criteria and extracted data using standard pro formas. The searches identified 34 citations, of which 26 (representing 13 trials) were eligible for inclusion. These 13 trials reported the use of inhaled corticosteroids in 506 people with cystic fibrosis aged between six and 55 years. One was a withdrawal trial in individuals who were already taking inhaled corticosteroids. Methodological quality and risk of bias were difficult to assess from published information. Many of the risk of bias judgements were unclear due to a lack of available information. Only two trials specified how

  17. Modulation in Wistar Rats of Blood Corticosterone Compartmentation by Sex and a Cafeteria Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, María del Mar; Holmgren-Holm, Fredrik; Grasa, Maria del Mar; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression) and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross- reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG.The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms. PMID:23451210

  18. Corticosteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Be an Advocate IBD Partners National Council of College Leaders Connect with Our Community IBD Help Center ... Want to Talk? Talk to a Specialist by phone at (888) MY-GUT-PAIN by email at info@crohnscolitisfoundation.org , or ... Visit our mobile site Full Site CCF Facebook Follow The CCF ...

  19. Use of systemic corticosteroids for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drucker, A M; Eyerich, K; de Bruin-Weller, M S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines discourage the use of systemic corticosteroids for atopic dermatitis (AD), but their use remains widespread. OBJECTIVES: To reach consensus among an international group of AD experts on the use of systemic corticosteroids for AD. METHODS: A survey consisting of statements a...

  20. Management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, J D; Olszynski, W P; Hanley, D A; Hodsman, A B; Kendler, D L; Siminoski, K G; Brown, J; Cowden, E A; Goltzman, D; Ioannidis, G; Josse, R G; Ste-Marie, L G; Tenenhouse, A M; Davison, K S; Blocka, K L; Pollock, A P; Sibley, J

    2000-02-01

    To educate scientists and health care providers about the effects of corticosteroids on bone, and advise clinicians of the appropriate treatments for patients receiving corticosteroids. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, describes the assessment methods used to evaluate this condition, examines the results of clinical trials of drugs, and explores a practical approach to the management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis based on data collected from published articles. Despite our lack of understanding about the biological mechanisms leading to corticosteroid-induced bone loss, effective therapy has been developed. Bisphosphonate therapy is beneficial in both the prevention and treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. The data for the bisphosphonates are more compelling than for any other agent. For patients who have been treated but continue to lose bone, hormone replacement therapy, calcitonin, fluoride, or anabolic hormones should be considered. Calcium should be used only as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment or prevention of corticosteroid-induced bone loss and should be administered in combination with other agents. Bisphosphonates have shown significant treatment benefit and are the agents of choice for both the treatment and prevention of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis.

  1. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy.

  2. Corticosteroid pulse therapy in active rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Jacobs, J. W.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The infusion of high doses of corticosteroids (corticosteroid pulse therapy, CPT) is used to treat refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the first part of this article, literature on the efficacy of CPT is reviewed, and different CPT regimens (high-dose, low-dose, oral CPT) are compared. Several

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Banned Corticosteroids in Cosmetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative Assessment of Banned Corticosteroids in Cosmetic Creams in Lagos Metropolis. B O Silva. Abstract. Background: Cosmetic creams are widely used for good causes. They however pose dangers when they contain banned corticosteroids. As part of its control measures and its effort on public safety, NAFDAC ...

  4. Corticosteroid contact allergy: an EECDRG multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dooms-Goossens, A; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandäo, F M

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the results of an EECDRG multicentre study on contact allergy to corticosteroids. A total of 7238 patients were investigated: 6238 in 13 centres in the course of 1993, and 1000 patients in 1 centre in 1993 and 1994. The 5 corticosteroids tested were budesonide 0.1% pet...

  5. Corticosteroids in Myositis and Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolova, Anna; Chen, Jennifer K; Chung, Lorinda

    2017-01-01

    Synopsis Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) involve inflammation of the muscles and are classified based on the patterns of presentation and immunohistopathologic features on skin and muscle biopsy into four categories: dermatomyositis, polymyositis, inclusion body myositis, and immune mediated necrotizing myopathy. The term “scleroderma” refers to fibrosis of the skin. Localized scleroderma (morphea) is skin-limited, while systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with vascular and internal organ involvement. Although there is a paucity of randomized clinical trials, treatment with systemic corticosteroids (CS) is the standard of care for IIM with muscle and organ involvement. The extra-cutaneous features of systemic sclerosis are frequently treated with CS, however high doses have been associated with scleroderma renal crisis in high-risk patients. CS monotherapy is neither recommended for the cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis nor scleroderma. While CS can be effective first line agents, their significant side effect profile encourages concomitant treatment with other immunosuppressive medications to enable timely tapering. PMID:26611554

  6. Corticosteroids decrease glomerular angiotensin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, J.G.

    1987-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors of glomerular mesangial cells are regulated in vivo by changes in Na balance, effects that are presumed to be secondary to changes in circulating ANG II. However, since changes in ANG II were accompanied by parallel changes in plasma aldosterone in all models tested, it is possible that aldosterone may have also participated in the modulation of glomerular ANG II receptors. To test this hypothesis, short-term aldosterone infusions within the physiological range were employed to favor actions that would be mediated through a high-affinity mineralocorticoid receptor. The glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, was also tested to determine the mineralocorticoid specificity of the response. Two infusion rates were associated with a decrease in glomerular /sup 125/I ANG II receptor density of 33 and 45%, respectively. Serum potassium and urinary Na/K ratio were lower in the aldosterone group. Spironolactone abolished the effect of aldosterone consistent with an action mediated through a specific mineralocorticoid receptor. These studies support the hypothesis that corticosteroids modulate glomerular ANG II receptors and validate the complexity of glomerular receptor modulation. The downregulation observed would be expected to diminish the ability of ANG II to influence glomerular hemodynamics in models such as mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid-induced hypertension.

  7. Corticosteroid treatment in Sydenham's chorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, C; Spagnoli, C

    2018-03-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is an immune-mediated hyperkinetic movement disorder, developing after group A Beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection. Aside from conventional symptomatic treatment (carbamazepine, valproate, neuroleptics), the use of steroids has also been advocated, mainly in severe, drug-resistant cases or if clinically disabling side effects develop with first line therapies. Based on the description of 5 cases followed in the Child Neurology Unit of Santa Maria Nuova Hospital in Reggio Emilia and on the available medical literature on this topic, we propose considering the use of corticosteroids therapy in children with SC, with the administration of IV methyl-prednisolone followed by oral deflazacort in severe cases and of oral deflazacort alone in mild and moderate degrees of involvement. In our experience this therapy is effective both in the short and long-term period, in different clinical presentations (chorea paralytica, distal chorea, hemichorea, "classic" chorea, association with mood disorder or dyspraxia) and very well tolerated (no significant side effects were recorded). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Adjunctive Corticosteroids in Adults with Bacterial Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; de Gans, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a complex disorder in which neurologic injury is caused, in part, by the causative organism and, in part, by the host's own inflammatory response. In studies of experimental bacterial meningitis, adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids, specifically dexamethasone, has

  9. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Veen, Natasja; Nicholls, Peter; Smith, Cairns; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy. Search strategy: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 4), MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1...

  10. Immediate-type hypersensitivity to succinylated corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Annett Isabel; Räwer, Helen-Caroline; Sieber, Wolfgang; Przybilla, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Despite their frequent use, systemic corticosteroids have rarely elicited immediate-type reactions. We report two male patients, aged 26 and 70 years, respectively, with severe immediate-type hypersensitivity secondary to the administration of corticosteroids esterified with succinate. Skin tests, basophil activation tests and challenge tests were performed for diagnostic evaluation. In both patients, immediate-type skin test reactions were found to methylprednisolone sodium hemisuccinate (MSH) and prednisolone sodium hemisuccinate (PSH). In contrast, nonsuccinylated corticosteroids (including methylprednisolone and prednisolone in one patient) yielded no test reactions. Basophils from one patient exhibited a stimulated expression of the activation marker CD63 upon in vitro incubation with PSH or hydrocortisone sodium succinate, but not with hydrocortisone. Skin tests and basophil activation tests were negative in controls. One patient was challenged with the incriminated drugs. He developed flush, conjunctivitis, tachycardia and dyspnea 2 min after injection of MSH, and dyspnea shortly after intravenous administration of PSH. Oral and intravenous challenge tests with nonsuccinylated corticosteroids were tolerated well by both patients. These case reports should alert clinicians to rare, but severe immediate-type reactions to corticosteroids, related to the succinate moiety in our patients. In case of allergic reactions to corticosteroids, it is mandatory to identify the causative agent and find safe alternatives. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Skeletal effects of systemic and topical corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Oral corticosteroids are associated with an increased risk of fractures from negative effects on sex steroids and vitamin D with a negative calcium balance, together with negative effects on the bone cells and the bone matrix. However, the increase in fracture risk with oral corticosteroids seems more linked to daily than to cumulative dose. A small daily dose may consequently be more detrimental than a large cumulative dose given as intermittent doses. Topical corticosteroids administered locally in the eyes, ears, in the mouth, on the skin, and rectally are not associated with an increased risk of fractures. Inhaled corticosteroids are not associated with an increased risk of fractures, except at very high doses that are much higher than the doses usually administered. With regard to the prevention of fractures, the use of topical corticosteroids may be preferred over oral administration where feasible. More research is needed to determine practically applicable intermittent dosing regimens for corticosteroids, replacing daily administration, to assess if this can have the same beneficial clinical effect but avoid, or at least reduce, the risk of osteoporosis and fractures.

  12. Corticosteroid Injections for Adhesive Capsulitis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ryan C; Walley, Kempland C; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J

    2017-05-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a self-limiting condition in a majority of patients and is often treated nonoperatively. However, symptoms may take 2 to 3 years to resolve fully. A small, but significant, portion of patients require surgical intervention. The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy of corticosteroid injections for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis (AC). A review of articles indexed by the United States National Library of Medicine was conducted by querying the PubMed database for studies involving participants with AC, frozen shoulder, stiff shoulder, or painful shoulder. Articles that included corticosteroids, glucocorticoids, steroids, and injections were included. Corticosteroid injections provide significant symptom relief for 2 to 24 weeks. Injections can be performed intra-articularly or into the subacromial space. Evidence suggests that a 20 mg dose of triamcinolone may be as effective as a 40 mg injection. It remains unclear whether image-guided injections produce a clinically significant difference in outcomes when compared with landmark-guided (blind) injections. Corticosteroids may be less beneficial for diabetic patients. Patients using protease inhibitors (antiretroviral therapy) should not receive triamcinolone because the drug-drug interaction may result in iatrogenic Cushing syndrome. Corticosteroid injections for AC demonstrate short-term efficacy, but may not provide a long-term benefit. More high quality, prospective studies are needed to determine whether corticosteroid injections using ultrasound guidance significantly improve outcomes.

  13. Genome Sequence of Azospirillum brasilense CBG497 and Comparative Analyses of Azospirillum Core and Accessory Genomes provide Insight into Niche Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Lozano, Luis; Acosta-Cruz, Erika; Borland, Stéphanie; Drogue, Benoît; Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Rouy, Zoé; Barbe, Valérie; Mendoza Herrera, Alberto; González, Victor; Mavingui, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum colonize roots of important cereals and grasses, and promote plant growth by several mechanisms, notably phytohormone synthesis. The genomes of several Azospirillum strains belonging to different species, isolated from various host plants and locations, were recently sequenced and published. In this study, an additional genome of an A. brasilense strain, isolated from maize grown on an alkaline soil in the northeast of Mexico, strain CBG497, was obtained. Comparative genomic analyses were performed on this new genome and three other genomes (A. brasilense Sp245, A. lipoferum 4B and Azospirillum sp. B510). The Azospirillum core genome was established and consists of 2,328 proteins, representing between 30% to 38% of the total encoded proteins within a genome. It is mainly chromosomally-encoded and contains 74% of genes of ancestral origin shared with some aquatic relatives. The non-ancestral part of the core genome is enriched in genes involved in signal transduction, in transport and in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino-acids, and in surface properties features linked to adaptation in fluctuating environments, such as soil and rhizosphere. Many genes involved in colonization of plant roots, plant-growth promotion (such as those involved in phytohormone biosynthesis), and properties involved in rhizosphere adaptation (such as catabolism of phenolic compounds, uptake of iron) are restricted to a particular strain and/or species, strongly suggesting niche-specific adaptation. PMID:24705077

  14. Genome Sequence of Azospirillum brasilense CBG497 and Comparative Analyses of Azospirillum Core and Accessory Genomes provide Insight into Niche Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor González

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum colonize roots of important cereals and grasses, and promote plant growth by several mechanisms, notably phytohormone synthesis. The genomes of several Azospirillum strains belonging to different species, isolated from various host plants and locations, were recently sequenced and published. In this study, an additional genome of an A. brasilense strain, isolated from maize grown on an alkaline soil in the northeast of Mexico, strain CBG497, was obtained. Comparative genomic analyses were performed on this new genome and three other genomes (A. brasilense Sp245, A. lipoferum 4B and Azospirillum sp. B510. The Azospirillum core genome was established and consists of 2,328 proteins, representing between 30% to 38% of the total encoded proteins within a genome. It is mainly chromosomally-encoded and contains 74% of genes of ancestral origin shared with some aquatic relatives. The non-ancestral part of the core genome is enriched in genes involved in signal transduction, in transport and in metabolism of carbohydrates and amino-acids, and in surface properties features linked to adaptation in fluctuating environments, such as soil and rhizosphere. Many genes involved in colonization of plant roots, plant-growth promotion (such as those involved in phytohormone biosynthesis, and properties involved in rhizosphere adaptation (such as catabolism of phenolic compounds, uptake of iron are restricted to a particular strain and/or species, strongly suggesting niche-specific adaptation.

  15. Relative receptor affinity comparisons among inhaled/intranasal corticosteroids: perspectives on clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochhaus Günther

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacokinetic properties, dosing regimen, and potency at the site of action are among the factors that influence activity of a corticosteroid. The potency of a corticosteroid at the site of action is determined significantly by its affinity to the glucocorticoid receptor. Recent literature on topical corticosteroids reveals an increasing emphasis on comparative relative receptor affinity values as a key method of differentiating among various corticosteroid compounds, particularly with regard to clinical efficacy. Methods A response was formulated to: Valotis A, Högger P: Human receptor kinetics and lung tissue retention of the enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid fluticasone furoate. Respir Res 2007, 8:54. Results Relative receptor binding affinities, while often showing significant variability across different laboratories, are a valid parameter when a comparison of the pharmacological activity of various glucocorticoids at the site of action is desired. Unfortunately within this context, scientific literature including the article from Valotis and Högger, confuse differences in potency (concentration or dose necessary to achieve a certain effect with differences in efficacy (a quantitative difference in the overall maximum effect, even if all the receptors are occupied. All glucocorticoids will show the same efficacy as long as the selected dose will occupy the same number of receptors. Conclusion While relative receptor affinities are useful for comparing in vitro potencies of corticosteroids, these data are not representative of physiologic conditions and should not be used as a basis for comparing the presumed effectiveness of compounds in a clinical situation.

  16. Behavioural changes in dogs treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Lorella; Burman, Oliver; Mills, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In human medicine, psychiatric side effects among patients on corticosteroid therapy are widely reported, but this appears to have been largely overlooked in the animal literature despite glucocorticoids being widely used in veterinary medicine. Therefore the aim of the current study was to identify possible psycho-behavioural changes in dogs treated with corticosteroids. Two different methodologies were used. Firstly, dog owners were asked to fill a 12 item questionnaire aimed at further validating the initial results of a previous survey relating to changes seen when their dog was receiving corticosteroid treatment. In a second study, a population of dogs undertook behavioural tests aimed at objectively identifying changes when receiving corticosteroid therapy. In the first study, a sample of owners whose dogs were receiving treatment for dermatological, orthopaedic or other conditions evaluated their dogs' behaviour on and off therapy, using a seven point scale. The survey was completed by 44 dog owners with dogs receiving treatment with a range of corticosteroid preparations (mainly prednisolone and methylprednisolone) and 54 dog owners with dogs receiving treatment with other drugs, mainly antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Dogs under corticosteroid treatment were reported to be significantly less playful, more nervous/restless, more fearful/less confident, more aggressive in the presence of food, more prone to barking, more prone to startle, more prone to reacting aggressively when disturbed, and more prone to avoiding people or unusual situations. In the second study, eleven “treatment” dogs were tested both before and during corticosteroid treatment with either methyl-prednisolone or prednisolone to assess their sensitivity to a potentially aversive sound stimulus. Eleven control dogs were also tested at the same time intervals in the same environment. Dogs were exposed to a brief dog growl while they explored bowls containing food

  17. Use of intranasal corticosteroids in adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakarya, E U; Bayar Muluk, N; Sakalar, E G; Senturk, M; Aricigil, M; Bafaqeeh, S A; Cingi, C

    2017-05-01

    This review examined the efficacy of intranasal corticosteroids for improving adenotonsillar hypertrophy. The related literature was searched using PubMed and Proquest Central databases. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy causes mouth breathing, nasal congestion, hyponasal speech, snoring, obstructive sleep apnoea, chronic sinusitis and recurrent otitis media. Adenoidal hypertrophy results in the obstruction of nasal passages and Eustachian tubes, and blocks the clearance of nasal mucus. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy and obstructive sleep apnoea are associated with increased expression of various mediators of inflammatory responses in the tonsils, and respond to anti-inflammatory agents such as corticosteroids. Topical nasal steroids most likely affect the anatomical component by decreasing inspiratory upper airway resistance at the nasal, adenoidal or tonsillar levels. Corticosteroids, by their lympholytic or anti-inflammatory effects, might reduce adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Intranasal corticosteroids reduce cellular proliferation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in a tonsil and adenoid mixed-cell culture system. Intranasal corticosteroids have been used in adenoidal hypertrophy and adenotonsillar hypertrophy patients, decreasing rates of surgery for adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

  18. Patch testing with corticosteroid mixes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksson, M; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandão, F M

    2000-01-01

    , each at 2 concentrations, were inserted into the standard series of 16 participating clinics. Tests were read on day (D) 3 or 4. 5432 patients were tested, and 110 (2.0%) had positive reactions to at least 1 of the 8 test preparations. Of the 8 preparations, mix I identified most allergic patients......This study investigated whether a corticosteroid mix containing tixocortol pivalate, budesonide, and hydrocortisone-17-butyrate could detect contact allergy to corticosteroids. 2 corticosteroid mixes, 1 with a high (mix I) and 1 with a low (mix II) concentration and the 3 individual constituents......, followed by mix II, budesonide 0.10%, budesonide 0.002%, and tixocortol pivalate, both concentrations (1.0 and 0.10%) tracing the same number. With the mixes, 53.2-59.6% of tixocortol pivalate allergy was missed. 47 patients were allergic to either concentration of tixocortol pivalate, 25% of these only...

  19. Evolution of ligand specificity in vertebrate corticosteroid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deitcher David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticosteroid receptors include mineralocorticoid (MR and glucocorticoid (GR receptors. Teleost fishes have a single MR and duplicate GRs that show variable sensitivities to mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids. How these receptors compare functionally to tetrapod MR and GR, and the evolutionary significance of maintaining two GRs, remains unclear. Results We used up to seven steroids (including aldosterone, cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone [DOC] to compare the ligand specificity of the ligand binding domains of corticosteroid receptors between a mammal (Mus musculus and the midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus, a teleost model for steroid regulation of neural and behavioral plasticity. Variation in mineralocorticoid sensitivity was considered in a broader phylogenetic context by examining the aldosterone sensitivity of MR and GRs from the distantly related daffodil cichlid (Neolamprologus pulcher, another teleost model for neurobehavioral plasticity. Both teleost species had a single MR and duplicate GRs. All MRs were sensitive to DOC, consistent with the hypothesis that DOC was the initial ligand of the ancestral MR. Variation in GR steroid-specificity corresponds to nine identified amino acid residue substitutions rather than phylogenetic relationships based on receptor sequences. Conclusion The mineralocorticoid sensitivity of duplicate GRs in teleosts is highly labile in the context of their evolutionary phylogeny, a property that likely led to neo-functionalization and maintenance of two GRs.

  20. Corticosteroids for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhok, Vishnu B; Gagyor, Ildiko; Daly, Fergus; Somasundara, Dhruvashree; Sullivan, Michael; Gammie, Fiona; Sullivan, Frank

    2016-07-18

    Inflammation and oedema of the facial nerve are implicated in causing Bell's palsy. Corticosteroids have a potent anti-inflammatory action that should minimise nerve damage. This is an update of a review first published in 2002 and last updated in 2010. To determine the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroid therapy in people with Bell's palsy. On 4 March 2016, we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished trials. We also searched clinical trials registries for ongoing trials. Randomised trials and quasi-randomised trials comparing different routes of administration and dosage schemes of corticosteroid or adrenocorticotrophic hormone therapy versus a control group receiving no therapy considered effective for this condition, unless the same therapy was given in a similar way to the experimental group. We used standard Cochrane methodology. The main outcome of interest was incomplete recovery of facial motor function (i.e. residual facial weakness). Secondary outcomes were cosmetically disabling persistent sequelae, development of motor synkinesis or autonomic dysfunction (i.e. hemifacial spasm, crocodile tears) and adverse effects of corticosteroid therapy manifested during follow-up. We identified seven trials, with 895 evaluable participants for this review. All provided data suitable for the primary outcome meta-analysis. One of the trials was new since the last version of this Cochrane systematic review. Risk of bias in the older, smaller studies included some unclear- or high-risk assessments, whereas we deemed the larger studies at low risk of bias. Overall, 79/452 (17%) participants allocated to corticosteroids had incomplete recovery of facial motor function six months or more after randomisation

  1. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids: Evaluation and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are anti-inflammatory medications used widely to treat allergic inflammation. Although the endocrine and gastrointestinal side effects of corticosteroids have been described, the occurrence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions and delayed contact dermatitis due to corticosteroids remains under-recognized. Hypersensitivity reactions can occur to a corticosteroid itself, or to the additives and vehicles in corticosteroid preparations. Skin testing and oral graded challenge can help confirm the suspected culprit agent in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and help identify an alternative tolerated corticosteroid. Patch testing can help identify the culprit agents in delayed hypersensitivity contact dermatitis. Cross-reactivity patterns have not been observed for immediate hypersensitivity reactions as they have been for delayed contact dermatitis. Sensitization in contact dermatitis exhibits cross-reactivity patterns based on corticosteroid structure. We review the current understanding regarding the clinical presentation, evaluation, and management of immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

  2. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy. A Cochrane review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage in leprosy. We assessed the effectiveness of corticosteroids for treating nerve damage due to leprosy. METHODS: A systematic search was undertaken to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing

  3. Atopic dermatitis: tacrolimus vs. topical corticosteroid use

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, concerns over adverse drug reactions associated with their long-term application limit their use. Tacrolimus, on the other hand, has been shown to be effective in stabilising the symptoms of AD in the long-term setting, without the side-effects that hamper the use of topical corticosteroids. Long-term safety data up to ...

  4. Corticosteroid injection for de Quervain's tenosynovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Veluthamaningal, Cyriac; van der Windt, Danielle A. W. M.; Winters, Jan C.; Jong, Betty Meyboom-de

    2009-01-01

    Back ground De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a disorder characterised by pain on the radial (thumb) side of the wrist and functional disability of the hand. It can be treated by corticosteroid injection, splinting and surgery. Objectives To summarise evidence on the efficacy and safety of

  5. Fluoride treatment in corticosteroid induced osteoporosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rejou, F; Dumas, R; Belon, C; Meunier, P J; Edouard, C

    1986-01-01

    Severe osteoporosis with multiple vertebral fractures occurred in two girls receiving prolonged high dose corticosteroids for relapsing dermatomyositis. Sodium fluoride, supplemented with calcium and vitamin D, helped control secondary osteoporosis in one case and should be considered as part of the curative treatment of corticoid induced osteoporosis.

  6. CORTICOSTEROID MICROVESICLES FOR TREATMENT OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, W.J.M.; Storm, Gerrit; Metselaar, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The invention provides a use of a long-circulating microvesicle comprising a sterol, partially synthetic or wholly synthetic vesicle- forming phospholipids, and a corticosteroid in water soluble form, which microvesicle has a mean particle diameter size range of between about 75 and 150 nm and which

  7. Corticosteroids as adjuvant therapy for ocular toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Smitha; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; John, Sheeja S; Horo, Saban; Sepah, Yasir J; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2017-01-26

    Ocular infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite, may result in inflammation in the retina, choroid, and uvea, and consequently lead to complications such as glaucoma, cataract, and posterior synechiae. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effects of adjunctive use of corticosteroids to anti-parasitic therapy versus anti-parasitic therapy alone for ocular toxoplasmosis. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register (2016; Issue 11)), MEDLINE Ovid, Epub Ahead of Print, In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE Ovid Daily (January 1946 to December 2016), Embase (January 1980 to December 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS (January 1982 to December 2016)), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP; www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We used no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 7 December 2016. We had planned to include randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Eligible trials would have enrolled participants of any age who were immunocompetent and were diagnosed with acute ocular toxoplasmosis. Included trials would have compared anti-parasitic therapy plus corticosteroids versus anti-parasitic therapy alone, different doses or times of initiation of corticosteroids. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts retrieved through the electronic searches. We retrieved full-text reports of studies categorized as 'unsure' or 'include' after we reviewed the abstracts. Two authors independently reviewed each full-text report for eligibility. Discrepancies were resolved through discussion. We identified no completed or ongoing trial that was eligible for this Cochrane review. Although research has identified a wide

  8. Use of inhaled corticosteroids in pediatric asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    1997-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids reduce asthma symptoms and exacerbations, improve lung function, and reduce airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity more effectively than other treatments. However, inhaled corticosteroids may be unable to return lung function and bronchial hyperreactivity...... to normal when introduced for moderately severe asthma. This finding highlights the need to improve treatment strategy in pediatric asthma. The natural progression of persistent asthma may lead to loss of lung function and chronic bronchial hyperreactivity for children and adults. There is evidence...... to suggest that asthma acts via a chronic inflammatory process that causes remodeling of the airways with mucosal thickening and smooth muscle hypertrophy. An optimal treatment strategy would be one aimed at reducing the ongoing airway inflammation. Inhaled steroids ameliorate the inflammation, whereas...

  9. Endogenous synthesis of corticosteroids in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimpei Higo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain synthesis of steroids including sex-steroids is attracting much attention. The endogenous synthesis of corticosteroids in the hippocampus, however, has been doubted because of the inability to detect deoxycorticosterone (DOC synthase, cytochrome P450(c21. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of P450(c21 was demonstrated using mRNA analysis and immmunogold electron microscopic analysis in the adult male rat hippocampus. DOC production from progesterone (PROG was demonstrated by metabolism analysis of (3H-steroids. All the enzymes required for corticosteroid synthesis including P450(c21, P450(2D4, P450(11β1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD were localized in the hippocampal principal neurons as shown via in situ hybridization and immunoelectron microscopic analysis. Accurate corticosteroid concentrations in rat hippocampus were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In adrenalectomized rats, net hippocampus-synthesized corticosterone (CORT and DOC were determined to 6.9 and 5.8 nM, respectively. Enhanced spinogenesis was observed in the hippocampus following application of low nanomolar (10 nM doses of CORT for 1 h. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results imply the complete pathway of corticosteroid synthesis of 'pregnenolone →PROG→DOC→CORT' in the hippocampal neurons. Both P450(c21 and P450(2D4 can catalyze conversion of PROG to DOC. The low nanomolar level of CORT synthesized in hippocampal neurons may play a role in modulation of synaptic plasticity, in contrast to the stress effects by micromolar CORT from adrenal glands.

  10. Effectiveness of corticosteroid injection in adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Gulec, Berna; Aydog, Ece; Gurcay, Eda; Cakci, Aytul

    2008-06-01

    To assess whether intraarticular corticosteroids improve the outcome of a comprehensive home exercise programme in patients with adhesive capsulitis. The study was undertaken in the Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Department of a Ministry of Health hospital in Turkey. Eighty patients with adhesive capsulitis were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: Group 1 patients were given intraarticular corticosteroid (1 mL, 40 mg methylprednisolone acetate) followed by a 12-week comprehensive home exercise programme. Group 2 patients were given intraarticular serum physiologic (1 mL solution of 0.9% sodium chloride) followed by a 12-week comprehensive home exercise programme. The outcome parameters were Shoulder Pain and Disability Index and University of California-Los Angeles end-result scores, night pain and shoulder passive range of motion. Mean actual changes in abduction range of motion, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index-total score and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index-pain score were statistically different between the two groups at the second week, with the better scores determined in group 1. However, there were no significant differences between the groups at the 12th week. Medians of University of California-Los Angeles scores in the second week were significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.02), with better scores in group 1; however, the difference in 12th week scores was insignificant. Intraarticular corticosteroids have the additive effect of providing rapid pain relief, mainly in the first weeks of the exercise treatment period. In patients with adhesive capsulitis who have pain symptom predominantly, intraarticular corticosteroid therapy could be advised concomitantly with exercise.

  11. Dapsone versus corticosteroids in lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chopra Adarsh

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy five patients with Lichen Planus (LP were enrolled from out-patient department for screening the therapeutic effect of dapsone. Patients were divided into two groups of 50 and 25. In regimen - 1 (RI 25 patients were given local corticosteroids and oral chlorpheniramine maleate. In regimen - 2 (R2 50 patients were given oral dapsone and chlorpheniramine maleate and topical coconut oil. It was found that total efficacy of R2 was 18% higher than R1.

  12. Systemic side-effects of topical corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipan Dhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of topical corticosteroids, a milestone has been achieved in dermatologic therapy; owing to its potent anti-inflammatory and ant proliferative effects, it became possible to treat some hitherto resistant dermatoses. But this magic drug can cause enough mischief if used inappropriately. Children are more susceptible to the systemic adverse effects because of enhanced percutaneous absorption through their tender skin. So, systemic side effects should be kept in mind while prescribing this therapeutically valuable topical medicament.

  13. Corticosteroid Treatment in Diabetic Macular Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Nurözler Tabakcı

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic macular edema is the most common cause of visual impairment in patients with diabetes mellitus. The pathogenesis of macular edema is complex and multifactorial. For many years, laser photocoagulation has been considered the standard therapy for the treatment of diabetic macular edema; however, few patients achieve significant improvements in visual acuity. Today the intravitreal administration of anti-inflammatory or anti-angiogenic agents together with the use of laser photocoagulation represents the standard of care for the treatment of this complication. The intravitreal route of administration minimizes the systemic side effects of corticosteroids. Steroid-related ocular side effects are elevated intraocular pressure and cataract, while injection-related complications include endophthalmitis, vitreous hemorrhage, and retinal detachment. In order to reduce the risks and complications, intravitreal implants have been developed recently to provide sustained release of corticosteroids and reduce repeated injections for the management of diabetic macular edema. In this review, the efficacy, safety, and therapeutic potential of intravitreal corticosteroids in diabetic macular edema are discussed with a review of recent literature.

  14. Plasma cytokine levels predict response to corticosteroids in septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzer, Peter; Fjell, Chris; Walley, Keith R; Boyd, John; Russell, James A

    2016-12-01

    To investigate if plasma cytokine concentrations predict a beneficial response to corticosteroid treatment in septic shock patients. A cohort of septic shock patients in whom a panel of 39 cytokines had been measured at baseline (n = 363) was included. Patients who received corticosteroids were propensity score matched to non-corticosteroid-treated patients. An optimal threshold to identify responders to corticosteroid treatment for each cytokine was defined as the concentration above which the odds ratio for 28-day survival between corticosteroid- and non-corticosteroid-treated patients was highest. Propensity score matching partitioned 165 patients into 61 sets; each set contained matched corticosteroid- and non-corticosteroid-treated patients. For 13 plasma cytokines threshold concentrations were found where the odds ratio for survival between corticosteroid- and non-corticosteroid-treated patients was significant (P highest odds ratio and identified 21 % of the patients in the propensity score matched cohort as responders to corticosteroid treatment. Combinations of triplets of cytokines with a significant odds ratio, using the thresholds identified above, were tested to find a higher proportion of responders. IL3, IL6, and CCL4 identified 50 % of the patients in the propensity score matched cohort as responders to corticosteroid treatment. The odds ratio for 28-day survival was 19 (95 % CI 3.5-140, P = 0.02) with a concentration above threshold for a least one of these cytokines. Plasma concentration of selected cytokines is a potential predictive biomarker to identify septic shock patients that may benefit from treatment with corticosteroids.

  15. Corticosteroid hypersensitivity studies in a skin allergy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbegal, L; DeLeon, F J; Silvestre, J F

    2015-12-01

    Corticosteroids can cause hypersensitivity reactions, particularly delayed-type allergic reactions. A new classification system for testing hypersensitivity to corticosteroids distributes the drugs into 3 groups according to molecular structure; patients are classified according to whether they are allergic to agents in 1 or more of the groups. We aimed to describe the clinical characteristics of corticosteroid-allergic patients treated at our clinic and apply the new classification system to them; we also compared these patients' characteristics to those of others treated at our clinic. Retrospective study of cases of delayed-type corticosteroid hypersensitivity treated in the skin allergy clinic of a tertiary level hospital over an 11-year period. We reviewed the records of 2857 patients, finding 33 with at least one positive patch test result showing corticosteroid hypersensitivity. Atopic dermatitis and hand involvement were less common in our corticosteroid-allergic patients. All were allergic to a group 1 corticosteroid (most often, budesonide, the culprit in 87.9%). Testing with a specific corticosteroid series revealed that 14 (42.4%) were also allergic to corticosteroids in group 2 and/or group 3. None were allergic exclusively to group 2 or group 3 agents. Twenty-one patients were exposed to a corticosteroid cream from a group their patch test results indicated allergy to; 13 of them (61.9%) did not develop a hypersensitivity reaction. The Spanish standard series only contains group 1 corticosteroids. In the interest of improving allergy management, we recommend testing with a specific corticosteroid series and a patient's own creams whenever patch testing with a standard series reveals a hypersensitivity reaction to corticosteroids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  16. [Related factors to lack of implementation of antenatal corticosteroids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Gutiérrez, América Aime; Olivares-Ramírez, Araceli; Fajardo-Dueñas, Sergio

    2015-10-01

    Despite the known benefits of antenatal corticosteroids therapy its use in clinical practice is not generalized. To identify factors related to antenatal corticosteroids non administration. Cross-sectional and descriptive study that included patients admitted to Hospital Civil de Guadalajara "Dr. Juan I. Menchaca", who had indication for antenatal corticosteroids therapy but did not receive it. Variables: antenatal corticosteroids therapy prescription, factors related to antenatal corticosteroids therapy non administration and lapsed time between diagnosis and birth. Antenatal corticosteroids therapy were not prescribed in 79 (94%) of 84 patients. Main related factors were imminent birth and severe maternal complication. The longer amount of time from diagnosis to birth was before hospitalization (91 vs. 9%, p <0.0005). The biggest and best opportunity for the administration of inducers of fetal lung maturity is during prenatal care, when cases with increased risk of preterm birth are detected.

  17. Corticosteroid use in management of pediatric emergency conditions [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Asalim; Greenfield, Tyler; Cantor, Richard M; Wilson, Bryan

    2018-03-01

    Corticosteroids have been used for over half a century to treat various inflammatory disorders; however, their use in many pediatric conditions remains controversial. This issue reviews evidence on corticosteroid treatment in acute asthma exacerbations, croup, acute pharyngitis, anaphylaxis, acute spinal injury, and bacterial meningitis. While corticosteroids are clearly indicated for management of asthma exacerbations and croup, they are not universally recommended for potential spinal cord injury. Due to insufficient data or conflicting data, corticosteroids may be considered in children with acute pharyngitis, anaphylaxis, and bacterial meningitis. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  18. Compressor/nebulizers differences in the nebulization of corticosteroids. The CODE study (Corticosteroids and Devices Efficiency).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzano, C; Petroianni, A; Parola, D; Ricci, A

    2007-01-01

    Nebulization is a common method of medical aerosol generation and it is largely used by adults and children all over the world, both for emergency treatment of acute illness and for long-term home treatment of lung diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in nebulization of inhaled corticosteroids among four representative types of compressor/nebulizers. Twelve compressor/jet nebulizers from four commercial sources were studied (three for each type): Clenny (MEDEL), Turbo Boy/LC Plus (PARI), Nebula Nuovo/MB5 (MARKOS MEFAR) and Maxaer (ARTSANA) compressor/Sidestream (Medic-Aid Ltd.) nebulizer. We compared the required time for the treatment (nebulization time), output/minutes, compressor pressures, and aerosol characteristics of inhaled corticosteroids: Beclomethasone dipropionate, Flunisolide, Fluticasone propionate and Budesonide. Nebulization Times showed a significant difference between nebulizer and inhaled corticosteroids for Clenny, Turbo Boy, and Maxaer. A considerable difference in the output of nebulized drugs was observed through the compressors/nebulizers. MMAD of all inhaled corticosteroids was significantly different among the four nebulizers. The percentage of particles 90%), whereas with flunisolide was good only for Clenny (98.8%) and Maxaer (96.3%), and with fluticasone only for Clenny (98%), Turbo Boy (99.1%), and Maxaer (86%). Also percentage of particles <2 microm showed significant variability among the devices. Our results clearly demonstrate that compressor/nebulizer unit plays a key role in the effectiveness of the treatment during inhaled corticosteroid therapy, and that several differences exist in the performance of the different nebulizers studied. Therefore, the device has the same importance of the compound to reach the best clinical response in the inflammatory diseases of the lower airways.

  19. Corticosteroids for treating hypotension in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hafis; Sinha, Ian P; Subhedar, Nimish V

    2011-12-07

    Systemic hypotension is a relatively common complication of preterm birth and is associated with periventricular haemorrhage, periventricular white matter injury and adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Corticosteroid treatment has been used as an alternative or an adjunct to conventional treatment with volume expansion and vasopressor/inotropic therapy. To determine the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroids used either as primary treatment of hypotension or for the treatment of refractory hypotension in preterm infants. Randomized or quasi-randomised controlled trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2011), MEDLINE (1996 to Jan 2011), EMBASE (1974 to Jan 2011), CINAHL (1981 to 2011), reference lists of published papers and abstracts from the Pediatric Academic Societies and the European Society for Pediatric Research meetings published in Pediatric Research (1995 to 2011). We included all randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of corticosteroid therapy in the treatment of hypotension in preterm infants (babies with hypotension resistant to inotropes/pressors and volume therapy. We included studies comparing oral/intravenous corticosteroids with placebo, other drugs used for providing cardiovascular support or no therapy in this review. Methodological quality of eligible studies was assessed according to the methods used for minimising selection bias, performance bias, attrition bias and detection bias. Studies that evaluated corticosteroids (1) as primary treatment for hypotension or (2) for refractory hypotension unresponsive to prior use of inotropes/pressors and volume therapy, were analysed using separate comparisons. Data were analysed using the standard methods of the Neonatal Review Group using Rev Man 5.1.2. Treatment effect was analysed using relative risk, risk reduction, number needed to treat for categorical outcomes and

  20. Gender differences in the associations between cortisol and insulin in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, RP; Lamberts, SWJ; deJong, FH; Pols, HAP; Grobbee, DE

    To investigate the role of cortisol in the etiology of insulin resistance in men and women, we examined 218 healthy non-hospitalized elderly, selected from the Rotterdam Study. Free cortisol was assessed by the ratio of fasting serum cortisol over corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), and insulin

  1. Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity to systemic corticosteroids: 2 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Lauren; Pratt, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Both immediate, type I reactions and delayed hypersensitivity, type IV reactions to systemic corticosteroid preparations have been reported. Type I reactions are rare, with delayed hypersensitivity reactions being slightly more common. A 33-year-old woman presented repeatedly to the emergency department with asthma attacks. She developed pruritus and hives approximately 30 minutes after the administration of parenteral corticosteroids. Her respiratory status deteriorated approximately 6 hours after she received the corticosteroids. An acute eczematous dermatitis on her face, neck, and upper body appeared 24 hours after administration of the corticosteroids. The dermatitis peaked at 72 hours. Intradermal testing to Solu-Medrol, Solu-Cortef, prednisone, and Decadron confirmed a type I, anaphylactoid reaction. The dermatitis that presented 24 hours after administration of the parenteral corticosteroids is consistent clinically with a type IV delayed hypersensitivity reaction to the corticosteroids. A second patient, a 51-year-old woman, developed urticarial lesions that lasted approximately 30 minutes, immediately after intralesional triamcinolone injections for keloid scars. Intradermal testing was performed. She showed a positive reaction to triamcinolone confirming a type I allergy to this steroid. It is important to consider an allergy to corticosteroids in patients with worsening anaphylactic symptoms after administration of systemic corticosteroids.

  2. Effect of corticosteroid therapy in acute pain edema caused by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the curative effect of corticosteroids in the treatment of acute pain, local edema, and skin lesions caused by ... Conclusion: Treatment of herpes zoster with appropriate corticosteroid isodose application can effectively relieve ..... Glueocorticoid treatment in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress ...

  3. Prednisone and Other Corticosteroids: Balance the Risks and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower legs High blood pressure Problems with mood, memory, behavior and other psychological effects Weight gain, with fat deposits in your abdomen, ... injected corticosteroids Injected corticosteroids can cause temporary ... skin thinning, loss of color in the skin, facial flushing, insomnia and high ...

  4. The Initial Response To Corticosteroid Therapy in Childhood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome (NS) in African children is associated with poor response to corticosteroids. There is disparity in treatment response on the African continent. The aim of this present study was to describe the initial response to corticosteroid therapy of childhood NS in Côte d'ivoire. Materials and methods: ...

  5. Corticosteroids reduce the tensile strength of isolated collagen fascicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, Bjarki Thor; Langberg, Henning; Aagaard, Per

    2006-01-01

    Overuse tendon injuries are frequent. Corticosteroid injections are commonly used as treatment, although their direct effects on the material properties of the tendon are poorly understood.......Overuse tendon injuries are frequent. Corticosteroid injections are commonly used as treatment, although their direct effects on the material properties of the tendon are poorly understood....

  6. Risk of miscarriage among users of corticosteroid hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anne-Mette B; Nielsen, Rikke B; Nørgaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this nested case-control study in Denmark was to study the association between use of corticosteroids and risk of miscarriage.......The purpose of this nested case-control study in Denmark was to study the association between use of corticosteroids and risk of miscarriage....

  7. Effects of long-term treatment with corticosteroids in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, TEJ; Schouten, JP; Koeter, GH; Postma, DS

    Study objective: To determine the effectiveness of treatment with corticosteroids in patients with COPD. Methods: In this study, we investigated the effect of a 2-year treatment with corticosteroids on clinical symptoms and the decline of lung function in 58 nonallergic patients with COPD. Subjects

  8. VESICLE-ENCAPSULATED CORTICOSTEROIDS FOR THE TREATMENT OF CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Metselaar, J.M.; Molema, Grietje; Storm, Gerrit

    2004-01-01

    The invention relates to the use of a composition comprising a corticosteroid encapsulated in a vesicle for the manufacture of a medicament for treating cancer, such as the use of a composition comprising a corticosteroid and liposomes, the liposomes comprising a non-charged vesicle-forming lipid,

  9. Vesicle-encapsulated corticosteroids for the treatment of cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Metselaar, J.M.; Molema, Grietje; Storm, Gerrit

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to the use of a composition comprising a corticosteroid encapsulated in a vesicle for the manufacture of a medicament for treating cancer, such as the use of a composition comprising a corticosteroid and liposomes, the liposomes comprising a non-charged vesicle-forming lipid

  10. Plasma and brain pharmacokinetic profile of cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidivarine (CBDV), Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) and cannabigerol (CBG) in rats and mice following oral and intraperitoneal administration and CBD action on obsessive-compulsive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiana, Serena; Watanabe, Akihito; Yamasaki, Yuki; Amada, Naoki; Arthur, Marlene; Fleming, Shona; Woodcock, Hilary; Dorward, Patricia; Pigliacampo, Barbara; Close, Steve; Platt, Bettina; Riedel, Gernot

    2012-02-01

    Phytocannabinoids are useful therapeutics for multiple applications including treatments of constipation, malaria, rheumatism, alleviation of intraocular pressure, emesis, anxiety and some neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Consistent with these medicinal properties, extracted cannabinoids have recently gained much interest in research, and some are currently in advanced stages of clinical testing. Other constituents of Cannabis sativa, the hemp plant, however, remain relatively unexplored in vivo. These include cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidivarine (CBDV), Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin (Δ(9)-THCV) and cannabigerol (CBG). We here determined pharmacokinetic profiles of the above phytocannabinoids after acute single-dose intraperitoneal and oral administration in mice and rats. The pharmacodynamic-pharmacokinetic relationship of CBD (120 mg/kg, ip and oral) was further assessed using a marble burying test in mice. All phytocannabinoids readily penetrated the blood-brain barrier and solutol, despite producing moderate behavioural anomalies, led to higher brain penetration than cremophor after oral, but not intraperitoneal exposure. In mice, cremophor-based intraperitoneal administration always attained higher plasma and brain concentrations, independent of substance given. In rats, oral administration offered higher brain concentrations for CBD (120 mg/kg) and CBDV (60 mg/kg), but not for Δ(9)-THCV (30 mg/kg) and CBG (120 mg/kg), for which the intraperitoneal route was more effective. CBD inhibited obsessive-compulsive behaviour in a time-dependent manner matching its pharmacokinetic profile. These data provide important information on the brain and plasma exposure of new phytocannabinoids and guidance for the most efficacious administration route and time points for determination of drug effects under in vivo conditions.

  11. Intradiscal corticosteroid injections in spondylotic cervical radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Rahmani, Lamia; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Nys, Alain; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ledoux, Michel; Revel, Michel [Hopital Cochin (AP-HP) Universite Paris 5, Service de Reeducation et de Readaptation de l' Appareil Locomoteur et des Pathologies du Rachis, Paris (France); Drape, Jean L.; Chevrot, Alain [Hopital Cochin (AP-HP), Department of Radiology B, Paris (France)

    2007-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcomes with intradiscal injection of corticosteroids (IDIC) in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Twenty consecutive patients were treated with intradiscal injection of 25 mg of acetate of prednisolone under fluoroscopic control. All patients had previously received a nonsurgical treatment for at least 3 months without success. Outcomes were assessed 1, 3 and 6 months after IDIC. Radicular pain reduction as scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS 100-mm length) was statistically significant at 1 month (19.0{+-}28.0 mm; p=0.008), 3 months (25.2{+-}27.5 mm; p=0.002), and 6 months (24.6{+-}28.4 mm; p=0.001). In all, 40% of treated patients described at least 50% pain improvement 6 months after treatment. Four patients had complete relief of radicular pain. In conclusion, IDIC should be an alternative in the nonsurgical management of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. (orig.)

  12. Asthma and Adherence to Inhaled Corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bårnes, Camilla Boslev; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    -related hospitalizations could be attributed to poor adherence. Most studies have reported an increase in adherence following focused interventions, followed by an improvement in quality of life, symptoms, FEV1, and oral corticosteroid use. However, 2 studies found no difference in health-care utilization, one observed...... was found to be between 22 and 63%, with improvement up to and after an exacerbation. Poor adherence was associated with youth, being African-American, having mild asthma, care provider, whereas improved adherence was associated with being...... to improve adherence. A total of 19 studies met the inclusion criteria: 9 focusing on the level of adherence, 6 focusing on effects of poor adherence, and 7 focusing on interventions to improve adherence. Three of the studies focused on more than one of these end points. The mean level of adherence to ICS...

  13. Targeting the Plantar Fascia for Corticosteroid Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Andrea Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is often a difficult condition to treat. It is related to repetitive strain of the fascia at its attachment to the heel bone. This condition quite often appears with the concomitant presence of a plantar calcaneal heel spur. Corticosteroid injection is a popular treatment choice for plantar fasciitis, and accurate localization of the injected medication is essential for successful resolution of symptoms after the injection. In the present brief technical communication, a method for targeting the attachment of the plantar fascia to the medial tubercle of the tuberosity of the calcaneus is described. The targeting method uses the lateral radiograph of the foot to aid in localization of the proximal attachment of the plantar fascia to the calcaneus. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Corticosteroids In Infections Of Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena AK

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections of central nervous system are still a major problem. Despite the introduction of newer antimicrobial agents, mortality and long-term sequelace associated with these infections is unacceptably high. Based on the evidence that proinflammtory cytokines have a role in pathophysiology of bacterial and tuberculous meningitis, corticosteroids with a potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effect have been tested and found to be of use in experimental and clinical studies, Review of the available literature suggests steroid administration just prior to antimicrobial therapy is effective in decreasing audiologic and neurologic sequelae in childern with H. influenzae nenigitis. Steroid use for bacterial meningitis in adults is found to be beneficial in case of S. pneumoniae. The value of adjunctive steroid therapy for other bacterial causes of meningitis remains unproven. Corticocorticoids are found to be of no benefit in viral meningitis, Role of steroids in HIV positive patients needs to be studied.

  15. Fluticasone furoate: A new intranasal corticosteroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intranasal corticosteroids are recommended as one of the first-line therapies for the treatment of allergic rhinitis (AR, especially when associated with nasal congestion and recurrent symptoms. Fluticasone furoate is a novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid for the treatment of AR approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2007 and recently introduced in India. Fluticasone furoate nasal spray is indicated for the treatment of the symptoms of seasonal and perennial AR in patients aged two years and older. This review summarizes the clinical data on fluticasone furoate nasal spray and discusses its role in the management of AR. Important attributes of fluticasone furoate include low systemic bioavailability (<0.5%, 24-h symptom relief with once-daily dosing, comprehensive coverage of both nasal and ocular symptoms, safety and tolerability with daily use, and availability in a side-actuated device that makes medication delivery simple and consistent. With these properties, fluticasone furoate nasal spray has the potential to enhance patient satisfaction and compliance, thus making it a good choice amongst available intranasal steroids.

  16. Intradiscal corticosteroid injections in spondylotic cervical radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, Francois; Rahmani, Lamia; Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Nys, Alain; Poiraudeau, Serge; Ledoux, Michel; Revel, Michel; Drape, Jean L.; Chevrot, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment outcomes with intradiscal injection of corticosteroids (IDIC) in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Twenty consecutive patients were treated with intradiscal injection of 25 mg of acetate of prednisolone under fluoroscopic control. All patients had previously received a nonsurgical treatment for at least 3 months without success. Outcomes were assessed 1, 3 and 6 months after IDIC. Radicular pain reduction as scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS 100-mm length) was statistically significant at 1 month (19.0±28.0 mm; p=0.008), 3 months (25.2±27.5 mm; p=0.002), and 6 months (24.6±28.4 mm; p=0.001). In all, 40% of treated patients described at least 50% pain improvement 6 months after treatment. Four patients had complete relief of radicular pain. In conclusion, IDIC should be an alternative in the nonsurgical management of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. (orig.)

  17. Role of oral corticosteroids in orbital cellulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushker, Neelam; Tejwani, Lalit Kumar; Bajaj, Mandeep S; Khurana, Saurbhi; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Chandra, Mahesh

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the role of oral corticosteroids as an anti-inflammatory adjunct in the treatment of orbital cellulitis. Prospective, comparative, single-masked, interventional clinical study. setting: Tertiary eye care center (All India Institute of Medical Sciences). study population: Patients with acute onset (within 14 days) of orbital cellulitis with or without abscess. intervention: Patients were randomized into 2 groups in the ratio of 1:2. Both groups received initial intravenous antibiotics. In Group 2, oral steroids were added after an initial response to intravenous antibiotics. main outcome measures: Resolution of signs and symptoms, duration of intravenous antibiotics, length of hospital stay, and sequelae of disease (ptosis, proptosis, and movement restriction) were evaluated and compared between the 2 groups. A total of 21 patients (age range, 11-59 years) with orbital cellulitis were studied. There were 7 patients in Group 1, who received standard intravenous antibiotics, and 14 in Group 2, who received adjuvant steroids. Patients in Group 2 showed an earlier resolution of inflammation in terms of periorbital edema (P = .002 at day 7), conjunctival chemosis (P orbital cellulitis may hasten resolution of inflammation with a low risk of exacerbating infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Medical adherence to topical corticosteroid preparations prescribed for psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mathias Tiedemann; Andersen, Flemming; Hansen, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Topical corticosteroids and corticosteroid combinations are the principal treatments in psoriasis. The aim of this study was to investigate published literature dealing with medical adherence to topical corticosteroid or corticosteroid combinations in patients with psoriasis. MATERIALS...... health outcome in topical treatment of psoriasis, further studies should be conducted addressing determinants of nonadherence and test interventions to improve adherence. Validated measurements of medical nonadherence, prescription registers, or medication-weight are needed....... interventional study. Observation periods varied and rates of nonadherence ranged from 8% to 88.3%. The rates were reported by patients on eight nonvalidated scales and one validated scale, measured by medication weight in two studies, and in two studies rates of nonadherence were measured using prescription...

  19. Acute corticosteroid-induced rhabdomyolysis in a golf player

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dose corticosteroids should be recognised by clinicians and sports medicine specialists. This article presents the case of a young golf player with rhabdomyolysis, as well as current theories on cellular mechanisms, and symptoms and treatment of ...

  20. Corticosteroid Receptors, Their Chaperones and Cochaperones: How Do They Modulate Adipogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Toneatto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids are part of the list of hormones that control adipogenesis as well as different aspects of the physiology of the adipose tissue. Their actions are mediated through their binding to the glucocorticoid and the mineralocorticoid receptors (GR and MR, respectively, in complex with heat shock proteins (Hsps and high molecular weight immunophilins (IMMs. Albeit many aspects of the molecular mechanism of the corticosteroid receptors are not fully elucidated yet, it was not until recently that the first evidences of the functional importance of Hsps and IMMs in the process of adipocyte differentiation have been described. Hsp90 and the high molecular weight IMM FKBP51 modulate GR and MR activity at multiple levels, that is, hormone binding affinity, their subcellular distribution, and the transcriptional status, among other aspects of the NR function. Interestingly, it has recently been described that Hsp90 and FKBP51 also participate in the control of PPARγ, a key transcription factor in the control of adipogenesis and the maintenance of the adipocyte phenotype. In addition, novel roles have been uncovered for FKBP51 in the organization of the nuclear architecture through its participation in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina and the control of the subnuclear distribution of GR. Thus, the aim of this review is to integrate and discuss the actual understanding of the role of corticosteroid receptors, their chaperones and cochaperones, in the process of adipocyte differentiation.

  1. Corticosteroids for all adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ger Rijkers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid therapy as adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a promising but controversial subject. The potentially beneficial effect of corticosteroids is based on the ability of steroids to dampen an excessive inflammatory response that often occurs in patients with CAP. This excessive inflammatory response can cause damage to the lungs and other organs, and is associated with poor outcome.

  2. Cushing's syndrome: hidden risk in usage of topical corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buluş, Ayşe Derya; Andıran, Nesibe; Koçak, Mesut

    2014-09-01

    Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome in children may occur as a result of the application of exogenous steroids. Prolonged use of powerful corticosteroids suppresses adrenal functions and iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome may develop particularly in infants who are given topical corticosteroids. We report here a case on three infants having Cushing's syndrome with similar clinical presentations due to overuse of topical steroids for diaper dermatitis. The importance of exercising caution during the use of topical steroids is underlined in this study.

  3. Misuse of topical corticosteroids: A clinical study of adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Dey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Misuse of topical corticosteroids is a widespread phenomenon among young people in India, especially women. The practice is associated with significant adverse effects and poor awareness of these effects among the general public. Aim: This study was conducted to examine the misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids among the people in Bastar region in Chhattisgarh state of India. Materials and Methods: Data collected from patients presenting with at least one of the adverse effects of topical corticosteroids as the chief complaint, from November 2010 to October 2011. Results: Out of the 6723 new patients, 379 (5.63% had presented with misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids, of whom 78.89% were females. More than 65% of the patients were in the age group 10-29 years. The main reason for using the topical corticosteroids was to lighten skin colour and treat melasma and suntan. Acne (37.99% and telangiectasia (18.99% were the most common adverse effects noted. Conclusions: Misuse of topical corticosteroids has a huge impact on dermatological practice, leading to a significant proportion of visits to the dermatologist. This hydra-headed problem needs multi-dimensional interventions, involving educational, legal and managerial approaches with cooperation from different sectors of society.

  4. Intratympanic corticosteroid for sudden hearing loss: does it really work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Monique Antunes de Souza Chelminski; Ledesma, Aleluia Lima Losno; de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires; Bahmad, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Sudden deafness is characterized by an abrupt hearing loss of at least 30dB in three sequential frequencies in the standard pure tone audiogram over three days or less. Treatment is based on its etiology, and oral corticosteroids are widely used. Intratympanic corticosteroids are included as primary or secondary treatment when there is no improvement with the use of oral corticosteroids. To determine the effectiveness of therapy with intratympanic steroids in sudden deafness. A systematic review was performed of publications on the topic in the databases of PubMed/MEDLINE, with the keywords: sudden deafness, sudden hearing loss, and corticosteroids. Thirty scientific studies were analyzed. As to the objectives of the study analyzed, 76.7% sought to evaluate the use of intratympanic therapy salvage after failure to conventional treatment, and intratympanic therapy was used as the primary treatment 23.3% of the studies. Intratympanic corticosteroid therapy is prescribed primarily when there is failure of conventional therapy and when it is limited to use systemic corticosteroids, such as the diabetic patient. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Systemic corticosteroids for acute otitis media in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranakusuma, Respati W; Pitoyo, Yupitri; Safitri, Eka D; Thorning, Sarah; Beller, Elaine M; Sastroasmoro, Sudigdo; Del Mar, Chris B

    2018-03-15

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common acute infection in children. Pain is its most prominent and distressing symptom. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for AOM, although they have only a modest effect in reducing pain at two to three days. There is insufficient evidence for benefits of other treatment options, including systemic corticosteroids. However, systemic corticosteroids are potent anti-inflammatory drugs, and so theoretically could be effective, either alone or as an addition to antibiotics. To assess the effects of systemic corticosteroids (oral or parenteral), with or without antibiotics, for AOM in children. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) which contains the Cochrane ARI Group's Specialised Register, MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Elsevier), CINAHL (EBSCO), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), and LILACS (BIREME) for published studies, and ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for completed and ongoing studies, to 20 February 2018. We checked the reference lists of all primary studies and review articles for additional references and contacted experts in the field to identify additional unpublished materials. We included randomised controlled trials of children with AOM that compared any systemic corticosteroid (oral or parenteral) with placebo, either with antibiotics (corticosteroid plus antibiotic versus placebo plus antibiotic) or without antibiotics (corticosteroid versus placebo). Three review authors (EDS, RR, YP) independently screened the titles and abstracts and retrieved the full texts of potentially relevant studies. We independently extracted study characteristics and outcome data from the included studies, and assessed the risk of bias for each study using the criteria outlined in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We assessed study quality using the GRADE method. We included two studies involving 252

  6. High dose corticosteroids in severe leptospirosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Lakshitha de Silva, Nipun; Goonaratne, Ravindi; Samarasekara, Keshinie; Wijesinghe, Indika; Parththipan, B; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-12-01

    The role of corticosteroids in the treatment of severe leptospirosis is unclear. The rationale for their use is that, in severe leptospirosis, there is a severe immunological response that is harmful to the host resulting in multi-organ dysfunction, which is potentially offset by the nonspecific immunosuppression of high dose steroids. We conducted a systematic review of studies that have assessed the use of high dose corticosteroids in patients with severe leptospirosis by searching MEDLINE and Scopus SciVerse without any language or time restrictions. We identified five studies, including one open randomized clinical trial, which had assessed the use of high dose steroids in severe leptospirosis. Four studies demonstrated a benefit of corticosteroids in treating severe disease with pulmonary involvement when administered early in the course of the disease, but these studies had several methodological constraints as highlighted in the text. Only the randomized controlled trial study showed that corticosteroids are ineffective and may increase the risk of nosocomial infections. There is no robust evidence to suggest that high dose corticosteroids are effective in severe leptospirosis, and a well-designed randomized clinical trial is needed to resolve this. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Corticosteroids in the treatment of dengue shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Maduranga, Sachith; Rajapakse, Anoja Chamarie

    2014-01-01

    Dengue infection causes significant morbidity and mortality in over 100 countries worldwide, and its incidence is on the rise. The pathophysiological basis for the development of severe dengue, characterized by plasma leakage and the "shock syndrome" are poorly understood. No specific treatment or vaccine is available, and careful monitoring and judicious administration of fluids forms the mainstay of management at present. It is postulated that vascular endothelial dysfunction, induced by cytokine and chemical mediators, is an important mechanism of plasma leakage. Although corticosteroids are potent modulators of the immune system, their role in pharmacological doses in modulating the purported immunological effects that take place in severe dengue has been a subject of controversy. The key evidence related to the role of corticosteroids for various manifestations of dengue are reviewed here. In summary, there is currently no high-quality evidence supporting the beneficial effects of corticosteroids for treatment of shock, prevention of serious complications, or increasing platelet counts. Non-randomized trials of corticosteroids given as rescue medication for severe shock have shown possible benefit. Nonetheless, the evidence base is small, and good-quality trials are lacking. We reiterate the need for well-designed and adequately powered randomized controlled trials of corticosteroids for the treatment of dengue shock.

  8. Immediate and delayed allergic hypersensitivity to corticosteroids: practical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeck, Marie; Goossens, An

    2012-01-01

    Corticosteroids (CS), anti-inflammatory drugs also widely used to treat various allergic diseases, may themselves give rise to immediate and delayed allergic hypersensitivity reactions. To realise an appropriate diagnostic work-up in order to determine the CS-allergic patient's sensitization/tolerance profile and define the potential replacement agents that can still be tolerated. Analysis of the patch test results and concomitant (cross-) reaction patterns obtained with 315 corticosteroid-allergic patients, as well as molecular modelling of molecules. Proposal of a simplified classification of corticosteroids as to their allergenic properties into 3 groups, determination of two patient profiles according to steric and electrostatic properties of the molecules. Conclusion. Practical information to the medical profession in order to detect and manage such reactions is provided. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Ocular complication of intralesional corticosteroid injection of a chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoşal, B M; Zilelioğlu, G

    2003-01-01

    To report a major complication of intralesional corticosteroid injection for the treatment of a chalazion. A 28-year-old woman presented with a 4-day history of decreased vision in her left eye that developed after corticosteroid injection to her upper eyelid for the treatment of chalazion. The visual acuity was 20/20 in her right and finger counting in her left eye. Anterior segment examination showed an inferior corneal opacity with positive Seidel test and cataract. A soft contact lens was applied to cornea and antibiotic therapy was given to prevent endophthalmitis. Cataract was removed by lens aspiration and a posterior chamber intraocular lens was implanted. After surgery, the visual acuity increased to 20/20 in her left eye. Inadvertent corneal penetration and traumatic cataract are possible and serious complications of intralesional corticosteroid injection.

  10. [Prevention of preterm birth complications by antenatal corticosteroid administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, T

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate short- and long-term benefits and risks associated with antenatal administration of a single course of corticosteroids and the related strategies: multiple and rescue courses. The PubMed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the French and foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. Antenatal administration of a single course of corticosteroids before 34 weeks of gestation is associated in the neonatal period with a significant reduction of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and death (LE1), and in possibly childhood with a reduction of cerebral palsy and increased psychomotor development index and intact survival (LE3). However, this treatment is associated with alterations of the HPA axis response persisting until 8 weeks after birth (LE2) and possibly with insulin resistance in adulthood (LE3). Antenatal corticosteroid administration after 34 weeks is associated, with high number needed to treat, with reduced respiratory morbidity (LE2), with no significant effect on neurological (LE2) or digestive (LE2) morbidities. Because of a very favourable benefit/risk balance, antenatal administration of a single course of corticosteroids is recommended for women at risk of preterm delivery before 34 weeks (grade A). The minimum gestational age for treatment will depend on the threshold chosen to start neonatal intensive care in maternity units and perinatal networks (Professional consensus). After 34 weeks, evidences are not consistent enough to recommend systematic antenatal corticosteroid treatment (grade B), however, a course might be indicated in the clinical situations associated with the higher risk of "severe" RDS, mainly in case of planned cesarean delivery (gradeC). In case of imminent preterm birth, pre-empting the second betamethasone injection is not recommended (gradeC), because this policy might be associated with increased rates of

  11. The effects of oral and topical corticosteroid in rabbit corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki-Sasaki, Kaoru; Katsuta, Osamu; Mano, Hidetoshi; Nagano, Takashi; Nakamura, Masatsugu

    2016-09-05

    To determine the most effective route of administration of corticosteroids in the treatment of ocular surface disease, by characterizing the difference between oral prednisolone and topical dexamethasone administration using an animal model. Pharmacokinetic analyses determined the corticosteroid concentrations in the normal ocular tissues of rabbits after oral or topical administration of corticosteroids using LC-MS/MS. In wound healing analyses, the area of the epithelial defect created by keratectomy using a 6-mm trephine was calculated with an image analyzer using an orally or topically steroid-administrated animal model. The average size of basal epithelial cells, the frequency of mitotic basal epithelial cells, the number of squamous cells, and the number of hypertrophic stromal fibroblasts were determined in the enucleated corneal tissues after wound closure. By slit lamp examination, no remarkable differences were observed between orally and topically administered groups. Pharmacokinetic analyses showed that the distribution of dexamethasone after topical administration was superior to that after oral administration in the cornea. In contrast, both concentrations of corticosteroid applied topically and orally were similar with regards to AUCs (area under the concentration-time curve) in the conjunctiva. Although the healing rate was slower in the topical group, all corneas were almost healed within 96 h in the wound healing analysis. According to the histological analyses of epithelial cells, the average basal cell size was larger, the frequency of mitotic basal cells was greater, and the number of squamous epithelial cell layers was lower in the topically administered group although all of these differences were with no statistical significance. However, the number of hypertrophic stromal fibroblasts in the topically administered group was significantly lower than that in the orally administered group. There are different distributions and effects between

  12. Effectiveness of corticosteroid injections in adhesive capsulitis of shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Mingmin; Zhou, Chenhe; Shi, Zhongli; Cai, Xunzi; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shigui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Primary adhesive capsulitis is mainly characterized by spontaneous chronic shoulder pain and the gradual loss of shoulder motion. The main treatment for adhesive capsulitis is a trial of conservative therapies, including analgesia, exercise, physiotherapy, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammation drugs, and intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Previously, it was reported that intra-articular corticosteroid lead to fast pain relief and improvement of range of motion (ROM). The objective of this study was to determine whether corticosteroid injections would lead to better pain relief and greater improvement in ROM. Methods: We searched PubMed, Medline, and the Cochrane library. We included 5 articles of the 1166 articles identified. Totally injection group included 115 patients and placebo group included 110 patients. We calculated the weighted mean differences to evaluate the pain relief as the primary outcome. We determined the ROM as the secondary outcome. Study quality was evaluated using the 12-item scale. We also used the criteria of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation to evaluate the quality of evidence. Results: In total, 5 studies were included, 4 of which were randomized clinical trials, with a sample size of 225 patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulders. The overall pooled data demonstrated that, compared with placebo as control treatment, intra-articular corticosteroid injections were more effective in reducing the pain score at 0 to 8 weeks, but there was no difference between the injection group and the control group at 9 to 24 weeks. Improvement of ROM in the injection group was greater than that of the control group both at 0 to 8 and 9 to 24 weeks. Conclusions: Intra-articular corticosteroid injections were more effective in pain relief in the short term, but this pain relief did not sustain in the long term. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection resulted in greater improvement in

  13. Corticosteroid adulteration in proprietary Chinese medicines: a recurring problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Y K; Ching, C K; Ng, S W; Mak, Tony W L

    2015-10-01

    To investigate adulteration of proprietary Chinese medicines with corticosteroids in Hong Kong. Case series with cross-sectional analysis. A tertiary clinical toxicology laboratory in Hong Kong. All patients using proprietary Chinese medicines adulterated with corticosteroids and referred to the authors' centre from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2012. Patients' demographic data, clinical presentation, medical history, drug history, laboratory investigations, and analytical findings of the proprietary Chinese medicines were analysed. The records of 61 patients who consumed corticosteroid-adulterated proprietary Chinese medicines were reviewed. The most common corticosteroid implicated was dexamethasone. Co-adulterants such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and histamine H1-receptor antagonists were detected in the proprietary Chinese medicine specimens. Among the patients, seven (11.5%) required intensive care, two (3.3%) died within 30 days of presentation, and 38 (62.3%) had one or more complications that were potentially attributable to exogenous corticosteroids. Of 22 (36.1%) patients who had provocative adrenal function testing performed, 17 (77.3% of those tested) had adrenal insufficiency. The present case series is the largest series of patients taking proprietary Chinese medicines adulterated with corticosteroids. Patients taking these illicit products are at risk of severe adverse effects, including potentially fatal complications. Adrenal insufficiency was very common in this series of patients. Assessment of adrenal function in these patients, however, has been inadequate and routine rather than discretionary testing of adrenal function is indicated in this group of patients. The continuing emergence of proprietary Chinese medicines adulterated with western medication indicates a persistent threat to public health.

  14. Lower corticosteroid skin blanching response is associated with severe COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J M Hoonhorst

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic airflow limitation caused by ongoing inflammatory and remodeling processes of the airways and lung tissue. Inflammation can be targeted by corticosteroids. However, airway inflammation is generally less responsive to steroids in COPD than in asthma. The underlying mechanisms are yet unclear. This study aimed to assess whether skin corticosteroid insensitivity is associated with COPD and COPD severity using the corticosteroid skin blanching test.COPD patients GOLD stage I-IV (n = 27, 24, 22, and 16 respectively and healthy never-smokers and smokers (n = 28 and 56 respectively were included. Corticosteroid sensitivity was assessed by the corticosteroid skin blanching test. Budesonide was applied in 8 logarithmically increasing concentrations (0-100 μg/ml on subject's forearm. Assessment of blanching was performed after 7 hours using a 7-point scale (normal skin to intense blanching. All subjects performed spirometry and body plethysmography.Both GOLD III and GOLD IV COPD patients showed significantly lower skin blanching responses than healthy never-smokers and smokers, GOLD I, and GOLD II patients. Their area under the dose-response curve values of the skin blanching response were 586 and 243 vs. 1560, 1154, 1380, and 1309 respectively, p<0.05. Lower FEV1 levels and higher RV/TLC ratios were significantly associated with lower skin blanching responses (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004 respectively. GOLD stage I, II, III and IV patients had similar age and packyears.In this study, severe and very severe COPD patients had lower skin corticosteroid sensitivity than mild and moderate COPD patients and non-COPD controls with comparable age and packyears. Our findings together suggest that the reduced skin blanching response fits with a subgroup of COPD patients that has an early-onset COPD phenotype.

  15. Efficacy of Low-Dose Corticosteroid Therapy Versus High-Dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Bell's Palsy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arican, Pinar; Dundar, Nihal Olgac; Gencpinar, Pinar; Cavusoglu, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acute peripheral facial nerve paralysis, but the optimal dose of corticosteroids in pediatric patients is still unclear. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose corticosteroid therapy compared with high-dose corticosteroid therapy in children with Bell's palsy. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the dose of oral prednisolone regimen initiated. The severity of idiopathic facial nerve paralysis was graded according to the House-Brackmann Grading Scale. The patients were re-assessed in terms of recovery rate at the first, third, and sixth months of treatment. There was no significant difference in complete recovery between the 2 groups after 1, 3, and 6 months of treatment. In our study, we concluded that even at a dose of 1 mg/kg/d, oral prednisolone was highly effective in the treatment of Bell's palsy in children.

  16. Perioperative corticosteroids for preventing complications following facial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Edina M K; Hochman, Bernardo; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2014-06-02

    Early recovery is an important factor for people undergoing facial plastic surgery. However, the normal inflammatory processes that are a consequence of surgery commonly cause oedema (swelling) and ecchymosis (bruising), which are undesirable complications. Severe oedema and ecchymosis delay full recovery, and may make patients dissatisfied with procedures. Perioperative corticosteroids have been used in facial plastic surgery with the aim of preventing oedema and ecchymosis. To determine the effects, including safety, of perioperative administration of corticosteroids for preventing complications following facial plastic surgery in adults. In January 2014, we searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid Embase; EBSCO CINAHL; and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS). There were no restrictions on the basis of date or language of publication. We included RCTs that compared the administration of perioperative systemic corticosteroids with another intervention, no intervention or placebo in facial plastic surgery. Two review authors independently screened the trials for inclusion in the review, appraised trial quality and extracted data. We included 10 trials, with a total of 422 participants, that addressed two of the outcomes of interest to this review: swelling (oedema) and bruising (ecchymosis). Nine studies on rhinoplasty used a variety of different types, and doses, of corticosteroids. Overall, the results of the included studies showed that there is some evidence that perioperative administration of corticosteroids decreases formation of oedema over the first two postoperative days. Meta-analysis was only possible for two studies, with a total of 60 participants, and showed that a single perioperative dose of 10 mg

  17. Perioperative corticosteroids for preventing complications following facial plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edina Mariko Koga da Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND:Early recovery is an important factor for people undergoing facial plastic. However, the normal inflammatory processes that are a consequence of surgery commonly cause oedema (swelling and ecchymosis (bruising, which are undesirable complications. Severe oedema and ecchymosis delay full recovery, and may make patients dissatisfied with procedures. Perioperative corticosteroids have been used in facial plastic surgery with the aim of preventing oedema and ecchymosis.OBJECTIVES:To determine the effects, including safety, of perioperative administration of corticosteroids for preventing complications following facial plastic surgery in adults.METHODS:Search strategy: In January 2014, we searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations; Ovid Embase; EBSCO CINAHL; and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS. There were no restrictions on the basis of date or language of publication. Selection criteria: We included RCTs that compared the administration of perioperative systemic corticosteroids with another intervention, no intervention or placebo in facial plastic surgery. ata collection and analysis: Two review authors independently screened the trials for inclusion in the review, appraised trial quality and extracted data.MAIN RESULTS: We included 10 trials, with a total of 422 participants, that addressed two of the outcomes of interest to this review: swelling (oedema and bruising (ecchymosis. Nine studies on rhinoplasty used a variety of different types, and doses, of corticosteroids. Overall, the results of the included studies showed that there is some evidence that perioperative administration of corticosteroids decreases formation of oedema over the first two postoperative days. Meta-analysis was only

  18. High-dose corticosteroids improve the prognosis of Bell's palsy compared with low-dose corticosteroids: A propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Haku, Yasuharu; Miyazaki, Takuya; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Sato, Shin-Ich; Tamaki, Hisanobu

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of high-dose corticosteroid (120mg prednisolone equivalent daily) in Bell's palsy compared with low-dose corticosteroid (60mg PSL equivalent). A single-center retrospective observational study was performed. We included adult Bell's palsy patients who were treated within 7days after disease onset. We compared high- and low-dose corticosteroid for the non-recovery rate at 6 months after disease onset using inverse probability-weighted propensity score analysis (IPW-PS). A total of 368 Bell's palsy patients (281 in the high-dose and 87 in the low-dose group) were included. The non-recovery rate without IPW-PS was 13.8% in the low-dose and 8.2% in the high-dose group. After IPW-PS adjustment, the non-recovery rate was 13.1% in the low-dose and 7.8% in the high-dose group (difference=-5.28%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -12.7% to -2.1%, p=0.040). High-dose corticosteroid decreased the non-recovery rate in severe Bell's palsy patients with a Yanagihara score of 0-10 (difference=-16.1%, 95% CI -38.5% to -6.2%, p=0.012), but did not decrease in moderate Bell's palsy patients with a Yanagihara score of 12-18 (difference=-2.0%, 95% CI -11.0% to 7.0%, p=0.591). Subgroup analysis revealed that the efficacy of high-dose corticosteroids was higher when patients were treated within 3days after disease onset, but not when patients were treated at 4days or later after disease onset. Physicians would be better to treat severe Bell's palsy patients with high-dose corticosteroids when the patients are treated within 3days after disease onset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of intranasal corticosteroids and antihistamines in allergic rhinitis: a review of randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lars P; Dahl, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    For several years there has been discussion of whether first-line pharmacological treatment of allergic rhinitis should be antihistamines or intranasal corticosteroids. No well documented, clinically relevant differences seem to exist for individual nonsedating antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Likewise, the current body of literature does not seem to favor any specific intranasal corticosteroid. When comparing efficacy of antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids in allergic rhinitis, present data favor intranasal corticosteroids. Interestingly, data do not support antihistamines as superior in treating conjunctivitis associated with allergic rhinitis. Safety data from comparative studies in allergic rhinitis do not indicate differences between antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids. Combining antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids in the treatment of allergic rhinitis does not provide additional beneficial effects to intranasal corticosteroids alone. Considering present data, intranasal corticosteroids seem to offer superior relief in allergic rhinitis, when compared with antihistamines.

  20. Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis prevention : longitudinal practice patterns in The Netherlands 2001-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyvendak, M.; Naunton, M.; Atthobari, J.; van den Berg, P. B.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated prevention trends and predictors for osteoporosis prevention in long term corticosteroid users. The use of bisphosphonates increased from 2001 to 2005. Longer duration of corticosteroid use and DMARD use were predictors for receiving prevention. Females appear reasonably well

  1. Corticosteroid Induced Decoupling of the Amygdala in Men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, Marloes J. A. G.; van Wingen, Guido A.; Joëls, Marian; Fernández, Guillén

    2012-01-01

    The amygdala is a key regulator of vigilance and heightens attention toward threat. Its activity is boosted upon threat exposure and contributes to a neuroendocrine stress response via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Corticosteroids are known to control brain activity as well as HPA

  2. Corticosteroid induced decoupling of the amygdala in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M.J.A.G.; Wingen, G.A. van; Joëls, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2012-01-01

    The amygdala is a key regulator of vigilance and heightens attention toward threat. Its activity is boosted upon threat exposure and contributes to a neuroendocrine stress response via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Corticosteroids are known to control brain activity as well as HPA

  3. Knowledge of health care workers on corticosteroid adverse drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Corticosteroids form the cornerstone of management for a myriad of rheumatological, dermatological and chronic respiratory tract diseases. Whereas these drugs are crucial in reducing morbidity and mortality, they are not without inherent grave risks. Health Care Workers (HCWs) providing care to patients on ...

  4. Corticosteroids in sports-related injuries: Friend or Foe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-03-16

    Mar 16, 2002 ... are thus seen as useful adjuncts in the treatment of some sports- related injuries. On the basis of their ability to down regulate the immune response, corticosteroids have been used extensively in the management of sports injuries to promote rapid return to the field of play. But to what extent do they affect ...

  5. Local corticosteroid injections: Rational use in common orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    corticosteroid used depends on the discretion of the orthopaedic surgeon based on his/her previous experience or on the availability of the preparation. When administered locally, it is the solubility and not the plasma half life that influences the efficacy. It is therefore prudent to use in acute inflammatory conditions a more.

  6. Atopic dermatitis: tacrolimus vs. topical corticosteroid use | Langa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite this, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) black box warning of possible malignancies has resulted in much debate among experts. The main focus of this article is to compare the safety and efficacy of topical corticosteroids to calcineurin inhibitors, particularly tacrolimus. Furthermore, the aim is to evaluate ...

  7. Time-dependent corticosteroid modulation of prefrontal working memory processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, Marloes J. A. G.; van Wingen, Guido A.; Joëls, Marian; Fernández, Guillén

    2011-01-01

    Corticosteroids are potent modulators of human higher cognitive function. They are released in response to stress, and are thought to be involved in the modulation of cognitive function by inducing distinct rapid nongenomic, and slow genomic changes, affecting neural plasticity throughout the brain.

  8. Corticosteroid therapy in Henoch-Schönlein gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Momčilo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP is the most common vascular disease of childhood. It is a multisystem disease most commonly affecting the skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys, but other organs may be affected, too. Gastrointestinal involvement occurs in approximately 65-90% of patients, ranging from mild symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, to more severe manifestations such as gastrointestinal bleeding and intussusception. In most cases, HSP spontaneously resolves without treatment. The use of corticosteroids is controversial and usually reserved for severe systemic manifestations. Some authors suggest that the abdominal pain and gastrointestinal hemorrhage of HSP may respond to steroids, with some suggesting that there is a benefit in their use and describing a regimen. Case outline. This is a case report of HSP in a fourteen year-old boy with abdominal pain and hematemesis. Upper endoscopy showed an edematous and erythematous change in the body of the stomach and purpuric lesions in the duodenum, while multiple erosions were found in the antral area. Parenteral corticosteroid therapy with gastric acid secretion inhibitor administration led to regression of gastrointestinal symptoms on the seventh day, with relapses on the fourth and sixth day. Peroral administration of corticosteroids and gradual decrease of daily doses started on the eighth day of abdominal symptoms. New purpuric skin rashes appeared during six weeks. Conclusion. Corticosteroid therapy with gastric acid secretion inhibitors showed a positive effect in our patient with a severe form of HSP accompanied by abdominal pain and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. .

  9. Acute corticosteroid-induced rhabdomyolysis in a golf player | Janse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute corticosteroid-induced rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but potentially life threatening, condition that deserves the attention of medical professionals and sport scientists. Early diagnosis is vital in minimising the secondary damage caused by rhabdomyolysis. This case of rhabdomyolysis highlights the severity of symptoms ...

  10. Atopic dermatitis: tacrolimus vs. topical corticosteroid use | Langa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), the dermatological manifestation of the atopic diathesis, has a variety of clinical presentations. It is a chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorder, requiring a multifaceted treatment approach. Topical corticosteroids are the backbone of therapy. However, concerns over adverse drug reactions ...

  11. Corticosteroids in sports-related injuries: Friend or Foe | Rotunno ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corticosteroids act as potent anti-inflammatory drugs and have been used in various sport settings for the treatment of both acute and chronic injuries. Basic physiology and mechanisms of action for gluco- and mineralocorticoids are discussed. Methods of administration, the action on the inflammatory response, and ...

  12. Effect of corticosteroid therapy in acute pain edema caused by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the curative effect of corticosteroids in the treatment of acute pain, local edema, and skin lesions caused by herpes zoster, and to develop some pertinent therapeutic guidelines. Methods: A total of 48 cases of patients diagnosed with herpes zoster from 2010 to 2011 in the dermatology clinic of Shan ...

  13. Antenatal corticosteroid use in preterm birth at Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Preterm birth causes about 75% of neonatal deaths that are not attributable to congenital malformations. Antenatal corticosteroids (ACS) given to mothers at risk of preterm birth reduce the incidence/severity of RDS, intraventricular haemmorhage, necrotizing enterocolitis and neonatal deaths. The WHO ...

  14. Fulminant Amebic Colitis after Corticosteroid Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie-Ann Shirley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Amebic colitis, caused by intestinal infection with the parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is a common cause of diarrhea worldwide. Fulminant amebic colitis is the most devastating complication of this infection, associated with both high mortality and morbidity. We conducted a review of the English literature to describe cases of fulminant amebic colitis associated with exposure to corticosteroid medications in order to identify the risk factors for poor outcome and determine difficulties in diagnosis and treatment.Articles reporting severe and fulminant forms of amebic colitis between 1991 and 2016 were collected. 525 records were screened to identify 24 cases for qualitative analysis associated with corticosteroid use. Cases arose from areas of high endemicity or travel to such areas. Most cases (14 of 24, 58% were given corticosteroids for initially misdiagnosed colitis, mainly inflammatory bowel, resulting in rapid progression of disease. Nearly half of all cases underwent surgical intervention, and 25% of cases died, despite all patients eventually receiving treatment with metronidazole. The odds of death did not differ significantly by prior misdiagnosis, co-morbidities, bowel perforation or need for surgery.Infection with E. histolytica should be considered prior to the administration of corticosteroids, in particular for patients residing in endemic areas or those with appropriate travel history, especially prior to the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. The development of preventative and treatment interventions are needed to improve outcomes of fulminant disease.

  15. Cushing's syndrome due to interaction between inhaled corticosteroids and itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Mark J; Bagg, Warwick; Thomas, Mark G; Lucas, Jennifer A; Ticehurst, Rob; Black, Peter N

    2004-01-01

    To report a case of an interaction between inhaled corticosteroids and itraconazole causing iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome and provide a review of the relevant literature. A 70-year-old white woman on long-term treatment with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids for asthma was diagnosed as having Scedosporium apiospermum infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. As a result, she was treated with itraconazole for 2 months. She subsequently developed Cushing's syndrome due to a probable cytochrome P450-mediated interaction between itraconazole and budesonide. She also had secondary adrenal insufficiency requiring prolonged treatment with replacement hydrocortisone. Budesonide is a potent glucocorticoid that is metabolized in the liver by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme to inactive metabolites. Itraconazole is a potent cytochrome P450 inhibitor. It can inhibit the metabolism of oral or inhaled corticosteroids, producing cortisol excess leading to Cushing's syndrome and adrenal insufficiency. An assessment of causality indicated a possible adverse interaction between itraconazole and budesonide. The combination of itraconazole and inhaled corticosteroids is increasingly being used to treat conditions such as allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Clinicians need to be aware of the potential for an interaction between such a combination.

  16. Bradycardia Following Oral Corticosteroid Use: Case Report and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Corticosteroids are used in various clinical conditions that include many immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Different side effects were described including cardiac arrhythmias. Most of those arrhythmias were in the form of bradycardia which usually occurs with high intravenous steroid doses.

  17. The effects of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a complication of excessive anticoagulation.2. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including aspirin. The NSAIDs produce their effects through a blockade of the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins by COX. Corticosteroids reduce the availability of arachidonic acid, contributing to the anti-inflammatory activity ...

  18. Corticosteroid Therapy for Hearing and Balance Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trune, Dennis R.; Canlon, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the current status of steroid therapies for hearing and vestibular disorders and how certain misconceptions may be undermining the efficacy in restoring normal ear function, both experimentally and clinically. Specific misconceptions addressed are that steroid therapy is not effective, steroid-responsive hearing loss proves an underlying inflammatory problem in the ear, and steroids only have application to the hearing disorders listed below. Glucocorticoid therapy for hearing and balance disorders has been employed for over 60 years. It is recommended in cases of sudden hearing loss, Meniére’s disease, immune-mediated hearing loss, and any vestibular dysfunction suspected of having an inflammatory etiology. The predominant steroids employed today are dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, and methyl-prednisolone. In spite of years of use, little is known of the steroid responsive mechanisms in the ear that are influenced by glucocorticoid therapy. Furthermore, meta-analyses and clinical study reviews occasionally question whether steroids offer any benefit at all. Foremost in the minds of clinicians is the immune suppression and antiinflammatory functions of steroids because of their efficacy for autoimmune hearing loss. However, glucocorticoids have a strong binding affinity for the mineralocorticoid (aldosterone) and glucocorticoid receptors, both of which are prominent in the ear. Because the auditory and vestibular end organs require tightly regulated endolymph and perilymph fluids, this ion homeostasis role of the mineralocorticoid receptor cannot be overlooked in both normal and pathologic functions of the ear. The function of the glucocorticoid receptor is to provide anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic signals by mediating survival factors. PMID:23044978

  19. [Crusted scabies induced by topical corticosteroids: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilan, P; Colin-Gorski, A-M; Chapelon, E; Sigal, M-L; Mahé, E

    2015-12-01

    The frequency of scabies is increasing in France. Crusted (or Norwegian) scabies is a very contagious form of scabies because of the huge number of mites in the skin. It is observed in patients suffering from immunodepression, motor or sensory deficiency, or mental retardation. The clinical presentation, except for the classic manifestation of scabies, is characterized by crusted lesions. Treatment is not easy and requires hospitalization. Topical corticosteroids are frequently used for children's dermatological diseases. Their long-term and inappropriate application in an infested scabies child can induce crusted scabies. We report on a case of an 8-year-old boy who developed crusted scabies induced by topical corticosteroid application. We discuss the therapeutic aspects of this severe form of scabies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction for liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Wettergren, André; Wilson, Colin H

    2014-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of T-cell specific antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction for prevention of acute rejection in liver transplant recipients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register...... to identify additional trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included all randomised clinical trials assessing immunosuppression with T-cell specific antibody induction versus corticosteroid induction in liver transplant recipients. Our inclusion criteria stated that participants within each included trial should...... (bias) using bias risk domains with definitions. We used trial sequential analysis to control for random errors (play of chance). MAIN RESULTS: We included 10 randomised trials with a total of 1589 liver transplant recipients, which studied the use of T-cell specific antibody induction versus...

  1. A Debilitating Orthopaedic Complication following Corticosteroid Therapy for Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Avascular necrosis (AVN of the scaphoid secondary to corticosteroid use is a rare entity. Previous reports in the literature refer to chronic steroid intake. We report a case secondary to low dose, short term use. AVN has a multifactorial cellular and genetic aetiology and most frequently affects the femoral head. Diagnosis relies on a high index of suspicion and early magnetic resonance (MR scanning. Treatment options are similar to those of traumatic scaphoid nonunions and include vascularised bone grafting and scaphoid excision. Polymyalgia Rheumatica is a common condition and its treatment is led by corticosteroid use. Mild to moderate strengths are advocated. However in our report we show that even with small doses serious adverse effects can be encountered.

  2. The effects of neonatal handling on adrenocortical responsiveness, morphological development and corticosterone binding globulin in nestling American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Buddy A; Breuner, Creagh W; Dufty, Alfred M

    2011-06-01

    Early developmental experiences play an important role in development of the adult phenotype. We investigated the effects of neonatal handling on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in a free-living avian species, the American kestrel (Falco sparverius). In the handled group (H), kestrel chicks were handled for 15 min/day from hatching until 26 days of age, after which time blood samples were collected for analysis of adrenal responsiveness and corticosterone binding globulin (CBG) levels. The non-handled control group (NH) was left undisturbed until 26 days of age when blood samples were collected and analyzed as above. Handled and NH kestrels did not differ in body condition index. Both total corticosterone (CORT) and CBG capacity were dampened significantly in H kestrels. However, free CORT did not differ between the two groups. In addition, hormone challenges of corticotropin releasing factor and adrenocorticotropin hormone were compared to saline injections to determine if the pituitary or the adrenal glands, respectively, were rendered more or less sensitive by handling. There was no difference in the responsiveness of H and NH kestrels to either hormone challenge. It is clear from these data that handling had an affect on fledgling phenotypic development, although whether the effects are permanent or ephemeral is unknown. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Corticosteroid Treatment Impact on Spinal Deformity in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sanzarello, Ilaria; Merlini, Luciano; Traina, Francesco; Rosa, Michele Attilio; Faldini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease with loss of ambulation at around 9-10 years of age, followed, if untreated, by development of scoliosis, respiratory insufficiency, and death in the second decade of life. This review highlights the natural history of the disease, in particular, with regard to the development of the spinal deformity and how this complication has been modified by surgical interventions and overall by corticosteroid treatment. The beneficial effect of cortic...

  4. Hydrodilatation, corticosteroids and adhesive capsulitis: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juel Niels

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrodilatation of the glenohumeral joint is by several authors reported to improve shoulder pain and range of motion for patients with adhesive capsulitis. Procedures described often involve the injection of corticosteroids, to which the reported treatment effects may be attributed. Any important contribution arising from the hydrodilatation procedure itself remains to be demonstrated. Methods In this randomized trial, a hydrodilatation procedure including corticosteroids was compared with the injection of corticosteroids without dilatation. Patients were given three injections with two-week intervals, and all injections were given under fluoroscopic guidance. Outcome measures were the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI and measures of active and passive range of motion. Seventy-six patients were included and groups were compared six weeks after treatment. The study was designed as an open trial. Results The groups showed a rather similar degree of improvement from baseline. According to a multiple regression analysis, the effect of dilatation was a mean improvement of 3 points (confidence interval: -5 to 11 on the SPADI 0–100 scale. T-tests did not demonstrate any significant between-group differences in range of motion. Conclusion This study did not identify any important treatment effects resulting from three hydrodilatations that included steroid compared with three steroid injections alone. Trial registration The study is registered in Current Controlled Trials with the registration number ISRCTN90567697.

  5. Hydrodilatation, corticosteroids and adhesive capsulitis: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveitå, Einar Kristian; Tariq, Rana; Sesseng, Sølve; Juel, Niels Gunnar; Bautz-Holter, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Background Hydrodilatation of the glenohumeral joint is by several authors reported to improve shoulder pain and range of motion for patients with adhesive capsulitis. Procedures described often involve the injection of corticosteroids, to which the reported treatment effects may be attributed. Any important contribution arising from the hydrodilatation procedure itself remains to be demonstrated. Methods In this randomized trial, a hydrodilatation procedure including corticosteroids was compared with the injection of corticosteroids without dilatation. Patients were given three injections with two-week intervals, and all injections were given under fluoroscopic guidance. Outcome measures were the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and measures of active and passive range of motion. Seventy-six patients were included and groups were compared six weeks after treatment. The study was designed as an open trial. Results The groups showed a rather similar degree of improvement from baseline. According to a multiple regression analysis, the effect of dilatation was a mean improvement of 3 points (confidence interval: -5 to 11) on the SPADI 0–100 scale. T-tests did not demonstrate any significant between-group differences in range of motion. Conclusion This study did not identify any important treatment effects resulting from three hydrodilatations that included steroid compared with three steroid injections alone. Trial registration The study is registered in Current Controlled Trials with the registration number ISRCTN90567697. PMID:18423042

  6. Use of adjunctive topical corticosteroids in bacterial keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Nina; Srinivasan, Muthiah; McLeod, Stephen D; Acharya, Nisha R; Lietman, Thomas M; Rose-Nussbaumer, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    Topical corticosteroid use in the setting of infectious keratitis has been a controversial issue. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the evidence for use of topical corticosteroids in addition to antibiotics in bacterial keratitis. Judicious use of steroids is postulated to limit the inflammatory component of bacterial keratitis, but can theoretically retard healing. Three small randomized controlled trials and one large-scale trial, the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial, have provided the most recent evidence to address this debate. Adjunctive topical corticosteroids initiated after at least 48 h of antibiotic usage in cases of culture-proven bacterial keratitis appear generally safe in the treatment of bacterial keratitis. They may be beneficial in cases of severe ulcers especially when initiated early in the course of the infection, in non-Nocardia ulcers, and in certain Pseudomonas ulcers. Several randomized controlled trials have greatly contributed to our understanding of the controversy over steroid use in the management of bacterial keratitis. Future studies are needed to confirm subgroup analysis findings and define optimal timing, dosage, and the most appropriate treatment populations.

  7. Effectiveness of second corticosteroid injections for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Nigel L; Bland, Jeremy D P

    2013-07-01

    A single local corticosteroid injection is an effective treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome. No study has specifically examined the effectiveness of a second injection on relapse after primary injection. We identified a cohort of patients who had received an initial corticosteroid injection into 1 wrist and then, at a later date, a second injection into the same wrist. We compared the change in the Boston Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) between first and second injections. In 229 patients who received 2 injections the mean improvement on the SSS was 1.2 (SD = 0.8) for the first injection and 1.3 (SD = 0.9) for the second, which was not statistically significant. Improvement in FSS for the first injection was 0.4 (SD = 0.8) and 0.7 (SD = 0.8) for the second, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Second corticosteroid injections appear to be at least as effective as the first. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Corticosteroid modulation of immunoglobulin expression and B-cell function in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Machin, Matthew; Russell, Kirsty E; Pavlidis, Stelios; Zhu, Jie; Barnes, Peter J; Chung, Kian F; Adcock, Ian M; Durham, Andrew L

    2016-05-01

    We investigated changes in gene expression that occur in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after corticosteroid treatment and sought to identify the mechanisms that regulate these changes. Biopsy samples were taken from patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage I to II) before and after treatment with fluticasone propionate (FP)/salmeterol (SM) (50/500, 4 wk). Gene expression was measured by microarray and was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The effect of FP on IgG expression and B-cell proliferation in the presence of oxidative stress was also studied. FP/SM significantly increased the expression of 180 genes while repressing 343 genes. The top 5 down-regulated genes were associated with immunoglobulin production, whereas the immunomodulatory FK506 binding protein (FK506BP) was up-regulated. Genes including IL6, IL8, and TBET-encoding TBX21 were unaffected. FP reduced IgG protein and mRNA expression and proliferation of human B cells through the dephosphorylation of ERK-1/2 via increased DUSP1 (dual-specificity protein phosphatase 1) expression. Consistent with in vivo data, oxidative stress did not prevent FP-induced suppression of IgG expression in human B cells in vitro Changes in expression were validated by RT-qPCR and by gene set enrichment analysis in distinct COPD cohorts. FP may reduce the adaptive immune response in COPD and may be more effective in patients with an increased B-cell/antibody response indicated by high autoantibody titers.-Lee, J., Machin, M., Russell, K. E., Pavlidis, S., Zhu, J., Barnes, P. J., Chung, K. F., Adcock, I. M., Durham, A. L. Corticosteroid modulation of immunoglobulin expression and B-cell function in COPD. © FASEB.

  9. Does the time of delivery after antenatal corticosteroids matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm delivery is associated with an increased risk of newborn morbidity and mortality. Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS is the most common comorbidity. It has been proven that this syndrome can be prevented with the administration of antenatal corticosteroids to women at risk of preterm delivery, before 35 weeks of gestational age.Aim: To evaluate the risk factors, severity, co-morbidities, and mortality of RDS in newborns of less than 35 weeks of gestational age, with specific emphasis on the association between the elapsed time since the administration of the last dose of a full cycle of corticosteroids and the frequency and severity of RDS.Methods: This descriptive retrospective study includes all newborns of less than 35 weeks of gestational age, who were born at our center between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014 and admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. Newborns with major malformations, chromosomopathies, hydrops, congenital TORCH infection or outborns were excluded. RDS was diagnosed according to the criteria of the Update on the European Consensus Guidelines on the Management of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Preterm Infants (2013 and classified with a grade of I to III, in accord with radiographic results.Results: A total of 234 newborns were studied, of which 35.5% had RDS. Antenatal corticosteroids were used for 90.1% of all newborns. When adjusted to the severity of RDS, birth weight, gestational age, and vasopressor support were all predictive factors of newborn mortality. A ROC curve identified a cut-off of at most 10.5 hours between the last dose of a full cycle of corticosteroids and the delivery as higher risk of onset of RDS and another cut-off of at most 6.5 hours as higher risk of onset of moderate to severe RDS (sensitivity of 80.0% and 83.3%, respectively.Conclusion: The last dose of a full antenatal corticosteroids cycle must be given at least 10.5 hours prior to delivery to

  10. Examination of effects of corticosteroids on skeletal muscles of boys with DMD using MRI and MRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpan, Ishu; Willcocks, Rebecca J; Forbes, Sean C; Finkel, Richard S; Lott, Donovan J; Rooney, William D; Triplett, William T; Senesac, Claudia R; Daniels, Michael J; Byrne, Barry J; Finanger, Erika L; Russman, Barry S; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Tennekoon, Gihan I; Walter, Glenn A; Sweeney, H L; Vandenborne, Krista

    2014-09-09

    To evaluate the effects of corticosteroids on the lower extremity muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) using MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Transverse relaxation time (T2) and fat fraction were measured by MRI/MRS in lower extremity muscles of 15 boys with DMD (age 5.0-6.9 years) taking corticosteroids and 15 corticosteroid-naive boys. Subsequently, fat fraction was measured in a subset of these boys at 1 year. Finally, MRI/MRS data were collected from 16 corticosteroid-naive boys with DMD (age 5-8.9 years) at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Five boys were treated with corticosteroids after baseline and the remaining 11 served as corticosteroid-naive controls. Cross-sectional comparisons demonstrated lower muscle T2 and less intramuscular (IM) fat deposition in boys with DMD on corticosteroids, suggesting reduced inflammation/damage and fat infiltration with treatment. Boys on corticosteroids demonstrated less increase in IM fat infiltration at 1 year. Finally, T2 by MRI/MRS detected effects of corticosteroids on leg muscles as early as 3 months after drug initiation. These results demonstrate the ability of MRI/MRS to detect therapeutic effects of corticosteroids in reducing inflammatory processes in skeletal muscles of boys with DMD. Our work highlights the potential of MRI/MRS as a biomarker in evaluating therapeutic interventions in DMD. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herretes, Samantha; Wang, Xue; Reyes, Johann MG

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial keratitis is a serious ocular infectious disease that can lead to severe visual disability. Risk factors for bacterial corneal infection include contact lens wear, ocular surface disease, corneal trauma, and previous ocular or eyelid surgery. Topical antibiotics constitute the mainstay of treatment in cases of bacterial keratitis, whereas the use of topical corticosteroids as an adjunctive therapy to antibiotics remains controversial. Topical corticosteroids are usually used to control inflammation using the smallest amount of the drug. Their use requires optimal timing, concomitant antibiotics, and careful follow-up. Objectives The objective of the review was to assess the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy for bacterial keratitis. Secondary objectives included evaluation of health economic outcomes and quality of life outcomes. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 14 July 2014. We also searched the Science Citation Index to identify additional studies that had cited the only trial included in the original version of this review, reference lists of included trials, earlier reviews, and the American Academy of Ophthalmology guidelines. We also contacted experts to identify any unpublished and

  12. Corticosteroid injection for adhesive capsulitis in primary care: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kim Hwee

    2016-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a common cause of shoulder pain and limited movement. The objectives of this review were to assess the efficacy and safety of corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis and to evaluate the optimum dose and anatomical site of injections. PubMed and CENTRAL databases were searched for randomised trials and a total of ten trials were included. Results revealed that corticosteroid injection is superior to placebo and physiotherapy in the short-term (up to 12 weeks). There was no difference in outcomes between corticosteroid injection and oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at 24 weeks. Dosages of intra-articular triamcinolone 20 mg and 40 mg showed identical outcomes, while subacromial and glenohumeral corticosteroid injections had similar efficacy. The use of corticosteroid injections is also generally safe, with infrequent and minor side effects. Physicians may consider corticosteroid injection to treat adhesive capsulitis, especially in the early stages when pain is the predominant presentation. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  13. Should corticosteroids be used in bacterial meningitis in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Semino, Margherita; Picciolli, Irene; Principi, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is one of the most serious infections in infants and children, with considerable morbidity and mortality. Despite the spreading of conjugated vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), the most important pneumococcal serotypes and serogroup C meningococcus has reduced the incidence of this infection in developed countries, it still remains a global public health problem and an important cause of mortality and disability. Whether corticosteroids should be used as a complementary therapy to antibacterials is still not clear because of the disparate findings from clinical trials and clinical evidence. The aim of this review is to analyze the available evidence on the impact of corticosteroid therapy in infants and children with bacterial meningitis in developed countries in order to define whether they should be added routinely in the empiric therapy of such disease. Our analysis concluded that in high-income countries dexamethasone has shown good results to prevent hearing loss in Hib meningitis if administered before or at the same time as the first dose of antibiotics. Dexamethasone should be evaluated in pneumococcal meningitis: it may be less beneficial in children with delayed presentation to medical attention and may be unfavourable in case of cephalosporin-resistant pneumococci. On the contrary, there is no evidence to recommend the use of corticosteroids in meningococcal meningitis. Further studies that take into account the epidemiologic changes of recent years, consider enrolment based on the onset of symptoms and evaluate outcomes such as hearing loss and neurologic sequelae with advanced techniques are urgently needed. Copyright © 2012 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of myofibroblasts and corticosteroid injections in adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettrich, Carolyn M; DiCarlo, Edward F; Faryniarz, Deborah; Vadasdi, Katherine B; Williams, Riley; Hannafin, Jo A

    2016-08-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a condition that results in restricted glenohumeral motion. Fibroblasts have been implicated in the disease process; however, their role as a contractile element in the development of fibrosis and capsular contracture is not well understood. We hypothesized (1) that myofibroblast prevalence in capsular biopsy specimens from patients with adhesive capsulitis would be increased compared with controls and (2) that patients treated with an intra-articular injection of corticosteroid would have fewer myofibroblasts. The study prospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with adhesive capsulitis scheduled for capsular release and matched controls. Tissue samples were collected from the posterior and anterior capsule for histomorphologic and immunohistologic analyses. Identical sectioning and preparation was performed in 14 additional adhesive capsulitis specimens from patients who had not received corticosteroid injections. Patients with adhesive capsulitis not treated with preoperative corticosteroid demonstrated more histologic evidence of fibromatosis, synovial hyperplasia, and an increase in positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin than patients who had received intra-articular injections of steroid. No specimens obtained from control patients demonstrated positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin. There was a higher prevalence of myofibroblast staining in patients with adhesive capsulitis, implicating activation of the myofibroblast in the pathophysiology of capsular contracture. Intra-articular steroid injection decreases the presence and amount of fibromatosis, vascular hyperplasia, fibrosis, and the presence of fibroblasts staining for α-smooth muscle actin. This supports the use of steroid injections to alter the disease process by decreasing the pathologic changes found in the capsular tissue. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Transdermal nitroglycerin versus corticosteroid infiltration for rotator cuff tendinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, S; Gallardo, C; Caballero, J; Martínez, T

    2001-10-31

    To compare transdermal nitroglycerin (NTG) and corticosteroid infiltration in patients with rotator cuff tendinitis (RCT). Experimental, randomized controlled study. Semirural basic health area in the Garraf region of Barcelona province, Spain, with a population of public health service users of 12000. Patients diagnosed as having RCT of less than 6 weeks' evolution who had not responded to treatment with oral nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs. The patients were distributed randomly into two groups: a) group A, local infiltration via a posterior approach with a depot corticosteroid and local anesthesia, and b) group B, treated for 3 days with a 5-mg NTC patch. Age, sex, pain (measured with an analog visual scale) and adverse events. In patients who showed a partial response, treatment was repeated up to 3 times at 15-day intervals. Pain was tested after 7-10 days of treatment. Complete improvement was considered a reduction in pain of more than 5 points on the analog visual scale; partial improvement was considered a reduction of 3-5 points, and treatment failure was recorded when there was no improvement in pain or when there was a decrease of less than 3 points. A total of 48 patients were included; 33 (69%) were women and 15 (31%) were men. Mean age was 61 years. In group A, complete improvement was seen in 19 patients and partial improvement in 3; treatment failed in 2 patients. In group B complete improvement was seen in 5 patients, partial improvement in 5, and failure of treatment in 14. The difference between groups was statistically significant. Adverse events were mild pain at the injection site in 4 patients from group A, and headache in 15 patients from group B, 8 of whom abandoned treatment for this reason. Treatment with NTG is not a clear alternative to infiltration of corticosteroids in patients with RCT, because of its lack of effectiveness and because of the greater number of patients who had adverse events that lead them to abandon treatment.

  16. Corticosteroids therapy and peptic ulcer disease in nephrotic syndrome patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, Kuo-Wei; Ng, Yee-Yung; Lu, Ching-Liang; Chen, Tseng-Shing; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Wu, Jia-Min; Lin, Han-Chieh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2010-01-01

    AIMS Whether corticosteroids induce peptic ulcer disease (PUD) remains uncertain. The study evaluated and compared the occurrence of PUD between nephrotic patients receiving oral prednisolone therapy and nephritic patients without steroid therapy. METHODS The prospective case control study compared 60 nephrotic syndrome patients who received 60 mg daily prednisolone therapy for 3 months with 30 age-and sex-matched nephritic patients without steroid therapy. Each patient underwent endoscopic examination and tissue and blood sampling before and after the study. Examined parameters included Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, and gastric and serum prostaglandin (PG) E2 and thromboxane (TX) B2 concentrations. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of endoscopic peptic ulcers between the two groups, while the secondary end point was the occurrence of ulcer complications. RESULTS The two groups were comparable in sex, age, smoking habits, alcohol drinking, past history of PUD, H. pylori infection rate and serum creatinine. There were no differences in the occurrence of endoscopic peptic ulcers (1.6% vs. 3.3%) and ulcer complications (0% vs. 0%), pre-therapy gastric PGE2, and pre- and post-therapy gastric TXB2, serum PGE2 and serum TXB2 between the two groups. However, there was significantly lower post-therapy gastric PGE2 concentrations in the prednisolone group. CONCLUSIONS Three-month therapy with 60 mg daily prednisolone caused few endoscopic ulcers (1.6%) and no ulcer complications in nephrotic patients. Corticosteroids therapy did not increase PUD in nephrotic syndrome patients [odds ratio 0.492 with 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03, 8.142, P= 0.620]. Further larger studies are needed to clarify the role of corticosteroids in PUD.

  17. Effectiveness of platelets rich plasma versus corticosteroids in lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Abdul; Khan, Imran; Inam, Muhammad; Saeed, Mohammad; Khan, Husnain; Iqbal, Malik Javed

    2015-11-01

    To compare the treatment modalities of lateral epicondylitis in terms of pain relief. The randomised controlled study was conducted at Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar, Pakistan, from April 2013 to March 2014, and comprised cases of lateral epicondylitis. The patients were selected through consecutive sampling from the outpatient department and were randomly allocated to two equal groups; group A receiving corticosteroid injections, and group B receiving injection of platelet-rich plasma. The patients were followed up for three weeks to determine the effectiveness of intervention. The 102 patients in the study were divided into two groups of 51(50%) each. The over mean age was 33.9±10.3 years. Mean age of patients in the corticosteroid group was 34.2±10.2 years and in the other group it was 33.6±10.5 years. Mean baseline visual analogue score in group A were 6.5±1.2 and in group B it was 6.7±1.4. In group A, 74.5% of patients presented in moderate pain category and 25.5% presented in severe pain category. In group B, 70.6% presented in moderate with 29.4% presented in severe pain category. On follow-up, the mean pain score in group A was 4.0±2.6 and in group B it was 3.5±2.61. Group A showed effectiveness in 52.9% patients and group B showed effectiveness in 82.3% (p=0.001). PRP is an effective alternate to corticosteroid in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow).

  18. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection in diabetic patients with adhesive capsulitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Hak; Yi, Seung Rim; Noh, Jung Ho; Lee, Sung Yup; Oh, Joo Han; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2012-10-01

    An intra-articular corticosteroid injection is considered an effective treatment for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. This study examined the efficacy of corticosteroid injections for the treatment for adhesive capsulitis in patients with diabetes mellitus. Forty-five diabetic patients were randomized into a corticosteroid injection group or non-injection control group and received the same instruction for a home stretching exercise. The corticosteroid group patients were administered intra-articular corticosteroid injection composed of 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide. Pain by a visual analogue scale, shoulder range of motion, and functional state by the American Shoulder and Elbow score were assessed at the baseline, 4-, 12-, and 24-week follow-up. Diabetic patients treated with corticosteroid injections showed significant improvement in the pain score at 4 weeks and in the functional score at 12 weeks (P = 0.020 and P = 0.042, respectively). The range of motion in forward elevation and internal rotation was significantly higher in the corticosteroid group than in the non-corticosteroid group at the 12-week follow-up (P = 0.030 and 0.045, respectively), but there were no significant differences at the final follow-up between the corticosteroid and non-corticosteroid groups. A corticosteroid injection in diabetic patients decreases the pain perception and accelerates the functional recovery in the early post-injection period. An intra-articular corticosteroid injection is considered a viable option for the treatment for adhesive capsulitis with diabetes. Randomized clinical trial, therapeutic study, Level II.

  19. Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in an Adolescent on Long-Term Inhalational Corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony C. Egger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between the development of osteonecrosis of the femoral head and systemic corticosteroids has been well established in the literature, particularly in adults. However, the link between osteonecrosis and inhaled corticosteroids is less researched and understood. We report an usual case report of a 10-year-old male who developed ipsilateral femoral head osteonecrosis after long-term inhalational corticosteroid and intermittent short courses of oral steroid usage with a unique presentation and delayed diagnosis.

  20. Osteonecrosis in a Patient with Crohn's Disease Unrelated to Corticosteroid Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis is a feared complication of corticosteroid use. However, a direct association between corticosteroid use and osteonecrosis has never been proven. The present report examines the case of a patient with longstanding Crohn's disease who had never been treated with corticosteroids and who developed osteonecrosis of the talus. The association of systemic inflammatory disorders with osteonecrosis and the possible association with vascular thrombosis are discussed.

  1. Successful Corticosteroid Treatment for Purpura Fulminans Associated with Quinolone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Ikue; Nakamura, Yukitsugu; Katsurada, Yuka; Sato, Ken; Ikeda, Takashi; Kimura, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is a life-threatening syndrome comprising progressive hemorrhagic necrosis due to disseminated intravascular coagulation and dermal vascular thrombosis that leads to purpura and tissue necrosis. Various therapies have been used to arrest the progression of this disease, however, there is no established treatment because of the variety of underlying causes. We herein present an adult case of PF associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis triggered by antibiotic (levofloxacin) intake. As a result of our rapid and accurate identification of the underlying cause, corticosteroid therapy successfully repressed the inflammatory process. As far as we know, this is the first report of levofloxacin-associated PF. PMID:27746448

  2. Experimental corticosteroid induction of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Bille-Hansen, Vivi; Settnes, O.P.

    1999-01-01

    Animal models of Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) pneumonia (PCP) play a central role in research on the Pc microorganism itself and the disease, especially the pathogenesis and the host defence. The classic rat model with corticosteroid-induced reactivation of a latent infection has been most widely used...... of the frontal lung lobes and/or atelectatic looking diaphragmatic lobes. Histopathologically, there was a focal interstitial pneumonia. Alveolar walls and interstitia had mononuclear cell infiltrations and the alveolar lumina were occluded by foamy acidophilic honeycomb material with a varying number of Pc...

  3. Self-reported osteoporosis prevention in inhaled corticosteroid users in community pharmacy setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Chan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The use of inhaled corticosteroids is the standard maintenance therapy in asthma therapy and as adjunct therapy in moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A dose-related increase in fracture risk is associated with inhaled corticosteroid use; there is an inverse relationship between bone mineral density and duration and cumulative dose of inhaled corticosteroid. Adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D are cornerstones of osteoporosis prevention. The objectives are to assess whether the proportion of patients receiving inhaled corticosteroids are taking calcium and vitamin D; the association between long-term inhaled corticosteroid use and abnormal bone mineral density or fractures; and how many qualified patients received bone mineral density scans. Methods: Patients who filled a prescription for inhaled corticosteroids at selected community pharmacies across Alberta were recruited for a survey of their osteoporosis prevention activities. Results: A total of 256 patients from 12 community pharmacies were included. The average age was 60 ± 17.4 years with 65% female. There were 21%, 51%, and 28% of patients on high, medium, and low dose inhaled corticosteroids, respectively. Only 17% of patients >50 years old received recommended calcium and vitamin D supplementation and 87 (73% of the qualified patients received bone mineral density scan. Conclusion: Osteoporosis prevention in inhaled corticosteroid users is currently poorly addressed. More promotion is needed to raise pharmacist awareness of the risks of inhaled corticosteroids.

  4. Use of Inhaled and Oral Corticosteroids in Pregnancy and the Risk of Malformations or Miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anne-Mette Bay; Ehrenstein, Vera; Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    databases, this MiniReview provides an overview of inhaled and oral corticosteroid use in pregnancy with specific emphasis on the association between use of corticosteroids during pregnancy and risk of miscarriage and congenital malformations in offspring. Use of corticosteroids among pregnant women ranged...... from 0.2% to 10% and increased nearly two-fold in recent years. Taken together, the evidence suggests that use of corticosteroids in early pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations overall or oral clefts in offspring; at the same time, published estimates...

  5. [Intralesional corticosteroid injection in the treatment of chalazion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimbo Wa Kaimbo, D; Nkidiaka, M C

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intralesional corticosteroid injection in the treatment of chalazia in black African patients. In a prospective study conducted between February 1999 and February 2000, 25 black African patients with chalazion (25 eyes, 29 chalazia), ranging in age from 15 to 54 years (mean age +/- SD, 30.6+/-9 years), were treated with intralesional triamcinolone (injection of 0.075 - 0.5 ml triamcinolone acetate at a 5-mg/ml concentration). Success was achieved in 18 (72%) of 25 patients [20 (74%) out of 27 eyes, 22 (76%) out of 29 chalazia)]. In 11 of 25 patients, two intralesional injections were necessary to obtain these results. Recurrence occurred in five eyes (five chalazia, 17%) after 5-6 weeks. During a mean +/- SD of 4.68 months (range, 3.5-12 months) of follow-up, no postinjection ocular complication occurred. Intralesional corticosteroid injection appears to be effective in managing chalazion in black African patients, as reported in previous studies in Caucasian patients. This treatment can be used when curettage is contraindicated.

  6. Nonsurgical Management of Oral Mucocele by Intralesional Corticosteroid Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupam Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral mucocele is a common lesion resulting from an alteration of minor salivary glands due to mucus accumulation. Rapid appearance, specific location, history of trauma, bluish colour, and consistency help in the diagnosis. Conventional surgical removal is the treatment of choice but has several disadvantages like damage to adjacent ducts with further development of satellite lesions. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of intralesional corticosteroid injection (betamethasone as a nonsurgical treatment procedure in oral mucoceles. Material and Method. A total of 20 cases (males and females, 10–30 years of age with clinically diagnosed oral mucoceles were given 1 mL of betamethasone intralesionally. All the patients were examined after a period of 7, 14, and 21 days to evaluate the response of the lesion towards treatment and consequently given the 2nd, 3rd, 4th injections. If the lesion resolved after one or two injections, the treatment was discontinued. Results. Out of the 20 cases, 18 of them showed complete regression of the lesion whereas the remaining 2 cases showed decrease in size. All the patients received maximum of 4 consecutive shots in weekly interval. Conclusion. Intralesional corticosteroid therapy can be considered as the first choice in the treatment of oral mucoceles.

  7. Dynamics of Corticosteroid Receptors: Lessons from Live Cell Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Mayumi

    2011-01-01

    Adrenal corticosteroids (cortisol in humans or corticosterone in rodents) exert numerous effects on the central nervous system that regulates the stress response, mood, learning and memory, and various neuroendocrine functions. Corticosterone (CORT) actions in the brain are mediated via two receptor systems: the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). It has been shown that GR and MR are highly colocalized in the hippocampus. These receptors are mainly distributed in the cytoplasm without hormones and translocated into the nucleus after treatment with hormones to act as transcriptional factors. Thus the subcellular dynamics of both receptors are one of the most important issues. Given the differential action of MR and GR in the central nervous system, it is of great consequence to clarify how these receptors are trafficked between cytoplasm and nucleus and their interactions are regulated by hormones and/or other molecules to exert their transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on the nucleocytoplasmic and subnuclear trafficking of GR and MR in neural cells and non-neural cells analyzed by using molecular imaging techniques with green fluorescent protein (GFP) including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and discuss various factors affecting the dynamics of these receptors. Furthermore, we discuss the future directions of in vivo molecular imaging of corticosteroid receptors at the whole brain level

  8. A randomised pragmatic trial of corticosteroid optimization in severe asthma using a composite biomarker algorithm to adjust corticosteroid dose versus standard care: Study protocol for a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hanratty, Catherine E.; Matthews, John G.; Arron, Joseph R.; Choy, David F.; Pavord, Ian D.; Bradding, P.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Cowan, Douglas C.; Djukanovic, Ratko; Gallagher, Nicola; Fowler, Stephen J.; Hardman, Tim C.; Harrison, Tim; Holweg, Cécile T.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Patients with difficult-to-control asthma consume 50-60% of healthcare costs attributed to asthma and cost approximately five-times more than patients with mild stable disease. Recent evidence demonstrates that not all patients with asthma have a typical type 2 (T2)-driven eosinophilic inflammation. These asthmatics have been called 'T2-low asthma' and have a minimal response to corticosteroid therapy. Adjustment of corticosteroid treatment using sputum eosinophil counts from indu...

  9. Corticosteroid Treatment for Prolonged Fever in Hepatosplenic Cat-Scratch Disease: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Amanda; Castagnini, Luis A

    2017-12-01

    Hepatosplenic cat-scratch disease (CSD) may cause prolonged fever. We present the case of a 4-year-old boy with confirmed hepatosplenic CSD with fever lasting 3 months despite use of multiple different antimicrobial agents. The patient became afebrile soon after corticosteroid therapy was started. Our case indicates corticosteroids may be useful in patients with hepatosplenic CSD and prolonged fever.

  10. Severe Adverse Effects Associated With Corticosteroid Treatment in Patients With IgA Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Cai

    2017-07-01

    Discussion: Corticosteroid use is associated with a high risk of SAEs in IgAN patients, especially those who are older, have hypertension, or impaired renal function. Current guidelines on corticosteroid regimens in IgAN should be reviewed with regard to safety.

  11. Knowledge of actions of inhaled corticosteroids in patients who did not persist drug treatment early

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menckeberg, T.T.; Hugtenburg, J.G.; Lammers, J.W.; Raaijmakers, J.A.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate, among new users of inhaled corticosteroids that did not persist treatment, knowledge of inhaled corticosteroids' actions and whether they were instructed on the use of their inhaler. Setting Fifteen community pharmacies in The Netherlands. Methods Patients were interviewed by

  12. A self-rating scale for patient-perceived side effects of inhaled corticosteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foster, Juliet M.; van Sonderen, Eric; Lee, Amanda J.; Sanderman, Robbert; Dijkstra, Antoon; Postma, Dirkje S.; van der Molen, Thys

    2006-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported side effect questionnaires offer a simple method for the systematic measurement of drug-related side effects. In order to measure patients' inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) related side effect perceptions the 14-day retrospective Inhaled Corticosteroid Questionnaire (ICQ)

  13. Contact allergy to corticosteroids and Malassezia furfur in seborrhoeic dermatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubojevic, S; Lipozencic, J; Basta-Juzbasic, A

    2011-06-01

    Seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) is a chronic skin disease, requiring long-term treatment, which might promote sensitization. Malassezia furfur (Mf) plays an important role in seborrhoeic dermatitis. Objectives  The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of contact sensitivity in SD patients. A total of 100 patients and 20 healthy controls (HC) were investigated: 50 suffering from SD with no previous local corticosteroid treatment (SDN), 50 SD patients treated with local corticosteroids (SDC). Mycological examination for Mf was performed. All patients were patch tested with the baseline standard, corticosteroid series, with 12 commercial corticosteroid preparations frequently used in Croatia; and also with Mf. Malassezia furfur was found in 44 (88%) SDN, 37 (74%) SDC, and in 4 (20%) HC; patch test reaction to Mf was positive in one SDN and in three SDC. Positive patch tests to standard allergens were observed in 17 (34%) SDN, 33 (66%) SDC and 2 (10%) HC. Patch tests to the corticosteroid series revealed positive reactions in 4 SDC and to commercial corticosteroids in seven patients, i.e. 2 SD and 5 SDC. Patch tests to the baseline series and to both individual corticosteroid and commercial corticosteroid preparations should be performed in SD patients with persistent dermatitis, as contact-allergic reactions may complicate their dermatitis. Sensitization to Mf was found to be infrequent. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  14. Corticosteroid-induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment in Earlier Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hua Liu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Clinicians should enhance their precaution awareness of corticosteroid-induced ONFH. For high-risk patients, regular follow-up is very important in the 1st year after high-dose prescription of corticosteroids. Patients with suspected ONFH should be referred to orthopedists for diagnosis and treatment in its earlier stage to preserve the joint.

  15. De novo glutamine synthesis induced by corticosteroids in vivo in rats is secondary to weight loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, I. de; Schols, A.M.W.J.; Koerts-de Lang, E.; Wouters, E.F.M.; Deutz, N.E.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Corticosteroid treatment affects muscle protein and glutamine metabolism. In the present study we aimed to clarify to what extent anorexia, weight loss and corticosteroids determine protein and glutamine metabolism in muscle. METHODS: The study was performed in Wistar rats (300-350 g,

  16. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children: limited benefit of corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluman, Joel; Goldman, Ran D

    2014-11-01

    A child recently presented to my office with lower limb petechiae, arthralgia, and abdominal pain characteristic of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). Will systemic corticosteroids help relieve these symptoms and prevent potential HSP complications such as intussusception and nephritis? Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a common and self-limiting disease in children. Current evidence does not support universal treatment of HSP with corticosteroids. Recent trials and meta-analyses found that corticosteroids do not prevent the onset of renal disease or abdominal complications. However, corticosteroids are effective as treatment of abdominal pain, arthralgia, and purpura. Clinicians are advised to use their discretion in choosing which patients might benefit most from oral corticosteroid treatment.

  17. A comparison of the anti-inflammatory properties of intranasal corticosteroids and antihistamines in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, P H

    2000-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis manifests itself clinically due to the local release of mediators from activated cells within the nasal mucosa. Treatment strategies aim either to reduce the effects of these mediators on the sensory neural and vascular end organs, or to reduce the tissue accumulation of the activated cells that generate them. Corticosteroids intervene at a number of steps in the inflammatory pathway, and, by reducing the release of cytokines and chemokines, inhibit cell recruitment and activation. These effects are evident both in vivo and in vitro. While antihistamines also have some anti-inflammatory effects in vitro, these require higher concentrations than with corticosteroids and are not consistently reproduced in vivo. In addition, although antihistamines and corticosteroids might appear to have complementary mechanisms of action, clinical trials suggest that their co-administration does not confer any additional long-term benefits compared with that achieved with corticosteroids alone. Topical corticosteroids are therefore the preferred anti-inflammatory therapy for persistent allergic rhinitis.

  18. Corticosteroids reduce IL-6 in ASM cells via up-regulation of MKP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quante, Timo; Ng, Yee Ching; Ramsay, Emma E; Henness, Sheridan; Allen, Jodi C; Parmentier, Johannes; Ge, Qi; Ammit, Alaina J

    2008-08-01

    The mechanisms by which corticosteroids reduce airway inflammation are not completely understood. Traditionally, corticosteroids were thought to inhibit cytokines exclusively at the transcriptional level. Our recent evidence, obtained in airway smooth muscle (ASM), no longer supports this view. We have found that corticosteroids do not act at the transcriptional level to reduce TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 gene expression. Rather, corticosteroids inhibit TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 secretion by reducing the stability of the IL-6 mRNA transcript. TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 mRNA decays at a significantly faster rate in ASM cells pretreated with the corticosteroid dexamethasone (t(1/2) = 2.4 h), compared to vehicle (t(1/2) = 9.0 h; P ASM cells.

  19. The effect in premature infants of prenatal corticosteroids on endogenous surfactant synthesis as measured with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, JEH; Carnielli, VP; Wattimena, JLD; Hop, WC; Sauer, PJJ; Zimmermann, LJI

    Most in vitro studies show that prenatal administration of corticosteroids stimulates the synthesis of surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC), but studies in animals are controversial. Whether prenatal corticosteroids stimulate surfactant PC synthesis in humans has not been studied. We studied

  20. The effect in premature infants of prenatal corticosteroids on endogenous surfactant synthesis as measured with stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.H. Bunt (Jan Erik); V.P. Carnielli (Virgilio); J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); P.J.J. Sauer (Pieter); L.J.I. Zimmermann (Luc)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractMost in vitro studies show that prenatal administration of corticosteroids stimulates the synthesis of surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC), but studies in animals are controversial. Whether prenatal corticosteroids stimulate surfactant PC synthesis in

  1. Practical Considerations for Dysphonia Caused by Inhaled Corticosteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, César A.; Guarderas, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy has become standard in the treatment of asthma. A common local adverse effect of ICS therapy is dysphonia, which has been reported to affect 5% to 58% of patients. Although causes of dysphonia associated with ICS therapy have been underinvestigated, it may result from deposition of an active ICS in the oropharynx during administration, which then causes myopathy or a mucosal effect in the laryngopharynx. Use of ICS should be considered during any evaluation of dysphonia. We recommend using the lowest effective dosage of ICS, administering medication with a spacer, gargling, rinsing the mouth and washing the face after inhalation, and washing the spacer. If dysphonia develops despite these interventions, ICS use should be suspended until symptoms resolve, provided that asthma control is not compromised. PMID:22958993

  2. Risks of pneumonia in patients with asthma taking inhaled corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Byrne, Paul M; Pedersen, Soren; Carlsson, Lars-Göran

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the mainstay of asthma treatment. Studies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease reported increased rates of pneumonia with ICS. Concerns exist about an increased pneumonia risk in patients with asthma taking ICS. Objectives: To evaluate the risks...... of pneumonia in patients with asthma taking ICS. Methods: A retrospective analysis evaluated studies of the ICS budesonide in asthma. The primary data set were all double-blind, placebo-controlled trials lasting at least 3 months, involving budesonide (26 trials, n = 9,067 for budesonide; n = 5...... effect of ICS on pneumonia adverse events (AEs) or serious adverse events (SAEs). Measurements and Main Results: In the primary data set, the occurrence of pneumonia AEs was 0.5% (rate 10.0 events/1,000 patient-years [TPY]) for budesonide and 1.2% (19.3 per TPY) for placebo (hazard ratio, 0.52; 95...

  3. short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. IV. Corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1948 a corticosteroid compound was administered for the first time to a patient affected by rheumatoid arthritis by Philip Showalter Hench, a rheumatologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota (USA. He was investigating since 1929 the role of adrenal gland-derived substances in rheumatoid arthritis. For the discovery of cortisone and its applications in anti-rheumatic therapy, Hench, along with Edward Calvin Kendall and Tadeusz Reichstein, won the 1950 Nobel Prize for Medicine. In this review we summarize the main stages that led to the identification of the so-called compound E, which was used by Hench. We also consider the subsequent development of steroid therapy in rheumatic diseases, through the introduction of new molecules with less mineralocorticoid effects, such as prednisone, and more recently, deflazacort.

  4. Chronic rhinitis: Effects of local corticosteroids on eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursulović Dejan D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestation of chronic rhinitis is due to local release of mediators from inflammatory cells. Eosinophil leukocytes are important in pathogenesis of nasal hypersensitivity as well as nasal hyperreactivity [1,2]. The aim of the study was to follow-up the effect of local corticosteroid treatment on a number of eosinophils in nasal secretion of patients with chronic rhinitis. The study was prospective and controlled. A total number of 88 subjects was included in the study. Patients with chronic rhinitis who were treated with local corticosteroids (63 constituted the experimental group (37 with isolated allergic rhinitis, 10 with isolated nonallergic noninfective hyperreactive rhinitis, 10 with allergic rhinitis associated with nasal polyposis and 6 with nonallergic noninfective hyperreactive rhinitis associated with nasal polyposis. There were 25 patients with chronic rhinitis in the control group (18 with iso- lated allergic rhinitis, 2 with isolated nonallergic noninfective hyperreactive rhinitis, 3 with allergic rhinitis associated with nasal polyposis, and 2 with nonallergic noninfective, hyperreactive rhinitis associated with nasal polyposis. During the treatment with beclomethasone dipropionate aqueous nasal spray (daily dose was 400 micrograms during 6 weeks for isolated rhinitis and 6 months for associated forms of rhinitis, control examinations were regularly performed. The first control was after one week the second after six weeks, the third after three months and the fourth after six months. The same control was carried out in the control group of patients who were without therapy. Cytological examination of nasal secretions included brush method of collecting secretions, staining smears with Leishman's stain and light microscopic scrutinising of nasal smear magnified up to 1000 times. The results of the study demonstrated the highly significant decrease in the number of eosinophils after the therapy in patients with isolated

  5. Corticosteroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome in children with myelodysplastic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanović Radovan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Several reports have documented various forms of glomerular diseases in adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS, but similar reports in children are lacking. We describe two children with MDS-associated with steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome (NS. Patient 1, who had MDS with myelofibrosis, presented also hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, chronic hepatitis, moderate proteinuria, hypocomplementemia and elevated ANA titer. During initial prednisone treatment proteinuria markedly diminished and partial but transient haematological improvement occurred. Relapse subsequently occurred that was manifested by overt NS and pancytopenia. High doses of prednisolone led to remission of the renal disease but haematological remission did not occur. Persisting pancytopenia and repeated infections terminated in sepsis, two years after the onset of MDS. Patient 2, who had refractory anemia with clonal monosomy 19, manifested bowel disease, hepatospleno- megaly, anaemia and non-organic specific autoantibodies. Prednisone led to both clinical and haematological remission. Haematologic disease relapsed 12 months later, when nephrotic-range proteinuria, haematuria and mild azotaemia were also found. Corticosteroid treatment led to long-lasting renal and haematologic remission, maintained by a small dosage of prednisone. In both patients renal biopsy findings were consistent with those seen in idiopathic NS. A Medline search disclosed 16 cases of glomerulopathy in the course of MDS in adult patients. Clinical features included NS, usually accompanied by renal insufficiency with either acute, chronic, or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. On biopsy, membranous nephropathy, crescentic or mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis and AL amyloidosis, were found. We conclude: (1 that glomerular disease may be present and should be searched for in patients with MDS; (2 that MDS can be added to the list of rare conditions associated with corticosteroid

  6. [Intratympanic corticosteroid perfusion in the therapy of Meniere's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanković-Babić, Snezana; Kosanović, Rade; Ivanković, Zoran; Babac, Snezana; Tatović, Milica

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades the intratympanic perfusion of corticosteroids has been used as a minimally invasive surgical therapy of Meniere's disease. According to experimental studies the antiinflammatory, immunoprotective, antioxidant and neuroprotective role of the locally perfused corticosteroids was noticed in the inner ear structures. The recovery of action potentials in the cells of the Corti organ was confirmed as well as a decreased expression of aquaporine-1, a glycoprotein responsible for labyrinth hydrops and N and K ions derangement. The study showed results of intratympanic perfusion therapy with dexamethasone in patients with retractable Meniere's disease who are resistant to conservative treatment. Single doses of 4 mg/ml dexamethasone were given intratympanically in 19 patients with retractable Meniere's disease. Six single successive doses of dexamethasone were administered in the posteroinferior quadrant of the tympanic membrane. Follow-up of the patients was conducted by using a clinical questionnaire a month after completed perfusion series as well as on every third month up to one year. One month after completed first course of perfusions, in 78% of patients, vertigo problems completely ceased or were markedly reduced. The recovery of hearing function was recorded in 68% and marked tinnitus reduction in 84% of patients. After a year of follow-up, in 63% of patients the reduction of vertigo persisted, while hearing function was satisfactory in 52%. Tinitus reduction was present in 73% of patients. Intratympanic perfusion of dexamethasone in patients with Meniere's disease is a minimally invasive therapeutic method that contributes to the reduction of the intensity of vertigo recurrent attacks, decrease of the intensity of tinnitus and improvement of the average hearing threshold. Patients with chronic diseases and Meniere's disease who are contraindicted for systemic administration of cortocosteroids (hypertension, diabetes, glaucoma, peptic

  7. Adverse effects of corticosteroids on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholter, D E; Armstrong, P W

    2000-04-01

    To review the potential adverse effects of glucocorticoid therapy on the cardiovascular system and to provide insight into the mechanisms of these effects. Case reports and studies demonstrating adverse effects of glucocorticoid therapy on the cardiovascular system were examined from a MEDLINE search. Animal data and in vitro studies were identified to provide insight on the mechanisms of these effects. Undesirable effects identified were dyslipidemia, hypertension and left ventricular free wall rupture after myocardial infarction. Elevations of total plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and high density lipoprotein cholesterol are often reported. The elevation of various lipid subfractions is likely mediated by increased plasma insulin levels, impaired lipid catabolism and increased lipid production in the liver. Hypertension was shown to be more prevalent in patients treated with high doses of glucocorticoid. The mechanisms are complex, but final pathways include increased systemic vascular resistance, increased extracellular volume and increased cardiac contractility. Glucocorticoids were demonstrated to increase the incidence of left ventricular free wall rupture by delaying myocardial scar formation in the postmyocardial infarction period. The major adverse effects of glucocorticoids on the cardiovascular system include dyslipidemia and hypertension. These effects may predispose treated patients to coronary artery disease if high doses and prolonged courses are used. Accordingly, corticosteroids should be employed judiciously in patients with other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and attention should be paid to risk modification. Low dose and alternate day therapy may reduce the incidence of complications in corticosteroid therapy. The mechanisms of these adverse effects are complex and have not yet been fully explained.

  8. Oral and inhaled corticosteroids: Differences in P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) mediated efflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, Andrew; Tan, Ai May

    2012-01-01

    There is concern that P-glycoprotein mediated efflux contributes to steroid resistance. Therefore, this study examined bidirectional corticosteroid transport and induction capabilities for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to understand which of the systemic and inhaled corticosteroids interacted with P-gp to the greatest extent. Hydrocortisone, prednisolone, prednisone, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone represented systemically active drugs, while fluticasone propionate, beclomethasone dipropionate, ciclesonide and budesonide represented inhaled corticosteroids. Aldosterone and fludrocortisone represented mineralocorticoids. All drugs were detected using individually optimised HPLC protocols. Transport studies were conducted through Caco-2 monolayers. Hydrocortisone and aldosterone had efflux ratios below 1.5, while prednisone showed a P-gp mediated efflux ratio of only 1.8 compared to its active drug, prednisolone, with an efflux ratio of 4.5. Dexamethasone and beclomethasone had efflux ratios of 2.1 and 3.3 respectively, while this increased to 5.1 for methylprednisolone. Fluticasone showed an efflux ratio of 2.3. Protein expression studies suggested that all of the inhaled corticosteroids were able to induce P-gp expression, from 1.6 to 2 times control levels. Most of the systemic corticosteroids had higher passive permeability (> 20 × 10 −6 cm/s) compared to the inhaled corticosteroids (> 5 × 10 −6 cm/s), except for budesonide, with permeability similar to the systemic corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids are not transported by P-gp to the same extent as systemic corticosteroids. However, they are able to induce P-gp production. Thus, inhaled corticosteroids may have greater interactions with other P-gp substrates, but P-gp itself is less likely to influence resistance to the drugs. -- Highlights: ► Inhaled corticosteroids are only weak substrates for P-gp, including budesonide. ► Inhaled corticosteroid potent P-gp inducers especially fluticasone and

  9. Oral and inhaled corticosteroids: Differences in P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) mediated efflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, Andrew, E-mail: a.p.crowe@curtin.edu.au; Tan, Ai May

    2012-05-01

    There is concern that P-glycoprotein mediated efflux contributes to steroid resistance. Therefore, this study examined bidirectional corticosteroid transport and induction capabilities for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to understand which of the systemic and inhaled corticosteroids interacted with P-gp to the greatest extent. Hydrocortisone, prednisolone, prednisone, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone represented systemically active drugs, while fluticasone propionate, beclomethasone dipropionate, ciclesonide and budesonide represented inhaled corticosteroids. Aldosterone and fludrocortisone represented mineralocorticoids. All drugs were detected using individually optimised HPLC protocols. Transport studies were conducted through Caco-2 monolayers. Hydrocortisone and aldosterone had efflux ratios below 1.5, while prednisone showed a P-gp mediated efflux ratio of only 1.8 compared to its active drug, prednisolone, with an efflux ratio of 4.5. Dexamethasone and beclomethasone had efflux ratios of 2.1 and 3.3 respectively, while this increased to 5.1 for methylprednisolone. Fluticasone showed an efflux ratio of 2.3. Protein expression studies suggested that all of the inhaled corticosteroids were able to induce P-gp expression, from 1.6 to 2 times control levels. Most of the systemic corticosteroids had higher passive permeability (> 20 × 10{sup −6} cm/s) compared to the inhaled corticosteroids (> 5 × 10{sup −6} cm/s), except for budesonide, with permeability similar to the systemic corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids are not transported by P-gp to the same extent as systemic corticosteroids. However, they are able to induce P-gp production. Thus, inhaled corticosteroids may have greater interactions with other P-gp substrates, but P-gp itself is less likely to influence resistance to the drugs. -- Highlights: ► Inhaled corticosteroids are only weak substrates for P-gp, including budesonide. ► Inhaled corticosteroid potent P-gp inducers especially

  10. A severe case of acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia treated with systemic corticosteroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Yasui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare disorder in adults. A treatment of choice for lipoid pneumonia has not been established, and systemic corticosteroid use remains controversial. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with schizophrenia who presented with kerosene-induced acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia that was treated with a systemic corticosteroid. In this case, supportive therapy did not improve the patient's condition, so systemic corticosteroid therapy was commenced four days after he ingested the kerosene. After corticosteroid commencement, the patient's symptoms and hypoxia improved within a few days. Although some radiological characteristics of this disorder have been reported previously, the process of radiological improvement of exogenous lipoid pneumonia is not well known. In this case, computed tomography findings changed dramatically after corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Extensive bilateral consolidations that were observed on admission improved. Although pneumatoceles developed two weeks after corticosteroid commencement, they were nearly gone after two months of the treatment. While corticosteroid therapy is not suitable for all cases, it should be considered for severe or refractory cases.

  11. A retrospective analysis of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenmin; Nie, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Li

    2016-12-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) are severe mucocutaneous reactions that incur high mortality, and in which the systemic application of corticosteroids remains controversial. This study aimed to determine the optimal protocols for the use of corticosteroids and treatment measures. We performed a retrospective analysis of 70 patients with SJS/TEN who were hospitalized between January 2008 and May 2015 in the Department of Dermatology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, and treated with corticosteroids. Expected and actual mortality rates in patients treated with different doses of corticosteroids, according to SCORTEN, were compared. The diagnoses associated with initial corticosteroid use differed significantly between the low- and high-dose groups (P = 0.041). There were significant differences between expected and actual mortality rates according to the use of corticosteroid therapy (P = 0.0168, standardized mortality ratio [SMR] = 0.30). There was a statistical difference between expected and actual mortality rates in the low-dose group (P = 0.0145, SMR = 0.20). Serum albumin levels were significantly lower in patients administered corticosteroids additive therapy (31.12 ± 8.32 g/l vs. 35.54 ± 5.82 g/l; P = 0.016), and the rate of use of antibiotics was higher among patients in the additive therapy group than in the non-additive group (94.7% vs. 60.8%). Our research supports the use of corticosteroids for the systemic treatment of SJS/TEN. Corticosteroids should be used in a timely manner and in accordance with disease severity, age, underlying diseases, serum albumin level, and concurrent treatment with antimicrobial therapy. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Adjuvant corticosteroids for reducing death in neonatal bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlesi, Tinuade A; Odigwe, Chibuzo C; Oladapo, Olufemi T

    2015-11-11

    Bacterial meningitis remains a significant cause of neonatal and childhood morbidity and mortality in many countries of the world, particularly in developing countries. In some instances, children recover but remain impaired as a result of neurological sequelae such as hearing loss, developmental delay and cognitive impairment. To assess the effectiveness and safety of adjunctive corticosteroids in reducing death and neurological sequelae in neonates with bacterial meningitis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 7), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to July 2015), African Index Medicus (up to January 2015), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (up to July 2015), EMBASE (up to July 2015) and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) for ongoing trials. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of adjunctive corticosteroids for treatment of neonates with bacterial meningitis. Two review authors independently assessed and extracted data on methods, participants, interventions and outcomes (all-cause death until hospital discharge, presence of sensorineural deafness at one year and presence of neurological deficits or developmental delay at two years, adverse events). Risk ratio (RR), risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) or number needed to treat for an additional harmful outcome (NNTH) were calculated when appropriate. We assessed quality using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool and the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. We found two trials with 132 participants that met our inclusion criteria. One of the included trials was a quasi-randomised trial.Adjunctive corticosteroids reduced the risk of death (typical RR 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.24 to 0.88; typical RD -0.19, 95% CI -0.33 to -0.04; NNTB = 6; two studies, 132 participants, very low-quality evidence) but did

  13. Corticosteroid administration alters the mechanical properties of isolated collagen fascicles in rat-tail tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, B T; Aagaard, P; Crafoord-Larsen, D

    2009-01-01

    L of 40 mg/mL mixed with 1.0 mL 9% saline (n=12), and (B) a control group that was injected with 9% saline (n=12). Three days after the injections, the animals were sacrificed and single individual collagen fascicles were collected and underwent displacement to failure. Corticosteroid administration......Overload tendon injuries are frequent in recreational and elite sports. The optimal treatment strategy remains unknown, but local administration of corticosteroids is one common treatment option. The direct effects of the corticosteroid administration on the tissue are not fully understood...

  14. Bilateral exudative retinal detachment associated with central serous chorioretinopathy in a patient treated with corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Rueda, T; Sánchez-Vicente, J L; Llerena-Manzorro, L; Medina-Tapia, A; González-García, L; Alfaro-Juárez, A; Vital-Berral, C; López-Herrero, F; Muñoz-Morales, A; Ortega, L S; Herrador-Montiel, Á

    2017-10-01

    The case is presented on a 54-year-old woman with a central serous chorioretinopathy, misdiagnosed as Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, and treated with systemic corticosteroids. The patient presented with a bilateral bullous exudative retinal detachment. Discontinuation of corticosteroid therapy, surgical drainage of subretinal fluid, and photodynamic therapy, led to anatomical and functional improvement. The recognition of an atypical presentation of central serous chorioretinopathy may avoid complications of the inappropriate treatment with corticosteroids. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. LOCAL CORTICOSTEROID VS. AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD FOR PLANTAR FASCIITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syam Sunder B

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain for which professional care is sought. Initially thought of as an inflammatory process, plantar fasciitis is a disorder of degenerative changes in the fascia and maybe more accurately termed plantar fasciosis. Traditional therapeutic efforts have been directed at decreasing the presumed inflammation. These treatments include icing, Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs, rest and activity modification, corticosteroids, botulinum toxin type A, splinting, shoe modifications and orthosis. Other treatment techniques have been directed at resolving the degeneration caused by the disease process. In general, these techniques are designed to create an acute inflammatory reaction with the goal of restarting the healing process. These techniques include autologous blood injection, Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP injection, nitroglycerin patches, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT and surgical procedures. Recently, research has focused on regenerative therapies with high expectations of success. The use of autologous growth factors is thought to heal through collagen regeneration and the stimulation of a well-ordered angiogenesis. These growth factors are administered in the form of autologous whole blood or Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP. Platelets can be isolated using simple cell-separating systems. The degranulation of the alpha granules in the platelets releases many different growth factors that play a role in tissue regeneration processes. Platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-P, vascular-derived endothelial growth factor, epithelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and insulin-like growth factor are examples of such growth factors. Injections with autologous growth factors are becoming common in clinical practice. The present study was an attempt to compare the efficacy of autologous blood injection in plantar fasciitis by comparing it with the local

  16. Acromion Types and Role of Corticosteroid with Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Shah Gillani, Syed Faraz Ul Hassan; Farooqi, Faheem Mubashir; Awais, Syed Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    To determine the association between shoulder impingement and morphological characteristics of acromion and the role of sub-acromial injection of methylprednisolone in the short-term treatment for relieving pain and improve functional disability of these patients. A descriptive study. Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology Unit-I (DOST-I), Mayo Hospital, Lahore, between November 2013 to June 2014. All patients presented in OPD with shoulder pain were included as subjects and evaluated by clinical test and categorised using X-ray scapula Y-view. Patients with impingement syndrome were correlated with Bigliani types and offered intra-lesional injection into sub-acromial space with 2ml of xylocaine 2% and 40 mg of methylprednisolone using 22 gauge needle. The effectiveness was assessed in terms of relieving pain and good functional outcomes; and rotator cuff tear was clinically assessed among impingement positive patient. The pain was assessed using visual analogue score before and after the administration of the injection. Demographic variables for frequencies and their associations were analysed using SPSS version 20.0. Significance level was p shoulder impingement. Most had moderate pain. Thirty-four patients required intralesional steroid, which relieved the pain in 31 of them. Shoulder impingement syndrome without tear of rotator cuff tendon was found in younger age group between 40 to 45 years, which was relieved by intralesional corticosteroid administration. These patients had type II (curved) acromion, according to Bigliani classification.

  17. Misuse of topical corticosteroids over face: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal Manchanda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Topical corticosteroids (TCS have been widely used in various dermatological diseases. However, because of inadvertent use, TCS misuse has become a common problem faced by dermatologists in various parts of the world. Prolonged use over the face can cause various side effects such as steroid rosacea, acneiform eruptions, and hypertrichosis. Aim: To study the effects of TCS misuse and analyze various factors promoting its use on face. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients presenting with various facial dermatoses following the misuse of TCS on the face were studied. Detailed history was noted and the various side effects were recorded. Results: Majority of the patients (70% were females with maximum number of patients belonging to the age group of 11–20 years. Eighty-five percent of the patients were applying TCS for medical conditions, with acne being the most common indication, and the rest were applying as a general face cream. Pruritus and acneiform eruptions were the most common side effects observed and the other reported were erythema, photosensitivity, steroid dependent face, and telangiectasia. Conclusion: TCS misuse especially over the face can lead to a multitude of side effects. It is high time to create awareness among the patients as well as doctors regarding the proper usage of this wonder drug.

  18. In vitro toxicity of local anaesthetics and corticosteroids on supraspinatus tenocyte viability and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton W. Nuelle

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This data confirms that peritendinous injection of commonly used local anaesthetics and corticosteroids results in significant supraspinatus tenotoxicity in vitro. Further in vivo studies are required before making definitive clinical recommendations.

  19. Corticosteroid Therapy in Critical Illness due to Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Yale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survey data suggest that Canadian intensivists administer corticosteroids to critically ill patients primarily in response to airway obstruction, perceived risk for adrenal insufficiency and hemodynamic instability.

  20. Corticosteroid-induced asthma: a manifestation of limited hyperinfection syndrome due to Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, P; Gil, C; Estrellas, B; Middleton, J R

    1995-09-01

    Inadequate therapeutic response to parenteral corticosteroids in patients with acute bronchial asthma is infrequent. We report four patients whose bronchial asthma symptoms worsened after treatment with parenteral corticosteroids. All had larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis in the stool. The new attack or the exacerbation of asthma appeared to be precipitated by systemic corticosteroid administration. The paradoxic therapeutic response of asthma to glucocorticoides was the major pulmonary manifestation of Strongyloides superinfection; there was no evidence of other organ involvement. Individuals with new onset of bronchial asthma or worsening of asthmatic episodes concurrent with the use of systemic corticosteroids should have thorough investigation for possible superinfection due to Strongyloides stercoralis. This is particularly important for patients who have resided in areas where intestinal helminthic infections are endemic. Discontinuance of steroid therapy or reduction in dosage of parenteral steroids appears necessary. Treatment with thiabendazole appears to be effective in patients with limited hyperinfection syndrome.

  1. Effects of intracerebral implantation of corticosteroids on extinction of an avoidance response in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van; Wied, D. de

    Intracerebral implantation of dexamethasone phosphate facilitated the rate of extinction of a pole jumping avoidance response when implanted into various areas in the median and posterior thalamus and in the ventriculus lateralis. Corticosterone, the rat's natural corticosteroid, also facilitated

  2. Analysis of serum corticosteroid-induced alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme in dogs with hepatobiliary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, K; Ohno, K; Kanemoto, H; Goto-Koshino, Y; Fukushima, K; Tsujimoto, H

    2017-05-01

    To reveal the relationship between canine corticosteroid-induced alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme activity and hepatobiliary diseases. Retrospective analysis of the relationship between serum corticosteroid-induced alkaline phosphatase activity and diagnosis, serum cortisol concentration and alanine transferase activity in dogs with hepatobiliary diseases. Dogs with a history of glucocorticoid administration were excluded. Seventy-two dogs with hepatobiliary diseases were analysed. The serum corticosteroid-induced alkaline phosphatase concentration was increased in dogs with hepatobiliary diseases. There was no correlation between serum cortisol concentration and serum corticosteroid-induced alkaline phosphatase percentage or activity. Dogs with hepatobiliary disease can exhibit high serum alkaline phosphatase activity even if the dogs have not been administrated glucocorticoids and the serum cortisol concentration is normal. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Late (≥ 7 days) inhalation corticosteroids to reduce bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onland, Wes; Offringa, Martin; van Kaam, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), defined as oxygen dependence at 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA), remains an important complication of prematurity. Pulmonary inflammation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of BPD. Attenuating pulmonary inflammation with postnatal systemic corticosteroids

  4. The role of inhaled corticosteroids in management of asthma in infants and preschoolers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A; Pedersen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    This review analyses published data on the treatment of wheezing in infants and preschoolers with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), including the effect in subgroups of patients such as 'multiple trigger wheeze' and 'episodic viral wheeze'....

  5. Outcome of Long-Term Corticosteroid Treatment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The clinical orthopedic effects of chronic daily corticosteroid treatment were evaluated by chart review in boys with genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD followed at the Ohio State University Muscular Dystrophy Clinic between 2000 and 2003.

  6. Outcome of Long-Term Corticosteroid Treatment in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    The clinical orthopedic effects of chronic daily corticosteroid treatment were evaluated by chart review in boys with genetically confirmed Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) followed at the Ohio State University Muscular Dystrophy Clinic between 2000 and 2003.

  7. Low basal serum cortisol in patients with severe atopic dermatitis : potent topical corticosteroids wrongfully accused

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeck, I.M.; Timmer-de Mik, L.; Lentjes, E.G.; Buskens, E.; Hijnen, D.J.; Guikers, C.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.; de Bruin-Weller, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical corticosteroids are used extensively to treat inflammatory skin disorders including atopic dermatitis (AD). Several studies have described temporary reversible suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function. However, sound evidence of permanent disturbance of adrenal

  8. A randomised pragmatic trial of corticosteroid optimization in severe asthma using a composite biomarker algorithm to adjust corticosteroid dose versus standard care: study protocol for a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hanratty, Catherine E.; Matthews, John G.; Arron, Joseph R.; Choy, David F.; Pavord, Ian D.; Bradding, P.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Cowan, Douglas C.; Djukanovic, Ratko; Gallagher, Nicola; Fowler, Stephen J.; Hardman, Tim C.; Harrison, Tim; Holweg, Cécile T.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Patients with difficult-to-control asthma consume 50–60% of healthcare costs attributed to asthma\\ud and cost approximately five-times more than patients with mild stable disease. Recent evidence demonstrates that\\ud not all patients with asthma have a typical type 2 (T2)-driven eosinophilic inflammation. These asthmatics have been\\ud called ‘T2-low asthma’ and have a minimal response to corticosteroid therapy. Adjustment of corticosteroid treatment\\ud using sputum eosinophil coun...

  9. Role of corticosteroids in Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, Vishal; Pundir, Jyotsna; Lancaster, Gillian; Baer, Simon; Kirkland, Paul; Cornet, Marjolein; Lourijsen, E S; Georgalas, Christos; Fokkens, W J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our study is to systematically review the existing evidence on the role of corticosteroids in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Systematic search of MEDLINE (1950- 2014), EMBASE (1980-2014), metaRegister, Cochrane Library and ISI conference proceedings was carried out. Eighteen randomised controlled trials with 1309 patients were included. Use of local and/or systemic corticosteroids with FESS was reported in four categories; operative, anaesthesia related, post-operative outcomes and risk of recurrence. Meta-analysis for operative outcomes demonstrated that, mean operative time (MD -10.70 minutes; 95% CI -15.86, -5.55; P <0.0001) and mean estimated blood loss (MD -28.32 mls; 95% CI -40.93, -15.72; P <0.0001) was significantly lower; and surgical field quality (MD -0.81; 95% CI -1.32, -0.30; P = 0.002) was significantly better in corticosteroid group. Meta-analysis showed that post-operative endoscopic scores (SMD -0.39; 95% CI -0.60, -0.17; P = 0.0004) were significantly better in corticosteroid group compared to no corticosteroid group. There was no increase in risk of sinusitis (RR 0.64; 95% CI 0.32, 1.30; P = 0.22) between use of corticosteroids and no corticosteroids; There was no significant difference in recurrence risk of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in mixed population studies (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.35, 1.70; P = 0.52) between the two groups but analysis of studies reporting on chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) (RR 0.64;95% CI 0.45,0.91;P=0.01) showed significant difference in favour of the corticosteroid group. Pre-operative use of local and/or systemic corticosteroids in FESS, results in significantly reduced blood loss, shorter operative time and improved surgical field quality. Studies are limited on the intra-operative use of corticosteroids to reduce postoperative pain. Postoperative corticosteroids improve postoperative endoscopic scores in CRS and recurrence rates in cases of CRSwNP.

  10. Corticosteroid injection for adhesive capsulitis in primary care: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Kim Hwee

    2016-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a common cause of shoulder pain and limited movement. The objectives of this review were to assess the efficacy and safety of corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis and to evaluate the optimum dose and anatomical site of injections. PubMed and CENTRAL databases were searched for randomised trials and a total of ten trials were included. Results revealed that corticosteroid injection is superior to placebo and physiotherapy in the short-term (up to 12 weeks). ...

  11. Do Corticosteroids Still Have a Role in the Management of Third Molar Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Wei Cheong; Lim, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The use of corticosteroids to reduce the post-operative sequelae of lower third molar surgery, namely pain, swelling and trismus, has been well studied by many researchers over the past 6 decades. This study reviewed the reported outcome of corticosteroids used in controlling the above sequalae after third molar surgery. A PubMed, Medline, EMBASE and Google search was undertaken of all controlled clinical trials on the effects of corticosteroids on pain, swelling and trismus after lower third molar surgery. The review was limited to studies published over the last 10 years (2006-2015). Of the 46 initially retrieved articles, 34 were finally included. Eleven studies compared the effect of 2 similar (but different dose) or different group of corticosteroids. Thirty-one studies reported the effects of corticosteroids on all sequale, 2 reported the outcome on swelling and trismus and another 1 on swelling and pain only. In 16 of the studies, corticosteroid use resulted in significant reductions in pain after third molar removal. Twenty-two out of 29 studies reported reduced swelling against negative control while 18 out of 25 studies reported improved mouth opening. Fourteen studies reported the benefit of corticosteroids on all 3 sequelae, with 71.4% resulted from the use of methylprednisolone. Although there are some conflicting effects, the results of this analysis shows in general the benefits derived from short-term use of corticosteroids in relation to pain, swelling and trismus following third molar surgical extraction, with no side effects observed. This work was supported by the University of Malaya's High Impact Research grant UM.C/625/1/HIR/MOHE/05.

  12. Osteoporotic Characteristics Persist in the Spine of Ovariectomized Sheep after Withdrawal of Corticosteroid Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Zarrinkalam, Mohammad-Reza; Schultz, Christopher G.; Parkinson, Ian H.; Moore, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    A validated ovine model of osteoporosis achieves severe bone loss in a relatively short period. This study investigated if osteoporotic features persist in this model after cessation of corticosteroid administration. Methods. Osteoporosis was induced in nine ewes by chronic corticosteroid injection, ovariectomy, and low calcium diet. Six ewes were used as controls. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine (LS) and body weight were assessed at regular intervals. After five months, cortic...

  13. Use of corticosteroids for anorexia in palliative medicine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sarah; McNutt, Louise; McCann, Mary-Ann; McCorry, Noleen

    2014-04-01

    Anorexia is a significant problem in patients approaching the end of life, for which corticosteroids are widely prescribed. It is not clear which regimen is the most safe and effective for this indication. The study objective was to identify the evidence for the use of corticosteroids, and the most safe and effective dosing regimen for management of anorexia in palliative care patients. A search of MEDLINE and CINAHL was carried out to identify original studies relevant to this question. These were reviewed against inclusion criteria and articles for inclusion were identified. Data was extracted and a narrative analysis was carried out. Subjects were adult patients with life-limiting diagnoses prescribed corticosteroids for anorexia in any care setting. Quality of studies was assessed using the system used by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network for grading evidence. Eight articles were identified that met the inclusion criteria. The corticosteroid drugs and dosing regimens used were wide ranging, and a variety of tools were used to assess appetite within these studies. All studies showed improvement in appetite with the corticosteroid used, although this did not always reach statistical significance. It was not possible to identify the most effective corticosteroid drug, dose, or duration of treatment from the identified studies: the best quality evidence was for an eight-week course of intravenous methylprednisolone; however the studies using this regimen had the highest attrition rates. Corticosteroids are beneficial in treating anorexia in palliative care patients with malignancies; however there is no evidence for their use in anorexia due to end-stage nonmalignant disease. There is insufficient evidence to recommend any particular corticosteroid drug over another, or to recommend a dosing regimen.

  14. Antenatal Corticosteroids for Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes: Single or Repeat Course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, Kathleen F.; El-Sayed, Yasser Y.; Chao, Lisa; Berger, Victoria; Naqvi, Mariam; Butwick, Alexander J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this article is to determine the risk of maternal chorioamnionitis and neonatal morbidity in women with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) exposed to one corticosteroid course versus a single repeat corticosteroid steroid course. Study Design Secondary analysis of a cohort of women with singleton pregnancies and PPROM. The primary outcome was a clinical diagnosis of maternal chorioamnionitis. Using multivariate logistic regression, we controlled for maternal age, race, body mass index, diabetes, gestational age at membrane rupture, preterm labor, and antibiotic administration. Neonatal morbidities were compared between groups controlling for gestational age at delivery. Results Of 1,652 women with PPROM, 1,507 women received one corticosteroid course and 145 women received a repeat corticosteroid course. The incidence of chorioamnionitis was similar between groups (single course = 12.3% vs. repeat course = 11.0%; p = 0.8). Women receiving a repeat corticosteroid course were not at increased risk of chorioamnionitis (adjusted odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–2.14). A repeat course of steroids was not associated with an increased risk of any neonatal morbidity. Conclusion Compared with a single steroid course, our findings suggest that the risk of maternal chorioamnionitis or neonatal morbidity may not be increased for women with PPROM receiving a repeat corticosteroid course. PMID:25545441

  15. Oxidants induce a corticosteroid-insensitive phosphorylation of histone 3 at serine 10 in monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Marwick

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress enhances inflammation and reduces the effectiveness of corticosteroids, but the inflammatory signalling pathways induced by oxidants remain ill-defined. Phosphorylation of histone 3 at serine 10 (H3-Pser10 marks out a subset of inflammatory genes for transcription, several of which are induced in oxidant-associated inflammation. However, the influence of oxidants or of corticosteroids on this modification remains unknown. We assessed the regulation of H3-Pser10 by oxidants and lipopolysaccharide (LPS in human blood monocytes and lung macrophages and the effectiveness of its abolition in controlling inflammatory gene expression in cells from asthmatic subjects compared to corticosteroids alone. Both oxidants and LPS promoted the induction of H3-Pser10 which was unaffected by corticosteroids. The induction of H3-Pser10 was mediated through p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and IκB kinase 2 (IKK-2 signalling. Consequently, inhibitors of p38α MAPK or IKK-2 used in combination with dexamethasone were more effective at controlling inflammatory gene expression from monocytes and lung macrophages from asthmatic patients than the corticosteroid alone. Therefore, reduction of H3-Pser10 by inhibition of p38α MAPK or of IKK-2 may provide greater anti-inflammatory control than corticosteroids alone in oxidant-associated inflammation such as severe asthma.

  16. Genesis of the use of corticosteroids in the treatment and prevention of brain edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shearwood; Long, Donlin M

    2008-04-01

    Since the groundbreaking article from the University of Minnesota in 1961 by Drs. Galicich, French, and Melby describing the use of dexamethasone for peritumoral cerebral edema, the use of corticosteroids in patients with brain tumors has become routine. Unfortunately, little has been reported regarding the environment that fostered arguably the greatest translational research contribution in the history of neurosurgery. During a pilot study to assess corticosteroid uptake in brain tumors, Dr. Galicich observed that patients given a large dose of corticosteroids just before craniotomy had a relatively benign postoperative course. This led, in October 1959, to the administration of high-dose corticosteroids to a patient with a large recurrent glioblastoma who was semicomatose and severely hemiparetic. The results were dramatic, with almost complete resolution of neurological deficit during a period of several days and marked reduction of midline shift on repeat angiograms. This finding prompted the studies that confirmed the efficacy of high-dose corticosteroids in reducing peritumoral brain edema in humans reported in the 1961 article. After publication, a revolution in brain tumor management occurred because corticosteroid therapy markedly reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with brain tumors both in the United States and worldwide. The combination of astute clinical observation and follow up by rigorous clinical research at the University of Minnesota resulted in one of the greatest contributions in the history of neurosurgery, rivaled only by the operative microscope in its effect on morbidity, and unsurpassed in reduction of mortality.

  17. Central serous chorioretinopathy resulting in altered vision and color perception after glenohumeral corticosteroid injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurvitz, Andrew P; Hodapp, Kristin L; Jadgchew, Jason; Solomon, Daniel J; Stolldorf, Hunter S; Provencher, Matthew T

    2009-08-01

    Complications from shoulder corticosteroid injections are uncommon. This article presents a case of altered color perception and visual disturbances in a 29-year-old male active duty Navy SEAL following an intra-articular glenohumeral corticosteroid injection, previously unreported in the orthopedic literature. The corticosteroid injection was administered for the treatment of right-shoulder stiffness occurring approximately 3 months following an arthroscopic superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) repair and subacromial decompression of the ipsilateral shoulder. The patient experienced immediate relief after the injection. Seven days later, however, he began to notice visual disturbances with color and image distortion of his right eye. He also developed a papular, nonpruritic rash on his upper trunk that eventually extended down his legs. He was diagnosed by an ophthalmologist as having central serous chorioretinopathy, a condition in which serous fluid accumulates in the subretinal space of the eye, causing detachment of the retina from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. The reaction spontaneously resolved within approximately 10 to 12 weeks without treatment. Although intra-articular corticosteroid injections are frequently performed with a low rate of complication, clinicians should be familiar with this rare yet distressing condition. Furthermore, patients with increased production of endogenous corticosteroids (eg, those with Cushing's syndrome, type A personality, hypertension, or obstructive sleep apnea) should be warned of the potential of chorioretinopathy after an intra-articular corticosteroid injection.

  18. Corticosteroid therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy: improvement of psychomotor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuko; Yamauchi, Akemi; Urano, Mari; Kondo, Eri; Saito, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    Of the numerous clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, only the corticosteroid prednisolone has shown potential for temporal improvement in motor ability. In this study, the effects of prednisolone on intellectual ability are examined in 29 cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy because little information has been reported. And also, motor functions and cardiac functions were evaluated. The treated group was administered prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg) orally on alternate days and the compared with the untreated control group. Gene mutations were investigated. The patients were examined for intelligence quotient adequate for age, brain natriuretic peptide, creatine kinase, and manual muscle testing before treatment and after the period 6 months to 2 years. Intelligence quotient scores of the treated increased to 6.5 ± 11.9 (mean ± standard deviation) were compared with the controls 2.1 ± 4.9 (P = 0.009). Intelligence quotient scores of the patients with nonsense point mutations improved significantly (21.0 ± 7.9) more than those with deletion or duplication (1.9 ± 9.0; P = 0.015). Motor function, such as time to stand up, of those treated improved significantly and brain natriuretic peptide level was reduced to a normal level after treatment in 15 patients (73%). Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of prednisolone in improving intellectual impairment as well as in preserving motor function and brain natriuretic peptide levels. We presume that prednisolone has a read-through effect on the stop codons in the central nervous systems of Duchenne muscular dystrophy because intelligence quotient of point mutation case was improved significantly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacokinetic interaction between corticosteroids and tacrolimus after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglicheau, Dany; Flamant, Martin; Schlageter, Marie Hélène; Martinez, Frank; Cassinat, Bruno; Beaune, Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Thervet, Eric

    2003-11-01

    Tacrolimus is an immunosuppressive drug that is a substrate of cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) enzymes and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). After transplantation, many pharmacological interactions have been described. Corticosteroids induce both CYP3A and P-gp activity. This study was designed to investigate the presence of a clinically significant interaction between steroids and tacrolimus after renal transplantation. We studied 83 renal transplant recipients receiving tacrolimus after transplantation. Patients were divided into three groups, according to steroid dose (low: 0-0.15 mg/kg/day; intermediate: 0.16-0.25 mg/kg/day; and high: >0.25 mg/kg/day). All other medications, including those known to interact with CYP3A and/or P-gp, were recorded. Steroid dosage, tacrolimus dosage, tacrolimus trough concentration (C0) and tacrolimus concentration/dose ratio [C0 divided by the 24 h dosage (mg/kg)] were assessed for each dosage group after 1 and 3 months of tacrolimus treatment. The three groups were not different as regards the use of non-immunosuppressive treatments or clinical events. At 1 and 3 months, the tacrolimus doses and concentration/dose ratios differed significantly in the three steroid dosage groups. With the higher doses, higher tacrolimus doses were needed to achieve the blood tacrolimus targeted trough level. We demonstrated that pharmacokinetic interaction occurs between steroids and tacrolimus in renal transplant patients. The higher the steroid dosage, the higher the dosage of tacrolimus needed to achieve target trough levels in these patients. The most likely interaction mechanism is specific enzymatic induction of CYP3A and/or P-gp. Interaction is present, even when the steroid dosage is low. The clinical events liable to occur during steroid sparing or tapering must be taken into account because it may be associated with episodes of tacrolimus-related nephrotoxicity.

  20. Acromion types and role of corticosteroid with shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, M.; Gillani, S.F.U.S.; Awais, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the association between shoulder impingement and morphological characteristics of acromion and the role of sub-acromial injection of methylprednisolone in the short-term treatment for relieving pain and improve functional disability of these patients. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology Unit-I (DOST-I), Mayo Hospital, Lahore, between November 2013 to June 2014. Methodology: All patients presented in OPD with shoulder pain were included as subjects and evaluated by clinical test and categorised using X-ray scapula Y-view. Patients with impingement syndrome were correlated with Bigliani types and offered intra-lesional injection into sub-acromial space with 2ml of xylocaine 2% and 40 mg of methylprednisolone using 22 gauge needle. The effectiveness was assessed in terms of relieving pain and good functional outcomes; and rotator cuff tear was clinically assessed among impingement positive patient. The pain was assessed using visual analogue score before and after the administration of the injection. Demographic variables for frequencies and their associations were analysed using SPSS version 20.0. Significance level was p<0.05. Among the 101 cases, there was no case of tear of rotator cuff tendon on clinical assessment. Majority of the patients (58.4%) were females with mean age of 31.38 +-1.13 years. Majority 57 (56.4%) of the patients had acromion type II (curved), which was the most common cause of shoulder impingement. Most had moderate pain. Thirty-four patients required intralesional steroid, which relieved the pain in 31 of them. Conclusion: Shoulder impingement syndrome without tear of rotator cuff tendon was found in younger age group between 40 to 45 years, which was relieved by intralesional corticosteroid administration. These patients had type II (curved) acromion, according to Bigliani classification. (author)

  1. Capsule-Preserving Hydrodilatation With Corticosteroid Versus Corticosteroid Injection Alone in Refractory Adhesive Capsulitis of Shoulder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Yoon, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Michael Y; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Rah, Ueon Woo

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether capsule-preserved hydrodilatation with corticosteroid improves pain and function in patients with refractory adhesive capsulitis (AC) better than intra-articular corticosteroid injection (IACI) alone. Prospective randomized controlled study. University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Subjects with primary AC (N=64) with shoulder pain level of visual analog scale (VAS) score ≥5, even after the initial administration of IACI alone. Participants randomly received ultrasound-guided IACI alone with 1mL of 40mg/mL triamcinolone acetonide and 3mL of 1% lidocaine (n=32) or ultrasound-guided capsule-preserved hydrodilatation with corticosteroid with a mixture of 1mL of 40mg/mL triamcinolone acetonide, 6mL of 1% lidocaine, and normative saline (n=32). The primary outcome measure was the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index score. Secondary outcomes were the VAS of shoulder pain level and angles of shoulder passive range of motion, including flexion, abduction, extension, external rotation, and internal rotation at pretreatment and weeks 3, 6, and 12 of posttreatment. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of demographic characteristics (age, sex, duration of symptoms, shoulder affected, and body mass index) at baseline. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed significant effect of time in all outcome measurements in both groups. However, group-by-time interactions were not significantly different for any of the outcomes between groups. This study shows that compared with pretreatment, all outcome measures improved significantly in both groups by time; however, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups. Therefore, we recommend IACI alone over capsule-preserved hydrodilatation with corticosteroid when considering the corticosteroid injection as a secondary option after the initial IACI fails to improve symptoms for patients with refractory AC. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  2. Corticosteroid-induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment in Earlier Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Hua; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Sun, Wei; Li, Zi-Rong; Gao, Fu-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to provide a current recommendation to multidisciplinary physicians for early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) based on a comprehensive analysis of the clinical literature. Data Sources: For the purpose of collecting potentially eligible articles, we searched for articles in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and CNKI databases up to February 2017, using the following key words: “corticosteroid”, “osteonecrosis of the femoral head”, “risk factors”, “diagnosis”, “prognosis”, and “treatment”. Study Selection: Articles on relationships between corticosteroid and ONFH were selected for this review. Articles on the diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention of earlier-stage ONFH were also reviewed. Results: The incidence of corticosteroid-induced ONFH was associated with high doses of corticosteroids, and underlying diseases in certain predisposed individuals mainly occurred in the first 3 months of corticosteroid prescription. The enhanced awareness and minimized exposure to the established risk factors and earlier definitive diagnosis are essential for the success of joint preservation. When following up patients with ONFH, treatment should be started if necessary. Surgical treatment yielded better results than conservative therapy in earlier-stage ONFH. The ideal purpose of earlier intervention and treatment is permanent preservation of the femoral head without physical restrictions in daily living. Conclusions: Clinicians should enhance their precaution awareness of corticosteroid-induced ONFH. For high-risk patients, regular follow-up is very important in the 1st year after high-dose prescription of corticosteroids. Patients with suspected ONFH should be referred to orthopedists for diagnosis and treatment in its earlier stage to preserve the joint. PMID:29067959

  3. Adrenal suppression by inhaled corticosteroids in patients with asthma: A systematic review and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Marek L; Wojciechowski, Piotr; Dziewonska, Marta; Rys, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids used for treating persistent asthma can suppress adrenal cortisol secretion. This inhibition of endogenous cortisol secretion is an important marker of systemic steroid activity. Although meta-analyses have demonstrated a dose-dependent suppression of cortisol by inhaled corticosteroids, regardless of inhaler type, the impact of novel freon-free inhaled corticosteroid preparations has not been reviewed. The aim of this study was to synthesize all currently available studies on novel inhaled corticosteroid preparations, including ciclesonide, beclomethasone dipropionate, budesonide, and fluticasone propionate. In particular, we aimed to compare the effect of ciclesonide on cortisol suppression with other existing preparations. We carried out a systematic review of the medical data bases on cortisol suppression in patients due to inhaled corticosteroids. A multivariate regression model was used to determine dose-dependent relationships between each inhaled corticosteroid and cortisol suppression with respect to age, type of inhaler, and study design. From analysis of 64 studies identified in the review, the strongest dose-response urinary cortisol suppression was observed in patients treated with beclomethasone (8.4% per 100 μg; p = 0.029), followed by fluticasone (3.2% per 100 μg; p < 0.001), and budesonide (3.1% per 100 μg; p = 0.001). No significant urinary cortisol suppression was associated with ciclesonide treatment (1.8% per 100 μg; p = 0.267). Although ciclesonide did not affect cortisol levels, this appeared to be due to its unique pharmacokinetic properties rather than the use of a novel formulation. Our findings indicated that the introduction of novel freon-free delivery technologies for inhaled corticosteroids had not eliminated adverse adrenal suppression of cortisol secretion.

  4. Hydrodilatation With Corticosteroid for the Treatment of Adhesive Capsulitis: A Systematic Review.

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    Catapano, Michael; Mittal, Nimish; Adamich, John; Kumbhare, Dinesh; Sangha, Harpreet

    2017-11-10

    Current evidence suggests that corticosteroid injection alone expedites the recovery of pain-free range of motion (ROM) in patients with adhesive capsulitis compared to physiotherapy or placebo. However, it remains unclear whether the addition of hydrodilatation with corticosteroid provides improvement in pain-free ROM as well as pain relief. A review of the literature was conducted to determine whether the combined intervention of hydrodilatation and corticosteroid injection expedites restoration of pain-free ROM compared to a control treatment of corticosteroid injection in patients with adhesive capsulitis. EMBASE, MEDLINE, and CINAHL were searched from database inception to January 2017. Relevant studies were determined as randomized controlled trials written in English, comparing the outcomes of hydrodilatation and corticosteroid injection to a control group treated with corticosteroid injection alone in patients with adhesive capsulitis. Two independent reviewers assessed manuscripts for study inclusion and extracted data. A total of 2276 studies were identified through the search, of which 6 randomized controlled studies (involving 410 shoulders) met criteria for inclusion in this review. Mean age ranged from 51-61 years, with mean symptom duration of 4-9 months. Studies varied significantly regarding the volume of injectate, anatomical injection approach, symptom duration, and the method of glenohumeral capsule distension (capsular rupture versus preservation). Two studies demonstrated clinically and statistically significant improvement in the combination group at 3-month follow-up, and one study demonstrated clinically significant improvement only in ROM and/or pain/functional scales, compared to 3 studies demonstrating no benefit when compared to corticosteroid injection alone. Combining hydrodilatation with corticosteroid injection potentially expedites recovery of pain-free ROM. The greatest benefit is experienced within the first 3 months of

  5. Algorithm development for corticosteroid management in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis trial using consensus methodology

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    Ilowite Norman T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of background corticosteroid therapy in rheumatology clinical trials poses a major challenge. We describe the consensus methodology used to design an algorithm to standardize changes in corticosteroid dosing during the Randomized Placebo Phase Study of Rilonacept in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Trial (RAPPORT. Methods The 20 RAPPORT site principal investigators (PIs and 4 topic specialists constituted an expert panel that participated in the consensus process. The panel used a modified Delphi Method consisting of an on-line questionnaire, followed by a one day face-to-face consensus conference. Consensus was defined as ≥ 75% agreement. For items deemed essential but when consensus on critical values was not achieved, simple majority vote drove the final decision. Results The panel identified criteria for initiating or increasing corticosteroids. These included the presence or development of anemia, myocarditis, pericarditis, pleuritis, peritonitis, and either complete or incomplete macrophage activation syndrome (MAS. The panel also identified criteria for tapering corticosteroids which included absence of fever for ≥ 3 days in the previous week, absence of poor physical functioning, and seven laboratory criteria. A tapering schedule was also defined. Conclusion The expert panel established consensus regarding corticosteroid management and an algorithm for steroid dosing that was well accepted and used by RAPPORT investigators. Developed specifically for the RAPPORT trial, further study of the algorithm is needed before recommendation for more general clinical use.

  6. The Management of Oral Pemphigus Vulgaris with Systemic Corticosteroid and Dapsone

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    Arash Azizi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Oral pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic autoimmune mucocutaneous intraepithelial disease that primarily affects patients over the age of fifty, resulting in mucosal ulceration and is a potentially life-threatening disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of dapsone in combination with systemic corticosteroids to treat the oral lesions of oral pemphigus.

    Materials and methods. Twenty patients diagnosed with oral pemphigus were selected. Oral manifestations were graded according to the severity of disease from 1 to 3. All patients were treated initially with systemic corticosteroids. Each was assigned to one of 4 groups according to their response to therapy. Patients who responded less than 50% healing of lesions began a trial of dapsone. After 4 weeks, signs and symptoms were recorded, and if a patient was lesion-free, the dapsone dosage was gradually tapered.

    Results. Five patients with mild to moderate disease were treated with systemic corticosteroids alone. 15 patients with moderate to severe disease were treated with systemic corticosteroid and dapsone therapy. Of these, 10 patients had significant benefits, while 5 patients did not respond to dapsone adjuvant.

    Conclusions. The use of dapsone in combination with systemic corticosteroids is a useful method for treatment of oral pemphigus.

  7. Differential effects of corticosteroids and theophylline on the adhesive interaction between eosinophils and endothelial cells

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    Makoto Nagata

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids and theophylline have been used widely for the treatment of asthma. These two classes of drugs appear to reduce the tissue infiltration of eosinophils, predominant inflammatory cells in the airways of asthmatic patients. Corticosteroids inhibit the generation of both endothelial-activating Th2 cytokines (e.g. interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 and eosinophil growth factors (e.g. IL-5/granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and also attenuate the effects of eosinophil growth factors on the differentiation and prolonged survival of eosinophils. However, corticosteroids modulate directly neither eosinophil adhesiveness nor the expression of adhesion proteins on endothelial cells in vitro. Therefore, it is likely that the inhibitory effect of corticosteroids on the tissue infiltration of eosinophils is the consequence of indirect mechanisms, mainly via the inhibition of cytokines. Interestingly, theophylline, which is generally accepted as a bronchodilator, attenuates eosinophil adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro at a clinically therapeutic concentration. Furthermore, theophylline inhibits the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 on endothelial cells that had been stimulated with IL-4 plus tumor necrosis factor-a. Thus, theophylline possibly exerts an inhibitory effect on both the adhesive property of eosinophils and the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. These findings possibly indicate that theophylline would be adequate to supplement the actions of corticosteroids in asthmatic airway inflammation, partly via its inhibitory effect on the interaction between blood eosinophils and endothelial cells.

  8. Isotonic saline nasal irrigation is an effective adjunctive therapy to intranasal corticosteroid spray in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Shaun A; Psaltis, Alkis J; Schlosser, Rodney J

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if the addition of large-volume, low-positive pressure nasal irrigations delivered with isotonic sodium chloride (hereinafter "saline") added to intranasal corticosteroid therapy improves quality of life and objective measures of nasal breathing in patients with allergic rhinitis when compared with intranasal corticosteroid alone. A prospective, unblinded, single-arm pilot study was performed of patients with allergic rhinitis already on intranasal corticosteroid pharmacotherapy. Patients added large-volume low-pressure saline irrigation twice daily for 8 weeks to their ongoing regiment of nasal corticosteroid. Mini-Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of life Questionnaire (mRQLQ) assessment and nasal peak inspiratory flow (NPIF) were performed at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks. A total of 40 patients were enrolled. Twice-daily nasal irrigation with isotonic saline significantly (p irrigation with isotonic saline is an effective adjunctive therapy to improve quality of life in patients with allergic rhinitis already on intranasal corticosteroid therapy. This study was a part of the clinical trial NCT01030146 registered at clinicaltrials.gov.

  9. Effect of antenatal corticosteroids on postmortem brain weight of preterm babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, D J

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the effects of single and repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids on brain growth in very preterm babies. Retrospective study of 110 very preterm babies delivered at a single University Teaching Hospital between 1992 and 1999 who had a full necropsy including detailed examination of the brain. Mean brain weight did not differ significantly between babies who received corticosteroids and those who did not 160 vs. 157 g, (p=0.82), nor was there a difference between mean brain weight of stillborn or liveborn babies in relation to steroid use 164 vs. 159 g, (p=0.84) and 156 vs. 152g (p=0.81). There was no apparent dose-response relationship between the total number of doses of corticosteroids or timing since the first dose of corticosteroids and brain weight, p=0.95 and p=0.87. Single and multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids had no significant effect on brain growth in babies delivered preterm who died but long-term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the functional neurological outcome of surviving children.

  10. Intratympanic corticosteroids in Ménière's disease: A mini-review

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    Mitesh Patel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the effectiveness of intratympanic corticosteroids for vertigo control in Ménière's disease at 2-years follow-up according to the guidelines expressed by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. Despite the increased use of intratympanic corticosteroids for vertigo control in Ménière's disease there is debate as to their effectiveness, particularly compared to gentamicin. Even so, after just a single course of injections, corticosteroids can reliably provide complete vertigo control (Class A at 2-years in about 50% of cases as indicated in a recent double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial (Patel et al., 2016. But the effectiveness of intratympanic corticosteroids truly increases when treatment is provided ‘as-needed’, whereby complete vertigo control is established in up to 91% of cases. On the basis of available literature, there is good evidence to recommend the use of intratympanic steroid treatment for vertigo control in Ménière's disease, but patients must be monitored for non-response. The rationale for treating patients as-needed and the possible reasons for corticosteroid non-response are discussed.

  11. Osteoporotic characteristics persist in the spine of ovariectomized sheep after withdrawal of corticosteroid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrinkalam, Mohammad-Reza; Schultz, Christopher G; Parkinson, Ian H; Moore, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    A validated ovine model of osteoporosis achieves severe bone loss in a relatively short period. This study investigated if osteoporotic features persist in this model after cessation of corticosteroid administration. Methods. Osteoporosis was induced in nine ewes by chronic corticosteroid injection, ovariectomy, and low calcium diet. Six ewes were used as controls. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine (LS) and body weight were assessed at regular intervals. After five months, corticosteroid treatment was withdrawn systematically over one month. Three months later, all animals were euthanised, and the LS was collected for histomorphometric analysis. Results. BMD in the LS of osteoporotic sheep was 25% lower than control sheep. Body weight of osteoporotic sheep was reduced in the first month of the corticosteroid withdrawal period but returned to baseline level thereafter. Trabecular bone volume of LS in osteoporotic sheep was 27% lower than controls and showed a heterogeneous structure. Conclusions. Osteoporotic characteristics remain in the vertebra after ceasing corticosteroid administration providing an opportunity to evaluate potential systemic or local treatments in vivo under realistic physiological conditions. The microstructural arrangement of vertebral trabecular bone in sheep is similar to humans demonstrating further relevance of this model for preclinical investigations.

  12. Osteoporotic Characteristics Persist in the Spine of Ovariectomized Sheep after Withdrawal of Corticosteroid Administration

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    Mohammad-Reza Zarrinkalam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A validated ovine model of osteoporosis achieves severe bone loss in a relatively short period. This study investigated if osteoporotic features persist in this model after cessation of corticosteroid administration. Methods. Osteoporosis was induced in nine ewes by chronic corticosteroid injection, ovariectomy, and low calcium diet. Six ewes were used as controls. Bone mineral density (BMD of the lumbar spine (LS and body weight were assessed at regular intervals. After five months, corticosteroid treatment was withdrawn systematically over one month. Three months later, all animals were euthanised, and the LS was collected for histomorphometric analysis. Results. BMD in the LS of osteoporotic sheep was 25% lower than control sheep. Body weight of osteoporotic sheep was reduced in the first month of the corticosteroid withdrawal period but returned to baseline level thereafter. Trabecular bone volume of LS in osteoporotic sheep was 27% lower than controls and showed a heterogeneous structure. Conclusions. Osteoporotic characteristics remain in the vertebra after ceasing corticosteroid administration providing an opportunity to evaluate potential systemic or local treatments in vivo under realistic physiological conditions. The microstructural arrangement of vertebral trabecular bone in sheep is similar to humans demonstrating further relevance of this model for preclinical investigations.

  13. Is there a link between treatments with exogenous corticosteroids and dog behaviour problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, L; Burman, O; Mills, D S

    2016-11-05

    Possible side effects of exogenous corticosteroids have been described in both humans and laboratory animals, with recent studies highlighting this issue in dogs. In this paper the behaviour of 345 dogs drawn from the caseload of a behaviour clinic based in the north of Italy between February 2012 and November 2014 were analysed. Possible relationships between dogs that received treatment with corticosteroids versus dogs that received treatment with drugs other than corticosteroids and positive or negative affective states, aggression towards people, other behaviour problems apart from aggression, occurrence of severe bites, and prescription of psychoactive drugs were initially assessed using a Pearson's chi-squared test. Regression analysis was then performed in order to evaluate the best predictors of the investigated items. The goal of this retrospective survey was to investigate possible relationships between the affective states associated with the behavioural complaint of dogs and their previous history of treatment with corticosteroids. Results showed that a history of corticosteroid treatment was a significant predictor of a range of behaviour problems associated with negative affective state, but this result may be confounded by age-related effects. British Veterinary Association.

  14. Hypertension and other morbidities with Cushing's syndrome associated with corticosteroids: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, Melpomeni; Krania, Maria; Raptis, Sotirios A

    2011-01-01

    Corticosteroids constitute an ideal treatment for various inflammatory and autoimmune disorders due to their anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory actions. However, corticosteroids have a considerable number of side effects, including hypertension, diabetes, lipid disorders, sleep apnea, osteoporosis, myopathy, and disorders of coagulation and fibrinolysis, which are components of Cushing's syndrome (CS). Corticosteroid-induced side effects are dependent on the formulation, route, dose, and time of exposure. However, the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms have not been clearly defined. A large body of evidence supports the role of an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilation with possible links to nitric oxide, prostanoids, angiotensin II, arginine vasopressin, endothelins, catecholamines, neuropeptide Y, and atrial natriuretic peptide. Increased oxidative stress, renin-angiotensin system activation, increased pressor response, metabolic syndrome, and sleep apnea appear to be pathogenetically involved as well. The ideal treatment is the withdrawal of corticosteroids, which is most often impossible due to the exacerbation of the underlying disease. Alternatively, a careful plan, including the proper selection of the formulation, time, and route, should be made, and each side effect should be treated properly. The focus of the research should be to develop synthetic corticosteroids with anti-inflammatory effects but fewer metabolic effects, which so far has been unsuccessful.

  15. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs versus corticosteroids for controlling inflammation after uncomplicated cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juthani, Viral V; Clearfield, Elizabeth; Chuck, Roy S

    2017-07-03

    Cataract is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Cataract surgery is commonly performed but can result in postoperative inflammation of the eye. Inadequately controlled inflammation increases the risk of complications. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids are used to prevent and reduce inflammation following cataract surgery, but these two drug classes work by different mechanisms. Corticosteroids are effective, but NSAIDs may provide an additional benefit to reduce inflammation when given in combination with corticosteroids. A comparison of NSAIDs to corticosteroids alone or combination therapy with these two anti-inflammatory agents will help to determine the role of NSAIDs in controlling inflammation after routine cataract surgery. To evaluate the comparative effectiveness of topical NSAIDs (alone or in combination with topical corticosteroids) versus topical corticosteroids alone in controlling intraocular inflammation after uncomplicated phacoemulsification. To assess postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), patient-reported discomfort, symptoms, or complications (such as elevation of IOP), and cost-effectiveness with the use of postoperative NSAIDs or corticosteroids. To identify studies relevant to this review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register (2016, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to December 2016), Embase Ovid (1947 to 16 December 2016), PubMed (1948 to December 2016), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database) (1982 to 16 December 2016), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com; last searched 17 June 2013), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov; searched December 2016), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en; searched December 2016). We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which

  16. Injected corticosteroids for treating plantar heel pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Judy A; Sankarapandian, Venkatesan; Christopher, Prince Rh; Chatterjee, Ahana; Macaden, Ashish S

    2017-06-11

    Plantar heel pain, commonly resulting from plantar fasciitis, often results in significant morbidity. Treatment options include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), orthoses, physical therapy, physical agents (e.g. extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), laser) and invasive procedures including steroid injections. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of injected corticosteroids for treating plantar heel pain in adults. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, clinical trials registries and conference proceedings. Latest search: 27 March 2017. Randomised and quasi-randomised trials of corticosteroid injections in the treatment of plantar heel pain in adults were eligible for inclusion. At least two review authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences (MDs) for continuous outcome measures. We used a fixed-effect model unless heterogeneity was significant, when a random-effects model was considered. We assessed the overall quality of evidence for individual outcomes using the GRADE approach. We included a total of 39 studies (36 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and 3 quasi-RCTs) that involved a total of 2492 adults. Most studies were small (median = 59 participants). Participants' mean ages ranged from 34 years to 59 years. When reported, most participants had heel pain for several months. The trials were usually conducted in outpatient specialty clinics of tertiary care hospitals in 17 countries. Steroid injection was given with a local anaesthetic agent in 34 trials. Follow-up was from one month to over two years. With one exception, trials were assessed at high risk of bias in one or more domains, mostly relating to lack of blinding, including lack of confirmation of allocation concealment

  17. Corticosteroid implants for chronic non-infectious uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Christopher J; Villanti, Andrea C; Law, Hua Andrew; Rahimy, Ehsan; Reddy, Rahul; Sieving, Pamela C; Garg, Sunir J; Tang, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    Background Uveitis is a term used to describe a heterogeneous group of intraocular inflammatory diseases of the anterior, intermediate, and posterior uveal tract (iris, ciliary body, choroid). Uveitis is the fifth most common cause of vision loss in high-income countries, accounting for 5% to 20% of legal blindness, with the highest incidence of disease in the working-age population. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of acute treatment for all anatomical subtypes of non-infectious uveitis and can be administered orally, topically with drops or ointments, by periocular (around the eye) or intravitreal (inside the eye) injection, or by surgical implantation. Objectives To determine the efficacy and safety of steroid implants in people with chronic non-infectious posterior uveitis, intermediate uveitis, and panuveitis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (Issue 10, 2015), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to November 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to November 2015), PubMed (1948 to November 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (1982 to November 2015), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlledtrials.com) (last searched 15 April 2013), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform(ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en).We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic search for studies. We last searched the electronic databases on 6 November 2015. We also searched reference lists of included study reports, citation databases, and abstracts and clinical study presentations from professional meetings. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials comparing either fluocinolone acetonide (FA) or dexamethasone intravitreal implants with standard

  18. Laryngeal Cryptococcosis Associated With Inhaled Corticosteroid Use: Case Reports and Literature Review

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    Daniel Jun Yi Wong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal cryptococcosis is a rare clinical entity. There have been a limited number of case reports in the literature with no consensus regarding optimal management. This review contributes two additional case reports of immunocompetent patients with cryptococcal infection of the larynx in whom exposure to high doses of inhaled corticosteroids is proposed as a significant risk factor. Twenty cases were identified from review of the literature. All patients presented with hoarseness and a spectrum of microlaryngoscopic features, often mimicking laryngeal malignancy. The majority of cases were treated with systemic antifungal therapy, three cases had surgical excision alone, and another three had a combination of medical and surgical management. Risk factor modification, in the form of a reduction in inhaled corticosteroid was employed in the two new cases, and in some previously published cases. Risk factor modification, such as reduction of inhaled corticosteroid dose, in addition to oral antifungal agents can be effective in managing cryptococcal laryngitis.

  19. Effect of preterm birth and antenatal corticosteroid treatment on lactogenesis II in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jennifer J; Hartmann, Peter E; Newnham, John P; Simmer, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The onset of copious milk secretion after birth is known as lactogenesis II. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of preterm birth and antenatal corticosteroids on the timing of lactogenesis II after birth. Women who had received antenatal betamethasone treatment and were expressing for a preterm infant whose gestational age was lactogenesis II. The volume of milk was reduced further when antenatal corticosteroids were administered between 28 and 34 weeks' gestation and delivery occurred 3 to 9 days later. In view of the advantages of mothers' own milk, additional support with lactation is recommended for mothers of preterm infants, particularly those who have been treated with corticosteroids before the delivery.

  20. Corticosteroid in Combination with Leflunomide and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of Pediatric Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu-Hong; Ou, Rong-Qiong; Wu, Bao-Jing; Wang, Hai-Yan; Fang, Jian-Pei; Tan, Wei-Ping

    2017-10-01

    This study evaluated the efficiency of corticosteroid, leflunomide and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the treatment of pediatric idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH). Ten patients were included in the study. The diagnosis of IPH was based on clinical symptoms, laboratory examinations and pulmonary hemosiderosis. Induction therapy consisted of methylprednisolone pulse therapy, followed by prednisone plus leflunomide. Maintenance therapy consisted of low-dose prednisone, leflunomide and administration of MSCs. All the patients achieved complete response after treatment with corticosteroid, leflunomide and MSCs. The median follow-up was 23 months (range: 4-34 months). Moreover, administration of MSCs induced an increase in the percentage of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells but a decrease in the percentage of Th17 cells. Treatment with corticosteroid, leflunomide and MSCs for pediatric IPH was safe and effective.

  1. Cyclin D1 in ASM Cells from Asthmatics Is Insensitive to Corticosteroid Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jodi C; Seidel, Petra; Schlosser, Tobias; Ramsay, Emma E; Ge, Qi; Ammit, Alaina J

    2012-01-01

    Hyperplasia of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a feature of the remodelled airway in asthmatics. We examined the antiproliferative effectiveness of the corticosteroid dexamethasone on expression of the key regulator of G(1) cell cycle progression-cyclin D1-in ASM cells from nonasthmatics and asthmatics stimulated with the mitogen platelet-derived growth factor BB. While cyclin D1 mRNA and protein expression were repressed in cells from nonasthmatics in contrast, cyclin D1 expression in asthmatics was resistant to inhibition by dexamethasone. This was independent of a repressive effect on glucocorticoid receptor translocation. Our results corroborate evidence demonstrating that corticosteroids inhibit mitogen-induced proliferation only in ASM cells from subjects without asthma and suggest that there are corticosteroid-insensitive proliferative pathways in asthmatics.

  2. The effects of intratendinous and retrocalcaneal intrabursal injections of corticosteroid on the biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugate, Ronald; Pennypacker, Jason; Saunders, Marnie; Juliano, Paul

    2004-04-01

    The use of corticosteroid injections in the treatment of retrocalcaneal bursitis is controversial. We assessed the effects of corticosteroid injections, both within the tendon substance and into the retrocalcaneal bursa, on the biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons. The systemic effects of bilateral corticosteroid injections were also studied. The rabbits were divided into three treatment groups. The rabbits in Group I received injections of corticosteroid into the Achilles tendon on the left side and injections of normal saline solution into the Achilles tendon on the right, those in Group II received injections of corticosteroid into the retrocalcaneal bursa on the left side and injections of saline solution into the Achilles tendon on the right, and those in Group III received injections of corticosteroid into the Achilles tendon on the left side and injections of corticosteroid into the retrocalcaneal bursa on the right. These injections were given weekly for three weeks. At four weeks after the final injection, the tendons were harvested and were tested biomechanically to determine failure load, midsubstance strain and total strain, modulus of elasticity, failure stress, and total energy absorbed. The site of failure was also documented. The groups were compared according to the location of the injections, the type of injection (steroid or saline solution), and the total systemic load of steroid. Specimens from limbs that had received intratendinous injections of corticosteroid showed significantly decreased failure stress compared with those from limbs that had received intratendinous injections of saline solution (p = 0.008). Specimens from limbs that had received intrabursal injections of corticosteroid demonstrated significantly decreased failure stress (p = 0.05), significantly decreased total energy absorbed (p = 0.017), and significantly increased total strain (p = 0.049) compared with specimens from limbs that had received intratendinous

  3. Corticosteroids and vestibular exercises in vestibular neuritis. Single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudakos, John K; Markou, Konstantinos D; Psillas, George; Vital, Victor; Tsaligopoulos, Miltiadis

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE The management of patients with unilateral acute vestibular neuritis (VN) has not been established to date. OBJECTIVE To compare the use of vestibular exercises vs corticosteroid therapy in the recovery of patients with acute VN. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective, single-blind, randomized clinical trial at a primary referral center. Among all patients with acute vertigo, those having VN were eligible for inclusion in the study. INTERVENTIONS Forty patients with acute VN were randomly assigned to perform vestibular exercises or to receive corticosteroid therapy. After a baseline examination, follow-up evaluations were performed at 1, 6, and 12 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Efficacy outcomes included clinical, canal, and otolith recovery. Scores on the European Evaluation of Vertigo Scale and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory were used for the evaluation of clinical recovery. Findings of caloric irrigation and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials indicated canal and otolith improvement, respectively. RESULTS Comparing the 2 treatment groups, no statistically significant differences were found in clinical, canal, or otolith recovery. At the 6-month examination, the number of patients with complete disease resolution in the corticosteroids group was significantly higher than that in the vestibular exercises group. However, at the end of the follow-up period, 45%(9 of 20) of patients in the vestibular exercises group and 50% (10 of 20) of patients in the corticosteroids group had complete disease resolution (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Treating patients who have acute VN with vestibular exercises seems equivalently effective as treating them with corticosteroid therapy in clinical, caloric, and otolith recovery. Corticosteroid therapy seems to enhance earlier complete acute VN resolution, with no added benefit in the long-term prognosis.

  4. Effectiveness of corticosteroid injections in adhesive capsulitis of shoulder: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Mingmin; Zhou, Chenhe; Shi, Zhongli; Cai, Xunzi; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shigui

    2017-07-01

    Primary adhesive capsulitis is mainly characterized by spontaneous chronic shoulder pain and the gradual loss of shoulder motion. The main treatment for adhesive capsulitis is a trial of conservative therapies, including analgesia, exercise, physiotherapy, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammation drugs, and intra-articular corticosteroid injections. Previously, it was reported that intra-articular corticosteroid lead to fast pain relief and improvement of range of motion (ROM). The objective of this study was to determine whether corticosteroid injections would lead to better pain relief and greater improvement in ROM. We searched PubMed, Medline, and the Cochrane library. We included 5 articles of the 1166 articles identified. Totally injection group included 115 patients and placebo group included 110 patients. We calculated the weighted mean differences to evaluate the pain relief as the primary outcome. We determined the ROM as the secondary outcome. Study quality was evaluated using the 12-item scale. We also used the criteria of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation to evaluate the quality of evidence. In total, 5 studies were included, 4 of which were randomized clinical trials, with a sample size of 225 patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulders. The overall pooled data demonstrated that, compared with placebo as control treatment, intra-articular corticosteroid injections were more effective in reducing the pain score at 0 to 8 weeks, but there was no difference between the injection group and the control group at 9 to 24 weeks. Improvement of ROM in the injection group was greater than that of the control group both at 0 to 8 and 9 to 24 weeks. Intra-articular corticosteroid injections were more effective in pain relief in the short term, but this pain relief did not sustain in the long term. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection resulted in greater improvement in passive ROM both in the short and the long terms.

  5. Efficacies of corticosteroid injection at different sites of the shoulder for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Lee, Seung-Yup

    2013-04-01

    A corticosteroid injection in the glenohumeral joint conducted blindly is technically demanding with a low rate of accuracy despite satisfactory clinical outcomes in the treatment for adhesive capsulitis. This study prospectively compared the clinical outcomes of patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis treated by a single corticosteroid injection in different locations of the shoulder. We randomly assigned 191 patients with adhesive capsulitis to 1 of 4 groups based on corticosteroid injection location: group I, subacromial; group II, intra-articular; group III, intra-articular combined with subacromial space; and group IV, medication. Pain relief and patient satisfaction were assessed with a visual analog scale and functional outcomes were evaluated with the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score up to 24 weeks after treatment. Patients treated with corticosteroids achieved faster pain relief and had greater satisfaction levels than patients in group IV during the 16 weeks after treatment. However, no significant difference in pain scores was observed among the 4 groups at 24-week follow-up visits (P = .670). Shoulder motion and function improved in all groups at final follow-up. However, shoulder motion in the injection groups recovered faster than that in group IV. At 24 weeks after treatment, no significant differences in shoulder motion or functional outcomes were found among the 4 groups (P = .117). The efficacy of a single corticosteroid injection was not found to be related to the site of injection. However, a single corticosteroid injection provided faster pain relief, a higher level of patient satisfaction, and an earlier improvement in shoulder motion and function than medication in patients with adhesive capsulitis. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypertension and other morbidities with Cushing’s syndrome associated with corticosteroids: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melpomeni Peppa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Melpomeni Peppa1, Maria Krania1, Sotirios A Raptis2,31Endocrine Unit, 2Second Department of Internal Medicine-Propaedeutic, Research Institute and Diabetes Center, Athens University Medical School, Attikon University Hospital, Athens, Greece; 3Hellenic National Diabetes Center for the Prevention, Research, Treatment of Diabetes and its Complications (HNDC, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Corticosteroids constitute an ideal treatment for various inflammatory and autoimmune disorders due to their anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory actions. However, corticosteroids have a considerable number of side effects, including hypertension, diabetes, lipid disorders, sleep apnea, osteoporosis, myopathy, and disorders of coagulation and fibrinolysis, which are components of Cushing’s syndrome (CS. Corticosteroid-induced side effects are dependent on the formulation, route, dose, and time of exposure. However, the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms have not been clearly defined. A large body of evidence supports the role of an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilation with possible links to nitric oxide, prostanoids, angiotensin II, arginine vasopressin, endothelins, catecholamines, neuropeptide Y, and atrial natriuretic peptide. Increased oxidative stress, renin–angiotensin system activation, increased pressor response, metabolic syndrome, and sleep apnea appear to be pathogenetically involved as well. The ideal treatment is the withdrawal of corticosteroids, which is most often impossible due to the exacerbation of the underlying disease. Alternatively, a careful plan, including the proper selection of the formulation, time, and route, should be made, and each side effect should be treated properly. The focus of the research should be to develop synthetic corticosteroids with anti-inflammatory effects but fewer metabolic effects, which so far has been unsuccessful.Keywords: corticosteroids, hypertension, iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome

  7. Cohort study of corticosteroid use and risk of hospital admission for diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjern, F; Mahmood, M W; Abraham-Nordling, M; Wolk, A; Håkansson, N

    2015-01-01

    Medication has been suggested as a potential risk factor for diverticular disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the intake of corticosteroids, indometacin or aspirin and diverticular disease. This was a prospective population-based cohort study of middle-aged women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Use of corticosteroids (oral or inhaled), indometacin or aspirin in 1997 was determined from questionnaires. Cases of diverticular disease were identified from the Swedish national registers until the end of 2010. The relative risk (RR) of diverticular disease requiring hospital admission according to the use of medication was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, body mass index, physical activity, fibre intake, diabetes, hypertension, alcohol, smoking and education. A total of 36 586 middle-aged women in the Swedish Mammography Cohort were included, of whom 674 (1.8 per cent) were hospitalized with diverticular disease at least once. Some 7.2 per cent of women reported intake of oral corticosteroids and 8.5 per cent use of inhaled corticosteroids. In multivariable analysis, women who reported oral corticosteroid intake had a 37 per cent (RR 1.37, 95 per cent c.i. 1.06 to 1.78; P = 0.012) increased risk of diverticular disease compared with those who reported no intake at all. Use of inhaled corticosteroids was associated with an even more pronounced increase in risk of 71 per cent (RR 1.71, 1.36 to 2.14; P diverticular disease requiring hospital admission. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Contact allergy in the population of patients with chronic inflammatory dermatoses and contact hypersensitivity to corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kot

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Clinical studies indicate that contact allergy to glucocorticosteroids (GCS is not rare and has been increasingly reported over the past decade. Among the risk factors for developing contact hypersensitivity to topical corticosteroids, chronic inflammatory skin diseases and polyvalent contact allergy seem to be most important. Aim : To present the structure of contact allergy in the population of patients with chronic inflammatory dermatoses (CID and contact hypersensitivity to corticosteroids. Material and methods : Twenty-seven patients with contact allergy to GCS and chronic inflammatory dermatoses were patch tested with 28 European Baseline Series allergens and 8 corticosteroid allergens. This study group consisted of 5 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD, 15 patients with contact eczema (CE and 7 with chronic leg eczema (CLE. Nineteen (70.4% patients were females and 8 (29.6% were males. Results : In the study group, the most sensitizing non-steroidal allergens were nickel sulfate (51.8%, cobalt chloride (33.3% and balsam of Peru (29.6%. The most sensitizing corticosteroid allergens were budesonide (77.8%, betamethasone valerate and clobetasol propionate (55.5% each. A total of 77.8% of patients allergic to GCS also showed sensitivity to at least one non-steroidal allergen from the European Baseline Series. Conclusions : The most important risk factors for developing contact allergy to corticosteroids appear to be chronic inflammatory dermatoses, long disease duration, extended on-and-off topical corticosteroid use, patients presenting two or more positive patch test results and polyvalent contact allergy to metal salts and to other non-steroidal haptens.

  9. Effects of Age and Disease Severity on Systemic Corticosteroid Responses in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipatanakul, Wanda; Mauger, David T; Sorkness, Ronald L; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Holguin, Fernando; Woodruff, Prescott G; Ly, Ngoc P; Bacharier, Leonard B; Bhakta, Nirav R; Moore, Wendy C; Bleecker, Eugene R; Hastie, Annette T; Meyers, Deborah A; Castro, Mario; Fahy, John V; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gaston, Benjamin M; Jarjour, Nizar N; Levy, Bruce D; Peters, Stephen P; Teague, W Gerald; Fajt, Merritt; Wenzel, Sally E; Erzurum, Serpil C; Israel, Elliot

    2017-06-01

    Phenotypic distinctions between severe asthma (SA) and nonsevere asthma (NONSA) may be confounded by differential adherence or incorrect use of corticosteroids. To determine if there are persistent phenotypic distinctions between SA (as defined by 2014 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society guidelines) and NONSA after intramuscular triamcinolone acetonide (TA), and to identify predictors of a corticosteroid response in these populations. A total of 526 adults age 18 years and older (315 SA) and 188 children age 6 to less than 18 years (107 SA) in the NHLBI Severe Asthma Research Program III were characterized before and 3 weeks after TA. The primary outcome for corticosteroid response was defined as greater than or equal to 10-point improvement in percent predicted FEV 1 . Adult asthma groups exhibited a small but significant mean FEV 1 % predicted improvement after TA (SA group mean difference, 3.4%; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-4.7%; P = 0.001), whereas children did not. Adult SA continued to manifest lower FEV 1 and worse asthma control as compared with NONSA after TA. In children, after TA only prebronchodilator FEV 1 distinguished SA from NONSA. A total of 21% of adults with SA and 20% of children with SA achieved greater than or equal to 10% improvement after TA. Baseline bronchodilator response and fractional exhaled nitric oxide had good sensitivity and specificity for predicting response in all groups except children with NONSA. One in five patients with SA exhibit greater than or equal to 10% improvement in FEV 1 with parenteral corticosteroid. Those likely to respond had greater bronchodilator responsiveness and fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels. In adults, differences in airflow obstruction and symptoms between SA and NONSA persist after parenteral corticosteroids, suggesting a component of corticosteroid nonresponsive pathobiology in adults with SA that may differ in children. Clinical trial registered with www

  10. A risk-benefit assessment of intra-articular corticosteroids in rheumatic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J A; Blyth, T H

    1999-11-01

    The appeal of intra-articular corticosteroid therapy has increased with the growing emphasis on early disease control in rheumatoid disease. The impact on the patient's pain and stiffness is impressive and prompt. This may encourage patient compliance with longer term therapies given to slow the course of the disease. The release of corticosteroid into the circulation also provides some generalised improvement. This can prove helpful during the management of flares of inflammatory disease. There is less evidence to support the use of intra-articular corticosteroids in other inflammatory arthritides, but experience suggests that the benefits are similar. In osteoarthritis the benefits are less certain, but intra-articular therapy may prove important in patients who cannot undergo salvage operative procedures because of intercurrent illness. The benefits of intra-articular corticosteroids may be enhanced by rest after the injection, or by the additional administration of agents such as radio-colloids, rifampicin (rifampin), or osmic acid. Most controlled trial data have been published on knee injections, but other joints can be useful targets for local therapy. The risks are mainly related to the discomfort of the procedure, localised pain post-injection and flushing, but most feared is septic arthritis which probably occurs in about 1 in 10000 injections. Careful aseptic technique is the best protection. Tissue atrophy at the injection site, abnormal uterine bleeding, hypertension and hyperglycaemia rarely cause problems. Osteonecrosis might be as much a problem with uncontrolled painful arthritis as with a joint rendered less symptomatic by corticosteroid injections. Intra-articular corticosteroids form an important part of the management of inflammatory joint disease and might be considered where an inflammatory element occurs in osteoarthritis. They may be used at any stage in the arthritic process, but should be seen as an adjunct to other forms of symptom

  11. Quantitative monitoring of corticosteroids in cosmetic products manufactured in Korea using LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Yun Sik; Kwon, Il Keun; Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Kang-Bong

    2012-07-10

    Some cosmetic products manufactured in Korea for the treatment of eczema, seborrhea and psoriasis have been suspected to contain anti-inflammatory corticosteroids such as prednisolone, hydrocortisone, betamethasone, dexamethasone and triamcinolone acetonide without these ingredients being indicated on the label. Due to their severe side effects such as permenent skin atopy, these corticosteroids have to be monitored in cosmetic products from a forensic point of view. Many cosmetic product samples (N=65) have been collected from both local and online markets in Korea. The corticosteroid content of these samples was analyzed by LC-MS/MS with diagnostic ions (m/z). Linearity was studied with 0.1-10 μg/mL range in all corticosteroids. Good correlation coefficients (r(2)≥0.997) were found and the limits of quantification were 4.68-7.97 ng/mL for each of the corticosteroids. At three different concentrations spanning the linear dynamic ranges, mean recoveries were 97.2-113.5%and precisions (RSD) for intra-day and inter-day analysis were less than 8.9%. Also, accuracy (Bias %) was less than 11.8%. The results showed that between 0.76-0.94 μg/g levels of prednisolone were detected in four cosmetic products and triamcinolone acetonidewas detected with a concentration in the range of 11.5-272 μg/g in nine samples. This fact reveals that some manufacturers have arbitrarily added these corticosteroids in their cosmetic products without indicating them on the label. Thus, these cosmetic products have to be monitored and if proven illegal preparations removed from the market. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sudden hearing loss: Our experiences in treatment with vasoactive and corticosteroid therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živić Ljubica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sudden hearing loss is a clinical entity of ambiguously defined aetiology manifested by hearing loss of more than 30 dB on three contiguous frequencies occurring within 72 hours. The lack of standard therapy protocol led to the use of variety of different therapies, thus making difficult objective quantification of their effect. Objective. The aim of the study was to present our experience in the treatment of sudden hearing loss with administration of vasoactive and corticosteroid therapy. Methods. Our research included 59 hospitally treated patients with a sudden hearing loss. During the period 1995-2004, 37 patients were treated using vasoactive agents (xanthinol nicotinate and pentoxifylline, and from 2004-2009, 22 patients were treated using parenteral corticosteroids (dexamethasone. All patients had unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of different level at frequencies from 500-4000 Hz, while other diagnostic procedures (laboratory tests, internist and neurology examinations, X-ray were within normal limits. Evaluation of therapy effect was done by follow-up of hearing threshold changes and subjective complaints. Results. The results showed that full recovery was achieved in patients with a mild and not fully severe hearing loss, with the majority of those (73% under corticosteroid treatment. In these patients recovery was also achieved more rapidly. A partial recovery of hearing was detected in patients with hearing loss of more than 80 dB, and mostly in patients treated with corticosteroids. Conclusion. Although statistical evaluation does not indicate significant differences between the application of vasoactive drugs or corticosteroids, clinical findings support advantages of corticosteroid therapy. Treatment of hearing loss, although controversial, requires change of some up-to-now used agents. Advantages should go in favour of contricosteroids.

  13. Corticosteroids for bacterial keratitis: the Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V; Ray, Kathryn J; Hong, Kevin C; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Lee, Salena M; Zegans, Michael E; McLeod, Stephen D; Lietman, Thomas M; Acharya, Nisha R

    2012-02-01

    To determine whether there is a benefit in clinical outcomes with the use of topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, multicenter clinical trial comparing prednisolone sodium phosphate, 1.0%, to placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and received topical moxifloxacin for at least 48 hours before randomization. The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) at 3 months from enrollment. Secondary outcomes included infiltrate/scar size, reepithelialization, and corneal perforation. Between September 1, 2006, and February 22, 2010, 1769 patients were screened for the trial and 500 patients were enrolled. No significant difference was observed in the 3-month BSCVA (-0.009 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]; 95% CI, -0.085 to 0.068; P = .82), infiltrate/scar size (P = .40), time to reepithelialization (P = .44), or corneal perforation (P > .99). A significant effect of corticosteroids was observed in subgroups of baseline BSCVA (P = .03) and ulcer location (P = .04). At 3 months, patients with vision of counting fingers or worse at baseline had 0.17 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (95% CI, -0.31 to -0.02; P = .03) compared with placebo, and patients with ulcers that were completely central at baseline had 0.20 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (-0.37 to -0.04; P = .02). We found no overall difference in 3-month BSCVA and no safety concerns with adjunctive corticosteroid therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Adjunctive topical corticosteroid use does not improve 3-month vision in patients with bacterial corneal ulcers. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00324168.

  14. Skin testing for immediate hypersensitivity to corticosteroids: a case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A; Empson, M; The, R; Fitzharris, P

    2015-03-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity to corticosteroids is reported to occur with an incidence of 0.1%. The largest previous case series reporting corticosteroid skin testing has seven patients. We identified 23 patients (mean age 50 years, 65% female) from Auckland City Hospital who underwent skin testing (ST) for suspected corticosteroid hypersensitivity between July 2005 and April 2012. We performed a retrospective clinical case note review detailing clinical history of reaction, skin test results and subsequent management. Most patients (21/23) had a standard panel of testing with prednisolone, triamcinolone, methylprednisolone, hydrocortisone and dexamethasone. Skin tests used a 10% steroid stock concentration for skin prick tests (SPT) and dilutions of 1 : 1000, 1 : 100 and 1 : 10 for subsequent intradermal testing. A weal 3 mm greater than the negative control was considered positive. A total of 23 patients were identified who had skin testing for suspected acute hypersensitivity to corticosteroids, eight of which had a history of anaphylaxis. From 28 reactions (in 23 patients), the most common route of administration was intra-articular (13), followed by oral (7), intravenous (3) and other (5). Skin tests were positive in 8/23 patients, and 7/8 of these patients had a history of corticosteroid-associated anaphylaxis. Skin tests were positive at either the skin prick test or intradermal stages. There was evidence suggesting clinical and skin test cross-reactivity between corticosteroids in one patient. One patient had a positive skin test, but negative oral challenge suggesting the skin test was false positive. Skin tests were negative in 15/23 patients. One patient had a negative prednisolone skin test and positive unblinded oral challenge, suggesting a false-negative skin test. Skin testing can provide sufficient evidence to diagnose allergy in patients with a clear history of immediate hypersensitivity to corticosteroids such as anaphylaxis. Both skin prick

  15. Nasal saline or intranasal corticosteroids to treat allergic rhinitis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Stefani; Brown, Elizabeth Aubrey; Franklin, Rachel; Wickersham, Elizabeth A.; McCarthy, Laine H.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical Question In pediatric populations, is nasal saline irrigation as effective as intranasal corticosteroids at relieving allergic rhinitis symptoms? Answer No. Intranasal steroids are more effective than nasal saline alone to reduce symptoms of allergic rhinitis (AR) in children. Combination therapy further improves symptom reduction. Level of Evidence for the Answer B Search Terms Allergic Rhinitis, Nasal Saline, Nasal corticosteroids, children younger than age 18. Date Search Was Conducted August and September 2014, October 2015. Inclusion Criteria Meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, cohort studies, nasal spray, hypertonic saline solution, nasal lavage, rhinitis, intranasal administration, nasal saline, human, English language. Exclusion Criteria Antihistamines, Adults, Articles older than 2008 PMID:27328556

  16. The impact of topical corticosteroid use before diagnosis on the outcome of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaei, Dana; Carnt, Nicole; Minassian, Darwin C; Dart, John K G

    2014-07-01

    To examine the impact of topical corticosteroid use before the diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) on final visual outcomes and to determine the prognostic factors predicting poorer outcomes. Cohort study. A total of 209 eyes of 196 patients with retrievable medical records, diagnosed with AK at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, between January 1991 and April 2012. One eye was randomly excluded from analysis in the 13 cases of bilateral AK. Patient demographic, initial clinical examination findings, and management details were collected. The outcomes of patients treated with topical corticosteroids before diagnosis of AK were compared with those not treated with topical corticosteroids before diagnosis. A multivariable logistic model, optimized for prior corticosteroid use, was used to derive the odds ratios (ORs) of a suboptimal visual outcome. Suboptimal visual outcome was defined as final visual acuity (VA) ≤ 20/80, corneal perforation, or need for keratoplasty. Acanthamoeba keratitis was diagnosed on microbiological culture in 94 eyes (48.0%), on histopathologic examination in 27 eyes (13.8%), on confocal microscopy in 38 eyes (19.4%), and on the basis of a typical clinical course and response to treatment in 37 eyes (18.9%). Final VA and prior corticosteroid use data were available for 174 eyes (88.8%). In multivariable analysis, corticosteroid use before diagnosis was associated with suboptimal visual outcome (OR, 3.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.78-8.55), as were disease stage 3 at presentation (OR, 5.62; 95% CI, 1.59-19.80) and older age (60+ years) at diagnosis (OR, 8.97; 95% CI, 2.13-37.79). Corticosteroid use before diagnosis of AK is highly predictive of a poorer visual outcome. This is largely due to the initial misdiagnosis of AK as herpetic keratitis. It is important to include AK in the differential diagnosis of keratitis in all contact lens users with keratitis, particularly before making a diagnosis of herpes keratitis and before the

  17. The role of topical corticosteroids in the management of Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D H; Palay, D A; Daya, S M; Stulting, R D; Krachmer, J H; Holland, E J

    1997-05-01

    To clarify the role of topical corticosteroids in the management of Acanthamoeba keratitis. The records of 38 patients diagnosed with Acanthamoeba keratitis at three institutions were retrospectively reviewed. After medical therapy alone, patients diagnosed within 1 month of symptom onset had an increased likelihood of being cured (p = 0.02) and attaining visual acuity of 20/60 or better (p Acanthamoeba keratitis. Rather, poor outcome was significantly related to diagnostic delays. Therefore prudent use of corticosteroids in selected patients with severe pain not responsive to analgesics or severe corneal or anterior chamber inflammation appears justified.

  18. Shower emboli and digital necrosis after a single corticosteroid injection for trigger thumb: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonathan; Dumanian, Gregory A

    2009-02-01

    Local corticosteroid injection into the hand is the preferred initial step in the management of trigger finger owing to its safety and efficacy. We report the case of a patient with shower emboli and digital necrosis after a local corticosteroid injection for the treatment of trigger thumb. Given the patient's subsequent negative hypercoagulability workup, we suspect that the patient's symptoms resulted from the injection of steroids into the princeps pollicis artery, with subsequent retrograde flow into multiple other arteries of the hand. The patient was managed conservatively and ultimately her symptoms resolved. No new areas of digital necrosis have appeared in 8 years of follow-up.

  19. Successful treatment using corticosteroid combined antibiotic for acute acalculous cholecystitis patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Weijie; He, Xiaodong; Qu, Qiang; Hong, Tao; Li, Binglu

    2017-07-01

    There is no consensus of treatments for acute acalculous cholecystitis with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The study was aimed to investigate the effect of the corticosteroid for these patients.A series of patients who were diagnosed as acute acalculous cholecystitis with SLE in the period from January 2012 to December 2016 at our hospital were included. They accepted 2 different conservative treatment strategies initially: the treatment using moxifloxacin (the antibiotic group), and the treatment using corticosteroid combined moxifloxacin (the corticosteroid group). Then clinical manifestations, laboratory features, and outcomes were analyzed.The study identified 22 women Han Chinese patients with the SLE history of 2.8 ± 1.4 year. There was no significant difference in SLE history, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index-2000 (SLEDAI-2000), Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology damage index (SLICC/ACR), hematologic examination results, and corticosteroid dosage between 2 groups. And there was no significant difference in the symptom of acute cholecystitis, duration of the symptoms, white blood level, and the thickness of gallbladder wall between 2 groups either. However, the SLEDAI-2000 of the corticosteroid group was lower than that of the antibiotic group (7.3 ± 1.4 vs 10.7 ± 3.0, P = .03), so was the SLICC/ACR (0.1 ± 0.3 vs 0.3 ± 0.5, P = .01). Moreover, total 11 of 12 patients were successfully treated in the corticosteroid group, only 1 patient got cholecystectomy because no improvement after conservative treatment. While 4 of 10 patients were successfully treated by moxifloxacin alone, 6 patients had to accept cholecystectomy in the antibiotic group. The rate of successful conservative treatment in the corticosteroid group was higher than that of the antibiotic group (P = .02). All patients were followed up at least 6 months, there was no statistical

  20. Optimal timing of antenatal corticosteroids in women with bleeding placenta previa or low-lying placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsayegh, Eman; Barrett, Jon; Melamed, Nir

    2018-01-11

    Administrating a single course of antenatal corticosteroids to women at risk of preterm birth between 24 and 34 weeks of gestation has been shown to decrease neonatal morbidity and mortality. There is evidence that the optimal timing for the administration of antenatal corticosteroids is within 1-7 days before birth as the effect of antenatal corticosteroids has been shown to decline 7 days after administration. Therefore, given that antenatal corticosteroids are the single most effective intervention in cases of preterm birth, efforts should be made to optimize the timing of administration of antenatal corticosteroids. To test the hypothesis that the timing of antenatal corticosteroids in women with vaginal bleeding due to placenta previa or low-lying placenta can be optimized by identifying women at low risk of imminent delivery. This was a retrospective cohort study of all women admitted to a tertiary referral center at 24-34 weeks' gestation with vaginal bleeding due to placenta previa or low-lying placenta between 2003 and 2014. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors that are independently associated with delivery within 14 days from admission. A total of 202 women who met the inclusion criteria were admitted with vaginal bleeding in the presence of placenta previa or low-lying placenta during the study period, of whom 31 (15.3%) and 44 (21.8%) gave birth within 7 and 14 days from admission, respectively. The following factors were independently associated with delivery within 14 days from admission: complete placenta previa (odds (OR) 3.57, 95%CI 1.57-9.03), severe bleeding at presentation (OR 17.14, 95%CI 2.92-100.70), uterine contractions at presentation (OR 6.02, 95%CI 1.91-19.00), and cervical length placenta previa or low-lying placenta, it seems possible to identify a subgroup of women in whom the likelihood of delivery within 14 days is low. This information may allow for selective (rather than routine) administration

  1. The Pharmacogenetics of Tacrolimus in Corticosteroid-Sparse Pediatric and Adult Kidney Transplant Recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Madsen, Mads; Bergmann, Troels K; Brøsen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    >A, POR*28 and CYP3A4*22 and dose-adjusted tacrolimus trough concentrations in a primarily corticosteroid-free (>85%) population of Danish pediatric and adult kidney transplant recipients. METHODS: Seventy-two patients receiving treatment with oral tacrolimus were genotyped using real-time polymerase....... CONCLUSION: This study shows that the known association of the CYP3A5 genotype with tacrolimus dose-adjusted trough concentrations has the same impact in a corticosteroid-sparse population. The association between PPARA variance and infections with CMV will need further investigation....

  2. A case of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy treated with long-time corticosteroid administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Higashino, Takanori; Obayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Hishikawa, Yoshio

    1998-05-01

    This is a report of one patient who developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy at a gap of two portals 31 months after 40 Gy irradiation. He presented an unusual clinical course with over 5 years and 6 months administration of oral corticosteroid, very slow progression and long-lasting presentation of Gd-DTPA enhanced area in the suffered cord by MRI. It is suggested that corticosteroid administration from initial onset for a long period may change the natural course of radiation myelopathy, that is, may delay progress of it. (author)

  3. Clinical Question: Nasal saline or intranasal corticosteroids to treat allergic rhinitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Stefani; Brown, Elizabeth Aubrey; Franklin, Rachel; Wickersham, Elizabeth A; McCarthy, Laine H

    2016-01-01

    In pediatric populations, is nasal saline irrigation as effective as intranasal corticosteroids at relieving allergic rhinitis symptoms? No. Intranasal steroids are more effective than nasal saline alone to reduce symptoms of allergic rhinitis (AR) in children. Combination therapy further improves symptom reduction. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE FOR THE ANSWER: B SEARCH TERMS: Allergic Rhinitis, Nasal Saline, Nasal corticosteroids, children younger than age 18. DATE SEARCH WAS CONDUCTED: August and September 2014, October 2015. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, cohort studies, nasal spray, hypertonic saline solution, nasal lavage, rhinitis, intranasal administration, nasal saline, human, English language. Antihistamines, Adults, Articles older than 2008.

  4. Topical corticosteroid reduces inflammation without compromising the efficacy of photodynamic therapy for actinic keratoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S R; Øager Petersen, Bibi; Wulf, H C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective and established treatment for actinic keratoses (AK) and nonmelanoma skin cancer. The main side-effects of PDT are post-treatment erythema and oedema, and pain during illumination. Severe erythema after PDT enhances the down time associated...... with methyl aminolaevulinate PDT in two symmetrical areas. One area was randomized to superpotent corticosteroid (clobetasol propionate) before and just after PDT. Objective and visual erythema, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence and pain were evaluated. RESULTS: Topical corticosteroid significantly...

  5. Anaphylaxis at image-guided epidural pain block secondary to corticosteroid compound.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Deirdre E

    2012-09-01

    Anaphylaxis during image-guided interventional procedures is a rare but potentially fatal event. Anaphylaxis to iodinated contrast is an established and well-recognized adverse effect. However, anaphylaxis to some of the other frequently administered medications given during interventional procedures, such as corticosteroids, is not common knowledge. During caudal epidural injection, iodinated contrast is used to confirm needle placement in the epidural space at the level of the sacral hiatus. A combination of corticosteroid, local anesthetic, and saline is subsequently injected. We describe a very rare case of anaphylaxis to a component of the steroid medication instilled in the caudal epidural space.

  6. Statistical analysis plan for the Adjunctive Corticosteroid Treatment in Critically Ill Patients with Septic Shock (ADRENAL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billot, Laurent; Venkatesh, Balasubramanian; Myburgh, John

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Adjunctive Corticosteroid Treatment in Critically Ill Patients with Septic Shock (ADRENAL) trial, a 3800-patient, multicentre, randomised controlled trial, will be the largest study to date of corticosteroid therapy in patients with septic shock. OBJECTIVE: To describe a statistic...

  7. First-line treatment of pemphigus vulgaris with a combination of rituximab and high-potency topical corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Cosnes, Anne; Ortonne, Nicolas; Hüe, Sophie; Paul, Muriel; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Chosidow, Olivier

    2015-02-01

    The main component of the first-line treatment of pemphigus vulgaris is high doses of systemic corticosteroids, but adverse effects of these drugs are frequent and sometimes severe. Rituximab has shown effectiveness as a corticosteroid-sparing agent or in case of relapse. To our knowledge, the effectiveness of rituximab as a first-line treatment without systemic corticosteroids has not been evaluated. Five women in their 50s, 60s, or 70s with pemphigus vulgaris (Pemphigus Disease Area Index score, 15-84 at diagnosis) and contraindications to systemic corticosteroid treatment received rituximab with high-potency topical corticosteroids as first-line treatment. All patients experienced a favorable response, with a mean time to healing of skin and mucosal lesions of 15 weeks. Two patients, with 42- and 48-month follow-up evaluations, did not experience relapse. Three patients developed 2 to 4 relapses, with effective retreatment achieved using rituximab and topical corticosteroids. No severe adverse effects were observed. Considering the high rate of severe adverse effects induced by prolonged administration of high doses of systemic corticosteroids, new therapeutic options are warranted in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris. The combination of rituximab and topical corticosteroids could be considered in mild to severe cutaneous disease. Larger long-term studies are needed to evaluate the optimal treatment strategies according to the severity of the disease and the benefit-risk ratio of rituximab.

  8. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid for treatment of osteoarthritis knee: comparative study to intra-articular corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soad A Elsawy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion Both HA and corticosteroid groups showed improvement in pain and knee function, but the intra-articular HA was superior to corticosteroid on long-term follow-up. This supports the potential rate of intra-articular HA as an effective long-term therapeutic option for patients with OA of the knee.

  9. Vías de administración de los corticosteroides en pacientes con crisis moderada de asma Ways of administration of corticosteroids in moderate asthma crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Dotres Martínez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: identificar las diferencias entre la administración de corticosteroides sistémicos parenterales y orales en el tratamiento de la crisis moderada de asma bronquial y el costo de su aplicación. Métodos: estudio descriptivo, prospectivo y aplicado, realizado en 105 pacientes asmáticos que acudieron al hospital pediátrico "Juan Manuel Márquez", entre el 1 de septiembre de 2009 y el 31 de mayo de 2011. Se organizaron tres grupos: grupo A, se administró hidrocortisona vía intramuscular; grupo B, metilprednisolona intramuscular y grupo C, prednisona oral. La selección y ubicación de los pacientes en los grupos fue al azar. Resultados: la duración de la crisis según vía de administración del corticosteroide fue de 1 a 3 días en 26 (74,3 % pacientes del grupo A, 24 (68,6 % asmáticos en el grupo B y 32 (91,4 % enfermos en el grupo C. La evolución de la crisis, con respecto a los días de dificultad respiratoria y la duración de la tos nocturna, tuvieron un comportamiento similar en los tres grupos. El costo del corticosteroide sistémico en el grupo A fue 13 veces superior al del grupo C y en el grupo B, fue 35 veces más que el del grupo C. Conclusiones: los corticoesteroides orales e intramusculares tienen la misma respuesta con respecto a la mejoría de los síntomas en pacientes con crisis moderada de asma bronquial. El uso del fármaco por vía oral conlleva un ahorro sustancial para el país y evita los efectos indeseables de la vía intramuscular.Objective: to determine the differences between the parenteral and the oral administration of systemic corticosteroids in moderate asthma crisis and the cost. Method: prospective and descriptive study performed in 105 patients, who presented with a moderate asthma crisis at "Juan Manuel Marquez" pediatric hospital from September 1, 2009 through May 31st, 2011. The patients were randomly selected and assigned to one of the following groups: Group A was given hydrocortisone

  10. Corticosteroid use and mortality risk in patients with perforated colonic diverticular disease: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broersen, L H A; Horváth-Puhó, E; Pereira, A M; Erichsen, R; Dekkers, O M; Sørensen, H T

    2017-01-01

    Corticosteroids are a potential risk factor for mortality in patients with perforated diverticular disease, due to blinding of disease severity, hampered wound healing or adrenal insufficiency. We examined mortality in corticosteroid users and non-users among patients with perforated diverticular disease. A cohort study based on medical databases including all patients ≥18 years in Denmark (source population 5 289 261 inhabitants) admitted to a hospital with incident perforated diverticular disease between 2005 and 2013. 7-day, 1-month, 3-month and 1-year mortality risks in corticosteroid users and non-users were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and compared with Cox proportional hazard regression adjusted for age, sex and comorbidities. The study included 4640 patients with perforated diverticular disease. Of these, 3743 (80.7%) had not used corticosteroids in the year before admission and 725 (15.6%) had been exposed to systemic corticosteroid treatment. The remaining 172 patients had been exposed to either inhaled or intestinal acting corticosteroid therapy. Mortality risk in non-users was 4.4% after 7 days and 15.6% after 1 year. This risk was doubled for corticosteroid users who filled their last prescription during the 90 days before admission, with mortality risks ranging from 14.2% after 7 days to 47.6% after 1 year. 1-year mortality risk was even higher for corticosteroid users with a first filled prescription ≤90 days before admission: 52.5%. Corticosteroid use was associated with clearly increased mortality risk after perforated diverticular disease. Thus, use of corticosteroids should be regarded as an important clinical prognostic factor for mortality in patients with this condition.

  11. "I was never like that": Australian findings on the psychological and psychiatric sequelae of corticosteroids in haematology treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Pam; Patton, Mary Anne; James, Sarah

    2009-04-01

    Corticosteroid treatments have been well documented to cause severe emotional and even psychiatric disturbances. Despite that corticosteroid use is at the core of most treatment protocols for haematological malignancies, there is a dearth of published research (and controversy in the existing research) on the emotional and psychiatric sequelae of corticosteroid use for haematology patients and its connection with pre-existing mental history. This paper aims to address this hiatus and confusion by examining the emotional and psychiatric side effects of corticosteroids on haematology patients in Australia. The findings are from a pilot study that explored the prior mental health history and effects of corticosteroid use of ten haematology patients in Australia. Data was collected through an iterative, phenomenological, qualitative research methodology using open-ended interviews conducted at the time and location of the participant's choice. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The language texts were then entered into the QSR NUD*IST computer program and analysed thematically. The significant finding from the study was that corticosteroids used in haematology treatments have the potential to affect anyone and are not related to an individual's prior mental health history. No participant presented evidence of psychiatric history or counseling and many reported emotional stability during previous times of difficulty. All participants reported emotional distress directly related to corticosteroid use. Participants reported difficulties during the period of withdrawal from corticosteroids and relief during periods free from the administration of corticosteroids. The findings provide evidence that emotional disturbances associated with corticosteroid use in haematology are a direct result of the drugs used and not a symptom of the individual's prior emotional health. Recommendations are given which have important implications for the management

  12. Randomised controlled trial of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters-Veluthamaningal, Cyriac; Winters, Jan C.; Groenier, Klaas H.; Meyboom-deJong, Betty

    2009-01-01

    Background: De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and leads to wrist pain and to impaired function of the wrist and hand. It can be treated by splinting, local corticosteroid injection and operation. In this study effectiveness of local

  13. Effect of Corticosteroids in Routine Treatment of PeriTonsillar Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Allaf-Akbari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are controversies regarding treatment of peritonsillar abscess as a common infection of head and neck, especially for prescription of corticosteroids. According to review of articles, use of corticosteroids in management of this abscess is increasing, but more controlled and comparative studies are needed. In this clinical trial study, we evaluated corticosteroid as an adjutant therapy for peritonsillar abscess. Methods: This clinical trial study was done on 50 hospitalized patients divided into 2 groups; steroid and placebo. Antibiotic therapy and method of abscess drainage was the same in both groups. A special questionnaire included characteristics, symptoms, clinical course and complications of patients. Data was filled and analyzed by SPSS software using chi square, repeated measurement and t tests. Results: Normalization of body temperature within 12 hours after treatment and mean time of painless swallowing was 100% and 9 hours in the steroid group as compared to 84% and 15 hours in placebo group (p value=0.04. Trismus recovery was faster in steroid group. Hospitalization period was 3 and 4 days in steroid and placebo groups, respectively (P value>0.05. Fewer complications were reported in steroid receiving patients. There was one case of relapse in the steroid group and 5 cases in the placebo group (P value=0.09. Conclusion: According to our findings, it seems that corticosteroid adjuvant therapy of peritonsillar abscess is effective and doesn’t lead to any important complication

  14. Cadherin 5 is Regulated by Corticosteroids and Associated with Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Carl; Pryds, Anders; Zeng, Shemin

    2014-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is characterized by leakage of fluid from the choroid into the subretinal space and, consequently, loss of central vision. The disease is triggered by endogenous and exogenous corticosteroid imbalance and psychosocial stress and is much more prevalent in men...... propose that genetically predetermined variation in CDH5, when combined with triggering events such as corticosteroid treatment or severe hormonal imbalance, underlie a substantial proportion of CSC in the male population.......Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is characterized by leakage of fluid from the choroid into the subretinal space and, consequently, loss of central vision. The disease is triggered by endogenous and exogenous corticosteroid imbalance and psychosocial stress and is much more prevalent in men....... We studied the association of genetic variation in 44 genes from stress response and corticosteroid metabolism pathways with the CSC phenotype in two independent cohorts of 400 CSC cases and 1,400 matched controls. The expression of cadherin 5 (CDH5), the major cell-cell adhesion molecule in vascular...

  15. Prevalence of vertebral deformities and symptomatic vertebral fractures in corticosteroid treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs, RNJ; Jacobs, JWG; Bijlsma, JWJ; Lems, WF; Laan, RFJM; Houben, HHM; ter Borg, EJ; Huisman, AM; Bruyn, GAW; van Oijen, PLM; Westgeest, AAA; Algra, A; Hofman, DM

    2001-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to determine whether the prevalence of vertebral deformities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with corticosteroids (Cs) is higher than in RA patients not receiving Cs therapy. Patients and methods. This multicentre cross-sectional study included

  16. Prevalence of vertebral deformities and symptomatic vertebral fractures in corticosteroid treated patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs, R. N.; Jacobs, J. W.; Bijlsma, J. W.; Lems, W. F.; Laan, R. F.; Houben, H. H.; ter Borg, E. J.; Huisman, A. M.; Bruyn, G. A.; van Oijen, P. L.; Westgeest, A. A.; Algra, A.; Hofman, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether the prevalence of vertebral deformities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with corticosteroids (Cs) is higher than in RA patients not receiving Cs therapy. This multicentre cross-sectional study included 205 patients with RA who were

  17. A review of antenatal corticosteroid use in premature neonates in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Antenatal corticosteroid (ANS) use in premature neonates has become a standard of practice. However, there is low ANS coverage in low- to middle-income countries (LMICs). Recent studies have questioned the efficacy of ANSs in such countries. Objective. To review the use of ANSs in preterm neonates at ...

  18. New insights into the pathogenesis of severe corticosteroid-dependent asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, B; Djukanovic, R; Bron, A; Aalbers, R

    1996-01-01

    Severe asthma is characterized by persistent T-cell activation, as demonstrated in both peripheral blood and bronchial mucosa. Endobronchial biopsy specimens of patients with severe, corticosteroid-dependent asthma revealed increased expression of CD25+ on mucosal T cells. Increased

  19. Resolution and recurrence rates of idiopathic trigger finger after corticosteroid injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, Marianne F.; Neuhaus, Valentin; Becker, Stéphanie J. E.; Jupiter, Jesse B.; Mudgal, Chaitanya; Ring, David

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses factors associated with apparent resolution and recurrence of triggering using data from providers with various treatment strategies. A retrospective review identified 878 adult patients with 1,210 Quinnell grade 2 or 3 trigger fingers that had one or more corticosteroid

  20. Psychological development of children who were treated antenatally with corticosteroids to prevent respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmand, B.; Neuvel, J.; Smolders-de Haas, H.; Hoeks, J.; Treffers, P. E.; Koppe, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Potential side effects of antenatal administration of corticosteroids to prevent neonatal respiratory distress syndrome were studied in 10- to 12-year-old children whose mothers had participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of betamethasone. Aspects of the children's

  1. Treatment of asthma by the inhaled corticosteroid ciclesonide given either in the morning or evening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, DS; Sevette, C; Martinat, Y; Schlosser, N; Aumann, J; Kafe, H

    The study addressed the question whether the novel inhaled prodrug corticosteroid ciclesonide is equally effective when inhaled in the morning compared to the evening. For this purpose a double-blind, randomized, parallel group study was initiated in which 209 asthmatic patients (forced expiratory

  2. Growth hormone treatment in children with rheumatic disease, corticosteroid induced growth retardation, and osteopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.K. Grote (Floor); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); D. Mul (Dick); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); R. ten Cate (Rebecca); W. Oostdijk (Wilma); W.H.J. van Luijk (Wilma); C.J.A. Jansen-Van Wijngaarden (C. J A); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In children with severe rheumatic disease (RD), treatment with corticosteroids (CS) is frequently needed and growth retardation and osteopenia may develop. A beneficial effect of human growth hormone (hGH) has been reported but mostly in trials without a control group. Aims:

  3. Growth hormone treatment in children with rheumatic disease, corticosteroid induced growth retardation, and osteopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, FK; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Mul, D; Hop, WCJ; ten Cate, R; Oostdijk, W; Van Luijk, W; Jansen-van Wijngaarden, CJA; Keizer-Schrama, SMPFD

    Background: In children with severe rheumatic disease (RD), treatment with corticosteroids (CS) is frequently needed and growth retardation and osteopenia may develop. A beneficial effect of human growth hormone (hGH) has been reported but mostly in trials without a control group. Aims: To study the

  4. A survey of corticosteroid use for the management of septic shock ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Critical illness is associated with pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction, and may cause adrenal insufficiency that manifests as septic shock that is poorly responsive to fluid or inotropic therapy. Administering a low-dose corticosteroid to these patients results in faster shock resolution, but there is controversy ...

  5. Measures to reduce maintenance therapy with oral corticosteroid in adults with severe asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Vivi Q; Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    ), masitinib (78% reduction in OCS dose), mepolizumab (50%83% reduction in OCS dose), and omalizumab (30%64% of enrolled patients achieved a reduction in OCS dose, and one study reported a dose reduction of 45%). CONCLUSIONS: In adults with severe asthma, several corticosteroid-sparing interventions were shown...

  6. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children: Limited benefit of corticosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Bluman, Joel; Goldman, Ran D.

    2014-01-01

    Question A child recently presented to my office with lower limb petechiae, arthralgia, and abdominal pain characteristic of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). Will systemic corticosteroids help relieve these symptoms and prevent potential HSP complications such as intussusception and nephritis?

  7. Inhaled Corticosteroids and the Occurrence of Oral Candidiasis : A Prescription Sequence Symmetry Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boven, Job F. M.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; Vegter, Stefan

    The primary aim of the study was to gain insight into the relative risk of clinically relevant oral candidiasis following inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) initiation over time. A secondary aim was to analyse the influence of patient characteristics and co-medication on the occurrence of this adverse

  8. Treatment with corticosteroids and the risk of anastomotic leakage following lower gastrointestinal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Tina Fransgård; Lassen, Cecilie Brandt; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a serious complication in colorectal surgery. Treatment with corticosteroids is known to impair wound healing but their influence on the healing of a colorectal anastomosis remains unclear, and studies have reported conflicting results. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  9. Antenatal corticosteroids administration: are we giving them at the right time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tiffany Tuck Chin; Tung, Janice Su Zhen; Lau, Hester Chang Qi; Tagore, Shephali

    2018-02-01

    Antenatal corticosteroids before preterm births are considered to be most effective 48 h after and up to 1 week after the first dose. We aim to evaluate: (1) our practice of administration of antenatal corticosteroids in Singapore; (2) admission characteristics of women for discriminatory factors of spontaneous preterm delivery within 1 week. This is a retrospective study in a tertiary obstetrics unit in Singapore. 3044 women who delivered live births (at term or preterm) from 1st November 2014 to 31st January 2015, who were at risk of spontaneous or induced preterm delivery, were included. Data related to the time of and indications for antenatal corticosteroids administration, characteristics assessed at the time of presentation, and time of delivery were collected and analysed. 85.9% of women who delivered at gestational age ≤ 34 +6 received at least one dose. 22.1% had delivered within the window of efficacy. Gestational age > 32 weeks at presentation, uterine activity on tocography and cervical dilation with effacement were associated with preterm delivery within 1 week of presentation. Overall, our antenatal corticosteroids administration rate is comparable to that attained by centres in other developed countries. It is difficult but important to discriminate women who will benefit from this timely intervention.

  10. Doctors' beliefs and knowledge on corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis : identifying barriers to improve prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyvendak, M.; Naunton, M.; van Roon, E. N.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.

    P>What is known and Objective: Despite the availability of effective treatments for the management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis (CIOP), the condition is undertreated. Our objective was to assess prescribers' knowledge and likely prescribing patterns concerning the diagnosis and treatment

  11. Is addition of sodium fluoride to cyclical etidronate beneficial in the treatment of corticosteroid induced osteoporosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lems, W. F.; Jacobs, J. W.; Bijlsma, J. W.; van Veen, G. J.; Houben, H. H.; Haanen, H. C.; Gerrits, M. I.; van Rijn, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    To investigate whether administration of sodium fluoride (NaF) in addition to cyclical etidronate has a positive effect on bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with established osteoporosis during continued treatment with corticosteroids. 47 patients who were receiving treatment with

  12. Topical corticosteroids in the treatment of acute sunburn - A randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Wulf, Hans Chr.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of topical corticosteroid treatment on acute sunburn. Design: Randomized, double-blind clinical trial. Setting: University dermatology department. Patients: Twenty healthy volunteers with Fitzpatrick skin types I (highly sensitive, always burns easily, tans...... in the acute sunburn reaction when applied 6 or 23 hours after UV exposure. Clinical Trial Registry: clinicaltrials. gov Identifier: NCT00206882 Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  13. High inhaled corticosteroids adherence in childhood asthma : the role of medication beliefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A.; Duiverman, Eric J.; Brand, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to study determinants of adherence in young asthmatic children over a 3-month period, including the role of parental illness and medication perceptions as determinants of adherence. Consecutive 2-6-yr-old children with asthma, using inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), followed-up at our

  14. Pneumonia risk in COPD patients receiving inhaled corticosteroids alone or in combination: TORCH study results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crim, C; Calverley, P M A; Anderson, J A

    2009-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are important in reducing exacerbation frequency associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, little is known about the risk of associated infections. In a post hoc analysis of the TOwards a Revolution in COPD Health (TORCH) study, we analysed...

  15. Adherence to inhaled corticosteroids in children with asthma and their parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dellen, Q.M. van; Stronks, K.; Bindels, P.J.E.; Öry, F.G.; Aalderen, W.M.C. van

    2006-01-01

    Poor adherence to inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) may contribute to the recent rise in asthma morbidity. In general, appropriate adherence to ICSs is a complex process that is influenced by various determinants. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that were associated with adherence to

  16. Sputum eosinophils and the response of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction to corticosteroid in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duong, MyLinh; Subbarao, Padmaja; Adelroth, Ellinor

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between eosinophilic airway inflammation and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), and the response to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy was examined. METHODS: Twenty-six steroid-naïve asthmatic patients with EIB were randomized to two parallel, double-blind,...

  17. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M.; Kovanen, V.; Aagaard, P.

    2009-01-01

    A randomized-controlled single-blind trial was conducted to investigate the clinical, structural and functional effects of peritendinous corticosteroid injections (CORT), eccentric decline squat training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) in patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-nine male...

  18. Adverse effects of extra-articular corticosteroid injections: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Brinks (Tineke); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.C. Volkers (Aloysius); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. To estimate the occurrence and type of adverse effects after application of an extra-articular (soft tissue) corticosteroid injection. Methods. A systematic review of the literature was made based on a PubMed and Embase search covering the period 1956 to January 2010. Case

  19. Inhaled corticosteroids should be the first line of treatment for children with asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Paul L. P.

    2011-01-01

    Although montelukast is claimed to be preferable to inhaled corticosteroids in children with asthma and allergic rhinitis, virus-induced exacerbations, exercise induced asthma, and in those experiencing difficulties with inhalation therapy, there is no scientific evidence to support any of these

  20. Effect of an intranasal corticosteroid on exercise induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, Elin T. G.; van Leeuwen, Janneke C.; Brand, Paul L. P.; Duiverman, Eric J.; de Jongh, Frans H. C.; Thio, Bernard J.; Driessen, Jean M. M.

    Rationale Allergic rhinitis and exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are common in asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to investigate whether treatment of allergic rhinitis with an intranasal corticosteroid protects against EIB in asthmatic children. Methods: This was a double-blind,

  1. From knemometry to final adult height: inhaled corticosteroids and their effect on growth in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vreede, Ilja; Haarman, Eric G.; Sprikkelman, Aline B.; van Aalderen, Wim M.

    2013-01-01

    Growth impairment in children with asthma, as a consequence of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), is a major issue. Adverse systemic effects of ICS have been reviewed extensively, but no clinically relevant effects are reported if they are used in an appropriate dose as advocated in most guidelines.

  2. Perioperative Corticosteroids Reduce Short-Term Edema and Ecchymosis in Rhinoplasty: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Cook, Deborah J; Farrokyar, Forough; Thoma, Achilleas

    2016-02-01

    A number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the role of perioperative corticosteroids in rhinoplasty. Each of these trials however has an insufficient sample sizes to reach definitive conclusions and detect harms. Three recent reviews have analyzed edema and ecchymosis outcomes following rhinoplasty; each arrived at a different conclusion and recommendation. To estimate the effectiveness of systemic perioperative corticosteroid treatment compared to placebo for clinical outcomes in rhinoplasty using a methodologically rigorous meta-analysis. Electronic databases were searched without language restriction. Included trials were randomized controlled trials of systemic perioperative corticosteroid treatment vs placebo in rhinoplasty evaluating at least one of: edema, ecchymosis, bleeding, cosmetic outcome, and patient satisfaction. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was applied to included trials, and the quality of evidence for each outcome was assessed using the GRADE approach. Analyses included 336 patients from eight trials. Perioperative corticosteroids reduced the worst edema (SMD: -1.03, 95%CI -1.30 to -0.76, P cosmetic outcome. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 2: Therapeutic. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Effects of Corticosteroids on Osteopontin Expression in a Murine Model of Allergic Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Masatsugu; Konno, Satoshi; Matsukura, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Mio; Ieki, Koushi; Suzuki, Shintarou; Odaka, Miho; Watanabe, Shin; Homma, Tetsuya; Sato, Masayuki; Takeuchi, Hiroko; Hirose, Takashi; Huang, Shau-Ku; Adachi, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) contributes to the development of T helper 1 (Th1)-mediated immunity and Th1-associated diseases. However, the role of OPN in bronchial asthma is unclear. Corticosteroids reduce airway inflammation, as reflected by the low eosinophil and T-cell counts, and the low level of cytokine expression. We investigated OPN production and the inhibitory effects of corticosteroids on OPN production in a murine model of allergic asthma. Methods BALB/c mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injections of ovalbumin (OVA) with alum. Some mice received daily injections of dexamethasone (DEX) or phosphate-buffered saline for 1 week. All OVA-challenged mice were exposed to aerosolized 1% OVA for 30 min an hour after these injections. After the OVA challenge, the mice were killed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were examined. Results The levels of OPN protein in BAL fluid and OPN mRNA in lung tissue increased after OVA challenge. Most OPN-expressing cells were CD11c+ cells and some were T cells. DEX decreased the levels of OPN protein in the BAL fluid, and those of OPN mRNA and OPN protein in lung tissue. Conclusions OPN may play an important role in allergic bronchial asthma. Corticosteroids inhibit OPN production in mice with allergic asthma. The beneficial effect of corticosteroids in bronchial asthma is partly due to their inhibitory effects on OPN production. PMID:19494498

  4. Corticosteroid-induced suppression of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation in four captive rhinoceros species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Terri L; Vance, Carrie K

    2007-12-01

    Captive African black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis) are unusually susceptible to several diseases not commonly observed in any of the other three rhinoceros species maintained in captivity. The potential role of corticosteroids (either endogenously produced or exogenously administered) in the development of these sometimes fatal diseases has been questioned. In this study, the suppressive effects of two therapeutic corticosteroids (dexamethasone and hydrocortisone) on in vitro lymphocyte proliferation was examined in four rhinoceros species, including the Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis, n = 3), Indian rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis, n = 4), African black rhinoceros (n = 10), and African white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum, n = 5). Three blood samples collected from each rhinoceros 1 mo to 1 yr apart provided replicates for the study. Both dexamethasone and hydrocortisone suppressed (P rhinoceros cell proliferation in response to any of the four mitogens was never completely suppressed, even in cultures containing the highest steroid concentration tested (10(-3) M). The effect of the two corticosteroids differed slightly among the rhinoceros species and subspecies tested, but there was no evidence that eastern or southern black rhinoceros lymphocytes were more sensitive to the suppressive effects of corticosteroids than the other rhinoceros species.

  5. Corticosteroid solubility and lipid polarity control release from solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Louise B; Magnussson, Emily; Gunnarsson, Linda; Vermehren, Charlotte; Nielsen, Hanne M; Petersson, Karsten

    2010-05-05

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) show promise as a drug delivery system for skin administration. The solid state of the lipid particle enables efficient drug encapsulation and controlled drug release. The present study addresses the influence of lipid composition and drug substance lipid solubility on the in vitro release profile of corticosteroids from SLN for topical administration. Firstly, the effect of lipid composition on the lipid solubility and in vitro release of betamethasone-17-valerate (BMV) was determined by varying the lipid monoglyceride content and the chain length of the fatty acid moiety. Secondly, the effect of drug substance physicochemical properties was determined by studying five different corticosteroid derivatives with different lipophilicity. A high concentration of monoglyceride in SLN increased the amount of BMV released. The corticosteroid release rate depended on the drug substance lipophilicity and it was clear that the release profiles depended on drug partitioning to the aqueous phase as indicated by zero order kinetics. The results emphasize that the corticosteroid solubility in the lipid phase greatly influence drug distribution in the lipid particles and release properties. Thus knowledge of drug substance solubility and lipid polarity contributes to optimize SLN release properties. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. LIPID-POLYMER-CONJUGATES COMPOSITIONS COMPRISING CORTICOSTEROIDS FOR THE TREATMENT OF CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Metselaar, J.M.; Molema, Grietje; Storm, Gerrit

    2004-01-01

    The use of long-circulating colloidal carrier compositions comprising a corticosteroid and a lipid-polymer-conjugate, wherein the polymer is a poly((derivatised) amino acid) and optionally a further useful active ingredient, for the manufacture of a medicament useful in the treatment of

  7. a meta-analysis of the use of corticosteroids in pregnancies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M are sis is he study ect, with unity iven ipants there that thasone in re y" that: ither his is er omen for lying the actors our reterm. 97: ion in rch, hrane f . Am 1 ce of. 994; 84: ochrane upture by study hue red ids ting e lacebo-. REVIEW ARTICLE. A META-ANALYSIS OF THE. USE OF CORTICOSTEROIDS IN. PREGNANCIES ...

  8. Long-term effects of inhaled corticosteroids on sputum bacterial and viral loads in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contoli, Marco; Pauletti, Alessia; Rossi, Maria Rita; Spanevello, Antonio; Casolari, Paolo; Marcellini, Andrea; Forini, Giacomo; Gnesini, Giulia; Marku, Brunilda; Barnes, Neil; Rizzi, Andrea; Curradi, Giacomo; Caramori, Gaetano; Morelli, Paolo; Papi, Alberto

    2017-10-01

    Inhaled corticosteroid-containing medications reduce the frequency of COPD exacerbations (mainly infectious in origin) while paradoxically increasing the risk of other respiratory infections . The aim was to determine the effects of inhaled corticosteroids on airway microbial load in COPD patients and evaluate the influence of the underlying inflammatory profile on airway colonisation and microbiome.This is a proof-of-concept prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded endpoint study. Sixty patients with stable moderate COPD were randomised to receive one inhalation twice daily of either a combination of salmeterol 50 μg plus fluticasone propionate 500 μg or salmeterol 50 μg for 12 months. The primary outcome was the change of sputum bacterial loads over the course of treatment.Compared with salmeterol, 1-year treatment with salmeterol plus fluticasone was associated with a significant increase in sputum bacterial load (p=0.005), modification of sputum microbial composition and increased airway load of potentially pathogenic bacteria. The increased bacterial load was observed only in inhaled corticosteroid-treated patients with lower baseline sputum or blood eosinophil (≤2%) levels but not in patients with higher baseline eosinophils.Long-term inhaled corticosteroid treatment affects bacterial load in stable COPD. Lower eosinophil counts are associated with increased airway bacterial load. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  9. Assessing adrenal insufficiency of corticosteroid secretion using free versus total cortisol levels in critical illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, Nienke; Johan Groeneveld, A. B.; Dijstelbloem, Hilde M.; de Jong, Margriet F. C.; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Beishuizen, Albertus

    2011-01-01

    To study the value of free versus total cortisol levels in assessing relative adrenal insufficiency during critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency. A prospective study in a mixed intensive care unit from 2004 to 2007. We consecutively included 49 septic and 63 non-septic patients with

  10. Assessing adrenal insufficiency of corticosteroid secretion using free versus total cortisol levels in critical illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, N.; Groeneveld, A.B.J.; Dijstelbloem, H.M.; de Jong, M.F.C.; Girbes, A.R.J.; Heijboer, A.C.; Beishuizen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To study the value of free versus total cortisol levels in assessing relative adrenal insufficiency during critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency. Methods: A prospective study in a mixed intensive care unit from 2004 to 2007. We consecutively included 49 septic and 63

  11. Role of corticosteroids in Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery--a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pundir, Vishal; Pundir, Jyotsna; Lancaster, Gillian; Baer, Simon; Kirkland, Paul; Cornet, Marjolein; Lourijsen, E. S.; Georgalas, Christos; Fokkens, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to systematically review the existing evidence on the role of corticosteroids in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Systematic search of MEDLINE (1950- 2014), EMBASE (1980-2014), metaRegister, Cochrane Library and ISI conference proceedings was

  12. Corticosteroids for the treatment of idiopathic acute vestibular dysfunction (vestibular neuritis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jonathan M; Burgess, Chris; Waddell, Angus

    2011-05-11

    Idiopathic acute vestibular dysfunction (vestibular neuritis) is the second most common cause of peripheral vertigo after benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and accounts for 7% of the patients who present at outpatient clinics specialising in the treatment of dizziness. The exact aetiology of the condition is unknown and the effects of corticosteroids on the condition and its recovery are uncertain. To assess the effectiveness of corticosteroids in the management of patients with idiopathic acute vestibular dysfunction (vestibular neuritis). We searched the Cochrane ENT Group Trials Register; CENTRAL; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; BIOSIS Previews; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the most recent search was 28 December 2010. Randomised controlled trials comparing corticosteroids with placebo, no treatment or other active treatments, for adults diagnosed with idiopathic acute vestibular dysfunction. Two authors independently selected studies from the search results and extracted data. Three authors independently assessed risk of bias. Four trials, involving a total of 149 participants, compared the effectiveness of oral corticosteroids against placebo. All the trials were small and of low methodological quality. Although there was an overall significant effect of corticosteroids compared with placebo medication on complete caloric recovery at one month (risk ratio (RR) of 2.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32 to 6.00, P = 0.007), no significant effect was seen on complete caloric recovery at 12 months (RR 1.58; 95% CI 0.45 to 5.62, P = 0.48), or on the extent of caloric recovery at either one month (mean difference (MD) 9.60%; 95% CI -20.66 to 39.86, P = 0.53) or at 12 months (MD 6.83%; 95% CI -27.69 to 41.36, P = 0.70). In addition, there was no significant difference between corticosteroids and placebo medication in the symptomatic recovery of vestibular function

  13. Glenohumeral corticosteroid injections in adhesive capsulitis: a systematic search and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Amos; Higgins, Laurence D; Newman, Joel; Jain, Nitin B

    2014-12-01

    To assess the literature on outcomes of corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis, and, in particular, image-guided corticosteroid injections. TYPE: Systematic search and review. The databases used were PubMed (1966-present), EMBASE (1947-present), Web of Science (1900-present), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Upon reviewing full-text articles of these studies, a total of 25 studies were identified for inclusion. The final yield included 7 prospective studies, 16 randomized trials, and 2 retrospective studies. This systematic review was formatted by using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Study criteria were limited to clinical trials, prospective studies, and retrospective studies that specifically evaluated intra-articular corticosteroid injections, both alone and in combination with other treatment modalities, for shoulder adhesive capsulitis. We included studies that were not randomized control trials because our review was not a meta-analysis. Data items extracted from each study included the following: study design, study population, mean patient age, duration of study, duration of symptoms, intervention, single or multiple injections, location of injections, control population, follow-up duration, and outcome measurements. A percentage change in outcome measurements was calculated when corresponding data were available. Risk of bias in individual studies was assessed when appropriate. All the studies involved at least 1 corticosteroid injection intended for placement in the glenohumeral joint, but only 8 studies used image guidance for all injections. Seven of these studies reported statistically significant improvements in range of motion at or before 12 weeks of follow-up. Ninety-two percent of all the studies documented a greater improvement in either visual analog pain scores or range of motion after corticosteroid injections in the first 1-6 weeks compared with the control

  14. Uveal effusion syndrome in 104 eyes: Response to corticosteroids – The 2017 Axel C. Hansen lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol L Shields

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the study was to investigate the corticosteroids for uveal effusion syndrome (UES. Methods: Retrospective series of 104 eyes with UES treated with oral corticosteroids (OCS, periocular corticosteroids (PCS, topical corticosteroids (TCS, or observation (OBS. Main outcome measure was UES resolution. Results: Of 104 eyes, treatment included OCS (n = 27, PCS (n = 12, TCS (n = 11, and OBS (n = 54. A comparison of the four groups (OCS vs. PCS vs. TCS vs. OBS revealed differences in those managed with OCS versus OBS as younger (66 vs. 72 years, P = 0.049, PCS versus OBS as male (100% vs. 54%, P = 0.002, PCS versus OBS with decreased visual acuity (VA/visual field (91% vs. 51%, P = 0.018, and OBS versus OCS as asymptomatic (28% vs. 0%, P = 0.001. Of the 59 with follow-up information, management included OCS (n = 21, PCS (n = 12, TCS (n = 6, and OBS (n = 20. There were differences in initial VA <20/400 in PCS versus OBS (42% vs. 5%, P = 0.018, effusion thickness in TCS versus OCS (7 vs. 3 mm, P = 0.004, and serous retinal detachment in PCS versus OBS (100% vs. 30%, P < 0.001 and PCS versus OCS (100% vs. 57%, P = 0.012. Regarding outcomes, VA showed less worsening in OCS versus OBS (0% vs. 30%, P = 0.008 and OCS versus PCS (0% vs. 33%, P = 0.012. There was no difference in rate of effusion resolution or effusion recurrence. Overall, using combination of corticosteroid therapies, effusion resolution was achieved in 56/59 (95% cases and the need for surgical management with scleral windows was necessary in only 3/59 (5% cases. Complications included cataract (n = 9 and no instance of steroid-induced glaucoma. Conclusion: Management of UES is complex and depends on disease severity. Using various corticosteroid delivery routes, UES control was achieved in 95%, and scleral window surgery was required in only 5%. A trial of corticosteroids can benefit patients with UES.

  15. Morphological correlates of corticosteroid-induced changes in prefrontal cortex-dependent behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, João J; Pêgo, José M; Taipa, Ricardo; Bessa, João M; Almeida, Osborne F X; Sousa, Nuno

    2005-08-24

    Imbalances in the corticosteroid milieu have been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction is also a hallmark of these conditions, causing impairments in executive functions such as behavioral flexibility and working memory. Recent studies have suggested that the PFC might be influenced by corticosteroids released during stress. To test this possibility, we assessed spatial working memory and behavioral flexibility in rats submitted to chronic adrenalectomy or treatment with corticosterone (25 mg/kg) or the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (300 microg/kg); the behavioral analysis was complemented by stereological evaluation of the PFC (prelimbic, infralimbic, and anterior cingulate regions), the adjacent retrosplenial and motor cortices, and the hippocampal formation. Dexamethasone treatment resulted in a pronounced impairment in working memory and behavioral flexibility, effects that correlated with neuronal loss and atrophy of layer II of the infralimbic, prelimbic, and cingulate cortices. Exposure to corticosterone produced milder impairments in behavioral flexibility, but not in working memory, and reduced the volume of layer II of all prefrontal areas. Interestingly, adrenalectomy-induced deleterious effects only became apparent on the reverse learning task and were not associated with structural alterations in the PFC. None of the experimental procedures influenced the morphology of retrosplenial or motor cortices, but stereological measurements confirmed previously observed effects of corticosteroids on hippocampal structure. Our results describe, for the first time, that imbalances in the corticosteroid environment can induce degeneration of specific layers of the PFC; these changes appear to be the morphological correlate of corticosteroid-induced impairment of PFC-dependent behavior(s).

  16. Predicting Hospitalization and Outpatient Corticosteroid Use in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Using Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waljee, Akbar K; Lipson, Rachel; Wiitala, Wyndy L; Zhang, Yiwei; Liu, Boang; Zhu, Ji; Wallace, Beth; Govani, Shail M; Stidham, Ryan W; Hayward, Rodney; Higgins, Peter D R

    2017-12-19

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease characterized by unpredictable episodes of flares and periods of remission. Tools that accurately predict disease course would substantially aid therapeutic decision-making. This study aims to construct a model that accurately predicts the combined end point of outpatient corticosteroid use and hospitalizations as a surrogate for IBD flare. Predictors evaluated included age, sex, race, use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive medications (immunomodulators and/or anti-TNF), longitudinal laboratory data, and number of previous IBD-related hospitalizations and outpatient corticosteroid prescriptions. We constructed models using logistic regression and machine learning methods (random forest [RF]) to predict the combined end point of hospitalization and/or corticosteroid use for IBD within 6 months. We identified 20,368 Veterans Health Administration patients with the first (index) IBD diagnosis between 2002 and 2009. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AuROC) for the baseline logistic regression model was 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.68). AuROC for the RF longitudinal model was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.84-0.85). AuROC for the RF longitudinal model using previous hospitalization or steroid use was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.87-0.88). The 5 leading independent risk factors for future hospitalization or steroid use were age, mean serum albumin, immunosuppressive medication use, and mean and highest platelet counts. Previous hospitalization and corticosteroid use were highly predictive when included in specified models. A novel machine learning model substantially improved our ability to predict IBD-related hospitalization and outpatient steroid use. This model could be used at point of care to distinguish patients at high and low risk for disease flare, allowing individualized therapeutic management. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America 2017.

  17. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM CORTICOSTEROID THERAPY OF NEPHROTIC SYNDROME IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Nastausheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long-term corticosteroid therapy in children leads to plenty of adverse effects with negative influence on health. Objective: analysis of adverse effects of corticosteroids in children with steroid-sensitive  nephrotic syndrome and development of recommendations of their early detection.Methods: A retrospective study is conducted on children with this syndrome aged 3–18 who applied to Voronezh Regional Children’s Clinical Hospital № 1 in 2011–2014.  Complications  of corticosteroid  therapy revealed during clinical examination of children were taken into account. Data on 118 healthy children examined in 2012–2014 were used to calculate integral index.Results: The study analyses treatment results of 18 children who received glucocorticosteroids  during 6 months before hospitalization and 13 children who were withdrawn from glucocorticosteroids  for 6 months or more before hospitalization. Among adverse reactions in group 1 there prevailed overweight/obesity  (78%, reactive pancreatitis (72%, leukemoid reactions (67%, liver damage (61%, Cushingoid syndrome (44%, chronic gastroduodenitis  (33%. Hyperglycemia (11%, hypertension (6% and infection (6% were less common. In group 2 only 2 (15% patients had chronic gastroduodenitis,  other complications were not documented. Indices that change in children with nephrotic syndrome during corticosteroid treatment (body mass index, blood serum glucose and amylase were measured by a single scale using modifications coefficients. Average value of the coefficients is suggested to be a new diagnostic criterion (metabolic reaction index which allows to reveal corticosteroid adverse effects before any clinical manifestations.Conclusion: Most adverse reactions of glucocorticosteroids are short-term and continue after 6 months in a small number of patients.

  18. The clinical effect of tendon repair for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection in hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Yang, Hu; Shen, Hui; Ye, Ganmin; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroid injections for hand tendinitis can lead to a rare significant complication of tendon spontaneous rupture. However, only sporadic cases were reported in the literature before. This study was designed to gauge the clinical effect of tendon repair in patients of tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection and analyze our experience. This was a retrospective observational study of 13 patients (8 women and 5 men) operated between July 2011 and December 2015 for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection. Demographic data, clinical features, imaging data, and surgical treatments were carefully reviewed. The average age was 52.308 ± 15.381 years (range 29–71). The average injection times were 2.538 ± 1.664 times (range 1–6). The average rupture time (after last injection) was 10.923 ± 9.500 weeks (range 3–32). Nine patients were treated by tendon suture (69% of cases), and 4 patients were treated by tendon grafting (31% of cases). All patients received follow-up in our outpatient clinic. The sites of the tendon rupture (15 tendons of 13 patients had involved) include extensor pollicis longus (6 tendons, 40% of cases), extensor digiti quinti and extensor digiti minimi (4 tendons, 27% of cases), ring finger of extensor digitorum communis (3 tendons, 20% of cases), and middle finger of extensor digitorum communis (2 tendons, 13% of cases). Two patients who had tendon adhesion (15% of cases) were treated by tendon release. One patient who had tendon rerupture (8% of cases) was treated by tendon grafting. No patient had complications of infections, vascular, or nerve injury. Tendon spontaneous rupture is a serious complication after corticosteroid injection for tendinitis. Rigid standard of corticosteroid injection is very important. Magnetic resonance imaging was contributory to preoperative assess tendon defect and can be used to monitor healing quality of tendons during the follow-up. PMID:27741145

  19. Antenatal and postnatal corticosteroid and resuscitation induced lung injury in preterm sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallapur Suhas G

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Initiation of ventilation using high tidal volumes in preterm lambs causes lung injury and inflammation. Antenatal corticosteroids mature the lungs of preterm infants and postnatal corticosteroids are used to treat bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Objective To test if antenatal or postnatal corticosteroids would decrease resuscitation induced lung injury. Methods 129 d gestational age lambs (n = 5-8/gp; term = 150 d were operatively delivered and ventilated after exposure to either 1 no medication, 2 antenatal maternal IM Betamethasone 0.5 mg/kg 24 h prior to delivery, 3 0.5 mg/kg Dexamethasone IV at delivery or 4 Cortisol 2 mg/kg IV at delivery. Lambs then were ventilated with no PEEP and escalating tidal volumes (VT to 15 mL/kg for 15 min and then given surfactant. The lambs were ventilated with VT 8 mL/kg and PEEP 5 cmH20 for 2 h 45 min. Results High VT ventilation caused a deterioration of lung physiology, lung inflammation and injury. Antenatal betamethasone improved ventilation, decreased inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and alveolar protein leak, but did not prevent neutrophil influx. Postnatal dexamethasone decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, but had no beneficial effect on ventilation, and postnatal cortisol had no effect. Ventilation increased liver serum amyloid mRNA expression, which was unaffected by corticosteroids. Conclusions Antenatal betamethasone decreased lung injury without decreasing lung inflammatory cells or systemic acute phase responses. Postnatal dexamethasone or cortisol, at the doses tested, did not have important effects on lung function or injury, suggesting that corticosteroids given at birth will not decrease resuscitation mediated injury.

  20. Association between systemic antibiotic and corticosteroid use for chronic rhinosinusitis and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Alisa; Hoehle, Lloyd P; Phillips, Katie M; Feng, Allen L; Campbell, Adam P; Caradonna, David S; Gray, Stacey T; Sedaghat, Ahmad R

    2018-01-01

    We sought to establish the significance of querying chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients about their past CRS-related oral antibiotic and corticosteroid usage by determining the association between these metrics and patients' quality of life (QoL). Cross-sectional study. A total of 157 patients with CRS were prospectively recruited. CRS-specific QoL was measured using the 22-item Sinonasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22). General health-related QoL was measured using the EuroQoL five-dimensional questionnaire visual analog scale. Associations were sought between these measures of QoL and frequency of CRS-related oral antibiotic and corticosteroid usage reported by the participants in the prior 3 and 12 months. More frequent antibiotic and corticosteroid use was significantly associated with worse CRS-specific and general health-related QoL, whether querying medication use over the prior 3 months or over the prior 12 months (P antibiotic use during the prior 3 months on CRS-specific QoL (SNOT-22 score) was significantly greater than for use during the prior 12 months. However, there was no other statistically significant difference in effect size for association between QoL and CRS-related antibiotic or corticosteroid use in the prior 3 months versus prior 12 months. These results were independent of the presence or absence of polyps. More frequent past CRS-related oral antibiotic and corticosteroid use, regardless of time period queried (3 months or 12 months) is associated with significant decrease in CRS-specific and general health-related QoL. CRS-related systemic medication use is an important indicator of CRS patients' QOL that easily can be queried and utilized in both clinical and research settings. 2c. Laryngoscope, 128:37-42, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Corticosteroids-Mechanisms of Action in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Sivapriya; Cidlowski, John A.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Glucocorticoids are primary stress hormones that regulate a variety of physiologic processes and are essential for life. The actions of glucocorticoids are predominantly mediated through the classic glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Glucocorticoid receptors are expressed throughout the body, but there is considerable heterogeneity in glucocorticoid sensitivity and biological responses across tissues. Ligand-activated GR induces or represses the transcription of thousands of genes through direct binding to DNA response elements, physically associating with other transcription factors, or both. The conventional belief that glucocorticoids act through a single GR protein has changed dramatically with the discovery of a diverse collection of receptor isoforms. These GR variants are derived from a single gene by alternative splicing and alternative translation initiation mechanisms. Moreover, posttranslational modifications of these GR isoforms further expand the heterogeneity of glucocorticoid signaling. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms that regulate glucocorticoid actions, highlight the dynamic nature of hormone signaling and discuss the molecular properties of the GR isoforms. PMID:26611548

  2. Evaluation of prenatal corticosteroid use in spontaneous preterm labor in the Brazilian Multicenter Study on Preterm Birth (EMIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Tabata Z; Passini, Renato; Tedesco, Ricardo P; Lajos, Giuliane J; Rehder, Patricia M; Nomura, Marcelo L; Costa, Maria L; Oliveira, Paulo F; Sousa, Maria H; Cecatti, Jose G

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate prenatal corticosteroid use in women experiencing spontaneous preterm labor and preterm delivery. The present cross-sectional multicenter study analyzed interview data from patients attending 20 hospitals in Brazil owing to preterm delivery between April 1, 2011 and July 30, 2012. Patients were stratified based on preterm delivery occurring before 34 weeks or at 34-36 +6  weeks of pregnancy, and the frequency of prenatal corticosteroid use at admission was compared. Prenatal corticosteroid use, sociodemographic data, obstetric characteristics, and neonatal outcomes were examined. There were 1455 preterm deliveries included in the present study; 527 (36.2%) occurred before 34 weeks of pregnancy and prenatal corticosteroids were used in 285 (54.1%) of these pregnancies. Among neonates delivered at 32-33 +6  weeks, prenatal corticosteroid use was associated with lower pneumonia (P=0.026) and mortality (P=0.029) rates. Among neonates delivered at 34-36 +6  weeks, prenatal corticosteroid use was associated with longer neonatal hospital admission (Pprenatal corticosteroids. This could reflect a sub-optimal interval between administration and delivery. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  3. A Retrospective Analysis of Corticosteroid Utilization Before Initiation of Biologic DMARDs Among Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Christina A; Griffith, Jenny; Kaplan, Cameron; Postlethwaite, Arnold; Ganguli, Arijit; Wang, Junling

    2017-12-04

    Understanding the effects of corticosteroid utilization prior to initiation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) can inform decision-makers on the appropriate use of these medications. This study examined treatment patterns and associated burden of corticosteroid utilization before initiation of biologic DMARDs among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted of adult RA patients in the US MarketScan Database (2011-2015). The following patterns of corticosteroid utilization were analyzed: whether corticosteroids were used; duration of use (short/long duration defined as biologic DMARD initiation were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. Likelihood and number of adverse events were examined using logistic and negative binomial regression models. Generalized linear models were used to examine healthcare costs. Independent variables in all models included patient demographics and health characteristics. A total of 25,542 patients were included (40.84% used corticosteroids). Lower hazard of biologic DMARD initiation was associated with corticosteroid use (hazard ratio = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.83-0.96), long duration and lower dose. Corticosteroid users compared to non-users had higher incidence rates of various adverse events including cardiovascular events (P biologic DMARDS and higher burden of adverse events and healthcare utilization/costs before the initiation of biologic DMARDs. AbbVie Inc.

  4. Autologous whole blood versus corticosteroid local injection in treatment of plantar fasciitis: A randomized, controlled multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Afshin; Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Erfani Fam, Saleh; Sedighipour, Leyla; Babaei-Ghazani, Arash

    2017-03-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Local injection modalities are among treatment options in patients with resistant pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of local autologous whole blood compared with corticosteroid local injection in treatment of plantar fasciitis. In this randomized controlled multicenter study, 36 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis were recruited. Patients were allocated randomly into three treatment groups: local autologous blood, local corticosteroid injection, and control groups receiving no injection. Patients were assessed with visual analog scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and plantar fasciitis pain/disability scale (PFPS) before treatment, as well as 4 and 12 weeks post therapy. Variables of pain and function improved significantly in both corticosteroid and autologous blood groups compared to control group. At 4 weeks following treatment, patients in corticosteroid group had significantly lower levels of pain than patients in autologous blood and control groups (higher PPT level, lower PFPS, and VAS). After 12 weeks of treatment, both corticosteroid and autologous blood groups had lower average levels of pain than control group. The corticosteroid group showed an early sharp and then more gradual improvement in pain scores, but autologous blood group had a steady gradual drop in pain. Autologous whole blood and corticosteroid local injection can both be considered as effective methods in the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis. These treatments decrease pain and significantly improve function compared to no treatment.

  5. The Effect of Postoperative Corticosteroid Administration on Free Vascularized Fibular Grafting for Treating Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Free vascularized fibular grafting (FVFG has been reported to be an effective method of treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH. This study evaluated whether postoperative maintenance doses of corticosteroids had an adverse effect on FVFG outcomes in patients with corticosteroid-induced ONFH. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 39 patients (67 hips who had received maintenance doses of corticosteroids following FVFG. This group was matched to a group of patients who had not received corticosteroids treatment after operation. The mean follow-up duration was 5.4 years for the postoperative corticosteroid administration group (PCA group and 5.0 years for the control group. At the latest follow-up, the average increase in Harris hip score was 11.1 ± 8.7 points for all hips in the PCA group and 12.6 ± 7.4 points for all hips in the control group (P>0.05. In the PCA group, through radiographic evaluation, 49 hips were improved, 10 hips appeared unchanged, and 8 hips appeared worse. In the control group, 47 hips were improved, 13 hips appeared unchanged, and 7 hips appeared worse. The results suggested that postoperative maintenance doses of corticosteroids do not have an adverse effect on FVFG outcomes in patients with corticosteroid-induced ONFH.

  6. Antenatal corticosteroids beyond 34 weeks gestation: What do we do now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Rozance, Paul J; Goldenberg, Robert L; Jobe, Alan H

    2016-10-01

    The practice of antenatal corticosteroid administration in pregnancies of 24-34 weeks of gestation that are at risk of preterm delivery was adopted over 20 years after the first randomized clinical trial in humans. It is biologically plausible that antenatal corticosteroid in pregnancies beyond 34 weeks of gestation would reduce rates of respiratory morbidity and neonatal intensive care admission. Mostly guided by the results of a large multicenter randomized trial of antenatal corticosteroid in late preterm infants, the Antenatal Late Preterm Steroids Trial, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has released a practice advisory that the "administration of betamethasone may be considered in women with a singleton pregnancy between 34 0/7 and 36 6/7 weeks of gestation at imminent risk of preterm birth within 7 days." However, many unanswered questions about the risks and benefits of antenatal corticosteroids in this population remain and should be considered with the adoption of this treatment recommendation. This review of the literature indicates that the greatest effect is in the reduction of transient tachypnea of the newborn infant, which is a mostly self-limited condition. This benefit must be weighed against unanticipated outcomes, such as neonatal hypoglycemia, and unknowns about long-term neurodevelopmental follow up and metabolic risks. Amelioration of respiratory morbidity in late preterm infants does not preclude these infants from having other complications that are related to prematurity that require intensive care. Other possible morbidities of prematurity may be magnified if these babies no longer have respiratory symptoms. Conversely, if these late preterm babies no longer exhibit respiratory symptoms and "look good," they may be discharged before other morbidities of prematurity have resolved and be at risk for readmission. Furthermore, it is also important to ensure that unintended consequences are avoided to achieve a minor

  7. The Effectiveness of Oral Pain Medication and Corticosteroid Injections for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome-A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisstede, Bionka Ma; Randsdorp, Manon S; van den Brink, Janneke; Franke, Thierry Pc; Koes, Bart W; Hoogvliet, Peter

    2018-04-04

    To present an evidence-based overview of the effectiveness of oral pain medication and corticosteroid injections to treat carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PEDro were searched for relevant systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Two reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted the data on pain (VAS), function or recovery and assessed the methodological quality. A best-evidence synthesis was performed to summarize the results of the included studies. Four reviews and nine RCTs were included. For oral pain medication strong and moderate evidence was found for the effectiveness of oral steroids versus placebo in the short-term. Moderate evidence was found in favor of oral steroids versus splinting in the short-term. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of oral steroids in the long-term. For corticosteroid injections, strong evidence was found in favor of a corticosteroid injection versus a placebo injection and moderate evidence was found in favor of corticosteroid injection versus oral steroids in the short-term. Also in short-term, moderate evidence was found in favor of a local versus a systematic corticosteroid injection. Higher doses of corticosteroid injections seem to be more effective in the midterm, however the benefits of corticosteroid injections were not maintained in the long-term. The reviewed evidence supports that oral steroids and corticosteroid injections benefit patient with CTS particular in the short-term. Although a higher dose of steroid injections seems to be more effective in the midterm, the benefits of oral pain medication and corticosteroid injections were not maintained in the long-term. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The effects of topical corticosteroids and a coal tar preparation on dithranol-induced irritation in patients with psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinkels, O.Q.J.; Kucharekova, M.; Prins, M.; Gerritsen, M.J.P.; van der Valk, P.G.M.; van de Kerkhof, P.C.M. [University of Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Medical Center

    2003-02-01

    Dithranol has been a mainstay in the treatment of psoriasis for more than 80 years. Although a safe approach, the irritation of the clinically uninvolved perilesional skin remains a major limitation of this treatment. Corticosteroids and coal tar solution have an anti-inflammatory potential. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical and cell-biological effects of two topical corticosteroids and a coal tar preparation on dithranol-irritated skin. The expression of epidermal proliferation, differentiation and inflammation markers and the clinical irritation scores indicate that the application of a high potency corticosteroid is the best approach to minimise dithranol irritation.

  9. Short-term efficacy of sacroiliac joint corticosteroid injection based on arthrographic contrast patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Paul M; Patel, Shounuck I; Christos, Paul J; Singh, Jaspal R

    2015-04-01

    To determine the relationship between sacroiliac joint (SIJ) contrast dispersal patterns during SIJ corticosteroid injection and pain relief at 2 and 8 weeks after the procedure. The association between the number of positive provocative SIJ physical examination maneuvers (minimum of one in all patients undergoing SIJ injection) and the patient's response to the intervention was also assessed. Retrospective chart review. Academic outpatient musculoskeletal practice. Fifty-four subjects who underwent therapeutic SIJ corticosteroid injection were screened for inclusion; 49 subjects were included in the final analysis. A retrospective review of electronic medical records identified patients who underwent SIJ corticosteroid injection. Fluoroscopic contrast flow patterns were categorized as type I (intra-articular injection with cephalad extension within the SIJ) or type II (intra-articular injection with poor cephalad extension). Self-reported numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) values at the time of injection and 2 and 8 weeks after the procedure were recorded. The number of positive provocative SIJ physical examination maneuvers at the time of the initial evaluation was also recorded. The primary outcome measure was the effect of contrast patterns (type I or type II) on change in NPRS values at 2 weeks and 8 weeks after the injection. The secondary outcome measure was the association between the number of positive provocative SIJ physical examination maneuvers and decrease in the level of pain after the procedure. At 2 weeks after the procedure, type I subjects demonstrated a significantly lower mean NPRS value compared with type II subjects (2.8 ± 1.4 versus 3.8 ± 1.6, respectively, P = .02). No statistically significant difference was observed at 8 weeks after the procedure. NPRS values were significantly reduced both at 2 weeks and 8 weeks, compared with baseline, in both subjects identified as having type I flow and those with type II flow (P < .0001 for all

  10. The effectiveness of corticosteroid injections compared with physiotherapeutic interventions for adhesive capsulitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Victoria; Barr, Steven; Cerisola, Frances L

    2010-06-01

    To determine the effectiveness of corticosteroid injections compared with physiotherapeutic interventions for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis/frozen shoulder. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and AMED were searched up to Week 23 2009. Additional database searching included the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), the National Research Register and the National Recognition Information Centre, also up to Week 23 2009. All English-language studies were eligible for inclusion if they showed evidence of random allocation of subjects to either a corticosteroid injection group or a physiotherapeutic intervention group. Studies were considered for inclusion if participants had a stated diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis/frozen shoulder or restriction of passive or active movement in two or more planes. The primary outcomes of interest were pain, external rotation and shoulder disability/function. Quality assessment was assessed using the PEDro scale. Standardised mean differences and effect estimates were calculated for the outcomes of pain, external rotation and shoulder disability at various follow-up periods. Six studies were deemed eligible for inclusion in the final review. All had evidence of random allocation to either an injection group or a physiotherapeutic intervention group. There were some differences between the studies with regard to both the corticosteroid injections and physiotherapeutic interventions. Standardised mean differences and effect estimates were calculated for three of the included studies at various follow-up periods. There was a medium effect for corticosteroid injections compared with physiotherapeutic interventions for the outcomes of pain, passive external rotation and shoulder disability at 6 weeks. There was only a small effect in favour of corticosteroid injections for pain, passive external rotation and shoulder disability at 12 to 16 weeks and 26 weeks

  11. Corticosteroids in sepsis: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis (protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochwerg, Bram; Oczkowski, Simon; Siemieniuk, Reed Alexander; Menon, Kusum; Szczeklik, Wojciech; English, Shane; Agoritsas, Thomas; Belley-Cote, Emilie; D'Aragon, Frédérick; Alhazzani, Waleed; Duan, Erick; Gossack-Keenan, Kira; Sevransky, Jon; Vandvik, Per; Venkatesh, Bala; Guyatt, Gordon; Annane, Djillali

    2017-06-30

    Sepsis is associated with a dysregulated host response to infection and impaired endogenous corticosteroid metabolism. As such, therapeutic use of exogenous corticosteroids is a promising adjunctive intervention. Despite a large number of trials examining this research question, uncertainty persists regarding the effect of corticosteroids on survival in sepsis. Several large randomised controlled trials have been published recently prompting a re-evaluation of the available literature. A rigorous and reproducible search and screening process from a Cochrane review on the same topic was comprehensive to October 2014. We will search MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, the Cochrane trial registry and clinicaltrials.gov for eligible randomised controlled trials investigating the use of corticosteroids in patients with sepsis from September 2014. Outcomes have been chosen by a semi-independent guideline panel, created in the context of a parallel BMJ Rapid Recommendation on the topic. This panel includes clinicians, content experts, methodologists and patient representatives, who will help identify patient-important outcomes that are critical for deciding whether to use or not use corticosteroids in sepsis. Two reviewers will independently screen and identify eligible studies; a third reviewer will resolve any disagreements. We will use RevMan to pool effect estimates from included studies for each outcome using a random-effect model. We will present the results as relative risk with 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes and as mean difference or standardised mean difference for continuous outcomes with 95% CI. We will assess the certainty of evidence at the outcome level using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. We will conduct a priori subgroup analyses, which have been chosen by the parallel BMJ Rapid Recommendation panel. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise the updated evidence on the efficacy and safety of corticosteroids

  12. A randomised pragmatic trial of corticosteroid optimization in severe asthma using a composite biomarker algorithm to adjust corticosteroid dose versus standard care:study protocol for a randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hanratty, Catherine E; Matthews, John G; Arron, Joseph R; Choy, David F; Pavord, Ian D; Bradding, P; Brightling, Christopher E; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Cowan, Douglas C; Djukanovic, Ratko; Gallagher, Nicola; Fowler, Stephen J; Hardman, Tim C; Harrison, Tim; Holweg, Cécile T

    2018-01-01

    Background Patients with difficult-to-control asthma consume 50–60% of healthcare costs attributed to asthma and cost approximately five-times more than patients with mild stable disease. Recent evidence demonstrates that not all patients with asthma have a typical type 2 (T2)-driven eosinophilic inflammation. These asthmatics have been called ‘T2-low asthma’ and have a minimal response to corticosteroid therapy. Adjustment of corticosteroid treatment using sputum eosinophil counts from induc...

  13. Molecularly imprinted polymers for corticosteroids: impact of polymer format on recognition behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzhenry, Laurence; Duggan, Patrick; McLoughlin, Peter; Manesiotis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on different polymeric formats for targeting corticosteroids, focusing on the use of bulk monolith and precipitation polymerisation strategies. Hydrocortisone-17-butyrate was selected as the template and methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, following 1 H NMR investigation of the pre-polymerisation mixture. Three different cross-linkers were tested, ranging from moderate to highly hydrophobic. The synthesised bulk and precipitated imprinted polymers were physically characterised by nitrogen sorption and evaluated by means of HPLC and frontal chromatography against a range of template analogues. While some degree of selectivity for the template was achieved for all tested polymers, the ones based on the tri-functional cross-linking monomer trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate exhibited the longest retention for all corticosteroids, especially in the precipitated format, which suggested broader group selectivity. (author)

  14. Enrolment in an Asthma Management Program during Pregnancy and Adherence with Inhaled Corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baarnes, Camilla Boslev; Hansen, A V; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor adherence with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is a major problem in asthma and according to previous studies not least during pregnancy. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess if enrolment in an asthma management program, and by that close monitoring, can improve self-reported and docum......BACKGROUND: Poor adherence with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) is a major problem in asthma and according to previous studies not least during pregnancy. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to assess if enrolment in an asthma management program, and by that close monitoring, can improve self....... Self-reported adherence was significantly correlated with MPR during pregnancy (p = 0.004) but not before pregnancy (p = 0.46). At the 3-month postpartum visit, adherence was close to the pre-pregnancy level. CONCLUSION: Enrolment in an asthma management program during pregnancy seems to improve...

  15. Providing antenatal corticosteroids for preterm birth: a quality improvement initiative in Cambodia and the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey Michael; Gupta, Shivam; Williams, Emma; Brickson, Kate; Ly Sotha, Keth; Tep, Navuth; Calibo, Anthony; Castro, Mary Christine; Marinduque, Bernabe; Hathaway, Mark

    2016-12-01

    To determine whether a simple quality improvement initiative consisting of a technical update and regular audit and feedback sessions will result in increased use of antenatal corticosteroids among pregnant women at risk of imminent preterm birth delivering at health facilities in the Philippines and Cambodia. Non-randomized, observational study using a pre-/post-intervention design conducted between October 2013 and June 2014. A total of 12 high volume facilities providing Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care services in Cambodia (6) and Philippines (6). A technical update on preterm birth and use of antenatal corticosteroids, followed by monthly audit and feedback sessions. The proportion of women at risk of imminent preterm birth who received at least one dose of dexamethasone. Coverage of at least one dose of dexamethasone increased from 35% at baseline to 86% at endline in Cambodia (P Cambodia and Philippines. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care.

  16. Eight Years Follow-up of a Case with Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis After Corticosteroid Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Hasan; Köksal, Nurhan; Özkan, Fuat

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is characterized by recurrent episodes of alveolar hemorrhage, hemoptysis, and secondary iron deficiency anemia with unknown etiology. It generally emerges in childhood and adolescence periods but rarely found in adulthood. Definite diagnosis is established by appearing the hemosiderin-laden macrophages at sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, or open lung biopsy. We reported a male patient who was born in 1975, expectorated blood since 1995, and was diagnosed in 1998. He received many blood replacements. He admitted to our clinic in 2003 with complaints of coughing up blood, shortness of breath, and tiredness. We gave the corticosteroid therapy to patient for 6-month period. After treatment, the patient did not have any complaints. Clinicians should keep in mind that idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis may differ in localization on chest X-ray and corticosteroid treatment should be started when diagnosis is established. PMID:22393549

  17. Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia Associated With Allogenic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Successfully Treated With Corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam-Phuong Nguyen DO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP is an extremely rare, relatively new, and distinct histological pattern of acute lung injury characterized predominately by the presence of intra-alveolar fibrin and associated organizing pneumonia. AFOP may be idiopathic or associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. It has a variable clinical presentation from mild respiratory symptoms to that similar to the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Currently there is no consensus on treatment, and corticosteroids previously were of unclear benefit. To date, there are less than 40 cases of AFOP reported in the literature and only one has been linked to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we report the first case series of 2 patients who developed AFOP following allogenic stem cell transplant that were successfully treated with high-dose corticosteroids.

  18. Ultrasound-guided Corticosteroid Injection for the Treatment of Athletic Pubalgia: A Series of 12 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Jose

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Surgical treatment for athletic pubalgia is the standard of care, however, it poses risks. This study investigated the use of ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections as an alternative treatment. Twelve consecutive patients underwent injections into the area of degeneration in the rectus abdominis and/or adductor longus aponeurosis. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC scores were used to evaluate treatment effectiveness. The average WOMAC score was 90.9. With a mean follow up of 8.7 months (range, 6–19 months, eight of the 12 patients reported complete symptom resolution. In conclusion, corticosteroid injections alleviate pain in patients with athletic pubalgia and provide an alternative to surgery.

  19. Treatment with aspirin, NSAID, corticosteroids, and colchicine in acute and recurrent pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazio, Massimo; Adler, Yehuda

    2013-05-01

    Empiric anti-inflammatory therapy for acute and recurrent pericarditis is warranted for viral and idiopathic cases that represent most cases of pericarditis in developed countries. For specific uncomplicated etiologies, such as systemic autoimmune diseases and postpericardiotomy syndromes, the same drugs are also indicated. Aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are mainstay of therapy with the possible adjunct of colchicine, especially for recurrences. Corticosteroids are a second choice for difficult cases requiring multi-drug therapies and specific medical conditions (i.e., specific cases with systemic autoimmune diseases, postpericardiotomy syndrome, and pregnancy). Medical therapy of pericarditis should be individualized as much as possible providing the attack dose every 8 h to ensure full daily control of symptoms and till remission and C-reactive protein normalization, and then tapering should be considered. The present paper will review current evidence for the treatment of acute and recurrent pericarditis with aspirin, NSAID, corticosteroids, and colchicine.

  20. Severe renal failure in acute bacterial pyelonephritis: Do not forget corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sqalli Tarik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a rare complication of acute pyelonephritis in adult immunocompetent patients. Recovery of renal function usually occurs if antibiotics are promptly initiated. However, long-term consequences of renal scarring due to acute pyelonephritis are probably underestimated, and some patients present with prolonged renal failure despite adequate antibiotic therapy. We report two cases of severe ARF complicating bacterial pyelonephritis successfully treated with corticosteroids in association with conventional antibiotics.

  1. Impact of socioeconomic status on the use of inhaled corticosteroids in young adult asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Søndergaard, Jens; Hallas, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this population-based longitudinal study was to examine the associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and anti-asthmatic treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) among young Danish adult asthmatics, and to investigate whether these associations were consistent over...... use in young adult asthmatics. To encourage ICS use, special attention should be paid to asthmatics with low educational level and low income. Further studies are needed to elucidate underlying mechanisms for this socioeconomic inequality....

  2. Intra-articular injection of hyaluronate versus corticosteroid in adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tae Kang; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Shon, Min Soo; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Young Eun; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this study was to prospectively compare the early clinical results of intra-articular injection of hyaluronate or corticosteroid in patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis. The authors' hypothesis was that there would be no difference between groups. Sixty-eight patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis were equally randomized to receive either corticosteroid or hyaluronate injection. All patients underwent standard physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging. Intra-articular injection was performed through an anterior approach by the same orthopedic surgeon without image guidance. Patients were followed up 2 and 12 weeks after completion of the injection. The primary outcome was the Constant score at week 12. Secondary outcomes included the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and range of motion at each time point. No significant differences were noted in preoperative demographic features or baseline shoulder function between groups. After treatment, no significant differences were noted in early clinical outcomes (at weeks 2 and 12) with VAS, ASES, and Constant scores between groups (all P>.05). Evaluation of range of motion showed no difference in forward elevation or external rotation at each time point. Internal rotation was significantly lower at week 2 in the hyaluronate group compared with the corticosteroid group (P=.015). Internal rotation improved at week 12, with no significant difference between groups. Patients treated with intra-articular injection of hyaluronate and corticosteroid for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis showed significant improvement in early clinical scores and range of motion without significant differences between groups. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Evaluation of bone and mineral metabolism in primary corticosteroid-sensitive pediatric nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Liern

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Steroid treatment for corticosteroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (CSNS could cause bone and mineral metabolism alterations, preventable with calcium and Vitamin D. Objectives: We carried out a preliminary retrospective study along 36 months with the following objectives. 1 To evaluate the relationship between Cumulative Corticosteroid Doses (CCD and 25-0 Vitamin D serum concentration and with Bone Mineral Content (BMC; 2 To evaluate the relationship between CCD and Bone Mineral Densitomety (BMD. Methods: We included patients between 2 and 12 years of age with corticosteroid sensitive primary nephrotic syndrome (CSNS (first episode, relapsing nephrotic syndrome, corticosteroid dependent nephrotic syndrome normotensive, eutrophic and FG>:90ml/min/1.73 m2, who were divided into three groups: GROUP A: =3 or 4 relapses/year, GROUP C: CSNS, we measured: a Quarterly: calcemia, phosphatemia, alkaline phosphatase; b half-yearly: 25-OH cholecalcipherol levels, CCD; c annually BMD in children >6 years (score Z and BMC, bone age, PTHi. Results: We evaluated 29 patients, average age: 4.4 years. The BMD was performed on 11 patients and there were no significant differences among the groups (p=0.08. No significant differences were seen between chronologic age and average bone age (p=0.3. Change in 25-OH cholecalcipherol levels due to the increase of ergocalcipherol dose was significant (T:32.4 Q:<0.001. There were significant correlation in the three groups, between Vitamin D dose and Vitamin D serum levels (Pearson correlation R=0.9, between CCD and 25 OH cholecalcipherol dose: (Pearson correlation R=0.62 and between CCD and BMC (Pearson correlation R=0.44. Finally, in these three groups the average increase of vitamin D was: 1833IU. Conclusions: We found a relationship between CCD and hypovitaminosis D, which could be corrected increasing Vitamin D dose.

  4. Outcomes of Ultrasound-guided Glen Humeral Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Amos; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.; Newman, Joel; Gomoll, Andreas; Jain, Nitin B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To assess short and longer-term outcomes of ultrasound-guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis. Study Design A mixed prospective and retrospective study design Place and Duration of Study Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, between June 2011 and July 2012. Methodology Using medical records, we first retrospectively identified patients who had r...

  5. Oral Corticosteroid Prescribing for Children With Asthma in a Medicaid Managed Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Harold J; Silveira, Edwin A; Vicere, Douglas R; Kothari, Viral D; Giardino, Angelo P

    2017-05-01

    Short courses of oral corticosteroid (OCS) medication are recommended for treatment of moderate to severe asthma exacerbations. Concern has been raised about OCS overuse. Our objective is to describe rates of OCS dispensing among children with asthma and factors associated with variation in OCS dispensing. Claims data for children 1 to overprescribing of OCS for children with an asthma diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Flexor pulley reconstruction after rupture following corticosteroid injections for trigger thumb: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Michio; Kuroshima, Nagatsugu; Matsushita, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare case of limitation of active flexion and subcutaneous bow-stringing as a result of flexor pulley rupture after repeated corticosteroid injections for trigger thumb. Complete rupture of the A1 and oblique flexor pulleys was confirmed during surgery, and the pulley system was reconstructed with a "three-loop technique" using a free palmaris longus autograft. This technique provided enough strength to allow early mobilization and prompt recovery to full range of motion.

  7. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head in lymphoma patients treated with combined chemotherapy including corticosteroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikkanen, T.A.V.; Maekinen, E.; Ekfors, T.O.; Hakkarainen, S.; Drysun, B.

    1980-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head developed in two patients with malignant lymphoma treated with combined chemotherapy. Pain was the main symptom. It was not possible to radiographically distinguish the necrotic lesions from metastatic tumour growth, and in both cases only histological examination revealed the true nature of bone destruction. The large doses of corticosteroids included in the treatment regiments were most likely of more importance in the etiology of the necrosis than the cytostatic drugs proper. (orig.) [de

  8. Treatment of Isolated Gastric Crohn’s Disease with Inhaled Corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar H. Ibrahim

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolated gastric Crohn’s disease is unusual and a rare cause of pyloric outlet obstruction. If medical therapy is ineffective, patients may require surgery to relieve gastric outlet obstruction. Herein we describe a patient with isolated gastric Crohn’s disease with pyloric outlet obstruction who was steroid-dependent and had a relapse despite receiving biologic and immunomodulatory therapy, but ultimately responded to topical treatment with inhaled corticosteroids.

  9. The CRASH trial protocol (Corticosteroid randomisation after significant head injury [ISRCTN74459797

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, millions of people are treated each year for significant head injury. A substantial proportion die, and many more are disabled. If short term corticosteroid infusion could be reliably shown to reduce these risks by just a few percent then this might affect the treatment of a few hundred thousand patients a year, protecting thousands from death or long term disability. Study design CRASH is a large simple, placebo-controlled trial of the effects of a 48-hour infusion of corticosteroids on death and on neurological disability, among adults with head injury and some impairment of consciousness. Head injured patients with impaired consciousness who are judged to be 16 years or older are eligible if the responsible doctor is, for any reason, substantially uncertain whether or not to use corticosteroids. Organisation The CRASH trial will determine reliably the effects on death and disability of a short corticosteroid infusion following significant head injury. To detect or refute improvements of only a few percent in outcome, many thousands of acute head injury patients must be randomised between control and steroid infusions. Such large numbers will be possible only if hundreds of doctors and nurses can collaborate in the participating emergency departments. Since they are busy, and working in emergency situations, the trial involves them in almost no extra work: no special investigations or changes to usual management are required, and data collection is absolutely minimal. The trial is on-going and new collaborators are welcome. Further information about the trial is available at http://www.crash.lshtm.ac.uk

  10. Use of corticosteroids in early pregnancy is not associated with risk of oral clefts and other congenital malformations in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay Bjørn, Anne-Mette; Ehrenstein, Vera; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager

    2012-01-01

    Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat inflammatory diseases. There is conflicting evidence regarding the association of corticosteroid use in pregnancy and congenital malformations in offspring. We conducted a prevalence study of 83,043 primiparous women who gave birth to a live-born singleton...... in northern Denmark, in 1999-2009. Through medical registries, we identified prescriptions for corticosteroids, congenital malformations, and covariates. Furthermore, we summarized the literature on this topic. Overall, 1449 women (1.7%) used inhaled or oral corticosteroids from 30 days before conception...... throughout the first trimester. Oral cleft in the offspring was recorded for 1 of the users (0.08%) and 145 of the nonusers (0.2%), prevalence odds ratio (OR) 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.07-3.34]. The prevalence OR for congenital malformations overall was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.79-1.32). According...

  11. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA): a screening study to measure class II skeletal pattern, TMJ PDS and use of systemic corticosteroids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mandall, Nicky A

    2010-03-01

    To screen patients with oligoarticular and polyarticular forms of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) to determine (i) the severity of their class II skeletal pattern; (ii) temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms and (iii) use of systemic corticosteroids.

  12. 21 CFR 510.410 - Corticosteroids for oral, injectable, and ophthalmic use in animals; warnings and labeling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... parturition may be followed by dystocia, fetal death, retained placenta, and metritis. Additionally... packaged corticosteroid-containing preparations intended for animal use shall bear conspicuously the... last trimester of pregnancy and may precipitate premature parturition followed by dystocia, fetal death...

  13. Corticosteroid-Induced MKP-1 Represses Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Enhancing Activity of Tristetraprolin (TTP) in ASM Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prabhala, Pavan; Ammit, Alaina; Bunge, Kristin; Ge, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated cytokine secretion drives pathogenesis of a number of chronic inflammatory diseases, including asthma. Anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapies, including corticosteroids, are front-line therapies and although they have proven clinical utility, the molecular mechanisms responsible for their

  14. Insufficient evidence for the effect of corticosteroid treatment on recovery of vestibular neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Inge; van Benthem, Peter Paul G; Aarts, Mark C J; Bruintjes, Tjasse D; Grolman, Wilko; van der Heijden, Geert J M G

    2012-11-01

    The authors studied the effect of corticosteroid treatment on clinical recovery and recovery of vestibular function in patients with vestibular neuritis. The comprehensive search (March 29, 2012) yielded 496 original papers, of which 5 (including 199 patients) during full-text screening satisfied our eligibility criteria. Methods assessment showed that 1 study (30 patients) provided direct evidence and carried low risk of bias. Two studies properly reported on their random and concealed allocation of treatment. In 1 study, patients were not randomly allocated to treatment. Blinding of outcomes was lacking in 2 studies, whereas outcome data were clearly incomplete for 2 studies. Given the wide variety in outcome measures and scales and follow-up duration, the meaning of the size of reported effects is not clear. Therefore, the reported effects cannot simply be compared between studies, and this precludes pooling of study results. Still, there are large differences between studies in the size of the reported absolute effects after the placebo treatment. Moreover, the difference in effects between treatments is rather small and does not always favor corticosteroids. The moderate to high risk of bias of studies precludes firm conclusions, whereas the reported short-term effects on symptom recovery and improvement of peripheral vestibular function are too small to be clinically important. No long-term effect on symptom recovery has been shown. Recommendations or decisions for corticosteroid treatment in patients with vestibular neuritis cannot be based on current best evidence and therefore should be discussed with the patient.

  15. Shoulder adhesive capsulitis: systematic review of randomised trials using multiple corticosteroid injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nicholas; Lewis, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background Adhesive capsulitis is a common, painful, and disabling condition that has been managed with corticosteroid injections for over 50 years. There is debate over the use of single or multiple injections, but no systematic review has investigated the effects of administering multiple injections. Aim To assess the efficacy of treating adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with multiple corticosteroid injections. Design of study Systematic review. Method An English language search for randomised controlled trials was conducted from: MEDLINE®, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, SIGLE, National Technical Information Service, British National Bibliography, Index of Scientific and Technical Proceedings® databases, and the Cochrane Library. Randomised controlled trials were identified from reference lists of review and eligible articles. The studies were assessed using a recognised rating system of methodological trial quality. The conclusions and results of the identified studies, based on their main outcome measures, were then summarised. Results Nine randomised controlled trials were identified and four studies were rated as high quality. Three high quality studies showed a beneficial effect for the use of multiple corticosteroid injections with outcome measures of pain reduction, improved function, and increased range of shoulder movement. Conclusion The evidence suggested that multiple injections were beneficial until 16 weeks from the date of the first injection. Up to three injections were beneficial, with limited evidence that four to six injections were beneficial. No evidence was found to support giving more than six injections. PMID:17688763

  16. Effectiveness of local tenoxicam versus corticosteroid injection for plantar fasciitis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner, Savas; Onder, Haci; Guner, Sukriye Ilkay; Ceylan, Mehmet Fethi; Gökalp, Mehmet Ata; Keskin, Siddik

    2013-10-01

    Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of foot pain in adults. In this prospective study, the outcomes of local tenoxicam injection and corticosteroid therapy for the treatment of plantar fasciitis were compared. Patients were randomly assigned to either the tenoxicam or corticosteroid group. The tenoxicam group (n=31) was treated using a local injection of 1 mL of tenoxicam (20 mg/2 mL) and 1 mL of 2% lidocaine, whereas the steroid group (n=30) was treated with a local 1-mL injection containing 40 mg of methylprednisolone acetate and 1 mL of 2% lidocaine. Clinical evaluations, which were performed before the injection and 6 and 12 months after the injection, consisted of patient-assessed pain using a visual analog scale. In addition, patient satisfaction was measured using the Roles and Maudsley score. Comparison of pre- and posttreatment visual analog scale scores demonstrated a statistically significant difference in both groups (P.05). The tenoxicam injection was not significantly more effective than the corticosteroid injection. However, both methods were effective and successful in treating patients with plantar fasciitis. Tenoxicam therapy appears to provide pain relief, but its effectiveness in the long term should be explored in additional studies. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Topical Corticosteroid Concerns in Dermatological Outpatients: A Cross-Sectional and Interventional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Simon M; Tomaschett, Dominique; Euler, Sebastian; Vogt, Deborah R; Herzog, Lisa; Itin, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Topical corticosteroid concerns (TCC) are an important issue in patients with atopic dermatitis, leading to non-adherence with poor disease control and increased health care costs. However, neither the prevalence of TCC in a more comprehensible dermatological population nor the impact of patient information on topical corticosteroids given by clinicians is known. Therefore, we assessed the prevalence, characteristics, and sources of TCC in a dermatological population and the impact of written and oral patient information on TCC. A total of 643 outpatients with various skin diseases answered a 12-item questionnaire while waiting for the doctor's visit. Patients with TCC quantified their concerns on a discrete visual analogue scale before and after patient information, which consisted of written and oral information about topical corticosteroids (TCS) given by dermatologists. The prevalence of TCC was 41.5%, and that of TCC-related non-adherence was 28.3%. TCC was positively associated with age TCC were negative reports by media, family, or friends. Both written and oral patient information significantly reduced TCC. The number needed to benefit from patient information was approximately 2. Non-responders were more often female, TCS-inexperienced, and users of CAM with an intermediate level of education. TCC are highly prevalent in dermatological patients. Patient information may lower TCC in almost every second patient. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Corticosteroids and neuromuscular blockers in development of critical illness neuromuscular abnormalities: A historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Susan R

    2017-02-01

    Weakness is common in critically ill patients, associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation and increased mortality. Corticosteroids and neuromuscular blockade (NMB) administration have been implicated as etiologies of acquired weakness in the intensive care unit. Medical literature since the 1970s is replete with case reports and small case series of patients with weakness after receiving high-dose corticosteroids, prolonged NMB, or both. Several risk factors for weakness appear in the early literature, including large doses of steroids, the dose and duration of NMB, hyperglycemia, and the duration of mechanical ventilation. With improved quality of data, however, the association between weakness and steroids or NMB wanes. This may reflect changes in clinical practice, such as a reduction in steroid dosing, use of cisatracurium besylate instead of aminosteroid NMBs, improved glycemic control, or trends in minimizing mechanical ventilatory support. Thus, based on the most recent and high-quality literature, neither corticosteroids in commonly used doses nor NMB is associated with increased duration of mechanical ventilation, the greatest morbidity of weakness. Minimizing ventilator support as soon as the patient's condition allows may be associated with a reduction in weakness-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Parenteral corticosteroids followed by early surgical resection of large amblyogenic eyelid hemangiomas in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Essawy R

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rania El Essawy,1 Rasha Essameldin Galal21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, EgyptBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of early surgical resection of large amblyogenic subdermal eyelid hemangiomas in infants after prior short-term parenteral administration of corticosteroids.Methods: Sixteen infants were given dexamethasone 2 mg/kg/day in two divided doses for three consecutive days prior to scheduled surgical excision of large eyelid hemangiomas. The lesions were accessed via an upper eyelid crease, subeyebrow incision, or a lower eyelid subciliary incision.Results: In all cases, surgical excision of the entire lesion was possible with no significant intraoperative or postoperative complications. The levator muscle/aponeurosis complex was involved in 31.25% of cases and was managed by reinsertion or repositioning without resection. A satisfactory lid position and contour with immediate clearing of the visual axis was achieved in all but one case (93.8%.Conclusion: Parenteral corticosteroids helped in reducing volume and blood flow from the hemangiomas, allowing for very early total excision of large subdermal infantile hemangiomas without significant intraoperative hemorrhage. This resulted in immediate elimination of any reason for occlusion amblyopia. Long-term follow-up of visual development in these patients would help to demonstrate the effectiveness of this strategy compared with more conservative measures.Keywords: large eyelid hemangiomas, early surgical resection, parenteral corticosteroids

  20. Intra-Articular Corticosteroids in Addition to Exercise for Reducing Pain Sensitivity in Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of one intra-articular corticosteroid injection two weeks prior to an exercise-based intervention program for reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: Randomized, masked, parallel, placebo-controlled trial involving 100 particip......OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of one intra-articular corticosteroid injection two weeks prior to an exercise-based intervention program for reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: Randomized, masked, parallel, placebo-controlled trial involving 100...... the injections all participants undertook a 12-week supervised exercise program. Main outcomes were changes from baseline in pressure-pain sensitivity (pressure-pain threshold [PPT] and temporal summation [TS]) assessed using cuff pressure algometry on the calf. These were exploratory outcomes from a randomized....... The mean group difference in changes from baseline at week 14 was 0.6 kPa (95% CI: -1.7 to 2.8; P = 0.626) for PPT and 384 mm×sec (95% CI: -2980 to 3750; P = 0.821) for TS. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that adding intra-articular corticosteroid injection 2 weeks prior to an exercise program does...

  1. Toxicogenomic markers for corticosteroid treatment in beef cattle: integrated analysis of transcriptomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegolo, Sara; Di Camillo, Barbara; Montesissa, Clara; Cannizzo, Francesca Tiziana; Biolatti, Bartolomeo; Bargelloni, Luca

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, an integrated analysis was performed on DNA-microarray data of bovine muscle samples belonging to controls, animals treated with various growth promoters (GPs) and unknown commercial samples. The aim was identify a robust gene expression signature of corticosteroid treatment for the classification of commercial samples, despite the effects of biological variation and other confounding factors. DNA-Microarray data from 5 different batches of bovine skeletal muscle samples were analyzed (146 samples). After preprocessing, expression data from animals treated with corticosteroids and controls from the different batches (89 samples) were used to train a Support Vector Machines (SVMs) classifier. The optimal number of gene probes chosen by our classification framework was 73. The SVMs with linear kernel built on these 73 biomarker genes was predicted to perform on novel samples with a high classification accuracy (Matthew's correlation coefficient equal to 0.77) and an average percentage of false positive and false negative equal to 5% and 6%, respectively. Concluding, a relatively small set of genes was able to discriminate between controls and corticosteroid-treated animals, despite different breeds, animal ages, and combination of GPs. The results are extremely promising, suggesting that integrated analysis provides robust transcriptomic signatures for GP abuse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI findings in Tolosa-Hunt syndrome before and after systemic corticosteroid therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cakirer, Sinan

    2003-01-01

    Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS) is characterized by painful ophthalmoplegia due to a granulomatous inflammation in the cavernous sinus. Corticosteroid therapy dramatically resolves both the clinical and radiological findings of THS. We present MRI findings of six patients with a clinical history of at least one episode of unilateral or bilateral orbital-periorbital pain, clinical findings of associated paresis of one or more of 3rd, 4th, 5th or 6th cranial nerves. All of the patients revealed an enlargement of the symptomatic cavernous sinus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Five patients revealed total resolution of the clinical findings within 1-8 weeks, following systemic corticosteroid treatment. One patient revealed only minor regression of clinical findings within 2 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, so the cavernous sinus lesion was reevaluated as meningioma on MRI, and the patient underwent surgical resection of the mass with resultant histopathological finding of cavernous sinus meningioma. A follow-up MRI scan was performed for five patients at the end of 8-weeks of steroid therapy. Three of these five patients showed total resolution of the cavernous sinus lesions whereas two of them revealed a partial regression of the cavernous sinus lesions. MRI findings before and after systemic corticosteroid therapy are important diagnostic criteria to put the definitive diagnosis of THS and to differentiate it from other cavernous sinus lesions that simulate THS both clinically and radiologically

  3. MRI findings in Tolosa-Hunt syndrome before and after systemic corticosteroid therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakirer, Sinan E-mail: scakirer@yahoo.com

    2003-02-01

    Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS) is characterized by painful ophthalmoplegia due to a granulomatous inflammation in the cavernous sinus. Corticosteroid therapy dramatically resolves both the clinical and radiological findings of THS. We present MRI findings of six patients with a clinical history of at least one episode of unilateral or bilateral orbital-periorbital pain, clinical findings of associated paresis of one or more of 3rd, 4th, 5th or 6th cranial nerves. All of the patients revealed an enlargement of the symptomatic cavernous sinus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Five patients revealed total resolution of the clinical findings within 1-8 weeks, following systemic corticosteroid treatment. One patient revealed only minor regression of clinical findings within 2 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, so the cavernous sinus lesion was reevaluated as meningioma on MRI, and the patient underwent surgical resection of the mass with resultant histopathological finding of cavernous sinus meningioma. A follow-up MRI scan was performed for five patients at the end of 8-weeks of steroid therapy. Three of these five patients showed total resolution of the cavernous sinus lesions whereas two of them revealed a partial regression of the cavernous sinus lesions. MRI findings before and after systemic corticosteroid therapy are important diagnostic criteria to put the definitive diagnosis of THS and to differentiate it from other cavernous sinus lesions that simulate THS both clinically and radiologically.

  4. Pulmonary and Meningeal Cryptococcosis after Corticosteroid Therapy for Autoimmune Hepatitis: Coexistence of Cryptococci within Pulmonary Cancer Nodule

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri, Takashi; Kimura, Ayako; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Emoto, Yuko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Tsubura, Airo

    2013-01-01

    A case of autoimmune hepatitis complicated with pulmonary and meningeal cryptococcosis during long-term treatment with corticosteroid is reported. An 84-year-old woman who received long-term corticosteroid therapy (40 mg/day prednisolone for two years) for autoimmune hepatitis developed a headache, slight fever, and anorexia and was diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis two months prior to hospital admission. Due to deterioration of her condition, the patient was transferred to our universit...

  5. Dapsone in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris: adverse effects and its importance as a corticosteroid sparing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Hezel, Janaína; Peretti, Murilo Calvo; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune disease characterized by suprabasal blisters with acantholysis, which has a fatal course in a large number of untreated patients. Systemic corticosteroid therapy is considered first-line therapy. Adjuvant treatment with the goal of sparing corticosteroids include, among others, dapsone. This drug is not without side effects and its use requires clinical and laboratory control. We present a patient with PV initially managed with suboptimal dose of prednisone, evolving into drug-induced hepatitis after introduction of dapsone.

  6. The prevention of coronary arterial abnormalities in Kawasaki disease: A meta-analysis of the corticosteroid effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsung-Ju; Lin, Ming-Tai; Lu, Chun-Yi; Chen, Jong-Min; Lee, Ping-Ing; Huang, Li-Min; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Chang, Luan-Yin

    2017-09-06

    The use of corticosteroid in Kawasaki disease (KD) remains controversial among current guidelines. The objective of this study is to summarize the effectiveness and safety of corticosteroid to prevent coronary arterial lesions in Kawasaki disease, both as initial and rescue therapy. The Medline, EMBASE, Google scholar, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Japanese Institutional Repositories Online were searched for studies up to 31 March 2017. Studies that compared incidence of coronary artery lesions between regimens with corticosteroid and regimen without it in a well-defined controlled group were included. The incidence of coronary artery lesion was analyzed by meta-analysis. Nineteen studies published between 1999 and 2016 fulfilled eligibility criteria. There were 3591 patients included for analysis. There was a significant reduction in incidence of coronary artery lesions with usage of corticosteroid with a pooled odds ratio of 0.72 (95% CI 0.57-0.92; p = 0.01) than that without usage of corticosteroid. In general, a greater effect was seen in the patient received corticosteroid as initial and adjuvant therapy with intravenous immune globulin (pooled odds ratio 0.39, 95% CI 0.21-0.73, p = 0.007) than those who received corticosteroid as rescue therapy. The risk reduction was statistically significant in Japanese groups (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.42-0.75 in fixed effects model) but not significant in non-Japanese groups (OR 1.45, 95% CI 0.91-2.30 in fixed effects model). We demonstrated an overall reduction in incidence of coronary artery lesions with the use of corticosteroid as initial and adjuvant treatment for Kawasaki disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Successful combination treatment of a patient with progressive juvenile localized scleroderma (morphea) using imatinib, corticosteroids, and methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamo, Yasuji; Ochiai, Toyoko

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of progressive juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS or morphea) treated with a combination of imatinib, corticosteroids, and methotrexate. This therapy halted the progressive skin thickening and the hand and finger joint deformity in the early stages of the disease. We conclude that imatinib used in addition to standard treatment with systemic corticosteroids and methotrexate may be of therapeutic benefit for individuals with JLS. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A PAMPA Assay as Fast Predictive Model of Passive Human Skin Permeability of New Synthesized Corticosteroid C-21 Esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina D. Karljikovic-Rajic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The permeation properties of twenty newly synthesized α-alkoxyalkanoyl and α-aryloxyalkanoyl C-21 esters of standard corticosteroids: Fluocinolone acetonide, dexamethasone, triamcinolone acetonide and hydrocortisone were established using a PAMPA assay (70% silicone oil and 30% isopropyl myristate. The data were compared with parent corticosteroids with addition of mometasone furoate and hydrocortisone acetate. All newly synthesized corticosteroid C-21 esters have effective permeability coefficients higher then -6, mostly followed with high values of retention factors and low permeation. The examined compounds were grouped through relationship between obtained retention factors and permeation parameters (groups I–III. The classification confirmed group I (membrane retentions as well as permeation lower then 30% for all corticosteroid standards except mometasone furoate, a potent topical corticosteroid which, with high membrane retention (81% and low permeation (7.7% fits into group III. The largest number of new synthesized corticosteroids C-21 esters, among them all fluocinolone acetonide C-21 esters, have high membrane retentions (32.4%–86.5% and low permeations (1.3%–27.1%, fitting in group III. The classification was related to previously obtained anti-inflammatory activity data for the fluocinolone acetonide C-21 esters series. According to the PAMPA results the new synthesized esters could be considered as potential new prodrugs with useful benefit/risk ratio.

  9. Incident Pneumonia and Mortality in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. A Double Effect of Inhaled Corticosteroids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids are commonly prescribed for patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although their use improves quality of life and reduces exacerbations, it is associated with increased risk of pneumonia. Curiously, their use has not been associated with increased risk of pneumonia-related or overall mortality. We review pertinent literature to further explore the effects of inhaled corticosteroids on incident pneumonia and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The association of use of inhaled corticosteroids and incident pneumonia is substantial and has been present in the majority of the studies on the topic. This includes both randomized controlled trials and observational studies. However, all of the studies have substantial risk of bias. Most randomized trials are limited by lack of systematic ascertainment of pneumonia; they depended on adverse event reporting. Many observational studies included proper radiographic assessment of pneumonia, but they are limited by their retrospective, observational design. The unadjusted higher risk of pneumonia is associated with longer duration of use, more potent ICS compounds, and higher doses. That implies a dose–effect relationship. Unlike pneumonia, mortality is a precise outcome. Despite the robust association of inhaled corticosteroid use with increased risk of pneumonia, all studies find either no difference or a reduction in pulmonary-related and overall mortality associated with the use of inhaled corticosteroids. These observations suggest a double effect of inhaled corticosteroids (i.e., an adverse effect plus an unexplained mitigating effect). PMID:25409118

  10. Contrast Dispersion Pattern and Efficacy of Corticosteroid at the Glenohumeral Joint in Adhesive Capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Jun; Choi, Yu Seong

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid injection has a wide range of success in adhesive capsulitis but the reason for this has not yet been explained. We hypothesized that this difference might be due to the distribution of the corticosteroids injected into the joint cavity because particulate steroid deposits in the capsule and will not be moved over time by shoulder motion. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the therapeutic efficacy of particulate corticosteroid injection into the glenohumeral joint differs according to the dispersion pattern. Prospective evaluation. Outpatient clinics at a tertiary university hospital. Seventy-two patients diagnosed as having adhesive capsulitis received a corticosteroid injection at the glenohumeral joint. The posterior capsule and the subscapular bursa were selected as dispersion sites and the dispersion of contrast dye was expressed as a ratio (%). Two weeks and 3 months after the injection clinical improvement ("not improved," "slightly improved," "much improved"), numeric rating scale (NRS), and passive range of motions (PROM) were evaluated. The dispersion of the contrast dye was compared according to the clinical improvements by an analysis of variance test. Pearson correlation test was done to find the relationship between PROM and the dispersion and between change of NRS and the dispersion. The distribution in the subscapular area was 30.0% in the "much improved" group, 22.0% in the "slightly improved" group, and 37.1% in the "no improvement" group which was not significantly different (P = 0.179). Correlations between changes of NRS and the dye distribution were not statistically significant (P = 0.429 at 2 weeks and P = 0.629 at 3 months). The change of passive external rotation 3 months after the injection was significantly correlated with the dye distribution (P = 0.035). Because of diverse pathologic findings in adhesive capsulitis, further studies will be needed to address the effect of the dye distribution on the pain

  11. Effectiveness of Kinesiotaping and Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin Onat, Şule; Biçer, Seda; Şahin, Zehra; Küçükali Türkyilmaz, Ayşegül; Kara, Murat; Özbudak Demir, Sibel

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether kinesiotaping or subacromial corticosteroid injection provides additional benefit when used with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Patients with shoulder impingement syndrome were divided into 3 groups as follows: NSAID group (n = 33), kinesiotaping group (kinesiotaping + NSAID) (n = 33), and injection group (subacromial corticosteroid injection + NSAID) (n = 33). Outcome measures including visual analog scale, shoulder ranges of motion, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) scale were evaluated before and after the treatment (fourth week). A total of 99 patients (21 male and 78 female patients) were enrolled in this study. Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics of the groups (except for body mass index and visual analog scale at night, both P = 0.05) were similar between the groups (all P > 0.05). Clinical parameters were found to have improved in the 3 groups (all P 0.05), each group had better outcome than did the NSAID group as regards pain (activity visual analog scale), ranges of motion, and Shoulder Disability Questionnaire and UCLA scale scores (all P shoulder impingement syndrome. Therefore, kinesiotaping might serve as an alternative treatment in case (injection of) corticosteroids are contraindicated. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES:: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Delineate appropriate treatment options for shoulder impingement syndrome; (2) Identify treatment benefits of kinesiotaping and corticosteroid injections in shoulder impingement syndrome; and (3) Incorporate kinesiotaping and corticosteroid injections into the treatment plan for patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Advanced : The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council

  12. Corticosteroid and long-acting ß-agonist therapy reduces epithelial goblet cell metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowicz-Scroggins, M E; Finkbeiner, W E; Gordon, E D; Yuan, S; Zlock, L; Bhakta, N R; Woodruff, P G; Fahy, J V; Boushey, H A

    2017-12-01

    Bronchial epithelial goblet cell metaplasia (GCM) with hyperplasia is a prominent feature of asthma, but the effects of treatment with corticosteroids alone or in combination with a long-acting β 2 -adrenergic receptor agonist (LABA) on GCM in the bronchial epithelium are unknown. To determine whether corticosteroid alone or in combination with a LABA alters protein and gene expression pathways associated with IL-13-induced goblet cell metaplasia. We evaluated the effects of fluticasone propionate (FP) and of salmeterol (SM), on the response of well-differentiated cultured bronchial epithelial cells to interleukin-13 (IL-13). Outcome measures included gene expression of SPDEF/FOXa2, gene expression and protein production of MUC5AC/MUC5B and morphologic appearance of cultured epithelial cell sheets. We additionally analysed expression of these genes in bronchial epithelial brushings from healthy, steroid-naïve asthmatic and steroid-treated asthmatic subjects. In cultured airway epithelial cells, FP treatment inhibited IL-13-induced suppression of FOXa2 gene expression and up-regulation of SPDEF, alterations in gene and protein measures of MUC5AC and MUC5B and induction of GCM. The addition of SM synergistically modified the effects of FP modestly-only for gel-forming mucin MUC5AC. In bronchial epithelial cells recovered from asthmatic vs healthy human subjects, we found FOXa2 and MUC5B gene expression to be reduced and SPDEF and MUC5AC gene expression to be increased; these alterations were not observed in bronchial epithelial cells recovered after treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. Corticosteroid treatment inhibits IL-13-induced GCM of the airways in asthma, possibly through its effects on SPDEF and FOXa2 regulation of mucin gene expression. These effects are modestly augmented by the addition of a long-acting ß-agonist. As we found evidence for drug treatment counteracting the effects of IL-13 on the epithelium, we conclude that further exploration into

  13. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, treatment with corticosteroid, corticosteroid with distension or treatment-as-usual; a randomised controlled trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Satya Pal; Bærheim, Anders; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Kvåle, Alice

    2016-05-26

    Optimal management for adhesive shoulder capsulitis (frozen shoulder) is currently unclear. We intended to explore whether treatment by intra-articular injections with corticosteroid and distension is more effective than treating with corticosteroids alone or treatment-as-usual in a primary care setting in Norway. In this prospective randomised intention to treat parallel study, 106 patients were block randomised to three groups; 36 (analysed 35) receiving steroid injection and Lidocaine (IS), 34 receiving steroid and additional saline as distension (ISD) and 36 had treatment-as-usual (TAU). Intervention groups received four injections within 8 weeks, assessed on 1st visit, at the 4th and 8th week. Outcomes were Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), Numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) and passive range of motion (PROM). Postal assessment was repeated after 1 year for SPADI. Patients in the IS and ISD groups were "blinded" for intervention received and the assessor was "blinded" to group allocation. At baseline there were no differences between groups in outcome measures. There were no statistical significant differences between the intervention groups in SPADI, NPRS and PROM at baseline, at short-term (4-and 8 weeks) or long-term (12 months). There were statistically significant differences (p  0.05). Effect size (ES) at 8 weeks was large between both injection groups and TAU (ES 1.2). At 12 months ES was reduced to 0.3 and 0.4 respectively. Transitory side effects as flushing and after-pain were reported by 14 % in intervention groups. This intention to treat RCT in primary care indicates that four injections with corticosteroid with or without distension, given with increasing intervals during 8 weeks, were better than treatment-as-usual in treatment of adhesive shoulder capsulitis. However, in the long run no difference was found between any of the groups, indicating that natural healing takes place independent of treatment or not. Clinical

  14. Moderately early (7-14 days) postnatal corticosteroids for preventing chronic lung disease in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, H L; Ehrenkranz, R A; Doyle, L W

    2003-01-01

    Corticosteroids have been used late in the neonatal period to treat chronic lung disease (CLD) in preterm babies, and early to try to prevent it. CLD is likely to be the result of persisting inflammation in the lung and the use of powerful anti-inflammatory drugs like dexamethasone has some rationale. Early use tends to be associated with increased adverse effects so that studies of moderately early treatment (7-14 days postnatal) might have the dual benefits of fewer side effects and onset of action before chronic inflammation is established. To determine if moderately early (7-14 days) postnatal corticosteroid treatment vs control (placebo or nothing) is of benefit in the prevention and/or treatment of early chronic lung disease in the preterm infant. Randomised controlled trials of postnatal corticosteroid therapy were sought from the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Database of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (1966 - October 2002), hand searching paediatric and perinatal journals, examining previous review articles and information received from practicing neonatologists. Authors of all studies were contacted, where possible, to confirm details of reported follow-up studies, or to obtain any information about long-term follow-up where none had been reported. Randomised controlled trials of postnatal corticosteroid treatment from 7-14 days of birth in high risk preterm infants were selected for this review. Data regarding clinical outcomes including mortality, CLD (including late rescue with corticosteroids, or need for home oxygen therapy), death or CLD, failure to extubate, complications during the primary hospitalisation (including infection, hyperglycaemia, hypertension, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, pneumothorax, severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), gastrointestinal bleeding, and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP)), and long term outcome (including blindness, deafness, cerebral palsy and major neurosensory

  15. Cost-Utility of a Single-Injection Combined Corticosteroid-Hyaluronic Acid Formulation vs a 2-Injection Regimen of Sequential Corticosteroid and Hyaluronic Acid Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Etienne L; Deakon, Robert T; Vannabouathong, Christopher; Bhandari, Mohit; Lamontagne, Martin; McCormack, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown early and sustained relief with a combination therapy of a corticosteroid (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This can be administered via a single injection containing both products or as separate injections. The former may be more expensive when considering only product cost, but the latter incurs the additional costs and time of a second procedure. The purpose of this study was to compare the cost-utility of the single injection with the 2-injection regimen. The results of this analysis revealed that the single-injection formulation of a CS and HA may be cost-effective, assuming a willingness-to-pay of $50 000 per quality-adjusted life year gained, for symptomatic relief of OA symptoms. This treatment may also be more desirable to patients who find injections to be inconvenient or unpleasant.

  16. Antenatal treatment with corticosteroids for preterm neonates: impact on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and intra-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joice Fabíola Meneguel

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Although the benefits of antenatal corticosteroids have been widely demonstrated in other countries, there are few studies among Brazilian newborn infants. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of antenatal corticosteroids on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and intra-hospital mortality among neonates with a gestational age of less than 34 weeks. TYPE OF STUDY: Cross-sectional. SETTING: A tertiary-care hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Neonates exposed to any dose of antenatal corticosteroids for fetal maturation up to 7 days before delivery, and newborns paired by sex, birth weight, gestational age and time of birth that were not exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. The sample obtained consisted of 205 exposed newborns, 205 non-exposed and 39 newborns exposed to antenatal corticosteroids for whom it was not possible to find an unexposed pair. PROCEDURES: Analysis of maternal and newborn records. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: The primary clinical outcomes for the two groups were compared: the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and intra-hospital mortality; as well as secondary outcomes related to neonatal morbidity. RESULTS: Antenatal corticosteroids reduced the occurrence of respiratory distress syndrome (OR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.21-0.51 and the protective effect persisted when adjusted for weight, gestational age and the presence of asphyxia (adjusted OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.17-0.43. The protective effect could also be detected through the reduction in the need for and number of doses of exogenous surfactant utilized and the number of days of mechanical ventilation needed for the newborns exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. Their use also reduced the occurrence of intra-hospital deaths (OR: 0.51: 95% CI: 0.38-0.82. However, when adjusted for weight, gestational age, presence of prenatal asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis and use of mechanical ventilation, the antenatal corticosteroids did not maintain the

  17. Profiling of Concanavalin A-Binding Glycoproteins in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells Activated with Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannan Qin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycoproteins play important roles in maintaining normal cell functions depending on their glycosylations. Our previous study indicated that the abundance of glycoproteins recognized by concanavalin A (ConA was increased in human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs following activation by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1; however, little is known about the ConA-binding glycoproteins (CBGs of HSCs. In this study, we employed a targeted glycoproteomics approach using lectin-magnetic particle conjugate-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to compare CBG profiles between LX-2 HSCs with and without activation by TGF-β1, with the aim of discovering novel CBGs and determining their possible roles in activated HSCs. A total of 54 and 77 proteins were identified in the quiescent and activated LX-2 cells, respectively. Of the proteins identified, 14.3% were glycoproteins and 73.3% were novel potential glycoproteins. Molecules involved in protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum (e.g., calreticulin and calcium signaling (e.g., 1-phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate phosphodiesterase β-2 [PLCB2] were specifically identified in activated LX-2 cells. Additionally, PLCB2 expression was upregulated in the cytoplasm of the activated LX-2 cells, as well as in the hepatocytes and sinusoidal cells of liver cirrhosis tissues. In conclusion, the results of this study may aid future investigations to find new molecular mechanisms involved in HSC activation and antifibrotic therapeutic targets.

  18. Social, state-dependent and environmental modulation of faecal corticosteroid levels in free-ranging female spotted hyenas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goymann, W; East, M L; Wachter, B; Höner, O P; Möstl, E; Van't Hof, T J; Hofer, H

    2001-12-07

    Little is known about to what extent the sensitivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may be state dependent and vary in the same species between environments. Here we tested whether the faecal corticosteroid concentrations of matrilineal adult female spotted hyenas are influenced by social and reproductive status in adjacent ecosystems and whether they vary between periods with and without social stress. Females in the Serengeti National Park frequently become socially subordinate intruders in other hyena territories by undertaking long-distance foraging trips to migratory herds, whereas in the Ngorongoro Crater they usually forage inside their own small territories on resident prey. The faecal corticosteroid concentrations in Serengeti females were significantly higher than in Ngorongoro females. Energy expenditure by lactation is exceptionally high in spotted hyenas and this may be reflected in their corticosteroid levels. The faecal corticosteroid levels in both populations were higher in lactating than in non-lactating females. During periods of social stability, faecal corticosteroid concentrations increased in non-lactating females but not in lactating females as social status declined. Lactating Serengeti females had significantly higher faecal corticosteroid concentrations during periods with acute severe social stress than during periods without, indicating that the HPA axis is sensitive to social stimuli even in lactating females. So far few studies have used non-invasive monitoring methods for assessing social stress in freeranging animals. This study demonstrates for the first time, to the authors' knowledge, that corticosteroid concentrations may differ between periods with and without social stress for a free-ranging female mammal and that the modulating effect of social status may depend on reproductive status.

  19. Withdrawal of corticosteroids in inflammatory bowel disease patients after dependency periods ranging from 2 to 45 years: a proposed method.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, S J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Even in the biologic era, corticosteroid dependency in IBD patients is common and causes a lot of morbidity, but methods of withdrawal are not well described. AIM: To assess the effectiveness of a corticosteroid withdrawal method. METHODS: Twelve patients (10 men, 2 women; 6 ulcerative colitis, 6 Crohn\\'s disease), median age 53.5 years (range 29-75) were included. IBD patients with quiescent disease refractory to conventional weaning were transitioned to oral dexamethasone, educated about symptoms of the corticosteroid withdrawal syndrome (CWS) and weaned under the supervision of an endocrinologist. When patients failed to wean despite a slow weaning pace and their IBD remaining quiescent, low dose synthetic ACTH stimulation testing was performed to assess for adrenal insufficiency. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess predictors of a slow wean. RESULTS: Median durations for disease and corticosteroid dependency were 21 (range 3-45) and 14 (range 2-45) years respectively. Ten patients (83%) were successfully weaned after a median follow-up from final wean of 38 months (range 5-73). Disease flares occurred in two patients, CWS in five and ACTH testing was performed in 10. Multivariate analysis showed that longer duration of corticosteroid use appeared to be associated with a slower wean (P = 0.056). CONCLUSIONS: Corticosteroid withdrawal using this protocol had a high success rate and durable effect and was effective in patients with long-standing (up to 45 years) dependency. As symptoms of CWS mimic symptoms of IBD disease flares, gastroenterologists may have difficulty distinguishing them, which may be a contributory factor to the frequency of corticosteroid dependency in IBD patients.

  20. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  1. IVIG therapy in pemphigus vulgaris has corticosteroid-sparing and immunomodulatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svecova, Danka

    2016-05-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is a biological agent composed of polyclonal antibodies prepared from a large cohort of human plasma pools. IVIG is increasingly used for the treatment of various antibody-mediated diseases, including pemphigus vulgaris (PV). The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefit and safety profiles of high dose IVIG therapy in PV patients determined by clinical remission, corticosteroid-sparing and immunomodulatory effects, and adverse events at 12 months' follow up. Ten PV patients underwent 3-8 monthly cycles of IVIG therapy at a dose of 2 g/kg per cycle. The pemphigus disease area index (PDAI) score, direct immunofluorescence (DIF), indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), and corticosteroid dosage were evaluated before IVIG therapy, after each cycle, and at 6 and 12 months' follow up. The baseline PDAI score was 75.70 ± 21.0 and baseline prednisone dosage was 201.60 ± 71.7 mg/day. The PDAI score reduction of 98% was achieved at 12 months' follow up and a corticosteroid dose reduction of 90% corresponded to clinical improvement. The decrease in both values was statistically significant (P = 0.002, respectively). At 12 months' follow up, seven patients were shown to be negative on IIF, of whom three proved to be negative on DIF. Adverse events were mild and transient and did not require the cessation of IVIG therapy. IVIG induced long-term clinical remission, while displaying a corticocorticosteroid-sparing effect and evoking a long-standing immunomodulatory effect in PV patients. The safety profile of IVIG therapy was assessed as good. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  2. Oral corticosteroids for asthma exacerbations might be associated with adrenal suppression: Are physicians aware of that?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina B. Barra

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Oral corticosteroids (OCS are a mainstay of treatment for asthma exacerbations, and short-term OCS courses were generally considered to be safe. Nevertheless, frequent short-term OCS courses could lead to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis dysfunction. Our study aimed at investigating the integrity of the HPA axis in children with persistent asthma or recurrent wheezing at the beginning of an inhaled corticosteroids (ICS trial. Method: Morning basal cortisol was assessed just before the beginning of ICS, and 30, 60, and 90 days later, using Immulite® Siemens Medical Solutions Diagnostic chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (Los Angeles, USA; 2006. Results: In all, 140 children (0.3-15 years old with persistent asthma or recurrent wheezing have been evaluated and 40% of them reported short-term OCS courses for up to 30 days before evaluation. Out of these, 12.5% had biochemical adrenal suppression but showed adrenal recovery during a three-month ICS trial treatment. No significant differences were observed among children with or without adrenal suppression, neither in the number of days free of OCS treatment before cortisol evaluation (p=0.29 nor in the last OCS course duration (p=0.20. The number of short-term OCS courses reported in the year preceding the cortisol evaluation was also not different (p=0.89. Conclusion: Short-term systemic courses of corticosteroids at conventional doses can put children at risk of HPA axis dysfunction. ICS treatment does not impair adrenal recovery from occurring. Health practitioners should be aware of the risk of a blunted cortisol response upon exposure to stress during the follow-up of patients with persistent asthma or recurrent wheezing.

  3. Impact of saline irrigation and topical corticosteroids on the post-surgical sinonasal microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cindy M.; Kohanski, Michael A.; Mendiola, Michelle; Soldanova, Katerina; Dwan, Michael G.; Lester, Richard; Nordstrom, Lora; Price, Lance B.; Lane, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Topical treatments with nasal saline irrigation, topical steroid sprays, or corticosteroid rinses can improve sinonasal symptoms in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). However, the impact of these therapies on commensals (Corynebacterium) and on biofilm pathogens associated with CRS (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas) is not well characterized. Methods Paired nasal and sinus swabs were collected endoscopically from 28 controls and 14 CRS patients with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) who had not received systemic antibiotics or corticosteroids in the previous eight weeks. Total DNA from swab eluents were extracted and analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing. A total 359,077 reads were obtained and classified taxonomically. The association of use of topical therapies with sinonasal microbiota composition was assessed by factor and vector-fitting. The proportional abundances of sinonasal bacteria between topical therapy users and non-users were further compared by two-tailed Kolmogorov-Smirnov test among controls and among CRSwNP participants. Result Nasal saline irrigation, with or without added budesonide, was not associated with significantly distinct sinonasal microbiota composition or significantly decreased Pseudomonas or S. aureus abundances among either controls or CRSwNP participants. Corynebacterium was slightly lower in controls that reported using saline irrigation than those who did not. No significant association was found between nasal saline irrigation and the proportional abundances of Pseudomonas, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium in CRSwNP participants. However, male CRSwNP patients were noted to have significantly higher Corynebacterium proportional abundances than their female counterparts. The use of topical steroid sprays was associated with a distinct microbiota in control subjects, characterized by higher proportional abundances of Dolosigranulum and Simonsiella and a lower proportional abundance of Campylobacter. Conclusion Nasal

  4. Virtual screening as a strategy for the identification of xenobiotics disrupting corticosteroid action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashev, Lyubomir G; Vuorinen, Anna; Praxmarer, Lukas; Chantong, Boonrat; Cereghetti, Diego; Winiger, Rahel; Schuster, Daniela; Odermatt, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Impaired corticosteroid action caused by genetic and environmental influence, including exposure to hazardous xenobiotics, contributes to the development and progression of metabolic diseases, cardiovascular complications and immune disorders. Novel strategies are thus needed for identifying xenobiotics that interfere with corticosteroid homeostasis. 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD2) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) are major regulators of corticosteroid action. 11β-HSD2 converts the active glucocorticoid cortisol to the inactive cortisone and protects MR from activation by glucocorticoids. 11β-HSD2 has also an essential role in the placenta to protect the fetus from high maternal cortisol concentrations. We employed a previously constructed 3D-structural library of chemicals with proven and suspected endocrine disrupting effects for virtual screening using a chemical feature-based 11β-HSD pharmacophore. We tested several in silico predicted chemicals in a 11β-HSD2 bioassay. The identified antibiotic lasalocid and the silane-coupling agent AB110873 were found to concentration-dependently inhibit 11β-HSD2. Moreover, the silane AB110873 was shown to activate MR and stimulate mitochondrial ROS generation and the production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Finally, we constructed a MR pharmacophore, which successfully identified the silane AB110873. Screening of virtual chemical structure libraries can facilitate the identification of xenobiotics inhibiting 11β-HSD2 and/or activating MR. Lasalocid and AB110873 belong to new classes of 11β-HSD2 inhibitors. The silane AB110873 represents to the best of our knowledge the first industrial chemical shown to activate MR. Furthermore, the MR pharmacophore can now be used for future screening purposes.

  5. Associations between timing of corticosteroid treatment initiation and clinical outcomes in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunkyung; Zhu, Yong; Romitti, Paul A; Fox, Deborah J; Sheehan, Daniel W; Valdez, Rodolfo; Matthews, Dennis; Barber, Brent J

    2017-08-01

    The long-term efficacy of corticosteroid treatment and timing of treatment initiation among Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients is not well-understood. We used data from a longitudinal, population-based DMD surveillance program to examine associations between timing of treatment initiation (early childhood [before or at age 5 years], late childhood [after age 5 years], and naïve [not treated]) and five clinical outcomes (age at loss of ambulation; ages at onset of cardiomyopathy, scoliosis, and first fracture; and pulmonary function). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using survival analysis. DMD patients who initiated corticosteroid treatment in early childhood had a higher risk of earlier onset cardiomyopathy compared to cases who initiated treatment in late childhood (HR = 2.0, 95% CI = [1.2, 3.4]) or treatment naïve patients (HR = 1.9, 95% CI = [1.1, 3.2]), and higher risk of suffering a fracture (HR = 2.3, 95% CI = [1.4, 3.7] and HR = 2.6, 95% CI = [1.6, 4.2], respectively). Patients with early childhood treatment had slightly decreased respiratory function compared with those with late childhood treatment. Ages at loss of ambulation or scoliosis diagnosis did not differ statistically among treatment groups. We caution that the results from our study are subject to several limitations, as they were based on data abstracted from medical records. Further investigations using improved reporting of disease onset and outcomes are warranted to obtain a more definitive assessment of the association between the timing of corticosteroid treatment and disease severity. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Effects of metabolic syndrome on the functional outcomes of corticosteroid injection for De Quervain tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Y H; Noh, J H; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2017-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of medical conditions that arise from insulin resistance and abnormal adipose deposition and function. In patients with metabolic syndrome and De Quervain tenosynovitis this might affect the outcome of treatment by local corticosteroid injection. A total of 64 consecutive patients with De Quervain tenosynovitis and metabolic syndrome treated with corticosteroid injection were age- and sex-matched with 64 control patients without metabolic syndrome. The response to treatment, including visual analogue scale score for pain, objective findings consistent with De Quervain tenosynovitis (tenderness at first dorsal compartment, Finkelstein test result), and Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score were assessed at 6, 12, and 24 weeks follow-up. Treatment failure was defined as persistence of symptoms or surgical intervention. Prior to treatment, patients with metabolic syndrome had mean initial pain visual analogue scale and Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores similar to those in the control group. The proportion of treatment failure in the metabolic syndrome group (43%) was significantly higher than that in the control group (20%) at 6 months follow-up. The pain visual analogue scale scores in the metabolic syndrome group were higher than the scores in the control group at the 12- and 24-week follow-ups. The Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand scores of the metabolic syndrome group were higher (more severe symptoms) than those of the control group at the 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Although considerable improvements in symptom severity and hand function will likely occur in patients with metabolic syndrome, corticosteroid injection for De Quervain tenosynovitis is not as effective in these patients compared with age- and sex-matched controls in terms of functional outcomes and treatment failure. III.

  7. Improved outcome of bacterial meningitis associated with use of corticosteroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baunbæk-Knudsen, Gertrud; Sølling, Mette; Farre, Annette; Benfield, Thomas; Brandt, Christian T

    2016-04-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with bacterial meningitis following the introduction of dexamethasone treatment in Denmark. Methods Adult patients with bacterial meningitis, admitted from 2003-2010 to two different university hospitals, were included retrospectively. Data at clinical presentation, Glasgow outcome scale (GOS), cerebrospinal fluid and blood biochemistry were collected. Relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was computed by Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Results One hundred and forty-seven patients were included in the study. The population had a median age of 62 years and 31% had an immunosuppressive co-morbidity. Eighty-nine patients had an unfavourable outcome (GOS score = 1-4). Adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids (RR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.30-0.76) was associated with a favourable outcome (GOS score = 5), while altered mental status (RR = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.17-4.78) and age (RR = 1.03; 95% CI = 1.01-1.04) per year increment was associated with an unfavourable outcome. Adjuvant corticosteroid treatment did not affect short- or long-term survival. Short-term mortality was influenced by age (RR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.04-1.09). Long-term mortality was influenced by age (RR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.03-1.08) and female sex (RR = 1.81; 95% CI = 1.05-3.14). Conclusion This study indicated that adjuvant corticosteroid treatment in acute bacterial meningitis improves the outcome and can safely be administered in an elderly population with high levels of immunosuppressive co-morbidity.

  8. Adjunctive corticosteroid therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in AIDS: a randomized European multicenter open label study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T L; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J K; Jensen, B N

    1992-01-01

    Fifty-nine human immunodeficiency virus type-1-infected patients with a microscopically proven first episode of moderate to severe Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) were enrolled into a randomized European multicenter study. The effect of adjunctive corticosteroid (CS) therapy was assessed on (a......) survival to discharge, (b) need for mechanical ventilation, and (c) survival at day 90. CS was given within 24 h of standard therapy as intravenous methylprednisolone 2 mg/kg body weight daily for 10 days. All patients received cotrimoxazole as standard treatment. Inclusion criteria were a PaO2 less than 9...

  9. Antenatal corticosteroids trial in preterm births to increase neonatal survival in developing countries: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Althabe Fernando

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is a major cause of neonatal mortality, responsible for 28% of neonatal deaths overall. The administration of antenatal corticosteroids to women at high risk of preterm birth is a powerful perinatal intervention to reduce neonatal mortality in resource rich environments. The effect of antenatal steroids to reduce mortality and morbidity among preterm infants in hospital settings in developed countries with high utilization is well established, yet they are not routinely used in developing countries. The impact of increasing antenatal steroid use in hospital or community settings with low utilization rates and high infant mortality among premature infants due to lack of specialized services has not been well researched. There is currently no clear evidence about the safety of antenatal corticosteroid use for community-level births. Methods We hypothesize that a multi country, two-arm, parallel cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a multifaceted intervention to increase the use of antenatal corticosteroids, including components to improve the identification of pregnancies at high risk of preterm birth and providing and facilitating the appropriate use of steroids, will reduce neonatal mortality at 28 days of life in preterm newborns, compared with the standard delivery of care in selected populations of six countries. 102 clusters in Argentina, Guatemala, Kenya, India, Pakistan, and Zambia will be randomized, and around 60,000 women and newborns will be enrolled. Kits containing vials of dexamethasone, syringes, gloves, and instructions for administration will be distributed. Improving the identification of women at high risk of preterm birth will be done by (1 diffusing recommendations for antenatal corticosteroids use to health providers, (2 training health providers on identification of women at high risk of preterm birth, (3 providing reminders to health providers on the use of the kits, and

  10. Antenatal corticosteroids trial in preterm births to increase neonatal survival in developing countries: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althabe, Fernando; Belizán, José M; Mazzoni, Agustina; Berrueta, Mabel; Hemingway-Foday, Jay; Koso-Thomas, Marion; McClure, Elizabeth; Chomba, Elwyn; Garces, Ana; Goudar, Shivaprasad; Kodkany, Bhalchandra; Saleem, Sarah; Pasha, Omrana; Patel, Archana; Esamai, Fabian; Carlo, Waldemar A; Krebs, Nancy F; Derman, Richard J; Goldenberg, Robert L; Hibberd, Patricia; Liechty, Edward A; Wright, Linda L; Bergel, Eduardo F; Jobe, Alan H; Buekens, Pierre

    2012-09-19

    Preterm birth is a major cause of neonatal mortality, responsible for 28% of neonatal deaths overall. The administration of antenatal corticosteroids to women at high risk of preterm birth is a powerful perinatal intervention to reduce neonatal mortality in resource rich environments. The effect of antenatal steroids to reduce mortality and morbidity among preterm infants in hospital settings in developed countries with high utilization is well established, yet they are not routinely used in developing countries. The impact of increasing antenatal steroid use in hospital or community settings with low utilization rates and high infant mortality among premature infants due to lack of specialized services has not been well researched. There is currently no clear evidence about the safety of antenatal corticosteroid use for community-level births. We hypothesize that a multi country, two-arm, parallel cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a multifaceted intervention to increase the use of antenatal corticosteroids, including components to improve the identification of pregnancies at high risk of preterm birth and providing and facilitating the appropriate use of steroids, will reduce neonatal mortality at 28 days of life in preterm newborns, compared with the standard delivery of care in selected populations of six countries. 102 clusters in Argentina, Guatemala, Kenya, India, Pakistan, and Zambia will be randomized, and around 60,000 women and newborns will be enrolled. Kits containing vials of dexamethasone, syringes, gloves, and instructions for administration will be distributed. Improving the identification of women at high risk of preterm birth will be done by (1) diffusing recommendations for antenatal corticosteroids use to health providers, (2) training health providers on identification of women at high risk of preterm birth, (3) providing reminders to health providers on the use of the kits, and (4) using a color-coded tape to measure

  11. Corticosteroid injections, eccentric decline squat training and heavy slow resistance training in patellar tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Kovanen, V; Aagaard, P

    2009-01-01

    A randomized-controlled single-blind trial was conducted to investigate the clinical, structural and functional effects of peritendinous corticosteroid injections (CORT), eccentric decline squat training (ECC) and heavy slow resistance training (HSR) in patellar tendinopathy. Thirty-nine male...... patients were randomized to CORT, ECC or HSR for 12 weeks. We assessed function and symptoms (VISA-p questionnaire), tendon pain during activity (VAS), treatment satisfaction, tendon swelling, tendon vascularization, tendon mechanical properties and collagen crosslink properties. Assessments were made at 0...

  12. Blood eosinophil count and exacerbations in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease after withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watz, Henrik; Tetzlaff, Kay; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood eosinophil counts might predict response to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a history of exacerbations. We used data from the WISDOM trial to assess whether patients with COPD with higher blood eosinophil counts wou...... of exacerbations. Our data suggest that counts of 4% or greater or 300 cells per μL or more might identify a deleterious effect of ICS withdrawal, an effect not seen in most patients with eosinophil counts below these thresholds. FUNDING: Boehringer Ingelheim....

  13. Xerostomia and Salivary Gland Hypofunction in Patients with Oral Lichen Planus Before and After Treatment with Topical Corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janaby, Hala; El-Sakka, Haytham; Masood, Manal; Ashani W Mendis, Walimuni; M Slack-Smith, Linda; Parsons, Richard; M Frydrych, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Oral lichen planus and mouth dryness are common pathoses, yet not entirely understood. These two conditions may be associated, with a few studies investigating the relationship between mouth dryness and oral lichen planus providing conflicting results. None of the studies have explored the specific impact of disease treatment on mouth dryness. The purpose of this observational before and after comparison study was to examine the effect of treatment of oral lichen planus with topical corticosteroids on mouth dryness. Nineteen subjects with oral lichen planus were evaluated for the severity of xerostomia using a xerostomia inventory and a visual analogue scale. Stimulated and unstimulated whole salivary flow rates, unstimulated salivary pH and buffering capacity were also measured. All subjects were evaluated before and after treatment with topical corticosteroids. All subjects reported xerostomia before treatment with topical corticosteroids, with 79% reporting a significant improvement ( P = 0.03) after treatment. Topical corticosteroid treatment was not associated with statistically significant differences in stimulated or unstimulated salivary flow rates, unstimulated salivary pH or buffering capacity. The results of this study suggest that treatment of oral lichen planus with topical corticosteroids may decrease the severity of dry mouth symptoms.

  14. Size at birth, morning cortisol and cardiometabolic risk markers in healthy Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaveni, G V; Veena, S R; Dhube, A; Karat, S C; Phillips, D I W; Fall, C H D

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may link reduced foetal growth with higher adult chronic disease risk. South Asians have a high prevalence of low birth weight and a thin-fat phenotype, which is associated with subsequent type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Altered HPA activity could be one of the pathological processes underlying this link. Plasma morning cortisol and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) concentrations were determined in 528 children aged 9·5 years from a prospective birth cohort in India. They had detailed anthropometry at birth, and current measurements of anthropometry, plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations and blood pressure. Insulin resistance (Homeostasis Model Assessment) and insulin secretion (the 30-min insulin increment) were also assessed. None of the birth measurements were associated with cortisol concentrations, but both birth weight (P = 0·03) and length (P = 0·004) were inversely associated with CBG concentrations. Cortisol concentrations were inversely associated with current body mass index (P = 0·02), and positively associated with glucose (fasting: P risk markers in Indian children. Although cortisol concentrations did not appear to be related to birth size, small size at birth was associated with higher CBG levels, and may be one of the processes by which foetal undernutrition affects adult health. The findings suggest a need for dynamic testing of HPA axis activity (such as measuring stress responses). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Photocarcinogenicity of selected topically applied dermatological drugs: calcineurin inhibitors, corticosteroids, and vitamin D analogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Margrethe Lerche

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Topical therapies constitute the mainstay of dermatological treatments for skin disorders, such as atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, psoriasis, or acne. Since some of these diseases are often chronic, treatment duration may last for years and may even last the patient’s entire lifetime. Obviously, such long-term therapy may raise safety concerns, which also include the potential photocarcinogenic effect. Most patients are exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR during leisure, work, vacations, or in tanning beds. Additionally, the patients may receive UVR via UVB phototherapy or psoralens plus UVA radiation (PUVA. The use of immunosuppressant’s, such as corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors, has markedly increased. Patients with skin diseases have benefited from both systemic and topical treatment of both new and established drugs. The issue of a black box warning by the US Food and Drug Administration has increased concerns about photocarcinogenesis, which raises the question: “Are these drugs safe?” This review focuses on the mechanism of action and photocarcinogenic potential of commonly used topical treatments, such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and vitamin D analogs.

  16. Combination total lymphoid irradiation and low-dose corticosteroid therapy for progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.D.; Zito, G.; Dowling, P.C.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Jotkowitz, A.; Rohowsky-Kochan, C.; Sheffet, A.

    1995-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has been reported to delay deterioration in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune disorders. Methods - In an open trial, the effect of TLI combined with a one year course of low dose prednisone was compared to the effect of sham TLI and TLI only in a prior double-blind study of patients with progressive multiple sclerosis. Results - Twenty-seven patients receiving TLI combined with corticosteroids had significantly greater lymphocytopenia in the year post-therapy than those receiving TLI only or sham TLI and Kaplan Meier product-limit survival analysis showed significantly less progression in the TLI plus steroid group over 4 years of follow-up. No difference in lymphocytopenia or progression was found with TLI plus corticosteroid therapy when the spleen was removed from the field of irradiation. Conclusion - These results lend further support to the hypothesis that TLI may be effective in progressive MS, and indicates that adding low-dose prednisone may enhance this effect. The study also suggests that TLI may be equally effective whether or not the spleen is irradiated. (au) (14 refs.)

  17. Stress-Dose Corticosteroid Versus Placebo in Neonatal Cardiac Operations: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suominen, Pertti K; Keski-Nisula, Juho; Ojala, Tiina; Rautiainen, Paula; Jahnukainen, Timo; Hästbacka, Johanna; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Pitkänen, Olli; Niemelä, Jussi; Kaskinen, Anu; Salminen, Jukka; Lapatto, Risto

    2017-10-01

    Corticosteroids can improve the hemodynamic status of neonates with postoperative low cardiac output syndrome after cardiac operations. This study compared a prophylactically administered stress-dose corticosteroid (SDC) regimen against placebo on inflammation, adrenocortical function, and hemodynamic outcome. Forty neonates undergoing elective open heart operations were randomized into two groups. The SDC group received perioperatively 2 mg/kg methylprednisolone, and 6 hours after the operation, a hydrocortisone infusion (0.2 mg/kg/h) was started with tapering doses for 5 days. Placebo was administered in a similar fashion. An adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was performed after the therapy. The primary endpoint of the study was plasma concentration of interleukin (IL-6). Secondary clinical outcomes included plasma cortisol, IL-10, C-reactive protein, echocardiographic systemic ventricle contractility evaluated by the Velocity Vector Imaging program, the inotropic score, and time of delayed sternal closure. The IL-6 values of the SDC group were significantly lower postoperatively than in the placebo group. Significantly lower inotropic scores (p SDC group. The SDC therapy did not suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis more than placebo. The mean plasma cortisol level did not decline in the placebo group after the operation. The SDC regimen for 5 days postoperatively in neonates was safe and did not cause suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Furthermore, the open heart operation per se did not lead to adrenal insufficiency in neonates. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Corticosteroids and redox potential modulate spontaneous contractions in isolated rat ventricular cardiomyocytes.

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    Rossier, Michel F; Lenglet, Sébastien; Vetterli, Laurène; Python, Magaly; Maturana, Andrés

    2008-10-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor has been implicated in the development of several cardiac pathologies and could participate in the high incidence of lethal ventricular arrhythmias associated with hyperaldosteronism. We have observed previously that aldosterone markedly increases in vitro the rate of spontaneous contractions of isolated neonate rat ventricular myocytes, a putative proarrhythmogenic condition if occurring in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the effect of glucocorticoids, the involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor, and the modulation of their action by redox agents. Aldosterone and glucocorticoids exerted in vitro a similar, concentration-dependent chronotropic action on cardiomyocytes, which was mediated by both the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors. However, the relative contribution of each receptor was different for each agonist, at each concentration. Angiotensin II induced a similar response that was entirely dependent on the activity of the glucocorticoid receptor. Corticosteroid action was modulated by the redox state of the cells, with oxidation increasing the response while reducing conditions partially preventing it. When only the mineralocorticoid receptor was functionally present in the cells, oxidation was necessary to reveal glucocorticoid action, but no obvious competition with mineralocorticoids was observed when both agonists where simultaneously present. In conclusion, corticosteroids exert a strong chronotropic action in ventricular cardiomyocytes, mediated by both the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors and modulated by the redox state of the cell. This phenomenon is believed to be because of cell electric remodeling and could contribute in vivo to the deleterious consequence of inappropriate receptor activation, leading to increased susceptibility of patients to arrhythmias.

  19. Biomolecules in the treatment of lichen planus refractory to corticosteroid therapy: Clinical and histopathological assessment.

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    Piñas, Laura; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Suárez-Fernández, Ricardo; Anitua, Eduardo

    2018-03-01

    Local deficit of several biomolecules have been described in oral lichen planus (OLP). Such a deficit impairs cellular functions and cell-matrix communication. Assess the efficacy of the local application of autologous biomolecules in the treatment of erosive OLP. In this study, the use of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) as a source of blood-derived and autologous growth factors and proteins were tested in erosive oral lichen planus refractory to corticosteroids. Histopathological features of the disease were also analysed at the time of diagnosis. Clinical data were the number of recurrences and achievement of pain reduction and complete healing of the lesions. A total of 10 patients with erosive OLP refractory to treatment by corticosteroids were included in the study. All patients were females with a mean age of 48±12years. A complete remission of the disease was achieved after one infiltration of PRGF in 8 patients. Only 2 patients required a total of 2 infiltrations to heal. Hydropic degeneration of the epithelium basal layer, band-like subepithelial lymphocytic infiltration and fibrin deposits in the epithelium were observed in all patients. Interestingly plasma cells were present in 2 patients. All patients presenting plasma cells healed after only one PRGF infiltration. However, 2 patients out of 6 (no plasma cells) required 2 infiltrations. The local administration of autologous local factors could overcome the deficit of biomolecular clues and thus improve cell functions and restore cell-matrix communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Severe acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B during pegylated interferon treatment and early intervention with corticosteroid

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    Mao Qing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Severe acute exacerbation or liver failure induced by standard interferon-α(IFN-α therapy had been reported to occur in few patients with chronic hepatitis B. However, no report showed that pegylated interferon-α therapy was able to induce severe acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B. Here, we describe three patients with severe acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B during pegylated interferon-α2a (Pegasys treatment. One patient progressed into acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF at the second week of Pegasys treatment. Two patients progressed into acute-on-chronic pre-liver failure (pre-ACLF at the second and eighth week of Pegasys treatment, respectively. Three patients recovered after early combined intervention with corticosteroid and lamivudine. Our data indicated that there was a risk of severe acute exacerbation among patients with chronic hepatitis B during receiving Pegasys treatment. Importantly, early combined intervention with corticosteroid and lamivudine should be introduced to prevent the disease progression and improve their prognosis once severe acute exacerbation was diagnosed.

  1. A case of recurrent impetigo herpetiformis treated with systemic corticosteroids and narrowband UVB.

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    Bozdag, Kubra; Ozturk, Serap; Ermete, Murat

    2012-03-01

    Impetigo herpetiformis is a rare pustular eruption with usual onset during the third trimester of pregnancy. The disease tends to remit after delivery, but may recur in subsequent pregnancies. Here we present a recurrent case of impetigo herpetiformis with earlier onset and poor response to corticosteroids in the subsequent pregnancy. She had widespread, erythematosquamous patches with tiny superficial pustules in the third trimester of her first pregnancy. Histopathological and clinical findings were consistent with impetigo herpetiformis. She was treated with systemic prednisolone and had a healthy baby without any complication. Three years later, the patient presented with impetigo herpetiformis again in the second trimester of her second pregnancy. After six weeks of oral prednisolone treatment, the lesions improved, but there were still new pustule formations and narrowband ultraviolet B treatment was added. Skin eruption cleared and she had a healthy baby in the 38th week of her second pregnancy. The corticosteroid dose was tapered gradually and stopped after delivery. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial in impetigo herpetiformis because of the risk of maternal and fetal complications. When prednisolone is not enough to control the eruption alone, narrowband UVB can safely be added to the treatment.

  2. Dental therapeutic practice patterns in the U.S. II. Analgesics, corticosteroids, and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paul A; Nahouraii, Helen S; Zovko, Jayme G; Wisniewski, Stephen R

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the prescribing practices for peripherally acting and centrally acting analgesics, corticosteroids, and antibiotics following third molar extraction. A nationwide survey involving the prescribing patterns of a random national sample of 850 practicing oral surgeons was performed in 2004. Ibuprofen was the peripherally acting analgesic respondents used most frequently in the previous month, selected by 73.5% of the respondents. The ibuprofen dose prescribed most frequently was 800 mg, followed by doses of 600 mg and 400 mg. The centrally acting analgesic prescribed most frequently was the combination formulation of hydrocodone with acetaminophen, selected by 64.0% of the respondents. Recommendations for oral analgesics to manage postoperative pain relied on the peripherally acting analgesic ibuprofen or the centrally acting analgesic combination formulation hydrocodone with acetaminophen. Routine instructions to use centrally acting analgesics "as needed for pain" suggest that centrally acting analgesics are offered to manage pain that postoperative peripherally acting analgesics and intraoperative long-acting local anesthetics do not control adequately. The frequency with which oral and maxillofacial surgeons administered antibiotics and corticosteroids varied widely based on perceived patient need and dentist expectations.

  3. Rituximab Therapy for Severe Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Angiitis Refractory to Corticosteroids, Cellcept and Cyclophosphamide

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    Kamel El-Reshaid

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We report our clinical experience with rituximab in the treatment of 2 patients with idiopathic cutaneous angiitis who relapsed after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. A 39-year-old woman and a 51-year-old man presented with ulcerating maculopapular rash in both lower limbs which relapsed 6 months after treatment with a combination of high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. After treatment with 2 g of rituximab, the first patient has still been in clinical remission for 32 months while the second has finished 28 months. Interestingly, CD19 which had dropped to 0.5% 8 months later in both patients. Despite that, our patients are still in clinical remission. No significant side effects were noted during infusions and up to the period of follow-up. In conclusion, rituximab is a useful and safe agent in the treatment of idiopathic cutaneous angiitis refractory to conventional therapy. Clinical remission persists years after improvement of B-cell suppression.

  4. The ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies.

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    Ville, Dorothée; Chiron, Catherine; Laschet, Jacques; Dulac, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Hormonal therapy or ketogenic diet often permits overcoming the challenging periods of many epileptic encephalopathies (West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes and encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep), but relapse affects over 20% of patients. We report here a monocenter pilot series of 42 consecutive patients in whom we combined oral steroids with the ketogenic diet for corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent epileptic encephalopathy. We retrospectively evaluated the effect on seizure frequency, interictal spike activity, neuropsychological course, and steroid treatment course. Twenty-three patients had West syndrome (WS), 13 had encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep (CSWS), and six others had miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. All patients succeeded to reach 0.8 to 1.6g/l ketone bodies in the urine following the usual KD regimen. For at least 6 months, 14/42 responded to the addition of the ketogenic diet: 4/23 with WS, 8/13 with CSWS, and 2/6 with miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. The addition of the KD allowed withdrawing steroids in all responders. Among them, 10/15 had been patients with steroid-dependent epileptic encephalopathy and 4/27 patients with steroid-resistant epileptic encephalopathy. Therefore, the ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies. Patients presenting with steroid-dependent CSWS seem to be the best candidates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Subacromial Ketorolac Injection versus Corticosteroid Injection in the Treatment of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Parisa; Dehghan, Farnaz; Mousavi, Sahar; Solouki, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common cause of shoulder pain and restriction in range of motion in the world. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of subacromial injection of ketorolac with the injection of corticosteroid for the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome. A total of forty patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Group A received 40 mg of methylprednisolone and Group B received 60 mg of ketorolac as a subacromial injection along with lidocaine. Each patient was evaluated in terms of visual analog scale (VAS) for evaluating pain and Constant's score for function evaluation (pain, activity level, and range of motion with standard goniometry). The patients were re-examined 1 and 3 months after intervention. All the patients educated for simple home exercise. At 1 and 3 months of follow-up, both treatment arms resulted in an increased range of motion and decreased pain. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant ( P > 0.05). In ketorolac group, mean pre- and post-treatment (at 12 weeks) VAS scores were 8.6 (range, 3-9) and 4.5 (range 2-4), respectively. In steroid group, mean pre- and post-treatment (at 12 weeks) VAS scores were 8.3 (range, 3-10) and 3.9 (range, 0-7), respectively. The difference was statistically significant within groups at baseline and 1 ( P shoulder and could be a reasonable alternative in case of corticosteroid contraindications.

  6. Use of Corticosteroid in Children with Unresponsiveness to Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Kawasaki Disease

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    Abdolkarim Hamedi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Kawasaki Disease (KD is a vasculitis with multi-organ involvementof unknown etiology; it is the most common cause of pediatric-heart diseases in developed countries. Treatment with Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG prevents coronary artery lesions; although there are some IVIG-resistant cases, combination therapy with corticosteroids and IVIG is one of the recommendations for treatment of these cases. The aim of this study was to compare these three options for treatment of Kawasaki Disease and to evaluate their ability to deal with coronary artery complication of Kawasaki Disease. Materials and Methods A prospective cross- sectional study of hospitalized cases of Kawasaki Disease, conducted in pediatric department of Imam Reza hospital, Mashhad-Iran, during 2013 to 2015 (18 months. Based on demographic and clinical data of these patients, children with high risk of unresponsiveness to IVIG therapy (based on Harada score, were determined and treated with IVIG and corticosteroids- combination initially. Follow-up patients for heart complications were 6 weeks. Results Twenty five patients (89.2% out of total 28 hospitalized patients in this period of time who fulfilled diagnostic criteria were considered as complete Kawasaki Disease. Coronary Artery Lesions (CALs were shown in 4 patients during the follow-up period, with high risk in patients with incomplete presentation (33.3% versus 12%, P

  7. An Active Learning Activity to Reinforce the Design Components of the Corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slauson, Stephen R; Mandela, Prashant

    2018-02-05

    Despite the popularity of active learning applications over the past few decades, few activities have been reported for the field of medicinal chemistry. The purpose of this study is to report a new active learning activity, describe participant contributions, and examine participant performance on the assessment questions mapped to the objective covered by the activity. In this particular activity, students are asked to design two novel corticosteroids as a group (6-8 students per group) based on the design characteristics of marketed corticosteroids covered in lecture coupled with their pharmaceutics knowledge from the previous semester and then defend their design to the class through an interactive presentation model. Although class performance on the objective mapped to this material on the assessment did not reach statistical significance, use of this activity has allowed fruitful discussion of misunderstood concepts and facilitated multiple changes to the lecture presentation. As pharmacy schools continue to emphasize alternative learning pedagogies, publication of previously implemented activities demonstrating their use will help others apply similar methodologies.

  8. An Active Learning Activity to Reinforce the Design Components of the Corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Slauson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the popularity of active learning applications over the past few decades, few activities have been reported for the field of medicinal chemistry. The purpose of this study is to report a new active learning activity, describe participant contributions, and examine participant performance on the assessment questions mapped to the objective covered by the activity. In this particular activity, students are asked to design two novel corticosteroids as a group (6–8 students per group based on the design characteristics of marketed corticosteroids covered in lecture coupled with their pharmaceutics knowledge from the previous semester and then defend their design to the class through an interactive presentation model. Although class performance on the objective mapped to this material on the assessment did not reach statistical significance, use of this activity has allowed fruitful discussion of misunderstood concepts and facilitated multiple changes to the lecture presentation. As pharmacy schools continue to emphasize alternative learning pedagogies, publication of previously implemented activities demonstrating their use will help others apply similar methodologies.

  9. HYPERSENSITIVE RHINITIS - EFFECTS OF TREATMENT WITH LOCAL CORTICOSTEROID UPON The clinic disease parameters

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    Slobodanka Janošević

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent symptoms of chronic rhinitis are nasal pruritus, sneezing, nasal secretion and nasal obstruction. The aim of our research was to determine the effect of the local corticosteroid upon nasal symptoms of the patients with moderate season and perennial hypersensitive rhinitis.In its character the study was prospective and controlled. The total number of 55 patients with moderate hypersensitive rhinitis was examined; 36 of them were treated by the local corticosteroid while 18 were with no therapy at all. The patients were treated with beclomethasone dipropionate in the nasal spray (daily dose of 400 p.g for 6 weeks. All the patients were subdued to many otorhinolaryngological examinations: before the therapy (basal, after a week's therapy and after six-week therapy. The nasal symptoms were graded according to their intensity and then their overall score was compared.After a week's therapy the results show a very important reduction of the score of the symptoms in the patients of the treated subgroups with respect to the basal state while after six week therapy no further important change was determined. In the patients of the non-treated subgroups there was no significant change of the symptom score during the follow-up period.The local treatment with beclomethasone dipropionate represents an important medicament of the first therapeutic line in moderate season and perennial hypersensitive rhinitis.

  10. Beyond corticosteroids: future prospects in the management of inflammation in COPD

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    N. Roche

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays a central role in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Exposure to cigarette smoke induces the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the airways and stimulates innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Airway inflammation is involved in increased bronchial wall thickness, increased bronchial smooth muscle tone, mucus hypersecretion and loss of parenchymal elastic structures. Oxidative stress impairs tissue integrity, accelerates lung ageing and reduces the efficacy of corticosteroids by decreasing levels of histone deacetylase-2. Protease–antiprotease imbalance impairs tissues and is involved in inflammatory processes. Inflammation is also present in the pulmonary artery wall and at the systemic level in COPD patients, and may be involved in COPD-associated comorbidities. Proximal airways inflammation contributes to symptoms of chronic bronchitis while distal and parenchymal inflammation relates to airflow obstruction, emphysema and hyperinflation. Basal levels of airways and systemic inflammation are increased in frequent exacerbators. Inhaled corticosteroids are much less effective in COPD than in asthma, which relates to the intrinsically poor reversibility of COPD-related airflow obstruction and to molecular mechanisms of resistance relating to oxidative stress. Ongoing research aims at developing new drugs targeting more intimately COPD-specific mechanisms of inflammation, hypersecretion and tissue destruction and repair. Among new anti-inflammatory agents, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors have been the first to emerge.

  11. Topical corticosteroid abuse on the face: a prospective, study on outpatients of dermatology

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    Hariharasubramony Ambika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Topical corticosteroids (TCS are widely misused. Uncontrolled use of steroids can cause undesirable adverse effects especially on face. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the skin manifestations of TCS misuse over the face in the patients attending dermatology outpatient and to analyze various factors contributing to such misuse. Material and Methods: A total of 200 patients with facial dermatoses using topical steroids over face for minimum period of 1 month, reported between June 2010 and May 2011 were enrolled in the study. Details about the usage of topical corticosteroids and their side effects were recorded. The patients were educated about the misuse. Results: Majority of the patients were females (71%. The most common reason for misuse was acne (61% followed by use as a fairness cream (23%. The average duration of usage was 6 months to 1 year, longest being 8 years. The drug most commonly misused was Betamethaone Valerate (71%. The commonest side effect noted was acne form eruptions (52% followed by steroid dependent face (SDF (36%. There were no cases of allergic contact dermatitis or perioral dermatitis. The exacerbation of the lesions on stoppage of steroid cream (90% fairness effect (10% were the reasons for continued use. (100% were unaware of side effects of topical steroids. Conclusions: Steroids have been misused by patients on their own or by doctors for various reasons. Hence the awareness about their correct usage is essential.

  12. Presumed late recurrence of Acanthamoeba keratitis exacerbated by exposure to topical corticosteroids

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    Dipika V Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old female with a history of contact lens wear presented with a 1 week history of pain and photophobia in her left eye. In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM and corneal scrape confirmed the diagnosis of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK which was treated with intensive topical propamidine isethionate (0.1% and chlorhexidine (0.02% with tapering dosage over 11 months. Five years after complete resolution of AK and cessation of all contact lens wear, the subject presented to her optometrist with a history of ocular discomfort and mild photophobia. Without further investigation she was prescribed topical corticosteroids. Three weeks later she presented with pain and reduced vision in the left eye. Slit-lamp examination revealed focal, inferior corneal stromal edema. IVCM confirmed widespread Acanthamoeba cysts. Treatment with topical polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB 0.02% and propamidine isethionate 0.1% resulted in resolution of the AK. Despite an initially mild AK, this subject presumably retained viable Acanthamoeba cysts in her cornea 5 years after the initial episode. This report highlights the importance of caution when using corticosteroids in patients with a previous history of AK, even in the relatively distant past. Patients with AK should be warned regarding the risks of recurrence following presumed resolution.

  13. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome due to High Dose Corticosteroids for an MS Relapse

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    Sarah A. Morrow

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased blood pressure is a known adverse effect associated with corticosteroids but little is published regarding the risk with the high doses used in multiple sclerosis (MS. A 53-year-old female with known relapsing remitting MS presented with a new brainstem relapse. Standard of care treatment for an acute MS relapse, 1250 mg of oral prednisone for 5 days, was initiated. She developed an occipital headache and dizziness and felt generally unwell. These symptoms persisted after treatment was complete. On presentation to medical attention, her blood pressure was 199/110 mmHg, although she had no history of hypertension. MRI changes were consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES, demonstrating abnormal T2 signal in both thalami, the posterior occipital and posterior parietal white matter with mild sulcal effacement. As her pressure normalized with medication, her symptoms resolved and the MRI changes improved. No secondary cause of hypertension was found. This is the first reported case of PRES secondary to high dose corticosteroid use for an MS relapse without a history of hypertension and with no other secondary cause of hypertension identified. This rare complication should be considered in MS patients presenting with a headache or other neurological symptoms during treatment for a relapse.

  14. Evaluation of factors that allow the clinician to taper inhaled corticosteroids in childhood asthma

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    Kentaro Matsuda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhaled corticosteroids are potent and effective treatment agents for controlling symptoms of childhood asthma. However, there are no predictive factors that help to determine which patients with asthma are likely to be tapered off inhaled corticosteroids successfully. We examined whether any factor or combination of factors could help the clinician safely discontinue inhaled steroid therapy. Thirty-six asthmatic children whose symptoms were stable on low-dose beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP were divided by parental choice into two groups: maintenance BDP (n = 11 and no BDP (n = 25. Methacholine inhalation tests were performed at the beginning of the study and after 1 month. Twelve children (48% who had BDP discontinued developed exacerbations after 2–3 months, whereas there were no problems in the maintenance group. The no BDP group was retrospectively divided into two subgroups: exacerbation (+ and (−. The threshold to methacholine in the exacerbation (+ subgroup decreased significantly in advance of clinical symptoms. The two subgroups were analyzed statistically by two-group discriminant function analysis. The change in threshold to methacholine, the dose and potency of drugs, duration of asthma and gender (female correlated with exacerbation. These results suggest that discontinuation of inhaled steroids should be done carefully, even in stable asthmatic children. The methacholine inhalation test, gender, drugs and history may be used as references for discontinuing inhaled steroids.

  15. Use of novel picolinoyl derivatization for simultaneous quantification of six corticosteroids by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

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    Yamashita, Kouwa; Takahashi, Madoka; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Okuyama, Mitsunobu; Honma, Seijiro

    2007-11-30

    Simultaneous quantification method of six corticosteroids, cortisone, cortisol, cortexolone, corticosterone, dehydrocorticosterone and deoxycorticosterone, by LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS in a positive mode using novel picolinoyl derivatization was investigated. Conversion of each corticosteroid into the corresponding picolinoyl derivative was performed by mixed anhydride method using picolinic acids and 2-methyl-6-nitrobenzoic anhydride. Derivatization proceeded smoothly to afford the corresponding 21-monopicolinoyl derivatives. Positive ion-ESI mass spectra of the picolinoyl derivatives were dominated by the appearance of [M+H](+) as base peaks. The picolinoyl derivatives provided 5-10 times higher ESI response in the LC-ESI-MS-selected reaction monitoring (SRM) when compared to those of underivatized molecules in a positive LC-ESI-MS mode. The use of the picolinoyl ester, solid-phase extraction, and deuterium labeled internal standards enabled to determine the concentrations of these corticosteroids in human saliva simultaneously by LC-ESI-MS-SRM.

  16. Symptomatic aggravation after corticosteroid pulse therapy in definite sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with the feature of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

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    Jang, Jae-Won; Park, So Young; Park, Young Ho; Kim, Jung E; Kim, SangYun

    2014-09-08

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Hashimoto's encephalopathy often show similar clinical presentation. Among Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease mimics, Hashimoto's encephalopathy is particularly important as it is treatable with corticosteroids. Thus, in cases of middle-aged woman diagnosed with probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and who exhibit high titers of antithyroid antibodies, corticosteroid pulse therapy is typically performed with expectations of near complete recovery from Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Herein, we provide the first case report that exhibited a negative effect of corticosteroid pulse therapy for a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with features of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. We report a case of 59-year-old Asian woman with blurred vision, dysarthria, myoclonus, and rapidly progressive dementia. Cerebrospinal fluid showed 14-3-3 protein positive. Electroencephalogram showed periodic sharp waves (1.5 Hz) at the bilateral frontal or occipital areas. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensities at the bilateral cerebral cortex, caudate nucleus, and putamen. The patient was diagnosed with probable Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, serum analysis showed a high titer of antithyroid antibodies. We started corticosteroid pulse therapy with subsequent aggravation of seizure activity including generalized myoclonus, epilepsia parialis continua, and ballistic dyskinesia, which was effectively treated with clonazepam. We provide evidence of a case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease that exhibited clinical deterioration after corticosteroid therapy. Although histopathological confirmation with brain biopsy is not easily available in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients, selective initiation of corticosteroid pulse therapy should be considered in cases of uncertain diagnosis for differentiation with Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  17. Optimal dose of intra-articular corticosteroids for adhesive capsulitis: a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Young; Lee, Hyun Jung; Kwack, Kyu-Sung

    2013-05-01

    Intra-articular corticosteroid injection is a commonly used therapy for adhesive capsulitis, but there are only few studies that compare the efficacy of corticosteroids according to different doses. To determine whether intra-articular injections with a high-dose corticosteroid improves pain and function in patients with adhesive capsulitis better than a low dose or a placebo. Randomized controlled clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1. Participants (n = 53) with primary adhesive capsulitis in the freezing stage were randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided intra-articular injections with 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide (high-dose group, n = 20), 20 mg triamcinolone acetonide (low-dose group, n = 20), or placebo (n = 13). After a single injection, participants were all instructed to carry out a home exercise program. The outcome measures included the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), visual analog scale (VAS) for average shoulder pain level, and passive range of motion including flexion, abduction, extension, external rotation, and internal rotation before treatment and at weeks 1, 3, 6, and 12 after treatment. There were no significant differences in demographic and clinical characteristics at baseline between the 3 groups. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests showed improvement in SPADI and VAS scores and in flexion, abduction, and internal rotation especially for the low- and high-dose groups compared with the placebo. Yet, no significant difference was found between the 2 different corticosteroid dose groups. We assessed the efficacy of corticosteroid injections according to 2 different doses that are most widely used in intra-articular injections for adhesive capsulitis. This study shows that there were no significant differences between the high- and low-dose corticosteroid groups, indicating the preferred use of a low dose in the initial stage.

  18. Corticosteroids as a therapy for bacterial keratitis: an evidence-based review of 'who, when and why'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallab, Raghad T; Stone, Donald U

    2016-06-01

    Corticosteroids have been proposed as an adjunct to antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial keratitis, with significant controversy regarding the appropriate use of this therapy. Recent prospective randomised controlled trials have provided additional evidence to guide clinical decision-making. A review of the epidemiology and mechanisms of pathogenesis, preliminary animal studies, retrospective human studies and prospective randomised clinical trials that address the potential risks and benefits of corticosteroids in patients with bacterial keratitis was performed. Four prospective randomised controlled trials were identified. Three small studies found no benefit of topical corticosteroids, but were underpowered to evaluate adverse events. The Steroids for Corneal Ulcers Trial (SCUT) study and subgroup analyses provide evidence for a relative gain of one line of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity in patients with non-Nocardia bacterial keratitis, especially when corticosteroids were initiated within 3 days of presentation; no increase in adverse events was noted. No evidence was found to support the concern for corneal thinning attributable to corticosteroids in the absence of an inadequately treated infectious process. In patients with culture-proven non-Nocardia bacterial keratitis, corticosteroids provide one line of vision improvement over antimicrobials alone, with no increase in adverse events. This benefit should not be extrapolated to patients with other aetiologies of keratitis, such as fungus, herpes viruses, acanthamoeba or atypical mycobacteria, and these entities should be excluded before considering adjunctive steroid therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Early initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy in the management of septic shock: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Yun; Suh, Gee Young; Song, Jae-Uk; Yoo, Hongseok; Jo, Ik Joon; Shin, Tae Gun; Lim, So Yeon; Woo, Sookyoung; Jeon, Kyeongman

    2012-01-07

    The use of low-dose steroid therapy in the management of septic shock has been extensively studied. However, the association between the timing of low-dose steroid therapy and the outcome has not been evaluated. Therefore, we evaluated whether early initiation of low-dose steroid therapy is associated with mortality in patients with septic shock. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 178 patients who received low-dose corticosteroid therapy for septic shock between January 2008 and December 2009. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors in the association between the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy and in-hospital mortality. The study population consisted of 107 men and 71 women with a median age of 66 (interquartile range, 54 to 71) years. The 28-day mortality was 44% and low-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated within a median of 8.5 (3.8 to 19.1) hours after onset of septic shock-related hypotension. Median time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was significantly shorter in survivors than in non-survivors (6.5 hours versus 10.4 hours; P=0.0135). The mortality rates increased significantly with increasing quintiles of time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P=0.0107 for trend). Other factors associated with 28-day mortality were higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 (Pshock, n=66) had a 37% lower mortality rate than the late therapy group (administered more than 6 hours after the onset of septic shock, n=112) (32% versus 51%, P=0.0132). Early initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was significantly associated with decreased mortality.

  20. Hair analysis reveals subtle HPA axis suppression associated with use of local corticosteroids: The Lifelines cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Vincent L; Noppe, Gerard; Savas, Mesut; van den Akker, Erica L T; de Rijke, Yolanda B; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C

    2017-06-01

    Scalp hair is increasingly used to measure the long-term exposure to endogenous glucocorticoids hormones. Long-term cortisone (HairE) and cortisol (HairF) have been associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and psychopathology. However, little is known about the influence of the use of local corticosteroids and major stressful life events on hair glucocorticoids. We determined HairE and HairF using liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry in 295 adult participants of the population-based Lifelines cohort study (75% females, median age 42). We collected anthropometry and fasting metabolic laboratory values, questionnaires on hair characteristics, recent use of corticosteroids, and recent major stressful life events. After adjustment for covariates, hair glucocorticoids increased with age, male sex, black or brown hair color, and frequency of sweating on the scalp, and decreased with higher hair washing frequency (PHairE was decreased in participants who used systemic corticosteroids (5.4 vs. 8.5pg/mg hair, P=0.041), and in participants who only used local agents such as inhaled, topical and nasal corticosteroids (6.8 vs. 8.5pg/mg, P=0.005). Recent life events were positively associated with HairF after adjustment for age and sex (P=0.026), but this association lost significance after adjustment for hair related characteristics (P>0.05). HairE can be a useful marker to detect mild adrenal suppression due to corticosteroid use in the general population, even when only inhaled, nasal or topical corticosteroids are used, which suggests that these commonly used agents induce systemic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-corticosteroid risk factors of symptomatic avascular necrosis of bone in systemic lupus erythematosus: A retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faezi, Seyedeh Tahereh; Hoseinian, Azam Sadat; Paragomi, Pedram; Akbarian, Mahmood; Esfahanian, Fatemeh; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Akhlaghi, Maassoumeh; Nadji, Abdolhadi; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Shahram, Farhad; Nejadhosseinian, Mohammad; Davatchi, Fereydoun

    2015-07-01

    Avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) is an important complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Corticosteroid therapy has been underlined as a main risk factor for osteonecrosis. However, AVN development in patients who have never received corticosteroid and the absence of AVN in the majority of the patients, who received corticosteroid, propose a role for non-corticosteroid risk factors in AVN development. This case-control study included two subsets: oral corticosteroid (66 AVN and 248 non-AVN patients) and pulse-therapy subset (39 AVN and 312 non-AVN patients) who have attended our Lupus clinic from 1979 to 2009. Patients received similar cumulative dose corticosteroid, equal maximum dose and 1-year maximum dose of corticosteroid. The demographic data (including sex, age of disease onset, age at the diagnosis of AVN), organs involvement, SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology-Damage index (SLICC/ACR-DI), number of disease flare ups were compared between two subsets. The mean age of SLE onset was younger (P value = 0.04) in the AVN patients. In oral corticosteroid subset, malar rash (P value < 0.001) and oral ulcer (P value = 0.003) were seen more frequently in non-AVN patients, whereas psychosis (P value = 0.03) was significantly more prevalent AVN subset in oral corticosteroid subset. In corticosteroid pulse subset, no significant difference in clinical features was noted. In oral corticosteroid subset, younger age of disease onset and psychosis were significantly associated with AVN, whereas malar rash and oral ulcer showed negative association AVN.

  2. Dapsone in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris: adverse effects and its importance as a corticosteroid sparing agent*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Hezel, Janaína; Peretti, Murilo Calvo; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune disease characterized by suprabasal blisters with acantholysis, which has a fatal course in a large number of untreated patients. Systemic corticosteroid therapy is considered first-line therapy. Adjuvant treatment with the goal of sparing corticosteroids include, among others, dapsone. This drug is not without side effects and its use requires clinical and laboratory control. We present a patient with PV initially managed with suboptimal dose of prednisone, evolving into drug-induced hepatitis after introduction of dapsone. PMID:26312673

  3. Zonal corticosteroid hormone biosynthesis in the adrenal cortex in rats exposed to emotional stress combined with salt loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shul'ga, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the pattern of biosynthesis of corticosteroid hormones in the zona glomerulosa and the combined zona fasciculata + zona reticularis of the adrenals, which are responsible for the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid function of the glands, during simultaneous exposure of animals to salt loading and emotional stress. Experiments were carried out on rats. The adrenals were divided into parts and samples were incubated in vitro with the addition of 3 H-progesterone to each sample. The specific activity of the 3 H-labeled corticosteroids decreased significantly in rats with a normal salt intake exposed to emotional stress

  4. Feature Binding in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Neri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Binding operations are primarily ascribed to cortex or similarly complex avian structures. My experiments show that the zebrafish, a lower vertebrate lacking cortex, supports visual feature binding of form and motion for the purpose of social behavior. These results challenge the notion that feature binding may require highly evolved neural structures and demonstrate that the nervous system of lower vertebrates can afford unexpectedly complex computations.

  5. Romiplostim therapy as a second-line treatment before splenectomy for refractory immune thrombocytopenia in a cirrhotic patient with iatrogenic Cushing syndrome secondary to corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas Taltavull, Teresa; Peña-Cala, Maria Carmen

    2017-02-01

    Our case report discusses the usefulness of administering romiplostim as a second-line treatment before splenectomy in a cirrhotic patient with immune thrombocytopenia who developed corticosteroid-induced Cushing's syndrome. Corticosteroids were tapered and consequently withdrawn. The patient made a full recovery postsplenectomy.

  6. Corticosteroid Is Associated with Both Hip Fracture and Fracture-Unrelated Arthropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chen Kao

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate whether and how corticosteroid use was associated with serious hip arthropathy.This population-based cohort study analyzed the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database and screened the one-million random sample from the entire population for eligibility. The steroid cohort consisted of 21,995 individuals who had used systemic corticosteroid for a minimum of 6 months between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2006. They were matched 1:1 in propensity score on the index calendar date with controls who never used steroid. All participants were followed up until occurrence of serious hip arthropathy that required arthroplasty, withdrawal from the national health insurance, or the end of 2011. Surgical indication was classified as fracture-related and -unrelated. The cumulative incidence of hip arthroplasty was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The association with steroid exposure was explored by the Cox proportional hazard model.Cumulative incidences of hip arthroplasty after 12 years of follow-up were 2.96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.73-3.2% and 1.34% (95% CI, 1.2-1.51% in the steroid users and non-users, respectively (P<0.0001. The difference was evident in fracture-related arthroplasty with 1.89% (95% CI, 1.71-2.09% versus 1.10% (95% CI, 0.97-1.25%, but more pronounced in fracture-unrelated surgery, 1.09% (95% CI, 0.95-1.24% versus 0.24% (95% CI, 0.19-0.32%. Multivariate-adjusted Cox regression analysis confirmed steroid use was independently associated with both fracture-related (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.65; 95% CI, 1.43-1.91 and unrelated arthroplasty (adjusted HR, 4.21; 95% CI, 3.2-5.53. Moreover, the risk for fracture-unrelated arthropathy rose with steroid dosage, as the adjusted HR increased from 3.30 (95% CI, 2.44-4.46 in the low-dose subgroup, 4.54 (95% CI, 3.05-6.77 in intermediate-dose users, to 6.54 (95% CI, 4.74-9.02 in the high-dose counterpart (Ptrend<0.0001.Corticosteroid use is

  7. Outcomes of Ultrasound-guided Glen Humeral Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Amos; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.; Newman, Joel; Gomoll, Andreas; Jain, Nitin B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess short and longer-term outcomes of ultrasound-guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis. Study Design A mixed prospective and retrospective study design Place and Duration of Study Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, between June 2011 and July 2012. Methodology Using medical records, we first retrospectively identified patients who had received ultrasound-guided injections of lidocaine and triamcinolone for adhesive capsulitis We then assessed short-term follow-up outcomes (within 3 months of procedure) using medical record review and phone interviews. Longer-term follow-up (at least 3 months from the procedure) outcomes were determined by mailings and phone calls. Average and worst shoulder pain scores were measured on a visual analog scale. Shoulder ROM was measured in forward flexion, isolated abduction, and external rotation. Results Patients presented an average of 5.1 (SD=4.1) months after onset of symptoms. Within three months of the injection, 55.9% (95% CI: 39.2%, 72.6%) of patients reported greater than 75% pain relief and 44.1% (95% CI: 27.4%, 60.8%) of patients reported greater than 75% ROM improvement. The percentage of patients who improved increased with increased duration of follow-up. At short-term follow-up (mean=2.1 months, SD=2.7), average pain decreased from 5.6 (SD=2.2) to 3.0 (SD=1.8) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased from 7.8 (SD=1.2) to 4.3 (SD=3.2) (p ≤ .001). At longer-term follow-up (mean =10.4 months, SD=3.7), average pain decreased to 1.9 (SD=1.9) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased to 2.9 (SD=2.3) (p ≤ .001). Conclusion A majority of patients had significant pain reduction and functional improvement after an ultrasound guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injection for adhesive capsulitis. Our patients experience the majority of their pain and functional relief within

  8. Outcomes of Ultrasound-guided Glen Humeral Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Amos; Katz, Jeffrey N; Higgins, Laurence D; Newman, Joel; Gomoll, Andreas; Jain, Nitin B

    2014-09-25

    To assess short and longer-term outcomes of ultrasound-guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis. A mixed prospective and retrospective study design. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, between June 2011 and July 2012. Using medical records, we first retrospectively identified patients who had received ultrasound-guided injections of lidocaine and triamcinolone for adhesive capsulitis We then assessed short-term follow-up outcomes (within 3 months of procedure) using medical record review and phone interviews. Longer-term follow-up (at least 3 months from the procedure) outcomes were determined by mailings and phone calls. Average and worst shoulder pain scores were measured on a visual analog scale. Shoulder ROM was measured in forward flexion, isolated abduction, and external rotation. Patients presented an average of 5.1 (SD=4.1) months after onset of symptoms. Within three months of the injection, 55.9% (95% CI: 39.2%, 72.6%) of patients reported greater than 75% pain relief and 44.1% (95% CI: 27.4%, 60.8%) of patients reported greater than 75% ROM improvement. The percentage of patients who improved increased with increased duration of follow-up. At short-term follow-up (mean=2.1 months, SD=2.7), average pain decreased from 5.6 (SD=2.2) to 3.0 (SD=1.8) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased from 7.8 (SD=1.2) to 4.3 (SD=3.2) (p ≤ .001). At longer-term follow-up (mean =10.4 months, SD=3.7), average pain decreased to 1.9 (SD=1.9) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased to 2.9 (SD=2.3) (p ≤ .001). A majority of patients had significant pain reduction and functional improvement after an ultrasound guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injection for adhesive capsulitis. Our patients experience the majority of their pain and functional relief within the first three months after an ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection with

  9. DNS & Bind Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Cricket

    2011-01-01

    The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. Following O'Reilly's popular problem-and-solution cookbook format, this title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, "How do I get BIND?" to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. It's full of BIND configuration files that yo

  10. Increased use of inhaled corticosteroids among young Danish adult asthmatics: An observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Søndergaard, Jens; Hallas, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This population-based longitudinal study aimed to investigate trends in use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and determinants of ICS use in young Danish adults with asthma. METHODS: 106 757 users, aged 18-44 years, of anti-asthmatic drugs were identified in the Danish Register of Medical...... prescriptions in 2006. CONCLUSION: Treatment with ICS among young Danish adult asthmatics has increased since 2001. This apparent improvement was associated with the introduction of fixed dose combination inhalers with ICS and inhaled long-acting beta-2-agonists. However, there is still room for improvement....... Product Statistics during 1997-2006. One year prevalences of ICS use were calculated in categories of gender, age, and annual consumption of inhaled beta-2-agonists (IBA) in defined daily doses (DDD) per year. Determinants of ICS use were estimated by logistic regression models. RESULTS: The one year...

  11. Study on Blood Cortisol in Patients treated with Oral Corticosteroid Drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Kim, K. W.; Yoo, H. S.; Lee, J. T.; Park, C. Y.; Ryu, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    This is an analysis of 32 patients who received long continuous corticosteroid drug due to some diseases. Patients were collected from June 1976 to March 1980. Blood cortisol level, variation of diurnal rhythm and side effects were studied. The Result as follows: 1) Side effects were observed in 24 patients (75%) and most common complaint was obesity. 2) Diurnal rhythm analysed by Doe's method shows abnormal diurnal rhythm is 21 out 32 (66%) 3) Mean durations of therapy of abnormal diurnal rhythm were 55.7±4.4 months and 43.9±7.0 months respectively which shows statistically significant difference. 4) Mean cortisol value of steroid treated patients were lower than normal. 5) Reverse diurnal rhythm was 4 out of 21 patients. 6) 8 A.M. cortisol value is lower than 2 times of 8 P.M. in all patients who showed abnormal diurnal rhythm except one.

  12. Low-dose corticosteroid and gallium-67 scintigraphy and acute interstitial nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsu Akimoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 19-year-old male who developed diclofenac-induced acute inters-titial nephritis (AIN. Diffuse mononuclear cell infiltration was confirmed by renal biopsy and a Gallium (Ga-67 scintigraphy revealed diffuse uptake of the isotope in both kidneys. His renal function had gradually and promptly recovered after initiation of low-dose prednisolone (0.5 mg/kg/day. There are no established criteria for the administration of corticosteroids in the treatment of drug-induced AIN. Moreover, no clear recommendations regarding the optimal dose and duration of steroid administration in the treatment for drug-induced AIN has been established. In addition, we discuss the clinical benefit of steroid treatment and the diagnostic impact of Ga scanning on the management of drug-induced AIN.

  13. CMTR1 is associated with increased asthma exacerbations in patients taking inhaled corticosteroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlin, Amber; Denny, Joshua; Roden, Dan M

    2015-01-01

    University Medical Center (VUMC) in Tennessee (369 patients), and Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP) at the Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin (437 patients). Using a case-control study design, the association of each SNP locus with the outcome of asthma exacerbations (defined as asthma-related......Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the most effective controller medications for asthma, and variability in ICS response is associated with genetic variation. Despite ICS treatment, some patients with poor asthma control experience severe asthma exacerbations, defined as a hospitalization...... or emergency room visit. We hypothesized that some individuals may be at increased risk of asthma exacerbations, despite ICS use, due to genetic factors. A GWAS of 237,726 common, independent markers was conducted in 806 Caucasian asthmatic patients from two population-based biobanks: BioVU, at Vanderbilt...

  14. Prophylactic treatment with a potent corticosteroid cream ameliorates radiodermatitis, independent of radiation schedule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulff, Eva; Maroti, Marianne; Serup, Jörgen

    2017-01-01

    schedules as well as for anatomical sites, skin type, breast size and BMI. Patients treated the irradiated area during the radiation period and two weeks following cessation of radiation. RESULTS: Patients receiving hypofraction RT developed less skin reactions than those treated with conventional RT...... of acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant RT, independent of RT schedule. Preventive application of a potent corticosteroid cream should be used in the routine and instituted at the start of RT....... in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after surgery. In total, 202 patients were randomized to betamethasone-17-valerate cream or Essex® cream, a moisturizer. Treatment was assessed by RTOG clinical scoring. Patients' symptoms were recorded. The analyses were stratified for RT...

  15. Stepwise withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroids in COPD patients receiving dual bronchodilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Helgo; Watz, Henrik; Kirsten, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Long-acting bronchodilators in combination with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to decrease the risk of recurrent exacerbations in patients with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage 3-4 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is increasing...... concern about the clinical benefit and long-term safety of ICS use in COPD patients. The WISDOM (Withdrawal of Inhaled Steroids During Optimised bronchodilator Management) study (NCT00975195) aims to evaluate the need for ICS use via stepwise withdrawal of ICS in COPD patients (GOLD 3-4 with a history...... of at least one exacerbation during the 12-month period prior to screening) receiving dual bronchodilation. During the 6-week run-in period, 2456 patients receive tiotropium 18 μg once daily, salmeterol 50 μg twice daily and fluticasone 500 μg twice daily. In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, active...

  16. A pooled analysis of FEV1 decline in COPD patients randomized to inhaled corticosteroids or placebo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, JB; Sin, DD; Zhang, X

    2007-01-01

    on smoking status and gender. Smokers who continued to smoke had a smaller increase in FEV1 during the first 6 months than did ex-smokers. Female ex-smokers had a larger increase in FEV1 with ICS therapy than did male ex-smokers. Conclusions: We conclude that in COPD in the first 6 months of treatment, ICS......Background: There is controversy about whether therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) modifies the natural history of COPD, characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Methods: The Inhaled Steroids Effect Evaluation in COPD (ISEEC) study is a pooled study of patient-level data from seven...... long-term randomized controlled trials of ICS vs placebo lasting 12 months in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. We have previously reported a survival benefit for ICS therapy in COPD patients using ISEEC data. We aimed to determine whether the regular use of ICSs vs placebo improves FEV1 decline...

  17. Improved outcome of bacterial meningitis associated with use of corticosteroid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baunbæk-Knudsen, Gertrud; Sølling, Mette; Farre, Annette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with bacterial meningitis following the introduction of dexamethasone treatment in Denmark. METHODS: Adult patients with bacterial meningitis, admitted from 2003-2010 to two different university hospitals, were...... (RR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.04-1.09). Long-term mortality was influenced by age (RR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.03-1.08) and female sex (RR = 1.81; 95% CI = 1.05-3.14). CONCLUSION: This study indicated that adjuvant corticosteroid treatment in acute bacterial meningitis improves the outcome and can safely...

  18. A pooled analysis of FEV1 decline in COPD patients randomized to inhaled corticosteroids or placebo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, JB; Sin, DD; Zhang, X

    2007-01-01

    .19% compared with placebo (p placebo and ICS therapy in terms of FEV1 decline (-0.01 ± 0.09%; p = 0.86). The initial treatment effect was dependent......Background: There is controversy about whether therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) modifies the natural history of COPD, characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Methods: The Inhaled Steroids Effect Evaluation in COPD (ISEEC) study is a pooled study of patient-level data from seven...... long-term randomized controlled trials of ICS vs placebo lasting 12 months in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. We have previously reported a survival benefit for ICS therapy in COPD patients using ISEEC data. We aimed to determine whether the regular use of ICSs vs placebo improves FEV1 decline...

  19. Comparative in vitro evaluation of four corticosteroid metered dose inhalers : Consistency of delivered dose and particle size distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Tjalling W; Rottier, Bart L; Gjaltema, Doetie; Hagedoorn, Paul; Frijlink, Henderik W; de Boer, Anne H

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Recent developments concerning pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the introduction of ciclesonide and the replacement of propellants. As the results of in vivo studies depend on pMDI performance, it is necessary to evaluate pMDIs in vitro

  20. The efficacy of hydrothermally obtained carbonated hydroxyapatite in healing alveolar bone defects in rats with or without corticosteroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Dejan; Jokanović, Vukoman; Petrović, Bojan; Perić, Tamara; Vukomanović, Biserka

    2014-05-01

    Autogenous bone grafting has been the gold standard in clinical cases when bone grafts are required for bone defects in dentistry. The study was undertaken to evaluate multilevel designed carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) obtained by hydrothermal method, as a bone substitute in healing bone defects with or without corticosteroid treatment in rats as assessed by histopathologic methods. Bone defects were created in the alveolar bone by teeth extraction in 12 rats. The animals were initially divided into two groups. The experimental group was pretreated with corticosteroids: methylprednisolone and dexamethasone, intramuscularly, while the control group was without therapy. Posterior teeth extraction had been performed after the corticosteroid therapy. The extraction defects were fulfilled with hydroxyapatite with bimodal particle sizes in the range of 50-250 μm and the sample from postextocactional defect of the alveolar bone was analyzed pathohystologically. The histopatological investigations confirmed the biologic properties of the applied material. The evident growth of new bone in the alveolar ridge was clearly noticed in both groups of rats. Carbonated HA obtained by hydrothermal method promoted bone formation in the preformed defects, confirming its efficacy for usage in bone defects. Complete resorption of the material's particles took place after 25 weeks. Hydroxyapatite completely meets the clinical requirements for a bone substitute material. Due to its microstructure, complete resorption took place during the observation period of the study. Corticosteroid treatment did not significantly affect new bone formation in the region of postextractional defects.

  1. Comparison of the narrow band UVB versus systemic corticosteroids in the treatment of lichen planus: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Iraji

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Overall, the results of our study and other previous studies showed that NBUVB may be regarded as an effective treatment for generalized cutaneous lichen planus. This treatment may be especially utilized when there is contraindication for systemic corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive drugs.

  2. Fecal corticosteroids in a territorial bird selected for different personalities : daily rhythm and the response to social stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carere, C; Groothuis, A.G.G.; Moestl, E; Daan, S.; Koolhaas, J.M.

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that in a passerine bird (great tit, Parus major) individuals differing for coping strategies differ in the magnitude of the adrenocortical response to social stress as well. Furthermore, we aimed at characterizing daily rhythms in corticosteroid release before

  3. Tc-99m technegas scintigraphy to evaluate the lung ventilation in patients with oral corticosteroid-dependent bronchial asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Jiro; Okada, Hiroki; Momoi, Atsuko; Yamadori, Ichiro; Takahara, Jiro; Tanabe, Masatada [Kagawa Medical Univ., Miki (Japan); Takahashi, Kazue; Satoh, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi

    1999-08-01

    Bronchial asthma is a clinical syndrome characterized by the reversibility of airway obstruction. Recently it has been suggested that remodeling of the airway causes irreversible airway obstruction which may be responsible for the patient's symptoms. With this background, the purpose of the present study was to assess patients with corticosteroid-dependent asthma by Tc-99m Technegas scintigraphy (Technegas) in both planar and SPECT images. Twelve patients (7 females and 5 males aged 36-72 years with a median age of 60 years: 4 smokers and 8 non-smokers) with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma were enrolled in this study. Lung ventilation scanning with Technegas in both planar and SPECT images, high-resolution computed tomography, and pulmonary function tests were performed in all patients. The results of Technegas scanning were graded and correlations with other clinical parameters were evaluated. Significant abnormalities were detected by ventilation scintigraphy with Technegas in patients with corticosteroid-dependent bronchial asthma even during remission. Our data demonstrate that airflow obstruction took place in patients with corticosteroid-dependent asthma even during remission. Technegas scanning appears to be a useful radiopharmaceutical for demonstrating airflow obstruction in patients with bronchial asthma. (author)

  4. Bilateral Morganella Morganii keratitis in a patient with facial topical corticosteroid-induced rosacea-like dermatitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Pan, Fei; Zhu, Kejian

    2017-06-28

    Bilateral keratitis rarely occurs in individuals without predisposing factors. Here we describe the clinical course of a patient who developed a bilateral keratitis caused by Morganella. morganii which might be associated with long term using of topical corticosteroids-containing preparations on the face. A 52-year-old female patient presented with marked bilateral corneal infiltration and hypopyon without any usual predisposing factors for bilateral infectious keratitis. There was diffuse erythema with itching on face before the onset of eye discomforts. Microbiological culture of materials from both corneas revealed significant growth of Morganella morganii. Topical corticosteroid-induced rosacea-like dermatitis was diagnosed by dermatologist because of the characteristic eruptions and long history of using the corticosteroids-containing cosmetic creams on her face. The corneal ulcers responded well to levofloxacin eye drops and ofloxacin ointment and healed with opacity and neovascularization. This case illustrates that bilateral bacterial corneal infection can develop in patients with long term using of topical corticosteroids-containing preparations on the face. To our knowledge, this is the first case of bilateral keratitis caused by Morganella morganii.

  5. Tc-99m technegas scintigraphy to evaluate the lung ventilation in patients with oral corticosteroid-dependent bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Jiro; Okada, Hiroki; Momoi, Atsuko; Yamadori, Ichiro; Takahara, Jiro; Tanabe, Masatada; Takahashi, Kazue; Satoh, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi

    1999-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a clinical syndrome characterized by the reversibility of airway obstruction. Recently it has been suggested that remodeling of the airway causes irreversible airway obstruction which may be responsible for the patient's symptoms. With this background, the purpose of the present study was to assess patients with corticosteroid-dependent asthma by Tc-99m Technegas scintigraphy (Technegas) in both planar and SPECT images. Twelve patients (7 females and 5 males aged 36-72 years with a median age of 60 years: 4 smokers and 8 non-smokers) with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma were enrolled in this study. Lung ventilation scanning with Technegas in both planar and SPECT images, high-resolution computed tomography, and pulmonary function tests were performed in all patients. The results of Technegas scanning were graded and correlations with other clinical parameters were evaluated. Significant abnormalities were detected by ventilation scintigraphy with Technegas in patients with corticosteroid-dependent bronchial asthma even during remission. Our data demonstrate that airflow obstruction took place in patients with corticosteroid-dependent asthma even during remission. Technegas scanning appears to be a useful radiopharmaceutical for demonstrating airflow obstruction in patients with bronchial asthma. (author)

  6. Airway gene expression in COPD is dynamic with inhaled corticosteroid treatment and reflects biological pathways associated with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berge, Maarten; Steiling, Katrina; Timens, Wim; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Heijink, Irene H.; Liu, Gang; Alekseyev, Yuriy O.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2014-01-01

    A core feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). The recent Groningen and Leiden Universities study of Corticosteroids in Obstructive Lung Disease (GLUCOLD) study suggested that particular phenotypes of COPD

  7. Airway gene expression in COPD is dynamic with inhaled corticosteroid treatment and reflects biological pathways associated with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berge, Maarten; Steiling, Katrina; Timens, Wim; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Heijink, Irene H.; Liu, Gang; Alekseyev, Yuriy O.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum; Postma, Dirkje S.

    BACKGROUND: A core feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). The recent Groningen and Leiden Universities study of Corticosteroids in Obstructive Lung Disease (GLUCOLD) study suggested that particular

  8. Long-Term Cortisol Concentration in Scalp Hair of Asthmatic Children Using Inhaled Corticosteroids: A Case-Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.P. (Maaike P.); E.H.G. van Leer (Eduard); G. Noppe (Gerard); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); Kramer van Driel, D. (Dieneke); E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) can interfere with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and may lead to adrenal insufficiency, resulting in a decrease of cortisol production. Cortisol levels measured in scalp hair provide a marker for long-term cortisol exposure.

  9. REMISSION OF CHILDHOOD ASTHMA AFTER LONG-TERM TREATMENT WITH AN INHALED CORTICOSTEROID (BUDESONIDE) - CAN IT BE ACHIEVED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANESSENZANDVLIET, EE; HUGHES, MD; WAALKENS, HJ; DUIVERMAN, EJ; KERREBIJN, KF

    This study was undertaken in order to determine whether long-term treatment with inhaled corticosteroid can induce a remission in childhood asthma, and to decide when stabilization of airway responsiveness occurred. We therefore carried out, an extended follow-up of 28-36 months in one of two groups

  10. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Utility of Corticosteroids in the Treatment of Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grooten, Iris J.; Vinke, Margot E.; Roseboom, Tessa J.; Painter, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Corticosteroids (CCS) are effective in reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, but it is unknown whether CCS are-effective in treating hyperemesis gravidarum (HG). METHODS: We searched PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov from inception to May 15, 2015, for randomized controlled

  11. Systematic review of trends in prophylaxis of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis : the need for standard audit guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duyvendak, M.; Naunton, M.; van Roon, E. N.; Bruyn, G. A. W.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis (CIOP) is currently undertreated. Systematic review of the literature revealed that the percentage of patients treated adequately is dependent on study quality. Therefore, it remains unknown whether adherence to the guidelines is really so poor. Five major quality

  12. Contact Hypersensitivity to European Baseline Series and Corticosteroid Series Haptens in a Population of Adult Patients with Contact Eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Marek; Bogaczewicz, Jarosław; Kręcisz, Beata; Woźniacka, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Contact eczema (CE) is one of the most common skin diseases and is regarded as a reaction pattern. However, the skin can react in the same way to different stimuli, some of which may act together. The golden standard in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the patch test. Contact allergy to topical corticosteroids is known to be gradually rising, and this represents a significant problem in the treatment of contact eczema. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of contact allergy to European Baseline Series and Corticosteroid Series haptens in a population of patients with CE. A group of 126 patients with the clinical diagnosis of contact eczema were patch tested with 28 European Baseline Series allergens and 8 corticosteroid allergens in different concentrations and in different media: 80 (64.5%) women and 46 (36.5%) men, mean age 50.4 years. The average duration of CE was 6.9 years. In total, 65 patients (51.6%) demonstrated an allergic reaction to at least one European Baseline Series allergen, and 22 patients (17.4%) to at least one corticosteroid. The most common allergens giving positive results were nickel sulfate (26.2%), cobalt chloride (15.1%), budesonide (14.3%), potassium dichromate (13.5%), and myroxylon pereirae resin (MPR) (11.9%). According our data, the European Baseline Series tests allow the cause of ACD to be identified in over 50% of cases.

  13. Efficacy of H, antihistamine, corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide in the treatment of chronic dermographic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available H, antihistamines relieve urticaria by blocking the action of histamine on the target tissue, while demonstration of autoantibodies in the sera of a proportion of the patients having chronic idiopathic urticaria, use of immunosuppressive drugs for the treatment of these patients has acquired the greater rationality. We evaluated the role of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide in the treatment of chronic dermographic urticaria. Twenty-five patients, 13 males and 12 females, between 18-53 years in age, having chronic dermographic urticaria were taken up for this study. The patients were divided into three groups. Group I patients (n=9 were treated with cetirizine hydrochloride 10 mg per day orally, group II patients (n=7 were treated with betamethasone 2 mg along with cyclophosphamide 50 mg along with cetirizine 10 mg per day for a total period of 4 weeks. The patients were evaluated every week to record the therapeutic response and side effects, and then followed up without treatment for a period of 6 months to look for recurrence of the urticaria, if any. Six patients in group I and all the patients in group II and group III had complete remission while the remaining patients in group I had partial relief. The side effects included drowsiness in 4 patients. All the patients in group II had weight gain, 4 patients had acne and 2 patients developed cushingoid features. Majority of the patients relapsed within 3 days after stopping the treatment. Supplementation of the treatment with oral corticosteroids or cyclophosphamide was more effective in controlling the symptoms as compared to cetirizine alone. But a four weeks supplementation was not adequate for preventing the relapses when the drugs were withdrawn.

  14. Corticosteroid Is Associated with Both Hip Fracture and Fracture-Unrelated Arthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Feng-Chen; Hsu, Yao-Chun; Lin, Chien-Fu Jeff; Lo, Ying-Ying; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether and how corticosteroid use was associated with serious hip arthropathy. This population-based cohort study analyzed the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database and screened the one-million random sample from the entire population for eligibility. The steroid cohort consisted of 21,995 individuals who had used systemic corticosteroid for a minimum of 6 months between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2006. They were matched 1:1 in propensity score on the index calendar date with controls who never used steroid. All participants were followed up until occurrence of serious hip arthropathy that required arthroplasty, withdrawal from the national health insurance, or the end of 2011. Surgical indication was classified as fracture-related and -unrelated. The cumulative incidence of hip arthroplasty was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The association with steroid exposure was explored by the Cox proportional hazard model. Cumulative incidences of hip arthroplasty after 12 years of follow-up were 2.96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.73-3.2%) and 1.34% (95% CI, 1.2-1.51%) in the steroid users and non-users, respectively (Prose with steroid dosage, as the adjusted HR increased from 3.30 (95% CI, 2.44-4.46) in the low-dose subgroup, 4.54 (95% CI, 3.05-6.77) in intermediate-dose users, to 6.54 (95% CI, 4.74-9.02) in the high-dose counterpart (Ptrendhip arthroplasty, particularly for fracture-unrelated arthropathy.

  15. From inhaler to lung: clinical implications of the formulations of ciclesonide and other inhaled corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nave R

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ruediger Nave, Helgert Mueller Nycomed: a Takeda Company, Nycomed GmbH, Konstanz, Germany Abstract: Asthma continues to be a global health problem and currently available treatments such as corticosteroids can cause unwanted side effects. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS are recommended as first-line therapy for reducing airway inflammation and have a distinct advantage over oral preparations as they provide a direct route of delivery to the lungs. However, local deposition of ICS in the oropharynx can lead to oral candidiasis, dysphonia, and pharyngitis. The pharmaceutical quality is a primary concern of any ICS asthma treatment, with a higher quality product resulting in improved efficacy and safety profiles. The particle size distribution and the spray force velocity of an ICS may directly influence lung deposition, and the spray duration of a device is another important factor when coordinating inhalation. Recent advances in ICS device and formulation technology have resulted in significant improvements in the efficacy of available asthma treatments. In particular, hydrofluoroalkane (HFA solution technology and the development of smaller particle sizes have resulted in the production of new ICS formulations that have the ability to directly target drug delivery to the site of airway inflammation. Both the ICS formulation and the pressurized metered-dose inhaler device used to administer ciclesonide (CIC HFA have been developed to treat the underlying chronic inflammation associated with asthma. CIC is administered as a prodrug which is activated in the lungs, leading to minimal oropharyngeal deposition. The small particle size of CIC results in the delivery of a high fraction of respirable particles to the small airways of the lungs, resulting in high lung deposition and continual dose consistency. This review summarizes how CIC administered as an HFA formulation is an effective treatment for asthma. Keywords: ciclesonide, asthma, small airways

  16. Scientific rationale for the possible inhaled corticosteroid intraclass difference in the risk of pneumonia in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janson C

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Christer Janson,1 Georgios Stratelis,1,2 Anna Miller-Larsson,3 Tim W Harrison,4 Kjell Larsson5 1Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; 2Respiratory, Inflammation and Autoimmunity, AstraZeneca Nordic, Södertälje, Sweden; 3Respiratory GMed, AstraZeneca Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden; 4Nottingham Respiratory Research Unit, City Hospital Campus, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; 5Lung and Airway Research, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Abstract: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs treatment combined with long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs reduces the risk of exacerbations in COPD, but the use of ICSs is associated with increased incidence of pneumonia. There are indications that this association is stronger for fluticasone propionate than for budesonide. We have examined systematic reviews assessing the risk of pneumonia associated with fluticasone propionate and budesonide COPD therapy. Compared with placebo or LABAs, we found that fluticasone propionate was associated with 43%–78% increased risk of pneumonia, while only slightly increased risk or no risk was found for budesonide. We have evaluated conceivable mechanisms which may explain this difference and suggest that the higher pneumonia risk with fluticasone propionate treatment is caused by greater and more protracted immunosuppressive effects locally in the airways/lungs. These effects are due to the much slower dissolution of fluticasone propionate particles in airway luminal fluid, resulting in a slower uptake into the airway tissue and a much longer presence of fluticasone propionate in airway epithelial lining fluid. Keywords: COPD, pneumonia, inhaled corticosteroids, budesonide, fluticasone

  17. Intratympanic corticosteroid perfusion in the therapy of Meniere’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanković-Babić Snežana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Over the last two decades the intratympanic perfusion of corticosteroids has been used as a minimally invasive surgical therapy of Meniere’s disease. According to experimental studies the antiinflammatory, immunoprotective, antioxidant and neuroprotective role of the locally perfused corticosteroids was noticed in the inner ear structures. The recovery of action potentials in the cells of the Corti organ was confirmed as well as a decreased expression of aquaporine-1, a glycoprotein responsible for labyrinth hydrops and N and K ions derangement. Objective. The study showed results of intratympanic perfusion therapy with dexamethasone in patients with retractable Meniere’s disease who are resistant to conservative treatment. Methods. Single doses of 4 mg/ml dexamethasone were given intratympanically in 19 patients with retractable Meniere’s disease. Six single successive doses of dexamethasone were administered in the posteroinferior quadrant of the tympanic membrane. Follow-up of the patients was conducted by using a clinical questionnaire a month after completed perfusion series as well as on every third month up to one year. Results. One month after completed first course of perfusions, in 78% of patients, vertigo problems completely ceased or were markedly reduced. The recovery of hearing function was recorded in 68% and marked tinnitus reduction in 84% of patients. After a year of follow-up, in 63% of patients the reduction of vertigo persisted, while hearing function was satisfactory in 52%. Tinitus reduction was present in 73% of patients. Conclusion. Intratympanic perfusion of dexamethasone in patients with Meniere’s disease is a minimally invasive therapeutic method that contributes to the reduction of the intensity of vertigo recurrent attacks, decrease of the intensity of tinnitus and improvement of the average hearing threshold. Patients with chronic diseases and Meniere’s disease who are contraindicted for

  18. Antenatal corticosteroids impact the inflammatory rather than the antiangiogenic profile of women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeri, Unzila A; Buhimschi, Irina A; Laky, Christine A; Cross, Sarah N; Duzyj, Christina M; Ramma, Wenda; Sibai, Baha M; Funai, Edmund F; Ahmed, Asif; Buhimschi, Catalin S

    2014-06-01

    Circulating antiangiogenic factors and proinflammatory cytokines are implicated in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that steroids modify the balance of inflammatory and proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors that potentially contribute to the patient's evolving clinical state. Seventy singleton women, admitted for antenatal corticosteroid treatment, were enrolled prospectively. The study group consisted of 45 hypertensive women: chronic hypertension (n=6), severe preeclampsia (n=32), and superimposed preeclampsia (n=7). Normotensive women with shortened cervix (preeclampsia cases were obtained before steroids and then serially up until delivery. A clinical severity score was designed to clinically monitor disease progression. Serum levels of angiogenic factors (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 [sFlt-1], placental growth factor [PlGF], soluble endoglin [sEng]), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and proinflammatory markers (IL-6, C-reactive protein [CRP]) were assessed before and after steroids. Soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R) and total immunoglobulins (IgG) were measured as markers of T- and B-cell activation, respectively. Steroid treatment coincided with a transient improvement in clinical manifestations of preeclampsia. A significant decrease in IL-6 and CRP was observed although levels of sIL-2R and IgG remained unchanged. Antenatal corticosteroids did not influence the levels of angiogenic factors but ET-1 levels registered a short-lived increase poststeroids. Although a reduction in specific inflammatory mediators in response to antenatal steroids may account for the transient improvement in clinical signs of preeclampsia, inflammation is unlikely to be the major contributor to severe preeclampsia or useful for therapeutic targeting.

  19. Corticosteroid and hyaluronic acid treatments in equine degenerative joint disease. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizolek, D J; White, K K

    1981-10-01

    Degenerative arthrosis is perhaps the most common debilitating disease of performance horses. Treatment should be based upon a knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of normal joints and upon an understanding of the processes of degeneration and repair. These topics are briefly reviewed. Although rest is probably, the most beneficial therapy, physical and pharmaceutical treatments are often employed in an effort to speed recovery. The effects and relative benefits of intrasynovial injections of corticosteroids, hyaluronica cid, and Arteparon are considered in detail. Although local corticosteroid therapy is inexpensive and is effective in reducing lameness caused by degenerative joint disease, it is rarely indicated. Septic arthritis and "steroid arthropathy" are two serious sequelae. Whereas the incidence of the former may be avoided through careful technique, the latter effect is inherent in the action of the drug. The accelerated rate of joint destruction observed in steroid arthropathy is due to suppression of chondrocyte metabolism and thus the processes of cartilage maintenance and repair. Hyaluronic acid is present in the synovial fluid and within the matrix of cartilage. The commercial preparation is no approved for use in the United States, but it is commonly obtained from other countries. Although hyaluronate apparently does not function in the lubrication of cartilage surfaces, it may improve lubrication of soft tissues thus decreasing resistance to joint movement and lessening pain. Reports substantiate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid in treating early cases of degenerative arthrosis despite the fact that the drug does not significantly promote cartilage healing. Arteparon, a polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been used in Europe for two decades in the treatment of degeneration joint disease and is currently being tested in this country. The drug is deposited within diseased cartilage and improves the functional properties of the cartilage as

  20. Does the combination of erythropoietin and tapered oral corticosteroids improve recovery following iatrogenic nerve injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Derek T; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio; Mathis, Kenneth B

    2016-08-01

    The reported prognosis for recovery after peripheral nerve injury is remarkably poor. Deficits may persist for years, resulting in significant functional disability. Both corticosteroids and Erythropoietin have been investigated as neuroprotective agents; however, their efficacy in total hip and knee arthroplasty is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of systemically-administered Erythropoietin and tapered oral corticosteroids on the recovery of postoperative nerve palsies in the setting of total hip and knee arthroplasty. Eleven patients sustaining postoperative peripheral nerve injuries after total hip or knee arthroplasty were treated acutely with Erythropoietin and tapered oral steroids. Motor and sensory function was assessed clinically pre- and postoperatively until complete motor recovery or for a minimum of 1 year. Motor loss was complete in seven (64%) patients and partial in four (36%). Seven (64%) patients' symptoms affected the common peroneal nerve distribution and four (36%) had concomitant tibial nerve involvement. Eight (73%) patients experienced full motor recovery at an average of 39 days (range: 3-133 days), and three (27%) had near-complete motor recovery. At final follow up, no patient required assistive devices for ambulation. Administration of Erythropoietin coupled with oral tapered steroids for patients sustaining iatrogenic nerve injuries in total hip and knee arthroplasty demonstrated faster and more complete recovery of motor and sensory function compared to previous reports in the literature. This study highlights the importance of further investigation to define the role of each in the setting of acute postoperative nerve palsies. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Addition of Azathioprine to Corticosteroids Does Not Benefit Patients with IgA Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrulli, Simeone; Pani, Antonello; Scaini, Patrizia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Fogazzi, Giambattista; Vogt, Bruno; De Cristofaro, Vincenzo; Allegri, Landino; Cirami, Lino; Procaccini, Aldo Deni; Locatelli, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    The optimal treatment for IgA nephropathy (IgAN) remains unknown. Some patients respond to corticosteroids, suggesting that more aggressive treatment may provide additional benefit. We performed a randomized, multicenter, controlled trial to determine whether adding azathioprine to steroids improves renal outcome. We randomly assigned 207 IgAN patients with creatinine ≤2.0 mg/dl and proteinuria ≥1.0 g/d to either (1) a 3-day pulse of methylprednisolone in months 1, 3, and 5 in addition to both oral prednisone 0.5 mg/kg every other day and azathioprine 1.5 mg/kg per day for 6 months (n = 101, group 1) or (2) steroids alone on the same schedule (n = 106, group 2). The primary outcome was renal survival (time to 50% increase in plasma creatinine from baseline); secondary outcomes were changes in proteinuria over time and safety. After a median follow-up of 4.9 years, the primary endpoint occurred in 13 patients in group 1 (12.9%, 95% CI 7.5 to 20.9%) and 12 patients in group 2 (11.3%, CI 6.5 to 18.9%) (P = 0.83). Five-year cumulative renal survival was similar between groups (88 versus 89%; P = 0.83). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that female gender, systolic BP, number of antihypertensive drugs, ACE inhibitor use, and proteinuria during follow-up predicted the risk of reaching the primary endpoint. Treatment significantly decreased proteinuria from 2.00 to 1.07 g/d during follow-up (P < 0.001) on average, with no difference between groups. Treatment-related adverse events were more frequent among those receiving azathioprine. In summary, adding low-dose azathioprine to corticosteroids for 6 months does not provide additional benefit to patients with IgAN and may increase the risk for adverse events. PMID:20634300

  2. Intraarticular injections (corticosteroid, hyaluronic acid, platelet rich plasma) for the knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Egemen; Kesmezacar, Hayrettin; Akgun, Isik

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex “whole joint” disease pursued by inflammatory mediators, rather than purely a process of “wear and tear”. Besides cartilage degradation, synovitis, subchondral bone remodeling, degeneration of ligaments and menisci, and hypertrophy of the joint capsule take parts in the pathogenesis. Pain is the hallmark symptom of OA, but the extent to which structural pathology in OA contributes to the pain experience is still not well known. For the knee OA, intraarticular (IA) injection (corticosteroids, viscosupplements, blood-derived products) is preferred as the last nonoperative modality, if the other conservative treatment modalities are ineffective. IA corticosteroid injections provide short term reduction in OA pain and can be considered as an adjunct to core treatment for the relief of moderate to severe pain in people with OA. IA hyaluronic acid (HA) injections might have efficacy and might provide pain reduction in mild OA of knee up to 24 wk. But for HA injections, the cost-effectiveness is an important concern that patients must be informed about the efficacy of these preparations. Although more high-quality evidence is needed, recent studies indicate that IA platelet rich plasma injections are promising for relieving pain, improving knee function and quality of life, especially in younger patients, and in mild OA cases. The current literature and our experience indicate that IA injections are safe and have positive effects for patient satisfaction. But, there is no data that any of the IA injections will cause osteophytes to regress or cartilage and meniscus to regenerate in patients with substantial and irreversible bone and cartilage damage. PMID:25035839

  3. Severe ocular hypertension secondary to systemic corticosteroid treatment in a child with nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito PN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pedro Nuno Brito,1 Sérgio Estrela Silva,1 José Silva Cotta,1 Fernando Falcão-Reis1,21Ophthalmology Department, Hospital S João, Porto, Portugal; 2Faculty of Medicine of Porto, University of Porto, Porto, PortugalPurpose: To report a case of severe, acute ocular hypertension in a 6-year-old child, 7 days after initiating treatment with oral prednisolone, due to nephrotic syndrome.Methods: A 6-year-old female Caucasian child was diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome and treated with oral prednisolone (60 mg/day. Seven days later the child initiated complaints of headache, vomiting, ocular pain, and photophobia. Ophthalmologic examination revealed a severely increased intraocular pressure (IOP of 52 mmHg in the right eye and 56 mmHg in the left eye. Anterior segment morphology was evaluated with ultrasound biomicroscopy. Optic disc status was evaluated by disc photography, kinetic perimetry, and optical coherence tomography.Results: Treatment was initiated with latanoprost, brimonidine, and the fixed association of timolol and dorzolamide. At each follow-up examination, progressively better control of IOP was obtained. Simultaneous with corticosteroid dosage decrease we were able to reduce antiglaucomatous medication while maintaining IOP under control. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed an open angle with normal anterior segment echographic findings. Perimetric evaluation revealed normal visual fields in both eyes. Four months after presentation, steroid treatment had been completed and IOP was 10 mmHg in both eyes without any antiglaucomatous medication. Optical coherence tomography revealed normal retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in all peripapillary sectors.Conclusions: Systemic steroid treatment can cause a severe, acute increase in IOP in children. Children undergoing steroid treatment should have routine ophthalmologic examinations during treatment duration. Prompt antiglaucomatous treatment prevents retinal nerve fiber layer damage and

  4. Statin Exposure Is Associated with Decreased Asthma-related Emergency Department Visits and Oral Corticosteroid Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingling; Butler, Melissa G.; Fung, Vicki; Kharbanda, Elyse O.; Larkin, Emma K.; Vollmer, William M.; Miroshnik, Irina; Rusinak, Donna; Weiss, Scott T.; Lieu, Tracy; Wu, Ann Chen

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Statins, or HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, may aid in the treatment of asthma through their pleiotropic antiinflammatory effects. Objectives: To examine the effect of statin therapy on asthma-related exacerbations using a large population-based cohort. Methods: Statin users aged 31 years or greater with asthma were identified from the Population-Based Effectiveness in Asthma and Lung population, which includes data from five health plans. Statin exposure and asthma exacerbations were assessed over a 24-month observation period. Statin users with a statin medication possession ratio greater than or equal to 80% were matched to non–statin users by age, baseline asthma therapy, site of enrollment, season at baseline, and propensity score, which was calculated based on patient demographics and Deyo-Charlson conditions. Asthma exacerbations were defined as two or more oral corticosteroid dispensings, asthma-related emergency department visits, or asthma-related hospitalizations. The association between statin exposure and each of the three outcome measures was assessed using conditional logistic regression. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 14,566 statin users, 8,349 statin users were matched to a nonuser. After adjusting for Deyo-Charlson conditions that remained unbalanced after matching, among statin users, statin exposure was associated with decreased odds of having asthma-related emergency department visits (odds ratio [OR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53–0.77; P statin users with asthma, statin exposure was associated with decreased odds of asthma-related emergency department visits and oral corticosteroid dispensings. PMID:24093599

  5. TLR4 stimulation and corticosteroid interactively induce osteonecrosis of the femoral head in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Shunichiro; Nagoya, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Mizuo, Keisuke; Shimizu, Junya; Watanabe, Satoshi; Inoue, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported that a toll-like receptor 4 signaling contributes to the development of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Also, oxidative stress is suggested to be one of the possible pathogenesis of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. A recent study showed that toll-like receptor 4 signaling leads to oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether toll-like receptor 4 stimulation and subsequent corticosteroid treatment lead to the development of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in rat, and oxidative stress is associated with it. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups: Saline + Saline, Saline + Methylprednisolone, Lipopolysaccharide + Saline, Lipopolysaccharide + Methylprednisolone. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head at 14 days after the treatment was observed in 1 of 10 Lipopolysaccharide + Saline, and 5 of 10 Lipopolysaccharide + Methylprednisolone treated rats. However, it was not observed at all in the Saline + Saline and Saline + Methylprednisolone treated groups. Glutathione peroxidase activity in the liver at 1 day after the treatment was significantly increased when treated with lipopolysaccharide. However, methylprednisolone treatment reduced the activity. On the other hand, glutathione peroxidase activity in the femur did not change in any intergroup. In conclusion, the present study showed that toll-like receptor 4 stimulation by lipopolysaccharide administration strengthen incidence of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head, however, concomitant oxidative stress via toll-like receptor 4 signaling may not contribute to the development of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in rats. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Comparison of asthma treatment given in addition to inhaled corticosteroids on airway inflammation and responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R H; Brightling, C E; McKenna, S; Hargadon, B; Neale, N; Parker, D; Ruse, C; Hall, I P; Pavord, I D

    2006-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that the assessment of eosinophilic airway inflammation using induced sputum and measurement of airway hyperresponsiveness provides additional, clinically important information concerning asthma control. The aim of this study was to directly compare the effects of different treatments on these markers in patients with asthma and persistent symptoms, despite the use of low-dose inhaled corticosteroids. A double-blind four-way crossover study was performed, which compared a 1-month treatment with budesonide 400 mug b.i.d., additional formoterol, additional montelukast and placebo in 49 patients with uncontrolled asthma despite budesonide 100 mug b.i.d., with each treatment separated by a 4-week washout period. The change in sputum eosinophil count with formoterol (2.4 to 3.8% change, 0.6-fold reduction, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5-0.9) differed significantly from placebo (2.8 to 2.5% change, 1.1-fold reduction, 95% CI 0.7-1.6) and high-dose budesonide (2.7 to 1.6% change, 1.6-fold reduction, 95% CI 1.2-2.2). The effects of montelukast did not differ from placebo. The changes in methacholine airway responsiveness were small and did not differ between treatments. High-dose budesonide had the broadest range of beneficial effects on other outcomes, including symptom scores, morning peak expiratory flow and forced expiratory volume in one second. In conclusion, treatment given in addition to low-dose inhaled corticosteroids results in modest benefits. Formoterol and high-dose budesonide have contrasting effects on eosinophilic airway inflammation.

  7. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  8. DNS BIND Server Configuratio

    OpenAIRE

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  9. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  10. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  11. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  12. Effect of corticosteroid injection for trochanter pain syndrome: design of a randomised clinical trial in general practice

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    Verhaar Jan AN

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regional pain in the hip in adults is a common cause of a general practitioner visit. A considerable part of patients suffer from (greater trochanteric pain syndrome or trochanteric bursitis. Local corticosteroid injections is one of the treatment options. Although clear evidence is lacking, small observational studies suggest that this treatment is effective in the short-term follow-up. So far, there are no randomised controlled trials available evaluating the efficacy of injection therapy. This study will investigate the efficacy of local corticosteroid injections in the trochanter syndrome in the general practice, using a randomised controlled trial design. The cost effectiveness of the corticosteroid injection therapy will also be assessed. Secondly, the role of co-morbidity in relation to the efficacy of local corticosteroid injections will be investigated. Methods/Design This study is a pragmatic, open label randomised trial. A total of 150 patients (age 18–80 years visiting the general practitioner with complaints suggestive of trochanteric pain syndrome will be allocated to receive local corticosteroid injections or to receive usual care. Usual care consists of analgesics as needed. The randomisation is stratified for yes or no co-morbidity of low back pain, osteoarthritis of the hip, or both. The treatment will be evaluated by means of questionnaires at several time points within one year, with the 3 month and 1 year evaluation of pain and recovery as primary outcome. Analyses of primary and secondary outcomes will be made according to the intention-to-treat principle. Direct and indirect costs will be assessed by questionnaires. The cost effectiveness will be estimated using the following ratio: CE ratio = (cost of injection therapy minus cost of usual care/(effect of injection therapy minus effect of usual care. Discussion This study design is appropriate to estimate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the

  13. Safety of bronchodilators and corticosteroids for asthma during pregnancy: what we know and what we need to do better

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    Gregersen TL

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Thorbjørn Lomholt Gregersen, Charlotte Suppli Ulrik Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, Denmark Abstract: Asthma is a common medical condition complicating pregnancy with potentially serious effects on pregnancy outcome. The aim of this review is to provide an update on efficacy and safety of asthma medications, primarily bronchodilators and corticosteroids, used during pregnancy with focus on pregnancy outcome, and, furthermore, to discuss limitations of available studies and point to possible improvements in future studies. A planned series of systematic searches was conducted using the PubMed database. Use of short-acting β2-agonists has generally been established as safe, and the few studies stating otherwise appear to have, perhaps critical, methodological limitations. The safety of long-acting β2-agonists remains to be further investigated, and the few available studies have methodological limitations and, therefore, provide no definite answers, although a very recent study supports the safety of add-on long-acting β2-agonists to inhaled corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids are generally found to be safe, although further research is needed to investigate both the efficacy and safety of high dose therapy with inhaled corticosteroids. Studies have reported associations between the use of systemic corticosteroids and adverse perinatal outcomes, such as preterm birth, low birth weight, and pre-eclampsia. This must, however, be weighed against the potential serious impact of severe, uncontrolled asthma itself on pregnancy outcome. The main obstacle to a valid interpretation of several of the available studies is the inadequate stratification for asthma severity and control. Overall, asthma in itself and not just poor asthma control poses a greater risk to pregnancy outcomes than asthma medication. Nonetheless, more studies focusing on disentangling the effects of asthma alone and

  14. Evaluation of Systemic Corticosteroids in Patients With an Acute Exacerbation of COPD and a Diagnosis of Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Tyler; Kiser, Tyree H.; Vondracek, Sheryl F.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pneumonia are leading causes of morbidity and mortality and are frequently comorbid. Studies of systemic corticosteroids in pneumonia have shown conflicting outcomes, whereas studies in acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) have shown significant benefits. No studies have evaluated systemic corticosteroids in patients with both an AECOPD and pneumonia. Purpose: To evaluate the use of systemic corticosteroids in patients with both an AECOPD and pneumonia. Patients and Methods: Patients with a diagnosis of both COPD or obstructive chronic bronchitis with exacerbation and pneumonia admitted to the University of Colorado Hospital between July 1, 2012 and May 20, 2016 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients who received systemic corticosteroids were compared to those that did not. The primary outcome was length of hospital stay (LOHS). Secondary outcomes were in-hospital treatment failure, a composite of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, ventilation, and escalation of steroid therapy, 30-day AECOPD or pneumonia readmission, and 30-day mortality. Results: A total of 138 patients were included-- 89 in the steroid group and 49 in the non-steroid group. No significant differences in baseline characteristic were noted. No difference was seen in mean LOHS (4.7±3.2 versus 4.2±2.1 days, p=0.27), in-hospital treatment failure (7% versus 4%, p=0.72), 30-day readmission or 30-day mortality between the steroid and non-steroid groups, respectively. There was a difference in mean LOHS for patients with severe pneumonia between the steroid and non-steroid groups (6.0±4.0 versus 4.3±1.8; p=0.03). Conclusions: This study suggests that systemic corticosteroids may not provide a clinical benefit to patients with an AECOPD and pneumonia. PMID:29629405

  15. Corticosteroid treatment ameliorates acute lung injury induced by 2009 swine origin influenza A (H1N1 virus in mice.

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    Chenggang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 2009 influenza pandemic affected people in almost all countries in the world, especially in younger age groups. During this time, the debate over whether to use corticosteroid treatment in severe influenza H1N1 infections patients resurfaced and was disputed by clinicians. There is an urgent need for a susceptible animal model of 2009 H1N1 infection that can be used to evaluate the pathogenesis and the therapeutic effect of corticosteroid treatment during infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We intranasally inoculated two groups of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice (using 4- or 6-to 8-week-old mice to compare the pathogenesis of several different H1N1 strains in mice of different ages. Based on the results, a very susceptible 4-week-old C57BL/6 mouse model of Beijing 501 strain of 2009 H1N1 virus infection was established, showing significantly elevated lung edema and cytokine levels compared to controls. Using our established animal model, the cytokine production profile and lung histology were assessed at different times post-infection, revealing increased lung lesions in a time-dependent manner. In additional,the mice were also treated with dexamethasone, which significantly improved survival rate and lung lesions in infected mice compared to those in control mice. Our data showed that corticosteroid treatment ameliorated acute lung injury induced by the 2009 A/H1N1 virus in mice and suggested that corticosteroids are valid drugs for treating 2009 A/H1N1 infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using the established, very susceptible 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 mouse model, our studies indicate that corticosteroids are a potential therapeutic remedy that may address the increasing concerns over future 2009 A/H1N1 pandemics.

  16. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in vernal keratoconjunctivitis patients under long-term topical corticosteroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingu, Abdullah Kursat; Cinar, Yasin; Turkcu, Fatih Mehmet; Sahinoglu-Keskek, Nedime; Sahin, Alparslan; Sahin, Muhammed; Yuksel, Harun; Caca, Ihsan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) patients who were under long-term topical corticosteroid therapy. Thirty-six eyes of 36 VKC patients with clear cornea and normal videokeratography and 40 eyes of 40 age- and gender-matched normal children were included in the study. Clinical and demographic characteristics of the patients were noted and detailed ophthalmological examination was performed. Visual acuity (VA), spherical equivalent (SE), axial length (AL) and RNFL thickness measurements were compared between the groups. To correct ocular magnification effect on RNFL, we used Littmann's formula. All VKC patients had history of topical corticosteroid use and the mean duration of the topical corticosteroid use was 23.8 ± 9.09 months. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of intraocular pressure (IOP). VKC group had significantly worse VA, greater SE and AL and thinner mean global, superior and inferior RNFL thickness. There were significant negative correlations between the duration of topical corticosteroid use and the mean global, superior and temporal RNFL thickness in VKC group. After correction of magnification effect, VKC group still had thinner mean global, superior and inferior RNFL thickness, and significant difference between the groups in inferior RNFL thickness did not disappear. Significant RNFL thickness difference between the groups suggests a possible effect of long-term corticosteroid use in VKC patients. Because visual field (VF) analysis in pediatric patients is difficult to perform and IOP may be illusive, RNFL thickness measurements in addition to routine examinations in VKC patients may help clinicians in their practice.

  17. Corticosteroides no tratamento da miastenia grave. Estudo de 12 casos com revisão da literatura Corticosteroids in the management of myasthenia gravis

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    José Lamartine de Assis

    1975-03-01

    to suppress the symptoms, as well as to allow remission or an improvement for remaining even when prednisone had been slowly decreased, after a scheduled of one to two years of treatment. In conclusion, 75% of 12 patients with generalized myasthenia gravis showed improvement or complete remission of symptoms during the corticosteroid therapy. There was only a case with thymoma that showed no response to all treatments. Other patient had a polymyositis associated with myasthenia gravis and showed an excellent therapeutic result. Two patients without thymoma showed an initial worsening. To date no important side effect was noted including in the patients treated for a long period.

  18. Randomised controlled trial of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis in general practice

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    Groenier Klaas H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background De Quervain's tenosynovitis is a stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and leads to wrist pain and to impaired function of the wrist and hand. It can be treated by splinting, local corticosteroid injection and operation. In this study effectiveness of local corticosteroid injections for de Quervain's tenosynovitis provided by general practitioners was assessed. Methods Participants with de Quervain's tenosynovitis were recruited by general practitioners. Short-term outcomes (one week after injections were assessed in a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Long-term effectiveness was evaluated in an open prospective cohort-study of steroid responders during a follow-up period of 12 months. Participants were randomised to one or two local injections of 1 ml of triamcinolonacetonide (TCA or 1 ml of NaCl 0.9% (placebo. Non-responders to NaCl were treated with additional TCA injections. Main outcomes were immediate treatment response, severity of pain, improvement as perceived by participant and functional disability using sub items hand and finger function of the Dutch Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (Dutch AIMS-2-HFF. Results 11 general practitioners included 21 wrists in 21 patients. The TCA-group had better results for short-term outcomes treatment response (78% vs. 25%; p = 0.015, perceived improvement (78% vs. 33%; p = 0.047 and severity of pain (4.27 vs. 1.33; p = 0.031 but not for the Dutch-AIMS-HFF (2.71 vs. 1.92; p = 0.112. Absolute risk reduction for the main outcome short-term treatment response was 0.55 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.76 with a number needed to treat of 2 (95% CI: 1, 3. In the cohort of steroid responders (n = 12 the beneficial effects of steroid injections were sustained during the follow-up of 12 months regarding severity of pain (p = 0.67 and scores of Dutch AIMS-2-HFF (p = 0.36, but not for patient perceived improvement (p = 0.02. No adverse events were observed during the 12

  19. A self-rating scale for patient-perceived side effects of inhaled corticosteroids

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    Dijkstra Antoon

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient-reported side effect questionnaires offer a simple method for the systematic measurement of drug-related side effects. In order to measure patients' inhaled corticosteroids (ICS related side effect perceptions the 14-day retrospective Inhaled Corticosteroid Questionnaire (ICQ was developed. In this research we aim to assess the construct validity and reliability of the ICQ and test its responsiveness to dose changes in adult asthma patients. Methods In a cross-sectional study, current inhaler users with asthma completed the ICQ (27 with non ICS inhaler; 61 BDP equivalent daily ICS low dose ≤400 μg; 62 mid dose 401–800 μg; and 105 with high dose >800 μg. We generated 3 construct validity hypotheses: 1 a hierarchical dose-response pattern for scoring of the individual items on the ICQ, and statistically significant differences in the scores of each of the 15 ICQ domains by ICS dose group 2 an association between ICS dose and ICQ scoring after adjusting for appropriate confounders in multiple regression; 3 greater convergence between local side effect domains than between systemic and local domains of the scale. Test-retest reliability was assessed on a randomly selected subgroup of patients (n = 73 who also completed the ICQ a second time after 7 days. In a separate longitudinal study, 61 patients with asthma completed the ICQ at baseline and after changing their daily ICS dose, at 2- and 6- months, in order to test the ICQ's responsiveness. Results All three construct validity hypotheses were well supported: 1 a statistically significant difference existed in scores for 14 domains, the high ICS dose group scoring highest; 2 ICS dose independently predicted ICQ scoring after adjusting for confounders; 3 greater convergence existed between local ICQ domains than between local and systemic domains. The ICQ had good reproducibility: test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients were ≥0.69 for all but the 'Facial

  20. Influence of Corticosteroids and Vitamin E Deficiency on Onset and Cytopathology of Radiation-Induced Cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junk, A. K.; Worgul, B. V.

    Cataracts characteristic of those arising from radiation exposure have been reported among the astronaut and cosmonaut corps. This being the case it is critical to appreciate how radiogenic cataracts relate to those arising from other exogenous causes such as therapeutics, which may, one day, have to be administered on an extended mission. Because they produce precisely the same clinical picture, corticosteroids are examples of a class of drugs that potentially can exacerbate damage to the lens from radiation. On the other hand, Vitamin E, a free radical scavenger, has been shown to ameliorate oxidative damage as caused by ionizing radiation and evidence is accumulating that it may constitute protection from radiogenic damage. An experimental study was conducted to understand if corticosteroids with and in the absence of Vitamin E deficiency modulate the onset of cataract induced by ionizing radiation. The right eyes of 72 28-day-old Brown-Norway rats were irradiated with 6 Gy of 240 kV X-rays, the shielded left eyes served as controls. Half of the animals were maintained on a Vitamin E free diet after irradiation, the others were kept on regular chow. In each nutritional group 18 rats additionally received dexamethasone. The initial daily dose of 10 mg/kg body weight injected subcutaneously was reduced to 0.5 mg/kg over the course of 6 months. Cataract onset and development were followed by weekly slit-lamp exam. After 6 month the lenses were harvested for microscopic analyses. Irradiated eyes in all treatment subgroups showed early cataract onset [5 wks versus 11 wks in controls (pdevelopment in both irradiated (pVitamin E deficiency did not affect cataract incidence in combination with radiation or steroids alone. Unexpectedly, when compared to irradiated controls, cataract development was inhibited in the group that received radiation, dexamethasone and the Vitamin E free diet (pVitamin E deficiency may be the result of a stathmokinetic effect on mitosis - a

  1. Influence of corticosteroids and vitamin E deficiency on onset of radiation-induced cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junk, A. K.; Worgul, B. W.

    Cataracts characteristic of those arising from radiation exposure have been reported among the astronaut and cosmonaut corps. This being the case it is critical to appreciate how radiogenic cataracts relate to those arising from other exogenous causes such as therapeutics, which may, one day, have to be administered on an extended mission. Because they produce precisely the same clinical picture, corticosteroids are examples of a class of drugs that potentially can exacerbate damage to the lens from radiation. On the other hand, Vitamin E, a free radical scavenger, has been shown to ameliorate oxidative damage as caused by ionizing radiation and evidence is accumulating that it may constitute protection from radiogenic damage. An experimental study was conducted to understand if corticosteroids with, and in the absence of Vitamin E deficiency modulate the onset of cataract induced by ionizing radiation. The right eyes of seventy-two 28-day-old Brown-Norway rats were irradiated with 6 Gy of 240 kV X-rays, the shielded left eyes served as controls. Half of the animals were maintained on a Vitamin E free diet after irradiation, the others were kept on standard chow. Fifty per cent of the animals in each nutritional group received dexamethasone. The initial daily dose of 10 mg/kg body weight injected subcutaneously was reduced to 0.5 mg/kg over the course of six months. Cataract onset and development were followed by weekly slit-lamp exam. After six month the lenses were harvested for microscopic analyses. Irradiated eyes in all treatment subgroups showed early cataract onset [5 wks vs. 11 wks in controls ( p development in both irradiated ( p Vitamin E deficiency did not affect cataract incidence in combination with radiation or steroids alone. Unexpectedly, when compared to irradiated controls, cataract development was inhibited in the group that received radiation, dexamethasone and the Vitamin E free diet ( p Vitamin E deficiency may be the result of a

  2. Intranasal corticosteroids compared with oral antihistamines in allergic rhinitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juel-Berg, Nanna; Darling, Peter; Bolvig, Julie; Foss-Skiftesvik, Majken H; Halken, Susanne; Winther, Lone; Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup; Askjaer, Nikolaj; Heegaard, Steffen; Madsen, Anders R; Opstrup, Morten S

    2017-01-09

    Intranasal corticosteroids (INS) (corticosteroid nasal sprays) and oral antihistamines (OA) are two of the most common treatments for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). To our knowledge, there are no systematic reviews on this topic including trials published after 2007. To compare INS with nonsedating OAs as treatments for AR. The systematic review and meta-analysis were based on the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation principles and the Patient, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome approach. Primary literature was searched up to January 22, 2015. Criteria for eligibility were randomized controlled trials that compared the efficacy and/or adverse effects of INS and OA in patients with AR. Continuous outcome data were analyzed by using standardized mean differences (SMD) for multiple outcome measures, and mean differences in the case of a single study or outcome. Pooled estimates of effects, 95% confidence interval (CI), were calculated by using random-effects models. The meta-analysis included five randomized controlled trials with a total of 990 patients. INS were superior to OAs in improving total nasal symptoms score (SMD -0.70 [95% CI, -0.93 to -0.47]) and in relieving the following: nasal obstruction (SMD -0.56 [95% CI, -0.82 to -0.29]), rhinorrhea (SMD -0.47 [95% CI, -1.00 to 0.05]), nasal itching (SMD -0.42 [95% CI, -0.65 to -0.18]), sneezing (SMD -0.52 [95% CI, -0.73 to -0.32]), and quality of life mean difference -0.90 [95% CI, -1.18 to -0.62]). There was no difference in relief of ocular symptoms (SMD -0.08 [95% CI, -0.23 to 0.08]). In addition, four randomized controlled trials were included in a narrative analysis. The results in the narrative analysis were comparable with those found in the meta-analysis. INS were superior to OAs in improving nasal symptoms and quality of life in patients with AR.

  3. Inhaled corticosteroids and the occurrence of oral candidiasis: a prescription sequence symmetry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boven, Job F M; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; Vegter, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The primary aim of the study was to gain insight into the relative risk of clinically relevant oral candidiasis following inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) initiation over time. A secondary aim was to analyse the influence of patient characteristics and co-medication on the occurrence of this adverse effect. Drug prescription data from 1994 to 2011 were retrieved from the IADB.nl database. To study the influence of ICS use on occurrence of oral candidiasis, a prescription symmetry analysis was used, including patients using medication for oral candidiasis up to 1 year before or after ICS initiation. The relative risk was calculated by dividing the number of patients receiving medication for oral candidiasis after ICS initiation by the number of patients receiving the same medication before ICS initiation. Sub-analyses were conducted to compare the relative risks at several time points after ICS initiation and to account for therapy persistence by only including chronic users of ICS. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify predictive factors. A total of 52,279 incident users of ICS therapy were identified, of which 1,081 received medication for oral candidiasis up to 1 year before or after ICS initiation. A total of 701 patients received medication for oral candidiasis after ICS initiation, while 361 received these medications in the reversed sequence, resulting in a sequence ratio (SR) of 1.94 (95 % CI 1.71-2.21). In the first 3 months after ICS initiation, the SR was 2.72 (95 % CI 2.19-3.38) and then decreased to 1.47 (95 % CI 1.11-1.95) 9-12 months after ICS initiation. Predictive factors were higher daily dose of ICS and concomitant use of oral corticosteroids. This study found a significant and clinically relevant increased number of patients receiving medication for oral candidiasis in the first year after therapy initiation with ICS. Relative risk is highest in the first 3 months, but remains increased up to at least 1 year after ICS

  4. Patient perspectives on fluticasone–vilanterol versus other corticosteroid combination products for the treatment of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bollmeier SG

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne G Bollmeier, Theresa R Prosser St Louis College of Pharmacy, St Louis, MO, USA Objective: Fluticasone furoate (FF, an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS, and vilanterol (VI, a long-acting beta2 receptor agonist (LABA, is a new combination used in an Ellipta® device. This article compares FF–VI to other ICS–LABA combinations available, particularly emphasizing product selection from the patient perspective. Data sources: A PubMED and EMBASE search completed in October 2015 identified trials using the MeSH terms “fluticasone”, “vilanterol”, and “asthma”. Additional information was gathered from references cited in the identified publications, the manufacturer, package insert, and ClinicalTrials.gov registry. Study selection/data extraction: Preference was given to randomized controlled clinical trials. Animal trials, trials for COPD, and non-English sources were excluded. Data synthesis: Seven efficacy trials of FF–VI in asthma were identified. Only one (24 weeks trial compared FF–VI to another ICS–LABA combination (fluticasone propionate–salmeterol. Primary outcomes (usually lung function and secondary outcomes (eg, quality of life and symptom scores were comparable. In three FF–VI safety trials, the type and frequency of common adverse reactions (ie, thrush and dysphonia were similar to those in clinical trials. Over 90% of subjects rated the Ellipta® device as “easy to use” and demonstrated correct device technique initially and at 4 weeks. Conclusion: Individuals may have drug- and device-specific preferences that should be incorporated into therapeutic decision making. Limited data indicate that clinical and patient-oriented efficacy/safety outcomes of FF–VI are likely comparable to other available combinations for adults with asthma. Patient-friendly features include once-daily dosing, flexibility of dose timing, and design/ease of the use of the device. Additional larger and long-term comparative

  5. Inhaled corticosteroid normalizes some but not all airway vascular remodeling in COPD

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    Soltani A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amir Soltani,1 Eugene Haydn Walters,1,* David W Reid,1,2 Shakti Dhar Shukla,1 Kaosia Nowrin,1 Chris Ward,3 H Konrad Muller,1 Sukhwinder Singh Sohal1,4,* 1NHMRC Center of Research Excellence for Chronic Respiratory Disease, School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia; 2Iron Metabolism Laboratory, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, UK; 4School of Health Sciences, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: This study assessed the effects of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS on airway vascular remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods: Thirty-four subjects with mild-to-moderate COPD were randomly allocated 2:1 to ICS or placebo treatment in a double-blinded clinical trial over 6 months. Available tissue was compared before and after treatment for vessel density, and expression of VEGF, TGF-β1, and TGF-β1-related phosphorylated transcription factors p-SMAD 2/3. This clinical trial has been registered and allocated with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR on 17/10/2012 with reference number ACTRN12612001111864. Results: There were no significant baseline differences between treatment groups. With ICS, vessels and angiogenic factors did not change in hypervascular reticular basement membrane, but in the hypovascular lamina propria (LP, vessels increased and this had a proportionate effect on lung air trapping. There was modest evidence for a reduction in LP vessels staining for VEGF with ICS treatment, but a marked and significant reduction in p-SMAD 2/3 expression. Conclusion: Six-month high-dose ICS treatment had little effect on hypervascularity or angiogenic growth factors in the reticular basement membrane in COPD, but normalized hypovascularity in the LP, and this was physiologically

  6. Evidence suggesting that oral corticosteroids increase mortality in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Nobuyuki; Miyazawa, Naoki; Morita, Satoshi; Kojima, Ryota; Inoue, Miyo; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2014-04-03

    Oral corticosteroids were used to control stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) decades ago. However, recent guidelines do not recommend long-term oral corticosteroids (LTOC) use for stable COPD patients, partly because it causes side-effects such as respiratory muscle deterioration and immunosuppression. Nonetheless, the impact of LTOC on life prognosis for stable COPD patients has not been clarified. We used the data of patients randomized to non-surgery treatment in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial. Severe and very severe stable COPD patients who were eligible for volume reduction surgery were recruited at 17 clinical centers in the United States and randomized during 1998-2002. Patients were followed-up for at least five years. Hazard ratios for death by LTOC were estimated by three models using Cox proportional hazard analysis and propensity score matching. The pre-matching cohort comprised 444 patients (prescription of LTOC: 23.0%. Age: 66.6 ± 5.4 year old. Female: 35.6%. Percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second: 27.0 ± 7.1%. Mortality during follow-up: 67.1%). Hazard ratio using a multiple-variable Cox model in the pre-matching cohort was 1.54 (P = 0.001). Propensity score matching was conducted with 26 parameters (C-statics: 0.73). The propensity-matched cohort comprised of 65 LTOC(+) cases and 195 LTOC(-) cases (prescription of LTOC: 25.0%. Age: 66.5 ± 5.3 year old. Female: 35.4%. Percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second: 26.1 ± 6.8%. Mortality during follow-up: 71.3%). No parameters differed between cohorts. The hazard ratio using a single-variable Cox model in the propensity-score-matched cohort was 1.50 (P = 0.013). The hazard ratio using a multiple-variable Cox model in the propensity-score-matched cohort was 1.73 (P = 0.001). LTOC may increase the mortality of stable severe and very severe COPD patients.

  7. Evaluation of the benefit of corticosteroid injection before exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Christensen, Robin; Klokker, Louise

    2015-01-01

    the clinical benefits of an intra-articular corticosteroid injection given before exercise therapy in patients with OA of the knee. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We performed a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluating the benefit of intra-articular corticosteroid injection vs...... placebo injection given before exercise therapy at an OA outpatient clinic from October 1, 2012, through April 2, 2014. The participants had radiographic confirmation of clinical OA of the knee, clinical signs of localized inflammation in the knee, and knee pain during walking (score >4 on a scale of 0......L of lidocaine hydrochloride (10 mg/mL) (placebo group). Two weeks after the injections, all participants started a 12-week supervised exercise program. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was change in the Pain subscale of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire (range...

  8. Too little or too much corticosteroid? Coexisting adrenal insufficiency and Cushing's syndrome from chronic, intermittent use of intranasal betamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Adrienne; Yu, Run; Carmichael, John

    2013-01-01

    To report the puzzling, rare occurrence of coexisting adrenal insufficiency and Cushing's syndrome from chronic, intermittent use of intranasal betamethasone spray. A 62-year-old male was referred to our endocrinology clinic for management of adrenal insufficiency. This previously healthy individual began to experience chronic sinus symptoms in 2007, was treated with multiple ensuing sinus surgeries, and received oral glucocorticoid for 6 months. In the following 5 years, he suffered severe fatigue and was diagnosed with secondary adrenal insufficiency. He could not be weaned from corticosteroid and developed clear cushingoid features. In our clinic, careful inquiry on medications revealed chronic, intermittent use of high-dose intranasal betamethasone since 2008, which was not apparent to his other treating physicians. His cushingoid features significantly improved after holding intranasal betamethasone. Chronic, intermittent intranasal betamethasone can cause secondary adrenal insufficiency and iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome when used in excess.Topical corticosteroid use should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency or Cushing's syndrome.

  9. Malignant transformation of oral lichen planus by a chronic inflammatory process. Use of topical corticosteroids to prevent this progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Rey, Eva Maria; Suarez-Alen, Fatima; Peñamaria-Mallon, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Jose; Blanco-Carrion, Andres

    2014-11-01

    Oral lichen planus is a potentially malignant disorder with a capacity, although low, for malignant transformation. Of all the factors related to the process of malignant transformation, it is believed that the chronic inflammatory process plays a key role in the development of oral cancer. This inflammatory process is capable of providing a microenvironment based on different inflammatory cells and molecules that affect cellular growth, proliferation and differentiation. The objectives of our study are: to review the available evidence about the possible relationship between the chronic inflammatory process present in oral lichen planus and its malignant transformation, to discuss the potential therapeutic implications derived from this relationship and to study the role that topical corticosteroids play in the control of oral lichen planus inflammation and its possible progression to malignant transformation. The maintenance of a minimum dose of topical corticosteroids could prevent the inflammatory progression of oral lichen planus to oral cancer.

  10. CARBOHYDRATE-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS WHICH BIND TO CARBOHYDRATE BINDING RECEPTORS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1995-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases.......Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases....

  11. Effect of inhaled corticosteroid use on weight (BMI) in pediatric patients with moderate-severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jennifer; Nguyen, John; Kim, Yuna; Geng, Bob; Romanowski, Gale; Alejandro, Lawrence; Proudfoot, James; Xu, Ronghui; Leibel, Sydney

    2018-04-19

    Assess the relationship between inhaled corticosteroid use (ICS) and weight (BMI) in pediatric patients with moderate-severe asthma. Assess if the number of emergency department (ED) visits correlates with overall BMI trajectory. Assess the trend of prescribing biologic therapy in pediatric patients with moderate-severe asthma and determine its relationship with weight (BMI). A retrospective chart review was performed on 93 pediatric patients with moderate-severe asthma to determine the relationship between ICS use and weight (BMI), biologic therapy and BMI, and number of ED visits and BMI trajectory. A mixed effects model was employed with the correlation between repeated measures accounted for through the random effects. There is a statistically significant increase of 0.369 kg/m 2 in BMI trajectory per year in subjects on high-dose steroids compared to an increase of 0.195 kg/m 2 in the low dose group (p BMI of subjects initiated on biologic therapy (omalizumab or mepolizumab) had a statistically significant decrease in BMI trajectory of 0.818 kg/m 2 per year (p BMI trajectory (p BMI trajectory; the higher the dose, the greater the projected BMI increase per year. Initiation of biologic therapy decreased BMI trajectory over time. Lastly, those with frequent ED visits had a higher BMI trend. Future prospective studies are warranted that further evaluate the potential metabolic impacts of ICS and assess the effects of biologic therapy on BMI.

  12. Evaluation of the conservative treatment of Trigger finger by local instillation of corticosteroids

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    Muris Pecar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trigger Finger (tenosynovitis stenosans is a specific, named disease from a group of repetitive strain injury (RSI diseases, caused by inflammation which results in difficulties during muscle contraction and weakened and painful tendon movement. It is common in the outpatient physical medicine and rehabilitation practice. The aim of our study was to evaluate the success of conservative treatment of Trigger Finger by local instillation of corticosteroids.Methods: The study was designed as an observational and open analysis of the results of conservative treatment of 45 patients. We used precise instillation of steroid anti-inflammatory antirheumatic drugs in the area of patho-anatomic, microtraumatic injuries of tendon and its sheath. Patients were evaluated before and after the treatment with 0 to 5 evaluation score scale. The data were analyzed using X2 test.Results: Most of the patients had evaluation score of 2, 3 and 4, before the treatment. After the treatment 10 (29% patients had achieved score 4 and 35 (71% patients had achieved score 5. All of the patients with score 5 had excellent working ability with full working capacity. Other patients had well-preserved working ability, which improved to excellent in maximum of 7 days.Conclusions: Conservative treatment of Trigger finger shows good therapeutic effects and taking into account the benefits, convenience and generally lower cost of conservative treatment for the patient, should be considered as an effective alternative to surgical treatment.

  13. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia-Results of treatment with clarithromycin versus corticosteroids-Observational study.

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    Elżbieta Radzikowska

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP is a clinicopathological syndrome of unknown origin. Corticosteroids are the standard treatment, but clarithromycin (CAM is also effective. The aim of this observational retrospective study was to compare the results of CAM versus prednisone (PRE treatment in patients with biopsy-proven OP without respiratory insufficiency.In a 15-year period, 40 patients were treated with CAM (500 mg twice daily orally for 3 months and 22 with PRE (mean initial dose of 0.67 ± 0.24 mg/kg/d for a mean of 8.59 ± 3.05 months.The clinical presentation, laboratory, and radiological findings did not differ markedly between patients treated with CAM and PRE, with the exception of a higher frequency of sweats (55% vs. 23%; p 80% identified patients who might be successfully treated with CAM with a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 88.57% (AUC 0.869; 95% CI 0.684-1; p = 0.008; the figures for the FEV1 were >70%, a sensitivity of 60%, and a specificity of 91.43% (AUC 0.809; 95%CI 0.609-1; p = 0.027.CAM can be used to treat COP patients in whom the pulmonary function parameters are within normal limits. Such therapy is shorter, better tolerated, and associated with fewer adverse events and relapses than is PRE. However, the therapy is ineffective in some patients.

  14. Small Airway Absorption and Microdosimetry of Inhaled Corticosteroid Particles after Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longest, P Worth; Hindle, Michael

    2017-10-01

    To predict the cellular-level epithelial absorbed dose from deposited inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) particles in a model of an expanding and contracting small airway segment for different particle forms. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based model of drug dissolution, absorption and clearance occurring in the surface liquid of a representative small airway generation (G13) was developed and used to evaluate epithelial dose for the same deposited drug mass of conventional microparticles, nanoaggregates and a true nanoaerosol. The ICS medications considered were budesonide (BD) and fluticasone propionate (FP). Within G13, total epithelial absorption efficiency (AE) and dose uniformity (microdosimetry) were evaluated. Conventional microparticles resulted in very poor AE of FP (0.37%) and highly nonuniform epithelial absorption, such that <5% of cells received drug. Nanoaggregates improved AE of FP by a factor of 57-fold and improved dose delivery to reach approximately 40% of epithelial cells. True nanoaerosol resulted in near 100% AE for both drugs and more uniform drug delivery to all cells. Current ICS therapies are absorbed by respiratory epithelial cells in a highly nonuniform manner that may partially explain poor clinical performance in the small airways. Both nanoaggregates and nanoaerosols can significantly improve ICS absorption efficiency and uniformity.

  15. Electronic monitoring of adherence to inhaled corticosteroids: an essential tool in identifying severe asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochmann, Anja; Artusio, Luca; Jamalzadeh, Angela; Nagakumar, Prasad; Delgado-Eckert, Edgar; Saglani, Sejal; Bush, Andrew; Frey, Urs; Fleming, Louise J

    2017-12-01

    International guidelines recommend that severe asthma can only be diagnosed after contributory factors, including adherence, have been addressed. Accurate assessment of adherence is difficult in clinical practice. We hypothesised that electronic monitoring in children would identify nonadherence, thus delineating the small number with true severe asthma.Asthmatic children already prescribed inhaled corticosteroids were prospectively recruited and persistence of adherence assessed using electronic monitoring devices. Spirometry, airway inflammation and asthma control were measured at the start and end of the monitoring period.93 children (62 male; median age 12.4 years) were monitored for a median of 92 days. Median (range) monitored adherence was 74% (21-99%). We identified four groups: 1) good adherence during monitoring with improved control, 24% (likely previous poor adherence); 2) good adherence with poor control, 18% (severe therapy-resistant asthma); 3) poor adherence with good control, 26% (likely overtreated); and 4) poor adherence with poor control, 32%. No clinical parameter prior to monitoring distinguished these groups.Electronic monitoring is a useful tool for identifying children in whom a step up in treatment is indicated. Different approaches are needed in those who are controlled when adherent or who are nonadherent. Electronic monitoring is essential in a paediatric severe asthma clinic. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  16. Additive effect of cysteinyl leukotriene or thromboxane modifiers to inhaled corticosteroids in asthmatic patients

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    Shigeharu Myou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the conducting airways. Current asthma treatment guidelines recommend inhaled corticosteroids (ICS as the first-line maintenance therapy for mild to severe persistent asthma, because ICS are the most efficacious anti-inflammatory medication. Despite treatment with ICS, suppression of inflammation is often incomplete and blockade by ICS of cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT and thromboxane (TX A2 biosynthesis is limited. The addition of a CysLT1 receptor antagonist to an ICS represents a reasonable alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of asthma patients whose symptoms remain uncontrolled on ICS alone. Indeed, CysLT1 receptor antagonists are demonstrated both to have an additive effect to ICS therapy and to allow the reduction of ICS dosage. Thromboxane modifiers also have an additive effect with low- to moderate-dose ICS. Although the long-term usefulness of add-on therapy of CysLT or TX modifiers (vs long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonists to ICS is unclear, these alternatives are worthy of further consideration.

  17. Treatment of severe forms of paracoccidioidomycosis: is there a role for corticosteroids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, Gil; Campos, Aléia F; Netto, Lucas C; Gonçalves, Luiz G; Machado, Luis R; Mimicos, Evanthia V; França, Francisco O S; Gryschek, Ronaldo C B

    2012-08-01

    Despite their immunosuppressive effects, corticosteroids have long been used as adjunct therapy (aCST) in the treatment of infectious diseases. The rationale is that in certain infections it is necessary to decrease the exacerbated host's inflammatory response, which can otherwise result in tissue damage and organ dysfunction. In fact, a major concern in treating paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is the host's intense inflammatory response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, which can be further intensified by antifungal therapy. Depending on its localization, this immunological phenomenon may be life threatening or result in permanent sequels, as is the case for some patients with cerebral or laryngeal involvement. However, the literature on aCST in paracoccidioidomycosis treatment is scarce and as a result we present our recent experience in the management of four patients with severe PCM manifestations, i.e., cerebral paracoccidioidal granuloma, laryngeal stenosis, compressive abdominal mass, and exacerbated inflammatory response with tissue destruction. In addition to the antifungal therapy, these patients required aCST, which probably promoted their clinical improvement and/or prevented serious complications. We suggest that aCST: (a) can potentially help in the management of selected cases of severe forms of PCM, particularly when there is a risk of acute complications, and (b) that it can be used safely provided that the risk-benefit ratio is carefully weighed. Well-controlled, prospective studies of aCST in the treatment of severe cases of paracoccidioidomycosis are needed to better define its role in the management of PCM.

  18. Influence of medication on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement (Part 1: hormons and corticosteroids

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    Mirhashemi Amirhossein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review article was to define the mechanism of action and effects of commonly used medications on the tissue remodeling and Orthodontic Tooth Movement (OTM. A review on the effects of medications and dietary supplements on the rate of experimental tooth movement was performed using Cochrane library, Embase and medline (1980-2013. 63 articles were included in this review. 34 of them were related to the effects of hormones and analgesics, were evaluated in this article but their interpretation was hindered by the variability in experimental design, magnitude of force applied during tooth movement and medication regimens. Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs reduced the rate of tooth movement while non-NSAIDs such as acetaminophen had no effect on the rate of OTM. Corticosteroids, parathyroid hormone and thyroxin increased the rate of tooth movement. Sturgeons might slow OTM, but experimental studies are lacking. Medications might have an important influence on the rate of tooth movement and information on their consumption is necessary to adequately discuss treatment planning with patients.

  19. Overcoming barriers to intranasal corticosteroid use in patients with uncontrolled allergic rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Mary Barna

    2017-01-01

    Patients suffering from allergic rhinitis often attempt to self-manage their symptoms and may seek advice from pharmacists about nonprescription product choices. Several drug classes, both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC), are available, including intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs); oral, intranasal, and ocular antihistamines; leukotriene antagonists; and topical and systemic decongestants, as well as immunotherapies. Selection of the optimal treatment approach depends on the temporal pattern, frequency, and severity of symptoms as well as the patient’s age. Nasal congestion is typically the most bothersome symptom, although rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, and ocular symptoms are also problematic. Together, these symptoms may adversely impact the quality of life, work productivity, sleep quality, and the ability to perform daily activities, particularly when uncontrolled. Practice guidelines recognize that INCSs are the most effective medications for controlling allergic rhinitis symptoms, including nasal congestion. Available INCS products have comparable safety and efficacy profiles, but they differ in formulation characteristics and sensory attributes. Several barriers can impede the use of INCSs, including concerns about safety, misperceptions regarding the loss of response from frequent use, and undesirable sensations associated with intranasal administration. Given the increasing number of INCSs available OTC, pharmacists can help allay these concerns by discussing treatment expectations, recommending INCS products with favorable formulation characteristics, and reviewing proper use and technique for the administration of the selected product. These steps can help to foster a collaborative relationship between the patient and the pharmacist in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. PMID:29354557

  20. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an atomic bomb survivor receiving corticosteroid therapy for aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujihara, Kazuo; Shida, Norihiko; Ohta, Michiya

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of successfully treated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) meningitis in a atomic bomb survivor receiving steroid therapy for aplastic anemia. The patient was a 62-year-old woman and the past medical history included hypothyroidism due to radioiodide therapy for Basedow disease, breast cancer, aplastic anemia, steroid-induced diabetes mellitus, and pulmonary tuberculosis. At the time of onset, she was receiving corticosteroid, anabolic steroid, an H 2 -blocker (famotidine), and other medication. Since she developed symptoms of meningitis when she visited our hospital for regular medical check-up for aplastic anemia, she was hospitalized and given antibiotic therapy, including ABPC, without delay. With this effective antibiotic therapy and successful management of the co-existing medical conditions, she was cured except for being a little euphoric. Lm meningitis is known to occur in aged and immunocompromised patients. Since most of the atomic bomb survivors are now aged and the prevalence of malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and other diseases which cause immunodeficiency have been rising year by year, Lm meningitis is one of the emergency neurologic conditions whose diagnosis should not be delayed in this population. (author)