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Sample records for cber regulated product

  1. Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CBER is the Center within FDA that regulates biological products for human use under applicable federal laws, including the Public Health Service Act and the Federal...

  2. FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some medical devices used to produce biologics are regulated by CBER under the FD&C Act's Medical ... لعربية | Kreyòl Ayisyen | Français | Polski | Português | Italiano | Deutsch | 日本語 | ف ...

  3. Next generation hyper resolution wide swath and multi-channel optical payload for CBERS series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weigang

    2017-11-01

    The China-Brazilian Earth Resources Satellite (CBERS) program, (also called ZY-1) the result of a space technology agreement between China and Brazil, was officially signed in 1988 after the first joint work report produced by National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST). During the 26 years of its existence, the program of cooperation between China and Brazil in space has achieved the successful launch of three satellites. It has become a unique example of cooperation in cutting edge technology between emerging nations. CBERS satellite is the first generation data-transferring remote sensing satellite developed by China. CBERS satellite data are widely applied to crop yield estimation, exploration of land and resources, urban planning, environmental protection and monitoring, disaster reduction, and other fields. CBERS series is just like Landsat series of USA and SPOT series of France.

  4. Exterior orientation of CBERS-2B imagery using multi-feature control and orbital data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcato Junior, J.; Tommaselli, A. M. G.

    2013-05-01

    The major contribution of this paper relates to the practical advantages of combining Ground Control Points (GCPs), Ground Control Lines (GCLs) and orbital data to estimate the exterior orientation parameters of images collected by CBERS-2B (China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite) HRC (High-resolution Camera) and CCD (High-resolution CCD Camera) sensors. Although the CBERS-2B is no longer operational, its images are still being used in Brazil, and the next generations of the CBERS satellite will have sensors with similar technical features, which motivates the study presented in this paper. The mathematical models that relate the object and image spaces are based on collinearity (for points) and coplanarity (for lines) conditions. These models were created in an in-house developed software package called TMS (Triangulation with Multiple Sensors) with multi-feature control (GCPs and GCLs). Experiments on a block of four CBERS-2B HRC images and on one CBERS-2B CCD image were performed using both models. It was observed that the combination of GCPs and GCLs provided better bundle block adjustment results than conventional bundle adjustment using only GCPs. The results also demonstrate the advantages of using primarily orbital data when the number of control entities is reduced.

  5. First in-Flight Radiometric Calibration of MUX and WFI on-Board CBERS-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Pinto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Brazil and China have a long-term joint space based sensor program called China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite (CBERS. The most recent satellite of this program (CBERS-4 was successfully launched on 7 December 2014. This work describes a complete procedure, along with the associated uncertainties, used to calculate the in-flight absolute calibration coefficients for the sensors Multispectral Camera (MUX and Wide-Field Imager (WFI on-board CBERS-4. Two absolute radiometric calibration techniques were applied: (i reflectance-based approach and (ii cross-calibration method. A specific site at Algodones Dunes region located in the southwestern portion of the United States of America was used as a reference surface. Radiometric ground and atmospheric measurements were carried out on 9 March 2015, when CBERS-4 passed over the region. In addition, a cross-calibration between both MUX and WFI on-board CBERS-4 and the Operational Land Imager (OLI on-board Landsat-8 was performed using the Libya-4 Pseudo Invariant Calibration Site. The gain coefficients are now available: 1.68, 1.62, 1.59 and 1.42 for MUX and 0.379, 0.498, 0.360 and 0.351 for WFI spectral bands blue, green, red and NIR, respectively, in units of (W/(m2·sr·μm/DN. These coefficients were determined with uncertainties lower than 3.5%. As a validation of these radiometric coefficients, cross-calibration was also undertaken. An evaluation of radiometric consistency was performed between the two instruments (MUX and WFI on-board CBERS-4 and with the well calibrated Landsat-7 ETM+. Results show that the reflectance values match in all the analogous spectral bands within the specified calibration uncertainties.

  6. Discriminação de variedades de citros em imagens CCD/CBERS-2 Discrimination of citrus varieties using CCD/CBERS-2 satellite imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieda Del'Arco Sanches

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve o objetivo de avaliar as imagens CCD/CBERS-2 quanto à possibilidade de discriminarem variedades de citros. A área de estudo localiza-se em Itirapina (SP e, para este estudo, foram utilizadas imagens CCD de três datas (30/05/2004, 16/08/2004 e 11/09/2004. Um modelo que integra os elementos componentes da cena citrícola sensoriada é proposto com o objetivo de explicar a variabilidade das respostas das parcelas de citros em imagens orbitais do tipo CCD/CBERS-2. Foram feitas classificações pelos algoritmos Isoseg e Maxver e, de acordo com o índice kappa, concluiu-se que é possível obterem-se exatidões qualificadas como muito boas, sendo que as melhores classificações foram conseguidas com imagens da estação seca.This paper was aimed at evaluating the possibility of discriminating citrus varieties in CCD imageries from CBERS-2 satellite ("China-Brazil Earth Resouces Satellite". The study area is located in Itirapina, São Paulo State. For this study, three CCD images from 2004 were acquired (May 30, August 16, and September 11. In order to acquire a better understanding and for explaining the variability of the spectral behavior of the citrus areas in orbital images (like as the CCD/CBERS-2 images a model that integrates the elements of the citrus scene is proposed and discussed. The images were classified by Isoseg and MaxVer classifiers. According to kappa index, it was possible to obtain classifications qualified as 'very good'. The best results were obtained with the images from the dry season.

  7. Deviations in CBERS-4 Satellite Direction Components From The Electromagnetic Disturbance of Communication Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, A.; Fernandes, C.

    2017-10-01

    The CBERS-4 is a low Earth orbit satellite, with a set of antennas S-band/UHF for communication almost omni-direcional. For the electromagnetic radiation from transmission antennas, was developed a model of electromagnetic disturbance considering the antennas theory and the laws of the conservation energy-momentum. Was propagated the orbit of the CBERS-4 satellite considering your state vector from the March 14, 2016, at 11h 14m 15.23s using the equation of motion in the form of cartesian components. From the state vector of the CBERS-4 satellite was possible to propagate the orbit for different periods, without disturbance (considering just the problem of two bodies) and with a disturbance of electromagnetic origin. The model of reaction of electromagnetic acceleration on the satellite depends on only the type of antenna. Quadrifilar and parabolic propeller antennas were considered in this paper. Using the equation of motion of the satellite based on the method of Runge-Kutta of fourth and fifth degree, the effect disturber this modeling was applied on the CBERS-4 considering the mass of satellite, characteristics of antenna, power irradiated and gain maximum of antenna. The final analysis discusses the values of components in the direction (radial, cross and normal) and the coordinates X-Y-Z considering the case disturbed to both antennas.

  8. Evaluation of land use classification accuracy based upon TM and CBERS-02B HR data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guifang; Lu, Heli

    2010-11-01

    Data fusions from SAR and TM, SPOT and TM, ASTER and TM, MODIS and ETM, etc are the common methods. But that from TM and CBERS-02B is rare. With HR camera working in September 19th 2007, Chinese-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite 02B (CBERS-02B) became the first civilian high-resolution satellite in China. It could provide 2.36m panchromatic image which is better to Landsat TM. Meanwhile the spectral resolution of TM is better than CBERS-02B. So it's a good idea to take advantage of benefits from CBERS-02B HR and TM through data fusion. In this study, images of TM and CBERS-02B HR in 2007 were used as data sources. After image registration and noiseremoval process, data fusion methods of IHS and PCA were adopted. Then unsupervised classification and supervised classification were used for land use classification. Finally, classification accuracy between original image and fusion image was compared and evaluated. The result shows: (1) Compared with original TM or CBERS-02B HR image, the fusion image not only retains abundance spectrum but also enhances the object details. Residential texture, lake morphological, the relative position between roads, industrial and mining sites, etc, was identified easily. (2) Results from IHS and PCA are different. IHS image had higher spatial resolution but more spectral distortion. Spectral differences between some objects became smaller and classification accuracy was lower. Supervised classification accuracy assessment shows that overall Kappa index and overall land use classification accuracy decreased by 0.237 and 11% respectively. Meanwhile PCA image not only had high spatial resolution, but also smaller spectral distortion. Different land use / cover types can be better distinguished. (3) Disadvantages of low spatial resolution in TM and single color in CBERS-02B HR image are overcome in PCA fusion image to a certain extent. In this research under supervised classification in PCA image Kappa index of farm land, forest land and

  9. Assessing the Relative Ecological Importance and Deforestation Risks of Unprotected Areas in Western Brazil Using Landsat, CBERS and Quantum GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.; Sevilla, C.; Lanclos, A.; Carson, C.; Larson, J.; Sankaran, M.; Saad, M.

    2012-12-01

    In addition to understanding Brazilian policies and currently utilized methodologies, the measurement of the impacts of deforestation is essential for enhancing techniques to reduce deforestation in the future. Adverse impacts of deforestation include biodiversity loss, increased carbon dioxide emissions, and a reduced rate of evapotranspiration, all of which contribute directly or indirectly to global warming. With the continual growth in population in developing countries such as Brazil, increased demands are placed on infrastructural development and food production. As a result, forested areas are cleared for agricultural production. Recently, exploration for hydrocarbons in Western Brazil has also intensified as a means to stimulate the economy, as abundant oil and gas is believed to be found in these regions. Unfortunately, hydrocarbon-rich regions of Western Brazil are also home to thousands of species. Many of these regions are as of yet untapped but are at risk of ecological disruption as a result of impending human activity. This project utilized Landsat 5 TM to monitor deforestation in a subsection of the Brazilian states of Rondônia and Amazonas. A risk map identifying areas susceptible to future deforestation, based on factors such as proximity to roads, bodies of water, cities, and proposed hydrocarbon activities such as pipeline construction, was created. Areas at higher risk of clearance were recommended to be a target for enhanced monitoring and law enforcement. In addition, an importance map was created based on biodiversity and location of endangered species. This map was used to identify potential areas for future protection. A Chinese-Brazilian satellite, CBERS 2B CCD was also utilized for comparison. The NDVI model was additionally replicated in Quantum GIS, an open source software, so that local communities and policymakers could benefit without having to pay for expensive ArcGIS software. The capabilities of VIIRS were also investigated to

  10. Product and labour market regulations, production prices, wages and productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cette, G.; Lopez, J.; Mairesse, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study is an attempt to evaluate the effects of product and labour market regulations on industry productivity through their various impacts on changes in production prices and wages. In a first stage, the estimation of a regression equation on an industry*country panel, with controls for

  11. STRIPING NOISE REMOVAL OF IMAGES ACQUIRED BY CBERS 2 CCD CAMERA SENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Amraei

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available CCD Camera is a multi-spectral sensor that is carried by CBERS 2 satellite. Imaging technique in this sensor is push broom. In images acquired by the CCD Camera, some vertical striping noise can be seen. This is due to the detectors mismatch, inter detector variability, improper calibration of detectors and low signal-to-noise ratio. These noises are more profound in images acquired from the homogeneous surfaces, which are processed at level 2. However, the existence of these noises render the interpretation of the data and extracting information from these images difficult. In this work, spatial moment matching method is proposed to modify these images. In this method, the statistical moments such as mean and standard deviation of columns in each band are used to balance the statistical specifications of the detector array to those of reference values. After the removal of the noise, some periodic diagonal stripes remain in the image where their removal by using the aforementioned method seems impossible. Therefore, to omit them, frequency domain Butterworth notch filter was applied. Finally to evaluate the results, the image statistical moments such as the mean and standard deviation were deployed. The study proves the effectiveness of the method in noise removal.

  12. The Organization of Regulated Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jos; Jeon, Doh-Shin; Menicucci, Domenico

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the choice between vertical separation (VS) and vertical integration (VI) when two regulated firms produce complementary inputs with correlated costs and are protected by ex post break-even constraints. First, in the absence of collusion the regulator prefers VI (VS) for negative...

  13. Orientação de imagens CBERS-2B usando o modelo rigoroso de colinearidade com dados orbitais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcato Junior

    Full Text Available Atualmente, o imageamento orbital é uma das principais técnicas de coleta de informações geoespaciais. Embora os sistemas orbitais sejam equipados com sensores de orientação direta (GNSS, giroscópios, sensores de estrelas, dentre outros, nem sempre as imagens corrigidas a partir dos dados (efemérides e atitude provenientes destes sensores apresentam a acurácia requerida para certas aplicações. Uma das alternativas para solucionar este problema é a orientação dessas imagens considerando as informações de órbita (efemérides e atitude com o uso adicional de pontos de apoio. O objetivo principal deste trabalho consiste em avaliar experimentalmente o modelo de colinearidade com dados orbitais no processo de orientação de imagens CBERS-2B. Este modelo foi implementado no programa TMS (Triangulação MultiSsensor, seguindo a abordagem de triangulação multissensor. Foram realizados experimentos com imagens do nível 1 (com apenas correção radiométrica coletadas pelos sensores CCD e HRC. Nos casos estudados verificou-se que a utilização das informações de órbita possibilita a orientação de imagens CBERS-2B com um número reduzido de pontos de apoio.

  14. AVALIAÇÃO DAS IMAGENS CBERS/CCD PARA O MAPEAMENTO DE AREAIS NO SUDOESTE DE GOIÁS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marluce Silva Sousa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi o de aplicar diferentes técnicasde transformação em duas imagens CBERS, dosperíodos seco e chuvoso, que permitissem realçar emapear as manchas de Neossolos Quartzarênicos, semcobertura vegetal (areais, da bacia do Ribeirão Sujo,município de Serranópolis/GO. Revisaram-se bibliografiassobre comportamento espectral de solos arenosose trabalhos relacionados à avaliação de áreas degradadas.Utilizaram-se três métodos de transformaçãode imagens para os dois períodos com a finalidade demapear os areais: o modelo linear de mistura espectral,o índice de vegetação da diferença normalizada (NDVI ea análise por componentes principais. Verificou-se queas imagens do período chuvoso ressaltaram melhor osareais em relação aos vários tipos de cobertura da terrae que a técnica que apresentou o melhor resultado para omapeamento dos areais foi a classificação supervisionadadas bandas 2, 3 e 4 do sensor CDD/CBERS.

  15. CCD CBERS and ASTER data in dasometric characterization of Pinus radiata D. Don (north-western Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Sevillano-Marco

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A Chinese-Brazilian Earth Resources Satellite (CBERS and an Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER scenes coupled with ancillary georeferenced data and field survey were employed to examine the potential of the remote sensing data in stand basal area, volume and aboveground biomass assessment over large areas of Pinus radiata D. Don plantations in Northwestern Spain. Statistical analysis proved that the near infrared band and the shade fraction image showed significant correlation coefficients with all stand variables considered. Predictive models were accordingly selected and utilized to undertake the spatial distribution of stand variables in radiata stands delimited by the National Forestry Map. The study reinforces the potentiality of remote sensing techniques in a cost-effective assessment of forest systems.

  16. Identifying Spatial Units of Human Occupation in the Brazilian Amazon Using Landsat and CBERS Multi-Resolution Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Sobral Escada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Every spatial unit of human occupation is part of a network structuring an extensive process of urbanization in the Amazon territory. Multi-resolution remote sensing data were used to identify and map human presence and activities in the Sustainable Forest District of Cuiabá-Santarém highway (BR-163, west of Pará, Brazil. The limits of spatial units of human occupation were mapped based on digital classification of Landsat-TM5 (Thematic Mapper 5 image (30m spatial resolution. High-spatial-resolution CBERS-HRC (China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite-High-Resolution Camera images (5 m merged with CBERS-CCD (Charge Coupled Device images (20 m were used to map spatial arrangements inside each populated unit, describing intra-urban characteristics. Fieldwork data validated and refined the classification maps that supported the categorization of the units. A total of 133 spatial units were individualized, comprising population centers as municipal seats, villages and communities, and units of human activities, such as sawmills, farmhouses, landing strips, etc. From the high-resolution analysis, 32 population centers were grouped in four categories, described according to their level of urbanization and spatial organization as: structured, recent, established and dependent on connectivity. This multi-resolution approach provided spatial information about the urbanization process and organization of the territory. It may be extended into other areas or be further used to devise a monitoring system, contributing to the discussion of public policy priorities for sustainable development in the Amazon.

  17. Regulating Hemp and Cannabis-Based Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Mindy; Hanson, Karmen

    2017-10-01

    (1)Different state agencies often regulate the hemp and cannabis industries separately. (2) Pharmaceutical products derived from cannabis are currently in clinical trials for approval in the U.S. and other countries. One product is already approved for use in 29 countries, but not in the U.S. (3) In August 2017, NCSL unanimously approved a policy position supporting federal legislation to define industrial hemp as a distinct agricultural crop (containing 1 percent or less of THC) and allow states to regulate commercial hemp farming.

  18. Related regulation of quality control of industrial products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This book introduce related regulation of quality control of industrial products, which includes regulations of industrial products quality control, enforcement ordinance of industrial products quality control, enforcement regulation of quality control of industrial products, designated items with industrial production quality indication, industrial production quality test, and industrial production quality test organization and management tips of factory quality by grade.

  19. 75 FR 33312 - Indexing Structured Product Labeling for Human Prescription Drug and Biological Products; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...] Indexing Structured Product Labeling for Human Prescription Drug and Biological Products; Request for... Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) are indexing certain categories of information in product labeling for use as terms to search repositories of approved prescription medical product structured product...

  20. Medicinal Product Regulation: Portugal׳s Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, Maria Teresa; Bastos, Paulo D; Teixeira-Rodrigues, António; Roque, Fátima

    2016-09-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is one of the most tightly regulated sectors, and it is essential to know each country׳s legal framework to understand the regulation, approval, and marketing of medicinal products for human use. This article describes the main statutes and procedures governing medicinal products for human use in Portugal and the role of the country׳s National Medicines and Health Products Authority (Autoridade Nacional do Medicamento e Produtos de Saúde, I.P.; INFARMED). From the most recently available data, an update of requests and approvals concerning marketing authorizations, variations, pricing, and reimbursements is provided. Data were sourced from the INFARMED website, Infomed (database of medicinal products for human use), and periodic reports issued by national authorities. Organic laws, acts, and law decrees published in the government gazette (Diário da República) are cited and reproduced as required. In 2015 Portugal ranked fifth in the European System of Medicines Evaluation in terms of the number of completed procedures as a reference member state. Approximately 80% of all approved drug applications in Portugal in 2015 were for generic drugs, mostly pertaining to the nervous system. In Portugal, INFARMED monitors drug quality, safety profile, and efficacy in all stages of the drug life cycle, ensuring patients' safety. The Portuguese market for medicinal products for human use has been appreciably changed by the advent of generic drugs. There is an increased trend for new request applications for biological and biotechnological substances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypothalamic leucine metabolism regulates liver glucose production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ya; Lam, Tony K T; He, Wu; Pocai, Alessandro; Bryan, Joseph; Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids profoundly affect insulin action and glucose metabolism in mammals. Here, we investigated the role of the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), a key center involved in nutrient-dependent metabolic regulation. Specifically, we tested the novel hypothesis that the metabolism of leucine within the MBH couples the central sensing of leucine with the control of glucose production by the liver. We performed either central (MBH) or systemic infusions of leucine in Sprague-Dawley male rats during basal pancreatic insulin clamps in combination with various pharmacological and molecular interventions designed to modulate leucine metabolism in the MBH. We also examined the role of hypothalamic ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (K(ATP) channels) in the effects of leucine. Enhancing the metabolism of leucine acutely in the MBH lowered blood glucose through a biochemical network that was insensitive to rapamycin but strictly dependent on the hypothalamic metabolism of leucine to α-ketoisocaproic acid and, further, insensitive to acetyl- and malonyl-CoA. Functional K(ATP) channels were also required. Importantly, molecular attenuation of this central sensing mechanism in rats conferred susceptibility to developing hyperglycemia. We postulate that the metabolic sensing of leucine in the MBH is a previously unrecognized mechanism for the regulation of hepatic glucose production required to maintain glucose homeostasis.

  2. Análise de mapas de represas publicados na web usando imagens orbitais CCD/CBERS no estado de Minas Gerais Analysis of dams maps published on the web by using orbital CCD/CBERS images in Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ferreira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, bancos de dados públicos e gratuitos disponíveis na World Wide Web (WEB foram utilizados para avaliar as áreas das superfícies dos espelhos d'água das represas de Furnas e do Funil, no Estado de Minas Gerais. O objetivo foi comparar as informações obtidas nos bancos da WEB com os valores das áreas calculadas a partir de imagens do sensor CCD a bordo dos satélites CBERS2 e CBERS2B. A área da represa de Furnas obtida a partir das imagens CCD/CBERS2B, ano 2008, foi de 1.138 km², mas nos bancos de dados consultados esta área estava entre 1.182 e 1.503 km². A represa do Funil, construída em 2003, com superfície de espelho d'água de 29,37 km² e uma ilha com área de 1,93 km² não aparecem nos bancos Atlas, Geominas, IGAM e IBGE. Os resultados mostraram algumas discrepâncias nos bancos de dados publicados na WEB, tais como diferenças em áreas e supressão ou extrapolação de limites do espelho d'água. Concluiu-se que, até o momento, os responsáveis por algumas publicações de bancos de dados no Estado de Minas Gerais não tiveram rigor suficiente com as atualizações. As imagens CCD/CBERS, que também são dados públicos disponíveis na WEB, mostraram ser produtos adequados para verificar, atualizar e melhorar as informações publicadas.In this work some public databases from the World Wide Web (WEB were used to find the area of the Furnas and Funil Dams in Minas Gerais State. The purpose of this work was to compare the WEB public databases values and the real values obtained from the CCD camera images on board CBERS2 and CBERS2B satellites. The Furnas Dam area obtained from CCD/ CBERS2B images, in 2008, was 1.138 km², but in the consulted databases this area ranged from 1.182 to 1.503 km². The dam of the Funil, built in 2003, with a water surface of 29.37 km² and an island with 1.93 km² area, did not appear in Atlas, Geominas, IGAM and IBGE databases. The results revealed some problems in the WEB public

  3. The use of CBERS (China-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite to trace the dynamics of total suspended matter at an urbanized coastal area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Colo Giannini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The distribution of organic and inorganic particles in the water column, or the total suspended matter (TSM, responds to local and remote oceanographic and meteorological processes, potentially impacting biogeochemical cycles. In shallow coastal areas, where particles have distinct origins and compositions and vary in different time scales, the use of remote sensing tools for monitoring and tracing this material is highly encouraged due to the high temporal and spatial data resolution. The objective of this work was to understand the variability of in situ TSM at Santos Bay (Southeastern Brazil and its response to oceanographic and meteorological conditions. We also aimed to verify the applicability of the satellite data from CBERS-2 sensor in order to map the dynamics of TSM in this region. Our results have shown that the distribution of TSM in Santos Bay varied consistently with winds, currents and tidal cycles, with significant relationships emphasizing the role of south-western winds and spring tides. Neap tides and eastern winds, along with rainfall, play an important role in the input of organic matter into the bay. In conclusion, our analyses showed that the main patterns observed in situ regarding the responses of TSM to the ocean-meteorological processes could be reproduced in the CBERS-2 satellite data, after simple and standard methods of images processing. TSM data retrieval from CBERS-2 or other satellite sensors were shown to be feasible, becoming an essential tool for synoptic observations of the composition and quality of water, especially at urbanized and impacted coastal areas.

  4. Intraspecific diversity regulates fungal productivity and respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wilkinson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals and not just species are key components of biodiversity, yet the relationship between intraspecific diversity and ecosystem functioning in microbial systems remains largely untested. This limits our ability to understand and predict the effects of altered genetic diversity in regulating key ecosystem processes and functions. Here, we use a model fungal system to test the hypothesis that intraspecific genotypic richness of Paxillus obscurosporus stimulates biomass and CO(2 efflux, but that this is dependent on nitrogen supply. Using controlled experimental microcosms, we show that populations containing several genotypes (maximum 8 of the fungus had greater productivity and produced significantly more CO(2 than those with fewer genotypes. Moreover, intraspecific diversity had a much stronger effect than a four-fold manipulation of the carbon:nitrogen ratio of the growth medium. The effects of intraspecific diversity were underpinned by strong roles of individuals, but overall intraspecific diversity increased the propensity of populations to over-yield, indicating that both complementarity and selection effects can operate within species. Our data demonstrate the importance of intraspecific diversity over a range of nitrogen concentrations, and the need to consider fine scale phylogenetic information of microbial communities in understanding their contribution to ecosystem processes.

  5. Food and Drug Administration tobacco regulation and product judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Annette R; Finney Rutten, Lila J; Parascandola, Mark; Blake, Kelly D; Augustson, Erik M

    2015-04-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act granted the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the authority to regulate tobacco products in the U.S. However, little is known about how regulation may be related to judgments about tobacco product-related risks. To understand how FDA tobacco regulation beliefs are associated with judgments about tobacco product-related risks. The Health Information National Trends Survey is a national survey of the U.S. adult population. Data used in this analysis were collected from October 2012 through January 2013 (N=3,630) by mailed questionnaire and analyzed in 2013. Weighted bivariate chi-square analyses were used to assess associations among FDA regulation belief, tobacco harm judgments, sociodemographics, and smoking status. A weighted multinomial logistic regression was conducted where FDA regulation belief was regressed on tobacco product judgments, controlling for sociodemographic variables and smoking status. About 41% believed that the FDA regulates tobacco products in the U.S., 23.6% reported the FDA does not, and 35.3% did not know. Chi-square analyses showed that smoking status was significantly related to harm judgments about electronic cigarettes (pFDA regulation was associated with tobacco product harm judgment uncertainty. Tobacco product harm perceptions are associated with beliefs about tobacco product regulation by the FDA. These findings suggest the need for increased public awareness and understanding of the role of tobacco product regulation in protecting public health. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Hungry granulocyte: its fate and regulation of production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1978-01-01

    The granulocyte, a phagocytic anti-1 bacterial defense cell, is discussed. Its production, the kinetics of its proliferation, the regulation of its production, and its loss from the blood are reviewed

  7. Federal approaches to the regulation of noncigarette tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Michael J A

    2012-11-01

    Under a grant funded by ClearWay Minnesota(SM) and in partnership with nationally recognized experts in tobacco product regulation, the Public Health Law Center investigated how laws at every level apply, or fail to apply, to noncigarette tobacco products--also called "other tobacco products." During the years 2010-2011, standard legal research techniques were used to identify and compile relevant statutes, regulations, decisions, pleadings, proposals, and related materials. Sources included standard commercial legal databases such as LexisNexis and Westlaw, online sources for pending rules and legislation, and direct contact with courts for legal pleadings and unpublished decisions. These legal authorities related to many aspects of the regulation, including price, flavorants, youth access, marketing restrictions, and product design of other tobacco products. Five of these products were used as case studies: dissolvable tobacco products, electronic cigarettes, little cigars, snus, and water pipes. Research during the years 2010-2011 revealed that the federal regulation of other tobacco products lags behind the regulation of more "traditional" tobacco products, such as cigarettes and moist snuff. Federal regulatory options to expand regulation of these products were identified. The article highlights several federal policy interventions that would address gaps in the regulation of other tobacco products. The FDA must determine whether these interventions will benefit public health and, if so, to what extent--the legal criteria for intervention under the federal Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 78 FR 49528 - Consolidation of Wound Care Products Containing Live Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ...] Consolidation of Wound Care Products Containing Live Cells AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... certain wound care products containing live cells from the Center for Devices and Radiological Health... CDRH and CBER. FDA believes that as more wound care products containing live cells are developed such...

  9. Effects of E-Waste Regulation on New Product Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Erica Plambeck; Qiong Wang

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of e-waste regulation on new product introduction in a stylized model of the electronics industry. Manufacturers choose the development time and expenditure for each new version of a durable product, which together determine its quality. Consumers purchase the new product and dispose of the last-generation product, which becomes e-waste. The price of a new product strictly increases with its quality and consumers' rational expectation about the time until th...

  10. Growth regulators and essential oil production

    OpenAIRE

    Prins, Cláudia L; Vieira, Ivo J. C; Freitas, Silvério P

    2010-01-01

    The aroma and fragrance industry is a billion-dollar world market which grows annually. Essential oils comprise the majority of compounds used by these industries. These sets of metabolites are formed mainly by monoterpenes, which are products of the plants' secondary metabolism. Biosynthesized from mevalonate and methylerythitol phosphate, the essential oil production depends not only on genetic factors and the developmental stage of plants, but also on environmental factors which could resu...

  11. Competitiveness regulation of dairy products production in the Crimea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domozhilkina Zh. V.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available the article outlines the results of studying the major problems concerning supporting competitiveness and quality of dairy products in the Crimea. The researchers compared the level of competitiveness of the dairy enterprise ltd. «Бег» with other brands of milk and suggested measures to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of competitiveness management of dairy products in this region.

  12. Regulation of chemicals in children's products: How U.S. and EU regulation impacts small markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negev, Maya; Berman, Tamar; Reicher, Shay; Balan, Simona; Soehl, Anna; Goulden, Shula; Ardi, Ruti; Shammai, Yaniv; Hadar, Laura; Blum, Arlene; Diamond, Miriam L

    2018-03-01

    Toys and children's products may contain trace metals and organic compounds that are potentially harmful to the health and development of infants and young children. Intergovernmental organizations and individual countries regulate chemicals in consumer products, but a coordinated international approach is lacking. This paper examines the implications of chemical regulation in children's products in large markets for a smaller market, namely Israel. We compared chemical regulations in children's products in the U.S., EU and Israel, and conducted in-depth interviews with diverse stakeholders in the Israeli product standardization process. Israel adopted EU chemical standards for certain chemicals (e.g., trace metals, phthalates) but not others (e.g., bisphenol A, flame retardants, trace metals in children's jewelry). Israeli regulation of chemicals in consumer products relies on regulations in large markets such as the U.S. and EU, which therefore have impacts beyond their territories. However, Israel adopts only product-specific standards and has regulatory gaps due to the lack of an overarching regulatory approach that exists in the U.S. and the EU. Furthermore, Israeli policy is to adopt parallel standards from large markets in order to remove trade barriers, despite their different approaches to chemical regulation, an approach which prioritizes trade considerations over health considerations. We conclude with policy recommendations for Israel, which have relevance for other small markets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Federal Environmental Regulations Impacting Hydrocarbon Exploration, Drilling, and Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    Waste handling and disposal from hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production are regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through federal and state regulations and/or through implementation of federal regulations. Some wastes generated in these operations are exempt under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) but are not exempt under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and other federal environmental laws. Exempt wastes remain exempt only if they are not mixed with hazardous wastes or hazardous substances. Once mixture occurs, the waste must be disposed as a hazardous material in an approved hazardous waste disposal facility. Before the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990, air emissions from production, storage, steam generation, and compression facilities associated with hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production industry were not regulated. A critical proposed regulatory change which will significantly effect Class II injection wells for disposal of produced brine and injection for enhanced oil recovery is imminent. Federal regulations affecting hydrocarbon exploration, drilling and production, proposed EPA regulatory changes, and a recent significant US Court of Appeals decision are covered in this report. It appears that this industry will, in the future, fall under more stringent environmental regulations leading to increased costs for operators.

  14. An innovative model for regulating supplement products: Natural health products in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestmann, Earle R.; Harwood, Melody; Martyres, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    On 1 January 2004, Health Canada officially added a new term to the global list of synonyms for dietary supplements: natural health products (NHP). Developed with the intent of providing Canadian consumers with ready access to NHP that are safe, effective, and of high quality, the Natural Health Products Regulations (the NHP regulations) are applicable to the sale, manufacture, packaging, labelling, importation, distribution, and storage of NHP, and are administered by the recently formed Natural Health Products Directorate (NHPD) within Health Canada. This paper provides an overview of the process for regulating supplement products in Canada

  15. Theoretical Deliberations on "Regulation as Productive Tool Use"

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Axel

    2003-01-01

    This paper is discusses some central points in a dissertation for the degree of dr. phil., "Regulation as Productive Tool Use - a Participatory Observation in the Control Room of a District Heating System." An earlier version of the paper was presented by the author as part of the defense of the dissertation at Roskilde University Center June 14 2002. As suggested by the title, the dissertation was an empirical study of regulation in a control room. The object of the authors participatory obs...

  16. Regulations for the peat production water pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savolainen, M.; Heikkinen, K.; Ihme, R.

    1996-01-01

    The regulations for peat production water pollution control include the latest information on anti-pollution constructions applicable to peat production including field ditches, sedimentation basins, overland flow areas, forest soil saturation, evaporation basins, chemicalization, detention of runoff and artificial flood plains. Information on subsurface drainage in peat mining is also given. The regulations deal with environmental viewpoints, planning of water protection and information on how to build, use and maintain anti-pollution constructions. Special attention is given to the soil conditions, because they play an important role in the building of different constructions. (orig.) (48 refs.)

  17. Regulations for the peat production water pollution control; Turvetuotannon vesiensuojeluohjeisto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, M.; Heikkinen, K.; Ihme, R. [ed.] [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The regulations for peat production water pollution control include the latest information on anti-pollution constructions applicable to peat production including field ditches, sedimentation basins, overland flow areas, forest soil saturation, evaporation basins, chemicalization, detention of runoff and artificial flood plains. Information on subsurface drainage in peat mining is also given. The regulations deal with environmental viewpoints, planning of water protection and information on how to build, use and maintain anti-pollution constructions. Special attention is given to the soil conditions, because they play an important role in the building of different constructions. (orig.) (48 refs.)

  18. Climate change and regulation of hepatotoxin production in Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehringer, Michelle M; Wannicke, Nicola

    2014-04-01

    Harmful, bloom-forming cyanobacteria (CyanoHABs) are occurring with increasing regularity in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The most commonly occurring cyanobacterial toxins are the hepatotoxic microcystin and nodularin. These cyclic hepta- and pentapeptides are synthesised nonribosomally by the gene products of the toxin gene clusters mcy and nda, respectively. Understanding of the regulation of hepatotoxin production is incomplete, although there is strong evidence supporting the roles of iron, light, higher nitrate availability and inorganic carbon in modulating microcystin levels. The majority of these studies have focused on the unicellular freshwater, microcystin-producing strain of Microcystis aeruginosa, with little attention being paid to terrestrial or marine toxin producers. This review intends to investigate the regulation of microcystin and nodularin production in unicellular and filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria against the background of changing climate conditions. Special focus is given to diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacteria, for example Nodularia spumigena, capable of regulating their nitrogen levels by actively fixing dinitrogen. By combining data from significant studies, an overall scheme of the regulation of toxin production is presented, focussing specifically on nodularin production in diazotrophs against the background of increasing carbon dioxide concentrations and temperatures envisaged under current climate change models. Furthermore, the risk of sustaining and spreading CyanoHABs in the future ocean is evaluated. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of primary productivity rate in the equatorial Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, R.T. (Duke Univ. Marine Lab., Beaufort, NC (United States)); Chavez, F.P. (Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., Pacific Grove, CA (United States))

    1991-12-01

    Analysis of the Chl-specific rate of primary productivity (P{sup B}) as a function of subsurface nutrient concentration at >300 equatorial stations provides an answer to the question: What processes regulate primary productivity rate in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll waters of the equatorial Pacific In the western Pacific where there is a gradient in 60-m (NO{sub 3}) from 0 to {approximately}12 {mu}M, the productivity rate is a linear function of nutrient concentration; in the eastern Pacific where the gradient is from 12 to 28 {mu}M, the productivity rate is independent of nutrient concentration and limited to {approximately}36 mg C(mg Chl){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1}, or a mean euphotic zone C-specific growth rate ({mu}) of 0.47 d{sup {minus}1}. However, rates downstream of the Galapagos Islands are not limited; they are 46.4 mg C(mg Chl){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1} and {mu} = 0.57 d{sup {minus}1}, very close to the predicted nutrient-regulated rates in the absence of other limitation. This pattern of rate regulation can be accounted for by a combination of eolian Fe, subsurface nutrients, and sedimentary Fe derived from the Galapagos platform. In the low-nutrient western Pacific the eolian supply of Fe is adequate to allow productivity rate to be set by subsurface nutrient concentration. In the nutrient-rich easter equatorial region eolian Fe is inadequate to support productivity rates proportional to the higher nutrient concentrations, so in this region eolian Fe is rate limiting. Around the Galapagos Islands productivity rates reach levels consistent with nutrient concentrations; sedimentary Fe from the Galapagos platform seems adequate to support increased nutrient-regulated productivity rates in this region.

  20. Regulation of primary productivity rate in the equatorial Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, R.T.; Chavez, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the Chl-specific rate of primary productivity (P B ) as a function of subsurface nutrient concentration at >300 equatorial stations provides an answer to the question: What processes regulate primary productivity rate in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll waters of the equatorial Pacific? In the western Pacific where there is a gradient in 60-m [NO 3 ] from 0 to ∼12 μM, the productivity rate is a linear function of nutrient concentration; in the eastern Pacific where the gradient is from 12 to 28 μM, the productivity rate is independent of nutrient concentration and limited to ∼36 mg C(mg Chl) -1 d -1 , or a mean euphotic zone C-specific growth rate (μ) of 0.47 d -1 . However, rates downstream of the Galapagos Islands are not limited; they are 46.4 mg C(mg Chl) -1 d -1 and μ = 0.57 d -1 , very close to the predicted nutrient-regulated rates in the absence of other limitation. This pattern of rate regulation can be accounted for by a combination of eolian Fe, subsurface nutrients, and sedimentary Fe derived from the Galapagos platform. In the low-nutrient western Pacific the eolian supply of Fe is adequate to allow productivity rate to be set by subsurface nutrient concentration. In the nutrient-rich easter equatorial region eolian Fe is inadequate to support productivity rates proportional to the higher nutrient concentrations, so in this region eolian Fe is rate limiting. Around the Galapagos Islands productivity rates reach levels consistent with nutrient concentrations; sedimentary Fe from the Galapagos platform seems adequate to support increased nutrient-regulated productivity rates in this region

  1. Attitudes Toward FDA Regulation of Newly Deemed Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah D; Goldstein, Adam O; Schmidt, Allison M; Hall, Marissa G; Brewer, Noel T

    2017-10-01

    To examine how smokers perceive FDA oversight of e-cigarettes, hookah, and cigars. Current US smokers (N = 1,520) participating in a randomized clinical trial of pictorial cigarette pack warnings completed a survey that included questions about attitudes toward new FDA regulations covering newly deemed tobacco products (ie, regulation of e-cigarettes, nicotine gels or liquids used in e-cigarettes, hookah, and cigars). Between 47% and 56% of current smokers viewed these new FDA regulations favorably and between 17% - 24% opposed them. Favorable attitudes toward the regulations were more common among smokers with higher quit intentions (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.17, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.33) and more negative beliefs about smokers (aOR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.33). Participants with higher education, higher income, and previous exposure to e-cigarette advertisements had higher odds of expressing positive attitudes toward the new FDA regulations (p FDA regulation of newly deemed tobacco products favorably. Local and state policy-makers and tobacco control advocates can build on this support to enact and strengthen tobacco control provisions for e-cigarettes, cigars, and hookah.

  2. Genetic regulation and manipulation for natural product discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianwei; Wu, Qihao; Hawas, Usama W; Wang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Natural products are an important source of modern medical development, e.g., antibiotics, anticancers, immune modulators, etc. and will continue to be a powerful driving force for the discovery of novel potential drugs. In the heterologous hosts, natural products are biosynthesized using dedicated metabolic networks. By gene engineering, pathway reconstructing, and enzyme engineering, metabolic networks can be modified to synthesize novel compounds containing enhanced structural feature or produce a large quantity of known valuable bioactive compounds. The review introduces some important technical platforms and relevant examples of genetic regulation and manipulation to improve natural product titers or drive novel secondary metabolite discoveries.

  3. Future development of global regulations of Chinese herbal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tai-Ping; Deal, Greer; Koo, Hoi-Lun; Rees, Daryl; Sun, He; Chen, Shaw; Dou, Jin-Hui; Makarov, Valery G; Pozharitskaya, Olga N; Shikov, Alexander N; Kim, Yeong Shik; Huang, Yi-Tsau; Chang, Yuan Shiun; Jia, William; Dias, Alberto; Wong, Vivian Chi-Woon; Chan, Kelvin

    2012-04-10

    GP-TCM is the first EU-funded Coordination Action consortium dedicated to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) research. One of the key deliverables of the Work Package 7 in GP-TCM was to investigate information of the existing requirements for registration of TCM products listed by global regulatory bodies. The paper aims to collate data and draw comparison of these regulations. Case studies are also presented to illustrate the problems involved in registering TCM products in different regions worldwide. A collaborative network task force was established during the early stage of the GP-TCM project and operated through exchanges, teleconferences and focused discussions at annual meetings. The task force involved coordinators, academics who are actively involved with R&D of Chinese herbal medicines, experts on monographic standards of Chinese materia medica, representatives from regulatory agencies, experts from industries in marketing Chinese medicines/herbal medicines and natural products. The co-ordinators took turns to chair teleconferences, led discussions on specific issues at AGM discussion sessions, at joint workshops with other work-packages such as WP1 (quality issues), WP3 (toxicology issues) and WP6 (clinical trial issues). Collectively the authors were responsible for collating discussion outcomes and updating written information. A global overview of regulations on herbal registration has been compiled during the three years of the consortium. The regulatory requirements for registration of herbal products in the EU and China were compared, and this is extended to other regions/countries: Africa, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Japan, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan, and the United States. A wide variation of the regulations for the categories of herbal products exists: food (functional food, novel foods, dietary food for special medical purpose, foods for particular nutritional use, food supplement); cosmetic, traditional herbal medicine products; herbal

  4. The Canadian Natural Health Products (NHP Regulations: Industry Compliance Motivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Laeeque

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study explores corporations' motivations to comply with new natural health products (NHP Regulations in Canada. Interviews were conducted with representatives from 20 Canadian NHP companies. Findings show that the rationale for compliance differs for large compared to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs. Large firms are motivated to comply with the regulations because of the deterrent fear of negative media coverage, social motivations, ability to comply and maintaining a competitive market advantage. In contrast, SMEs are motivated to comply due to the deterrent fear of legal prosecution and a sense of duty.

  5. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyanogenic glycoside production in forage plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhanmin; Zhang, Kaixuan; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Yanmin; Tang, Yixiong; Georgiev, Milen I; Zhang, Xinquan; Lin, Min; Zhou, Meiliang

    2018-01-01

    The natural products cyanogenic glycosides (CNglcs) are present in various forage plant species including Sorghum spp., Trifolium spp., and Lotus spp. The release of toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from endogenous CNglcs, which is known as cyanogenesis, leads to a serious problem for animal consumption while as defensive secondary metabolites, CNglcs play multiple roles in plant development and responses to adverse environment. Therefore, it is highly important to fully uncover the molecular mechanisms of CNglc biosynthesis and regulation to manipulate the contents of CNglcs in forage plants for fine-tuning the balance between defensive responses and food safety. This review summarizes recent studies on the production, function, polymorphism, and regulation of CNglcs in forage plants, aiming to provide updated knowledge on the ways to manipulate CNglcs for further beneficial economic effects.

  6. Focus adjustment method for CBERS 3 and 4 satellites Mux camera to be performed in air condition and its experimental verification for best performance in orbital vacuum condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaduto, Lucimara C. N.; Malavolta, Alexandre T.; Modugno, Rodrigo G.; Vales, Luiz F.; Carvalho, Erica G.; Evangelista, Sérgio; Stefani, Mario A.; de Castro Neto, Jarbas C.

    2017-11-01

    The first Brazilian remote sensing multispectral camera (MUX) is currently under development at Opto Eletronica S.A. It consists of a four-spectral-band sensor covering a 450nm to 890nm wavelength range. This camera will provide images within a 20m ground resolution at nadir. The MUX camera is part of the payload of the upcoming Sino-Brazilian satellites CBERS 3&4 (China-Brazil Earth Resource Satellite). The preliminary alignment between the optical system and the CCD sensor, which is located at the focal plane assembly, was obtained in air condition, clean room environment. A collimator was used for the performance evaluation of the camera. The preliminary performance evaluation of the optical channel was registered by compensating the collimator focus position due to changes in the test environment, as an air-to-vacuum environment transition leads to a defocus process in this camera. Therefore, it is necessary to confirm that the alignment of the camera must always be attained ensuring that its best performance is reached for an orbital vacuum condition. For this reason and as a further step on the development process, the MUX camera Qualification Model was tested and evaluated inside a thermo-vacuum chamber and submitted to an as-orbit vacuum environment. In this study, the influence of temperature fields was neglected. This paper reports on the performance evaluation and discusses the results for this camera when operating within those mentioned test conditions. The overall optical tests and results show that the "in air" adjustment method was suitable to be performed, as a critical activity, to guarantee the equipment according to its design requirements.

  7. Global regulator BldA regulates morphological differentiation and lincomycin production in Streptomyces lincolnensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bingbing; Tao, Liyuan; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Wei; Guo, Meijin; Ye, Jiang; Wu, Haizhen; Zhang, Huizhan

    2018-03-17

    Global regulator BldA, the only tRNA for a rare leucine codon UUA, is best known for its ability to affect morphological differentiation and secondary metabolism in the genus Streptomyces. In this study, we confirmed the regulatory function of the bldA gene (Genbank accession no. EU124663.1) in Streptomyces lincolnensis. Disruption of bldA hinders the sporulation and lincomycin production, that can recur when complemented with a functional bldA gene. Western blotting assays demonstrate that translation of the lmbB2 gene which encodes a L-tyrosine hydroxylase is absolutely dependent on BldA; however, mistranslation of the lmbU gene which encodes a cluster-situated regulator (CSR) is observed in a bldA mutant. Intriguingly, when the preferential cognate codon CTG was used, the expression level of LmbU was not the highest compared to the usage of rare codon TTA or CTA, indicating the rare codon in this position is significant for the regulation of lmbU expression. Moreover, replacement of TTA codons in both genes with another leucin codon in the bldA mutant did not restore lincomycin production. Thus, we believe that the bldA gene regulates lincomycin production via controlling the translation of not only lmbB2 and lmbU, but also the other TTA-containing genes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated the importance of the bldA gene in morphological differentiation and lincomycin production in S. lincolnensis.

  8. Advanced glycation end products regulate interleukin-1? production in human placenta

    OpenAIRE

    SENO, Kotomi; SASE, Saoko; OZEKI, Ayae; TAKAHASHI, Hironori; OHKUCHI, Akihide; SUZUKI, Hirotada; MATSUBARA, Shigeki; IWATA, Hisataka; KUWAYAMA, Takehito; SHIRASUNA, Koumei

    2017-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a major risk factor for pregnancy complications, causing inflammatory cytokine release in the placenta, including interleukin-1? (IL-1?), IL-6, and IL-8. Pregnant women with obesity develop accelerated systemic and placental inflammation with elevated circulating advanced glycation end products (AGEs). IL-1? is a pivotal inflammatory cytokine associated with obesity and pregnancy complications, and its production is regulated by NLR family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3)...

  9. Regulation of cerebrospinal fluid production by caffeine consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Sik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caffeine is the most commonly consumed psycho-stimulant in the world. The effects of caffeine on the body have been extensively studied; however, its effect on the structure of the brain has not been investigated to date. Results In the present study we found that the long-term consumption of caffeine can induce ventriculomegaly; this was observed in 40% of the study rats. In the caffeine-treated rats with ventriculomegaly, there was increased production of CSF, associated with the increased expression of Na+, K+-ATPase and increased cerebral blood flow (CBF. In contrast to the chronic effects, acute treatment with caffeine decreased the production of CSF, suggesting 'effect inversion' associated with caffeine, which was mediated by increased expression of the A1 adenosine receptor, in the choroid plexus of rats chronically treated with caffeine. The involvement of the A1 adenosine receptor in the effect inversion of caffeine was further supported by the induction of ventriculomegaly and Na+, K+-ATPase, in A1 agonist-treated rats. Conclusion The results of this study show that long-term consumption of caffeine can induce ventriculomegaly, which is mediated in part by increased production of CSF. Moreover, we also showed that adenosine receptor signaling can regulate the production of CSF by controlling the expression of Na+, K+-ATPase and CBF.

  10. Crosstalk between Rac1-mediated actin regulation and ROS production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Alejandro; González-Billault, Christian

    2018-02-20

    The small RhoGTPase Rac1 is implicated in a variety of events related to actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Remarkably, another event that is completely different from those related to actin regulation has the same relevance; the Rac1-mediated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through NADPH oxidases (NOX). Each outcome involves different Rac1 downstream effectors; on one hand, events related to the actin cytoskeleton require Rac1 to bind to WAVEs proteins and PAKs that ultimately promote actin branching and turnover, on the other, NOX-derived ROS production demands active Rac1 to be bound to a cytosolic activator of NOX. How Rac1-mediated signaling ends up promoting actin-related events, NOX-derived ROS, or both is poorly understood. Rac1 regulators, including scaffold proteins, are known to exert tight control over its functions. Hence, evidence of Rac1 regulatory events leading to both actin remodeling and NOX-mediated ROS generation are discussed. Moreover, cellular functions linked to physiological and pathological conditions that exhibit crosstalk between Rac1 outcomes are analyzed, while plausible roles in neuronal functions (and dysfunctions) are highlighted. Together, discussed evidence shed light on cellular mechanisms which requires Rac1 to direct either actin- and/or ROS-related events, helping to understand crucial roles of Rac1 dual functionality. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transport and transcriptional regulation of oil production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manan, Sehrish; Chen, Beibei; She, Guangbiao; Wan, Xiaochun; Zhao, Jian

    2017-08-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) serves as an energy reservoir and phospholipids as build blocks of biomembrane to support plant life. They also provide human with foods and nutrients. Multi-compartmentalized biosynthesis, trafficking or cross-membrane transport of lipid intermediates or precursors and their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent progress has aided our understanding of how fatty acids (FAs) and phospholipids are transported between the chloroplast, the cytoplasm, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and how the ins and outs of lipids take place in the peroxisome and other organelles for lipid metabolism and function. In addition, information regarding the transcriptional regulation network associated with FA and TAG biosynthesis has been further enriched. Recent breakthroughs made in lipid transport and transcriptional regulation has provided significant insights into our comprehensive understanding of plant lipid biology. This review attempts to highlight the recent progress made on lipid synthesis, transport, degradation, and their regulatory mechanisms. Metabolic engineering, based on these knowledge-powered technologies for production of edible oils or biofuels, is reviewed. The biotechnological application of metabolic enzymes, transcription factors and transporters, for oil production and composition improvement, are discussed in a broad context in order to provide a fresh scenario for researchers and to guide future research and applications.

  12. Productivity growth and price regulation of Slovenian water distribution utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Zorić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyse the price regulation method and performance of thewater industry in Slovenia. A stochastic cost frontier model is employed to estimate and decompose the total factor productivity (TFP growth of water distribution utilities in the 1997-2003 period. The main goal is to find out whether the lack of proper incentives to improve performance has resulted in the low TFP growth of Slovenian water distribution utilities. The evidence suggests that cost inefficiencies are present in water utilities, which indicates considerable cost saving potential in the analysed industry. Technical change is found to have positively affected the TFP growth over time, while cost inefficiency levels remained essentially unchanged. Overall, the average annual TFP growth in the analysed period is estimated to be only slightly above zero, which is a relatively poor result. This can largely be contributed to the present institutional and regulatory setting that does not stimulate utilities to improve productivity. Therefore, the introduction of an independent regulatory agency and an incentive-based price regulation scheme should be seriously considered in order to enhance the performance of Slovenian water distribution utilities.

  13. Environmental Policies, Product Market Regulation and Innovation in Renewable Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesta, Lionel; Vona, Francesco; Nicolli, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of policies in favor of innovation in renew- able energy under different levels of competition. Using information regarding renewable energy policies, product market regulation and high-quality green patents for OECD countries since the late 1970's, we develop a pre-sample mean count-data econometric specification that also accounts for the endogeneity of policies. We find that renewable energy policies are significantly more effective in fostering green innovation in countries with deregulated energy markets. We also find that public support for renewable energy is crucial only in the generation of high-quality green patents, whereas competition enhances the generation of green patents irrespective of their quality. (authors)

  14. IMMUNE REGULATING ES-PRODUCTS IN PARASITIC NEMATODES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlool, Qusay Zuhair Mohammad; Buchmann, Kurt; Kania, Per Walter

    work elucidates the effect of ES substances on the fish immune system by measuring immune gene expression in spleen and liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) injected intraperitoneally with ES products isolated from A. simplex third stage larvae. The overall gene expression profile of exposed...... fish showed a generalized down-regulation of the immune genes tested, suggesting a role of ES proteins in minimizing the immune reaction of rainbow trout against invading nematodes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of the ES proteins and found that lipase, esterase lipase, valine and cysteine...... arylamidases, naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase and a-galactosidase activities were present in the ES solution. This type of hydrolytic enzyme activity may play a role in nematode penetration of host tissue. Based on the notion that A. simplex ES-proteins may have an immune-depressive effect, it could also...

  15. Smad4 regulates growth plate matrix production and chondrocyte polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Amanda T; Berthet, Ellora; Cantu, Andrea; Laird, Diana J; Alliston, Tamara

    2017-03-15

    Smad4 is an intracellular effector of the TGFβ family that has been implicated in Myhre syndrome, a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, brachydactyly and stiff joints. The TGFβ pathway also plays a critical role in the development, organization and proliferation of the growth plate, although the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Skeletal phenotypes in Myhre syndrome overlap with processes regulated by the TGFβ pathway, including organization and proliferation of the growth plate and polarity of the chondrocyte. We used in vitro and in vivo models of Smad4 deficiency in chondrocytes to test the hypothesis that deregulated TGFβ signaling leads to aberrant extracellular matrix production and loss of chondrocyte polarity. Specifically, we evaluated growth plate chondrocyte polarity in tibiae of Col2-Cre +/- ;Smad4 fl/fl mice and in chondrocyte pellet cultures. In vitro and in vivo , Smad4 deficiency decreased aggrecan expression and increased MMP13 expression. Smad4 deficiency disrupted the balance of cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation, even though the sequential expression of growth plate chondrocyte markers was intact. Chondrocytes in Smad4-deficient growth plates also showed evidence of polarity defects, with impaired proliferation and ability to undergo the characteristic changes in shape, size and orientation as they differentiated from resting to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Therefore, we show that Smad4 controls chondrocyte proliferation, orientation, and hypertrophy and is important in regulating the extracellular matrix composition of the growth plate. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Smad4 regulates growth plate matrix production and chondrocyte polarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda T. Whitaker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Smad4 is an intracellular effector of the TGFβ family that has been implicated in Myhre syndrome, a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, brachydactyly and stiff joints. The TGFβ pathway also plays a critical role in the development, organization and proliferation of the growth plate, although the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Skeletal phenotypes in Myhre syndrome overlap with processes regulated by the TGFβ pathway, including organization and proliferation of the growth plate and polarity of the chondrocyte. We used in vitro and in vivo models of Smad4 deficiency in chondrocytes to test the hypothesis that deregulated TGFβ signaling leads to aberrant extracellular matrix production and loss of chondrocyte polarity. Specifically, we evaluated growth plate chondrocyte polarity in tibiae of Col2-Cre+/−;Smad4fl/fl mice and in chondrocyte pellet cultures. In vitro and in vivo, Smad4 deficiency decreased aggrecan expression and increased MMP13 expression. Smad4 deficiency disrupted the balance of cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation, even though the sequential expression of growth plate chondrocyte markers was intact. Chondrocytes in Smad4-deficient growth plates also showed evidence of polarity defects, with impaired proliferation and ability to undergo the characteristic changes in shape, size and orientation as they differentiated from resting to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Therefore, we show that Smad4 controls chondrocyte proliferation, orientation, and hypertrophy and is important in regulating the extracellular matrix composition of the growth plate.

  17. Production and transcriptional regulation of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in forage legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meiliang; Wei, Li; Sun, Zhanmin; Gao, Lihua; Meng, Yu; Tang, Yixiong; Wu, Yanmin

    2015-05-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PA), also known as condensed tannins, contribute to important forage legumes traits including disease resistance and forage quality. PA in forage plants has both positive and negative effects on feed digestibility and animal performance. The analytical methods and their applicability in measuring the contents of PA in forage plants are essential to studies on their nutritional effects. In spite of important breakthroughs in our understanding of the PA biosynthesis, important questions still remain to be answered such as the PA polymerization and transport. Recent advances in the understanding of transcription factor-mediated gene regulation mechanisms in anthocyanin and PA biosynthetic pathway in model plants suggest new approaches for the metabolic engineering of PA in forage plants. The present review will attempt to present the state-of-the-art of research in these areas and provide an update on the production and metabolic engineering of PA in forage plants. We hope that this will contribute to a better understanding of the ways in which PA production to manipulate the content of PA for beneficial effects in forage plants.

  18. Verification of product design using regulation knowledge base and Web services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ik June [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Chul; Mun Du Hwan [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Chul [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jin Sang [PartDB Co., Ltd., Daejeom (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chae Ho [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Since product regulations contain important rules or codes that manufacturers must follow, automatic verification of product design with the regulations related to a product is necessary. For this, this study presents a new method for the verification of product design using regulation knowledge base and Web services. Regulation knowledge base consisting of product ontology and rules was built with a hybrid technique combining ontology and programming languages. Web service for design verification was developed ensuring the flexible extension of knowledge base. By virtue of two technical features, design verification is served to various products while the change of system architecture is minimized.

  19. Verification of product design using regulation knowledge base and Web services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ik June; Lee, Jae Chul; Mun Du Hwan; Kim, Byung Chul; Hwang, Jin Sang; Lim, Chae Ho

    2015-01-01

    Since product regulations contain important rules or codes that manufacturers must follow, automatic verification of product design with the regulations related to a product is necessary. For this, this study presents a new method for the verification of product design using regulation knowledge base and Web services. Regulation knowledge base consisting of product ontology and rules was built with a hybrid technique combining ontology and programming languages. Web service for design verification was developed ensuring the flexible extension of knowledge base. By virtue of two technical features, design verification is served to various products while the change of system architecture is minimized.

  20. 76 FR 57682 - Petition Requesting Regulations Restricting Cadmium in Children's Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... Requesting Regulations Restricting Cadmium in Children's Products AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission...'') has received a petition requesting standards restricting cadmium in children's products, especially... to begin drafting a proposed rule unless a voluntary standard for cadmium in children's jewelry is...

  1. Pupils' Readiness for Self-Regulated Learning in the Forethought Phase of Exploratory Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsärinne, Mika; Kallio, Manne; Virta, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses pupils' readiness for self-regulation in Exploratory Production in Technology Education. In the forethought phase of Exploratory Production, pupils envision and regulate their technological production activities. Next, in the performance phase, the envisioned goals are tried and implemented through ideating, planning and…

  2. Management practices in Australasian ethical investment products: a role for environmental regulation?

    OpenAIRE

    Haigh, Matthew; Guthrie, James

    2010-01-01

    This paper adds to the literatures on socially responsible investment (SRI), investment management, regulation of financial services and social accounting by providing a comprehensive survey of investment methods used in SRI products and regulated social reporting in financial services. Australian and New Zealand regulations require issuers of self-declarative SRI products to provide details on methods used in portfolio construction. Regulators' objectives to standardize the reporting of port...

  3. Clarification of When Products Made or Derived From Tobacco Are Regulated as Drugs, Devices, or Combination Products; Amendments to Regulations Regarding "Intended Uses." Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing this final rule to describe the circumstances in which a product made or derived from tobacco that is intended for human consumption will be subject to regulation as a drug, device, or a combination product under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act). This action is intended to provide direction to regulated industry and to help avoid consumer confusion.

  4. Expression regulation of design process gene in product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bo; Fang, Lusheng; Li, Bo

    2011-01-01

    is proposed and analyzed, as well as its three categories i.e., the operator gene, the structural gene and the regulator gene. Second, the trigger mechanism that design objectives and constraints trigger the operator gene is constructed. Third, the expression principle of structural gene is analyzed...... with the example of design management gene. Last, the regulation mode that the regulator gene regulates the expression of the structural gene is established and it is illustrated by taking the design process management gene as an example. © (2011) Trans Tech Publications....

  5. Dynamic Water Regulation Under Endogenous Irrigation Investment and Production Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiangfeng

    2001-01-01

    We study the problem of regulating California agriculture water use. Regulatory decisions are conditioned on current information as well as the anticipation of future learning. Endogenous learning, either about damages from waterlogging or about abatement costs, affects the optimal control today. These regulations affect farmers' water usage and their incentives to adopt new irrigation technology.

  6. DIRECTIONS AND MECHANISMS OF STATE REGULATION OF THE PRODUCTION OF FUNCTIONAL BAKERY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Bogomolova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In the article the basic socio-economic problems associated with micronutrient deficiency in the diet of the population and their possible solutions through production of a functional purpose, summed up the experience of foreign countries, as well as the possible mechanisms of state regulation and support enterprises of the baking industry in socially significant programs. The rapid pace of development of the economies of most countries of the world have led to negative social consequences, the main one of which is a violation of the power structure in the general population, lack of nutritional vitamins and trace elements , jetlag and diet , eating dangerous and harmful products . Way out of this situation is the creation and distribution of food functionality, including the baking of products. Currently, the production of functional food - one of the fastest growing areas of activity of subjects of the food industry. In enterprises of our region there is a great potential for the development of this segment. By the State in support of this direction are implemented targeted programs aimed at the development of the baking industry for the production of enriched bakery products. The paper presents the principles that can contribute to the effective interaction with state actors bakery business needed to overcome the lag in the development of socially significant sectors of the Russian economy from foreign counterparts, such as the development of competition and the creation of favorable conditions for the realization of entrepreneurial initiatives; increasing the investment attractiveness, social and economic efficiency of production and sale of bread and bakery in the Delhi - regions; reducing administrative barriers to accelerate the development of the market of bread and bakery products functional and specialized purpose . Bakery products needs competent positioning, because the development of the market and changing consumer

  7. 7 CFR 966.4 - Production area and regulated area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES... Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico. ...

  8. The Optimal Regulation of Product Quality under Monopoly

    OpenAIRE

    Hans Zenger

    2006-01-01

    This paper characterizes the optimal quality regulation of a monopolist when quality is observable. In contrast to Sheshinski (1976) it is shown that a minimum quality standard may be desirable even if it induces the firm to reduce output.

  9. Towards regulation of similar biotherapeutic products: Thailand's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanaphollert, Prapassorn; Tungsanga, Kriang

    2011-09-01

    The implementation of universal health coverage scheme in Thailand allows quality, equitable and accessible health care for all. Patients with life threatening and chronic diseases can get access to biotherapeutic products to treat their ailments. This triggered a major impact on the need for specific guidelines in evaluation of similar biotherapeutic products in order to standardize the regulatory pathway to license this class of products ensuring that the products meet acceptable levels of quality, safety and efficacy. The development of similar biotherapeutic products (SBP) should be considered to ensure therapeutic equivalence of biotherapeutics products at more affordable prices. This will lead to greater ease and speed of approval and assurance of the quality, safety and efficacy of these products. Therefore, we report herein the SBP situation in Thailand. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Xenotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Organs Letter - ARCHIVED Xenotransplantation Guidances Related Links Human Organ and Tissue Transplantation World Health Organization International Xenotransplantation Information Recalls & Alerts Recalls (Biologics) CBER-Regulated Products: Shortages and Discontinuations Report a Problem to the Center ...

  11. Applying toxicological risk assessment principles to constituents of smokeless tobacco products: implications for product regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayo-Yusuf, Olalekan A; Connolly, Greg N

    2011-01-01

    To determine how information on chemical constituents of different smokeless tobacco products (STPs) may be used in cancer risk assessment for regulatory purposes. This study investigated select STP constituents potentially associated with significant cancer risk by applying a known toxicological risk assessment framework. Cancer risk estimates were obtained for selected constituents of STPs and a medicinal nicotine gum formulation with comparable toxicity information and also median concentration data on the GothiaTek analytes. The calculated cancer risk was considered 'unacceptable' if it exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) benchmark of an 'acceptable' cancer risk of 10E-6. The cancer risk estimates derived from daily use of 10 g of STPs meeting the industry-set GothiaTek limits exceed the levels generally considered 'acceptable' by the USEPA at least 8000 times. Except for the medicinal nicotine tested, all the STP types, including the relatively lower tobacco specific nitrosamine (TSNA)-containing snus, were found to carry an 'unacceptable' cancer risk. The calculated cancer risks associated with the snus and the US moist snuff products were, respectively, at least 1000 times and 6000 times greater than the minimum acceptable. TSNA and cadmium are associated with the largest estimated cancer risks for all the STPs evaluated. This study's findings provide an empirical risk assessment that could guide STP regulation using an existing toxicological assessment framework. The study findings question the scientific rationale of the industry-set standards and highlight the need for regulatory actions to reduce specific toxicants in all STPs.

  12. 77 FR 57043 - Regulations Under the Fur Products Labeling Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ..., or otherwise artificially colored fur; (3) that the garment is composed of, among other things, paws... Identification Number of the manufacturer or other party responsible for the garment; and (5) the product's... how a particular industry, including the fur industry, identifies its products.'' \\32\\ In addition...

  13. In vitro production of growth regulators and phosphatase activity by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The result showed that the population levels of phosphobacteria were higher in the rhizosphere soil of groundnut plant. Further, all the strains of phosphobacteria were able to produce phytohormones and phosphatase enzyme under in vitro conditions. Keywords: In vitro, phosphobacteria, growth regulators ...

  14. LnqR, a TetR-family transcriptional regulator, positively regulates lacticin Q production in Lactococcus lactis QU 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatani, Shun; Ishibashi, Naoki; Flores, Floirendo P; Zendo, Takeshi; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Lacticin Q is an unmodified leaderless bacteriocin produced by Lactococcus lactis QU 5. It has been revealed that the production and self-immunity of lacticin Q are facilitated by a gene cluster lnqQBCDEF The gene for a putative TetR-family transcriptional regulator, termed lnqR, was found nearby the lnqQBCDEF cluster, but its involvement in lacticin Q biosynthesis remained unknown. In this study, we created an LnqR-overexpressing QU 5 recombinant by using lactococcal constitutive promoter P32 The recombinant QU 5 showed enhanced production of and self-immunity to lacticin Q. RT-PCR analysis has revealed that an overexpression of LnqR increases the amounts of lnqQBCDEF transcripts, and these six genes are transcribed as an operon in a single transcriptional unit. Interestingly, LnqR expression and thus lacticin Q production by L. lactis QU 5 was found temperature dependent, while LnzR, an LnqR-homologue, in L. lactis QU 14 was expressed in a similar but not identical manner to LnqR, resulting in dissimilar bacteriocin productivities by these strains. This report demonstrates LnqR as the first TetR-family transcriptional regulator involved in LAB bacteriocin biosynthesis and that, as an exceptional case of TetR-family regulators, LnqR positively regulates the transcription of these biosynthetic genes. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Premarket Regulation of Tissue Engineered Medical Products in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunren; Wang, Anqi; Feng, Xiaoming; Ke, Linnan; Huang, Yuanli; Han, Qianqian; Sun, Xue; Yang, Zhaopeng

    2015-12-01

    Tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs) use state-of-the-art technologies and offer the patients with alternative clinical options for diseases that conventional treatments may fail or be incompetent. However promising, this technology is comparatively new with very limited hands-on experiences with both manufacturing and clinical therapy. Of great significance to products with such complexity and novelty is the establishment of a complete jurisdiction framework and a standardization database so that the safety of the technique in clinical treatment can be ensured. Although different regulatory routes are adopted in different countries, risks are generally considered to be derived from the cellular components within the product, the material scaffolds, and potentially from the final products. This article is to provide an insight of the regulatory considerations and the role of China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) in the supervision of TEMPs.

  16. New Zealand's regulation of cosmetic products containing nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    This paper evaluates the proposed amendments to New Zealand's Cosmetic Group Standard that relate to nanomaterials in cosmetics. Manufactured nanomaterials are being increasingly used in cosmetic products. There are concerns that some nanomaterials present potential human and environmental health and safety risks. The proposed amendments are unique in New Zealand not only because they make specific mention of nanomaterials, but also because they propose introducing labelling requirements. Few jurisdictions have adopted mandatory labelling for products containing nanomaterials. The use of nanomaterials in consumer products provides another opportunity to explore the efficacy of labelling as a regulatory tool. The challenges are heightened for products containing nanomaterials due to the difficulties in defining the term "nano."

  17. Further amendments to general regulations of the Food and Drug Administration to incorporate tobacco products. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending certain of its general regulations to include tobacco products, where appropriate, in light of FDA's authority to regulate these products under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act). With these amendments, tobacco products are subject to the same general requirements that apply to other FDA-regulated products.

  18. Production, regulation and transportation of bacillibactin in bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, W.; Hussain, Q.; Shen, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis produces a catecholate type siderophore 'Bacillibactin'. This review focuses on the non-ribosomal synthesis, transport and regulation of bacillibactin. Bacillibactin biosynthetic operon contains five genes (dhbACEBF). The uptake of bacillibactin requires the FeuABC transporter, inner-membrane permease, FepDG and YusV ATPase and an esterase encoding gene, besA and while export required YmfE major facilitator super-family (MFS)-type transporter. Fur is the major iron-controlled transcriptional regulator in B. subtilis, which acts as an iron-dependent repressor of the dhb operon in vivo while an iron-independent repressor in vitro. Knowledge of the Fur regulon will be useful in interpreting other global analysis of transcriptional responses. (author)

  19. State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements

  20. 75 FR 51246 - Petition Requesting Regulations Restricting Cadmium in Children's Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... Restricting Cadmium in Children's Products AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... standards restricting cadmium in children's products, especially toy metal jewelry. The Commission invites... stating that the Commission should issue regulations to ban cadmium in all toy jewelry under the Federal...

  1. Energy efficiency regulation for industrial products and manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badea George-Vlad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the energy efficiency of industrial products or manufacturing as compared to the framework legislative measures implemented by EU through the Eco-design and Energy Labeling Directives. The Eco-design implementing measures such as taking into account all phases of the life cycle (manufacturing, transport, use, disposal, as well as the essential environmental aspects (consumption, materials, emissions, waste, etc. for each phase, are considered. The implementing measures should have no significant negative impact on the functionality, health and safety, affordability and industry's competitiveness, as well as they should not impose proprietary technology on manufacturers and not be an excessive administrative burden for them. In this paper a method for implementing Legislative measures concerning the Eco-design and Energy labeling of industrial product is proposed. It grounds on the analysis of particular interest versus general interest relation, for each product case. Method application consists in products classifying relative to the two types of interest, followed by a voluntary agreement between manufacturers operating on market and EU. Finally, the paper presents the limits and possibilities for Eco-design of industrial products and manufacturing industry.

  2. Production and regulation of lignin degrading enzymes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of mycelia extension and enhanced enzyme production has biotechnological applications in wood and pulp, textile and tanning, as well as in oil industries. Key words: Basidiomycetes, Lentinus squarrosulus, Psathyrella atroumbonata, ligninase, cofactors. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.2(11) 2003: ...

  3. Effects of growth regulator herbicide on downy brome (Bromus tectorum) seed production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research showed growth regulator herbicides, such as picloram and aminopyralid, have a sterilizing effect on Japanese brome (Bromus japonicus Thunb.) that can reduce this invasive annual grass’s seed production nearly 100%. This suggests growth regulators might be used to control invasive ...

  4. Laccases: Production, Expression Regulation, and Applications in Pharmaceutical Biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Li, Wenjuan; Ng, Tzi Bun; Deng, Xiangzhen; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2017-01-01

    Laccases are a family of copper-containing oxidases with important applications in bioremediation and other various industrial and biotechnological areas. There have been over two dozen reviews on laccases since 2010 covering various aspects of this group of versatile enzymes, from their occurrence, biochemical properties, and expression to immobilization and applications. This review is not intended to be all-encompassing; instead, we highlighted some of the latest developments in basic and applied laccase research with an emphasis on laccase-mediated bioremediation of pharmaceuticals, especially antibiotics. Pharmaceuticals are a broad class of emerging organic contaminants that are recalcitrant and prevalent. The recent surge in the relevant literature justifies a short review on the topic. Since low laccase yields in natural and genetically modified hosts constitute a bottleneck to industrial-scale applications, we also accentuated a genus of laccase-producing white-rot fungi, Cerrena , and included a discussion with regards to regulation of laccase expression.

  5. Laccases: Production, Expression Regulation, and Applications in Pharmaceutical Biodegradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laccases are a family of copper-containing oxidases with important applications in bioremediation and other various industrial and biotechnological areas. There have been over two dozen reviews on laccases since 2010 covering various aspects of this group of versatile enzymes, from their occurrence, biochemical properties, and expression to immobilization and applications. This review is not intended to be all-encompassing; instead, we highlighted some of the latest developments in basic and applied laccase research with an emphasis on laccase-mediated bioremediation of pharmaceuticals, especially antibiotics. Pharmaceuticals are a broad class of emerging organic contaminants that are recalcitrant and prevalent. The recent surge in the relevant literature justifies a short review on the topic. Since low laccase yields in natural and genetically modified hosts constitute a bottleneck to industrial-scale applications, we also accentuated a genus of laccase-producing white-rot fungi, Cerrena, and included a discussion with regards to regulation of laccase expression.

  6. Reticulophagy and Ribophagy: Regulated Degradation of Protein Production Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Cebollero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During autophagy, cytosol, protein aggregates, and organelles are sequestered into double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes and delivered to the lysosome/vacuole for breakdown and recycling of their basic components. In all eukaryotes this pathway is important for adaptation to stress conditions such as nutrient deprivation, as well as to regulate intracellular homeostasis by adjusting organelle number and clearing damaged structures. For a long time, starvation-induced autophagy has been viewed as a nonselective transport pathway; however, recent studies have revealed that autophagy is able to selectively engulf specific structures, ranging from proteins to entire organelles. In this paper, we discuss recent findings on the mechanisms and physiological implications of two selective types of autophagy: ribophagy, the specific degradation of ribosomes, and reticulophagy, the selective elimination of portions of the ER.

  7. Economic Welfare Effects of the FDA Regulation of Tobacco Products on Tobacco Growers

    OpenAIRE

    Tiller, Kelly; Feleke, Shiferaw T.; Starnes, Jane H.

    2011-01-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 (FSPTCA) became federal law on June 22, 2009, authorizing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to regulate the manufacturing and marketing of tobacco products in the country. This study examines the potential economic welfare implications for tobacco farms using the Equilibrium Displacement Model. Results suggest that the FDA regulation of tobacco products could induce a significant fall in domestic cigarette sales, leading ...

  8. Robo signaling regulates the production of cranial neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Tan; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Guang; Chuai, Manli; Münsterberg, Andrea; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-12-01

    Slit/Robo signaling plays an important role in the guidance of developing neurons in developing embryos. However, it remains obscure whether and how Slit/Robo signaling is involved in the production of cranial neural crest cells. In this study, we examined Robo1 deficient mice to reveal developmental defects of mouse cranial frontal and parietal bones, which are derivatives of cranial neural crest cells. Therefore, we determined the production of HNK1 + cranial neural crest cells in early chick embryo development after knock-down (KD) of Robo1 expression. Detection of markers for pre-migratory and migratory neural crest cells, PAX7 and AP-2α, showed that production of both was affected by Robo1 KD. In addition, we found that the transcription factor slug is responsible for the aberrant delamination/EMT of cranial neural crest cells induced by Robo1 KD, which also led to elevated expression of E- and N-Cadherin. N-Cadherin expression was enhanced when blocking FGF signaling with dominant-negative FGFR1 in half of the neural tube. Taken together, we show that Slit/Robo signaling influences the delamination/EMT of cranial neural crest cells, which is required for cranial bone development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Implications of environmental regulations on refinery product specification, operation and investment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    During the 1980s, refiners mainly in OECD countries were occupied with improving their refinery configurations for producing high-value light products which would not only satisfy the product demand slate but also meet the increasingly restrictive environmental regulations. In the 1990s refiners will continue to be challenged to improve the world's air quality not only by producing products that minimize emissions of toxic and hazardous hydrocarbons, but also through the refinery operation itself by investment in upgrading the industry and products to cope with the constant flow of new regulations. These investments will not only be limited to consuming centres but will also be extended to cover exporting refineries as well due to competition of acquiring market shares for product exports. The additional cost will be directly related to product quality and site regulations and will vary from one country to the other. This paper deals mainly with the air pollution and the impact of related environmental issues on the refining industry. Environmental regulations for refinery products in the USA and Europe are examined and international regulations for the tanker industry are noted. (author)

  10. Regulation of Adrenal Aldosterone Production by Serine Protease Prostasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Ko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A serine protease prostasin has been demonstrated to have a pivotal role in the activation of the epithelial sodium channel. Systemic administration of adenovirus carrying human prostasin gene in rats resulted in an increase in plasma prostasin and aldosterone levels. However, the mechanism by which the elevation of prostasin levels in the systemic circulation stimulated the plasma aldosterone levels remains unknown. Therefore, we examined if prostasin increases the aldosterone synthesis in a human adrenocortical cell line (H295R cells. Luciferase assay using CYP11B2 promoter revealed that prostasin significantly increased the transcriptional activity of CYP11B2. Prostasin significantly increased both CYP11B2 mRNA expression and aldosterone production in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, treatment with camostat mesilate, a potent prostasin inhibitor, had no effect on the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin and also a protease-dead mutant of prostasin significantly stimulated the aldosterone production. A T-type/L-type calcium channel blocker and a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor significantly reduced the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin. Our findings suggest a stimulatory effect of prostasin on the aldosterone synthesis by adrenal gland through the nonproteolytic action and indicate a new role of prostasin in the systemic circulation.

  11. The importance of product definitions in US e-cigarette laws and regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Lauren K; Grana, Rachel; Glantz, Stanton A

    2016-04-01

    How electronic cigarettes and similar products (e-cigarettes) are defined affects how they are regulated, particularly whether existing laws for cigarettes apply, including sales and marketing, youth access, smoke-free and taxation laws. We examined the text of 46 bills that define e-cigarettes enacted in 40 states and characterised how e-cigarettes and similar products were defined. States enact laws creating new product categories for e-cigarettes separate from the 'tobacco product' category (eg, 'alternative nicotine product,' 'vapour product,' 'electronic nicotine device'), with four states explicitly excluding e-cigarettes from 'tobacco products.' Twenty-eight states do not include e-cigarettes in their definitions of 'tobacco products' or 'smoking,' eight include e-cigarettes as 'tobacco products,' three include e-cigarettes in 'smoking.' Sixteen states' definitions of e-cigarettes require nicotine, and five states pre-empt more stringent local laws. Tobacco and e-cigarette industry representatives tried to shape laws that benefit their interests. Definitions separating e-cigarettes from other tobacco products are common. Similar to past 'Trojan horse' policies, e-cigarette policies that initially appear to restrict sales (eg, limit youth access) may actually undermine regulation if they establish local pre-emption or create definitions that divide e-cigarettes from other tobacco products. Comparable issues are raised by the European Union Tobacco Products Directive and e-cigarette regulations in other countries. Policymakers should carefully draft legislation with definitions of e-cigarettes that broadly define the products, do not require nicotine or tobacco, do not pre-empt stronger regulations and explicitly include e-cigarettes in smoke-free and taxation laws. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. The professionalization of Western herbalists: response to new product regulations in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Karen; Boon, Heather; Ballantyne, Peri; Kachan, Natasha

    2007-12-01

    New Canadian Natural Health Products regulations (NHP regulations) came into law January 1st, 2004 and will be implemented over 6 years. These regulations have the potential to impact a variety of stakeholders, in particular complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners. In this article, we document Canadian Western herbalist leaders' responses to the new regulations, so as to provide insight into how new healthcare policy serves as a stimulus for the organization of an emerging healthcare profession. The data are derived from key informant interviews with Western herbalist leaders in Canada (n=9). The NHP regulations include "good manufacturing practices" and Western herbalist leaders are concerned that many small companies, often owned and run by Western herbalists, will find the regulations too costly to implement, causing them to reduce the number and diversity of products they manufacture, or go out of business all together. Furthermore, lack of availability of whole plant products could severely restrict the practice of Canadian Western herbalists. In response to this challenge, herbalists are attempting to (i) organize as a more cohesive group, (ii) define their unique body of knowledge and (iii) increase the perceived legitimacy of their practices in the eyes of the public, conventional healthcare practitioners, and regulators, in an attempt to protect their unique practices. An examination of the findings reveals the extent to which external factors (i.e., the new NHP regulations) both provoke and shape the professionalization of this group of healthcare practitioners.

  13. Endothelin Regulates Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Production of Inflammatory Cytokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Yeon Son

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a very common oral inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of supporting connective and osseous tissues of the teeth. Although the exact etiology is still unclear, Gram-negative bacteria, especially Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival pockets are thought to be one of the major etiologic agents of periodontitis. Endothelin (ET is a family of three 21-amino acid peptides, ET-1, -2, and -3, that activate G protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB. Endothelin is involved in the occurrence and progression of various inflammatory diseases. Previous reports have shown that ET-1 and its receptors, ETA and ETB are expressed in the periodontal tissues and, that ET-1 levels in gingival crevicular fluid are increased in periodontitis patients. Moreover, P. gingivalis infection has been shown to induce the production of ET-1 along with other inflammatory cytokines. Despite these studies, however, the functional significance of endothelin in periodontitis is still largely unknown. In this study, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms of ET-1 action in periodontitis using human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs. ET-1 and ETA, but not ETB, were abundantly expressed in HGECs. Stimulation of HGECs with P. gingivalis or P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide increased the expression of ET-1 and ETA suggesting the activation of the endothelin signaling pathway. Production of inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, TNFα, and IL-6, was significantly enhanced by exogenous ET-1 treatment, and this effect depended on the mitogen-activated protein kinases via intracellular Ca2+ increase, which resulted from the activation of the phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway. The inhibition of the endothelin receptor-mediated signaling pathway with the dual receptor inhibitor, bosentan, partially ameliorated alveolar bone loss and immune cell infiltration. These results suggest that endothelin plays an important role in P. gingivalis

  14. Scientific problems in the regulation of red blood cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, John R

    2012-08-01

    For the past 30 years, red blood cell (RBC) storage systems have been licensed in the United States based on the demonstration that 24-hour in vivo recovery was greater than 75% and hemolysis was less than 1%. Now additional requirements for storage system licensure have being added. The meaning and value of these new requirements have been questioned. The literature regarding the performance of present and suggested new tests for RBC licensure was reviewed. (51) Cr 24-hr in vivo recovery has an intrinsic 4% error of measurement whereas the error in measures of hemolysis is less than 0.1%. Both measures have large donor-dependent end-of-storage variability; nevertheless, they have successfully guided RBC storage system development for six decades. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate are difficult to measure accurately and international shared-sample studies suggest 6 and 11% coefficients of variation across laboratories. There is no readily available way to measure the oxygen equilibrium curve accurately. The new failure criteria provide no useful information and randomly fail good products. Attempts to expand the useful regulatory requirements for RBC storage system licensure are limited by poor understanding of the storage lesion and its effect of RBC performance. Measures of (51) Cr 24-hour in vivo recovery remain critical and resources for this measure are limiting. The interaction between limited testing resources and large donor variability remains a major limit on RBC storage system development. It is important that new required tests contribute meaningful information and not make development and licensure of better products more difficult. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Encountering Challenges with the EU Regulation on Advance Therapy Medical Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-12-01

    This article aims at analysing how well the Advanced Therapy Medical Product Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 (ATMP Regulation) meets the needs of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMES), academia and public tissue establishments developing advanced therapy medical products (ATMPS). Benefits and shortcomings of the ATMP Regulation are identified, and possible amendments are proposed to accelerate the translation of research into advanced therapies and to facilitate the commercialisation of ATMPS whilst ensuring safety. It was set up as a lex specialis to ensure the free movement of ATMPS within the EU in order to facilitate their access to the internal market and to foster the competitiveness of European pharmaceutical companies, while guaranteeing the highest level protection of public health. Since the adoption of the ATMP Regulation in late 2008, only 5 ATMPS have been granted marketing authorisations thus far. Hence, there is a need to analyse whether the ATMP Regulation meets its objectives.

  16. Management practices in Australasian ethical investment products: a role for regulation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haigh, Matthew; Guthrie, James

    2010-01-01

    This paper adds to the literatures on socially responsible investment (SRI), investment management, regulation of financial services and social accounting by providing a comprehensive survey of investment methods used in SRI products and regulated social reporting in financial services. Australian...... and New Zealand regulations require issuers of self-declarative SRI products to provide details on methods used in portfolio construction. Regulators' objectives to standardize the reporting of portfolio construction and thus improve its comparability were identified by examination of parliamentary...... debates and other public reports. Portfolio construction styles of 86 SRI products managed by 63 financial institutions in Australia and New Zealand were chosen for analysis. Statistical analysis was conducted to identify associations between styles, construction methods and assessment techniques over...

  17. Attitudes towards tobacco product regulations and their relationship with the tobacco control policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidón-Moyano, Cristina; Sampedro-Vida, Marc; Matilla-Santander, Nuria; Martín-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; González-Marrón, Adrián; Bunch, Kailey; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M

    2018-02-21

    The objective of this work is to describe the acceptability of some tobacco products regulations and to explore their relation with tobacco control legislation levels in Europe. We used data on tobacco control activities in Europe in 2007, 2010 and 2013 measured by the Tobacco Control Scale (TCS) and data regarding attitudes about tobacco control regulations (i.e. adding picture health warnings on all packages of tobacco products or increasing taxes on tobacco products) from the Special Eurobarometer of 2009, 2012 and 2014 (n = 80,831). We calculated the prevalence ratio of favorable attitudes towards tobacco products restrictions in the reference year 2009 vs. the most current year (i.e. 2009 vs 2014), and the effect of previous TCS scores on the attitudes towards tobacco products regulations adjusted for sociodemographic variables. Strong support for the studied tobacco products regulations, which modestly increased over time, was observed. A positive relation was generally observed between TCS scores and support for the studied tobacco products regulations at both the ecological and individual level. A positive correlation was found between TCS scores and support for increasing taxes on tobacco products (r sp :0.29; 95%CI: 0.10, 0.48) at the ecological level, while at the individual level, the positive association was more remarkable in the case of support for adding large health warning labels to packaging. In conclusion, support for the studied tobacco products regulations were positively related with European tobacco control levels of implementation both at the ecological and individual level. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CdtR Regulates TcdA and TcdB Production in Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley A Lyon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a global health burden and the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea worldwide, causing severe gastrointestinal disease and death. Three well characterised toxins are encoded by this bacterium in two genetic loci, specifically, TcdB (toxin B and TcdA (toxin A in the Pathogenicity Locus (PaLoc and binary toxin (CDT in the genomically distinct CDT locus (CdtLoc. Toxin production is controlled by regulators specific to each locus. The orphan response regulator, CdtR, encoded within the CdtLoc, up-regulates CDT production. Until now there has been no suggestion that CdtR influences TcdA and TcdB production since it is not carried by all PaLoc-containing strains and CdtLoc is not linked genetically to PaLoc. Here we show that, in addition to CDT, CdtR regulates TcdA and TcdB production but that this effect is strain dependent. Of clinical relevance, CdtR increased the production of TcdA, TcdB and CDT in two epidemic ribotype 027 human strains, modulating their virulence in a mouse infection model. Strains traditionally from animal lineages, notably ribotype 078 strains, are increasingly being isolated from humans and their genetic and phenotypic analysis is critical for future studies on this important pathogen. Here we show that CdtR-mediated toxin regulation did not occur in other strain backgrounds, including a ribotype 078 animal strain. The finding that toxin gene regulation is strain dependent highlights the regulatory diversity between C. difficile isolates and the importance of studying virulence regulation in diverse lineages and clinically relevant strains. Our work provides the first evidence that TcdA, TcdB and CDT production is linked by a common regulatory mechanism and that CdtR may act as a global regulator of virulence in epidemic 027 strains.

  19. Layered dynamic regulation for improving metabolic pathway productivity inEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doong, Stephanie J; Gupta, Apoorv; Prather, Kristala L J

    2018-03-20

    Microbial production of value-added chemicals from biomass is a sustainable alternative to chemical synthesis. To improve product titer, yield, and selectivity, the pathways engineered into microbes must be optimized. One strategy for optimization is dynamic pathway regulation, which modulates expression of pathway-relevant enzymes over the course of fermentation. Metabolic engineers have used dynamic regulation to redirect endogenous flux toward product formation, balance the production and consumption rates of key intermediates, and suppress production of toxic intermediates until later in the fermentation. Most cases, however, have utilized a single strategy for dynamically regulating pathway fluxes. Here we layer two orthogonal, autonomous, and tunable dynamic regulation strategies to independently modulate expression of two different enzymes to improve production of D-glucaric acid from a heterologous pathway. The first strategy uses a previously described pathway-independent quorum sensing system to dynamically knock down glycolytic flux and redirect carbon into production of glucaric acid, thereby switching cells from "growth" to "production" mode. The second strategy, developed in this work, uses a biosensor for myo -inositol (MI), an intermediate in the glucaric acid production pathway, to induce expression of a downstream enzyme upon sufficient buildup of MI. The latter, pathway-dependent strategy leads to a 2.5-fold increase in titer when used in isolation and a fourfold increase when added to a strain employing the former, pathway-independent regulatory system. The dual-regulation strain produces nearly 2 g/L glucaric acid, representing the highest glucaric acid titer reported to date in Escherichia coli K-12 strains.

  20. Regulating access of oil production and refining objects to pipeline networks: Russian and German experience

    OpenAIRE

    GULIYEV I.; LITVINYUK I.; ZINCHENKO O.

    2016-01-01

    In Russia the right to access oil and oil product pipeline networks is governed by a vast number of laws and subordinate legislation. On one hand, this imperative method is justified in order to ensure indiscriminate access to pipelines. On the other hand, international practices show that these objectives can also be achieved using a permissive legal regulation method more broadly. Therefore it is pertinent to analyze and compare the practice of pipeline access regulation in different states...

  1. The feed-back regulation of erythropoietin production in healthy humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The proposed oxygen-dependent feed-back loop regulation of EPO (erythropoietin) production is mainly supported by data from studies in animals and cell cultures. The feed-back loop and its dependence on oxygen was therefore challenged by studies in healthy humans: Exposure of humans to different levels of acute and continued altitude hypobaria provided evidence for an oxygen dependence of the EPO response. This response is consistent with the proposed feed-back loop regulation of EPO production; Exposure to continued altitude hypobaria demonstrated that the decline in human EPO production is initiated before an EPO-induced erythopoiesis is detectable, and that this decline is related to a concomitant decrease in the haemoglobin-oxygen affinity. Contrary to the feed-back loop, this time-relation indicate that the feed-back regulation of EPO production during continued hypobaric hypoxia is exerted primarily through a decrease in the haemoglobin-oxygen affinity, rather than by the effects of an EPO-stimulated erythropoiesis; Increased circulating levels of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 was found in healthy humans during four days of altitude exposure as compared with sea level. The other proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta, and TNF alpha remained unchanged, and the increased serum IL-6 did not induce production of c-reactive protein; Comparable circadian variations in human EPO production were shown in sedentary subjects, athletes, and healthy but hypoxaemic subjects. Human EPO production could not be triggered by one hour of high-intensity exercise, whereas longitudinal changes in exercise showed a trend of relation between human EPO production, serum concentration of free testosterone, and indices of body composition. These results have demonstrated and endogenous, probably hormonal, and oxygen-independent regulation of human EPO production, which is at variance with the oxygen dependent feed-back loop regulation of EPO production. Conclusively, the present

  2. DMPD: The atrial natriuretic peptide regulates the production of inflammatorymediators in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11890659 The atrial natriuretic peptide regulates the production of inflammatorymed...tml) (.csml) Show The atrial natriuretic peptide regulates the production of inflammatorymediators in macrop...hages. PubmedID 11890659 Title The atrial natriuretic peptide regulates the produ

  3. Multihormonal regulation of thyroglobulin production by the OVNIS 6H thyroid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1988-02-01

    The hormonal regulation of thyroglobulin production has been studied using a clone of the ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 6H. 3 among the 6 hormones proposed for serum replacement are required for an optimal thyroglobulin production; insulin, hydrocortisone and thyrotropin. Insulin alone stimulates thyroglobulin production. The presence of insulin is also required to observe hydrocortisone and TSH stimulations. Newborn calf serum inhibits thyroglobulin production. The best conditions for optimal thyroglobulin expression and TSH responsiveness are obtained in serum-free medium supplemented with 5 micrograms/ml insulin, 100 nM hydrocortisone and 1 mU/ml TSH.

  4. Smokers' reactions to FDA regulation of tobacco products: findings from the 2009 ITC United States survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Brian V; O'Connor, Richard J; Fong, Geoffrey T; Borland, Ron; Cummings, K M; Hyland, Andrew

    2011-12-16

    On June 22, 2009, the US FDA was granted the authority to regulate tobacco products through the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA). The intent is to improve public health through regulations on tobacco product marketing and tobacco products themselves. This manuscript reports baseline data on smokers' attitudes and beliefs on specific issues relevant to the FSPTCA. Between November 2009 and January 2010, a telephone survey among a nationally representative sample of n = 678 smokers in the US was performed as part of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) United States Survey. Participants answered a battery of questions on their attitudes and beliefs about aspects of the FSPTCA. Most smokers were unaware of the new FDA tobacco regulations. Smokers indicated support for banning cigarette promotion and nearly a quarter supported requiring tobacco companies to sell cigarettes in plain packaging. Seventy two percent of smokers supported reducing nicotine levels to make cigarettes less addictive if nicotine was made easily available in non-cigarette form. Most smokers were limited in their understanding of efforts to regulate tobacco products in general. Smokers were supportive of efforts to better inform the public about health risks, restrict advertising, and make tobacco products less addictive.

  5. Smokers' reactions to FDA regulation of tobacco products: Findings from the 2009 ITC United States survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fix Brian V

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On June 22, 2009, the US FDA was granted the authority to regulate tobacco products through the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA. The intent is to improve public health through regulations on tobacco product marketing and tobacco products themselves. This manuscript reports baseline data on smokers' attitudes and beliefs on specific issues relevant to the FSPTCA. Method Between November 2009 and January 2010, a telephone survey among a nationally representative sample of n = 678 smokers in the US was performed as part of the International Tobacco Control (ITC United States Survey. Participants answered a battery of questions on their attitudes and beliefs about aspects of the FSPTCA. Results Most smokers were unaware of the new FDA tobacco regulations. Smokers indicated support for banning cigarette promotion and nearly a quarter supported requiring tobacco companies to sell cigarettes in plain packaging. Seventy two percent of smokers supported reducing nicotine levels to make cigarettes less addictive if nicotine was made easily available in non-cigarette form. Conclusion Most smokers were limited in their understanding of efforts to regulate tobacco products in general. Smokers were supportive of efforts to better inform the public about health risks, restrict advertising, and make tobacco products less addictive.

  6. A CRE1- regulated cluster is responsible for light dependent production of dihydrotrichotetronin in Trichoderma reesei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Alonso Monroy

    Full Text Available Changing light conditions, caused by the rotation of earth resulting in day and night or growth on the surface or within a substrate, result in considerably altered physiological processes in fungi. For the biotechnological workhorse Trichoderma reesei, regulation of glycoside hydrolase gene expression, especially cellulase expression was shown to be a target of light dependent gene regulation. Analysis of regulatory targets of the carbon catabolite repressor CRE1 under cellulase inducing conditions revealed a secondary metabolite cluster to be differentially regulated in light and darkness and by photoreceptors. We found that this cluster is involved in production of trichodimerol and that the two polyketide synthases of the cluster are essential for biosynthesis of dihydrotrichotetronine (syn. bislongiquinolide or bisorbibutenolide. Additionally, an indirect influence on production of the peptaibol antibiotic paracelsin was observed. The two polyketide synthetase genes as well as the monooxygenase gene of the cluster were found to be connected at the level of transcription in a positive feedback cycle in darkness, but negative feedback in light, indicating a cellular sensing and response mechanism for the products of these enzymes. The transcription factor TR_102497/YPR2 residing within the cluster regulates the cluster genes in a light dependent manner. Additionally, an interrelationship of this cluster with regulation of cellulase gene expression was detected. Hence the regulatory connection between primary and secondary metabolism appears more widespread than previously assumed, indicating a sophisticated distribution of resources either to degradation of substrate (feed or to antagonism of competitors (fight, which is influenced by light.

  7. A Human Variant of Glucose-Regulated Protein 94 That Inefficiently Supports IGF Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal; Hawkes, Colin P; Eletto, Davide

    2016-01-01

    IGFs are critical for normal intrauterine and childhood growth and sustaining health throughout life. We showed previously that the production of IGF-1 and IGF-2 requires interaction with the chaperone glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) and that the amount of secreted IGFs is proportional to th...

  8. Regulation of tattoo ink production and the tattoo business in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, I M; Laumann, S L; Laumann, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    The production of tattoo ink and pigments in the US is unregulated. There are no guidelines or standards issued by national agencies. However, the practice of tattooing is regulated at the state and local levels but varies widely. Adverse events are addressed when a problem is reported. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Regulating Tobacco Product Advertising and Promotions in the Retail Environment: A Roadmap for States and Localities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Tamara; Hoefges, Michael; Ribisl, Kurt M

    2015-01-01

    Recent amendments to federal law and a burgeoning body of research have intensified public health officials' interest in reducing youth initiation of tobacco use, including by regulating the time, place, or manner of tobacco product advertising at the point of sale. This article analyzes legal obstacles to various strategies for reducing youth initiation. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  10. Tools Related to the Federal Tobacco Products Regulations: What Retailers Need to Know PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-16

    PSA to announce a new mobile text message program that will help raise retailers' awareness of the new federal tobacco regulations.  Created: 9/16/2010 by The CDC Division of News and Electronic Media and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products.   Date Released: 9/16/2010.

  11. Regulation of acidity and reduction of turbidity in the clarified pomegranate juice production

    OpenAIRE

    ESHMATOV FOZIL KHIDIROVICH; MAKSUMOVA DILRABO KUCHKAROVNA; DODAEVA LAYLO KUCHKAROVNA

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of acidity and reduction of turbidity in the clarified pomegranate juice production. From sour varieties of pomegranates may obtain normal natural pomegranate juice by anion-exchange resin. There are determined problems quantity of precipitate and unstable color in the pomegranate juice and concentrate by experimentally.

  12. Mucosal Immune Regulation in Intestinal Disease. The role of bacterial products, food components and drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol-Schoenmakers, M.

    2009-01-01

    The challenge of the mucosal gut associated immune system is to remain unresponsive to food products and commensal microbiota, while mounting an appropriate immune response towards pathogens. This implicates the necessity of tight immune regulation within the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT).

  13. 76 FR 32843 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Fire-Resistant Fiber for Production of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Fire-Resistant Fiber for Production of Military Uniforms (DFARS... of the use of fire-resistant rayon fiber in solicitations issued before January 1, 2015. DATES.... [cir] E-mail: [email protected] . Include DFARS Case 2011-D021 in the subject line of the message. [cir...

  14. Regulation of M-CSF production by cultured human thymic epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galy, A. H.; Spits, H.; Hamilton, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the regulation of M-CSF production by human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) in a continuing effort to better understand the contribution of TEC to the intrathymic cytokine network. The levels of M-CSF were measured by radioimmunoassay. Five different TEC cultures were studied and we

  15. CRISPRi mediated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase regulation to enhance the production of lipid in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Pei-Hsun; Ng, I-Son

    2017-12-01

    In this study, CRISPRi (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference) was used for the first time to regulate expression of exogenously supplied rfp gene as a proof-of-concept, and endogenous PEPC1 gene as a proof-of-function in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The efficiency of 94% and stability of 7 generations via CRISPRi mediated gene regulation in C. reinhardtii have been demonstrated by RFP. Gene PEPC1 encoding proteins are essential for controlling the carbon flux that enters the TCA cycle and plays a crucial role in carbon partitioning of substrates in competition with lipid synthesis. All CrPEPC1 down-regulated strains have lower chlorophyll color, but higher biomass concentration and lipid accumulation rate. The present results revealed that CRISPRi based transcriptional silencing was applicable in C. reinhardtii and expanded the way to improve the yield, titer and productivity of microalgae-based products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Monitoring of transcriptional regulation in Pichia pastoris under protein production conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Anamitra

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become evident that host cells react to recombinant protein production with a variety of metabolic and intrinsic stresses such as the unfolded protein response (UPR pathway. Additionally, environmental conditions such as growth temperature may have a strong impact on cell physiology and specific productivity. However, there is little information about the molecular reactions of the host cells on a genomic level, especially in context to recombinant protein secretion. For the first time, we monitored transcriptional regulation of a subset of marker genes in the common production host Pichia pastoris to gain insights into the general physiological status of the cells under protein production conditions, with the main focus on secretion stress related genes. Results Overexpression of the UPR activating transcription factor Hac1p was employed to identify UPR target genes in P. pastoris and the responses were compared to those known for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most of the folding/secretion related genes showed similar regulation patterns in both yeasts, whereas genes associated with the general stress response were differentially regulated. Secretion of an antibody Fab fragment led to induction of UPR target genes in P. pastoris, however not to the same magnitude as Hac1p overproduction. Overexpression of S. cerevisiae protein disulfide isomerase (PDI1 enhances Fab secretion rates 1.9 fold, but did not relief UPR stress. Reduction of cultivation temperature from 25°C to 20°C led to a 1.4-fold increase of specific product secretion rate in chemostat cultivations, although the transcriptional levels of the product genes (Fab light and heavy chain were significantly reduced at the lower temperature. A subset of folding related genes appeared to be down-regulated at the reduced temperature, whereas transcription of components of the ER associated degradation and the secretory transport was enhanced. Conclusion Monitoring of

  17. Dynamic regulation of fatty acid pools for improved production of fatty alcohols in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teixeira, Paulo Goncalves; Ferreira, Raphael; Zhou, Yongjin J.

    2017-01-01

    loss of precursors that compromises the process yield. In the present study, we aimed for dynamic expression of the fatty acyl-CoA synthetase gene FAA1 to regulate FFA and acyl-CoA pools in order to improve fatty alcohol production yields. Results: We analyzed the metabolite dynamics of a faa1 Delta...... faa4 Delta strain constitutively expressing a carboxylic acid reductase from Mycobacterium marinum (MmCAR) and an endogenous alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh5) for in vivo production of fatty alcohols from FFAs. We observed production of fatty acids and fatty alcohols with different rates leading to high...... levels of FFAs not being converted to the final product. To address the issue, we expressed the MmCAR + Adh5 pathway together with a fatty acyl-CoA reductase from Marinobacter aquaeolei to enable fatty alcohol production simultaneously from FFA and acyl-CoA, respectively. Then, we expressed FAA1 under...

  18. Performance-based regulation: enterprise responsibility for reducing death, injury, and disease caused by consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Stephen D

    2009-12-01

    This article offers a bold new idea for confronting the staggering level of death, injury, and disease caused by five consumer products: cigarettes, alcohol, guns, junk food, and motor vehicles. Business leaders try to frame these negative outcomes as "collateral damage" that is someone else's problem. That framing not only is morally objectionable but also overlooks the possibility that, with proper prodding, industry could substantially lessen these public health disasters. I seek to reframe the public perception of who is responsible and propose to deploy a promising approach called "performance-based regulation" to combat the problem. Performance-based regulation would impose on manufacturers a legal obligation to reduce the negative social costs of their products. Rather than involving them in litigation or forcing them to operate differently (as "command-and-control" regimes do), performance-based regulation allows the firms to determine how best to decrease bad public health consequences. Like other public health strategies, performance-based regulation focuses on those who are far more likely than individual consumers to achieve real gains. Analogous to a tax on causing harm that exceeds a threshold level, performance-based regulation seeks to harness private initiative in pursuit of the public good.

  19. The FDA may not regulate tobacco products as "drugs" or as "medical devices".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, R A

    1998-04-01

    Professor Richard Merrill contends that the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act does not grant the FDA regulatory authority over cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products. The fact that Congress did not expressly deny the FDA regulatory authority over tobacco cannot, Professor Merrill argues, be used to infer such authority. This inference is particularly inappropriate in the case of tobacco regulation, he maintains, because there is compelling evidence that Congress had no intention of delegating this authority to the FDA. He is unpersuaded that presidential approval legally sanctions the FDA's claim of authority by granting it a superficial political legitimacy. Finally, he reminds us of the FDA's own repeated denials of jurisdiction over tobacco products, and he recalls the numerous times that Congress passed legislation directed at tobacco without granting the FDA any role in its regulation. Professor Merrill's Essay, like the other pieces in this volume, was written after the United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina decided Coyne Beahm v. FDA, but before a three judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit reversed that decision in Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. v. FDA. In Coyne Beahm, the District Court held that the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act authorized the FDA to regulate tobacco products, but not tobacco advertising. The Fourth Circuit rejected the District Court's jurisdictional ruling and invalidated the FDA's regulations in their entirety. The Clinton Administration has since requested an en banc rehearing before the Fourth Circuit.

  20. Levelling the Playing Field: the FDA's Regulation of Nicotine Dependence Products

    OpenAIRE

    Szubin, Adam J.

    1999-01-01

    There is a great need for the increased development and use of nicotine dependence products (NDPs) in this country. A creative regulatory approach, such as the FDA brought to tobacco regulation, could do an enormous amount of good. In the field of NDPs, as in every area of drug regulation, a new regulatory approach will bring with it costs and benefits. As our knowledge advances, the FDA should not be slow to adopt the same aggressive yet flexible approach to NDPs that it has adopted towards ...

  1. A mathematical model of quorum sensing regulated EPS production in biofilm communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Biofilms are microbial communities encased in a layer of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The EPS matrix provides several functional purposes for the biofilm, such as protecting bacteria from environmental stresses, and providing mechanical stability. Quorum sensing is a cell-cell communication mechanism used by several bacterial taxa to coordinate gene expression and behaviour in groups, based on population densities. Model We mathematically model quorum sensing and EPS production in a growing biofilm under various environmental conditions, to study how a developing biofilm impacts quorum sensing, and conversely, how a biofilm is affected by quorum sensing-regulated EPS production. We investigate circumstances when using quorum-sensing regulated EPS production is a beneficial strategy for biofilm cells. Results We find that biofilms that use quorum sensing to induce increased EPS production do not obtain the high cell populations of low-EPS producers, but can rapidly increase their volume to parallel high-EPS producers. Quorum sensing-induced EPS production allows a biofilm to switch behaviours, from a colonization mode (with an optimized growth rate), to a protection mode. Conclusions A biofilm will benefit from using quorum sensing-induced EPS production if bacteria cells have the objective of acquiring a thick, protective layer of EPS, or if they wish to clog their environment with biomass as a means of securing nutrient supply and outcompeting other colonies in the channel, of their own or a different species. PMID:21477365

  2. Bringing smart pills to market: FDA regulation of ingestible drug/device combination products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Matthew; Liu, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Imagine a pill that, after you swallow it, can track its position in your body. Or imagine a pill that can transmit a message to a doctor to tell him that you have taken your bitter medicine. Pills like this already exist. These so-called smart pills are an emerging type of medical therapy. However, this nascent technology has yet to reach the market and developers of these novel therapies face significant regulatory challenges. This article predicts how the Food and Drug Administration will regulate smart pills and shows how the current regulatory regime is inadequate. The article then proposes modifying the current regulatory regime to encourage development of smart pills and other innovative combination products by: (1) regulating combination products based on their "novel mode of action" rather than their "primary mode of action," (2) creating a marketing approval pathway specifically for combination products, and (3) eliminating regulations that require sponsors to get marketing approval from multiple centers within FDA and providing regulatory guidance specifically for ingestible drug/device combination products.

  3. A strategy for controlling the marketing of tobacco products: a regulated market model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, R

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To outline a novel strategy for controlling the tobacco market. Arguments: More comprehensive controls over the tobacco market are essential and long overdue. Effective controls need to encourage the development of less harmful products; control commercial communication to ensure that potential harms are highlighted relative to any benefits; and provide mechanisms to move consumers away from tobacco use, or at least towards less harmful alternatives. Achieving this by regulating the existing industry is one strategy. This paper puts the case for an alternative: to have marketing controlled by an agency (called here the Tobacco Products Agency, or TPA) which tendered to manufacturers for product and which distributed to retailers in ways that reduce incentives to bend or break the law. The TPA would be backed by legislation that made tobacco a controlled substance with possession sale and use only allowed as permitted by the regulations, which in reality would be only as provided by the TPA. Conclusions: The overall effect of such a model, which we call a "regulated market model", would be to eliminate most of the incentives and remaining opportunities for commercial promotion of tobacco and to create incentives to encourage the development of less harmful tobacco products. Such a model preserves the competition inherent in a free market, but directs it towards the challenge of reducing the harm from tobacco use. PMID:14660771

  4. Current Regulations for the Production of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke C M

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: In this review, the appropriate legislation on the expansion of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in Europe is described. The collection of cells and the manufacturing of MSCs are being regulated by European Directives (EUDs). Recently, the Regulation on Advanced Therapies Medicinal Products (ATMPs) is being published, which is of importance for the production of MSCs in Europe, and this legislation is not yet ready, but it is in its final stage. MSCs are currently being used in clinical trials, mostly in academic hospitals, for patients suffering from a wide variety of diseases. Companies (small and medium-sized enterprises) are becoming more and more involved in the production of MSCs for human use, and since marketing authorisation is the scope of the Regulation it was decided to install a Committee on Advanced Therapies (CAT) within European Medicines Agency (EMEA). This CAT will formulate a draft opinion on quality, safety and efficacy of ATMPs and will have an advisory and scientific role for the Committee for Medicinal Products for human use. The aim of this review is to outline the current legislation which is important for the manufacturing of MSCs.

  5. A strategy for controlling the marketing of tobacco products: a regulated market model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, R

    2003-12-01

    To outline a novel strategy for controlling the tobacco market. More comprehensive controls over the tobacco market are essential and long overdue. Effective controls need to encourage the development of less harmful products; control commercial communication to ensure that potential harms are highlighted relative to any benefits; and provide mechanisms to move consumers away from tobacco use, or at least towards less harmful alternatives. Achieving this by regulating the existing industry is one strategy. This paper puts the case for an alternative: to have marketing controlled by an agency (called here the Tobacco Products Agency, or TPA) which tendered to manufacturers for product and which distributed to retailers in ways that reduce incentives to bend or break the law. The TPA would be backed by legislation that made tobacco a controlled substance with possession sale and use only allowed as permitted by the regulations, which in reality would be only as provided by the TPA. The overall effect of such a model, which we call a "regulated market model", would be to eliminate most of the incentives and remaining opportunities for commercial promotion of tobacco and to create incentives to encourage the development of less harmful tobacco products. Such a model preserves the competition inherent in a free market, but directs it towards the challenge of reducing the harm from tobacco use.

  6. Basic Substances under EU Pesticide Regulation: An Opportunity for Organic Production?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice A. Marchand

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Some of the active substances allowed in organic production are now approved as basic sub- stances under the EU plant protection products regulation. Previously, all organic farming permitted active substances were approved as conventional plant protection products. In accordance with the criteria of Article 23 of the EU regulation (EC No 1107/2009, basic substances are granted without maximum residue limits and have a good prospect for being included in Annex II of organic farming Regulation (EC 889/2008. In fact, most of them are already permitted in organic farming. At this stage, it seems desirable to organize applications in order to avoid duplications and to clarify strategy across Europe. This organization should be planned in order to identify corresponding knowledge and data from field experiments, and to further constitute the most crucial issues related to organic production. A work of this nature was initially supported by IFOAM-EU for lecithin, calcium hydroxide and Quassia extract. The Institut Technique de l’Agriculture Biologique (ITAB was previously engaged in a large-scale approval plan motivated by the continuous demand for the regularization of compounds/substances already in use and has a mandate for testing and approving new compatible substances. Thus, the horsetail extract (Equisetum arvense was the first approved basic substance and ITAB has obtained 11 of the 15 basic substances approved at the EU level.

  7. FEATURES OF THE STATE REGULATION OF THE PRODUCTION OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED PRODUCTS IN THE WORLD AND IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Bashuk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to investigate the regulation of the use, consumption, and trade of genetically modified organisms in different countries of the world, as well as in Ukraine. The definition of international approaches to risk assessment of genetically modified products is of particular importance for international trade. Methodology. The study is based on data from different sources, beginning with the first mention of genetically modified organisms, ending with the latest received data from different countries. Purpose. Show how different countries refer differently to the production of genetically modified products, differently perceive it and are guided by different principles. Find ways to solve the problems associated with the introduction of GMOs in Ukraine and compare them with other countries. Results. The study showed that developed countries have developed clear rules for the production, labelling, consumption, and trade of products containing GMOs. Also, the bodies and structures responsible for compliance with all these rules are defined and a large number of legislative acts has been adopted, which cannot be said of Ukraine. In Ukraine, this is a large gap because “on paper” also seems that there are some rules according to GMOs but they are not clear, consistent, and they are not followed due to their observance, as these powers are entrusted to a large number of structures. Due to imperfect legislation and lack of funds, products that are imported are not tested for GMOs content, there are no studies on the safety of their consumption and cultivation, the reliability of information on labels is not followed. Practical implications. In Ukraine, in order to ensure the proper level of state regulation, protection, and use of genetically modified products obtained with the help of modern biotechnologies, it is necessary to adhere strictly to the fulfilment of the main criteria: 1 adoption and further improvement of

  8. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  9. AmyR is a novel negative regulator of amylovoran production in Erwinia amylovora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongping Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we attempted to understand the role of an orphan gene amyR in Erwinia amylovora, a functionally conserved ortholog of ybjN in Escherichia coli, which has recently been characterized. Amylovoran, a high molecular weight acidic heteropolymer exopolysaccharide, is a virulent factor of E. amylovora. As reported earlier, amylovoran production in an amyR knockout mutant was about eight-fold higher than that in the wild type (WT strain of E. amylovora. When a multicopy plasmid containing the amyR gene was introduced into the amyR mutant or WT strains, amylovoran production was strongly inhibited. Furthermore, amylovoran production was also suppressed in various amylovoran-over-producing mutants, such as grrSA containing multicopies of the amyR gene. Consistent with amylovoran production, an inverse correlation was observed between in vitro expression of amyR and that of amylovoran biosynthetic genes. However, both the amyR knockout mutant and over-expression strains showed reduced levan production, another exopolysaccharide produced by E. amylovora. Virulence assays demonstrated that while the amyR mutant was capable of inducing slightly greater disease severity than that of the WT strain, strains over-expressing the amyR gene did not incite disease on apple shoots or leaves, and only caused reduced disease on immature pear fruits. Microarray studies revealed that amylovoran biosynthesis and related membrane protein-encoding genes were highly expressed in the amyR mutant, but down-regulated in the amyR over-expression strains in vitro. Down-regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis genes in the amyR over-expression strain partially explained why over-expression of amyR led to non-pathogenic or reduced virulence in vivo. These results suggest that AmyR plays an important role in regulating exopolysaccharide production, and thus virulence in E. amylovora.

  10. World integrated medicine forum on the regulation of homoeopathic medicinal products: National and global strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harleen Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The first World Integrated Medicine Forum on the regulation of homoeopathic medicinal products included 50 delegates from 25 countries to discuss the current state of regulation of homoeopathic medicinal products (HMPs. The stakeholders in attendance included government officials, manufacturers, pharmacopoeia organisations, pharmacists, and healthcare providers worldwide. The Minister of Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy from India, who is likely the only high ranking national official in the world specifically dedicated to oversight of traditional medicines including Homoeopathy, was the keynote speaker for the meeting. The core presentations delivered information on the country-to-country variance in regulatory requirements for homoeopathic medicine manufacture and marketing. Different speakers addressed the current pharmacopeia structures in various countries, variance in premarket approval process, regulatory frameworks for homoeopathic medicines, labelling requirements, safety requirements, marketing approaches and good manufacturing practices. Debates focused on quality control testing, stability of intermediate stocks, shelf life of finished products, pre-market approval process and labelling and they shed light on regional differences in regulation. A lengthy discussion was held on the potential value of harmonisation of pharmacopoeias, manufacturing standards, safety evaluation and labelling. The group consensus was to meet again to pursue specific topics. Daily summaries of take-away points are provided at the end of each day's talk summaries. Much acclaim was won by the organisers for materialising this unique forum which proved to be an apt platform for rigorous discussions on lesser discussed, but very vital points such as regulations of HMPs, harmonisation of pharmacopeias and linking industry and regulators' sectors for unified efforts for global development of Homoeopathy.

  11. Asexual sporulation signalling regulates autolysis of Aspergillus nidulans via modulating the chitinase ChiB production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pócsi, I; Leiter, E; Kwon, N-J; Shin, K-S; Kwon, G-S; Pusztahelyi, T; Emri, T; Abuknesha, R A; Price, R G; Yu, J-H

    2009-08-01

    Elucidation of the regulation of ChiB production in Aspergillus nidulans. Mutational inactivation of the A. nidulans chiB gene resulted in a nonautolytic phenotype. To better understand the mechanisms controlling both developmental progression and fungal autolysis, we examined a range of autolysis-associated parameters in A. nidulans developmental and/or autolytic mutants. Investigation of disorganization of mycelial pellets, loss of biomass, extra-/intracellular chitinase activities, ChiB production and chiB mRNA levels in various cultures revealed that, in submerged cultures, initialization of autolysis and stationary phase-induced ChiB production are intimately coupled, and that both processes are controlled by the FluG-BrlA asexual sporulation regulatory pathway. ChiB production does not affect the progression of apoptotic cell death in the aging A. nidulans cultures. The endochitinase ChiB plays an important role in autolysis of A. nidulans, and its production is initiated by FluG-BrlA signalling. Despite the fact that apoptosis is an inseparable part of fungal autolysis, its regulation is independent to FluG-initiated sporulation signalling. Deletion of chiB and fluG homologues in industrial filamentous fungal strains may stabilize the hyphal structures in the autolytic phase of growth and limit the release of autolytic hydrolases into the culture medium.

  12. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  13. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégu, Teddy; Domenichini, Séverine; Blein, Thomas; Ariel, Federico; Christ, Aurélie; Kim, Soon-Kap; Crespi, Martin; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Mouille, Grégory; Bourge, Mickaël; Hirt, Heribert; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  14. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Montes de Oca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1 cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation.

  15. Regulation of advanced therapy medicinal products in Europe and the role of academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Kim F; Hildebrandt, Martin; Greinix, Hildegard; Scheding, Stefan; Koehl, Ulrike; Worel, Nina; Apperley, Jane; Edinger, Matthius; Hauser, Andrea; Mischak-Weissinger, Eva; Dickinson, Anne M; Lowdell, Mark W

    2014-03-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are gene therapy, somatic cell therapy or tissue-engineered products regulated under (EC) No. 1394/2007 to ensure their free movement within the European Union while guaranteeing the highest level of health protection for patients. Academic good manufacturing practice (GMP) centers are major contributors in the development of ATMPs and this study assessed the impact of regulations on them. European academic and non-industrial facilities (n = 747) were contacted, and a representative sample of 50 replied to a detailed questionnaire. Experienced centres were further selected in every Member State (MS) for semi-structured interviews. Indicators of ATMP production and development success were statistically assessed, and opinions about directive implementation were documented. Facilities experienced in manufacturing cell therapy transplant products are the most successful in developing ATMPs. New centres lacking this background struggle to enter the field, and there remains a shortage of facilities in academia participating in translational research. This is compounded by heterogeneous implementation of the regulations across MS. GMP facilities successfully developing ATMPs are present in all MS. However, the implementation of regulations is heterogeneous between MS, with substantial differences in the definition of ATMPs and in the approved manufacturing environment. The cost of GMP compliance is underestimated by research funding bodies. This is detrimental to development of new ATMPs and commercialization of any that are successful in early clinical trials. Academic GMP practitioners should strengthen their political visibility and contribute to the development of functional and effective European Union legislation in this field. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelko, Magdalena; Oude Lansink, Alfons; Stefanou, Spiro E

    2015-01-01

    This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 2002 (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002). The empirical application uses panel data of Spanish meat, dairy, and oils and fats industries over the period 1996-2011. The results suggest that in the oils and fats industry the impact of food regulation on dynamic productivity growth is negative initially and then positive over the long run. In contrast, the opposite pattern is observed for the meat and dairy processing industries. The results further imply that firms in the meat processing and oils and fats industries face similar impacts of food safety regulation on dynamic technical change, dynamic inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change.

  17. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelko, Magdalena; Lansink, Alfons Oude; Stefanou, Spiro E.

    2015-01-01

    This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 2002 (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002). The empirical application uses panel data of Spanish meat, dairy, and oils and fats industries over the period 1996-2011. The results suggest that in the oils and fats industry the impact of food regulation on dynamic productivity growth is negative initially and then positive over the long run. In contrast, the opposite pattern is observed for the meat and dairy processing industries. The results further imply that firms in the meat processing and oils and fats industries face similar impacts of food safety regulation on dynamic technical change, dynamic inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change. PMID:26057878

  18. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPand exemptions to the Regulation 1394/2007: how confident can we be? An exploratory analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eVan Wilder

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The market authorisation procedure for medicinal products for human use is relying on their demonstrated efficacy, safety and pharmaceutical quality. This applies to all medicinal products whether of chemical or biological origin. Since October 2009, the first advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP has been authorised through the centralized procedure. ATMPs are gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products or tissue-engineered products.An appropriate ATMP- Regulation is dealing with ATMP requirements.Two exemptions are foreseen to the ATMP-Regulation: a. Products, which were legally on the Community market when the Regulation became applicable, should comply to the Regulation by 30 December 2012. b.the hospital exemption rule for non routine products for an individual patient. In this work we explored whether the actual application of the Regulation on ATMPs is in line with the aim of the Regulation in terms of guaranteeing the highest level of health protection for patients. Based on the analysis of the relative efficacy of the only EC authorized ATMP and its exempted alternatives, there is evidence against this Regulation 1394/2007 assumption.

  19. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products and Exemptions to the Regulation 1394/2007: How Confident Can We be? An Exploratory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wilder, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The market authorization procedure for medicinal products for human use is relying on their demonstrated efficacy, safety, and pharmaceutical quality. This applies to all medicinal products whether of chemical or biological origin. Since October 2009, the first advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) has been authorized through the centralized procedure. ATMPs are gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products or tissue-engineered products. An appropriate ATMP - Regulation is dealing with ATMP requirements. Two exemptions are foreseen to the ATMP Regulation: (a) Products, which were legally on the Community market when the Regulation became applicable, should comply to the Regulation by December 30, 2012. (b) The hospital exemption rule for non-routine products for an individual patient. In this work we explored whether the actual application of the Regulation on ATMPs is in line with the aim of the Regulation in terms of guaranteeing the highest level of health protection for patients. Based on the analysis of the relative efficacy of the only EC authorized ATMP and its exempted alternatives, there is evidence against this Regulation 1394/2007 assumption.

  20. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngan, Chew Yee; Wong, Chee-Hong; Choi, Cindy; Pratap, Abhishek; Han, James; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2013-02-19

    The diminishing reserve of fossil fuels calls for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from renewable resources, including photosynthetic organisms, generating clean energy. Microalgae is one of the potential feedstock for biofuels production. It grows easily even in waste water, and poses no competition to agricultural crops for arable land. However, little is known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory mechanisms. Most studies relied on the homology to other plant model organisms, in particular Arabidopsis or through low coverage expression analysis to identify key enzymes. This limits the discovery of new components in the biosynthetic pathways, particularly the genetic regulators and effort to maximize the production efficiency of algal biofuels. Here we report an unprecedented and de novo approach to dissect the algal lipid pathways through disclosing the temporal regulations of chromatin states during lipid biosynthesis. We have generated genome wide chromatin maps in chlamydomonas genome using ChIP-seq targeting 7 histone modifications and RNA polymerase II in a time-series manner throughout conditions activating lipid biosynthesis. To our surprise, the combinatory profiles of histone codes uncovered new regulatory mechanism in gene expression in algae. Coupled with matched RNA-seq data, chromatin changes revealed potential novel regulators and candidate genes involved in the activation of lipid accumulations. Genetic perturbation on these candidate regulators further demonstrated the potential to manipulate the regulatory cascade for lipid synthesis efficiency. Exploring epigenetic landscape in microalgae shown here provides powerful tools needed in improving biofuel production and new technology platform for renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental survey.

  1. Can green consumerism replace environmental regulation? A differentiated-products example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Clas [Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7013, S-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    This paper assumes that consumers are willing to pay an extra premium for a good if it has a low impact on the environment. We examine if a little dose of such idealistic behavior has a large impact on the market equilibrium, and to what extent it can replace the environmental regulation. The analysis is carried out in a model with product differentiation, where consumers differ in their preferences for product quality. Consumers' willingness to pay the environmental premium may be uniformly or non-uniformly distributed. Green consumerism will only be modestly influential in both cases, despite the fact that product differentiation leads to relaxed competition and increased profits, and thereby creates leverage.

  2. Can green consumerism replace environmental regulation? A differentiated-products example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, Clas

    2004-01-01

    This paper assumes that consumers are willing to pay an extra premium for a good if it has a low impact on the environment. We examine if a little dose of such idealistic behavior has a large impact on the market equilibrium, and to what extent it can replace the environmental regulation. The analysis is carried out in a model with product differentiation, where consumers differ in their preferences for product quality. Consumers' willingness to pay the environmental premium may be uniformly or non-uniformly distributed. Green consumerism will only be modestly influential in both cases, despite the fact that product differentiation leads to relaxed competition and increased profits, and thereby creates leverage

  3. Product unconformable in the light of legal regulations and the ISO 9001:2000 standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Górna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The supervision of unconformable product is a key problem in the era of globalization. In Poland the supervision of safety product has been entrusted to the President of the Office of Competition and Consumer Protection. The agency supporting its activities is the Trade Inspection. Growing popularity of the quality systems conformable with the ISO 9000 standard caused that they have been included in the EU regulations as criteria of assessment of conformability with requirements. The certificate of the quality management system is indispensable for companies for functioning in many market areas. One should remember that quality management system will help the company to supervise unconformable products only when it really functions and is not just on paper. Only then it will function efficiently.

  4. Improved eicosapentaenoic acid production in Pythium splendens RBB-5 based on metabolic regulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liang; Zhou, Pengpeng; Zhu, Yuanmin; Zhang, Ruijiao; Yu, Longjiang

    2017-05-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid for human beings. At present, the production of commercially available long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, mainly from wild-caught ocean fish, is struggling to meet the increasing demand for EPA. Production of EPA by microorganisms may be an alternative, effective and economical method. The oleaginous fungus Pythium splendens RBB-5 is a potential source of EPA, and thanks to the simple culture conditions required, high yields can be achieved in a facile manner. In the study, lipid metabolomics was performed in an attempt to enhance EPA biosynthesis in Pythium splendens. Synthetic, metabolic regulation and gene expression analyses were conducted to clarify the mechanism of EPA biosynthesis, and guide optimization of EPA production. The results showed that the Δ 6 desaturase pathway is the main EPA biosynthetic route in this organism, and ∆ 6 , ∆ 12 and Δ 17 desaturases are the rate-limiting enzymes. All the three desaturase genes were separately introduced into the parent strain to increase the flow of fatty acids into the Δ 6 desaturase pathway. Enhanced expression of these key enzymes, in combination with improved regulation of metabolism, resulted in a maximum yield of 1.43 g/L in the D12 transgenic strain, which represents a tenfold increase over the parent strain before optimization. This is the higher EPA production yield yet reported for a microbial system. Our findings may allow the production of EPA at an industrial scale, and the strategy employed could be used to increase the production of EPA or other lipids in oleaginous microorganisms.

  5. Uranium mining and production: A legal perspective on regulating an important resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The importance of uranium can be examined from several perspectives. First, natural uranium is a strategic energy resource because it is a key ingredient for the generation of nuclear power and, therefore, it can affect the energy security of a state. Second, natural uranium is also a raw material in relative abundance throughout the world, which can, through certain steps, be transformed into nuclear explosive devices. Thus, there is both an interest in the trade of uranium resources and a need for their regulatory control. The importance of uranium to the worldwide civilian nuclear industry means that its extraction and processing - the so-called 'front end' of the nuclear fuel cycle - is of regulatory interest. Like 'ordinary' metal mining, which is generally regulated within a country, uranium mining must also be considered from the more particular perspective of regulation and control, as part of the international nuclear law regime that is applied to the entire nuclear fuel cycle. The present overview of the regulatory role in overseeing and controlling uranium mining and production will outline the regulation of this resource from an international level, both from early days to the present day. Uranium mining is not regulated internationally; rather, it is a state responsibility. However, developments at the international level have, over time, led to better national regulation. One can note several changes in the approach to the uranium industry since the time that uranium was first mined on a significant scale, so that today the mining and trade of uranium is a well-established and regulated industry much less marked by secrecy and Cold War sentiment. At the same time, it is informed by international standards and conventions, proliferation concerns and a modern regard for environmental protection and the health and safety of workers and the public. (author)

  6. DksA-HapR-RpoS axis regulates haemagglutinin protease production in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Pallabi; Pal, Ritesh Ranjan; Dasgupta, Shreya; Bhadra, Rupak K

    2017-06-01

    DksA acts as a co-factor for the intracellular small signalling molecule ppGpp during the stringent response. We recently reported that the expression of the haemagglutinin protease (HAP), which is needed for shedding of the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae during the late phase of infection, is significantly downregulated in V. cholerae ∆dksA mutant (∆dksAVc) cells. So far, it has been shown that HAP production by V. cholerae cells is critically regulated by HapR and also by RpoS. Here, we provide evidence that V. cholerae DksA (DksAVc) positively regulates HapR at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We show that in ∆dksAVc cells the CsrB/C/D sRNAs, required for the maintenance of intracellular levels of hapR transcripts during the stationary growth, are distinctly downregulated. Moreover, the expression of exponential phase regulatory protein Fis, a known negative regulator of HapR, was found to continue even during the stationary phase in ∆dksAVc cells compared to that of wild-type strain, suggesting another layer of complex regulation of HapR by DksAVc. Extensive reporter construct-based and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses supported that RpoS is distinctly downregulated at the post-transcriptional/translational levels in stationary phase-grown ∆dksAVc cells. Since HAP expression through HapR and RpoS is stationary phase-specific in V. cholerae, it appears that DksAVc is also a critical stationary phase regulator for fine tuning of the expression of HAP. Moreover, experimental evidence provided in this study clearly supports that DksAVc is sitting at the top of the hierarchy of regulation of expression of HAP in V. cholerae.

  7. [A contribution to the development of advertising in pharmacy II. Historical development of regulation of advertising of medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranová, Vilma

    2012-10-01

    The article deals with the development of regulation of advertising of medicinal products in the Czech Lands of the Habsburg Monarchy and Czechoslovakia in the years 1775-1938. Advertising medicines had and has its specifics and its regulation had been addressed by specific standards and linked to other health laws and regulations. Regulation of advertising of medicinal products has undergone a long process from the initial total ban on advertising to the establishment of clear rules, some of which, such as restrictions on advertising prescription-only medicines only to the professional healthcare press, are still valid.

  8. CANDU 9 - the CANDU product to meet customer and regulator requirements now and in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.; Webb, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    CANDU reactors developed under Canadian licensing regulations that placed the primary responsibility for safety on the licensee. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), Canada's nuclear regulatory agency, state in their regulations what is expected in terms of safety performance so that designers are free to propose the best means of meeting this performance. This goal-oriented approach, besides encouraging innovation, allowed CANDU to be licensed in other jurisdictions. The latest design - the large, single unit, CANDU 9 - explicitly incorporates licensability in Canada through a formal AECB review of the design; lessons learned from licensing CANDU 6 in Asian countries, particularly with Wolsong 2, 3 and 4 in Korea, and more recently with Qinshan in China; utility requirements for modem evolutionary plants; and emerging international standards for safety, sponsored or issued by the IAEA. By combining the assurance of acceptability in Canada with compliance with foreign and international requirements, CANDU 9 becomes an internationally licensable product. (author)

  9. The Root Growth-Regulating Brevicompanine Natural Products Modulate the Plant Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montaigu, Amaury; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Krahn, Jan H; Suliman, Mohamed N S; Halder, Vivek; de Ansorena, Elisa; Nickel, Sabrina; Schlicht, Markus; Plíhal, Ondřej; Kubiasová, Karolina; Radová, Lenka; Kracher, Barbara; Tóth, Réka; Kaschani, Farnusch; Coupland, George; Kombrink, Erich; Kaiser, Markus

    2017-06-16

    Plant growth regulating properties of brevicompanines (Brvs), natural products of the fungus Penicillium brevicompactum, have been known for several years, but further investigations into the molecular mechanism of their bioactivity have not been performed. Following chemical synthesis of brevicompanine derivatives, we studied their activity in the model plant Arabidopsis by a combination of plant growth assays, transcriptional profiling, and numerous additional bioassays. These studies demonstrated that brevicompanines cause transcriptional misregulation of core components of the circadian clock, whereas other biological read-outs were not affected. Brevicompanines thus represent promising chemical tools for investigating the regulation of the plant circadian clock. In addition, our study also illustrates the potential of an unbiased -omics-based characterization of bioactive compounds for identifying the often cryptic modes of action of small molecules.

  10. The safety and regulation of natural products used as foods and food ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Ali; Anyangwe, Njwen; Carlacci, Louis; Casper, Steve; Danam, Rebecca P; Enongene, Evaristus; Erives, Gladys; Fabricant, Daniel; Gudi, Ramadevi; Hilmas, Corey J; Hines, Fred; Howard, Paul; Levy, Dan; Lin, Ying; Moore, Robert J; Pfeiler, Erika; Thurmond, T Scott; Turujman, Saleh; Walker, Nigel J

    2011-10-01

    The use of botanicals and dietary supplements derived from natural substances as an adjunct to an improved quality of life or for their purported medical benefits has become increasingly common in the United States. This review addresses the safety assessment and regulation of food products containing these substances by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The issue of safety is particularly critical given how little information is available on the toxicity of some of these products. The first section uses case studies for stevia and green tea extracts as examples of how FDA evaluates the safety of botanical and herbal products submitted for consideration as Generally Recognized as Safe under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetics Act. The 1994 Dietary Supplement Health Education Act (DSHEA) created a regulatory framework for dietary supplements. The article also discusses the regulation of this class of dietary supplements under DSHEA and addresses the FDA experience in analyzing the safety of natural ingredients described in pre-market safety submissions. Lastly, we discuss an ongoing interagency collaboration to conduct safety testing of nominated dietary supplements.

  11. Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex regulates muscle nitric oxide production through mechanoregulation of AMPK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbincius, Joanne F; Michele, Daniel E

    2015-11-03

    Patients deficient in dystrophin, a protein that links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), exhibit muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, and impaired muscle nitric oxide (NO) production. We used live-cell NO imaging and in vitro cyclic stretch of isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes as a model system to investigate if and how the DGC directly regulates the mechanical activation of muscle NO signaling. Acute activation of NO synthesis by mechanical stretch was impaired in dystrophin-deficient mdx cardiomyocytes, accompanied by loss of stretch-induced neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) S1412 phosphorylation. Intriguingly, stretch induced the acute activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in normal cardiomyocytes but not in mdx cardiomyocytes, and specific inhibition of AMPK was sufficient to attenuate mechanoactivation of NO production. Therefore, we tested whether direct pharmacologic activation of AMPK could bypass defective mechanical signaling to restore nNOS activity in dystrophin-deficient cardiomyocytes. Indeed, activation of AMPK with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside or salicylate increased nNOS S1412 phosphorylation and was sufficient to enhance NO production in mdx cardiomyocytes. We conclude that the DGC promotes the mechanical activation of cardiac nNOS by acting as a mechanosensor to regulate AMPK activity, and that pharmacologic AMPK activation may be a suitable therapeutic strategy for restoring nNOS activity in dystrophin-deficient hearts and muscle.

  12. Human Lung Mast Cell Products Regulate Airway Smooth Muscle CXCL10 Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhouri, H; Cha, V; Tong, K; Moir, L M; Armour, C L; Hughes, J M

    2014-01-01

    In asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) produces CXCL10 which may attract CXCR3(+) mast/T cells to it. Our aim was to investigate the effects of mast cell products on ASM cell CXCL10 production. ASM cells from people with and without asthma were stimulated with IL-1 β , TNF- α , and/or IFN γ and treated with histamine (1-100  μ M) ± chlorpheniramine (H1R antagonist; 1  μ M) or ranitidine (H2R antagonist; 50  μ M) or tryptase (1 nM) ± leupeptin (serine protease inhibitor; 50  μ M), heat-inactivated tryptase, or vehicle for 4 h or 24 h. Human lung mast cells (MC) were isolated and activated with IgE/anti-IgE and supernatants were collected after 2 h or 24 h. The supernatants were added to ASM cells for 48 h and ASM cell CXCL10 production detected using ELISA (protein) and real-time PCR (mRNA). Histamine reduced IL-1 β /TNF- α -induced CXCL10 protein, but not mRNA, levels independent of H1 and H2 receptor activation, whereas tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants reduced all cytokine-induced CXCL10. Tryptase also reduced CXCL10 levels in a cell-free system. Leupeptin inhibited the effects of tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants. MC 24 h supernatants contained TNF- α and amplified IFN γ -induced ASM cell CXCL10 production. This is the first evidence that MC can regulate ASM cell CXCL10 production and its degradation. Thus MC may regulate airway myositis in asthma.

  13. Role of FSH glycan structure in the regulation of Sertoli cell inhibin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreone, Luz; Ambao, Verónica; Pellizzari, Eliana H; Loreti, Nazareth; Cigorraga, Selva B; Campo, Stella

    2017-11-01

    Variations in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) carbohydrate composition and structure are associated with important structural and functional changes in Sertoli cells (SCs) during sexual maturation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of FSH oligosaccharide structure and its interaction with gonadal factors on the regulation of monomeric and dimeric inhibin production at different maturation stages of the SC. Recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) glycosylation variants were isolated according to their sialylation degree (AC and BA) and complexity of oligosaccharides (CO and HY). Native rhFSH stimulated inhibin α-subunit (Pro-αC) but did not show any effect on inhibin B (INHB) production in immature SCs isolated from 8-day-old rats. Activin A stimulated INHB and had a synergistic effect on FSH to stimulate Pro-αC. The less acidic/sialylated rhFSH charge analogues, BA, were the only charge analogue mix that stimulated INHB as well as the most potent stimulus for Pro-αC production. Native rhFSH stimulated both Pro-αC and INHB in SCs at a more advanced maturation stage, isolated from 20-day-old rats. In these cells, all rhFSH glycosylation variants increased INHB and Pro-αC production, even in the presence of growth factors. The BA preparation exerted a more marked stimulatory effect on INHB and Pro-αC than the AC. Glycoforms bearing high mannose and hybrid-type oligosaccharides, HY, stimulated INHB and Pro-αC more effectively than those bearing complex oligosaccharides, CO, even in the presence of gonadal growth factors. These findings demonstrate the modulatory effect of FSH oligosaccharide structure on the regulation of inhibin production in the male gonad. © 2017 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  14. Regulation of P450 oxidoreductase by gonadotropins in rat ovary and its effect on estrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uesaka Miki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P450 oxidoreductase (POR catalyzes electron transfer to microsomal P450 enzymes. Its deficiency causes Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS, and about half the patients with ABS have ambiguous genitalia and/or impaired steroidogenesis. POR mRNA expression is up-regulated when mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiate into steroidogenic cells, suggesting that the regulation of POR gene expression is important for steroidogenesis. In this context we examined the regulation of POR expression in ovarian granulosa cells by gonadotropins, and its possible role in steroidogenesis. Methods Changes in gene expression in MSCs during differentiation into steroidogenic cells were examined by DNA microarray analysis. Changes in mRNA and protein expression of POR in the rat ovary or in granulosa cells induced by gonadotropin treatment were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Effects of transient expression of wild-type or mutant (R457H or V492E POR proteins on the production of estrone in COS-7 cells were examined in vitro. Effects of POR knockdown were also examined in estrogen producing cell-line, KGN cells. Results POR mRNA was induced in MSCs following transduction with the SF-1 retrovirus, and was further increased by cAMP treatment. Expression of POR mRNA, as well as Cyp19 mRNA, in the rat ovary were induced by equine chorionic gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin. POR mRNA and protein were also induced by follicle stimulating hormone in primary cultured rat granulosa cells, and the induction pattern was similar to that for aromatase. Transient expression of POR in COS-7 cells, which expressed a constant amount of aromatase protein, greatly increased the rate of conversion of androstenedione to estrone, in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of mutant POR proteins (R457H or V492E, such as those found in ABS patients, had much less effect on aromatase activity than expression of wild

  15. IL-27 affects helper T cell responses via regulation of PGE2 production by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yayoi; Hara, Hiromitsu; Okuno, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Naoko; Suzuki, Shinobu; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2014-08-22

    IL-27 is a heterodimeric cytokine that regulates both innate and adaptive immunity. The immunosuppressive effect of IL-27 largely depends on induction of IL-10-producing Tr1 cells. To date, however, effects of IL-27 on regulation of immune responses via mediators other than cytokines remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we examined immunoregulatory effects of conditional medium of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from WSX-1 (IL-27Rα)-deficient mice and found enhanced IFN-γ and IL-17A secretion by CD4(+) T cells as compared with that of control BMDMs. We then found that PGE2 production and COX-2 expression by BMDMs from WSX-1-deficient mice was increased compared to control macrophages in response to LPS. The enhanced production of IFN-γ and IL-17A was abolished by EP2 and EP4 antagonists, demonstrating PGE2 was responsible for enhanced cytokine production. Murine WSX-1-expressing Raw264.7 cells (mWSX-1-Raw264.7) showed phosphorylation of both STAT1 and STAT3 in response to IL-27 and produced less amounts of PGE2 and COX-2 compared to parental RAW264.7 cells. STAT1 knockdown in parental RAW264.7 cells and STAT1-deficiency in BMDMs showed higher COX-2 expression than their respective control cells. Collectively, our result indicated that IL-27/WSX-1 regulated PGE2 secretion via STAT1-COX-2 pathway in macrophages and affected helper T cell response in a PGE2-mediated fashion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of Clinical Trials with Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Matthias; Anliker, Brigitte; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schuele, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, clinical trials for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products are regulated at the national level, in contrast to the situation for a Marketing Authorisation Application, in which a centralised procedure is foreseen for these medicinal products. Although based on a common understanding regarding the regulatory requirement to be fulfilled before conduct of a clinical trial with an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product, the procedures and partly the scientific requirements for approval of a clinical trial application differ between the European Union Member States. This chapter will thus give an overview about the path to be followed for a clinical trial application and the subsequent approval process for an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product in Germany and will describe the role of the stakeholders that are involved. In addition, important aspects of manufacturing, quality control and non-clinical testing of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the clinical development phase are discussed. Finally, current and future approaches for harmonisation of clinical trial authorisation between European Union Member States are summarised.

  17. TGF-β1 regulation of estrogen production in mature rat Leydig cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Besides androgens, estrogens produced in Leydig cells are also crucial for mammalian germ cell differentiation. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 is now known to have multiple effects on regulation of Leydig cell function. The objective of the present study is to determine whether TGF-β1 regulates estradiol (E2 synthesis in adult rat Leydig cells and then to assess the impact of TGF-β1 on Cx43-based gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC between Leydig cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary cultured Leydig cells were incubated in the presence of recombinant TGF-β1 and the production of E2 as well as testosterone (T were measured by RIA. The activity of P450arom was addressed by the tritiated water release assay and the expression of Cyp19 gene was evaluated by Western blotting and real time RT-PCR. The expression of Cx43 and GJIC were investigated with immunofluorescence and fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP, respectively. Results from this study show that TGF-β1 down-regulates the level of E2 secretion and the activity of P450arom in a dose-dependent manner in adult Leydig cells. In addition, the expression of Cx43 and GJIC was closely related to the regulation of E2 and TGF-β1, and E2 treatment in turn restored the inhibition of TGF-β1 on GJIC. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate, for the first time in adult rat Leydig cells, that TGF-β1 suppresses P450arom activity, as well as the expression of the Cyp19 gene, and that depression of E2 secretion leads to down-regulation of Cx43-based GJIC between Leydig cells.

  18. Electron acceptor-based regulation of microbial greenhouse gas production from thawing permafrost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Ebbe Norskov; Jones, Eleanor; Yde, Jacob Clement

    Permafrost contains about 35% of the global soil organic carbon (0-3 m depth). As a consequence of global warming, the active layer thickness is steadily increasing and its organic carbon is becoming available for degradation, causing a concomitant release of CO2 and CH4. The climate forcing...... of sulfate and iron and the microbial community structure regulate the production of CO2 and CH4 in thawing permafrost, and to elucidate how the rate of the organic carbon degradation changes with depth in permafrost-affected soils. This study improves our understanding of climate feedback mechanisms...

  19. A Drosophila Genome-Wide Screen Identifies Regulators of Steroid Hormone Production and Developmental Timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas Danielsen, E.; E. Møller, Morten; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormones control important developmental processes and are linked to many diseases. To systematically identify genes and pathways required for steroid production, we performed a Drosophila genome-wide in vivo RNAi screen and identified 1,906 genes with potential roles in steroidogenesis...... and developmental timing. Here, we use our screen as a resource to identify mechanisms regulating intracellular levels of cholesterol, a substrate for steroidogenesis. We identify a conserved fatty acid elongase that underlies a mechanism that adjusts cholesterol trafficking and steroidogenesis with nutrition...

  20. Regulation of toxin production by Bacillus cereus and its food safety implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceuppens, Siele; Rajkovic, Andreja; Heyndrickx, Marc; Tsilia, Varvara; Van De Wiele, Tom; Boon, Nico; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2011-08-01

    Toxin expression is of utmost importance for the food-borne pathogen B. cereus, both in food poisoning and non-gastrointestinal host infections as well as in interbacterial competition. Therefore it is no surprise that the toxin gene expression is tightly regulated by various internal and environmental signals. An overview of the current knowledge regarding emetic and diarrheal toxin transcription and expression is presented in this review. The food safety aspects and management tools such as temperature control, food preservatives and modified atmosphere packaging are discussed specifically for B. cereus emetic and diarrheal toxin production.

  1. 'No, the government doesn't need to, it's already self-regulated': a qualitative study among vape shop operators on perceptions of electronic vapor product regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Pratibha; Barker, Dianne C; Huang, Jidong; Kemp, Catherine B; Wagener, Theodore L; Chaloupka, Frank

    2018-03-26

    While the market share of electronic vapor products (EVPs), sold primarily through vape shops and other outlets, has increased rapidly, these products remained largely unregulated until 2016. This study, conducted prior to announcement of the deeming regulations, provides insights into vape shop operator attitudes toward potential government regulations of EVPs. In 2015, we conducted 37 in-person interviews of vape shop operators across nine US cities. Shops were identified through extensive web-searches. We used QSR International's NVivo 11 qualitative data analysis software to analyze the transcripts. Many vape shop operators viewed regulations requiring safe production of e-liquids, child-resistant bottles and listing e-juice ingredients as acceptable. They disagreed with the elimination of free samples and bans on flavored e-liquid sales, which generate significant revenue for their stores. Many held negative perceptions of pre-market review of new product lines and EVP-specific taxes. All agreed that EVPs should not be sold to minors, but most felt that owners should not be fined if minors visited vape shops. Findings from this study offer insights into the acceptability of proposed regulations, as well as barriers to effective regulation implementation.

  2. Variation of muscle efficiency and regulation of heat production in an organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, K.P.

    1987-03-01

    The results of over twenty years of studies on the mechanism of heat production during muscle contraction in homiothermic organisms are presented. The mechanisms regulating energy exchange during contractile (or shivering) thermogenesis and noncontractile muscle thermogenesis are examined, with special consideration given to the efficiency coefficients (ECs) of muscle work related to the processes of muscle contraction and ATP synthesis, and to relative changes in these ECs. Special attention is given to the effect of acclimatization to cold on muscle energetics, when the EC of the muscle contraction falls, while the heat production increases; the mechanism of this phenomenon is considered to be related to the increasing degree of uncoupling between the oxidation and phosphorylation processes. The role of hormones and of the sympathetic nervous system in thermoregulation is discussed. 71 references.

  3. Economies of scale in biogas production and the significance of flexible regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skovsgaard, Lise; Jacobsen, Henrik Klinge

    2017-01-01

    Biogas production is characterised by economies of scale in capital and operational costs of the plant and diseconomies of scale from transport of input materials. We analyse biogas in a Danish setting where most biogas is based on manure, we use a case study with actual distances, and find that the benefits of scale in capital and operational costs dominate the diseconomies of increasing transport distances to collect manure. To boost the yield it is common to use co-substrates in the biogas production. We investigate how costs and income changes, when sugar beet is added in this case study, and demonstrate that transport cost can be critical in relation to co-substrates. Further we compare the new Danish support for upgraded biogas with the traditional support for biogas being used in Combined Heat and Power production in relation to scale economies. We argue that economies of scale is facilitated by the new regulation providing similar support to upgraded biogas fed into the natural gas grid, however in order to keep transport costs low, we suggest that the biogas plants should be allowed to use and combine as many co-substrates as possible, respecting the sustainability criteria regarding energy crops in Danish legislation. - Highlights: • For Denmark we find economies of scale in biogas production based on pure manure. • Adding sugar beet outweigh economy of scale due to increased transport costs. • We investigate the main risks associated with input prices, yield and output prices. • Biogas fed into the gas grid should receive similar support as directly used in CHP. • Regulation should allow large biogas plants with few restrictions on co-substrates.

  4. Increasing Malonyl-CoA Derived Product through Controlling the Transcription Regulators of Phospholipid Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2017-05-19

    Malonyl-CoA is a precursor of a variety of compounds such as polyketides and flavonoids. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, malonyl-CoA concentration is tightly regulated and therefore maintained at a very low level, limiting the production of malonyl-CoA-derived chemicals. Here we manipulated the phospholipid synthesis transcriptional regulators to control the malonyl-CoA levels and increase the downstream product. Through manipulating different regulators including Ino2p, Ino4p, Opi1p, and a series of synthetic Ino2p variants, combining with studying the inositol and choline effect, the engineered strain achieved a 9-fold increase of the titer of malonyl-CoA-derived product 3-hydroxypropionic acid, which is among the highest improvement relative to previously reported strategies. Our study provides a new strategy to regulate malonyl-CoA availability and will contribute to the production of other highly valued malonyl-CoA-derived chemicals.

  5. A comparison of US and Norwegian regulation of coumarin in tobacco products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givel, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines policy processes regarding why the USA and Norway have not regulated coumarin in tobacco. Design: A qualitative analysis of all tobacco industry documents regarding coumarin since the 1950s from the 1998 US Master Settlement Agreement and subsequent legal settlements. Additional data were collected from newspaper reports, general internet search engines, journal articles, scholarly reports, court cases, statutes, regulations, and informal correspondence with tobacco control experts in Norway. Main outcome measure: An overview, summary, and analysis of all documents related to coumarin. Results: In the USA from 1954 until 1985 when coumarin was reportedly removed from domestic cigarettes, but not from pipe tobacco until 1996, and not at all from imported Indian bidi cigarettes, regulatory efforts were stymied. In Norway, from 1973 to the present, the tobacco industry has never disclosed whether its tobacco products contain coumarin. In both the USA and Norway, the extreme delay and lack of vigorous evidence gathering and significant remedies were caused by tobacco industry assertions that revealing tobacco additives was a violation of trade secrets, and by weak regulatory authority and efforts to regulate coumarin. Conclusion: Vigorous and expeditious regulatory investigations and remedies for harmful additives in tobacco, such as coumarin, can protect the public health. Astute insider and outsider political advocacy by health advocates is required to hold elected officials and civil servants publicly accountable for failing to enact disclosure laws and to engage in effective regulatory efforts. PMID:14660776

  6. Microcystin production and regulation under nutrient stress conditions in toxic microcystis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Juliana S M; Giani, Alessandra

    2014-09-01

    Microcystin is a common and well-known cyanobacterial toxin whose intracellular role is still under investigation. Increasing knowledge on microcystin gene expression and regulation can contribute to the understanding of its putative cellular function. In this work, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the transcriptional response of the mcyD gene to nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) and phosphorus limitation in two toxic Microcystis strains. The existence of a direct correlation between transcripts of mcyD and ntcA genes was also identified. In previous studies, NtcA (global nitrogen regulator) has been described as a potential component in the control of microcystin biosynthesis. This research showed that stress agents linked to nutrient deprivation could lead to a significant increase of microcystin production in both strains studied. The more toxic strain proved to be more resistant to nutrient limitation. The similar outcomes of mcyD regulation observed for all nutrients suggest that this response can be linked to oxidative stress of cells undergoing adverse growth conditions. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Fis is a global regulator critical for modulation of virulence factor production and pathogenicity of Dickeya zeae

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Mingfa; Chen, Yufan; Liao, Lisheng; Liang, Zhibin; Shi, Zurong; Tang, Yingxin; Ye, Sixuan; Zhou, Jianuan; Zhang, Lianhui

    2018-01-01

    Dickeya zeae is the causal agent of rice foot rot disease, which has recently become a great threat to rice planting countries and regions. The pathogen produces a family of phytotoxins named zeamines that is critical for bacterial virulence, but little is known about the signaling pathways and regulatory mechanisms that govern zeamine production. In this study, we showed that a conserved transcriptional regulator Fis is involved in the regulation of zeamine production in D. zeae strain EC1. ...

  8. Typical investigational medicinal products follow relatively uniform regulations in 10 European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Kubiak, Christine; Whitfield, Kate

    2012-01-01

    In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe.......In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe....

  9. Environmental Regulations on Waste Electrical Equipment Industry: The Production Chain to the Final Consumer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Tunes Mazon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the electronics industry requires its transition to sustainable production patterns, as defined by the European directives WEEE, RoHS, and the National Policy on Solid Waste. In 2010, the group began a national project whose purpose is to support sustainability with a focus on the triple bottom line Brazilian electronics industry. The implementation of these proposals began with the implementation of a pilot project with nine companies of electromedical equipment, chosen because they are technology intensive, and require exporters suit environmental regulations. This paper aims to present the main results obtained in the studies with these nine companies in the period Apr/2011 Mar/2012 regarding the suitability of its products, processes, management systems and supply chains. The study was divided into three stages: an assessment to identify general aspects of each organization, a thorough assessment to understand the characteristics of each organization ahead of the general characteristics of the group analyzed and a detailed diagnosis, performed individually during visits in companies. The main findings were that the waste management and reverse logistics associated are still incipient, the products still have dangerous substances and supply chain is still very poorly prepared for the challenges. The level of employment of employees and costs associated with the adequacy of its products and processes, constitute the two biggest problems for companies fit the relevant environmental legislation.

  10. Hypothalamic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulates ghrelin production and food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingjie; Yu, Quan; Lin, Li; Zhang, Heng; Peng, Miao; Jing, Chunxia; Xu, Geyang

    2018-04-09

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) regulates fatty acid storage, glucose metabolism, and food intake. Ghrelin, a gastric hormone, provides a hunger signal to the central nervous system to stimulate appetite. However, the effects of PPARγ on ghrelin production are still unclear. In the present study, the effects of PPARγ on ghrelin production were examined in lean- or high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6J mice and mHypoE-42 cells, a hypothalamic cell line. 3rd intracerebroventricular injection of adenoviral-directed overexpression of PPARγ (Ad-PPARγ) reduced hypothalamic and plasma ghrelin, food intake in both lean C57BL/6J mice and diet-induced obese mice. These changes were associated with a significant increase in mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity. Overexpression of PPARγ enhanced mTORC1 signaling and suppressed ghrelin production in cultured mHypoE-42 cells. Our results suggest that hypothalamic PPARγ plays a vital role in ghrelin production and food intake in mice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Natural Compounds as Regulators of NLRP3 Inflammasome-Mediated IL-1β Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Tőzsér

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IL-1β is one of the main proinflammatory cytokines that regulates a broad range of immune responses and also participates in several physiological processes. The canonical production of IL-1β requires multiprotein complexes called inflammasomes. One of the most intensively studied inflammasome complexes is the NLRP3 inflammasome. Its activation requires two signals: one signal “primes” the cells and induces the expression of NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β, while the other signal leads to the assembly and activation of the complex. Several stimuli were reported to function as the second signal including reactive oxygen species, lysosomal rupture, or cytosolic ion perturbation. Despite very intensive studies, the precise function and regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome are still not clear. However, many chronic inflammatory diseases are related to the overproduction of IL-1β that is mediated via the NLRP3 inflammasome. In this review, we aimed to provide an overview of studies that demonstrated the effect of plant-derived natural compounds on NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β production. Although many of these studies lack the mechanistic explanation of their action, these compounds may be considered as complementary supplements in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, consumed as preventive agents, and may also be considered as molecular tools to study NLRP3 function.

  12. Economic Analysis of Legal Regulations Regarding Liability for Loss Resulting from a Dangerous Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kuźmicka-Sulikowska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers fundamental issues associated with economic analysis of legal regulations pertaining to liability for damage caused by a dangerous product. The discussion is conducted from the perspective of a lawyer analysing the conclusions stemming from economic analyses of the aforementioned liability by individual authors, which constitutes a base for subsequent observations. The relationships between the various potential configurations of manufacturer liability are discussed, in particular a situation where such liability is not stipulated, as well as where there is the introduction of liability based on the risk or fault principles and the ensuing motivation for maintaining an appropriate level of carefulness. Attention is focused on the search for an economically efficient solution. An analysis of current regulation is performed, as well as de lege ferenda conclusions grounded in economic analysis of law with reference to the shape of the regulatory liability regime for damage caused by a dangerous product. Many reservations are also listed, including ones concerning the fact that it does not seem that the legislative process should be guided only by conclusions stemming from economic analysis of law (especially considering the differences of opinion in that area, which does, however, unquestionably constitute a useful tool in such matters.

  13. Indirect Regulation of Endogenous Glucose Production by Insulin: The Single Gateway Hypothesis Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Richard N; Iyer, Malini S

    2017-07-01

    On the basis of studies that investigated the intraportal versus systemic insulin infusion and transendothelial transport of insulin, we proposed the "single gateway hypothesis," which supposes an indirect regulation of hepatic glucose production by insulin; the rate-limiting transport of insulin across the adipose tissue capillaries is responsible for the slow suppression of free fatty acids (FFAs), which in turn is responsible for delayed suppression of hepatic endogenous glucose production (EGP) during insulin infusion. Preventing the fall in plasma FFAs during insulin infusion either by administering intralipids or by inhibiting adipose tissue lipolysis led to failure in EGP suppression, thus supporting our hypothesis. More recently, mice lacking hepatic Foxo1 in addition to Akt1 and Akt2 (L-AktFoxo1TKO), all required for insulin signaling, surprisingly showed normal glycemia. Inhibiting the fall of plasma FFAs in these mice prevented the suppression of EGP during a clamp, reaffirming that the site of insulin action to control EGP is extrahepatic. Measuring whole-body turnover rates of glucose and FFAs in L-AktFoxo1TKO mice also confirmed that hepatic EGP was regulated by insulin-mediated control of FFAs. The knockout mouse model in combination with sophisticated molecular techniques confirmed our physiological findings and the single gateway hypothesis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  14. Substrate specificity changes for human reticulocyte and epithelial 15-lipoxygenases reveal allosteric product regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecksler, Aaron T; Kenyon, Victor; Deschamps, Joshua D; Holman, Theodore R

    2008-07-15

    Human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase (15-hLO-1) and epithelial 15-lipoxygenase (15-hLO-2) have been implicated in a number of human diseases, with differences in their substrate specificity potentially playing a central role. In this paper, we present a novel method for accurately measuring the substrate specificity of the two 15-hLO isozymes and demonstrate that both cholate and specific LO products affect substrate specificity. The linoleic acid (LA) product, 13-hydroperoxyoctadienoic acid (13-HPODE), changes the ( k cat/ K m) (AA)/( k cat/ K m) (LA) ratio more than 5-fold for 15-hLO-1 and 3-fold for 15-hLO-2, while the arachidonic acid (AA) product, 12-( S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HPETE), affects only the ratio of 15-hLO-1 (more than 5-fold). In addition, the reduced products, 13-( S)-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE) and 12-( S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), also affect substrate specificity, indicating that iron oxidation is not responsible for the change in the ( k cat/ K m) (AA)/( k cat/ K m) (LA) ratio. These results, coupled with the dependence of the 15-hLO-1 k cat/ K m kinetic isotope effect ( (D) k cat/ K m) on the presence of 12-HPETE and 12-HETE, indicate that the allosteric site, previously identified in 15-hLO-1 [Mogul, R., Johansen, E., and Holman, T. R. (1999) Biochemistry 39, 4801-4807], is responsible for the change in substrate specificity. The ability of LO products to regulate substrate specificity may be relevant with respect to cancer progression and warrants further investigation into the role of this product-feedback loop in the cell.

  15. Reproduction-Related Sound Production of Grasshoppers Regulated by Internal State and Actual Sensory Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Ralf; Kunst, Michael; Wirmer, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The interplay of neural and hormonal mechanisms activated by entero- and extero-receptors biases the selection of actions by decision making neuronal circuits. The reproductive behavior of acoustically communicating grasshoppers, which is regulated by short-term neural and longer-term hormonal mechanisms, has frequently been used to study the cellular and physiological processes that select particular actions from the species-specific repertoire of behaviors. Various grasshoppers communicate with species- and situation-specific songs in order to attract and court mating partners, to signal reproductive readiness, or to fend off competitors. Selection and coordination of type, intensity, and timing of sound signals is mediated by the central complex, a highly structured brain neuropil known to integrate multimodal pre-processed sensory information by a large number of chemical messengers. In addition, reproductive activity including sound production critically depends on maturation, previous mating experience, and oviposition cycles. In this regard, juvenile hormone released from the corpora allata has been identified as a decisive hormonal signal necessary to establish reproductive motivation in grasshopper females. Both regulatory systems, the central complex mediating short-term regulation and the corpora allata mediating longer-term regulation of reproduction-related sound production mutually influence each other’s activity in order to generate a coherent state of excitation that promotes or suppresses reproductive behavior in respective appropriate or inappropriate situations. This review summarizes our current knowledge about extrinsic and intrinsic factors that influence grasshopper reproductive motivation, their representation in the nervous system and their integrative processing that mediates the initiation or suppression of reproductive behaviors. PMID:22737107

  16. Regulation of Cytokine Production by the Unfolded Protein Response; Implications for Infection and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judith A

    2018-01-01

    Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential cell function. To safeguard this process in the face of environmental threats and internal stressors, cells mount an evolutionarily conserved response known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Invading pathogens induce cellular stress that impacts protein folding, thus the UPR is well situated to sense danger and contribute to immune responses. Cytokines (inflammatory cytokines and interferons) critically mediate host defense against pathogens, but when aberrantly produced, may also drive pathologic inflammation. The UPR influences cytokine production on multiple levels, from stimulation of pattern recognition receptors, to modulation of inflammatory signaling pathways, and the regulation of cytokine transcription factors. This review will focus on the mechanisms underlying cytokine regulation by the UPR, and the repercussions of this relationship for infection and autoimmune/autoinflammatory diseases. Interrogation of viral and bacterial infections has revealed increasing numbers of examples where pathogens induce or modulate the UPR and implicated UPR-modulated cytokines in host response. The flip side of this coin, the UPR/ER stress responses have been increasingly recognized in a variety of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Examples include monogenic disorders of ER function, diseases linked to misfolding protein (HLA-B27 and spondyloarthritis), diseases directly implicating UPR and autophagy genes (inflammatory bowel disease), and autoimmune diseases targeting highly secretory cells (e.g., diabetes). Given the burgeoning interest in pharmacologically targeting the UPR, greater discernment is needed regarding how the UPR regulates cytokine production during specific infections and autoimmune processes, and the relative place of this interaction in pathogenesis.

  17. Differential effect of glucocorticoids on tumour necrosis factor production in mice: up-regulation by early pretreatment with dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantuzzi, G; Demitri, M T; Ghezzi, P

    1994-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are well known inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production. We investigated the role of endogenous GC in the regulation of TNF production in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a pretreatment with dexamethasone (DEX) to down-regulate the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). Short-term DEX pretreatment (up to 12 h before LPS) inhibited TNF production, but earlier (24-48 h) pretreatments potentiated it. This up-regulating effect was not observed in adrenalectomized mice or when GC synthesis was inhibited with cyanoketone (CK). This effect could not be explained only by the suppression of LPS-induced corticosterone (CS) levels induced by DEX, since a 48-h pretreatment potentiated TNF production without affecting LPS-induced CS levels. On the other hand, mice chronically pretreated with DEX were still responsive to its inhibitory effect on TNF production, thus ruling out the possibility of a decreased responsiveness to GC.

  18. Multiple-level regulation of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol production by the sigma regulator PsrA in Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 is a rhizospheric bacterium that aggressively colonizes the plant roots. It produces the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphoroglucinol (2,4-DAPG, which contributes to the protection of various crop plants against soil borne diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens. The biosynthesis of 2,4-DAPG is regulated at the transcriptional level in the expression of the phlACBD operon as well as at the posttranscriptional level by the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway. However, the detailed mechanism of such regulation is not clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we identified a binding site for the sigma regulator PsrA in the promoter region of the phlA gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift experiments revealed direct and specific binding of PsrA to the phlA promoter region. Consistent with the fact that its binding site locates within the promoter region of phlA, PsrA negatively regulates phlA expression, and its inactivation led to significant increase in 2,4-DAPG production. Interestingly, PsrA also activates the expression of the sigma factor RpoS, which negatively regulates 2,4-DAPG production by inducing the expression of the RNA-binding protein RsmA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that PsrA is an important regulator that modulates 2,4-DAPG biosynthesis at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  19. Production of Cellulases by Rhizopus stolonifer from Glucose-Containing Media Based on the Regulation of Transcriptional Regulator CRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingyiing; Tang, Bin; Du, Guocheng

    2017-03-28

    Carbon catabolite repression is a crucial regulation mechanism in microorganisms, but its characteristic in Rhizopus is still unclear. We extracted a carbon regulation gene, cre , that encoded a carbon catabolite repressor protein (CRE) from Rhizopus stolonifer TP-02, and studied the regulation of CRE by real-time qPCR. CRE responded to glucose in a certain range, where it could significantly regulate part of the cellulase genes ( eg, bg, and cbh2 ) without cbh1 . In the comparison of the response of cre and four cellulase genes to carboxymethylcellulose sodium and a simple carbon source (lactose), the effect of CRE was only related to the concentration of reducing sugars. By regulating the reducing sugars to range from 0.4% to 0.6%, a glucose-containing medium with lactose as the inducer could effectively induce cellulases without the repression of CRE. This regulation method could potentially reduce the cost of enzymes produced in industries and provide a possible solution to achieve the large-scale synthesis of cellulases.

  20. The Impact of Agricultural Products Insurance on Using Technical-Healthy Regulations of Production: A Case Study of Industrial Livestock and Apple Farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Falsafian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural insurance is considered as a support policy that reduces negative effects of risk in agricultural farms. In addition, it can improve managerial behavior of insured and technical-healthy regulations of production by using some special tools. This study investigated the impact ofinsurance of agricultural products insurance on using technical-healthy regulations of production in industrial livestock farms at Khorasan province and apple farms at Damavand County. To this end, the required data were survyed from the farms; then it was statistically analyzed. Results indicated that the insurance has exactly significant influence on using any of technical-healthy regulations of production in industrial livestock farms; whereas the insurance does not have any significant influence in the apple farms. In addition, it was also found out that the greatest influence of insurance was in industrial livestock and apple farms that had less than 200 animals and 3 hectares farms, respectively.

  1. Abnormal regulation for progesterone production in placenta with prenatal cocaine exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L; Yan, J; Qu, S C; Feng, Y Q; Jiang, X L

    2012-12-01

    Cocaine abuse in pregnant women is currently a significant public hygiene problem and is tightly associated with elevated risk for preterm delivery. Placental steroidogenesis especially progesterone production was essential for success and maintenance of pregnancy in humans and rodents. In the present study, we determined the impact of prenatal cocaine exposure on pathways of placental progesterone synthesis in rats. Pregnant rats were treated cocaine twice daily (15 mg/kg/day) during the third trimester, and the maternal and fetal plasma progesterone and pregnenolone concentrations were detected. We also examined both the protein and mRNA expression of some key enzymes and regulators for progesterone production in placenta. Results showed that, after maternal cocaine use during pregnancy, progesterone and pregnenolone concentrations in both maternal and fetal rats were significantly decreased. Although prenatal cocaine exposure had no effects on placental 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3βHSD1) expression, protein and mRNA expression of the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc/CYP11a) in placenta was significantly inhibited. Moreover, protein and mRNA expressions of MLN64 that regulating cholesterol transport and activating protein 2γ (AP2γ/Tfap2c) that controlling P450scc/CYP11a gene expression in placenta were both decreased following maternal cocaine use in pregnancy. Collectively, this study suggested that prenatal cocaine exposure could insult the placental progesterone production in rats possibly associated with the high risk for preterm delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TRIM11 negatively regulates IFNβ production and antiviral activity by targeting TBK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younglang Lee

    Full Text Available The innate immune response is a host defense mechanism against infection by viruses and bacteria. Type I interferons (IFNα/β play a crucial role in innate immunity. If not tightly regulated under normal conditions and during immune responses, IFN production can become aberrant, leading to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified TRIM11 (tripartite motif containing 11 as a novel negative regulator of IFNβ production. Ectopic expression of TRIM11 decreased IFNβ promoter activity induced by poly (I:C stimulation or overexpression of RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I signaling cascade components RIG-IN (constitutively active form of RIG-I, MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein, or TBK1 (TANK-binding kinase-1. Conversely, TRIM11 knockdown enhanced IFNβ promoter activity induced by these stimuli. Moreover, TRIM11 overexpression inhibited the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3 and expression of IFNβ mRNA. By contrast, TRIM11 knockdown increased the IRF3 phosphorylation and IFNβ mRNA expression. We also found that TRIM11 and TBK1, a key kinase that phosphorylates IRF3 in the RIG-I pathway, interacted with each other through CC and CC2 domain, respectively. This interaction was enhanced in the presence of the TBK1 adaptor proteins, NAP1 (NF-κB activating kinase-associated protein-1, SINTBAD (similar to NAP1 TBK1 adaptor or TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator. Consistent with its inhibitory role in RIG-I-mediated IFNβ signaling, TRIM11 overexpression enhanced viral infectivity, whereas TRIM11 knockdown produced the opposite effect. Collectively, our results suggest that TRIM11 inhibits RIG-I-mediated IFNβ production by targeting the TBK1 signaling complex.

  3. Nitric oxide interacts with salicylate to regulate biphasic ethylene production during the hypersensitive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mur, Luis A J; Laarhoven, Lucas J J; Harren, Frans J M; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Aileen R

    2008-11-01

    C(2)H(4) is associated with plant defense, but its role during the hypersensitive response (HR) remains largely uncharacterized. C(2)H(4) production in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) following inoculation with HR-eliciting Pseudomonas syringae pathovars measured by laser photoacoustic detection was biphasic. A first transient rise (C(2)H(4)-I) occurred 1 to 4 h following inoculation with HR-eliciting, disease-forming, and nonpathogenic strains and also with flagellin (flg22). A second (avirulence-dependent) rise, at approximately 6 h (C(2)H(4)-II), was only seen with HR-eliciting strains. Tobacco leaves treated with the C(2)H(4) biosynthesis inhibitor, aminoethoxyvinylglycine, suggested that C(2)H(4) influenced the kinetics of a HR. Challenging salicylate hydroxylase-expressing tobacco lines and tissues exhibiting systemic acquired resistance suggested that C(2)H(4) production was influenced by salicylic acid (SA). Disrupted expression of a C(2)H(4) biosynthesis gene in salicylate hydroxylase tobacco plants implicated transcriptional control as a mechanism through which SA regulates C(2)H(4) production. Treating leaves to increase oxidative stress or injecting with SA initiated monophasic C(2)H(4) generation, but the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside initiated biphasic rises. To test whether NO influenced biphasic C(2)H(4) production during the HR, the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester was coinoculated with the avirulent strain of P. syringae pv phaseolicola into tobacco leaves. The first transient C(2)H(4) rise appeared to be unaffected by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but the second rise was reduced. These data suggest that NO and SA are required to generate the biphasic pattern of C(2)H(4) production during the HR and may influence the kinetics of HR formation.

  4. Role of opioid peptides in the regulation of cytokine production by murine CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bergh, P; Dobber, R; Ramlal, S; Rozing, J; Nagelkerken, L

    1994-03-01

    The presence of the opioid peptides alpha- and beta-endorphin (-End) but not methionine enkephalin (Met-enk) in in vitro cultures of purified CD4+ T cells, stimulated with concanavalin A in the presence of irradiated spleen cells, resulted in a threefold stimulation of IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-gamma production. The stimulating effect was dependent on the concentration of the peptides and reached optimal values in the dose range from 10(-12) to 10(-10) M. Similar results were obtained when purified CD4+ T cells were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3, indicating a direct effect of opioid peptides on CD4+ T cells. Moreover, in this system a twofold enhancement of IL-6, but not IL-1, secretion was observed. These stimulatory effects were not mediated through opioid receptors since the peptide fragment beta-End6-31 that lacks the N-terminal opioid receptor binding part was still stimulatory. This is in agreement with our finding that beta-End did not affect cAMP, as described for the triggering of classical opioid receptors. Experiments undertaken to reveal the mechanism of action of opioid peptides suggest an overall enhancement of lymphokine production: (1) enhancement of IL-4 production occurred also in the presence of excess IL-2; and (2) neither IL-1 receptor-antagonizing protein nor anti-IL-6 were capable to abrogate the stimulatory effect on IL-2 and IL-4 production. Finally, the presence and activity of opioid receptors in cultures of CD4+ T cells were substantiated by the fact that the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone by itself enhanced cytokine synthesis, which points to the endogenous production by lymphocytes of down-regulating opioid peptides.

  5. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Ryan D; Hsu, Alan C-Y; Nichol, Kristy S; Jones, Bernadette; Knight, Darryl A; Wark, Peter A B; Hansbro, Philip M; Hirota, Jeremy A

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production. Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM) and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies. HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4) inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells. Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  6. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan D Huff

    Full Text Available The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production.Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies.HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4 inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells.Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  7. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Ryan D.; Hsu, Alan C-Y.; Nichol, Kristy S.; Jones, Bernadette; Knight, Darryl A.; Wark, Peter A. B.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production. Materials and methods Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM) and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies. Results HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4) inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:28863172

  8. Basic Science and Public Policy: Informed Regulation for Nicotine and Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Christie D; Gipson, Cassandra D; Kleykamp, Bethea A; Rupprecht, Laura E; Harrell, Paul T; Rees, Vaughan W; Gould, Thomas J; Oliver, Jason; Bagdas, Deniz; Damaj, M Imad; Schmidt, Heath D; Duncan, Alexander; De Biasi, Mariella

    2017-08-03

    Scientific discoveries over the past few decades have provided significant insight into the abuse liability and negative health consequences associated with tobacco and nicotine-containing products. While many of these advances have led to the development of policies and laws that regulate access to and formulations of these products, further research is critical to guide future regulatory efforts, especially as novel nicotine-containing products are introduced and selectively marketed to vulnerable populations. In this narrative review, we provide an overview of the scientific findings that have impacted regulatory policy and discuss considerations for further translation of science into policy decisions. We propose that open, bidirectional communication between scientists and policy makers is essential to develop transformative preventive- and intervention-focused policies and programs to reduce appeal, abuse liability, and toxicity of the products. Through these types of interactions, collaborative efforts to inform and modify policy have the potential to significantly decrease the use of tobacco and alternative nicotine products and thus enhance health outcomes for individuals. This work addresses current topics in the nicotine and tobacco research field to emphasize the importance of basic science research and provide examples of how it can be utilized to inform public policy. In addition to relaying current thoughts on the topic from experts in the field, the article encourages continued efforts and communication between basic scientists and policy officials. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Further European initiatives and regulations concerning radiation protection: drinking water guideline, maximum permissible contamination in food products and feeding stuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundigl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The radiation protection community has observed intensively the development of basic safety standards concerning protection against hazards of ionizing radiation. The new core part of the European radiation protection legislation is complemented by several specialized regulations relevant for radiation protection. Besides the existing regulations in the field of emergency protection the European Commission initiated a drinking water guideline that will be published in the near future. Furthermore the European commission approved a revised regulation concerning the maximum permissible contamination limits for food products and feeding stuff in case of a future nuclear accident. Together with the new radiation protection basic standards a new complete, coherent and modernized European regulation package will be accomplished.

  10. Role of glycolytic intermediate in regulation: Improving lycopene production in Escherichia coli by engineering metabolic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, W.R.; Liao, J.C.

    2001-06-01

    Metabolic engineering in the postgenomic era is expected to benefit from a full understanding of the biosynthetic capability of microorganisms as a result of the progress being made in bioinformatics and functional genomics. The immediate advantage of such information is to allow the rational design of novel pathways and the elimination of native reactions that are detrimental or unnecessary for the desired purpose. However, with the ability to manipulate metabolic pathways becoming more effective, metabolic engineering will need to face a new challenge: the reengineering of the regulatory hierarchy that controls gene expression in those pathways. In addition to constructing the genetic composition of a metabolic pathway, they propose that it will become just as important to consider the dynamics of pathways gene expression. It has been widely observed that high-level induction of a recombinant protein or pathway leads to growth retardation and reduced metabolic activity. These phenotypic characteristics result from the fact that the constant demands of production placed upon the cell interfere with its changing requirements for growth. They believe that this common situation in metabolic engineering can be alleviated by designing a dynamic controller that is able to sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate the expression of the recombinant pathway accordingly. This approach, which is termed metabolic control engineering, involves redesigning the native regulatory circuits and applying them to the recombinant pathway. The general goal of such an effort will be to control the flux to the recombinant pathway adaptively according to the cell's metabolic state. The dynamically controlled recombinant pathway can potentially lead to enhanced production, minimized growth retardation, and reduced toxic by-product formation. The regulation of gene expression in response to the physiological state is also essential to the success of gene therapy. Here they

  11. Stakeholders' perspectives on the regulation and integration of complementary and alternative medicine products in Lebanon: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Naja, Farah; Abdel-Salam, Sarah; Maalouf, Salwa; Matta, Claudia

    2011-08-28

    The regulation of the markets for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) products presents a global challenge. There is a dearth of studies that have examined or evaluated the regulatory policies of CAM products in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR). We investigate the regulatory frameworks and the barriers for the proper regulation and integration of CAM products in Lebanon, as an example of an EMR country with a weak public infrastructure. We utilized a qualitative study design involving a series of semi-structured interviews with stakeholders of the CAM market in Lebanon. Snowball sampling was used to identify interviewees; interviews continued until the "saturation" point was reached. A total of 16 interviews were carried out with decision makers, representatives of professional associations, academic researchers, CAM product importers, policy makers and a media representative. Interviews were transcribed and thematic analysis of scripts was carried out. There was a consensus among all stakeholders that the regulation of the market for CAM products in Lebanon needs to be strengthened. Thematic analysis identified a number of impediments jeopardizing the safety of public consumption and hindering the integration of CAM therapies into mainstream medicine; including: weak infrastructure, poor regulation, ineffective policies and politics, weak CAM awareness and sub-optimal coordination and cooperation among stakeholders. With respect to policy instruments, voluntary instruments (self regulation) were deemed ineffective by stakeholders due to poor awareness of both users and providers on safe use of CAM products. Stakeholders' rather recommended the adoption of a combination of mixed (enhancing public awareness and integration of CAM into medical and nursing curricula) and compulsory (stricter governmental regulation) policy instruments for the regulation of the market for CAM products. The current status quo with respect to the regulation of CAM products

  12. Improving fatty acids production by engineering dynamic pathway regulation and metabolic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Li, Lingyun; Zhang, Fuming; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Koffas, Mattheos

    2014-01-01

    Global energy demand and environmental concerns have stimulated increasing efforts to produce carbon-neutral fuels directly from renewable resources. Microbially derived aliphatic hydrocarbons, the petroleum-replica fuels, have emerged as promising alternatives to meet this goal. However, engineering metabolic pathways with high productivity and yield requires dynamic redistribution of cellular resources and optimal control of pathway expression. Here we report a genetically encoded metabolic switch that enables dynamic regulation of fatty acids (FA) biosynthesis in Escherichia coli. The engineered strains were able to dynamically compensate the critical enzymes involved in the supply and consumption of malonyl-CoA and efficiently redirect carbon flux toward FA biosynthesis. Implementation of this metabolic control resulted in an oscillatory malonyl-CoA pattern and a balanced metabolism between cell growth and product formation, yielding 15.7- and 2.1-fold improvement in FA titer compared with the wild-type strain and the strain carrying the uncontrolled metabolic pathway. This study provides a new paradigm in metabolic engineering to control and optimize metabolic pathways facilitating the high-yield production of other malonyl-CoA–derived compounds. PMID:25049420

  13. DasR is a pleiotropic regulator required for antibiotic production, pigment biosynthesis, and morphological development in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Cheng-Heng; Xu, Ya; Rigali, Sébastien; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-12-01

    The GntR-family transcription regulator, DasR, was previously identified as pleiotropic, controlling the primary amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and chitin metabolism in Saccharopolyspora erythraea and Streptomyces coelicolor. Due to the remarkable regulatory impact of DasR on antibiotic production and development in the model strain of S. coelicolor, we here identified and characterized the role of DasR to secondary metabolite production and morphological development in industrial erythromycin-producing S. erythraea. The physiological studies have shown that a constructed deletion of dasR in S. erythraea resulted in antibiotic, pigment, and aerial hyphae production deficit in a nutrient-rich condition. DNA microarray assay, combined with quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), confirmed these results by showing the downregulation of the genes relating to secondary metabolite production in the dasR null mutant. Notably, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed DasR as being the first identified regulator that directly regulates the pigment biosynthesis rpp gene cluster. In addition, further studies indicated that GlcNAc, the major nutrient signal of DasR-responsed regulation, blocked secondary metabolite production and morphological development. The effects of GlcNAc were shown to be caused by DasR mediation. These findings demonstrated that DasR is an important pleiotropic regulator for both secondary metabolism and morphological development in S. erythraea, providing new insights for the genetic engineering of S. erythraea with increased erythromycin production.

  14. 75 FR 391 - Medical Device Quality System Regulation Educational Forum on Risk Management Through the Product...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... Cycle; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop...), is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Medical Device Quality System Regulation Educational Forum... information about FDA's Medical Device Quality Systems Regulation (QSR) to the regulated industry...

  15. New genetic regulators question relevance of abundant yolk protein production in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rompay, Liesbeth; Borghgraef, Charline; Beets, Isabel; Caers, Jelle; Temmerman, Liesbet

    2015-11-10

    Vitellogenesis or maternal yolk formation is considered critical to the reproduction of egg-laying animals. In invertebrates, however, most of its regulatory genes are still unknown. Via a combined mapping and whole-genome sequencing strategy, we performed a forward genetic screen to isolate novel regulators of yolk production in the nematode model system Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition to isolating new alleles of rab-35, rab-10 and M04F3.2, we identified five mutant alleles corresponding to three novel regulatory genes potently suppressing the expression of a GFP-based yolk reporter. We confirmed that mutations in vrp-1, ceh-60 and lrp-2 disrupt endogenous yolk protein synthesis at the transcriptional and translational level. In contrast to current beliefs, our discovered set of mutants with strongly reduced yolk proteins did not show serious reproduction defects. This raises questions as to whether yolk proteins per se are needed for ultimate reproductive success.

  16. Natural regulation of Delia radicum in organic cabbage production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyling, Nicolai Vitt; Navntoft, Søren; Philipsen, Holger Frederik

    2013-01-01

    In a field experiment, we evaluated effects of three different organic white cabbage-cropping systems (O1, O2, O3) on the cabbage root fly, Delia radicum, and its egg predators and pupal parasitoids over 3 years. The three systems all complied with regulations for organic production, but varied...... in external nutrient input and N-recycling, and were compared to a conventionally farmed control. One organic system (O3) included an intercropped strip of green manure between crop rows. Oviposition by D. radicum was generally not reduced in organic cropping systems. However, higher pupae/egg ratios were...... observed in the conventional compared to all organic systems, indicating that immature survival from oviposition to pupation was reduced under all the three organic farming practices. In organic system O2 most small coleopteran predators were recorded, but predation on fly eggs was not significantly higher...

  17. Expression of TEX101, regulated by ACE, is essential for the production of fertile mouse spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Tokuhiro, Keizo; Muro, Yuko; Kondoh, Gen; Araki, Yoshihiko; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Formation of spermatozoa of normal shape, number, and motility is insufficient for the male siring of pups. The spermatozoa must be accompanied by sound fertilizing ability. We found that males with disrupted testis-expressed gene 101 (Tex101) produce normal-looking but fertilization-incompetent spermatozoa, which were accompanied by a deficiency of a disintegrin and metallopeptidase domain 3 (ADAM3) on sperm plasma membrane. It was also found that the existence of TEX101 on spermatozoa was regulated by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). The removal of GPI-anchored protein TEX101 by ACE was essential to produce fertile spermatozoa, and the function of ACE was not depending on its well-known peptidase activity. The finding of TEX101 as a unique specific substrate for ACE may provide a potential target for the production of an awaited contraceptive medicine for men. PMID:23633567

  18. Insulin-like peptide 5 is a microbially regulated peptide that promotes hepatic glucose production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying Shiuan; De Vadder, Filipe; Tremaroli, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a recently identified gut hormone that is produced predominantly by L-cells in the colon, but its function is unclear. We have previously shown that colonic expression of the gene for the L-cell hormone GLP-1 is high in mice that lack a microbiota...... expression in the brain was higher in CONV-R versus GF mice. We also observed that colonic Insl5 expression was suppressed by increasing the energy supply in GF mice by colonization or high-fat feeding. We did not observe any differences in food intake, gut transit or oral glucose tolerance between Insl5......-/- and wild-type mice. However, we showed impaired intraperitoneal glucose tolerance in Insl5-/- mice. We also observed improved insulin tolerance and reduced hepatic glucose production in Insl5-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: We have shown that colonic Insl5 expression is regulated by the gut microbiota and energy...

  19. Regulation – Do or Die: An Analysis of Factors Critical to New Product Development in a Regulatory Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare O'Dwyer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores new product development in a strict regulatory and historically secretive environment. Adopting a systems perspective and a mixed methods approach in our research, we examine medical device development in Ireland. Findings indicate that the possession of a regulatory strategy expedites the rate of commercialization, so too does the generation of clear product definitions and marketing claims in the earliest developmental phases. Moreover, results suggest that if the regulated industry strengthens its culture for regulation by prioritizing regulation over speed to market, by encouraging cross-functional team collaborations, and by taking a more proactive approach in post-marketing surveillance activities, it has the potential to improve customer satisfaction and enhance product innovation. This study provides unique empirical data enriched by the homogeneity of its sample. It also contributes guidance to practitioners of new product development within a regulatory context.

  20. Estrogen regulates progesterone production by human placental trophoblast cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    We have suggested that estrogen regulates placental low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake and thus progesterone (P 4 ) production during primate pregnancy based on results obtained in antiestrogen-treated baboons. The objectives of the present study, were to determine whether estrogen is also important to regulation of P 4 formation by the human placenta, and whether effects of estrogen were mediated by availability of cholesterol substrate via the LDL, de novo, or deesterification pathways. Term human placenta were dispersed in 0.125% trypsin, cytotrophoblasts were purified via a 70-5% Percoll gradient, incubated 72 h in DMEM with 10% FBS to stimulate formation of syncytia, then incubated an additional 48 h with estradiol (E2). In Experiment 1, 1 μg/ml E 2 and 500 μg/MI LDL-protein, stimulated P 4 (P 2 increased LDL uptake. Scatchard analysis indicated that trophoblast uptake of [ 125 I]LDL (ng/mg cell protein) was 50% greater (P 2 (mean ± SE, 638 +/- 23; n = 6) than DMEM in the presence of antiestrogen MER-25. Moreover, uptake and degradation of LDL, and cellular content of free and esterified cholesterol, increased in a dose-dependent manner with 0.1 to 1000 ng/ml E 2 . These results suggest that estrogen regulates placental cell uptake of LDL and thus availability of cholesterol for P 4 biosynthesis during human pregnancy. In Experiment 2, E 2 Stimulated P 4 formation (ng/mg cell protein/48 h) from a control level of 194 ± 25 to 357 ± 62, in the absence of LDL. Under these conditions, cholesterol for P 4 biosynthesis must have been derived from de novo synthesis and/or deesterification of cholesteryl ester stores

  1. Advanced Glycation End-Products affect transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puddu, A.; Storace, D.; Odetti, P.; Viviani, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are generated by the covalent interaction of reducing sugars with proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. AGEs are implicated in diabetic complications and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that exposure of the pancreatic islet cell line HIT-T15 to high concentrations of AGEs leads to a significant decrease of insulin secretion and content. Insulin gene transcription is positively regulated by the beta cell specific transcription factor PDX-1 (Pancreatic and Duodenal Homeobox-1). On the contrary, the forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits PDX-1 gene transcription. Activity of FoxO1 is regulated by post-translational modifications: phosphorylation deactivates FoxO1, and acetylation prevents FoxO1 ubiquitination. In this work we investigated whether AGEs affect expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1 and FoxO1. HIT-T15 cells were cultured for 5 days in presence of AGEs. Cells were then lysed and processed for subcellular fractionation. We determined intracellular insulin content, then we assessed the expression and subcellular localization of PDX-1, FoxO1, phosphoFoxO1 and acetylFoxO1. As expected intracellular insulin content was lower in HIT-T15 cells cultured with AGEs. The results showed that AGEs decreased expression and nuclear localization of PDX-1, reduced phosphorylation of FoxO1, and increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. These results suggest that AGEs decrease insulin content unbalancing transcription factors regulating insulin gene expression.

  2. Current products and future plan of regulatory research for risk-informed regulation in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Key Yong; Lee, Chang Ju; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2003-01-01

    The first phase of a regulatory research project for risk-informed regulation (RIR) and applications (RIA) was finished in March of 2002. Various results that could be useful for preparing Korean RIR system have been developed. One of the remarkable outputs is development of reactor safety goals and acceptance criteria for RIR and RIA in Korea. The Safety Goal has a 4-tier hierarchical structure and each tier has specified goals classified for their usage. Regulatory review guides for probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) including level-1, level-2 and low power and shutdown PSA have been updated by reflecting new information obtained from not only the overseas documents but also experience and insights from regulatory review in Korea. In addition, draft regulatory guides for risk-informed in-service inspection, in-service testing, importance ranking of motor-operated valves, and AOT/STI change of Technical Specifications have been developed for preparing ongoing and future licensing work. Risk-based inspection guides with inspection items selected from a viewpoint of risk importance have been suggested for Korean standard NPPs as well. In the second phase of a research project (April of 2002 to March of 2005), two regulatory research projects on RIR were initiated. One is a study on institutionalization of risk-informed and performance-based regulation. Main topics of this project are evaluation of benefit and characteristics of RIR, development of optimized Korean RIR model, impact analysis for the change of current regulation framework, and suggestion of RIR-related laws and rules. The other is focusing on the development in the areas of a regulatory audit PSA model and regulatory guides for risk monitoring, and application techniques of risk information to the significance determination of plant performance indicators and inspection findings. It is expected that a concrete scheme and detailed regulatory techniques for embodiment of RIR system in Korea will be

  3. Regulation of soybean seed germination through ethylene production in response to reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Koda, Yuka; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite their toxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in plant cell signalling pathways, such as mediating responses to stress or infection and in programmed cell death, at lower levels. Although studies have indicated that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) promotes seed germination of several plants such as Arabidopsis, barley, wheat, rice and sunflower, the role of H2O2 in soybean seed germination is not well known. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the relationships between ROS, plant hormones and soybean seed germination. Methods An examination was made of soybean seed germination, the expression of genes related to ethylene biosynthesis, endogenous ethylene contents, and the number and area of cells in the root tip, using N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, to counteract the effect of ROS. Key Results H2O2 promoted germination, which N-acetylcysteine suppressed, suggesting that ROS are involved in the regulation of soybean germination. H2O2 was produced in the embryonic axis after imbibition. N-Acetylcysteine suppressed the expression of genes related to ethylene biosynthesis and the production of endogenous ethylene. Interestingly, ethephon, which is converted to ethylene, and H2O2 reversed the suppression of seed germination by N-acetylcysteine. Furthermore, morphological analysis revealed that N-acetylcysteine suppressed cell elongation at the root tip, and this suppression was also reversed by ethephon or H2O2 treatments, as was the case in germination. Conclusions In soybean seeds, ROS produced in the embryonic axis after imbibition induce the production of endogenous ethylene, which promotes cell elongation in the root tip. This appears to be how ROS regulate soybean seed germination. PMID:23131300

  4. Klotho expression in long bones regulates FGF23 production during renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Komaba, Hirotaka; Sato, Tadatoshi; Erben, Reinhold G; Baron, Roland; Olauson, Hannes; Larsson, Tobias E; Lanske, Beate

    2017-05-01

    Circulating levels of bone-derived fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) increase early during acute and chronic kidney disease and are associated with adverse outcomes. Membrane-bound Klotho acts as a permissive coreceptor for FGF23, and its expression was recently found in osteoblasts/osteocytes. We hypothesized that Klotho in bone cells is part of an autocrine feedback loop that regulates FGF23 expression during renal failure. Thus, we induced renal failure in mice with targeted deletion of Klotho in long bones. Uremic wild-type ( KL fl/fl ) and knockout ( Prx1-Cre;KL fl/fl ) mice both responded with reduced body weight, kidney atrophy, hyperphosphatemia, and increased bone turnover. Importantly, long bones of Prx1-Cre;KL fl/fl mice but not their axial skeleton failed to increase FGF23 expression as observed in uremic KL fl/fl mice. Consequently, Prx1-Cre;KL fl/fl mice had significantly lower serum FGF23 and parathyroid hormone levels, and higher renal 1-α-hydroxylase expression, serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and calcium levels than KL fl/fl mice. These results were confirmed in two independent models of renal failure, adenine diet induced and 5/6 nephrectomy. Moreover, FGF23-treated bone cells required Klotho to increase FGF23 mRNA and ERK phosphorylation. In summary, our novel findings show that Klotho in bone is crucial for inducing FGF23 production upon renal failure. We propose the presence of an autocrine feedback loop in which Klotho senses the need for FGF23.-Kaludjerovic, J., Komaba, H., Sato, T., Erben, R. G., Baron, R., Olauson, H., Larsson, T. E., Lanske, B. Klotho expression in long bones regulates FGF23 production during renal failure. © FASEB.

  5. Impact of Environmental Regulation and Technical Progress on Industrial Carbon Productivity: An Approach Based on Proxy Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the main influencing factors of China’s industrial carbon productivity by incorporating environmental regulation and technical progress into an econometric model. The paper focuses on data from 35 of China’s industrial sectors and covers the period from 2006 to 2014, in order to examine the impact of environmental regulation and technical progress on carbon productivity. Methods applied include panel fixed effect model, panel random effect model and two stage least squares with instrumental variables (IV-2SLS. The effect of environmental regulation and technical progress has industrial heterogeneity. The paper subdivides industrial sectors into capital and technology intensive, resource intensive and labor intensive sectors according to factor intensiveness. The estimation results of the subgroups have uncovered that for capital and technology intensive and resource intensive sectors, environmental regulation has a more significant impact than technical progress; while for labor intensive sectors, innovation more significantly influences carbon productivity. In addition, foreign direct investment (FDI and industrialization level facilitate improving carbon productivity for the full sample. By contrast, industrial structure inhibits the overall industrial carbon productivity. The industry-specific results indicate that for capital and technology intensive sectors, optimizing of the industrial structure can improve carbon productivity; for resource intensive sectors, FDI and energy consumption structure should be emphasized more; for labor intensive sectors, industrialization levels help enhance carbon productivity. Finally the industrial sector-specific policy suggestions are proposed.

  6. Developmentally regulated sesquiterpene production confers resistance to Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in ripe pepper fruits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangkyu Park

    Full Text Available Sesquiterpenoid capsidiol, exhibiting antifungal activity against pathogenic fungus, is accumulated in infected ripe pepper fruits. In this study, we found a negative relation between the capsidiol level and lesion size in fruits infected with Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, depending on the stage of ripening. To understand the developmental regulation of capsidiol biosynthesis, fungal-induced gene expressions in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways were examined in unripe and ripe pepper fruits. The sterol biosynthetic pathway was almost shut down in healthy ripe fruits, showing very low expression of hydroxymethyl glutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR and squalene synthase (SS genes. In contrast, genes in the carotenoid pathway were highly expressed in ripe fruits. In the sesquiterpene pathway, 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (EAS, belonging to a sesquiterpene cyclase (STC family, was significantly induced in the ripe fruits upon fungal infection. Immunoblot and enzyme activity analyses showed that the STCs were induced both in the infected unripe and ripe fruits, while capsidiol was synthesized discriminatively in the ripe fruits, implying diverse enzymatic specificity of multiple STCs. Thereby, to divert sterol biosynthesis into sesquiterpene production, infected fruits were pretreated with an SS inhibitor, zaragozic acid (ZA, resulting in increased levels of capsidiol by more than 2-fold in the ripe fruits, with concurrent reduction of phytosterols. Taken together, the present results suggest that the enhanced expression and activity of EAS in the ripe fruits play an important role in capsidiol production, contributing to the incompatibility between the anthracnose fungus and the ripe pepper fruits.

  7. SlyA regulates phytotoxin production and virulence in Dickeya zeae EC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia-Nuan; Zhang, Hai-Bao; Lv, Ming-Fa; Chen, Yu-Fan; Liao, Li-Sheng; Cheng, Ying-Ying; Liu, Shi-Yin; Chen, Shao-Hua; He, Fei; Cui, Zi-Ning; Jiang, Zi-De; Chang, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2016-12-01

    Dickeya zeae is a causal agent of rice root rot disease. The pathogen is known to produce a range of virulence factors, including phytotoxic zeamines and extracellular enzymes, but the mechanisms of virulence regulation remain vague. In this study, we identified a SlyA/MarR family transcription factor SlyA in D. zeae strain EC1. Disruption of slyA significantly decreased zeamine production, enhanced swimming and swarming motility, reduced biofilm formation and significantly decreased pathogenicity on rice. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis confirmed the role of SlyA in transcriptional modulation of a range of genes associated with bacterial virulence. In trans expression of slyA in expI mutants recovered the phenotypes of motility and biofilm formation, suggesting that SlyA is downstream of the acylhomoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing pathway. Taken together, the findings from this study unveil a key transcriptional regulatory factor involved in the modulation of virulence factor production and overall pathogenicity of D. zeae EC1. © 2016 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Toxicant exposure from smoking a little cigar: further support for product regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickworth, Wallace B; Rosenberry, Zachary R; Koszowski, Bartosz

    2017-05-01

    Although numerous studies have documented the prevalence and increasing use of little cigars and other cigar products, the present study is the first direct, head-to-head laboratory comparison of little cigar and cigarette smoking. The study addressed a fundamental objective to compare exposure and use characteristics of little cigar and cigarette smoking. Smoking patterns, toxicant exposure and subjective measures were collected and analysed in 21 adults after smoking a little cigar (Winchester) and a cigarette (own brand). Participants were dual users of little cigars and cigarettes. Similar to cigarettes, little cigars delivered substantial nicotine and relatively more carbon monoxide. Puff volume, puff duration and time to smoke were significantly greater after cigarettes, but the temporal pattern of smoking more intensively at the beginning was similar in little cigars and cigarettes. Both little cigars and cigarettes reduced urge to smoke. Participants consistently mentioned that the lower cost of little cigars was a reason for initiation and continuation of their use. The results support the notion that regulation of little cigars is appropriate in light of public health considerations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. NLRP12 negatively regulates proinflammatory cytokine production and host defense against Brucella abortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Tatiana N; Gomes, Marco Túlio R; Oliveira, Luciana S; Campos, Priscila C; Machado, Gabriela G; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2017-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the causative agent of brucellosis, which causes abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever in humans. This bacterium infects and proliferates mainly in macrophages and dendritic cells, where it is recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including Nod-like receptors (NLRs). Our group recently demonstrated the role of AIM2 and NLRP3 in Brucella recognition. Here, we investigated the participation of NLRP12 in innate immune response to B. abortus. We show that NLRP12 inhibits the early production of IL-12 by bone marrow-derived macrophages upon B. abortus infection. We also observed that NLRP12 suppresses in vitro NF-κB and MAPK signaling in response to Brucella. Moreover, we show that NLRP12 modulates caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in B. abortus infected-macrophages. Furthermore, we show that mice lacking NLRP12 are more resistant in the early stages of B. abortus infection: NLRP12 -/- infected-mice have reduced bacterial burdens in the spleens and increased production of IFN-γ and IL-1β compared with wild-type controls. In addition, NLRP12 deficiency leads to reduction in granuloma number and size in mouse livers. Altogether, our findings suggest that NLRP12 plays an important role in negatively regulating the early inflammatory responses against B. abortus. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Developmentally Regulated Production of meso-Zeaxanthin in Chicken Retinal Pigment Epithelium/Choroid and Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorusupudi, Aruna; Shyam, Rajalekshmy; Li, Binxing; Vachali, Preejith; Subhani, Yumna K; Nelson, Kelly; Bernstein, Paul S

    2016-04-01

    meso-Zeaxanthin is a carotenoid that is rarely encountered in nature outside of the vertebrate eye. It is not a constituent of a normal human diet, yet this carotenoid comprises one-third of the primate macular pigment. In the current study, we undertook a systematic approach to biochemically characterize the production of meso-zeaxanthin in the vertebrate eye. Fertilized White Leghorn chicken eggs were analyzed for the presence of carotenoids during development. Yolk, liver, brain, serum, retina, and RPE/choroid were isolated, and carotenoids were extracted. The samples were analyzed on C-30 or chiral HPLC columns to determine the carotenoid composition. Lutein and zeaxanthin were found in all studied nonocular tissues, but no meso-zeaxanthin was ever detected. Among the ocular tissues, the presence of meso-zeaxanthin was consistently observed starting at embryonic day 17 (E17) in the RPE/choroid, several days before its consistent detection in the retina. If RPE/choroid of an embryo was devoid of meso-zeaxanthin, the corresponding retina was always negative as well. This is the first report of developmentally regulated synthesis of meso-zeaxanthin in a vertebrate system. Our observations suggest that the RPE/choroid is the primary site of meso-zeaxanthin synthesis. Identification of meso-zeaxanthin isomerase enzyme in the developing chicken embryo will facilitate our ability to determine the biochemical mechanisms responsible for production of this unique carotenoid in other higher vertebrates, such as humans.

  11. The role of nitrogen and phosphorus in regulating Phormidium sp. (cyanobacteria) growth and anatoxin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Mark; Wood, Susie A; Young, Roger G; Ryan, Ken G

    2016-03-01

    Benthic proliferations of the cyanobacteria Phormidium can cover many kilometres of riverbed. Phormidium can produce neurotoxic anatoxins and ingestion of benthic mats has resulted in numerous animal poisonings in the last decade. Despite this, there is a poor understanding of the environmental factors regulating growth and anatoxin production. In this study, the effects of nitrogen and phosphorus on the growth of two Phormidium strains (anatoxin-producing and non-anatoxin-producing) were examined in batch monocultures. Cell concentrations were significantly reduced under reduced nitrogen (ca. production. Cellular anatoxin concentrations were lowest (169 fg cell(-1)) under the high-nitrogen and high-phosphorus treatment. This supports the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis that suggests actively dividing and expanding cells are less likely to produce secondary-metabolites. Anatoxin quota was highest (>407 fg cell(-1)) in the reduced phosphorus treatments, possibly suggesting that it is produced as a stress response to growth limiting conditions. In all treatments there was a 4-5-fold increase in anatoxin quota in the lag growth phase, possibly indicating it may provide a physiological benefit during initial substrate colonization. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A family of indoles regulate virulence and Shiga toxin production in pathogenic E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Bommarius

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC are intestinal pathogens that cause food and water-borne disease in humans. Using biochemical methods and NMR-based comparative metabolomics in conjunction with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we developed a bioassay to identify secreted small molecules produced by these pathogens. We identified indole, indole-3-carboxaldehyde (ICA, and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, as factors that only in combination are sufficient to kill C. elegans. Importantly, although lethal to C. elegans, these molecules downregulate several bacterial processes important for pathogenesis in mammals. These include motility, biofilm formation and production of Shiga toxins. Some pathogenic E. coli strains are known to contain a Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE, which encodes virulence factors that cause "attaching and effacing" (A/E lesions in mammals, including formation of actin pedestals. We found that these indole derivatives also downregulate production of LEE virulence factors and inhibit pedestal formation on mammalian cells. Finally, upon oral administration, ICA inhibited virulence and promoted survival in a lethal mouse infection model. In summary, the C. elegans model in conjunction with metabolomics has facilitated identification of a family of indole derivatives that broadly regulate physiology in E. coli, and virulence in pathogenic strains. These molecules may enable development of new therapeutics that interfere with bacterial small-molecule signaling.

  13. Regulation of nitric oxide production by δ-opioid receptors during glaucomatous injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Husain

    Full Text Available To determine the roles of nitric oxide in glaucomatous injury and its regulation by δ-opioid-receptor activation, animals were treated with: 1 a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor (aminoguanidine; AG; 25 mg/kg, i.p.; 2 δ-opioid-receptor agonist (SNC-121; 1 mg/kg, i.p.; or 3 with both drugs simultaneously for 7 days, once daily. The loss in retinal ganglion cell (RGC numbers and their function in glaucomatous eyes were significantly improved in the presence of AG or SNC-121; however, we did not see any significant additive or synergistic effects when animals were treated with both drugs simultaneously. The levels of nitrate-nitrite were significantly increased in the glaucomatous retina when compared with normal retina (normal retina 86±9 vs. glaucomatous retina 174±10 mM/mg protein, which was reduced significantly when animals were treated either with SNC-121 (121±7 mM/mg protein; P<0.05 or AG (128±10 mM/mg protein; P<0.05. Additionally, SNC-121-mediated reduction in nitrate-nitrite levels was not only blocked by naltrindole (a δ-opioid-receptor antagonist, but naltrindole treatment potentiated the nitrate-nitrite production in glaucomatous retina (235±4 mM/mg protein; P<0.001. As expected, naltrindole treatment also fully-blocked SNC-121-mediated retina neuroprotection. The nitrotyrosine level in the glaucomatous retina was also increased, which was significantly reduced in the SNC-121-treated animals. Additionally, the expression level of iNOS was clearly increased over the control levels in the glaucomatous retina and optic nerves, which was also reduced by SNC-121 treatment. In conclusion, our data support the notion that nitric oxide plays a detrimental role during glaucomatous injury and inhibition of nitric oxide production provided RGC neuroprotection. Furthermore, δ-opioid receptor activation regulates the production of nitric oxide via inhibiting the activity of iNOS in the retina and optic nerve.

  14. The global regulator LaeA controls production of citric acid and endoglucanases in Aspergillus carbonarius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Tore; Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The global regulatory protein LaeA is known for regulating the production of many kinds of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus species, as well as sexual and asexual reproduction, and morphology. In Aspergillus carbonarius, it has been shown that LaeA regulates production of ochratoxin. We have...... investigated the regulatory effect of LaeA on production of citric acid and cellulolytic enzymes in A. carbonarius. Two types of A. carbonarius strains, having laeA knocked out or overexpressed, were constructed and tested in fermentation. The knockout of laeA significantly decreased the production of citric...... acid and endoglucanases, but did not reduce the production of beta-glucosidases or xylanases. The citric acid accumulation was reduced with 74–96 % compared to the wild type. The endoglucanase activity was reduced with 51–78 %. Overexpression of LaeA seemed not to have an effect on citric acid...

  15. Endothelial surface glycocalyx can regulate flow-induced nitric oxide production in microvessels in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanyi Yen

    Full Text Available Due to its unique location, the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG at the luminal side of the microvessel wall may serve as a mechano-sensor and transducer of blood flow and thus regulate endothelial functions. To examine this role of the ESG, we used fluorescence microscopy to measure nitric oxide (NO production in post-capillary venules and arterioles of rat mesentery under reduced (low and normal (high flow conditions, with and without enzyme pretreatment to remove heparan sulfate (HS of the ESG and in the presence of an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA. Rats (SD, 250-300 g were anesthetized. The mesentery was gently taken out from the abdominal cavity and arranged on the surface of a glass coverslip for the measurement. An individual post-capillary venule or arteriole was cannulated and loaded for 45 min with 5 μM 4, 5-Diaminofluorescein diacetate, a membrane permeable fluorescent indictor for NO, then the NO production was measured for ~10 min under a low flow (~300 μm/s and for ~60 min under a high flow (~1000 μm/s. In the 15 min after switching to the high flow, DAF-2-NO fluorescence intensity increased to 1.27-fold of its baseline, DAF-2-NO continuously increased under the high flow, to 1.53-fold of its baseline in 60 min. Inhibition of eNOS by 1 mM L-NMMA attenuated the flow-induced NO production to 1.13-fold in 15 min and 1.30-fold of its baseline in 60 min, respectively. In contrast, no significant increase in NO production was observed after switching to the high flow for 60 min when 1 h pretreatment with 50 mU/mL heparanase III to degrade the ESG was applied. Similar NO production was observed in arterioles under low and high flows and under eNOS inhibition. Our results suggest that ESG participates in endothelial cell mechanosensing and transduction through its heparan sulfate to activate eNOS.

  16. Prostaglandin D2 production in FM55 melanoma cells is regulated by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and is not related to melanin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Mojgan; Nicolaou, Anna; Gledhill, Karl; Rhodes, Lesley E; Tobin, Desmond J; Thody, Anthony J

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that prostaglandins in human FM55 melanoma cells and epidermal melanocytes are produced by COX-1. Prostaglandin production in FM55 melanoma cells was unrelated to that of melanin suggesting that the two processes can occur independently. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone, which had no effect on melanin production in FM55 cells, stimulated PGD2 production in these cells without affecting PGE2. While cAMP pathways may be involved in regulating PGD2 production, our results suggest that α-MSH acts independently of cAMP, possibly by regulating the activity of lipocalin-type PGD synthase. This α-MSH-mediated effect may be associated with its role as an immune modulator. PMID:20482620

  17. Natural products, an important resource for discovery of multitarget drugs and functional food for regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Sijian; Wang, Wei; Chen, Qian; Ma, Yanmin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is one of the critical pathologic events in the development of metabolic syndromes (MSs). Therefore, regulation of imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is important in drug development for MS treatment. In this review, we discuss the major targets that regulate hepatic glucose homeostasis in human physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, involving hepatic glucose uptake, glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, and summarize their changes in MSs. Recent literature suggests the necessity of multitarget drugs in the management of MS disorder for regulation of imbalanced glucose homeostasis in both experimental models and MS patients. Here, we highlight the potential bioactive compounds from natural products with medicinal or health care values, and focus on polypharmacologic and multitarget natural products with effects on various signaling pathways in hepatic glucose metabolism. This review shows the advantage and feasibility of discovering multicompound-multitarget drugs from natural products, and providing a new perspective of ways on drug and functional food development for MSs.

  18. 15-Lipoxygenases regulate the production of chemokines in human lung macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrial, C; Grassin-Delyle, S; Salvator, H; Brollo, M; Naline, E; Devillier, P

    2015-09-01

    15-Lipoxygenase (15-LOX) activity is associated with inflammation and immune regulation. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the expression of 15-LOX-1 and 15-LOX-2 and evaluate the enzymes' roles in the polarization of human lung macrophages (LMs) in response to LPS and Th2 cytokines (IL-4/-13). LMs were isolated from patients undergoing surgery for carcinoma. The cells were cultured with a 15-LOX inhibitor (PD146176 or ML351), a COX inhibitor (indomethacin), a 5-LOX inhibitor (MK886) or vehicle and then stimulated with LPS (10 ng · mL(-1)), IL-4 (10 ng · mL(-1)) or IL-13 (50 ng · mL(-1)) for 24 h. Levels of ALOX15 (15-LOX-1) and ALOX15B (15-LOX-2) transcripts were determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Immunoassays were used to measure levels of LPS-induced cytokines (TNF-α, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CXCL1, CXCL8 and CXCL10) and Th2 cytokine-induced chemokines (CCL13, CCL18 and CCL22) in the culture supernatant. Stimulation of LMs with LPS was associated with increased expression of ALOX15B, whereas stimulation with IL-4/IL-13 induced the expression of ALOX15. PD146176 and ML351 (10 μM) reduced the release of the chemokines induced by LPS and Th2 cytokines. The effects of these 15-LOX inhibitors were maintained in the presence of indomethacin and MK886. Furthermore, indomethacin revealed the inhibitory effect of PD146176 on TNF-α release. Inhibition of the 15-LOX pathways is involved in the down-regulation of the in vitro production of chemokines in LMs. Our results suggest that the 15-LOX pathways have a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung disorders and may thus constitute a potential drug target. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Lessons from the 'Humanitarian Golden Rice' project: regulation prevents development of public good genetically engineered crop products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrykus, Ingo

    2010-11-30

    Compared to a non-Genetically Engineered (GE) variety, the deployment of Golden Rice has suffered from a delay of at least ten years. The cause of this delay is exclusively GE-regulation. Considering the potential impact of Golden Rice on the reduction in vitamin A-malnutrition, this delay is responsible for an unjustifiable loss of millions of lives, mostly children and women. GE-regulation is also responsible for the fact that no public institution can deliver a public good GE-product and that thus we have a de facto monopoly in favour of a few potent industries. Considering the forgone benefits from prevented public good GE-products, GE-regulation is responsible for hundreds of millions of lives, all of them, of course, in developing countries. As there is no scientific justification for present GE-regulation, and as it has, so far, not prevented any harm, our society has the urgent responsibility to reconsider present regulation, which is based on an extreme interpretation of the precautionary principle, and change it to science-based regulation on the basis of traits instead of technology. GE-technology has an unprecedented safety record and is far more precise and predictable than any other 'traditional' and unregulated breeding technology. Not to change GE-regulation to a scientific basis is considered by the author 'a crime against humanity'. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Interleukin 2-regulated in vitro antibody production following a single spinal manipulative treatment in normal subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodorczyk-Injeyan Julita A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our recent investigations have demonstrated that cell cultures from subjects, who received a single spinal manipulative treatment in the upper thoracic spine, show increased capacity for the production of the key immunoregulatory cytokine, interleukin-2. However, it has not been determined if such changes influence the response of the immune effector cells. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine whether, in the same subjects, spinal manipulation-related augmentation of the in vitro interleukin-2 synthesis is associated with the modulation of interleukin 2-dependent and/or interleukin-2-induced humoral immune response (antibody synthesis. Methods A total of seventy-four age and sex-matched healthy asymptomatic subjects were studied. The subjects were assigned randomly to: venipuncture control (n = 22, spinal manipulative treatment without cavitation (n = 25 or spinal manipulative treatment associated with cavitation (n = 27 groups. Heparinized blood samples were obtained from the subjects before (baseline and then at 20 minutes and 2 hours post-treatment. Immunoglobulin (antibody synthesis was induced in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by stimulation with conventional pokeweed mitogen or by application of human recombinant interleukin-2. Determinations of the levels of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M production in culture supernatants were performed by specific immunoassays. Results The baseline levels of immunoglobulin synthesis induced by pokeweed mitogen or human recombinant interleukin-2 stimulation were comparable in all groups. No significant changes in the production of pokeweed mitogen-induced immunoglobulins were observed during the post-treatment period in any of the study groups. In contrast, the production of interleukin-2 -induced immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M was significantly increased in cultures from subjects treated with spinal manipulation. At 20 min post

  1. Hydrogen peroxide prevents vascular calcification induced ROS production by regulating Nrf-2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wensong; Li, Yi; Ding, Hanlu; Du, Yaqin; Wang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Although vascular calcification in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) represents a ubiquitous human health problem, effective therapies with limited side effects are still lacking, and the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. The Nrf-2/ARE pathway is a pivotal to regulate anti-oxidative responses in vascular calcification upon ESRD. Although Nrf-2 plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis, pulmonary fibrosis, and brain ischemia, the effect of Nrf-2 and oxidative stress on vascular calcification in ESRD patients is still unclear. The aim of this research was to study the protective role of hydrogen peroxide in vascular calcification and the mechanism of Nrf-2 and oxidative stress on vascular calcification. Here we used the rat vascular smooth muscle cell model of β-glycerophosphate-induced calcification resembling vascular calcification in ESRD to investigate the therapeutic effect of 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide on vascular calcification and further explores the possible underlying mechanisms. Our current report shows the in vitro role of 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide in protecting against intracellular ROS accumulation upon vascular calcification. Both hydrogen peroxide and sulforaphane pretreatment reduced ROS production, increased the expression of Nrf-2, and decreased the expression of Runx2 following calcification. Our study demonstrates that 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide can effectively protect rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells against oxidative stress by preventing vascular calcification induced ROS production through Nrf-2 pathway. These data might define an antioxidant role of hydrogen peroxide in vascular calcification upon ESRD.

  2. Dairy product intake in relation to glucose regulation indices and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struijk, E A; Heraclides, A; Witte, Daniel Rinse

    2013-01-01

    and milk products, cheese and fermented dairy. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose (2hPG), HbA(1c), insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR) and beta-cell function (HOMA2-B) were considered at 5-year follow-up. In the maximally-adjusted model (demographics, lifestyle factors, dietary factors and waist......), cheese intake was inversely associated with 2hPG (β = -0.048, 95% CI -0.095; -0.001). Fermented dairy intake was inversely associated with FPG (β = -0.028, 95% CI -0.048; -0.008) and HbA(1c) (β = -0.016, 95% CI -0.030; -0.001). Total dairy intake and the dairy subgroups were not related to HOMA......-IR and HOMA-B in the maximally-adjusted model. Furthermore, there was no significant association between intake of total dairy or any of the dairy subgroups and incidence of T2D. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest a modest beneficial effect of cheese and fermented dairy on glucose regulation measures; however...

  3. THADA Regulates the Organismal Balance between Energy Storage and Heat Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Alexandra; Cakan-Akdogan, Gulcin; Strassburger, Katrin; Males, Matilda; Mueller, Sandra; Jabs, Markus; Muelleder, Michael; Frejno, Martin; Braeckman, Bart P; Ralser, Markus; Teleman, Aurelio A

    2017-04-10

    Human susceptibility to obesity is mainly genetic, yet the underlying evolutionary drivers causing variation from person to person are not clear. One theory rationalizes that populations that have adapted to warmer climates have reduced their metabolic rates, thereby increasing their propensity to store energy. We uncover here the function of a gene that supports this theory. THADA is one of the genes most strongly selected during evolution as humans settled in different climates. We report here that THADA knockout flies are obese, hyperphagic, have reduced energy production, and are sensitive to the cold. THADA binds the sarco/ER Ca 2+ ATPase (SERCA) and acts on it as an uncoupler. Reducing SERCA activity in THADA mutant flies rescues their obesity, pinpointing SERCA as a key effector of THADA function. In sum, this identifies THADA as a regulator of the balance between energy consumption and energy storage, which was selected during human evolution. Copyright © 2017 The Francis Crick Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiological Impacts and Regulation of Rare Earth Elements in Non-Nuclear Energy Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Ault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy industries account for a significant portion of total rare earth usage, both in the US and worldwide. Rare earth minerals are frequently collocated with naturally occurring radioactive material, imparting an occupational radiological dose during recovery. This paper explores the extent to which rare earths are used by various non-nuclear energy industries and estimates the radiological dose which can be attributed to these industries on absolute and normalized scales. It was determined that typical rare earth mining results in an occupational collective dose of approximately 0.0061 person-mSv/t rare earth elements, amounting to a total of 330 person-mSv/year across all non-nuclear energy industries (about 60% of the annual collective dose from one pressurized water reactor operated in the US, although for rare earth mining the impact is spread out over many more workers. About half of the collective dose from non-nuclear energy production results from use of fuel cracking catalysts for oil refining, although given the extent of the oil industry, it is a small dose when normalized to the energy equivalent of the oil that is used annually. Another factor in energy industries’ reliance on rare earths is the complicated state of the regulation of naturally occurring radiological materials; correspondingly, this paper also explores regulatory and management implications.

  5. Bayesian Computational Approaches for Gene Regulation Studies of Bioethanol and Biohydrogen Production. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newberg, Lee; McCue, Lee Anne; Van Roey, Patrick

    2014-04-17

    The project developed mathematical models and first-version software tools for the understanding of gene regulation across multiple related species. The project lays the foundation for understanding how certain alpha-proteobacterial species control their own genes for bioethanol and biohydrogen production, and sets the stage for exploiting bacteria for the production of fuels. Enabling such alternative sources of fuel is a high priority for the Department of Energy and the public.

  6. The tripeptide feG regulates the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species by neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison Joseph S

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The D-isomeric form of the tripeptide FEG (feG is a potent anti-inflammatory agent that suppresses type I hypersensitivity (IgE-mediated allergic reactions in several animal species. One of feG's primary actions is to inhibit leukocyte activation resulting in loss of their adhesive and migratory properties. Since activation of neutrophils is often associated with an increase in respiratory burst with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, we examined the effect of feG on the respiratory burst in neutrophils of antigen-sensitized rats. A role for protein kinase C (PKC in the actions of feG was evaluated by using selective isoform inhibitors for PKC. Results At 18h after antigen (ovalbumin challenge of sensitized Sprague-Dawley rats a pronounced neutrophilia occurred; a response that was reduced in animals treated with feG (100 μg/kg. With antigen-challenged animals the protein kinase C (PKC activator, PMA, significantly increased intracellular ROS of circulating neutrophils, as determined by flow cytometry using the fluorescent probe dihydrorhodamine-123. This increase was prevented by treatment with feG at the time of antigen challenge. The inhibitor of PKCδ, rottlerin, which effectively prevented intracellular ROS production by circulating neutrophils of animals receiving a naïve antigen, failed to inhibit PMA-stimulated ROS production if the animals were challenged with antigen. feG treatment, however, re-established the inhibitory effects of the PKCδ inhibitor on intracellular ROS production. The extracellular release of superoxide anion, evaluated by measuring the oxidative reduction of cytochrome C, was neither modified by antigen challenge nor feG treatment. However, hispidin, an inhibitor of PKCβ, inhibited the release of superoxide anion from circulating leukocytes in all groups of animals. feG prevented the increased expression of the β1-integrin CD49d on the circulating neutrophils elicited by antigen

  7. Fis is a global regulator critical for modulation of virulence factor production and pathogenicity of Dickeya zeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Mingfa; Chen, Yufan; Liao, Lisheng; Liang, Zhibin; Shi, Zurong; Tang, Yingxin; Ye, Sixuan; Zhou, Jianuan; Zhang, Lianhui

    2018-01-10

    Dickeya zeae is the causal agent of rice foot rot disease, which has recently become a great threat to rice planting countries and regions. The pathogen produces a family of phytotoxins named zeamines that is critical for bacterial virulence, but little is known about the signaling pathways and regulatory mechanisms that govern zeamine production. In this study, we showed that a conserved transcriptional regulator Fis is involved in the regulation of zeamine production in D. zeae strain EC1. Deletion mutants were markedly attenuated in the virulence against rice seed germination. Transcriptome and phenotype analyses showed that Fis is a potent global transcriptional regulator modulating various virulence traits, including production of extracellular enzymes and exopolysaccharides, swimming and swarming motility, biofilm formation and cell aggregation. DNA gel retardation analysis showed that Fis directly regulates the transcription of key virulence genes and the genes encoding Vfm quorum sensing system through DNA/protein interaction. Our findings unveil a key regulator associated with the virulence of D. zeae EC1, and present useful clues for further elucidation of the regulatory complex and signaling pathways which govern the virulence of this important pathogen.

  8. Evaluation of petroleum products pricing regulation in Nova Scotia : a 2 year review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    Gasoline price regulation was introduced in Nova Scotia on July 1st, 2006. This report presented the findings and recommendations of a review of the first two years of the gasoline price regulation in Nova Scotia. The regulations had three main objectives. This review examined whether, and to what extent, they were achieved. The objectives were to stabilize price, maintain industry infrastructure, and minimize cost to consumers. The report described the rationale for the regulation, study objectives, and approach taken to gasoline regulation in Nova Scotia, including the objectives and technical aspects of how regulation works. The gasoline market in Nova Scotia was examined, including the market structure and competitive behaviour in an unregulated market. The report also provided some theoretical perspectives on how regulation was likely to affect industry structure and competitive behaviour. The extent to which the regulation was meeting its objectives was then assessed and perspectives on the regulation from consumers, retailers and wholesalers were offered. Last, the report provided a review of the findings in terms of the key elements of regulatory design and set out recommendations for improving the system. It was recommended that in order to improve certainty, particularly given the regulated price differences amongst grades, the regulations should be amended to include grade specifications referencing octane ratings. tabs., figs

  9. Petroleum products price regulation in Nov Scotia : a six-month review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Gasoline pricing regulation was introduced in July 2006 in order to achieve the following 3 main objectives: (1) stabilize prices by reducing the frequency of price changes and creating more uniform pricing across the province, (2) maintain industry infrastructure by slowing or halting the decline in the dealer network, particularly in rural areas, by improving viability through regulated margins, and (3) minimize the cost to consumers since higher prices are expected to result from the actions needed to maintain price stability and the higher margins needed to maintain industry infrastructure. This report examined the extent to which these objectives were achieved and contained the findings and recommendations of a review of the first six months of gasoline price regulation in Nova Scotia. The report discussed the rationale for regulation, study objectives, approach, and warning signs. It also discussed gasoline regulation in Nova Scotia including how regulation works and implementing regulation. The Nova Scotia gasoline market was presented with reference to industry structure; pre-regulation competition and pricing; and how regulation may affect structure and competition. Last, the report discussed whether regulation was meeting the objectives and perspectives on regulation. Several recommendations were presented, such as reducing the benchmark price adjustment period from two weeks to one week; removing the price cap on full-serve gasoline; adopting a fixed and transparent formula for forward averaging and applying it at each adjustment; and considering a framework for regulatory review. 12 refs., 15 figs

  10. The Regulation of Behavioral Plasticity by Performance-Based Feedback and an Experimental Test with Avian Egg Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockman, Keith W

    2016-05-01

    Optimizing plasticity in behavioral performances requires the abilities to regulate physiological effort and to estimate the effects of the environment. To describe how performance-based feedback could play a role in regulating recursive or continuous behavioral performances, I developed two models, one (environmental feedback) that assumes an initial ability to regulate effort but not to predict the effects of the environment and the other (effort feedback) that assumes an initial ability to predict the effects of the environment but not to regulate effort. I tested them by manipulating feedback on egg production, using an egg-substitution experiment in wild, free-ranging Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii). I discovered that females adjusted the size of their clutches' third laid eggs in response to the size of an experimentally substituted first laid egg, such that the size of the third laid egg increased with the size of the substitute. Results were largely consistent with the environmental feedback model, though small portions of the response surface were consistent with the effort feedback model or with neither. Regardless, such feedback-based regulation predicted by either model may help females maximize net benefits of egg production and may be a basis for mechanisms regulating a wide range of other behavioral performances, as well.

  11. Regulation of coronafacoyl phytotoxin production by the PAS-LuxR family regulator CfaR in the common scab pathogen Streptomyces scabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhenlong; Bown, Luke; Tahlan, Kapil; Bignell, Dawn R D

    2015-01-01

    Potato common scab is an economically important crop disease that is characterized by the formation of superficial, raised or pitted lesions on the potato tuber surface. The most widely distributed causative agent of the disease is Streptomyces scabies, which produces the phytotoxic secondary metabolite thaxtomin A that serves as a key virulence factor for the organism. Recently, it was demonstrated that S. scabies can also produce the phytotoxic secondary metabolite coronafacoyl-L-isoleucine (CFA-L-Ile) as well as other related metabolites in minor amounts. The expression of the biosynthetic genes for CFA-L-Ile production is dependent on a PAS-LuxR family transcriptional regulator, CfaR, which is encoded within the phytotoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in S. scabies. In this study, we show that CfaR activates coronafacoyl phytotoxin production by binding to a single site located immediately upstream of the putative -35 hexanucleotide box within the promoter region for the biosynthetic genes. The binding activity of CfaR was shown to require both the LuxR and PAS domains, the latter of which is involved in protein homodimer formation. We also show that CFA-L-Ile production is greatly enhanced in S. scabies by overexpression of both cfaR and a downstream co-transcribed gene, orf1. Our results provide important insight into the regulation of coronafacoyl phytotoxin production, which is thought to contribute to the virulence phenotype of S. scabies. Furthermore, we provide evidence that CfaR is a novel member of the PAS-LuxR family of regulators, members of which are widely distributed among actinomycete bacteria.

  12. Regulation of coronafacoyl phytotoxin production by the PAS-LuxR family regulator CfaR in the common scab pathogen Streptomyces scabies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlong Cheng

    Full Text Available Potato common scab is an economically important crop disease that is characterized by the formation of superficial, raised or pitted lesions on the potato tuber surface. The most widely distributed causative agent of the disease is Streptomyces scabies, which produces the phytotoxic secondary metabolite thaxtomin A that serves as a key virulence factor for the organism. Recently, it was demonstrated that S. scabies can also produce the phytotoxic secondary metabolite coronafacoyl-L-isoleucine (CFA-L-Ile as well as other related metabolites in minor amounts. The expression of the biosynthetic genes for CFA-L-Ile production is dependent on a PAS-LuxR family transcriptional regulator, CfaR, which is encoded within the phytotoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in S. scabies. In this study, we show that CfaR activates coronafacoyl phytotoxin production by binding to a single site located immediately upstream of the putative -35 hexanucleotide box within the promoter region for the biosynthetic genes. The binding activity of CfaR was shown to require both the LuxR and PAS domains, the latter of which is involved in protein homodimer formation. We also show that CFA-L-Ile production is greatly enhanced in S. scabies by overexpression of both cfaR and a downstream co-transcribed gene, orf1. Our results provide important insight into the regulation of coronafacoyl phytotoxin production, which is thought to contribute to the virulence phenotype of S. scabies. Furthermore, we provide evidence that CfaR is a novel member of the PAS-LuxR family of regulators, members of which are widely distributed among actinomycete bacteria.

  13. Nitric oxide production by Biomphalaria glabrata haemocytes: effects of Schistosoma mansoni ESPs and regulation through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Ruth S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosoma mansoni uses Biomphalaria glabrata as an intermediate host during its complex life cycle. In the snail, the parasite initially transforms from a miracidium into a mother sporocyst and during this process excretory-secretory products (ESPs are released. Nitric oxide (NO and its reactive intermediates play an important role in host defence responses against pathogens. This study therefore aimed to determine the effects of S. mansoni ESPs on NO production in defence cells (haemocytes from schistosome-susceptible and schistosome-resistant B. glabrata strains. As S. mansoni ESPs have previously been shown to inhibit extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation (activation in haemocytes from susceptible, but not resistant, B. glabrata the regulation of NO output by ERK in these cells was also investigated. Results Haemocytes from resistant snails challenged with S. mansoni ESPs (20 μg/ml over 5 h displayed an increase in NO production that was 3.3 times greater than that observed for unchallenged haemocytes; lower concentrations of ESPs (0.1–10 μg/ml did not significantly increase NO output. In contrast, haemocytes from susceptible snails showed no significant change in NO output following challenge with ESPs at any concentration used (0.1–20 μg/ml. Western blotting revealed that U0126 (1 μM or 10 μM blocked the phosphorylation (activation status of ERK in haemocytes from both snail strains. Inhibition of ERK signalling by U0126 attenuated considerably intracellular NO production in haemocytes from both susceptible and resistant B. glabrata strains, identifying ERK as a key regulator of NO output in these cells. Conclusion S. mansoni ESPs differentially influence intracellular NO levels in susceptible and resistant B. glabrata haemocytes, possibly through modulation of the ERK signalling pathway. Such effects might facilitate survival of S. mansoni in its intermediate host.

  14. Lactobacillus Acidophilus Strain L-92 Regulates the Production of Th1 Cytokine as well as Th2 Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Torii

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: Oral L-92 administration regulated both Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses, suppressed serum OVA-specific IgE, and induced TGF-β production in PPs. TGF-β is known to be associated with activation of regulatory T (Treg cells. These data suggest that LAB may have immunomodulative effect by Treg cells via TGF-β activity.

  15. Regulation of fluid flow through the mammary gland of dairy cows and its effect on milk production: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Wang, Diming; Liu, Jianxin

    2018-03-01

    Dairy milk consists of more than 85% water. Therefore, understanding the regulation of fluid absorption in the mammary gland is relevant to improving milk production. In recent decades, studies using different approaches, including blood flow, transmembrane fluid flow, tight junction, fluid flow of the paracellular pathway and functional mammary epithelial cell state, have been conducted aiming to investigate how mammary gland fluid absorption is regulated. However, the relationship between regulation mechanisms of fluid flow and milk production has not been studied systematically. The present review summarizes a series of key milk yield regulatory factors mediated by whole-mammary fluid flow, including milk, mammary blood flow, blood/tissue fluid-cell fluid flow and cell-alveolus fluid flow. Whole-mammary fluid flow regulates milk production by altering transporter activity, ion channels, local microcirculation-related factors, driving force of fluid transport (osmotic pressure or electrochemical gradient), cellular connection state and a cell volume sensitive mechanism. In addition, whole-mammary fluid flow plays important roles in milk synthesis and secretion. Knowledge gained from fluid flow-mediated regulatory mechanisms of the dairy mammary gland will lead to a fundamental understanding of lactation biology and will be beneficial for the improvement of dairy productivity. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Administration of JTE013 abrogates experimental asthma by regulating proinflammatory cytokine production from bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashita, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Nagano, Tatsuya; Kawa, Yoshitaka; Tamura, Daisuke; Nakata, Kyosuke; Yamamoto, Masatsugu; Tachihara, Motoko; Kamiryo, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-09

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive phospholipid that acts as a signal transducer by binding to S1P receptors (S1PR) 1 to 5. The S1P/S1PRs pathway has been associated with remodeling and allergic inflammation in asthma, but the expression pattern of S1PR and its effects on non-immune cells have not been completely clarified. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of the signaling of S1P and S1PRs expressed in airway epithelial cells (ECs) to asthma responses in mice. Bronchial asthma was experimentally induced in BALB/c mice by ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization followed by an OVA inhalation challenge. The effects of S1PR antagonists on the development of asthma were analyzed 24 h after the OVA challenge. Immunohistological analysis revealed S1PR1-3 expression on mouse airway ECs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that S1P greatly stimulated the induction of CCL3 and TIMP2 mRNA in human airway ECs, i.e., BEAS-2B cells, in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with the S1PR2 antagonist JTE013 inhibited the CCL3 gene expression in BEAS-2B cells. Immunohistological analysis also showed that the expression level of CCL3 was attenuated by JTE013 in asthmatic mice. Furthermore, JTE013 as well as anti-CCL3 antibody attenuated allergic responses. Intratracheal administration of JTE013 also attenuated eosinophilic reactions in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. S1P induced transcription factor NFκB activation, while JTE013 greatly reduced the NFκB activation. JTE013 attenuated allergic airway reactions by regulating CCL3 production from bronchial ECs. The intratracheal administration of JTE013 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for bronchial asthma.

  17. MeCP2 involvement in the regulation of neuronal alpha-tubulin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhatzira, Liron; Shemer, Ruth; Razin, Aharon

    2009-04-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a dominant mutation in the X-linked methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene. Neuroanatomically, RTT is characterized by a reduction in dendritic arborization and perikaryal size in the brain. MECP2 binds methylated promoters and facilitates assembly of a multiprotein repressor complex that includes Sin3A and the histone deacetylases HDAC1/HDAC2. MeCP2 has recently been found to be downregulated in autistic spectrum disorders such as Angelman syndrome (AS) and RTT, which share some phenotypic manifestations. We have conducted expression analysis of cytoskeleton-related genes in brain tissue of RTT and AS patients. Striking examples of genes with reduced expression were TUBA1B and TUBA3 that encode the ubiquitous alpha-tubulin and the neuronal specific alpha-tubulin, respectively. In accordance with the downregulation of expression of these genes, we have observed a reduction in the level of the corresponding protein product-tyrosinated alpha-tubulin. Low levels of alpha-tubulin and deteriorated cell morphology were also observed in MeCP2(-/y) MEF cells. The effects of MeCP2 deficiency in these cells were completely reversed by introducing and expressing the human MeCP2 gene. These results imply that MeCP2 is involved in the regulation of neuronal alpha-tubulin and add molecular evidence that reversal of the effects of MeCP2 deficiency is achievable. This raises hopes for a cure of Rett syndrome and related MeCP2 deficiency disorders of the autistic spectrum.

  18. Dairy product intake in relation to glucose regulation indices and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijk, E A; Heraclides, A; Witte, D R; Soedamah-Muthu, S S; Geleijnse, J M; Toft, U; Lau, C J

    2013-09-01

    A high intake of dairy has been linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The relationship between dairy intake and glucose metabolism is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the intake of total dairy and dairy subgroups and T2D and measures of glucose metabolism. A total of 5953 Danish men and women aged 30-60 years without baseline diabetes or cardiovascular diseases were included in this prospective analysis. The dairy intake at baseline was categorised into low-fat dairy, full-fat dairy, milk and milk products, cheese and fermented dairy. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose (2hPG), HbA1c, insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR) and beta-cell function (HOMA2-B) were considered at 5-year follow-up. In the maximally-adjusted model (demographics, lifestyle factors, dietary factors and waist), cheese intake was inversely associated with 2hPG (β = -0.048, 95% CI -0.095; -0.001). Fermented dairy intake was inversely associated with FPG (β = -0.028, 95% CI -0.048; -0.008) and HbA1c (β = -0.016, 95% CI -0.030; -0.001). Total dairy intake and the dairy subgroups were not related to HOMA-IR and HOMA-B in the maximally-adjusted model. Furthermore, there was no significant association between intake of total dairy or any of the dairy subgroups and incidence of T2D. Our data suggest a modest beneficial effect of cheese and fermented dairy on glucose regulation measures; however, this did not translate into a significant association with incident T2D. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in Penicillium chrysogenum is involved in regulation of beta-lactam production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykær, Jette; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Noorman, H.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between the ammonium assimilatory pathways and beta-lactam production were investigated by disruption of the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase gene (gdhA) in two industrial beta-lactam-producing strains of Penicillium chrysogenum. The strains used were an adipoyl-7-ADCA...... continued beta-lactam production for the reference strains whereas the Delta gdhA strains remained non-productive under all conditions. By overexpressing the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, the specific growth rate could be restored, but still no beta-lactam production was detected. The results...... indicate that the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase may be directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of beta-lactann production in industrial strains of P. chrysogenum....

  20. The FlbA-regulated predicted transcription factor Fum21 of Aspergillus niger is involved in fumonisin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, David; Hauer, Esther E; Ohm, Robin A; Arentshorst, Mark; Teertstra, Wieke R; Phippen, Christopher; Ram, Arthur F J; Frisvad, Jens C; Wösten, Han A B

    2018-03-01

    Aspergillus niger secretes proteins throughout the colony except for the zone that forms asexual spores called conidia. Inactivation of flbA that encodes a regulator of G-protein signaling results in colonies that are unable to reproduce asexually and that secrete proteins throughout the mycelium. In addition, the ΔflbA strain shows cell lysis and has thinner cell walls. Expression analysis showed that 38 predicted transcription factor genes are differentially expressed in strain ΔflbA. Here, the most down-regulated predicted transcription factor gene, called fum21, was inactivated. Growth, conidiation, and protein secretion were not affected in strain Δfum21. Whole genome expression analysis revealed that 63 and 11 genes were down- and up-regulated in Δfum21, respectively, when compared to the wild-type strain. Notably, 24 genes predicted to be involved in secondary metabolism were down-regulated in Δfum21, including 10 out of 12 genes of the fumonisin cluster. This was accompanied by absence of fumonisin production in the deletion strain and a 25% reduction in production of pyranonigrin A. Together, these results link FlbA-mediated sporulation-inhibited secretion with mycotoxin production.

  1. Regulations of 1 March 1983 relating to production, imports and sales of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    These regulations were issued by the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, pursuant to the Act of 19th June 1938 on the use of radium and X-rays etc. The Regulations came into force on the date they were issued. They apply to radioisotopes used for industrial, commercial, agricultural, medical and scientific purposes. (NEA) [fr

  2. SIRT3 deacetylates mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase 2 and regulates ketone body production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shimazu, Tadahiro; Hirschey, Matthew D; Hua, Lan

    2010-01-01

    with SIRT3 and in vivo by overexpression of SIRT3. Deacetylation of HMGCS2 lysines 310, 447, and 473 by incubation with wild-type SIRT3 or by mutation to arginine enhances its enzymatic activity. Molecular dynamics simulations show that in silico deacetylation of these three lysines causes conformational...... changes of HMGCS2 near the active site. Mice lacking SIRT3 show decreased β-hydroxybutyrate levels during fasting. Our findings show SIRT3 regulates ketone body production during fasting and provide molecular insight into how protein acetylation can regulate enzymatic activity....

  3. Dietary estimates of dioxins consumed in U.S. Department of Agriculture-regulated meat and poultry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearfield, Kerry L; Edwards, Sarah R; O'Keefe, Margaret M; Abdelmajid, Naser M; Blanchard, Ashley J; Labarre, David D; Bennett, Patty A

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) examined whether levels of dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) measured in FSIS-regulated meat and poultry products indicate possible concern for U.S. public health based on usual and recommended consumption patterns of meat and poultry for the U.S. population. The FSIS estimated daily dietary exposures and compared them with the reference dose (RfD) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for potential noncancer risks from 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), assuming that all measured DLCs were represented by the RfD (i.e., not just TCDD alone). The estimates indicate that a typical U.S. adult daily exposure of DLCs from FSIS-regulated products is below the EPA-established RfD. Only children consuming chronic average daily servings of meat or poultry products containing the highest measured levels of DLCs may exceed the RfD. If one follows the recommendations from the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, all expected exposures to DLCs from FSIS-regulated products are estimated to be well below the RfD.

  4. Natural products, an important resource for discovery of multitarget drugs and functional food for regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian Li,1,* Haiyang Yu,2,* Sijian Wang,1 Wei Wang,3 Qian Chen,1 Yanmin Ma,2 Yi Zhang,1 Tao Wang1 1Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, 2Department of Phytochemistry, Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China; 3Internal Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is one of the critical pathologic events in the development of metabolic syndromes (MSs. Therefore, regulation of imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is important in drug development for MS treatment. In this review, we discuss the major targets that regulate hepatic glucose homeostasis in human physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, involving hepatic glucose uptake, glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, and summarize their changes in MSs. Recent literature suggests the necessity of multitarget drugs in the management of MS disorder for regulation of imbalanced glucose homeostasis in both experimental models and MS patients. Here, we highlight the potential bioactive compounds from natural products with medicinal or health care values, and focus on polypharmacologic and multitarget natural products with effects on various signaling pathways in hepatic glucose metabolism. This review shows the advantage and feasibility of discovering multicompound–multitarget drugs from natural products, and providing a new perspective of ways on drug and functional food development for MSs. Keywords: hepatic glucose metabolism, natural products, multitarget, metabolic syndromes, drug and functional food development integrative medicine

  5. Effect of modafinil on heat production and regulation of body temperatures in cold-exposed humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, L; Jacobs, I; Bateman, W A; Vallerand, A L

    1994-11-01

    Military personnel often undergo sustained operations that affect vigilance and alertness. Pharmacological agents may be used to enhance vigilance. Most such agents also have thermogenic properties. Whether a new promising stimulant, modafinil (Lyons and French, Aviat. Space Environ. Med. 1991; 62:432-435), has a beneficial effect on cold tolerance in the military context, is not known. The goal of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the effect of this new drug on thermal balance and the regulation of body temperatures in neutral conditions and when challenged by a cold exposure. Nine subjects underwent three trials each: two in the cold (3 h at rest, 10 degrees C) 0.5 h after the ingestion of either placebo or modafinil (200 mg), and one in thermal neutrality with modafinil (same conditions except Tdb = 29.3 degrees C). As expected, cold produced a drop in Tre and Tsk and an increase in Vo2. Although non-significant, there was a tendency for a slightly greater drop in Tre with modafinil (0.65 degrees C vs. 0.57 degrees C with placebo). A similar tendency was found for the heat debt (S) which was greater with modafinil than with placebo (16.1 +/- 0.7 vs. 14.7 +/- 0.6 kJ.kg-1, respectively, +9.5%, p = 0.11). This tendency appears to be the combined result of a slightly lower mean heat production during the test and a slightly greater mean dry heat loss. When tested at thermal neutrality, the drug had no effect on any thermal or metabolic parameters. The results demonstrate that the ingestion of a single dose of modafinil has no significant acute effect on thermal balance in neutral conditions and on thermoregulation in normal subjects exposed to cold. However, a tendency for slightly greater cooling was noted with modafinil. It is not known whether the use of modafinil in conjunction with sleep deprivation (a likely scenario) could magnify this effect.

  6. The scientific basis of tobacco product regulation: second report of a WHO study group

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    ...; and, cigarette machine smoking regimens. The study group intends this new set of recommendations to be useful to WHO member states, and national policymakers and regulators in shaping tobacco control policy.--Publisher's description.

  7. Vibrio cholerae VpsT Regulates Matrix Production and Motility by Directly Sensing Cyclic di-GMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasteva, P.; Fong, J; Shikuma, N; Beyhan, S; Navarro, M; Yildiz, F; Sondermann, H

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms can switch from a planktonic, free-swimming life-style to a sessile, colonial state, called a biofilm, which confers resistance to environmental stress. Conversion between the motile and biofilm life-styles has been attributed to increased levels of the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), yet the signaling mechanisms mediating such a global switch are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcriptional regulator VpsT from Vibrio cholerae directly senses c-di-GMP to inversely control extracellular matrix production and motility, which identifies VpsT as a master regulator for biofilm formation. Rather than being regulated by phosphorylation, VpsT undergoes a change in oligomerization on c-di-GMP binding.

  8. Does regulation stimulate productivity? The effect of air quality policies on the efficiency of US power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleishman, Rachel; Alexander, Rob; Bretschneider, Stuart; Popp, David

    2009-01-01

    This research examines the effect of air quality regulations on the productivity of US power plants based on both economic and environmental outputs. Using data envelopment analysis (DEA) to estimate an efficiency measure incorporating both economic and environmental outcomes, we look at changes in efficiency in US power plants over an eleven-year time period (1994-2004) during which several different regulations were implemented for the control of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ). The paper then models how estimated efficiency behaves over time as a function of regulatory changes. Findings suggest mixed effects of regulations on power plant efficiency when pollution abatement and electricity generation are both included as outputs.

  9. 78 FR 36693 - Rules and Regulations Under the Fur Products Labeling Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... Textile Fiber Products Identification Act (``Textile Act''). Among other things, the proposed changes... enforcement issues. Specifically, many people who intend to comply with the Rules may be understandably... products are not sold as private label products; and (3) the businesses have no reason to know that the...

  10. U.S. Tobacco Growers’ Concern about the Impact of the FDA Regulation of Tobacco Products

    OpenAIRE

    Feleke, Shiferaw T.; Starnes, Jane H.; Tiller, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to establish an empirical relationship between household characteristics and tobacco growers’ perception of the impact of the FDA regulation. A logistic model is applied on primary data that came from the Center for Tobacco Grower Research’s (CTGR’s) 2011 mail survey of tobacco producers. Results indicate that over 80 percent of the sample tobacco growers are concerned about the impact of the FDA regulation. The profiles of growers who reported to be concerned ab...

  11. Successful New Product Development by Optimizing Development Process Effectiveness in Highly Regulated Sectors: The Case of the Spanish Medical Devices Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pullen, A.J.J.; Cabello-Medina, Carmen; de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.; Visscher, Klaasjan; Groen, Arend J.; Tschirky, H.; Herstatt, C.; Probert, D.; Gemunden, H.G.; Colombo, M.G.; Durand, T.; de Weerd-Nederhof, P.C.; Schweisfurth, T.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid development and commercialization of new products is of vital importance for small and medium sized enterprises (SME) in regulated sectors. Due to strict regulations, competitive advantage can hardly be achieved through the effectiveness of product concepts only. If an SME in a highly

  12. Rac1 regulates the NLRP3 inflammasome which mediates IL-1beta production in Chlamydophila pneumoniae infected human mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Eitel

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila pneumoniae causes acute respiratory tract infections and has been associated with development of asthma and atherosclerosis. The production of IL-1β, a key mediator of acute and chronic inflammation, is regulated on a transcriptional level and additionally on a posttranslational level by inflammasomes. In the present study we show that C. pneumoniae-infected human mononuclear cells produce IL-1β protein depending on an inflammasome consisting of NLRP3, the adapter protein ASC and caspase-1. We further found that the small GTPase Rac1 is activated in C. pneumoniae-infected cells. Importantly, studies with specific inhibitors as well as siRNA show that Rac1 regulates inflammasome activation in C. pneumoniae-infected cells. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae infection of mononuclear cells stimulates IL-1β production dependent on a NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated processing of proIL-1β which is controlled by Rac1.

  13. Classification of consumer products under the EU CLP Regulation: what to consider when caring for contact dermatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Possibly hazardous chemical substances and mixtures need to be clearly and correctly classified and labelled, in order for their hazards to be properly identified and communicated. As dermatologists may encounter cases of harm to patients induced by chemicals, such as chemical burns, and irritant and allergic contact dermatitis, it is essential for them to be aware of the EU CLP Regulation and its potential pitfalls. Manufacturers are required by CLP to classify their products according to the rules given in the CLP Regulation. The enforcement duty lies with the Member States and their competent authorities. Dangerous non-food consumer products have to be reported to the European Commission to be entered into the Rapid Alert System for Dangerous Non-food Products (RAPEX) notifications. The sheer complexity of the CLP Regulation and lack of awareness of its ramifications by companies, competent authorities, consumer associations and the public at large may prevent efficient enforcement actions. When dermatologists become aware of inappropriately labelled chemicals, they should inform the competent authorities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. GM-CSF and IL-4 produced by NKT cells inversely regulate IL-1β production by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sehee; Jeong, Dongjin; Oh, Sae Jin; Ahn, Jiye; Lee, Seung Hyo; Chung, Doo Hyun

    2017-02-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are distinct T cell subset that link innate and adaptive immune responses. IL-1β, produced by various immune cells, plays a key role in the regulation of innate immunity in vivo. However, it is unclear whether NKT cells regulate IL-1β production by macrophages. To address this, we co-cultured NKT cells and peritoneal macrophages in the presence of TCR stimulation and inflammasome activators. Among cytokines secreted from NKT cells, GM-CSF enhanced IL-1β production by macrophages via regulating LPS-mediated pro-IL-1β expression and NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation, whereas IL-4 enhanced M2-differentiation of macrophages and decreased IL-1β production. Together, our findings suggest the NKT cells have double-sided effects on IL-1β-mediated innate immune responses by producing IL-4 and GM-CSF. These findings may be helpful for a comprehensive understanding of NKT cell-mediated regulatory mechanisms of the pro-inflammatory effects of IL-1β in inflammatory diseases in vivo. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Models for estimation of the presence of non-regulated disinfection by-products in small drinking water systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2017-10-23

    Among all the organic disinfection by-products (DBPs), only trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) are regulated in drinking water, while most DBPs are not. Very little information exists on the occurrence of non-regulated DBPs, particularly in small water systems (SWS). Paradoxically, SWS are more vulnerable to DBPs because of a low capacity to implement adequate treatment technologies to remove DBP precursors. Since DBP analyses are expensive, usually SWS have difficulties to implement a rigorous characterization of these contaminants. The purpose of this study was to estimate non-regulated DBP levels in SWS from easy measurements of relevant parameters regularly monitored. Since no information on non-regulated DBPs in SWS was available, a sampling program was carried out in 25 SWS in two provinces of Canada. Five DBP families were investigated: THMs, HAAs, haloacetonitriles (HANs), halonitromethanes (HNMs), and haloketones (HKs). Multivariate linear mixed regression models were developed to estimate HAN, HK, and HNM levels from water quality characteristics in the water treatment plant, concentrations of regulated DBPs, and residual disinfectant levels. The models obtained have a good explanatory capacity since R 2 varies from 0.77 to 0.91 according to compounds and conditions for application (season and type of treatment). Model validation with an independent database suggested their ability for generalization in similar SWS in North America.

  16. The interim regulated legal market for NPS ('legal high') products in New Zealand: The impact of new retail restrictions and product licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Chris

    2014-01-01

    New Zealand has recently established the world's first regulated legal market for new psychoactive products (NPS) (i.e. 'legal highs'). While the new regime is currently in a transitional phase, a range of retail restrictions and an interim licensing regime for NPS products and operators has been introduced. A product safety assessment framework has been developed to determine if a product should receive an interim licence. As a result of the licensing requirements, the number of NPS retail outlets fell from 3000- 4000 largely convenience stores to 156 specialty stores, and the number of legally available NPS products fell from 200 to fewer than 46. Some of the licensed products contain potent cannabinoid compounds. The licensing system provided, for the first time, information on all the products and operators involved in the sector, and this will assist future monitoring. The effectiveness of the new product safety assessment framework will depend on the quality of the data available on adverse cases. This is a challenge as self-reported information from users is often unreliable, and some emergency department cases do not have all the information required to make an accurate assessment. These data limitations indicate the need for retrospective studies of NPS adverse cases and additional test data. While the new legislation initially reduced the number of NPS retailers by prohibiting convenience outlets, new specialized NPS retail outlets may emerge as the new sector expands. Empirical research is required to measure the impact of the reduction in retail outlets and products on NPS availability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effects of irradiation on the production of factors regulating humoral hematopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Kazuko

    1974-01-01

    Changes in factors regulating humoral hematopoiesis after irradiation were studied by intraperitoneal insertion of cellulose acetate membrane (CA membrane). There is little possibility that regulation factors is produced by macrophage itself. The growth of the colony depends mainly on increase or decrease of regulation factors in the host. However, there is a possibility that the macrophage interferes the action of these regulation factors. From the fact that there is no action of EPO (erythropoiesis) in Sl/slsup(d) mice having abnormal function of microenvironment, it is suggested that the action of EPO is brought about through the function of the microenvironment. In the analysis of the colony formation by intraperitoneal insertion of CA membrane, it is considered that the erythroblastic colony can be formed by the macrophage through the action of EPO. In short, it is concluded that factors regulating humoral hematopoiesis increased in the body of the mouse which have been irradiated to the whole body, and the increase in these factors is not constant, but remarkably changes with time. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Knowledge Management for Safety Regulators: Cooperation to Achieve a Much Needed Product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge management (KM) has been identified by a number of IAEA documents as one of the key factors that can contribute to the safe and efficient operation of nuclear facilities in Member States. The IAEA Strategic Approaches to Education and Training in Nuclear and Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety identify and underline KM as an important line of action for effective national and organizational strategies in education and training. The capacity building “umbrella concept”, developed within the Action Plan in Nuclear Safety, also recognizes KM as one of the main four pillars (Education and Training, Human Resource Development, Knowledge Management and Knowledge Networks) of capacity building. Within existing IAEA publications, there is currently no specific practical guidance on how to develop and implement KM programmes for regulators. As such, in 2014, the IAEA Steering Committee on Regulatory Capacity Building and Knowledge Management requested the IAEA to develop a publication providing such practical guidance. The objective of the publication is to provide practical guidance to Member States on how to plan, establish and maintain an effective safety KM programme for regulators of facilities and activities. The report will identify benefits and uses of KM by regulators and will describe how a regulator could use KM in support of its functions. This presentation will provide an overview of the Knowledge Management for Safety Regulators document while highlighting the cross-departmental cooperation (i.e., NS and NE) used in its development. Furthermore, this presentation will provide insight into the challenges currently being faced by safety regulators vis-à-vis KM programmes and present potential paths forward with respect to the definition of efficient and effective KM indicators. (author

  19. TGF-?1 Regulation of Estrogen Production in Mature Rat Leydig Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Man-Li; Wang, Huan; Wang, Zong-Ren; Zhang, Yu-Fen; Chen, Yan-Qiu; Zhu, Fang-Hong; Zhang, Yuan-Qiang; Ma, Jing; Li, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Besides androgens, estrogens produced in Leydig cells are also crucial for mammalian germ cell differentiation. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is now known to have multiple effects on regulation of Leydig cell function. The objective of the present study is to determine whether TGF-β1 regulates estradiol (E2) synthesis in adult rat Leydig cells and then to assess the impact of TGF-β1 on Cx43-based gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between Leydig cells. METH...

  20. Global harmonization of food safety regulation from the perspective of Korea and a novel fast automatic product recall system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Mun-Gi; Oh, Sangsuk

    2014-08-01

    Efforts have been made for global harmonization of food safety regulations among countries through international organizations such as WTO and WHO/FAO. Global harmonization of food safety regulations is becoming increasingly important for Korean consumers because more than half of food and agricultural products are imported and consumed. Through recent reorganization of the Korean government, a consolidated national food safety authority-the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS)-has been established for more efficient food safety control and better communication with consumers. The Automatic Sales Blocking System (ASBS), which blocks the sales of the recalled food products at the point of sale, has been implemented at over 40,000 retail food stores around the nation using state-of-the art information and communication technology (ICT) for faster recall of adulterated food products, and the e-Food Safety Control System has been developed for more efficient monitoring of national food safety surveillance situations. The National Food Safety Information Service was also established for monitoring and collecting food safety information and incidents worldwide, and shares relevant information with all stakeholders. The new approaches adopted by the Korean Food Safety Authority are expected to enhance public trust with regard to food safety issues and expedite the recall process of adulterated products from the market. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. The CpAL Quorum Sensing System Regulates Production of Hemolysins CPA and PFO To Build Clostridium perfringens Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shak, Joshua R.; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens strains produce severe diseases, including myonecrosis and enteritis necroticans, in humans and animals. Diseases are mediated by the production of potent toxins that often damage the site of infection, e.g., skin epithelium during myonecrosis. In planktonic cultures, the regulation of important toxins, such as CPA, CPB, and PFO, is controlled by the C. perfringens Agr-like (CpAL) quorum sensing (QS) system. Strains also encode a functional LuxS/AI-2 system. Although C. perfringens strains form biofilm-like structures, the regulation of biofilm formation is poorly understood. Therefore, our studies investigated the role of CpAL and LuxS/AI-2 QS systems and of QS-regulated factors in controlling the formation of biofilms. We first demonstrate that biofilm production by reference strains differs depending on the culture medium. Increased biomass correlated with the presence of extracellular DNA in the supernatant, which was released by lysis of a fraction of the biofilm population and planktonic cells. Whereas ΔagrB mutant strains were not able to produce biofilms, a ΔluxS mutant produced wild-type levels. The transcript levels of CpAL-regulated cpa and pfoA genes, but not cpb, were upregulated in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Accordingly, Δcpa and ΔpfoA mutants, in type A (S13) or type C (CN3685) backgrounds, were unable to produce biofilms, whereas CN3685Δcpb made wild-type levels. Biofilm formation was restored in complemented Δcpa/cpa and ΔpfoA/pfoA strains. Confocal microscopy studies further detected CPA partially colocalizing with eDNA on the biofilm structure. Thus, CpAL regulates biofilm formation in C. perfringens by increasing levels of certain toxins required to build biofilms. PMID:25824838

  2. A Nutrient-Regulated Cyclic Diguanylate Phosphodiesterase Controls Clostridium difficile Biofilm and Toxin Production during Stationary Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Erin B; McKee, Robert W; Courson, David S; Garrett, Elizabeth M; McBride, Shonna M; Cheney, Richard E; Tamayo, Rita

    2017-09-01

    The signaling molecule cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) mediates physiological adaptation to extracellular stimuli in a wide range of bacteria. The complex metabolic pathways governing c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation are highly regulated, but the specific cues that impact c-di-GMP signaling are largely unknown. In the intestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile , c-di-GMP inhibits flagellar motility and toxin production and promotes pilus-dependent biofilm formation, but no specific biological functions have been ascribed to any of the individual c-di-GMP synthases or phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Here, we report the functional and biochemical characterization of a c-di-GMP PDE, PdcA, 1 of 37 confirmed or putative c-di-GMP metabolism proteins in C. difficile 630. Our studies reveal that pdcA transcription is controlled by the nutrient-regulated transcriptional regulator CodY and accordingly increases during stationary phase. In addition, PdcA PDE activity is allosterically regulated by GTP, further linking c-di-GMP levels to nutrient availability. Mutation of pdcA increased biofilm formation and reduced toxin biosynthesis without affecting swimming motility or global intracellular c-di-GMP. Analysis of the transcriptional response to pdcA mutation indicates that PdcA-dependent phenotypes manifest during stationary phase, consistent with regulation by CodY. These results demonstrate that inactivation of this single PDE gene is sufficient to impact multiple c-di-GMP-dependent phenotypes, including the production of major virulence factors, and suggest a link between c-di-GMP signaling and nutrient availability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. An R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Regulates Eugenol Production in Ripe Strawberry Fruit Receptacles1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Puche, Laura; Molina-Hidalgo, Francisco Javier; Boersma, Maaike; Schuurink, Robert C.; López-Vidriero, Irene; Solano, Roberto; Franco-Zorrilla, José-Manuel; Caballero, José Luis; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol is a volatile phenylpropanoid that contributes to flower and ripe fruit scent. In ripe strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit receptacles, eugenol is biosynthesized by eugenol synthase (FaEGS2). However, the transcriptional regulation of this process is still unknown. We have identified and functionally characterized an R2R3 MYB transcription factor (EMISSION OF BENZENOID II [FaEOBII]) that seems to be the orthologous gene of PhEOBII from Petunia hybrida, which contributes to the regulation of eugenol biosynthesis in petals. The expression of FaEOBII was ripening related and fruit receptacle specific, although high expression values were also found in petals. This expression pattern of FaEOBII correlated with eugenol content in both fruit receptacle and petals. The expression of FaEOBII was repressed by auxins and activated by abscisic acid, in parallel to the ripening process. In ripe strawberry receptacles, where the expression of FaEOBII was silenced, the expression of CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE1 and FaEGS2, two structural genes involved in eugenol production, was down-regulated. A subsequent decrease in eugenol content in ripe receptacles was also observed, confirming the involvement of FaEOBII in eugenol metabolism. Additionally, the expression of FaEOBII was under the control of FaMYB10, another R2R3 MYB transcription factor that regulates the early and late biosynthetic genes from the flavonoid/phenylpropanoid pathway. In parallel, the amount of eugenol in FaMYB10-silenced receptacles was also diminished. Taken together, these data indicate that FaEOBII plays a regulating role in the volatile phenylpropanoid pathway gene expression that gives rise to eugenol production in ripe strawberry receptacles. PMID:25931522

  4. Intermediate Product Regulation in Tandem Solid Catalysts with Multimodal Porosity for High-Yield Synthetic Fuel Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Bartsch, Mathias; Trotuş, Ioan-Teodor; Pfänder, Norbert; Lorke, Axel; Schüth, Ferdi; Prieto, Gonzalo

    2017-09-11

    Tandem catalysis is an attractive strategy to intensify chemical technologies. However, simultaneous control over the individual and concerted catalyst performances poses a challenge. We demonstrate that enhanced pore transport within a Co/Al 2 O 3 Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst with hierarchical porosity enables its tandem integration with a Pt/ZSM-5 zeolitic hydrotreating catalyst in a spatially distant fashion that allows for catalyst-specific temperature adjustment. Nevertheless, this system resembles the case of close active-site proximity by mitigating secondary reactions of primary FT α-olefin products. This approach enables the combination of in situ dewaxing with a minimum production of gaseous hydrocarbons (18 wt %) and an up to twofold higher (50 wt %) selectivity to middle distillates compared to tandem pairs based on benchmark mesoporous FT catalysts. An overall 80 % selectivity to liquid hydrocarbons from syngas is attained in one step, attesting to the potential of this strategy for increasing the carbon efficiency in intensified gas-to-liquid technologies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor regulates interleukin-6 production by facilitating nuclear factor-kappa B activation during Vibrio vulnificus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Pui-Ching

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients infected with Vibrio vulnificus (V. vulnificus show severe inflammatory responses characterised by the upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF, an upstream proinflammatory regulator, increases the inflammation caused by sepsis. Whether MIF regulates responses to V. vulnificus infection and the actual mechanism by which V. vulnificus initiates these MIF-modulated proinflammatory cytokines remain unclear. Results MIF increased inflammation during V. vulnificus infection in vivo. In V. vulnificus-infected mice, MIF was produced earlier than tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6 and was expressed in a time-dependent manner. ISO-1 ((S, R-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole acetic acid methyl ester, a small-molecule inhibitor of MIF, significantly decreased IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α production in a time- and dose-dependent manner in human peripheral blood cells infected with V. vulnificus. The induction of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α production by V. vulnificus infection was mediated via the NF-κB- and p38 MAPK-regulated pathways but not via the Akt pathway. ISO-1-treated human peripheral blood cells showed lower V. vulnificus-induced NF-κB activation, IL-6 mRNA expression, and IκB phosphorylation, but they did not show lower p38 MAPK activation. Conclusions We conclude that MIF regulates V. vulnificus-induced IL-6 production via NF-κB activation and that p38 MAPK activation in V. vulnificus infection is not MIF dependent.

  6. Improvement in methanol production by regulating the composition of synthetic gas mixture and raw biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Mardina, Primata; Kim, Dongwook; Kim, Sang-Yong; Kalia, Vipin C; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2016-10-01

    Raw biogas can be an alternative feedstock to pure methane (CH4) for methanol production. In this investigation, we evaluated the methanol production potential of Methylosinus sporium from raw biogas originated from an anaerobic digester. Furthermore, the roles of different gases in methanol production were investigated using synthetic gas mixtures of CH4, carbon dioxide (CO2), and hydrogen (H2). Maximum methanol production was 5.13, 4.35, 6.28, 7.16, 0.38, and 0.36mM from raw biogas, CH4:CO2, CH4:H2, CH4:CO2:H2, CO2, and CO2:H2, respectively. Supplementation of H2 into raw biogas increased methanol production up to 3.5-fold. Additionally, covalent immobilization of M. sporium on chitosan resulted in higher methanol production from raw biogas. This study provides a suitable approach to improve methanol production using low cost raw biogas as a feed containing high concentrations of H2S (0.13%). To our knowledge, this is the first report on methanol production from raw biogas, using immobilized cells of methanotrophs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of annual variation in heterotrophic bacterial production in the Schelde estuary (SW Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosen, N.K.; Van Rijswijk, P.; Kromkamp, J.C.; Peene, J.

    1997-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacterioplankton production (H-3-thymidine incorporation rate) and abundance in the surface water of the Schelde estuary (The Netherlands) were studied during an annual cycle in 1991 along the salinity gradient (0.8 to 33 psu). Bacterial production and numbers increased from the lower

  8. 76 FR 40368 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Environmentally Sound Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ...; Submission for OMB Review; Environmentally Sound Products AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD), General... submitting to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve an extension of a previously approved information collection requirement concerning environmentally sound products. DATES...

  9. Medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids containing products - Regulations in Europe and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhasira, Ran; Shbiro, Liat; Landschaft, Yuval

    2018-03-01

    In 1937, the United States of America criminalized the use of cannabis and as a result its use decreased rapidly. In recent decades, there is a growing interest in the wide range of medical uses of cannabis and its constituents; however, the laws and regulations are substantially different between countries. Laws differentiate between raw herbal cannabis, cannabis extracts, and cannabinoid-based medicines. Both the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) do not approve the use of herbal cannabis or its extracts. The FDA approved several cannabinoid-based medicines, so did 23 European countries and Canada. However, only four of the reviewed countries have fully authorized the medical use of herbal cannabis - Canada, Germany, Israel and the Netherlands, together with more than 50% of the states in the United States. Most of the regulators allow the physicians to decide what specific indications they will prescribe cannabis for, but some regulators dictate only specific indications. The aim of this article is to review the current (as of November 2017) regulations of medical cannabis use in Europe and North America. Copyright © 2018 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of adipokine production in human adipose tissue by propionic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Lahham, Sa'ad H.; Roelofsen, Han; Priebe, Marion; Weening, Desiree; Dijkstra, Martijn; Hoek, Annemieke; Rezaee, Farhad; Venema, Koen; Vonk, Roel J.

    P>Background Dietary fibre (DF) has been shown to be protective for the development of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Short-chain fatty acids, produced by colonic fermentation of DF might mediate this beneficial effect. Adipose tissue plays a key role in the regulation of energy

  11. Regulation of adipokine production in human adipose tissue by propionic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Lahham, S.H.; Roelofsen, H.; Priebe, M.; Weening, D.; Dijkstra, M.; Hoek, A.; Rezaee, F.; Venema, K.; Vonk, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Dietary fibre (DF) has been shown to be protective for the development of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Short-chain fatty acids, produced by colonic fermentation of DF might mediate this beneficial effect. Adipose tissue plays a key role in the regulation of energy

  12. 77 FR 74177 - Information Collection Requirement; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... material management and accounting systems conform to established DoD standards. c. The information... to establish, maintain, and disclose material management and accounting systems. c. DFARS 252.247... and Reporting (OMB Control Number 0704-0250) AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations System...

  13. Environmental Regulations: Impact on the United States Petroleum Exploration and Production Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    through the following: " A permit program (NPDES) " Minimum national effluent standards for each industry "* Water quality standards "* Provisions...chromium thinner (a) Lignosufonate/Lignite Sulfomethylated tannin / chromium thinner (a) dichromate Sodium dichromate/ chromium corrosion (b) chromate...local effluent requirements. Solid wastes, such as garbage, paper, etc. should be disposed of in accordance with state solid waste regulations. Empty

  14. The Politics of Systematization in EU Product Safety Regulation: Market, State, Collectivity, and Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnhagen, K.

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the increasing role of the legal method of systematisation in European Union (EU) law. It argues that the legal method of systematisation that has been developed in a welfare-state context is increasingly used as a regulative tool to functionally integrate the market. The book

  15. An R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Regulates Eugenol Production in Ripe Strawberry Fruit Receptacles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medina-Puche, L.; Molina-Hidalgo, F.J.; Boersma, M.; Schuurink, R.C.; López-Vidriero, I.; Solano, R.; Franco-Zorrilla, J.M.; Caballero, J.L.; Blanco-Portales, R.; Muñoz-Blanco, J.

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol is a volatile phenylpropanoid that contributes to flower and ripe fruit scent. In ripe strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) fruit receptacles, eugenol is biosynthesized by eugenol synthase (FaEGS2). However, the transcriptional regulation of this process is still unknown. We have identified and

  16. Effect of plant growth regulators on production of alpha-linolenic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sujana Kokkiligadda

    2017-10-05

    Oct 5, 2017 ... fatty acid–alpha-linolenic acid and grows fast, was con- sidered to study the effect of plant growth regulators on the yield of alpha-linolenic acid .... softener agents, dispersing agents and food packaging. It is also used to manufacture pharmaceuticals as nutritional supplements and as an emollient and ...

  17. Circulating Glucagon 1-61 Regulates Blood Glucose by Increasing Insulin Secretion and Hepatic Glucose Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J.; Kuhre, Rune E.; Hornburg, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    that PG 1-61 dose-dependently increases levels of cAMP, through the glucagon receptor, and increases insulin secretion and protein levels of enzymes regulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. In rats, PG 1-61 increases blood glucose and plasma insulin and decreases plasma levels of amino acids in...

  18. Cyclin Y Is Involved in the Regulation of Adipogenesis and Lipid Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei An

    Full Text Available A new member of the cyclin family cyclin Y (CCNY is involved in the regulation of various physiological processes. In this study, the role of CCNY in energy metabolism was characterized. We found that compared with wild-type (WT mice, Ccny knockout (KO mice had both lower body weight and lower fat content. The Ccny KO mice also had a higher metabolic rate, resisted the stress of a high-fat diet, and were sensitive to calorie restriction. The expression levels of UCP1 and PGC1α were significantly higher in the brown adipose tissue (BAT of the Ccny KO mice than that of the WT littermate controls, whereas there was no significant difference in BAT weight between the WT and the Ccny KO mice. In addition, the down-regulation of Ccny resulted in suppression of white adipocyte differentiation both in vivo and in vitro, while the expression of Ccny was up-regulated by C/EBPα. Furthermore, both hepatocytes and HepG2 cells that were depleted of Ccny were insensitive to insulin stimulation, consistent with the significant inhibition of insulin sensitivity in the liver of the Ccny KO mice, but no significant changes in WAT and muscle, indicating that CCNY is involved in regulating the hepatic insulin signaling pathway. The hepatic insulin resistance generated by Ccny depletion resulted in down-regulation of the sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP1 and fatty acid synthase (FASN. Together, these results provide a new link between CCNY and lipid metabolism in mice, and suggest that inhibition of CCNY may offer a therapeutic approach to obesity and diabetes.

  19. Functional Characterization of NAC and MYB Transcription Factors Involved in Regulation of Biomass Production in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiqin Zhong

    Full Text Available Switchgrass is a promising biofuel feedstock due to its high biomass production and low agronomic input requirements. Because the bulk of switchgrass biomass used for biofuel production is lignocellulosic secondary walls, studies on secondary wall biosynthesis and its transcriptional regulation are imperative for designing strategies for genetic improvement of biomass production in switchgrass. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of a group of switchgrass transcription factors, including several NACs (PvSWNs and a MYB (PvMYB46A, for their involvement in regulating secondary wall biosynthesis. PvSWNs and PvMYB46A were found to be highly expressed in stems and their expression was closely associated with sclerenchyma cells. Overexpression of PvSWNs and PvMYB46A in Arabidopsis was shown to result in activation of the biosynthetic genes for cellulose, xylan and lignin and ectopic deposition of secondary walls in normally parenchymatous cells. Transactivation and complementation studies demonstrated that PvSWNs were able to activate the SNBE-driven GUS reporter gene and effectively rescue the secondary wall defects in the Arabidopsis snd1 nst1 double mutant, indicating that they are functional orthologs of Arabidopsis SWNs. Furthermore, we showed that PvMYB46A could activate the SMRE-driven GUS reporter gene and complement the Arabidopsis myb46 myb83 double mutant, suggesting that it is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis MYB46/MYB83. Together, these results indicate that PvSWNs and PvMYB46A are transcriptional switches involved in regulating secondary wall biosynthesis, which provides molecular tools for genetic manipulation of biomass production in switchgrass.

  20. MEK1 Dependent and Independent ERK Activation Regulates IL-10 and IL-12 Production in Bone Marrow Derived Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhamdan, Mohamad; Bauerfeld, Christian; Talreja, Jaya; Beuret, Laurent; Charron, Jean; Samavati, Lobelia

    2015-01-01

    The mitogen activated protein kinases ERK1/2 play an important role in response to toll like receptor (TLR) activation and cytokine production, including IL-10 and IL-12. Here, we examined the role of MEK1 in ERK1/2 activation in response to TLR4 agonist by using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from wild type (WT) and Mek1d/dSox2Cre mice. Our data demonstrates that MEK1 is essential for ERK1/2 activation in response to LPS. Furthermore, stimulation of the TLR4 receptor of BMDMs derived from Mek1d/d Sox2Cre mice showed enhanced STAT4 phosphorylation and increased IL-12 secretion, but exhibited a significantly lower IL-10 production as compared to WT macrophages. Most interestingly, TLR ligation in the presence of recombinant IL-10 (rIL-10) or retinoic acid (RA) led to ERK1/2 activation independent of MEK1 in BMDMs derived from Mek1d/dSox2Cre mice and led to inhibition of STAT4 and decreased IL-12 levels. Collectively, these data suggest that MEK1 is required for TLR4 mediated ERK activation and in turn regulates production of IL-10 and IL-12. It also indicates that ERK1/2 can be activated independent of MEK1 in the presence of IL-10 and RA and this activation negatively regulates IL-12, but positively regulates IL-10 production. These findings may have significant implications for the development of drugs that modulate MEK1 activity in the treatment of inflammatory, autoimmune and proliferative diseases such as cancer. PMID:26208884

  1. Functional Characterization of NAC and MYB Transcription Factors Involved in Regulation of Biomass Production in Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Yuan, Youxi; Spiekerman, John J; Guley, Joshua T; Egbosiuba, Janefrances C; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Switchgrass is a promising biofuel feedstock due to its high biomass production and low agronomic input requirements. Because the bulk of switchgrass biomass used for biofuel production is lignocellulosic secondary walls, studies on secondary wall biosynthesis and its transcriptional regulation are imperative for designing strategies for genetic improvement of biomass production in switchgrass. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of a group of switchgrass transcription factors, including several NACs (PvSWNs) and a MYB (PvMYB46A), for their involvement in regulating secondary wall biosynthesis. PvSWNs and PvMYB46A were found to be highly expressed in stems and their expression was closely associated with sclerenchyma cells. Overexpression of PvSWNs and PvMYB46A in Arabidopsis was shown to result in activation of the biosynthetic genes for cellulose, xylan and lignin and ectopic deposition of secondary walls in normally parenchymatous cells. Transactivation and complementation studies demonstrated that PvSWNs were able to activate the SNBE-driven GUS reporter gene and effectively rescue the secondary wall defects in the Arabidopsis snd1 nst1 double mutant, indicating that they are functional orthologs of Arabidopsis SWNs. Furthermore, we showed that PvMYB46A could activate the SMRE-driven GUS reporter gene and complement the Arabidopsis myb46 myb83 double mutant, suggesting that it is a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis MYB46/MYB83. Together, these results indicate that PvSWNs and PvMYB46A are transcriptional switches involved in regulating secondary wall biosynthesis, which provides molecular tools for genetic manipulation of biomass production in switchgrass.

  2. Changes in turnover rather than production regulate biomass of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelium across a Pinus sylvestris chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenbo, Andreas; Clemmensen, Karina E; Finlay, Roger D; Kyaschenko, Julia; Lindahl, Björn D; Fransson, Petra; Ekblad, Alf

    2017-04-01

    In boreal forest soils, ectomycorrhizal fungi are fundamentally important for carbon (C) dynamics and nutrient cycling. Although their extraradical mycelium (ERM) is pivotal for processes such as soil organic matter build-up and nitrogen cycling, very little is known about its dynamics and regulation. In this study, we quantified ERM production and turnover, and examined how these two processes together regulated standing ERM biomass in seven sites forming a chronosequence of 12- to 100-yr-old managed Pinus sylvestris forests. This was done by determining ERM biomass, using ergosterol as a proxy, in sequentially harvested in-growth mesh bags and by applying mathematical models. Although ERM production declined with increasing forest age from 1.2 to 0.5 kg ha -1  d -1 , the standing biomass increased from 50 to 112 kg ha -1 . This was explained by a drastic decline in mycelial turnover from seven times to one time per year with increasing forest age, corresponding to mean residence times from 25 d up to 1 yr. Our results demonstrate that ERM turnover is the main factor regulating biomass across differently aged forest stands. Explicit inclusion of ERM parameters in forest ecosystem C models may significantly improve their capacity to predict responses of mycorrhiza-mediated processes to management and environmental changes. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Gas exchange rates, plant height, yield components, and productivity of upland rice as affected by plant regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Félix Alvarez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate gas exchange rates, plant height, yield components, and productivity of upland rice, as affected by type and application time of plant growth regulators. A randomized block design, in a 4x2 factorial arrangement, with four replicates was used. Treatments consisted of three growth regulators (mepiquat chloride, trinexapac-ethyl, and paclobutrazol, besides a control treatment applied at two different phenological stages: early tillering or panicle primordial differentiation. The experiment was performed under sprinkler-irrigated field conditions. Net CO2 assimilation, stomatal conductance, plant transpiration, and water-use efficiency were measured four times in Primavera upland rice cultivar, between booting and milky grain phenophases. Gas exchange rates were neither influenced by growth regulators nor by application time. There was, however, interaction between these factors on the other variables. Application of trinexapac-ethyl at both tillering and differentiation stages reduced plant height and negatively affected yield components and rice productivity. However, paclobutrazol and mepiquat chloride applied at tillering, reduced plant height without affecting rice yield. Mepiquat chloride acted as a growth stimulator when applied at the differentiation stage, and significantly increased plant height, panicle number, and grain yield of upland rice.

  4. Paul Carlson | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Carlson, Ph.D. March 28 Principal Investigator Laboratory of Mucosal Pathogens and Cellular Immunology Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), FDA Topic:  "Research and Regulation of novel biologic products at the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research"

  5. Regulation of activities producing uranium as a by-product: South African perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajane, E.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of radioactive material in the gold bearing ores of the Witwatersrand was first noted in 1915; in 1923 the material was identified as uraninite. The gold bearing reefs of the Witwatersrand Basin were extensively assayed for uranium in the mid 1940s and full scale of Uranium production in the Republic of South Africa commenced in 1952 as a by-product of the Witwatersrand gold mining industry which was established in the 1880s. Since the early 1970s uranium has also been produced as a by-product from an open cast copper mine • A total of 27 uranium plants were constructed during the period 1952 to 1990.

  6. Metabolic regulation is sufficient for global and robust coordination of glucose uptake, catabolism, energy production and growth in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Pierre; Smallbone, Kieran; Mendes, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    The metabolism of microorganisms is regulated through two main mechanisms: changes of enzyme capacities as a consequence of gene expression modulation ("hierarchical control") and changes of enzyme activities through metabolite-enzyme interactions. An increasing body of evidence indicates that hierarchical control is insufficient to explain metabolic behaviors, but the system-wide impact of metabolic regulation remains largely uncharacterized. To clarify its role, we developed and validated a detailed kinetic model of Escherichia coli central metabolism that links growth to environment. Metabolic control analyses confirm that the control is widely distributed across the network and highlight strong interconnections between all the pathways. Exploration of the model solution space reveals that several robust properties emerge from metabolic regulation, from the molecular level (e.g. homeostasis of total metabolite pool) to the overall cellular physiology (e.g. coordination of carbon uptake, catabolism, energy and redox production, and growth), while allowing a large degree of flexibility at most individual metabolic steps. These properties have important physiological implications for E. coli and significantly expand the self-regulating capacities of its metabolism.

  7. Metabolic regulation is sufficient for global and robust coordination of glucose uptake, catabolism, energy production and growth in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Millard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of microorganisms is regulated through two main mechanisms: changes of enzyme capacities as a consequence of gene expression modulation ("hierarchical control" and changes of enzyme activities through metabolite-enzyme interactions. An increasing body of evidence indicates that hierarchical control is insufficient to explain metabolic behaviors, but the system-wide impact of metabolic regulation remains largely uncharacterized. To clarify its role, we developed and validated a detailed kinetic model of Escherichia coli central metabolism that links growth to environment. Metabolic control analyses confirm that the control is widely distributed across the network and highlight strong interconnections between all the pathways. Exploration of the model solution space reveals that several robust properties emerge from metabolic regulation, from the molecular level (e.g. homeostasis of total metabolite pool to the overall cellular physiology (e.g. coordination of carbon uptake, catabolism, energy and redox production, and growth, while allowing a large degree of flexibility at most individual metabolic steps. These properties have important physiological implications for E. coli and significantly expand the self-regulating capacities of its metabolism.

  8. Is the European medical products authorization regulation equipped to cope with the challenges of nanomedicines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorbeck-Jung, Barbel R.; Chowdhury, Nupur; Chowdhury, Nupur

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the emerging European regulatory activities in relation to nanopharmaceuticals. The central question is whether the regulatory responses are appropriate to cope with the regulatory problems nanomedicinal development is posing. The article explores whether the medical product

  9. 9 CFR 327.3 - No product to be imported without compliance with applicable regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... be submitted by the exporter or his authorized agent to the Administrator and determined by the... showing that the product has been prepared and handled in a sanitary manner. (c) [Reserved] [35 FR 15610...

  10. Differential Regulation of Eicosanoid and Endocannabinoid Production by Inflammatory Mediators in Human Choriodecidua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M D Mitchell

    Full Text Available An increase in intrauterine prostaglandin production is critical for the onset and progression of labor in women and indeed all mammalian species studied. Endocannabinoids can act as substrates for enzymes of the prostaglandin biosynthetic pathways and can be utilized to generate other related compounds such as prostamides. The end products are indistinguishable by radioimmunoassay. We have separated such compounds by mass spectrometry. We now show that inflammatory stimuli such as LPS and proinflammatory cytokines act differentially on these pathways in human choriodecidua and preferentially create drive through to prostaglandin end products. These findings create doubt about the interpretation of data on prostaglandin biosynthesis in intrauterine tissues from pregnant women especially in the presence of an infection. The possibility is raised that separation of these products might reduce variability in results and lead to potential uses for their measurement in the diagnosis of preterm labor.

  11. Political constraints on government cartelization: the case of oil production regulation in Texas and Saudi Arabia.

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Libecap; James L. Smith

    2001-01-01

    We examine government cartelization efforts in crude oil production. Texas and Saudi Arabia are alleged to act as swing producers to maintain the interstate (1933-1972) and OPEC (1973 on) oil cartels respectively. We analyze the political constraints that affected the ability of Texas and Saudi Arabia to act as residual producers within their respective cartels. In the case of Texas, political factors molded individual firm production quotas, advantaging high-cost producers and hence, reducin...

  12. Extreme temperature regulation in the automation process in the production of biogas methane tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Uzhelovs'kyy, V.; Tkachenko, S.

    2015-01-01

    Problem statement. The efficiency of bioconversion processes is largely determined by the level of automation and process control biogas, which allows to optimize the process, enhance its efficiency and the ability to adapt to the real operating conditions.Analyzing of the resent research. In studies of contemporary experts in the field of process management energy production from unconventional sources has had a steady and good understanding of the management of biogas production from biomas...

  13. Guidebook on the development of regulations for uranium deposit development and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The main purpose of this guidebook is to discuss the various factors and questions that need to be considered by Government organizations in formulating and implementing a regulatory regime to control uranium resource projects. It also provides examples of regulatory requirements in countries where such regulations have evolved into more mature stages. It provides useful policy and technical guidance and directs the user to where greater detail can be found in the existing literature

  14. Regulation of resveratrol production in Vitis amurensis cell cultures by calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleynova, O A; Dubrovina, A S; Manyakhin, A Y; Karetin, Y A; Kiselev, K V

    2015-02-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring plant stilbene that exhibits a wide range of valuable biological and pharmacological properties. Although the beneficial effects of trans-resveratrol to human health and plant protection against fungal pathogens are well-established, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating stilbene biosynthesis in plant cells. It has been recently shown that overexpression of the calcium-dependent protein kinase VaCPK20 gene considerably increased resveratrol accumulation in cell cultures of Vitis amurensis. It is possible that calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play an important role in the regulation of resveratrol biosynthesis. In the present work, we investigated the effects of overexpression of other members of the CDPK multigene family (VaCPK9, VaCPK13, VaCPK21, and VaCPK29) on resveratrol accumulation and growth parameters of grape cell cultures. The obtained data show that overexpression of VaCPK29 increased resveratrol content 1.6-2.4-fold and fresh biomass accumulation 1.1-1.4-fold in the four independently transformed cell lines of V. amurensis compared with that in the empty vector-transformed calli. However, overexpression of the VaCPK9, VaCPK13, and VaCPK21 genes did not considerably affect resveratrol content and fresh/dry biomass accumulation in the independently transformed cell lines of V. amurensis. VaCPK29-transformed calli were capable of producing between 1.02 and 1.39 mg/l of resveratrol, while the control calli produced 0.48 to 0.79 mg/l of resveratrol. The data indicate that the VaCPK9, VaCPK13, and VaCPK21 genes are not involved in the regulation of stilbene biosynthesis in grape cells, while the VaCPK29 and VaCPK20 genes are implicated in resveratrol biosynthesis as positive regulators.

  15. Methanol regulated yeast promoters: production vehicles and toolbox for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Brigitte; Steiger, Matthias G; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2015-12-02

    Promoters are indispensable elements of a standardized parts collection for synthetic biology. Regulated promoters of a wide variety of well-defined induction ratios and expression strengths are highly interesting for many applications. Exemplarily, we discuss the application of published genome scale transcriptomics data for the primary selection of methanol inducible promoters of the yeast Pichia pastoris (Komagataella sp.). Such a promoter collection can serve as an excellent toolbox for cell and metabolic engineering, and for gene expression to produce heterologous proteins.

  16. Pioglitazone attenuates progression of aortic valve calcification via down-regulating receptor for advanced glycation end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Cai, Zhejun; Chen, Fang; Shi, Xucong; Zhang, Qiao; Chen, Si; Shi, Jiawei; Wang, Dao Wen; Dong, Nianguo

    2012-11-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is associated with inflammation and the progression of cardiovascular diseases. The current study tested the hypothesis that RAGE is involved in the pathogenesis of aortic valve (AV) calcification. Pioglitazone attenuated AV calcification in experimental hypercholesterolemic rabbits via down-regulation of RAGE. Male New Zealand rabbits weighing 2.5-3.0 kg were randomly divided into three groups: control group, high cholesterol + vitamin D(2) (HC + vitD(2)) group and HC + vitD(2) supplemented with pioglitazone group. Compared with HC + vitD(2) group, pioglitazone significantly inhibited the progression of AV calcification assessed by echocardiography. HC + vitD(2) diet markedly increased RAGE expression, oxidative stress, inflammatory cells infiltration and osteopontin expression. These changes were also significantly attenuated by administration of pioglitazone. Cultured porcine aortic valve interstitial cells (VICs) were used as in vitro model. We found that advanced glycation end products of bovine serum albumin markedly increased the expression of RAGE, induced high levels of production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and promoted osteoblastic differentiation of VICs. However, these effects were found to be remarkably suppressed by siRNA silencing of RAGE and pioglitazone as well. Our data provide evidence that RAGE activation-induced inflammation promotes AV calcification in hypercholesterolemic rabbits, which can be attenuated by pioglitazone treatment. This beneficial effect is associated with remarkable down-regulation of RAGE expression.

  17. Interactions between calcium and phosphorus in the regulation of the production of fibroblast growth factor 23 in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinn, S.J.; Thomsen, A.R.B.; Pang, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium and phosphorus homeostasis are highly interrelated and share common regulatory hormones, including FGF23. However, little is known about calcium's role in the regulation of FGF23. We sought to investigate the regulatory roles of calcium and phosphorus in FGF23 production using genetic mou...... appears to be fundamentally important in coordinating the serum levels of both mineral ions and ensuring that the calcium × phosphorus product remains within a physiological range.......Calcium and phosphorus homeostasis are highly interrelated and share common regulatory hormones, including FGF23. However, little is known about calcium's role in the regulation of FGF23. We sought to investigate the regulatory roles of calcium and phosphorus in FGF23 production using genetic mouse...... models with targeted inactivation of PTH (PTH KO) or both PTH and the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR; PTH-CaSR DKO). In wild-type, PTH KO, and PTH-CaSR DKO mice, elevation of either serum calcium or phosphorus by intraperitoneal injection increased serum FGF23 levels. In PTH KO and PTH-CaSR DKO mice...

  18. The cross-pathway control system regulates production of the secondary metabolite toxin, sirodesmin PL, in the ascomycete, Leptosphaeria maculans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Ellen M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirodesmin PL is a secondary metabolite toxin made by the ascomycetous plant pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans. The sirodesmin biosynthetic genes are clustered in the genome. The key genes are a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, sirP, and a pathway-specific transcription factor, sirZ. Little is known about regulation of sirodesmin production. Results Genes involved in regulation of sirodesmin PL in L. maculans have been identified. Two hundred random insertional T-DNA mutants were screened with an antibacterial assay for ones producing low levels of sirodesmin PL. Three such mutants were isolated and each transcribed sirZ at very low levels. One of the affected genes had high sequence similarity to Aspergillus fumigatus cpcA, which regulates the cross-pathway control system in response to amino acid availability. This gene was silenced in L. maculans and the resultant mutant characterised. When amino acid starvation was artificially-induced by addition of 3-aminotriazole for 5 h, transcript levels of sirP and sirZ did not change in the wild type. In contrast, levels of sirP and sirZ transcripts increased in the silenced cpcA mutant. After prolonged amino acid starvation the silenced cpcA mutant produced much higher amounts of sirodesmin PL than the wild type. Conclusions Production of sirodesmin PL in L. maculans is regulated by the cross pathway control gene, cpcA, either directly or indirectly via the pathway-specific transcription factor, sirZ.

  19. Morphological regulation of Aspergillus niger to improve citric acid production by chsC gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaowen; Wu, Hefang; Zhao, Genhai; Li, Zhemin; Wu, Xihua; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Zhiming

    2018-04-02

    The mycelial morphology of Aspergillus niger, a major filamentous fungus used for citric acid production, is important for citric acid synthesis during submerged fermentation. To investigate the involvement of the chitin synthase gene, chsC, in morphogenesis and citric acid production in A. niger, an RNAi system was constructed to silence chsC and the morphological mutants were screened after transformation. The compactness of the mycelial pellets was obviously reduced in the morphological mutants, with lower proportion of dispersed mycelia. These morphological changes have caused a decrease in viscosity and subsequent improvement in oxygen and mass transfer efficiency, which may be conducive for citric acid accumulation. All the transformants exhibited improvements in citric acid production; in particular, chsC-3 showed 42.6% higher production than the original strain in the shake flask. Moreover, the high-yield strain chsC-3 exhibited excellent citric acid production potential in the scale-up process.The citric acid yield and the conversion rate of glucose of chsC-3 were both improved by 3.6%, when compared with that of the original strain in the stirred tank bioreactor.

  20. Regulation of gene expression by tobacco product preparations in cultured human dermal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malpass, Gloria E., E-mail: gloria.malpass@gmail.com [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Arimilli, Subhashini, E-mail: sarimill@wakehealth.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Prasad, G.L., E-mail: prasadg@rjrt.com [R and D Department, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Winston-Salem, NC 27102 (United States); Howlett, Allyn C., E-mail: ahowlett@wakehealth.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Skin fibroblasts comprise the first barrier of defense against wounds, and tobacco products directly contact the oral cavity. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to smokeless tobacco extract (STE), total particulate matter (TPM) from tobacco smoke, or nicotine at concentrations comparable to those found in these extracts for 1 h or 5 h. Differences were identified in pathway-specific genes between treatments and vehicle using qRT-PCR. At 1 h, IL1α was suppressed significantly by TPM and less significantly by STE. Neither FOS nor JUN was suppressed at 1 h by tobacco products. IL8, TNFα, VCAM1, and NFκB1 were suppressed after 5 h with STE, whereas only TNFα and NFκB1 were suppressed by TPM. At 1 h with TPM, secreted levels of IL10 and TNFα were increased. Potentially confounding effects of nicotine were exemplified by genes such as ATF3 (5 h), which was increased by nicotine but suppressed by other components of STE. Within 2 h, TPM stimulated nitric oxide production, and both STE and TPM increased reactive oxygen species. The biological significance of these findings and utilization of the gene expression changes reported herein regarding effects of the tobacco product preparations on dermal fibroblasts will require additional research. - Highlights: • Tobacco product preparations (TPPs) alter gene expression in dermal fibroblasts. • Some immediate early genes critical to the inflammatory process are affected. • Different TPPs produce differential responses in certain pro-inflammatory genes.

  1. The effect of CO2 regulations on the cost of corn ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevin, R. J.; Mueller, S.

    2008-04-01

    To explore the effect of CO2 price on the effective cost of ethanol production we have developed a model that integrates financial and emissions accounting for dry-mill corn ethanol plants. Three policy options are modeled: (1) a charge per unit of life cycle CO2 emissions, (2) a charge per unit of direct biorefinery emissions only, and (3) a low carbon fuel standard (LCFS). A CO2 charge on life cycle emissions increases production costs by between 0.005 and 0.008 l-1 per 10 Mg-1 CO2 price increment, across all modeled plant energy systems, with increases under direct emissions somewhat lower in all cases. In contrast, a LCFS increases the cost of production for selected plant energy systems only: a LCFS requiring reductions in average fuel global warming intensity (GWI) with a target of 10% below the 2005 baseline increases the production costs for coal-fired plants only. For all other plant types, the LCFS operates as a subsidy. The findings depend strongly on the magnitude of a land use change adder. Some land use change adders currently discussed in the literature will push the GWI of all modeled production systems above the LCFS target, flipping the CO2 price from a subsidy to a tax.

  2. Regulating the production of (R-3-hydroxybutyrate in Escherichia coli by N or P limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica eGuevara-Martínez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The chiral compound (R-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB is naturally produced by many wild type organisms as the monomer for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB. Both compounds are commercially valuable and co-polymeric polyhydroxyalkanoates have been used e.g. in medical applications for skin grafting and as components in pharmaceuticals.In this paper we investigate cultivation strategies for production of 3HB in the previously described E. coli strain AF1000 pJBGT3RX. This strain produces extracellular 3HB by expression of two genes from the PHB pathway of Halomonas boliviensis. H. boliviensis is a newly isolated halophile that forms PHB as a storage compound during carbon excess and simultaneous limitation of another nutrient like nitrogen and phosphorous. We hypothesize that a similar approach can be used to control the flux from acetyl-CoA to 3HB also in E. coli; decreasing the flux to biomass and favouring the pathway to the product. We employed ammonium- or phosphate-limited fed-batch processes for comparison of the productivity at different nutrient limitation or starvation conditions. The feed rate was shown to affect the rate of glucose consumption, respiration, 3HB and acetic acid production, although the proportions between them were more difficult to affect. The highest 3HB volumetric productivity, 1.5 g L-1 h-1, was seen for phosphate-limitation.

  3. Role of specific quorum-sensing signals in the regulation of exopolysaccharide II production within Sinorhizobium meliloti spreading colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengsheng Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quorum sensing (QS in Sinorhizobium meliloti involves at least half a dozen different N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL signals. These signals are produced by SinI, the sole AHL synthase in S. meliloti Rm8530. The sinI gene is regulated by two LuxR-type transcriptional regulators, SinR and ExpR. Mutations in sinI, sinR and expR abolish the production of exopolysaccharide II (EPS II. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study investigated a new type of coordinated surface spreading of Rm8530 that can be categorized as swarming. Motility assays on semi-solid surfaces revealed that both flagella and EPS II are required for this type of motility. The production of EPS II depends on AHLs produced by SinI. Of these AHLs, only C(16:1- and 3-oxo-C(16:1-homoserine lactones (HSLs stimulated swarming in an ExpR-dependent manner. These two AHLs induced the strongest response in the wggR reporter fusions. WggR is a positive regulator of the EPS II biosynthesis gene expression. The levels of the wggR activation correlated with the extent of swarming. Furthermore, swarming of S. meliloti required the presence of the high molecular weight (HMW fraction of EPS II. Within swarming colonies, a recombinase-based RIVET reporter in the wggR gene was resolved in 30% of the cells, indicating an enhanced regulation of EPS II production in the subpopulation of cells, which was sufficient to support swarming of the entire colony. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Swarming behavior of S. meliloti Rm8530 on semi-solid surfaces is found to be dependent on the functional QS regulatory cascades. Even though multiple AHL signals are produced by the bacterium, only two AHLs species, C(16:1- and 3-oxo-C(16:1-HSLs, affected swarming by up-regulating the expression of wggR. While EPS II is produced by Rm8530 as high and low molecular weight fractions, only the HMW EPS II facilitated initial stages of swarming, thus, suggesting a function for this polymer.

  4. American Ginseng Stimulates Insulin Production and Prevents Apoptosis through Regulation of Uncoupling Protein-2 in Cultured β Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Zeqi Luo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available American ginseng root displays the ability to achieve glucose homeostasis both experimentally and clinically but the unknown mechanism used by ginseng to achieve its therapeutic effects on diabetes limits its application. Disruption in the insulin secretion of pancreatic β cells is considered the major cause of diabetes. A mitochondrial protein, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2 has been found to play a critical role in insulin synthesis and β cell survival. Our preliminary studies found that the extracts of American ginseng inhibit UCP-2 expression which may contribute to the ability of ginseng protecting β cell death and improving insulin synthesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that ginseng extracts suppress UCP-2 in the mitochondria of pancreatic β cells, promoting insulin synthesis and anti-apoptosis (a programmed cell-death mechanism. To test the hypothesis, the serum-deprived quiescent β cells were cultured with or without interleukin-1β (IL-1β, (200 pg ml−1, a cytokine to induce β cell apoptosis and water extracts of American ginseng (25 μg per 5 μl administered to wells of 0.5 ml culture for 24 h. We evaluated effects of ginseng on UCP-2 expression, insulin production, anti-/pro-apoptotic factors Bcl-2/caspase-9 expression and cellular ATP levels. We found that ginseng suppresses UCP-2, down-regulates caspase-9 while increasing ATP and insulin production/secretion and up-regulates Bcl-2, reducing apoptosis. These findings suggest that stimulation of insulin production and prevention of β cell loss by American ginseng extracts can occur via the inhibition of mitochondrial UCP-2, resulting in increase in the ATP level and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2, while down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factor caspase-9 occurs, lowering the occurrence of apoptosis, which support the hypothesis.

  5. Contributions of citrate in redox potential maintenance and ATP production: metabolic pathways and their regulation in Lactobacillus panis PM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Sun; Korber, Darren R; Tanaka, Takuji

    2013-10-01

    Lactobacillus panis PM1 belongs to the group III heterofermentative lactobacilli and can utilize various NADH-reoxidizing routes (e.g., citrate, glycerol, and oxygen) according to environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated the ability of L. panis PM1 to produce succinate, acetate, and lactate via citrate utilization. Possible pathways, as well as regulation, for citrate metabolism were examined on the basis of the genome sequence data and metabolic profiles of L. panis PM1. The presence of citrate led to the up-regulation, at the transcriptional level, of the genes encoding for citrate lyase, malate dehydrogenase, and malic enzyme of the citrate pathways by 10- to 120-fold. The transcriptional regulator of the dha operon coding for glycerol dehydratase of L. panis PM1 repressed the expression of the citrate lyase gene (10-fold). Metabolite analyses indicated that the transcriptional enhancement by citrate stimulated succinate yield. Citrate metabolism contributed to energy production by providing a major alternate pathway for NAD(+) regeneration and allowed acetyl phosphate to yield acetate/ATP instead of ethanol/NAD(+). Additionally, a branching pathway from oxaloacetate to pyruvate increased the pool of lactate, which was then used to produce ATP during stationary phase. However, the redirection of NADH-to-citrate utilization resulted in stress caused by end-products (i.e., succinate and acetate). This stress reduced succinate production by up to 50 % but did not cause significant changes at transcriptional level. Overall, citrate utilization was beneficial for the growth of L. panis PM1 by providing a NAD(+) regeneration route and producing extra ATP.

  6. Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Ruiz, José Luis; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient production of appropriate oxygen carriers for transfusions (blood substitutes or artificial blood) has been pursued for many decades, and to date several strategies have been used, from synthetic polymers to cell-free hemoglobin carriers. The recent advances in the field of metabolic...... engineering also allowed the generation of different genetically modified organisms for the production of recombinant human hemoglobin. Several studies have showed very promising results using the bacterium Escherichia coli as a production platform, reporting hemoglobin titers above 5% of the total cell...... protein content. However, there are still certain limitations regarding the protein stability and functionality of the recombinant hemoglobin produced in bacterial systems. In order to overcome these limitations, yeast systems have been proposed as the eukaryal alternative. We recently reported...

  7. Potential reduction exposure products and FDA tobacco and regulation: a CNS call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Janie; Andrews, Jeannette; Balkstra, Cindy R

    2004-01-01

    A new generation of tobacco harm reduction products is stirring controversy and confusion among healthcare providers. These products, known as "potential reduction exposure products" (PREPs), can be described in terms of reported scientific evidence, as "the good, the bad, and the ugly." On the good side, there is sufficient scientific evidence to support the use of Commit, a new over-the-counter nicotine lozenge PREP, approved for smoking cessation. On the bad side, there is no scientific evidence to support the use of Ariva, another over-the-counter nicotine lozenge PREP, marketed as an alternative to cigarettes when smoking is restricted. On the ugly side, both of these PREPs are nicotine delivery systems with "candy-like" appearances; however, one (Commit) has the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and the other (Ariva) does not. This article provides an overview of PREPs and strategies to help clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) address tobacco harm reduction issues.

  8. Online data sources for regulation and remediation of chemical production, distribution, use and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, B.; Arnold, S.

    1995-01-01

    Environmental awareness is essential for todays corporation. Corporations have been held liable for the short-term and long-term effects of such chemicals as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and petrochemicals to name a few. Furthermore, corporations have been held accountable for disposal of wastes or by-products of chemical production. Responsibility for the environment either mandated by government agencies or done voluntarily is an economic factor for business operations. Remediation of environmental hazards on a voluntary basis has often created goodwill and a payoff for being socially responsible. Remediation also can result in new business opportunities or savings in production costs. To be environmentally aware and socially responsible, the chemist should know where to find regulatory information for countries worldwide. Using online data sources is an efficient method of seeking this information

  9. Fungi regulate response of N2O production to warming and grazing in a Tibetan grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lei; Wang, Shiping; Xu, Xingliang; Wang, Yanfen; Rui, Yichao; Zhou, Xiaoqi; Shen, Qinhua; Wang, Jinzhi; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Caiyun; Gu, Tianbao; Ma, Wenchao; Chen, Guanyi

    2018-03-01

    Lack of understanding of the effects of warming and winter grazing on soil fungal contribution to nitrous oxide (N2O) production has limited our ability to predict N2O fluxes under changes in climate and land use management, because soil fungi play an important role in driving terrestrial N cycling. Here, we examined the effects of 10 years' warming and winter grazing on soil N2O emissions potential in an alpine meadow. Our results showed that soil bacteria and fungi contributed 46 % and 54 % to nitrification, and 37 % and 63 % to denitrification, respectively. Neither warming nor winter grazing affected the activity of enzymes responsible for overall nitrification and denitrification. However, warming significantly increased the enzyme activity of bacterial nitrification and denitrification to 53 % and 55 %, respectively. Warming significantly decreased enzyme activity of fungal nitrification and denitrification to 47 % and 45 %, respectively, while winter grazing had no such effect. We conclude that soil fungi could be the main source for N2O production potential in the Tibetan alpine grasslands. Warming and winter grazing may not affect the potential for soil N2O production potential, but climate warming can alter biotic pathways responsible for N2O production. These findings indicate that characterizing how fungal nitrification/denitrification contributes to N2O production, as well as how it responds to environmental and land use changes, can advance our understanding of N cycling. Therefore, our results provide some new insights about ecological controls on N2O production and lead to refine greenhouse gas flux models.

  10. Lactobacillus helveticus SBT2171, a cheese starter, regulates proliferation and cytokine production of immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, M; Ukibe, K; Uenishi, H; Hosoya, T; Sakai, F; Kadooka, Y

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of a Lactobacillus helveticus SBT2171 (LH2171)-containing cheese has been reported to exhibit immunoregulatory actions, including an increase in regulatory T cell population and reduction in proinflammatory cytokine production in mice. We examined the in vitro effects of LH2171 cells per se on immune cell function, specifically proliferation and cytokine production, which are primary reactions of the immune response. Immune cell fractions were prepared by mechanical disruption of mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), Peyer's patches (PP), and spleens (SP) of mice. The cell fractions were dispensed into a culture plate and stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibody beads in place of antigen-presenting cells or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of heat-treated LH2171 cells and other bacterial strains for comparison. After incubation, proliferation, cytokine production, and cell viability of the immune cells were determined. The LH2171 significantly inhibited the proliferation of MLN immune cells stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 compared with other bacterial strains. The antiproliferative potency of LH2171 was effective not only on MLN but also on PP and SP stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 or LPS. The LH2171 also decreased LPS-stimulated IL-6 production from MLN, PP, and SP, and IL-1β production from SP, but LH2171 did not affect the viability of immune cells. The LH2171 inhibited immune cell proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-6 and IL-1β) production. The inhibitory actions were not due to cytotoxicity to immune cells, suggesting that LH2171 is a dairy Lactobacillus strain with beneficial immunoregulatory properties. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Disulphide production by Ero1a-PDI relay is rapid and effectively regulated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Riemer, Jan; Zito, Ester

    2010-01-01

    with PDI, to a lesser extent with the PDI-family members ERp57 and ERp72, but are not detectable with another homologue TMX3. We also show for the first time that the oxidation level of PDIs and glutathione is precisely regulated. Apparently, this is achieved neither through ER import of thiols nor...... by transport of disulphides to the Golgi apparatus. Instead, our data suggest that a dynamic equilibrium between Ero1- and glutathione disulphide-mediated oxidation of PDIs constitutes an important element of ER redox homeostasis....

  12. NEC1, a regulator of nectary development and nectar production in Petunia hybrida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ge, Ya-Xin

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes an efficient cloning, characterization and functional analysis of a nectary-specific gene in Petunia hybrida. NEC1, a novel gene, is highly expressed in nectaries. NEC1 is involved in nectar production and nectar secretion. Nectar secreted from floral nectaries is the main

  13. Assessing the Toxicities of Regulated and Unregulated Disinfection By-products in Normal Human Colon Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of over six hundred disinfection by-products (DBPs) and less than half of the total organic halides present in finished water has created a need for short-term in vitro assays to address toxicities that might be associated with human exposure. . We are using a normal...

  14. Differential regulation of amidase- and formamidase-mediated ammonia production by the Helicobacter pylori fur repressor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); J. Stoof (Jeroen); S.W. Poppelaars (Sophie); S. Bereswill (Stefan); G. Homuth (Georg); M. Kist (Manfred); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); J.G. Kusters (Johannes)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe production of high levels of ammonia allows the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori to survive the acidic conditions in the human stomach. H. pylori produces ammonia through urease-mediated degradation of urea, but it is also able to convert a range of amide

  15. Economies of scale in biogas production and the significance of flexible regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lise Skovsgaard; Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    that the benefits of scale in capital and operational costs dominate the diseconomies of increasing transport distances to collect manure. To boost the yield it is common to use co-substrates in the biogas production. We investigate how costs and income changes, when sugar beet is added in this case study...

  16. Changes in carbohydrate metabolism by triazole growth regulators in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz); effects on tuber production and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomathinayagam, Muthiah; Jaleel, Cheruth Abdul; Lakshmanan, G M Alagu; Panneerselvam, Rajaram

    2007-09-01

    We have evaluated the ability of two triazole growth regulators, viz. triadimefon (TDM) and hexaconazole (HEX), in the enhancement of tuber production and quality in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) through their effects on carbohydrate metabolism. One litre of 20 mg(-1) TDM and 15 mg(-1) HEX solution per plant were used for the treatments and groundwater was given to control plants. Triazole treatments reduced plant height and leaf area, but increased fresh and dry weights. Plants treated with TDM showed an increased net assimilation rate, which is followed by HEX and control plants. Triazole compounds increased the relative growth rate of cassava after 200 DAP, i.e. in the phase of tuber enlargement. Triazole compounds increased the starch and other carbohydrate contents and carbohydrate metabolising enzyme activities. From the results of this study, it can be concluded that these triazoles can significantly enhance the tuber production and quality by affecting the starch metabolism, apart from their fungicidal properties.

  17. The Adaptor Protein SAP Regulates Type II NKT Cell Development, Cytokine Production and Cytotoxicity Against Lymphoma1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L.; Stein, Paul L.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT cell TCR transgenic mouse model (24αβTg), we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells but not thymic epithelial cells meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Further, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT cell development by controlling Egr2 and PLZF expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IRF4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. PMID:25236978

  18. Four hundred and sixty brands of e-cigarettes and counting: implications for product regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu-Hong; Sun, Jessica Y; Bonnevie, Erika; Cummins, Sharon E; Gamst, Anthony; Yin, Lu; Lee, Madeleine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction E-cigarettes are largely unregulated and internet sales are substantial. This study examines how the online market for e-cigarettes has changed over time: in product design and in marketing messages appearing on websites. Methods Comprehensive internet searches of English-language websites from May–August 2012 and December 2013–January 2014 identified brands, models, flavours, nicotine strengths, ingredients and product claims. Brands were divided into older and newer groups (by the two searches) for comparison. Results By January 2014 there were 466 brands (each with its own website) and 7764 unique flavours. In the 17 months between the searches, there was a net increase of 10.5 brands and 242 new flavours per month. Older brands were more likely than newer brands to offer cigalikes (86.9% vs 52.1%, pe-cigarettes. PMID:24935895

  19. Optimizing heterologous protein production in the periplasm of E. coli by regulating gene expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Susan; Rujas, Edurne; Ytterberg, Anders Jimmy; Zubarev, Roman A; Luirink, Joen; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2013-03-12

    In Escherichia coli many heterologous proteins are produced in the periplasm. To direct these proteins to the periplasm, they are equipped with an N-terminal signal sequence so that they can traverse the cytoplasmic membrane via the protein-conducting Sec-translocon. For poorly understood reasons, the production of heterologous secretory proteins is often toxic to the cell thereby limiting yields. To gain insight into the mechanism(s) that underlie this toxicity we produced two secretory heterologous proteins, super folder green fluorescent protein and a single-chain variable antibody fragment, in the Lemo21(DE3) strain. In this strain, the expression intensity of the gene encoding the target protein can be precisely controlled. Both SFGFP and the single-chain variable antibody fragment were equipped with a DsbA-derived signal sequence. Producing these proteins following different gene expression levels in Lemo21(DE3) allowed us to identify the optimal expression level for each target gene. Too high gene expression levels resulted in saturation of the Sec-translocon capacity as shown by hampered translocation of endogenous secretory proteins and a protein misfolding/aggregation problem in the cytoplasm. At the optimal gene expression levels, the negative effects of the production of the heterologous secretory proteins were minimized and yields in the periplasm were optimized. Saturating the Sec-translocon capacity can be a major bottleneck hampering heterologous protein production in the periplasm. This bottleneck can be alleviated by harmonizing expression levels of the genes encoding the heterologous secretory proteins with the Sec-translocon capacity. Mechanistic insight into the production of proteins in the periplasm is key to optimizing yields in this compartment.

  20. Regulation of staphylococcal enterotoxin B-elicited nitric oxide production by endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClaire, R D; Kell, W M; Sadik, R A; Downs, M B; Parker, G W

    1995-01-01

    The effect of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-elicited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in mouse endothelial cells was investigated. Results showed that SEB stimulated the same level of NO production in gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-primed cells as did trichloroacetic acid-extracted lipopolysaccharide. The kinetics of induced NO production and expression of mRNA for iNOS differed markedly in endothelial and macrophage cells. Induced endothelial nitrite production was transient and was 15 to 20% of that generated by macrophage cells; mRNA levels peaked by 2 h and then steadily declined, whereas macrophage message levels continually increased. The ability of endothelial cells to produce SEB-induced NO depended on priming with IFN-gamma, although detectable mRNA could be elicited by SEB alone. Induction of endothelial iNOS mRNA was inhibited by cycloheximide, which indicated a requirement for de novo protein synthesis. Niacinamide and interleukin-10 significantly reduced SEB-induced endothelial NO production. Both are reported to affect IFN-gamma-induced class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression on antigen-presenting cells. Niacinamide reduced iNOS mRNA levels and markedly reduced IFN-gamma induction of endothelial class II MHC surface antigen. Interleukin-10 did not consistently reduce iNOS mRNA expression and had no effect on IFN-gamma induction of endothelial class II MHC surface antigen. These results suggest that SEB interacts with IFN-gamma-primed endothelial cells to elicit induced NO and that this induction can be effectively modulated at the receptor or transcriptional level. PMID:7529748

  1. Biotin status affects nickel allergy via regulation of interleukin-1beta production in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroishi, Toshinobu; Kinbara, Masayuki; Sato, Naoki; Tanaka, Yukinori; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Endo, Yasuo; Sugawara, Shunji

    2009-05-01

    Biotin, a water-soluble B complex vitamin, is possibly involved in chronic inflammatory diseases, although the detailed mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of biotin status on nickel (Ni) allergy in mice. Mice were fed a basal or biotin-deficient (BD) diet for 8 wk and sensitized with an intraperitoneal injection of NiCl(2) and lipopolysaccharide. Ten days after sensitization, NiCl(2) was intradermally injected into pinnas and ear swelling was measured. For in vitro analysis, we cultured a murine macrophage cell line, J774.1, under a biotin-sufficient (C, meaning control) or BD condition for 4 wk and analyzed interleukin (IL)-1 production. Significantly higher ear swelling was induced in BD mice than C mice. Adaptive transfer of splenocytes from both C and BD mice induced Ni allergy in unsensitized mice. Regardless of donor mice, ear swelling was significantly higher in BD recipient mice than C recipient mice. Ni allergy was not induced in either C or BD IL-1(-/-) mice. Splenocytes from BD mice produced a significantly higher amount of IL-1beta than those from C mice. Production and mRNA expression of IL-1beta were significantly higher in BD J774.1 cells than in C cells. Biotin supplementation inhibited the augmentation of IL-1beta production in vitro. In vivo supplementation of biotin in drinking water dose-dependently decreased ear swelling in C and BD mice. These results indicate that biotin status affects Ni allergy in the elicitation phase via the upregulation of IL-1beta production in mice, suggesting that biotin supplementation may have therapeutic effects on human metal allergy.

  2. Secondary Plant Products Causing Photosensitization in Grazing Herbivores: Their Structure, Activity and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jane C.; Kessell, Allan; Weston, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Photosensitivity in animals is defined as a severe dermatitis that results from a heightened reactivity of skin cells and associated dermal tissues upon their exposure to sunlight, following ingestion or contact with UV reactive secondary plant products. Photosensitivity occurs in animal cells as a reaction that is mediated by a light absorbing molecule, specifically in this case a plant-produced metabolite that is heterocyclic or polyphenolic. In sensitive animals, this reaction is most severe in non-pigmented skin which has the least protection from UV or visible light exposure. Photosensitization in a biological system such as the epidermis is an oxidative or other chemical change in a molecule in response to light-induced excitation of endogenous or exogenously-delivered molecules within the tissue. Photo-oxidation can also occur in the plant itself, resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species, free radical damage and eventual DNA degradation. Similar cellular changes occur in affected herbivores and are associated with an accumulation of photodynamic molecules in the affected dermal tissues or circulatory system of the herbivore. Recent advances in our ability to identify and detect secondary products at trace levels in the plant and surrounding environment, or in organisms that ingest plants, have provided additional evidence for the role of secondary metabolites in photosensitization of grazing herbivores. This review outlines the role of unique secondary products produced by higher plants in the animal photosensitization process, describes their chemistry and localization in the plant as well as impacts of the environment upon their production, discusses their direct and indirect effects on associated animal systems and presents several examples of well-characterized plant photosensitization in animal systems. PMID:24451131

  3. Regulation of cyclotron radiopharmaceutical production and distribution: An agreement state perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    While research accelerators producing radioactive material have been regulated for some time, the use of such devices in the preparation and distribution of radiopharmaceuticals has been confined to a few commercial firms and pioneering medical institutions. Such use requires multi-agency approval. The agencies involved, particularly state agencies, may not always be equally informed in the state of the art, may not have adopted positions or developed guidance with regard to their own rules for such activities and may not have staff trained and/or available to respond expeditiously to authorization requests. This presentation will describe the recent experience of the Texas Bureau of Radiation Control with two cyclotron facilities within its jurisdiction

  4. S-nitrosothiols regulate nitric oxide production and storage in plants through the nitrogen assimilation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frungillo, Lucas; Skelly, Michael J; Loake, Gary J; Spoel, Steven H; Salgado, Ione

    2014-11-11

    Nitrogen assimilation plays a vital role in plant metabolism. Assimilation of nitrate, the primary source of nitrogen in soil, is linked to the generation of the redox signal nitric oxide (NO). An important mechanism by which NO regulates plant development and stress responses is through S-nitrosylation, that is, covalent attachment of NO to cysteine residues to form S-nitrosothiols (SNO). Despite the importance of nitrogen assimilation and NO signalling, it remains largely unknown how these pathways are interconnected. Here we show that SNO signalling suppresses both nitrate uptake and reduction by transporters and reductases, respectively, to fine tune nitrate homeostasis. Moreover, NO derived from nitrate assimilation suppresses the redox enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase 1 (GSNOR1) by S-nitrosylation, preventing scavenging of S-nitrosoglutathione, a major cellular bio-reservoir of NO. Hence, our data demonstrates that (S)NO controls its own generation and scavenging by modulating nitrate assimilation and GSNOR1 activity.

  5. Effects of growth regulators on callus induction and secondary metabolite production in Cuminum cyminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farvardin, Atefeh; Ebrahimi, Asa; Hosseinpour, Batul; Khosrowshahli, Mahmood

    2017-09-01

    Cumin (Cuminum cyminum) is an annual plant from Apiaceae family that is cultivated in Iran as landraces. The most important chemical composition of the cumin essential oil was cuminaldehyde. In this research, the effect of different landraces and growth regulators was evaluated on callus induction, and best callus was used for amount of cuminaldehyde content. Node, root, leaf and hypocotyl explant from seedlings of Birjand and Qaen landraces were cultured on MS and MS5 medium supplemented with different concentrations of 2, 4-D and Kin. This experiment has been carried out in a completely randomised design with 3 replications. Percentage of callogenesis, callus volume, fresh and dry weight were measured. The best treatment for callus induction was 2.5 mg/L 2, 4-D and 0.5 mg/L Kin in MS5 medium. The best callus result was evaluated for cuminaldehyde content. An amount of 5.7% cuminaldehyde was measured using hydrodistillation method.

  6. Genome-wide screens for gene products regulating lipid droplet dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Weihua; Yang, Hongyuan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are emerging as dynamic cellular organelles that play a key role in lipid and membrane homeostasis. Abnormal lipid droplet dynamics are associated with the pathophysiology of many metabolic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and even cancer. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the dynamics of LDs, namely, their biogenesis, growth, maintenance, and degradation, will not only shed light on the cellular functions of LDs, but also provide additional clues to treatment of metabolic diseases. Genome-wide screen is a powerful approach to identify genetic factors that regulate lipid droplet dynamics. Here, we summarize recent genome-wide studies using yeast and Drosophila cells to understand the cellular dynamics of LDs. The results suggest that the genome-wide screens should be carried out in multiple organisms or cells, and using different nutritional conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. New Trend in Crop Production – Application of Plant Natural Multicomponent Growth Regulators with Bioprotective Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P. Ponomarenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available With the help of the Dot-blot hybridization the difference in steps of homology between mRNA of control plants and small regulatory si/mi RNA isolated from second-generation plantlets of wheat, corn, soybeans, sugar beets, chickpea, etc. cultivated from the seeds of plants infected and processed by new polycomponent plant growth regulators Regoplant® and Stimpo® in the first generation was found. It is proved that this difference is related to a partial reprogramming of the cell genome under the influence of biostimulators on growing plants with infected backgrounds that turns out in induction of low-molecular si/miRNA with antipathogenic and antiparasitic properties, which are the components of the immune system of a living organism.

  8. SS-A/Ro52 promotes apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauharoh, Siti Nur Aisyah; Saegusa, Jun; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Ardianto, Bambang; Kasagi, Shimpei; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kurimoto, Chiyo; Tokuno, Osamu; Nakamachi, Yuji; Kumagai, Shunichi; Kawano, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ro52 low HeLa cells are resistant to apoptosis upon various stimulations. ► Ro52 is upregulated by IFN-α, etoposide, or IFN-γ and anti-Fas Ab. ► Ro52-mediated apoptosis is independent of p53. ► Ro52 selectively regulates Bcl-2 expression. -- Abstract: SS-A/Ro52 (Ro52), an autoantigen in systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome, has E3 ligase activity to ubiquitinate proteins that protect against viral infection. To investigate Ro52’s role during stress, we transiently knocked it down in HeLa cells by siRo52 transfection. We found that Ro52 low HeLa cells were significantly more resistant to apoptosis than wild-type HeLa cells when stimulated by H 2 O 2 - or diamide-induced oxidative stress, IFN-α, IFN-γ and anti-Fas antibody, etoposide, or γ-irradiation. Furthermore, Ro52-mediated apoptosis was not influenced by p53 protein level in HeLa cells. Depleting Ro52 in HeLa cells caused Bcl-2, but not other Bcl-2 family molecules, to be upregulated. Taken together, our data showed that Ro52 is a universal proapoptotic molecule, and that its proapoptotic effect does not depend on p53, but is exerted through negative regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. These findings shed light on a new physiological role for Ro52 that is important to intracellular immunity.

  9. Regulated deficit irrigation as a water management strategy in Vitis vinifera production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wample, R.L.; Smithyman, R.

    2002-01-01

    An initial six-year study in a commercial vineyard located in the Columbia River Valley of Washington State, United States of America, examined the management practices and potential benefits of regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) on Vitis vinifera cv. Sauvignon blanc. The objective of the treatments was to evaluate the effect of deficit irrigation prior to, compared with after, veraison. Each of four irrigation treatments was applied to 1.6 ha and replicated four times for a total 27.0 ha. Irrigation treatments were based on desired soil moisture levels in the top metre of the profile where most of the root system is found. Soil moisture was monitored using a neutron probe and the information was combined with calculations of evaporative demand to determine the irrigation required on a weekly basis. Vine growth, yield, fruit quality and cold hardiness were monitored throughout the study. The results indicated that RDI prior to veraison was effective in controlling shoot growth, as determined by shoot length and elongation rate, as well as pruning weights. Sixteen wine lots, each of approximately 12,000 litres, were prepared each season. Although there was some effect on berry weight, yield was not always significantly reduced. Full irrigation prior to veraison resulted in excessive shoot growth. RDI applied after veraison to vines with large canopies resulted in greater water deficit stress. Fruit quality was increased by pre-veraison RDI compared to postveraison RDI based on wines made. Regulated deficit irrigation applied at anytime resulted in better early-season lignification of canes and cold hardening of buds. There was a slight improvement in mid-winter cold hardiness of vines subjected to RDI. However, this effect was inconsistent. Studies on Cabernet Sauvignon and White Riesling are underway to confirm these results and to investigate the impact of RDI on fruit quality and winemaking practices. (author)

  10. SS-A/Ro52 promotes apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauharoh, Siti Nur Aisyah [Department of Clinical Pathology and Immunology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University, Jakarta 15412 (Indonesia); Saegusa, Jun; Sugimoto, Takeshi [Department of Clinical Pathology and Immunology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Ardianto, Bambang [Department of Clinical Pathology and Immunology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta 55282 (Indonesia); Kasagi, Shimpei; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kurimoto, Chiyo [Department of Clinical Pathology and Immunology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Tokuno, Osamu; Nakamachi, Yuji [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kobe University Hospital, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Kumagai, Shunichi [Department of Clinical Pathology and Immunology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Kawano, Seiji, E-mail: sjkawano@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Pathology and Immunology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kobe University Hospital, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ro52{sup low} HeLa cells are resistant to apoptosis upon various stimulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ro52 is upregulated by IFN-{alpha}, etoposide, or IFN-{gamma} and anti-Fas Ab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ro52-mediated apoptosis is independent of p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ro52 selectively regulates Bcl-2 expression. -- Abstract: SS-A/Ro52 (Ro52), an autoantigen in systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjoegren's syndrome, has E3 ligase activity to ubiquitinate proteins that protect against viral infection. To investigate Ro52's role during stress, we transiently knocked it down in HeLa cells by siRo52 transfection. We found that Ro52{sup low} HeLa cells were significantly more resistant to apoptosis than wild-type HeLa cells when stimulated by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}- or diamide-induced oxidative stress, IFN-{alpha}, IFN-{gamma} and anti-Fas antibody, etoposide, or {gamma}-irradiation. Furthermore, Ro52-mediated apoptosis was not influenced by p53 protein level in HeLa cells. Depleting Ro52 in HeLa cells caused Bcl-2, but not other Bcl-2 family molecules, to be upregulated. Taken together, our data showed that Ro52 is a universal proapoptotic molecule, and that its proapoptotic effect does not depend on p53, but is exerted through negative regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. These findings shed light on a new physiological role for Ro52 that is important to intracellular immunity.

  11. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-05-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references.

  12. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-01-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references

  13. Diazepam enhances production of diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI), a negative saliva secretion regulator, localized in rat salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Eri; Kawaguchi, Mitsuru; Shinomiya, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Kawano, Toshihiko; Okubo, Migiwa; Sawaki, Kohei

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) and central-type benzodiazepine receptor (CBR) in salivary gland play a role in the inhibitory regulation of salivary secretion in rodents. Diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous ligand for PBR, produces neurosteroids, which modulate CBR activity. In this study, we investigated the effect of repetitive administration of diazepam (DZP) on salivary secretion and expression of DBI mRNA and peptide. Moreover, mRNA expression of PBR and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), a transcriptional regulator for DBI promoter, was evaluated after repetitive administration of DZP. Repetitive administration, but not single administration, of 0.4 mg/kg DZP caused inhibition of salivary secretion and enhanced expression of DBI, PACAP, and PBR mRNA in rat salivary gland, with an increase in production of DBI peptide. These results suggest that repetitive administration of DZP stimulates DBI production, which may result in an increase in the suppressive effect of DZP on salivary secretion.

  14. Group 2 innate lymphoid cell production of IL-5 is regulated by NKT cells during influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Ann Gorski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory virus infections, such as influenza, typically induce a robust type I (pro-inflammatory cytokine immune response, however, the production of type 2 cytokines has been observed. Type 2 cytokine production during respiratory virus infection is linked to asthma exacerbation; however, type 2 cytokines may also be tissue protective. Interleukin (IL-5 is a prototypical type 2 cytokine that is essential for eosinophil maturation and egress out of the bone marrow. However, little is known about the cellular source and underlying cellular and molecular basis for the regulation of IL-5 production during respiratory virus infection. Using a mouse model of influenza virus infection, we found a robust transient release of IL-5 into infected airways along with a significant and progressive accumulation of eosinophils into the lungs, particularly during the recovery phase of infection, i.e. following virus clearance. The cellular source of the IL-5 was group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 infiltrating the infected lungs. Interestingly, the progressive accumulation of eosinophils following virus clearance is reflected in the rapid expansion of c-kit⁺ IL-5 producing ILC2. We further demonstrate that the enhanced capacity for IL-5 production by ILC2 during recovery is concomitant with the enhanced expression of the IL-33 receptor subunit, ST2, by ILC2. Lastly, we show that NKT cells, as well as alveolar macrophages (AM, are endogenous sources of IL-33 that enhance IL-5 production from ILC2. Collectively, these results reveal that c-kit⁺ ILC2 interaction with IL-33 producing NKT and AM leads to abundant production of IL-5 by ILC2 and accounts for the accumulation of eosinophils observed during the recovery phase of influenza infection.

  15. The effects of customer benefit and regulation on environmental product innovation. Empirical evidence from appliance manufacturers in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammerer, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Environmental product (EP) innovations and their determinants have received increasing attention from researchers during the past years. So far, empirical studies have shown inconsistent results, especially regarding the impact of regulation. In this paper, I seek to advance the understanding of EP-innovation by introducing and testing a novel research framework. First, a novel unit of analysis, the environmental issue level, is applied. EP-innovation is not studied in broad terms but specifically for four environmental issues that are relevant to the electrical and electronic appliances industry: energy efficiency, toxic substances, material efficiency, and electromagnetic fields. Second, the customer benefit, a concept from the green marketing literature, is included as an explanatory variable for EP-innovation for the first time. The argument is that green products which besides their public benefits have private environmental benefits for the customer (e.g., energy savings) will generate stronger consumer demand and can thus constitute the firm's motivation to implement those innovations in the first place. Third, EP-innovation is observed more comprehensively, measuring its extent and level of novelty. I apply this research framework to study EP-innovations of German manufacturers of electrical and electronic appliances. My results support the issue level as unit of analysis. The impact of customer benefit and regulation on EP-innovation is analyzed with logit regression and the results clearly show that both customer benefit and regulation play a key role for EP-innovation. They not only foster the implementation of EP-innovations but also their broad application and their level of novelty. (author)

  16. CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) for gene regulation and succinate production in cyanobacterium S. elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Hung; Shen, Claire R; Li, Hung; Sung, Li-Yu; Wu, Meng-Ying; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2016-11-15

    Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 holds promise for biochemical conversion, but gene deletion in PCC 7942 is time-consuming and may be lethal to cells. CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) is an emerging technology that exploits the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) and single guide RNA (sgRNA) to repress sequence-specific genes without the need of gene knockout, and is repurposed to rewire metabolic networks in various procaryotic cells. To employ CRISPRi for the manipulation of gene network in PCC 7942, we integrated the cassettes expressing enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP), dCas9 and sgRNA targeting different regions on eyfp into the PCC 7942 chromosome. Co-expression of dCas9 and sgRNA conferred effective and stable suppression of EYFP production at efficiencies exceeding 99%, without impairing cell growth. We next integrated the dCas9 and sgRNA targeting endogenous genes essential for glycogen accumulation (glgc) and succinate conversion to fumarate (sdhA and sdhB). Transcription levels of glgc, sdhA and sdhB were effectively suppressed with efficiencies depending on the sgRNA binding site. Targeted suppression of glgc reduced the expression to 6.2%, attenuated the glycogen accumulation to 4.8% and significantly enhanced the succinate titer. Targeting sdhA or sdhB also effectively downregulated the gene expression and enhanced the succinate titer ≈12.5-fold to ≈0.58-0.63 mg/L. These data demonstrated that CRISPRi-mediated gene suppression allowed for re-directing the cellular carbon flow, thus paving a new avenue to rationally fine-tune the metabolic pathways in PCC 7942 for the production of biotechnological products.

  17. Donor lung derived myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells differentially regulate T cell proliferation and cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Heather L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct allorecognition, i.e., donor lung-derived dendritic cells (DCs stimulating recipient-derived T lymphocytes, is believed to be the key mechanism of lung allograft rejection. Myeloid (cDCs and plasmacytoid (pDCs are believed to have differential effects on T cell activation. However, the roles of each DC type on T cell activation and rejection pathology post lung transplantation are unknown. Methods Using transgenic mice and antibody depletion techniques, either or both cell types were depleted in lungs of donor BALB/c mice (H-2d prior to transplanting into C57BL/6 mice (H-2b, followed by an assessment of rejection pathology, and pDC or cDC-induced proliferation and cytokine production in C57BL/6-derived mediastinal lymph node T cells (CD3+. Results Depleting either DC type had modest effect on rejection pathology and T cell proliferation. In contrast, T cells from mice that received grafts depleted of both DCs did not proliferate and this was associated with significantly reduced acute rejection scores compared to all other groups. cDCs were potent inducers of IFNγ, whereas both cDCs and pDCs induced IL-10. Both cell types had variable effects on IL-17A production. Conclusion Collectively, the data show that direct allorecognition by donor lung pDCs and cDCs have differential effects on T cell proliferation and cytokine production. Depletion of both donor lung cDC and pDC could prevent the severity of acute rejection episodes.

  18. SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication and regulates interferon production in mouse myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruonan Zhang

    Full Text Available SAMHD1 restricts the replication of HIV-1 and other retroviruses in human myeloid and resting CD4(+ T cells and that is counteracted in SIV and HIV-2 by the Vpx accessory protein. The protein is a phosphohydrolase that lowers the concentration of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTP, blocking reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome. Polymorphisms in the gene encoding SAMHD1 are associated with Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by increased type-I interferon production. SAMHD1 is conserved in mammals but its role in restricting virus replication and controlling interferon production in non-primate species is not well understood. We show that SAMHD1 is catalytically active and expressed at high levels in mouse spleen, lymph nodes, thymus and lung. siRNA knock-down of SAMHD1 in bone marrow-derived macrophages increased their susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. shRNA knock-down of SAMHD1 in the murine monocytic cell-line RAW264.7 increased its susceptibility to HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus and increased the levels of the dNTP pool. In addition, SAMHD1 knock-down in RAW264.7 cells induced the production of type-I interferon and several interferon-stimulated genes, modeling the situation in Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome. Our findings suggest that the role of SAMHD1 in restricting viruses is conserved in the mouse. The RAW264.7 cell-line serves as a useful tool to study the antiviral and innate immune response functions of SAMHD1.

  19. Impact of nitrogen feeding regulation on polyhydroxyalkanoates production by mixed microbial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernando; Campanari, Sabrina; Matteo, Stefania; Valentino, Francesco; Majone, Mauro; Villano, Marianna

    2017-07-25

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) is typically used for selecting mixed microbial cultures (MMC) for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production. Since many waste streams suitable as process feedstock for PHA production are nitrogen-deficient, a nutrient supply in the SBR is typically required to allow for efficient microbial growth. The scope of this study was to devise a nitrogen feeding strategy which allows controlling the nitrogen levels during the feast and famine regime of a lab-scale SBR, thereby selecting for PHA-storing microorganisms. At the beginning of the cycle the reactor was fed with a synthetic mixture of acetic and propionic acids at an overall organic load rate of 8.5gCODL -1 d -1 (i.e. 260CmmolL -1 d -1 ), whereas nitrogen (in the form of ammonium sulphate) was added either simultaneously to the carbon feed (coupled feeding strategy) or after the end of the feast phase (uncoupled feeding strategy). As a main result, PHA production was more than doubled (up to about 1300±64mgCODL -1 ) when carbon and nitrogen were separately fed and the higher PHA production also corresponded to an 82% increase in the polymer HV content (up to 20±1%, wtwt -1 ). Three SBR runs were performed with the uncoupled carbon and nitrogen feeding at different carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios (of 14.3, 17.9, and 22.3CmolNmol -1 , respectively) which were varied by progressively reducing the concentration of the nitrogen feeding. In spite of a comparable PHA storage yield at 14.3 and 17.9CmolNmol -1 (0.41±0.05 gCOD PHA gCOD VFA -1 and 0.38±0.05 gCOD PHA gCOD VFA -1 , respectively), the storage response of the selected MMC significantly decreased when the C/N ratio was set at the highest investigated value. Notably, an increase in this parameter also resulted in a change in the HV content in the polymer regardless the composition of the organic acids solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Complement C1q regulates LPS-induced cytokine production in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahide; Oritani, Kenji; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Ishikawa, Jun; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Isao; Kawamoto, Shinichirou; Ishida, Naoko; Ujiie, Hidetoshi; Masaie, Hiroaki; Botto, Marina; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    We show here that C1q suppresses IL-12p40 production in LPS-stimulated murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC). Serum IL-12p40 concentration of C1q-deficient mice was higher than that of wild-type mice after intraperitoneal LPS-injection. Because neither globular head of C1q (gC1q) nor collagen-like region of C1q (cC1q) failed to suppress LPS-induced IL-12p40 production, both gC1q and cC1q, and/or some specialized conformation of native C1q may be required for the inhibition. While C1q did not affect mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MD-2, and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), BMDC treated with C1q showed the reduced activity of NF-kappaB and the delayed phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase after LPS-stimulation. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-induced IL-12p40 and TNF-alpha production, another MyD88-dependent TLR-mediated signal, was also suppressed by C1q treatment. Therefore, C1q is likely to suppress MyD88-dependent pathway in TLR-mediated signals. In contrast, C1q failed to suppress colony formation of B cells responding to LPS or LPS-induced CD40 and CD86 expression on BMDC in MyD88-deficient mice, indicating that inhibitory effects of C1q on MyD88-independent pathways may be limited. Taken together, C1q may regulate innate and adaptive immune systems via modification of signals mediated by interactions between invading pathogens and TLR.

  1. Photic and circadian regulation of melatonin production in the Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Yoshiaki; Ueda, Satomi; Takemura, Akihiro

    2009-01-01

    Diverse circadian systems related to phylogeny and ecological adaptive strategies are proposed in teleosts. Recently, retinal photoreception was reported to be important for the circadian pacemaking activities of the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. We aimed to confirm the photic and circadian responsiveness of its close relative-the Mozambique tilapia O. mossambicus. Melatonin production in cannulated or ophthalmectomized fish and its secretion from cultured pineal glands were examined under several light regimes. Melatonin production in the cannulated tilapias was measured at 3-h intervals; it fluctuated daily, with a nocturnal increase and a diurnal decrease. Exposing the cannulated fish to several light intensities (1500-0.1 lx) and to natural light (0.1 and 0.3 lx) suppressed melatonin levels within 30 min. Static pineal gland culture under light-dark and reverse light-dark cycles revealed that melatonin synthesis increased during the dark periods. Rhythmic melatonin synthesis disappeared on pineal gland culture under constant dark and light conditions. After ophthalmectomy, plasma melatonin levels did not vary with light-dark cycles. These results suggest that (1) Mozambique tilapias possess strong photic responsiveness, (2) their pineal glands are sensitive to light but lack circadian pacemaker activity, and (3) they require lateral eyes for rhythmic melatonin secretion from the pineal gland.

  2. The invasive microalga Chrysophaeum taylorii: Interactive stressors regulate cell density and mucilage production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronni, Sarah; Calabretti, Chiara; Cavagna, Gianluca; Ceccherelli, Giulia; Delaria, Maria Anna; Macri, Giovanni; Navone, Augusto; Panzalis, Pieraugusto

    2017-08-01

    The benthic mucilage producing microalga Chrysophaeum taylorii Lewis and Bryan (Pelagophyceae) has recently received attention for its rapid spread in the Mediterranean Sea, where its blooms have remarkable detrimental effects. So far no information on C. taylorii response to multiple stressors, especially in terms of mucilage hyperproduction, is available in the literature yet, and a manipulative field experiment in this topic was designed in Tavolara Punta Coda Cavallo Marine Protected Area. The aim of the study was to test the effects of nutrient enrichment (addition of nutrients), mechanical disturbance (partial and total benthic organisms removal) and hydrodynamics (increased water turbulence) on C. taylorii cell density and mucilage abundance. To the purpose, the three above mentioned stressors were simulated and the three treatments were assigned to 20 × 20 cm plots following a full-factorial design (n = 3). Interactive effects of the three stressors affected significantly both benthic C. taylorii cell density and mucilage cover although differently. Mechanical disturbance and high hydrodynamics produced consistent effects on cell density and mucilage production (i.e. the former factor enhancing and the latter decreasing). Nutrient enrichment on the contrary led to contrasting effects, promoting cell abundance and inhibiting mucilage production. Therefore, important mucilage blooms are expected in oligotrophic sheltered coastal locations where barren areas are present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Involvement of the vagus nerves in the regulation of basal hepatic glucose production in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, Sylvain; Walmsley, Konstantin; Neal, Doss W; Williams, Phillip E; Cherrington, Alan D

    2002-11-01

    We determined if blocking transmission in the fibers of the vagus nerves would affect basal hepatic glucose metabolism in the 18-h-fasted conscious dog. A pancreatic clamp (somatostatin, basal portal insulin, and glucagon) was employed. A 40-min control period was followed by a 90-min test period. In one group, stainless steel cooling coils (Sham, n = 5) were perfused with a 37 degrees C solution, while in the other (Cool, n = 6), the coils were perfused with -20 degrees C solution. Vagal blockade was verified by heart rate change (80 +/- 9 to 84 +/- 14 beats/min in Sham; 98 +/- 12 to 193 +/- 22 beats/min in Cool). The arterial glucose level was kept euglycemic by glucose infusion. No change in tracer-determined glucose production occurred in Sham, whereas in Cool it dropped significantly (2.4 +/- 0.4 to 1.9 +/- 0.4 mg. kg(-1). min(-1)). Net hepatic glucose output did not change in Sham but decreased from 1.9 +/- 0.3 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 mg. kg(-1). min(-1) in the Cool group. Hepatic gluconeogenesis did not change in either group. These data suggest that vagal blockade acutely modulates hepatic glucose production by inhibiting glycogenolysis.

  4. Regulation of the wind power production. Contribution of the electric vehicles and other energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateus, Carlos B. [Instituto de Meteorologia, Lisboa (Portugal); Estanqueiro, Ana [INETI/LNEG - National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2012-07-01

    The increase in penetration of variable renewable energy sources (RES) introduced additional difficulties regarding the management of the Portuguese Power System. This is mainly due to the high temporal variability and low controllability, characteristics of these kinds of sources. There is a real need to reduce the impact of non-dispatchable RES sources; maximizing their penetration and minimizing curtailment. This is especially true for wind power and run-of-the-river hydro (ROR); as it appears beneficial to combine their variable production with added capacity of energy storage and demand side management; thereby increasing the flexibility of the power system as a whole. This paper aims to assess the excess wind generation (and other non-dispatchable sources); this for periods of production's excess in a 2020 timeframe, and assuming different weather scenarios. The adjustment of wind power generation (WPG) profile to the load profile is also addressed; the result is computed in the form of the value of the energy temporally deferred, using Pumped Hydro Storage (PHS) power plants as well as electric Vehicles (EVs). (orig.)

  5. Four hundred and sixty brands of e-cigarettes and counting: implications for product regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu-Hong; Sun, Jessica Y; Bonnevie, Erika; Cummins, Sharon E; Gamst, Anthony; Yin, Lu; Lee, Madeleine

    2014-07-01

    E-cigarettes are largely unregulated and internet sales are substantial. This study examines how the online market for e-cigarettes has changed over time: in product design and in marketing messages appearing on websites. Comprehensive internet searches of English-language websites from May-August 2012 and December 2013-January 2014 identified brands, models, flavours, nicotine strengths, ingredients and product claims. Brands were divided into older and newer groups (by the two searches) for comparison. By January 2014 there were 466 brands (each with its own website) and 7764 unique flavours. In the 17 months between the searches, there was a net increase of 10.5 brands and 242 new flavours per month. Older brands were more likely than newer brands to offer cigalikes (86.9% vs. 52.1%, pdesign and advertising messages of e-cigarettes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. The effect of potential electronic nicotine delivery system regulations on nicotine product selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesko, Michael F; Kenkel, Donald S; Wang, Hua; Hughes, Jenna M

    2016-04-01

    To estimate the effect of potential regulations of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) among adult smokers, including increasing taxes, reducing flavor availability and adding warning labels communicating various levels of risk. We performed a discrete choice experiment (DCE) among a national sample of 1200 adult smokers. We examined heterogeneity in policy responses by age, cigarette quitting interest and current ENDS use. Our experiment overlapped January 2015 by design, providing exogenous variation in cigarette quitting interest from New Year resolutions. KnowledgePanel, an online panel of recruited respondents. A total of 1200 adult smokers from the United States. Hypothetical purchase choice of cigarettes, nicotine replacement therapy and a disposable ENDS. Increasing ENDS prices from $3 to $6 was associated with a 13.6 percentage point reduction in ENDS selection (P taxes, a proposed US Food and Drug Administration warning label for electronic nicotine delivery systems and a more severe warning label may discourage adult smokers from switching to electronic nicotine delivery systems. Reducing the availability of flavors may reduce ENDS use by young adult smokers. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Nitrous oxide production and consumption: regulation of gene expression by gas-sensitive transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Several biochemical mechanisms contribute to the biological generation of nitrous oxide (N2O). N2O generating enzymes include the respiratory nitric oxide (NO) reductase, an enzyme from the flavo-diiron family, and flavohaemoglobin. On the other hand, there is only one enzyme that is known to use N2O as a substrate, which is the respiratory N2O reductase typically found in bacteria capable of denitrification (the respiratory reduction of nitrate and nitrite to dinitrogen). This article will briefly review the properties of the enzymes that make and consume N2O, together with the accessory proteins that have roles in the assembly and maturation of those enzymes. The expression of the genes encoding the enzymes that produce and consume N2O is regulated by environmental signals (typically oxygen and NO) acting through regulatory proteins, which, either directly or indirectly, control the frequency of transcription initiation. The roles and mechanisms of these proteins, and the structures of the regulatory networks in which they participate will also be reviewed. PMID:22451107

  8. MCPIP-1, Alias Regnase-1, Controls Epithelial Inflammation by Posttranscriptional Regulation of IL-8 Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Ewelina; Wilamowski, Mateusz; Lech, Maciej; Bugara, Beata; Jura, Jolanta; Potempa, Jan; Koziel, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors are critical for the detection of invading microorganisms. They activate multiple pathways that lead to the induction of proinflammatory responses and pathogen clearance. The intensity and duration of this immune reaction must be tightly controlled spatially and temporally in every tissue by different negative regulators. We hypothesized that monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-induced protein-1 (MCPIP-1) might play a role in maintaining immune homeostasis in the epithelium both under physiological conditions and upon bacterial infection. To this end, we examined the distribution of the MCPIP-1 transcript and protein in various tissues. The MCPIP-1 protein level was higher in epithelial cells than in myeloid cells. MCPIP-1 exerted RNase activity towards the interleukin (IL)-8 transcript and the lifespan of IL-8 was determined by the presence of the stem-loops/hairpin structures at the 3'UTR region of IL-8 mRNA. Moreover, using fully active, purified recombinant MCPIP-1 protein, we elucidated the mechanism by which MCPIP-1 controls the IL-8 mRNA level. In conclusion, we uncovered a novel IL-8-dependent mechanism via which MCPIP-1 maintains epithelial homeostasis. This study reveals for the first time that MCPIP-1 plays a crucial anti-inflammatory role not only in myeloid cells but also in epithelial cells. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Regulation of the E. coli SOS response by the lexA gene product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brent, R.

    1983-01-01

    In an Escherichia coli that is growing normally, transcription of many genes is repressed by the product of the lexA gene. If cellular DNA is damaged, proteolytically competent recA protein (recA protease) inactivates lexA protein and these genes are induced. Many of the cellular phenomena observed during the cellular response to DNA damage (the SOS response) are the consequence of the expression of these lexA-prepressed genes. Since the SOS response of E. coli has recently been the subject of a comprehensive review, in this paper I would like to concentrate on some modifications to the picture based on new data. 12 references, 2 figures

  10. Alternaria mycotoxins in black rot lesion of tomato fruit: conditions and regulation of their production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H A

    1996-01-01

    Alternaria represents the most colon decay organism of the post-harvest tomato fruit. The prevalent type of decay, black rot lesion, is caused by Alternaria alternata which may invade tomato tissue damaged by sun scald. The mainly natural mycotoxins produced in rotted tomato are alternariol (AOH), alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), and tenuazonic acid (TA). Whereas, altertoxin-I and -II (AT-I and -II), in addition to AOH, AME and TA were produced by local A. alternata in a synthetic medium. The optimum temperature for toxin production by A. alternata IMI 89344 was 28 degrees C for AOH and AME, 21 degrees C for TA and 14 degrees C for AT-I and -II. The growth and toxin were produced in a noticeable amount at 7 degrees C but drop at 35 degrees C. Significant inhibition in these toxins was attained at 500 ppm cinnamon oil in YES-Czapek's medium and in homogenate of tomato.

  11. Identification of a potent small molecule capable of regulating polyploidization, megakaryocyte maturation, and platelet production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Megakaryocytic cell maturation involves polyploidization, and megakaryocyte (MK ploidy correlates with their maturation and platelet production. Retardation of MK maturation is closely associated with poor MK engraftment after cord blood transplantation and neonatal thrombocytopenia. Despite the high prevalence of thrombocytopenia in a range of setting that affect infants to adults, there are still very limited modalities of treatment. Methods Human CD34+ cells were isolated from cord blood or bone marrow samples acquired from consenting patients. Cells were cultured and induced using 616452 and compared to current drugs on the market such as rominplostim or TPO. Ploidy analysis was completed using propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry analysis. Animal studies consisted of transplanting human CD34+ cells into NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIl2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice followed by daily injections of 15 mg/kg of 616452. Results Within one week of culture, the chemical was able to induce polyploidization, the process required for megakaryocyte maturation with the accumulation of DNA content, to 64 N or greater to achieve a relative adult size. We observed fold increases as high as 200-fold in cells of 16 N or greater compared to un-induced cells with a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MK differentiated in the presence of 616452 demonstrated a more robust capacity of MK differentiation than that of MKs cultured with rominplostim used for adult idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP patients. In mice transplanted with human cord blood, 616452 strikingly enhanced MK reconstitution in the marrow and human peripheral platelet production. The molecular therapeutic actions for this chemical may be through TPO-independent pathways. Conclusion Our studies may have an important impact on our fundamental understanding of fetal MK biology, the clinical management of thrombocytopenic neonates and leukemic differentiation therapy.

  12. Pathway analysis of Pichia pastoris to elucidate methanol metabolism and its regulation for production of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unrean, Pornkamol

    2014-01-01

    This research rationally analyzes metabolic pathways of Pichia pastoris to study the metabolic flux responses of this yeast under methanol metabolism. A metabolic model of P. pastoris was constructed and analyzed by elementary mode analysis (EMA). EMA was used to comprehensively identify the cell's metabolic flux profiles and its underlying regulation mechanisms for the production of recombinant proteins from methanol. Change in phenotypes and flux profiles during methanol adaptation with varying feed mixture of glycerol and methanol was examined. EMA identified increasing and decreasing fluxes during the glycerol-methanol metabolic shift, which well agreed with experimental observations supporting the validity of the metabolic network model. Analysis of all the identified pathways also led to the determination of the metabolic capacities as well as the optimum metabolic pathways for recombinant protein synthesis during methanol induction. The network sensitivity analysis revealed that the production of proteins can be improved by manipulating the flux ratios at the pyruvate branch point. In addition, EMA suggested that protein synthesis is optimum under hypoxic culture conditions. The metabolic modeling and analysis presented in this study could potentially form a valuable knowledge base for future research on rational design and optimization of P. pastoris by determining target genes, pathways, and culture conditions for enhanced recombinant protein synthesis. The metabolic pathway analysis is also of considerable value for production of therapeutic proteins by P. pastoris in biopharmaceutical applications. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  13. IL-4 enhances IL-10 production in Th1 cells: implications for Th1 and Th2 regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ruth E; Hassan, Masriana; Burton, Bronwen R; Britton, Graham; Hill, Elaine V; Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C

    2017-09-12

    IL-10 is an immunomodulatory cytokine with a critical role in limiting inflammation in immune-mediated pathologies. The mechanisms leading to IL-10 expression by CD4 + T cells are being elucidated, with several cytokines implicated. We explored the effect of IL-4 on the natural phenomenon of IL-10 production by a chronically stimulated antigen-specific population of differentiated Th1 cells. In vitro, IL-4 blockade inhibited while addition of exogenous IL-4 to Th1 cultures enhanced IL-10 production. In the in vivo setting of peptide immunotherapy leading to a chronically stimulated Th1 phenotype, lack of IL-4Rα inhibited the induction of IL-10. Exploring the interplay of Th1 and Th2 cells through co-culture, Th2-derived IL-4 promoted IL-10 expression by Th1 cultures, reducing their pathogenicity in vivo. Co-culture led to upregulated c-Maf expression with no decrease in the proportion of T-bet + cells in these cultures. Addition of IL-4 also reduced the encephalitogenic capacity of Th1 cultures. These data demonstrate that IL-4 contributes to IL-10 production and that Th2 cells modulate Th1 cultures towards a self-regulatory phenotype, contributing to the cross-regulation of Th1 and Th2 cells. These findings are important in the context of Th1 driven diseases since they reveal how the Th1 phenotype and function can be modulated by IL-4.

  14. A Quorum-Sensing System That RegulatesStreptococcus pneumoniaeBiofilm Formation and Surface Polysaccharide Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junges, Roger; Salvadori, Gabriela; Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Åmdal, Heidi A; Periselneris, Jimstan N; Chen, Tsute; Brown, Jeremy S; Petersen, Fernanda C

    2017-01-01

    Despite vaccines, Streptococcus pneumoniae kills more than a million people yearly. Thus, understanding how pneumococci transition from commensals to pathogens is particularly relevant. Quorum sensing regulates collective behaviors and thus represents a potential driver of commensal-to-pathogen transitions. Rgg/small hydrophobic peptide (SHP) quorum-sensing systems are widespread in streptococci, yet they remain largely uncharacterized in S. pneumoniae . Using directional transcriptome sequencing, we show that the S. pneumoniae D39 Rgg0939/SHP system induces the transcription of a single gene cluster including shp and capsule gene homologs. Capsule size measurements determined by fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran exclusion allowed assignment of the system to the regulation of surface polysaccharide expression. We found that the SHP pheromone induced exopolysaccharide expression in R36A, an unencapsulated derivative of D39. In the encapsulated parent strain, overexpression of the Rgg system resulted in a mutant with increased capsule size. In line with previous studies showing that capsule expression is inversely associated with biofilm formation, we found that biofilm formed on lung epithelial cells was decreased in the overexpression strain and increased in an rgg deletion mutant. Although no significant differences were observed between D39 and the rgg deletion mutant in a mouse model of lung infection, in competitive assays, overexpression reduced fitness. This is the first study to reveal a quorum-sensing system in streptococci that regulates exopolysaccharide synthesis from a site distinct from the original capsule locus. IMPORTANCE Quorum sensing regulates bacterial social behaviors by production, secretion, and sensing of pheromones. In this study, we characterized a new quorum-sensing system of the Rgg/SHP class in S. pneumoniae D39. The system was found to directly induce the expression of a single gene cluster comprising the gene for the SHP pheromone

  15. Role of the GacS sensor kinase in the regulation of volatile production by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Xu; Cordovez, Viviane; Etalo, Desalegn W.; Voort, van der M.; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2016-01-01

    In plant-associated Pseudomonas species,the production of several secondary metabolites and exoenzymes is regulated by the GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system (the Gac-system). Here,we investigated if a mutation in the GacS sensor kinase affects the production of volatile organic compounds

  16. Role of the GacS Sensor Kinase in the Regulation of Volatile Production by Plant Growth-Promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Xu; Cordovez da Cunha, Viviane; Etalo, Desalegn W.; van der Voort, Menno; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2016-01-01

    In plant-associated Pseudomonas species, the production of several secondary metabolites and exoenzymes is regulated by the GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system (the Gac-system). Here, we investigated if a mutation in the GacS sensor kinase affects the production of volatile organic compounds

  17. New European commission regulation on variations to the terms of marketing authorization for medicinal products and its impact on Croatian legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinac, Adrijana Ilić; Tomić, Sinisa; Simicić, Mirna

    2010-09-01

    Variations introduced to medicinal product documentation must not affect the quality, efficacy, and safety of the product. Croatian Medicinal Products Act and accompanying ordinances are largely aligned with the EU regulations. The EU has now tried to simplify the issue of variations with a new Regulation, creating differences in the definition of and approach to resolving certain types of variations between Croatia and the EU. These differences could hinder the approval procedure for variations in Croatia, particularly for medicines already approved in the EU. Amending the Croatian Ordinance on medicines already authorised in the EU would be one way of maintaining the efficiency of the Croatian regulatory system.

  18. Production of co-polymers of polyhydroxyalkanoates by regulating the hydrolysis of biowastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prasun; Ray, Subhasree; Kalia, Vipin C

    2016-01-01

    Production of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) co-polymers by Bacillus spp. was studied by feeding defined volatile fatty acids (VFAs) obtained through controlled hydrolysis of various wastes. Eleven mixed hydrolytic cultures (MHCs) each containing 6 strains could generate VFA from slurries of (2% total solids): pea-shells (PS), potato peels (PP), apple pomace (AP) and onion peels (OP). PS hydrolysates (obtained with MHC2 and MHC5) inoculated with Bacillus cereus EGU43 and Bacillus thuringiensis EGU45 produced co-polymers of PHA at the rate of 15-60mg/L with a 3HV content of 1%w/w. An enhancement in PHA yield of 3.66-fold, i.e. 205-550mg/L with 3HV content up to 7.5%(w/w) was observed upon addition of OP hydrolysate and 1% glucose (w/v) to PS hydrolysates. This is the first demonstration, where PHA co-polymer composition, under non-axenic conditions, could be controlled by customizing VFA profile of the hydrolysate by the addition of different biowastes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Domain- and nucleotide-specific Rev response element regulation of feline immunodeficiency virus production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hong; Huisman, Willem; Ellestad, Kristofor K.; Phillips, Tom R.; Power, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Computational analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) RNA sequences indicated that common FIV strains contain a rev response element (RRE) defined by a long unbranched hairpin with 6 stem-loop sub-domains, termed stem-loop A (SLA). To examine the role of the RNA secondary structure of the RRE, mutational analyses were performed in both an infectious FIV molecular clone and a FIV CAT-RRE reporter system. These studies disclosed that the stems within SLA (SA1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) of the RRE were critical but SA6 was not essential for FIV replication and CAT expression. These studies also revealed that the secondary structure rather than an antisense protein (ASP) mediates virus expression and replication in vitro. In addition, a single synonymous mutation within the FIV-RRE, SA3/45, reduced viral reverse transcriptase activity and p24 expression after transfection but in addition also showed a marked reduction in viral expression and production following infection. PMID:20570310

  20. Dynamics of Public Service Motivation: Attraction, Selection, and Socialization in the Production and Regulation of Social Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Anne Mette

    2014-01-01

    The literature on public service motivation (PSM) has typically focused on the relationship between this motivation and public/private sector of employment, while the character of the work being performed has been neglected. Through panel surveys with pre- and post-entry measures of PSM among...... certified Danish social workers, this study provides a unique design to investigate PSM-based attraction‒selection and socialization effects with respect to the choice between work related to service production and service regulation (controlled for public/private sector of employment). The study shows...... that the PSM profiles of social work students predict their preference for one of the two types of work tasks, but do not predict first employment in the preferred job. Conversely, post-entry shifts in social workers’ PSM profiles result from a complex interplay between influences from both work task...

  1. Role of lake regulation on glacier fed rivers in enhancing salmon productivity: The Cook Inlet watershed south central Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    Rivers fed by glaciers constitute a major part of the freshwater runoff into the Cook Inlet basin of south-central Alaska. This basin is very important to the economy of the State of Alaska because it is home to more than half of the population and it supports multi-million dollar commercial, subsistence and sport fisheries. Hence an understanding of how glacial runoff influences biological productivity is important for managing rivers that drain into Cook Inlet. This paper examines the ways in which the regulation of glacier-fed rivers by proglacial lakes affects salmon productivity, with particular reference to the Kenai River. Salmon escapement per unit channel length on the Kenai River is between two and ten times that found for rain-and-snowmelt dominated rivers and glacier-fed rivers lacking lake regulation. Lakes are shown to influence biological processes in glacier-fed rivers by attenuating peak flows, sustaining high flows throughout the summer, supplementing winter low flows, settling suspended sediment, and increasing river temperatures. Downstream from large lakes, glacier-fed rivers are less disturbed, channels are relatively stable and have well-developed salmonid habitats. The positive influences are indicated by the high diversity and abundances of benthic macroinvertebrates, which are important food resources for juvenile salmonids. High summer flows allow access for up-river salmon runs and lakes also provide both overwintering and rearing habitat. Copyright ?? 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Rivers fed by glaciers constitute a major part of the freshwater runoff into the Cook Inlet basin of south-central Alaska. This basin is very important to the economy of the State of Alaska because it is home to more than half of the population and it supports multi-million dollar commercial, subsistence and sport fisheries. Hence an understanding of how glacial runoff influences biological productivity is important for managing rivers that drain into Cook Inlet

  2. Power Production Losses Study by Frequency Regulation in Weak-Grid-Connected Utility-Scale Photovoltaic Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Muñoz-Cruzado-Alba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, an increasing penetration of utility-scale photovoltaic plants (USPVPs leads to a change in dynamic and operational characteristics of the power distribution system. USPVPs must help to maintain the system stability and reliability while implementing minimum technical requirements (MTRs imposed by the utility grid. One of the most significant requirements is about frequency regulation (FR. Overall production of USPVPs is reduced significantly by applying FR curves, especially in weak grids with high rate of frequency faults. The introduction of a battery energy storage system (BESS reduces losses and improves the grid system reliability. Experimental frequency and irradiance data of several weak grids have been used to analyse USPVPs losses related to FR requirements and benefits from the introduction of a BESS. Moreover, its economic viability is showen without the need for any economic incentives.

  3. The adaptor protein SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity against lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L; Stein, Paul L; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-12-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT-cell TCR transgenic mouse model, we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells, but not thymic epithelial cells, meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Furthermore, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development by controlling early growth response 2 protein and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IFN regulatory factor 4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. MicroRNA-451 Negatively Regulates Hepatic Glucose Production and Glucose Homeostasis by Targeting Glycerol Kinase-Mediated Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Shu; Yang, Mengmei; Zhao, Yanan; Chen, Xiaofang; Zhang, Feifei; Li, Na; Yao, Pengle; Zhu, Tengfei; Mei, Hong; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Yu; Chen, Shiting; Le, Yingying

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of regulatory molecules implicated in type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by insulin resistance and hepatic glucose overproduction. We show that miRNA-451 (miR-451) is elevated in the liver tissues of dietary and genetic mouse models of diabetes. Through an adenovirus-mediated gain- and loss-of-function study, we found that miR-451 negatively regulates hepatic gluconeogenesis and blood glucose levels in normal mice and identified glycerol kinase (Gyk) as a direct target of miR-451. We demonstrate that miR-451 and Gyk regulate hepatic glucose production, the glycerol gluconeogenesis axis, and the AKT-FOXO1-PEPCK/G6Pase pathway in an opposite manner; Gyk could reverse the effect of miR-451 on hepatic gluconeogenesis and AKT-FOXO1-PEPCK/G6Pase pathway. Moreover, overexpression of miR-451 or knockdown of Gyk in diabetic mice significantly inhibited hepatic gluconeogenesis, alleviated hyperglycemia, and improved glucose tolerance. Further studies showed that miR-451 is upregulated by glucose and insulin in hepatocytes; the elevation of hepatic miR-451 in diabetic mice may contribute to inhibiting Gyk expression. This study provides the first evidence that miR-451 and Gyk regulate the AKT-FOXO1-PEPCK/G6Pase pathway and play critical roles in hepatic gluconeogenesis and glucose homeostasis and identifies miR-451 and Gyk as potential therapeutic targets against hyperglycemia in diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. The Effects of Plant Growth Regulators on Cell Growth, Protein, Carotenoid, PUFAs and Lipid Production of Chlorella pyrenoidosa ZF Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanmin Du

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, eight kinds plant growth regulators—salicylic acid (SA, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA, gibberellic acid (GA3, 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA, 2, 4-epi-brassinolide (EBR, abscisic acid (ABA, ethephon (ETH, and spermidine (SPD—were used to investigate the impact on microalgal biomass, lipid, total soluble protein, carotenoids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAS production of Chlorella pyrenoidosa ZF strain. The results showed the quickest biomass enhancement was induced by 50 mg·L−1 NAA, with a 6.3-fold increase over the control; the highest protein content was increased by 0.005 mg·L−1 ETH, which produced 3.5-fold over the control; total carotenoids content was induced most effectively by 1 mg·L−1 NAA with 3.6-fold higher production than the control; the most efficient elicitor for lipid production was 5 mg·L−1 GA3 at 1.9-fold of the control; 0.2 mg·L−1 ETH induced the abundant production of 1.82 ± 0.23% linoleic acid; 0.65 ± 0.01% linolenic acid was induced by 1 mg·L−1 NAA; 2.53 ± 0.15% arachidonic acid and 0.44 ± 0.05% docosahexaenoic acid were induced by 5 mg·L−1 GA3. Transcriptional expression levels of seven lipid-related genes, including ACP, BC, FAD, FATA, KAS, MCTK, and SAD, were studied by real-time RT-q-PCR. 5 mg·L−1 GA3 was the most effective regulator for transcriptional expressions of these seven genes, producing 23-fold ACP, 31-fold BC, 25-fold FAD, 6-fold KAS, 12-fold MCTK compared with the controls, respectively.

  6. Simvastatin attenuates acrolein-induced mucin production in rats: involvement of the Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Juan; Chen, Peng; Wang, Hai-Xia; Wang, Tao; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xun; Sun, Bei-Bei; Liu, Dai-Shun; Xu, Dan; An, Jing; Wen, Fu-Qiang

    2010-06-01

    Airway mucus overproduction is a cardinal feature of airway inflammatory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Since the small G-protein Ras is known to modulate cellular functions in the lung, we sought to investigate whether the Ras inhibitor simvastatin could attenuate acrolein-induced mucin production in rat airways. Rats were exposed to acrolein for 12 days, after first being pretreated intragastrically for 24 h with either simvastatin alone or simvastatin in combination with mevalonate, which prevents the isoprenylation needed for Ras activation. Lung tissue was analyzed for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity, goblet cell metaplasia and mucin production. To analyze the effect of simvastatin on mucin production in more detail, acrolein-exposed human airway epithelial NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with simvastatin alone or together with mevalonate. Culture medium was collected to detect mucin secretion, and cell lysates were examined for Ras-GTPase activity and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ERK phosphorylation. In vivo, simvastatin treatment dose-dependently suppressed acrolein-induced goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia in bronchial epithelium and inhibited ERK phosphorylation in rat lung homogenates. Moreover, simvastatin inhibited Muc5AC mucin synthesis at both the mRNA and protein levels in the lung. In vitro, simvastatin pretreatment attenuated the acrolein-induced significant increase in MUC5AC mucin expression, Ras-GTPase activity and EGFR/ERK phosphorylation. These inhibitory effects of simvastatin were neutralized by mevalonate administration both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that simvastatin may attenuate acrolein-induced mucin protein synthesis in the airway and airway inflammation, possibly by blocking ERK activation mediated by Ras protein isoprenylation. Thus, the evidence from the experiment suggests that human trials are warranted to determine the potential

  7. TNF-α production in NKT cell hybridoma is regulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate: implications for inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shiori; Iwaki, Soichiro; Kondo, Rie; Satoh, Masashi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Mishima, Yuko; Yatomi, Yutaka; Furumoto, Tomoo; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Satoshi

    2014-06-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are unique T lymphocytes that recognize glycolipid antigen and produce various cytokines. NKT cells accelerate atherosclerosis in mice. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid and regulates T-lymphocyte trafficking. We aimed to determine the effects of S1P on the production of proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, in NKT cell hybridomas and mouse NKT cells. NKT cell hybridomas and sorted mouse NKT cells were stimulated with S1P and α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), the major ligand to produce cytokines in NKT cells. TNF-α mRNA expression and protein production were determined by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Cell migration was assayed using chemotaxicell. Plasma S1P was measured using HPLC. Hybridomas expressed S1P receptors, S1P1, S1P2, and S1P4. S1P and α-GalCer increased TNF-α mRNA expression and protein production. S1P enhanced TNF-α induction by α-GalCer. S1P receptor antagonists decreased the TNF-α mRNA expression induced by S1P. FTY720, an immunosuppressive S1P receptor modulator, also decreased the TNF-α mRNA expression. The migration of NKT cell hybridomas was increased by S1P. FTY720 reduced the migration induced by S1P. S1P also increased the TNF-α mRNA expression in mouse NKT cells. Plasma TNF-α levels in patients with high plasma S1P (≥500 nmol/l) were higher than those in patients with low S1P (NKT cells and enhances TNF-α production. TNF-α overproduction may induce atherogenic inflammatory responses. S1P may serve as a novel therapeutic target for amelioration of vascular inflammatory diseases.

  8. Microstructured Titanium Regulates Interleukin Production by Osteoblasts, an Effect Modulated by Exogenous BMP-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyzy, Sharon; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hutton, Daphne L.; Tan, Christian; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    Microtextured implant surfaces increase osteoblast differentiation in vitro and enhance bone-to-implant contact in vivo and clinically. These implants may be used in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) to enhance peri-implant bone formation. However, the effect of surface modifications alone or in combination with rhBMP-2 on osteoblast-produced inflammatory microenvironment is unknown. MG63 cells were cultured on tissue culture polystyrene or titanium substrates: smooth pretreated (PT, Ra=0.2μm), sandblasted/acid-etched (SLA, Ra=3.2μm), or hydrophilic-SLA (modSLA). Expression and protein production of pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL1b, IL6, IL8, IL17) and anti-inflammatory interleukins (IL10) were measured in cells with or without rhBMP-2. To determine which BMP signaling pathways were involved, cultures were incubated with BMP pathway inhibitors to blocking Smad (dorsomorphin), TAB/TAK1 ((5Z)-7-oxozeaenol), or PKA (H-8) signaling. Culture on rough SLA and modSLA surfaces decreased pro-inflammatory interleukins and increased anti-inflammatory IL10. This effect was negated in cells treated with rhBMP-2, which caused an increase in pro-inflammatory interleukins and a decrease in anti-inflammatory interleukins through TAB/TAK signaling. The results suggest that surface microtexture modulates the inflammatory process during osseointegration, an effect that may enhance healing. However, rhBMP-2 in combination with microtextured titanium implants can influence the effect of cells on these surfaces, and may adversely affect cells involved in osseointegration. PMID:23123301

  9. Basal hepatic glucose production is regulated by the portal vein insulin concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, D K; Chu, C A; Venson, P; Donahue, E P; Neal, D W; Cherrington, A D

    1998-04-01

    The ability of portal vein insulin to control hepatic glucose production (HGP) is debated. The aim of the present study was to determine, therefore, if the liver can respond to a selective decrease in portal vein insulin. Isotopic ([3H]glucose) and arteriovenous difference methods were used to measure HGP in conscious overnight fasted dogs. A pancreatic clamp (somatostatin plus basal portal insulin and glucagon) was used to control the endocrine pancreas. A 40-min control period was followed by a 180-min test period. During the latter, the portal vein insulin level was selectively decreased while the arterial insulin level was not changed. This was accomplished by stopping the portal insulin infusion and giving insulin peripherally at half the basal portal rate (PID, n=5). In a control group (n=5), the portal insulin infusion was not changed and glucose was infused to match the hyperglycemia that occurred in the PID group. A selective decrease of 120 pmol/l in portal vein insulin was achieved (basal, 150+/-36 to last 30 min, 30+/-12 pmol/l) in the absence of a change in the arterial insulin level (basal, 30+/-3 to last 30 min, 36+/-4 pmol/l). Neither arterial nor portal insulin levels changed in the control group (30+/-6 and 126+/-30 pmol/l, respectively). In response to the selective decrease in portal vein insulin, net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) increased significantly, from 8+/-1 (basal) to 30+/-6 and 14+/-2 micromol x kg(-1) x min(-1) by 15 min and the last 30 min (P glycogenolysis. These studies indicate that after an overnight fast, basal HGP (glycogenolysis) is highly sensitive to the hepatic sinusoidal insulin level.

  10. Regulation of SDF-1 (CXCL12) production by osteoblasts; a possible mechanism for stem cell homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Y; Wang, J; Schneider, A; Sun, Y-X; Koh-Paige, A J; Osman, N I; McCauley, L K; Taichman, R S

    2006-04-01

    Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 or CXCL12) controls many aspects of stem cell function including trafficking and proliferation. Previously, it was demonstrated that DNA-damaging agents such as irradiation, cyclophosphamide or 5-fluorouracil increase the expression of SDF-1 by osteoblasts in murine marrow. Here, the production of SDF-1 by osteoblasts in vitro in response to cytokines known to be particularly important in bone physiology was examined using primary human osteoblasts (HOBs), mixed marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), and by, mouse, rat and human osteoblast-like cell lines. From these studies, it was determined that the expression of SDF-1 is an early feature of osteoblastic induction that may be modulated by IL-1beta, PDGF-BB, VEGF, TNF-alpha and PTH. Each of these factors increased SDF-1 synthesis, while TGF-beta1 decreased SDF-1 secretion. Of note, the biodistribution of SDF-1 in culture was equally distributed between the medium and detergent-soluble and -insoluble fractions of the cultures. Immunohistochemistry of developing bones demonstrated that SDF-1 was also a feature of early bone development first beginning in the perichondrium and moving into the marrow cavity of the developing bone analogue. As SDF-1 expression increases in response to PTH in vitro, animals were treated with an anabolic regime of PTH for 21 days. Under these conditions, significant increases in SDF-1 mRNA expression were observed near the growth plate and epiphysis regions of the long bones. Yet, in serum, immunodetectable SDF-1 levels were significantly reduced (24%) in the PTH-treated animals (Vehicle: 408 +/- 25 vs. PTH 308 +/- 20 SDF-1 pg/ml). Together, these data suggest a possible mechanism for localizing stem cells into a developing marrow where increased expression of SDF-1 in the local marrow environment along with decreased SDF-1 in the serum may create a homing gradient.

  11. Leaf Extracts of Mangifera indica L. Inhibit Quorum Sensing – Regulated Production of Virulence Factors and Biofilm in Test Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a global gene regulatory mechanism in bacteria for various traits including virulence factors. Disabling QS system with anti-infective agent is considered as a potential strategy to prevent bacterial infection. Mangifera indica L. (mango has been shown to possess various biological activities including anti-QS. This study investigates the efficacy of leaf extracts on QS-regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram negative pathogens. Mango leaf (ML extract was tested for QS inhibition and QS-regulated virulence factors using various indicator strains. It was further correlated with the biofilm inhibition and confirmed by electron microscopy. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. In vitro evaluation of anti-QS activity of ML extracts against Chromobacterium violaceum revealed promising dose-dependent interference in violacein production, by methanol extract. QS inhibitory activity is also demonstrated by reduction in elastase (76%, total protease (56%, pyocyanin (89%, chitinase (55%, exopolysaccharide production (58% and swarming motility (74% in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 800 μg/ml concentration. Biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was reduced considerably (36–82% over control. The inhibition of biofilm was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, ML extracts significantly reduced mortality of Caenorhabditis elegans pre-infected with PAO1 at the tested concentration. Phytochemical analysis of active extracts revealed very high content of phenolics in methanol extract and a total of 14 compounds were detected by GC-MS and UPLC. These findings suggest that phytochemicals from the ML could provide bioactive anti-infective and needs further investigation to isolate and uncover their therapeutic efficacy.

  12. Leaf Extracts of Mangifera indica L. Inhibit Quorum Sensing – Regulated Production of Virulence Factors and Biofilm in Test Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Fohad M.; Ahmad, Iqbal; Al-thubiani, Abdullah S.; Abulreesh, Hussein H.; AlHazza, Ibrahim M.; Aqil, Farrukh

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a global gene regulatory mechanism in bacteria for various traits including virulence factors. Disabling QS system with anti-infective agent is considered as a potential strategy to prevent bacterial infection. Mangifera indica L. (mango) has been shown to possess various biological activities including anti-QS. This study investigates the efficacy of leaf extracts on QS-regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation in Gram negative pathogens. Mango leaf (ML) extract was tested for QS inhibition and QS-regulated virulence factors using various indicator strains. It was further correlated with the biofilm inhibition and confirmed by electron microscopy. Phytochemical analysis was carried out using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. In vitro evaluation of anti-QS activity of ML extracts against Chromobacterium violaceum revealed promising dose-dependent interference in violacein production, by methanol extract. QS inhibitory activity is also demonstrated by reduction in elastase (76%), total protease (56%), pyocyanin (89%), chitinase (55%), exopolysaccharide production (58%) and swarming motility (74%) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 at 800 μg/ml concentration. Biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa PAO1 and Aeromonas hydrophila WAF38 was reduced considerably (36–82%) over control. The inhibition of biofilm was also observed by scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, ML extracts significantly reduced mortality of Caenorhabditis elegans pre-infected with PAO1 at the tested concentration. Phytochemical analysis of active extracts revealed very high content of phenolics in methanol extract and a total of 14 compounds were detected by GC-MS and UPLC. These findings suggest that phytochemicals from the ML could provide bioactive anti-infective and needs further investigation to isolate and uncover their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28484444

  13. Phosphorylation of Dgk1 Diacylglycerol Kinase by Casein Kinase II Regulates Phosphatidic Acid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yixuan; Hassaninasab, Azam; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2016-12-16

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Dgk1 diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase catalyzes the CTP-dependent phosphorylation of DAG to form phosphatidic acid (PA). The enzyme in conjunction with Pah1 PA phosphatase controls the levels of PA and DAG for the synthesis of triacylglycerol and membrane phospholipids, the growth of the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and the formation of lipid droplets. Little is known about how DAG kinase activity is regulated by posttranslational modification. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of Dgk1 DAG kinase by casein kinase II (CKII). When phosphate groups were globally reduced using nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, Triton X-100-solubilized membranes from DGK1-overexpressing cells showed a 7.7-fold reduction in DAG kinase activity; the reduced enzyme activity could be increased 5.5-fold by treatment with CKII. Dgk1(1-77) expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli was phosphorylated by CKII on a serine residue, and its phosphorylation was dependent on time as well as on the concentrations of CKII, ATP, and Dgk1(1-77). We used site-specific mutagenesis, coupled with phosphorylation analysis and phosphopeptide mapping, to identify Ser-45 and Ser-46 of Dgk1 as the CKII target sites, with Ser-46 being the major phosphorylation site. In vivo, the S46A and S45A/S46A mutations of Dgk1 abolished the stationary phase-dependent stimulation of DAG kinase activity. In addition, the phosphorylation-deficient mutations decreased Dgk1 function in PA production and in eliciting pah1Δ phenotypes, such as the expansion of the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane, reduced lipid droplet formation, and temperature sensitivity. This work demonstrates that the CKII-mediated phosphorylation of Dgk1 regulates its function in the production of PA. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Phosphorylation of Dgk1 Diacylglycerol Kinase by Casein Kinase II Regulates Phosphatidic Acid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yixuan; Hassaninasab, Azam; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.

    2016-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Dgk1 diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase catalyzes the CTP-dependent phosphorylation of DAG to form phosphatidic acid (PA). The enzyme in conjunction with Pah1 PA phosphatase controls the levels of PA and DAG for the synthesis of triacylglycerol and membrane phospholipids, the growth of the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and the formation of lipid droplets. Little is known about how DAG kinase activity is regulated by posttranslational modification. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of Dgk1 DAG kinase by casein kinase II (CKII). When phosphate groups were globally reduced using nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, Triton X-100-solubilized membranes from DGK1-overexpressing cells showed a 7.7-fold reduction in DAG kinase activity; the reduced enzyme activity could be increased 5.5-fold by treatment with CKII. Dgk1(1–77) expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli was phosphorylated by CKII on a serine residue, and its phosphorylation was dependent on time as well as on the concentrations of CKII, ATP, and Dgk1(1–77). We used site-specific mutagenesis, coupled with phosphorylation analysis and phosphopeptide mapping, to identify Ser-45 and Ser-46 of Dgk1 as the CKII target sites, with Ser-46 being the major phosphorylation site. In vivo, the S46A and S45A/S46A mutations of Dgk1 abolished the stationary phase-dependent stimulation of DAG kinase activity. In addition, the phosphorylation-deficient mutations decreased Dgk1 function in PA production and in eliciting pah1Δ phenotypes, such as the expansion of the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane, reduced lipid droplet formation, and temperature sensitivity. This work demonstrates that the CKII-mediated phosphorylation of Dgk1 regulates its function in the production of PA. PMID:27834677

  15. 5-HT2A receptors control body temperature in mice during LPS-induced inflammation via regulation of NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronova, Irina P; Khramova, Galina M; Kulikova, Elizabeth A; Petrovskii, Dmitrii V; Bazovkina, Daria V; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled 5-HT2A receptors are involved in the regulation of numerous normal and pathological physiological functions. At the same time, its involvement in the regulation of body temperature (Tb) in normal conditions is obscure. Here we study the effect of the 5-HT2A receptor activation or blockade on Tb in sick animals. The experiments were carried out on adult C57BL/6 mouse males. Systemic inflammation and sickness were produced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg, ip), while the 5-HT2A receptor was stimulated or blocked through the administration of the receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin (1mg/kg), respectively. LPS, DOI or ketanserin alone produced no effect on Tb. However, administration of LPS together with a peripheral or central ketanserin injection reduced Tb (32.2°C). Ketanserin reversed the LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase in the brain. Consequently, an involvement of NO in the mechanism of the hypothermic effect of ketanserin in sick mice was hypothesized. Administration of LPS together with NO synthase inhibitor, l-nitro-arginine methyl ester (60mg/kg, ip) resulted in deep (28.5°C) and prolonged (8h) hypothermia, while administration of l-nitro-arginine methyl ester alone produced no effect on Tb. Thus, 5-HT2A receptors play a key role in Tb control in sick mice. Blockade of this GPCR produces hypothermia in mice with systemic inflammation via attenuation of LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate an unexpected role of 5-HT2A receptors in inflammation and NO production and have a considerable biological impact on understanding the mechanism of animal adaptation to pathogens and parasites. Moreover, adverse side effects of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists in patients with inflammation may be expected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interaction of free fatty acids and epinephrine in regulating hepatic glucose production in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chang An; Galassetti, Pietro; Igawa, Kayano; Sindelar, Dana K; Neal, Doss W; Burish, Mark; Cherrington, Alan D

    2003-02-01

    To determine the effects of an increase in lipolysis on the glycogenolytic effect of epinephrine (EPI), the catecholamine was infused portally into 18-h-fasted conscious dogs maintained on a pancreatic clamp in the presence [portal (Po)-EPI+FFA, n = 6] and absence (Po-EPI+SAL, n = 6) of peripheral Intralipid infusion. Control groups with high glucose (70% increase) and free fatty acid (FFA; 200% increase; HG+FFA, n = 6) and high glucose alone (HG+SAL, n = 6) were also included. Hepatic sinusoidal EPI levels were elevated (Delta 568 +/- 77 and Delta 527 +/- 37 pg/ml, respectively) in Po-EPI+SAL and EPI+FFA but remained basal in HG+FFA and HG+SAL. Arterial plasma FFA increased from 613 +/- 73 to 1,633 +/- 101 and 746 +/- 112 to 1,898 +/- 237 micromol/l in Po-EPI+FFA and HG+FFA but did not change in EPI+SAL or HG+SAL. Net hepatic glycogenolysis increased from 1.5 +/- 0.3 to 3.1 +/- 0.4 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P glycogenolysis decreased from 1.7 +/- 0.2 to 0.9 +/- 0.2 and 1.6 +/- 0.2 to 0.7 +/- 0.2 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) by 30 min in HG+FFA and HG+SAL. Hepatic gluconeogenic flux to glucose 6-phosphate increased from 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 1.2 +/- 0.1 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P < 0.05; by 3 h) and 0.7 +/- 0.1 to 1.6 +/- 0.1 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P < 0.05; at 90 min) in HG+FFA and Po-EPI+FFA. The gluconeogenic parameters remained unchanged in the Po-EPI+SAL and HG+SAL groups. In conclusion, increased FFA markedly changed the mechanism by which EPI stimulated hepatic glucose production, suggesting that its overall lipolytic effect may be important in determining its effect on the liver.

  17. Accuracy of drug advertisements in medical journals under new law regulating the marketing of pharmaceutical products in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Macarena Gonzalez; Bucher, Heiner C; Nordmann, Alain J

    2008-12-31

    New legal regulations for the marketing of pharmaceutical products were introduced in 2002 in Switzerland. We investigated whether claims in drug advertisements citing published scientific studies were justified by these studies after the introduction of these new regulations. In this cross-sectional study, two independent reviewers screened all issues of six major Swiss medical journals published in the year 2005 to identify all drug advertisements for analgesic, gastrointestinal and psychopharmacologic drugs and evaluated all drug advertisements referring to at least one publication. The pharmaceutical claim was rated as being supported, being based on a potentially biased study or not to be supported by the cited study according to pre-specified criteria. We also explored factors likely to be associated with supported advertisement claims. Of 2068 advertisements 577 (28%) promoted analgesic, psychopharmacologic or gastrointestinal drugs. Among them were 323 (56%) advertisements citing at least one reference. After excluding multiple publications of the same drug advertisement and advertisements with non-informative references, there remained 29 unique advertisements with at least one reference to a scientific study. These 29 advertisements contained 78 distinct pairs of claims of analgesic, gastrointestinal and psychopharmacologic drugs and referenced studies. Thirty-seven (47%) claims were supported, 16 (21%) claims were not supported by the corresponding reference, and 25 (32%) claims were based on potentially biased evidence, with no relevant differences between drug groups. Studies with conflict of interest and studies stating industry funding were more likely to support the corresponding claim (RR 1.52, 95% CI 1.07-2.17 and RR 1.50, 95% CI 0.98-2.28) than studies without identified conflict of interest and studies without information on type of funding. Following the introduction of new regulations for drug advertisement in Switzerland, 53% of all assessed

  18. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Regulates Production of Amyloid-β Peptides and Tau Phosphorylation in Diabetic Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Sen Qu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of diabetic neurological complications is not fully understood. Diabetes mellitus (DM and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are characterized by amyloid deposits. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AD and DM. Here we tried to investigate the production of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ and phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau in DM rats and elucidate the role of GSK-3 and Akt (protein kinase B, PKB in these processes. Streptozotocin injection-induced DM rats displayed an increased GSK-3 activity, decreased activity and expression of Akt. And Aβ40 and Aβ42 were found overproduced and the microtubule-associated protein tau was hyperphosphorylated in the hippocampus. Furthermore, selective inhibition of GSK-3 by lithium could attenuate the conditions of Aβ overproduction and tau hyperphosphorylation. Taken together, our studies suggest that GSK-3 regulates both the production of Aβ and the phosphorylation of tau in rat brain and may therefore contribute to DM caused AD-like neurological defects.

  19. Influence of growth regulators in biomass production and volatile profile of in vitro plantlets of Thymus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affonso, Vanessa Ribeiro; Bizzo, Humberto Ribeiro; Lage, Celso Luiz Salgueiro; Sato, Alice

    2009-07-22

    In vitro shoots of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) were established, and the effects of the auxin indole-3-acetic (IAA) acid and the cytokinins benzyladenine (BA), zeatin (ZEA), and kinetin (KIN) at 1.0, 5.0, and 10.0 microM on rooting, biomass production, and volatile compounds production by these plants were investigated. The volatiles were extracted by solid phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed by gas chromatography. The highest biomass shoot growth was obtained with BA at 5.0 microM, while IAA at all concentrations tested achieved 100% rooting frequency. The three major compounds were gamma-terpinene (22.8-38.8%), p-cymene (13.8-27.9%), and thymol (6.5-29.0%). Quantitative changes of these compounds were observed in response to the effect of varying growth regulators concentrations in the culture medium. Growing Thymus vulgaris L. plants in media supplemented with IAA at 1.0 microM increased volatile compounds such as thymol by 315%. Nevertheless, the same major compounds were produced in all treatments and no qualitative changes were observed in the volatile profile of thyme plants.

  20. CodY, a pleiotropic regulator, influences multicellular behaviour and efficient production of virulence factors in Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbäck, Toril; Mols, Maarten; Basset, Coraline; Granum, Per Einar; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Ákos T

    2012-08-01

    In response to nutrient limitation in the environment, the global transcriptional regulator CodY modulates various pathways in low G+C Gram-positive bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis CodY triggers adaptation to starvation by secretion of proteases coupled to the expression of amino acid transporters. Furthermore, it is involved in modulating survival strategies like sporulation, motility, biofilm formation, and CodY is also known to affect virulence factor production in pathogenic bacteria. In this study, the role of CodY in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579, the enterotoxin-producing type strain, is investigated. A marker-less deletion mutant of codY (ΔcodY) was generated in B.cereus and the transcriptome changes were surveyed using DNA microarrays. Numerous genes involved in biofilm formation and amino acid transport and metabolism were upregulated and genes associated with motility and virulence were repressed upon deletion of codY. Moreover, we found that CodY is important for efficient production of toxins and for adapting from nutrient-rich to nutrient-limited growth conditions of B.cereus. In contrast, biofilm formation is highly induced in the ΔcodY mutant, suggesting that CodY represses biofilm formation. Together, these results indicate that CodY plays a crucial role in the growth and persistence of B.cereus in different environments such as soil, food, insect guts and the human body. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. β-Glucan Size Controls Dectin-1-Mediated Immune Responses in Human Dendritic Cells by Regulating IL-1β Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Elder

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dectin-1/CLEC7A is a pattern recognition receptor that recognizes β-1,3 glucans, and its stimulation initiates signaling events characterized by the production of inflammatory cytokines from human dendritic cells (DCs required for antifungal immunity. β-glucans differ greatly in size, structure, and ability to activate effector immune responses from DC; as such, small particulate β-glucans are thought to be poor activators of innate immunity. We show that β-glucan particle size is a critical factor contributing to the secretion of cytokines from human DC; large β-glucan-stimulated DC generate significantly more IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 compared to those stimulated with the smaller β-glucans. In marked contrast, the secretion of TSLP and CCL22 were found to be insensitive to β-glucan particle size. Furthermore, we show that the capacity to induce phagocytosis, and the relative IL-1β production determined by β-glucan size, regulates the composition of the cytokine milieu generated from DC. This suggests that β-glucan particle size is critically important in orchestrating the nature of the immune response to fungi.

  2. Trib1 Is Overexpressed in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, While It Regulates Immunoglobulin Production in Murine B Cells

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    Léa Simoni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a severe and heterogeneous autoimmune disease with a complex genetic etiology, characterized by the production of various pathogenic autoantibodies, which participate in end-organ damages. The majority of human SLE occurs in adults as a polygenic disease, and clinical flares interspersed with silent phases of various lengths characterize the usual evolution of the disease in time. Trying to understand the mechanism of the different phenotypic traits of the disease, and considering the central role of B cells in SLE, we previously performed a detailed wide analysis of gene expression variation in B cells from quiescent SLE patients. This analysis pointed out an overexpression of TRIB1. TRIB1 is a pseudokinase that has been implicated in the development of leukemia and also metabolic disorders. It is hypothesized that Trib1 plays an adapter or scaffold function in signaling pathways, notably in MAPK pathways. Therefore, we planned to understand the functional significance of TRIB1 overexpression in B cells in SLE. We produced a new knock-in model with B-cell-specific overexpression of Trib1. We showed that overexpression of Trib1 specifically in B cells does not impact B cell development nor induce any development of SLE symptoms in the mice. By contrast, Trib1 has a negative regulatory function on the production of immunoglobulins, notably IgG1, but also on the production of autoantibodies in an induced model. We observed a decrease of Erk activation in BCR-stimulated Trib1 overexpressing B cells. Finally, we searched for Trib1 partners in B cells by proteomic analysis in order to explore the regulatory function of Trib1 in B cells. Interestingly, we find an interaction between Trib1 and CD72, a negative regulator of B cells whose deficiency in mice leads to the development of autoimmunity. In conclusion, the overexpression of Trib1 could be one of the molecular pathways implicated in the negative regulation

  3. Glycine regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lean and monosodium glutamate-obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon-Aguilar, F J; Almanza-Perez, Julio; Blancas, Gerardo; Angeles, Selene; Garcia-Macedo, Rebeca; Roman, Ruben; Cruz, Miguel

    2008-12-03

    Fat tissue plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory processes. Increased visceral fat has been associated with a higher production of cytokines that triggers a low-grade inflammatory response, which eventually may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated whether glycine, an amino acid that represses the expression in vitro of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Kupffer and 3T3-L1 cells, can affect in vivo cytokine production in lean and monosodium glutamate-induced obese mice (MSG/Ob mice). Our data demonstrate that glycine treatment in lean mice suppressed TNF-alpha transcriptional expression in fat tissue, and serum protein levels of IL-6 were suppressed, while adiponectin levels were increased. In MSG/Ob mice, glycine suppressed TNF-alpha and IL-6 gene expression in fat tissue and significantly reduced protein levels of IL-6, resistin and leptin. To determine the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) in the modulation of this inflammatory response evoked by glycine, we examined its expression levels in fat tissue. Glycine clearly increased PPAR-gamma expression in lean mice but not in MSG/Ob mice. Finally, to identify alterations in glucose metabolism by glycine, we also examined insulin levels and other biochemical parameters during an oral glucose tolerance test. Glycine significantly reduced glucose tolerance and raised insulin levels in lean but not in obese mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that glycine suppresses the pro-inflammatory cytokines production and increases adiponectin secretion in vivo through the activation of PPAR-gamma. Glycine might prevent insulin resistance and associated inflammatory diseases.

  4. Membrane-anchored MucR mediates nitrate-dependent regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yajie

    2015-04-29

    Alginates exhibit unique material properties suitable for medical and industrial applications. However, if produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, it is an important virulence factor in infection of cystic fibrosis patients. The alginate biosynthesis machinery is activated by c-di-GMP imparted by the inner membrane protein, MucR. Here, it was shown that MucR impairs alginate production in response to nitrate in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent site-specific mutagenesis of MucR revealed that the second MHYT sensor motif (MHYT II, amino acids 121–124) of MucR sensor domain was involved in nitrate sensing. We also showed that both c-di-GMP synthesizing and degrading active sites of MucR were important for alginate production. Although nitrate and deletion of MucR impaired alginate promoter activity and global c-di-GMP levels, alginate yields were not directly correlated with alginate promoter activity or c-di-GMP levels, suggesting that nitrate and MucR modulate alginate production at a post-translational level through a localized pool of c-di-GMP. Nitrate increased pel promoter activity in the mucR mutant while in the same mutant the psl promoter activity was independent of nitrate. Nitrate and deletion of mucR did not impact on swarming motility but impaired attachment to solid surfaces. Nitrate and deletion of mucR promoted the formation of biofilms with increased thickness, cell density, and survival. Overall, this study provided insight into the functional role of MucR with respect to nitrate-mediated regulation of alginate biosynthesis. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  5. Regulation of anti-Müllerian hormone production in the cow: a multiscale study at endocrine, ovarian, follicular, and granulosa cell levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Charlène; Médigue, Claire; Fabre, Stéphane; Jarrier, Peggy; Bontoux, Martine; Clément, Frédérique; Monniaux, Danielle

    2011-03-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is an endocrine marker that can help predict superovulatory responses to treatments administered to cows for embryo production. However, the optimal time of the estrous cycle at which a blood test should be performed for a highly reliable prognosis has not yet been established. Moreover, little is known about the regulation of AMH production. To answer these questions, a study was designed to investigate the regulation of AMH production in cows selected for their high or low ovulatory responses to superovulation. At the granulosa cell level, AMH production was inhibited by follicle-stimulating hormone but enhanced by bone morphogenetic proteins. At the follicular level, the expression of AMH within the follicle was dependent on the stage of follicular development. At the ovarian level, the size of the pool of small antral growing follicles determined ovarian AMH production. At the endocrine level, AMH followed a specific dynamic profile during the estrous cycle, which occurred independently of the follicular waves of terminal follicular development. Cows selected for their high or low responses to superovulation did not differ in the regulation of AMH production, but cows with higher responses had higher plasma AMH concentrations throughout the cycle. The optimal period of the estrous cycle at which to measure AMH concentrations with the aim of selecting the best cows for embryo production was found to be at estrus and after Day 12 of the cycle. Based on this multiscale study, we propose a model that integrates the different regulatory levels of AMH production.

  6. Rice bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae produces multiple DSF-family signals in regulation of virulence factor production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha Jae-Soon

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo is the causal agent of rice bacterial blight disease. Xoo produces a range of virulence factors, including EPS, extracellular enzyme, iron-chelating siderophores, and type III-secretion dependent effectors, which are collectively essential for virulence. Genetic and genomics evidence suggest that Xoo might use the diffusible signal factor (DSF type quorum sensing (QS system to regulate the virulence factor production. However, little is known about the chemical structure of the DSF-like signal(s produced by Xoo and the factors influencing the signal production. Results Xoo genome harbours an rpf cluster comprising rpfB, rpfF, rpfC and rpfG. The proteins encoded by these genes are highly homologous to their counterparts in X. campestris pv. campestris (Xcc, suggesting that Xcc and Xoo might use similar mechanisms for DSF biosynthesis and autoregulation. Consistent with in silico analysis, the rpfF mutant was DSF-deficient and the rpfC mutant produced about 25 times higher DSF-like activity than the wild type Xoo strain KACC10331. From the supernatants of rpfC mutant, we purified three compounds showing strong DSF-like activity. Mass spectrometry and NMR analysis revealed that two of them were the previously characterized DSF and BDSF; the third one was a novel unsaturated fatty acid with 2 double bonds and was designated as CDSF in this study. Further analysis showed that all the three DSF-family signals were synthesized via the enzyme RpfF encoded by Xoo2868. DSF and BDSF at a final concentration of 3 μM to the rpfF mutant could fully restore its extracellular xylanase activity and EPS production to the wild type level, but CDSF was less active than DSF and BDSF in induction of EPS and xylanase. DSF and CDSF shared a similar cell density-dependent production time course with the maximum production being detected at 42 h after inoculation, whereas the maximum production of BDSF was observed

  7. Interferon Potentiates Toll-Like Receptor-Induced Prostaglandin D2 Production through Positive Feedback Regulation between Signal Transducer and Activators of Transcription 1 and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yun Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2 is a potent lipid mediator that controls inflammation, and its dysregulation has been implicated in diverse inflammatory disorders. Despite significant progress made in understanding the role of PGD2 as a key regulator of immune responses, the molecular mechanism underlying PGD2 production remains unclear, particularly upon challenge with different and multiple inflammatory stimuli. Interferons (IFNs potentiate macrophage activation and act in concert with exogenous inflammatory mediators such as toll-like receptor (TLR ligands to amplify inflammatory responses. A recent study found that IFN-γ enhanced lipopolysaccharide-induced PGD2 production, indicating a role of IFNs in PGD2 regulation. Here, we demonstrate that TLR-induced PGD2 production by macrophages was significantly potentiated by signaling common to IFN-β and IFN-γ in a signal transducer and activators of transcription (STAT1-dependent mechanism. Such potentiation by IFNs was also observed for PGE2 production, despite the differential regulation of PGD synthase and PGE synthase isoforms mediating PGD2 and PGE2 production under inflammatory conditions. Mechanistic analysis revealed that the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS was remarkably potentiated by IFNs and required for PGD2 production, but was nullified by STAT1 deficiency. Conversely, the regulation of STAT1 level and activity by IFNs was largely dependent on ROS levels. Using a model of zymosan-induced peritonitis, the relevance of this finding in vivo was supported by marked inhibition of PGD2 and ROS produced in peritoneal exudate cells by STAT1 deficiency. Collectively, our findings suggest that IFNs, although not activating on their own, are potent amplifiers of TLR-induced PGD2 production via positive-feedback regulation between STAT1 and ROS.

  8. The changes in hazard classification and product notification procedures of the new European CLP and Cosmetics Regulations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, R.; Brekelmans, P.; Herremans, J.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (UN-GHS) is developed to harmonize the criteria for hazard communication worldwide. The European Regulation on classification, labeling, and packaging of substances and mixtures [CLP Regulation

  9. The changes in hazard classification and product notification procedures of the new European CLP and Cosmetics Regulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Ronald; Brekelmans, Pieter; Herremans, Joke; Meulenbelt, Jan

    Introduction. The United Nations Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (UN-GHS) is developed to harmonize the criteria for hazard communication worldwide. The European Regulation on classification, labeling, and packaging of substances and mixtures [CLP Regulation

  10. Regulation of Pathogen-Triggered Tryptophan Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana by MYB Transcription Factors and Indole Glucosinolate Conversion Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerigmann, Henning; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Molina, Antonio; Glawischnig, Erich; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Bednarek, Paweł

    2016-05-02

    MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 transcription factors are known as decisive regulators of indolic glucosinolate (IG) biosynthesis with a strong impact on expression of genes encoding CYP79B2 and CYP79B3 enzymes that redundantly convert tryptophan to indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx). This intermediate represents a branching point for IG biosynthesis, and pathways leading to camalexin and indole-carboxylic acids (ICA). Here we investigate how these MYBs affect the pathogen-triggered Trp metabolism. Our experiments indicated that these three MYBs affect not only IG production but also constitutive biosynthesis of other IAOx-derived metabolites. Strikingly, the PENETRATION 2 (PEN2)-dependent IG-metabolism products, which are absent in myb34/51/122 and pen2 mutants, were indispensable for full flg22-mediated induction of other IAOx-derived compounds. However, gene induction and accumulation of ICAs and camalexin upon pathogen infection was not compromised in myb34/51/122 plants, despite strongly reduced IG levels. Hence, in comparison with cyp79B2/B3, which lacks all IAOx-derived metabolites, we found myb34/51/122 an ideal tool to analyze IG contribution to resistance against the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Plectosphaerella cucumerina. The susceptibility of myb34/51/122 was similar to that of pen2, but much lower than susceptibility of cyp79B2/B3, indicating that MYB34/51/122 contribute to resistance toward P. cucumerina exclusively through IG biosynthesis, and that PEN2 is the main leaf myrosinase activating IGs in response to microbial pathogens. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MMP14 is a novel target of PTH signaling in osteocytes that controls resorption by regulating soluble RANKL production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Calle, Jesus; Hancock, Benjamin; Likine, Elive F; Sato, Amy Y; McAndrews, Kevin; Sanudo, Carolina; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Riancho, Jose A; Tonra, James R; Bellido, Teresita

    2018-01-17

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) affects the skeleton by acting on osteocytes (Ot) in bone through yet unclear mechanisms. We report that matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14) expression/activity are increased in bones from mice with genetic constitutive activation (ca) of the PTH receptor 1 (PTH1R) in Ot (caPTH1R Ot ) and in bones from mice exposed to elevated PTH levels but not in mice lacking [conditional knockout (cKO)] the PTH1R in Ot (cKOPTH1R Ot ). Furthermore, PTH upregulates MMP14 in human bone cultures and in Ot-enriched bones from floxed control mice but not from cKOPTH1R Ot mice. MMP14 activity increases soluble receptor activator of NF-κΒ ligand production, which in turn, stimulates osteoclast differentiation and resorption. Pharmacologic inhibition of MMP14 activity reduced the high bone remodeling exhibited by caPTH1R Ot mice or induced by chronic PTH elevation and decreased bone resorption but allowed full stimulation of bone formation induced by PTH injections, thereby potentiating bone gain. Thus, MMP14 is a new member of the intricate gene network activated in Ot by PTH1R signaling that can be targeted to adjust the skeletal responses to PTH in favor of bone preservation.-Delgado-Calle, J., Hancock, B., Likine, E. F., Sato, A. Y., McAndrews, K., Sanudo, C., Bruzzaniti, A., Riancho, J. A., Tonra, J. R., Bellido, T. MMP14 is a novel target of PTH signaling in osteocytes that controls resorption by regulating soluble RANKL production.

  12. Market, Regulation, Market, Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Galland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the European Regulatory system which was settled both for opening the Single Market for products and ensuring the consumers' safety. It claims that the New Approach and Standardization, and the Global Approach to conformity assessment, which suppressed the last technical...... barriers to trade in Europe, realized the free movement of products by organizing progressively several orders of markets and regulation. Based on historical and institutional documents, on technical publications, and on interviews, this article relates how the European Commission and the Member States had...... alternatively recourse to markets and to regulations, at the three main levels of the New Approach Directives implementation. The article focuses also more specifically on the Medical Devices sector, not only because this New Approach sector has long been controversial in Europe, and has recently been concerned...

  13. Reforming the Regulation of Therapeutic Products in Canada: The Protecting of Canadians from Unsafe Drugs Act (Vanessa’s Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Fierlbeck

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Enacted November 2014, Vanessa’s Law amends the Food and Drugs Act to give Health Canada greater powers to compel the disclosure of information, recall drugs and devices, impose fines and injunctions, and collect post-market safety information. The Act amends seriously outdated legislation that had been in place since 1954. While the explicit goals of the Act are to improve patient safety and provide transparency, it also establishes a regulatory framework that facilitates investment in the burgeoning field of biotechnology. While regulatory reform was already on the public agenda, public awareness of litigation against large pharmaceutical firms combined with the championing of the legislation by Conservative MP Terence Young, whose daughter Vanessa died from an adverse drug reaction, pushed the legislation through to implementation. Many key aspects of the Act depend upon the precise nature of supporting regulations that are still to be implemented. Despite the new powers conferred by the legislation on the Minister of Health, there is some concern that these discretionary powers may not be exercised, and that Health Canada may not have sufficient resources to take advantage of these new powers. Given experience to date since enactment, the new legislation, designed to provide greater transparency vis-à-vis therapeutic products, may actually have a chilling effect on independent scrutiny.

  14. Decision-making in product portfolios of pharmaceutical research and development – managing streams of innovation in highly regulated markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jekunen A

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Antti Jekunen Vaasa Oncology Clinic, Vaasa, Finland Abstract: Decision-making is a core function of any drug development firm. Developing drugs demands a firm to be highly innovative, while at the same time the activity is strictly regulated. Successful drug development offers the right to apply for a long-term patent that confers exclusive marketing rights. This article addresses the issue of what constitutes an adequate portfolio of drugs for a drug development firm and how it might be managed successfully. The paper investigates decision-making in the industry and specifically in the development of oncology drugs from various perspectives: the need for decisions, their timing, decision-making at the project level, the optimal portfolio, tools for portfolio analysis, the evaluation of patents, and finally the importance of the drug portfolio. Drug development decisions as important organizational elements should get more emphasis, and decisions in drug portfolio using modern decision-making methods should be used more widely than what currently happens. Structured, informed decisions would help avoiding late terminations of drugs in Phase III development. An improved research and development pipeline and drug portfolio management are the major elements in the general strategy targeting success. Keywords: decision-making, drug development, clinical oncology, product management, pipeline, portfolio, portfolio analysis, company organization

  15. Regulation of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Ectodomain Shedding and Its Role in Cell Function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braley, Alex; Kwak, Taekyoung; Jules, Joel; Harja, Evis; Landgraf, Ralf; Hudson, Barry I.

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand transmembrane receptor that can undergo proteolysis at the cell surface to release a soluble ectodomain. Here we observed that ectodomain shedding of RAGE is critical for its role in regulating signaling and cellular function. Ectodomain shedding of both human and mouse RAGE was dependent on ADAM10 activity and induced with chemical activators of shedding (ionomycin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate) and endogenous stimuli (serum and RAGE ligands). Ectopic expression of the splice variant of RAGE (RAGE splice variant 4), which is resistant to ectodomain shedding, inhibited RAGE ligand dependent cell signaling, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell spreading, and cell migration. We found that blockade of RAGE ligand signaling with soluble RAGE or inhibitors of MAPK or PI3K blocked RAGE-dependent cell migration but did not affect RAGE splice variant 4 cell migration. We finally demonstrated that RAGE function is dependent on secretase activity as ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors blocked RAGE ligand-mediated cell migration. Together, our data suggest that proteolysis of RAGE is critical to mediate signaling and cell function and may therefore emerge as a novel therapeutic target for RAGE-dependent disease states. PMID:27022018

  16. Regulation of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Ectodomain Shedding and Its Role in Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braley, Alex; Kwak, Taekyoung; Jules, Joel; Harja, Evis; Landgraf, Ralf; Hudson, Barry I

    2016-06-03

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand transmembrane receptor that can undergo proteolysis at the cell surface to release a soluble ectodomain. Here we observed that ectodomain shedding of RAGE is critical for its role in regulating signaling and cellular function. Ectodomain shedding of both human and mouse RAGE was dependent on ADAM10 activity and induced with chemical activators of shedding (ionomycin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate) and endogenous stimuli (serum and RAGE ligands). Ectopic expression of the splice variant of RAGE (RAGE splice variant 4), which is resistant to ectodomain shedding, inhibited RAGE ligand dependent cell signaling, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell spreading, and cell migration. We found that blockade of RAGE ligand signaling with soluble RAGE or inhibitors of MAPK or PI3K blocked RAGE-dependent cell migration but did not affect RAGE splice variant 4 cell migration. We finally demonstrated that RAGE function is dependent on secretase activity as ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors blocked RAGE ligand-mediated cell migration. Together, our data suggest that proteolysis of RAGE is critical to mediate signaling and cell function and may therefore emerge as a novel therapeutic target for RAGE-dependent disease states. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to E1 Tor toxin co-regulated pilus of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falero, G; Rodríguez, B L; Rodríguez, I; Campos, J; Ledon, T; Valle, E; Silva, Y; Marrero, K; Suzarte, E; Valmaseda, T; Moreno, A; Fando, R

    2003-10-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Vibrio cholerae toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) were generated using conventional hybridoma procedures. Four hybridomas were obtained and two characterized. Hybridomas 10E10E1 and 4D6F9 secreted antibodies of the IgG2a and IgG1 isotypes, respectively, that reacted with a 24-kDa antigen corresponding to the product of the El Tor tcpA gene fused to a six Histidine tail. Additionally, MAbs produced by 4D6F9 selectively recognized the major pilin subunit (TcpA) of El Tor and O139 vibrios in western immunoblot, while MAbs from 10E10E1 also cross-reacted with classical TcpA. Furthermore, vibrios expressing TCP on their surface selectively inhibited binding of the antibodies secreted by both hybridomas to TcpA-coated microtiter plates. Thus, the MAbs reported in this work detected the structural subunit of the pilus either denatured or assembled on the bacterial surface.

  18. Stress-induced dynamic regulation of mitochondrial STAT3 and its association with cyclophilin D reduce mitochondrial ROS production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Jeremy A.; Hyun, Moonjung; Cantwell, Marc; Raza, Ali; Mertens, Claudia; Raje, Vidisha; Sisler, Jennifer; Tracy, Erin; Torres-Odio, Sylvia; Gispert, Suzana; Shaw, Peter E.; Baumann, Heinz; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Takabe, Kazuaki; Larner, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is associated with various physiological and pathological functions, mainly as a transcription factor that translocates to the nucleus upon tyrosine phosphorylation induced by cytokine stimulation. In addition, a small pool of STAT3 resides in the mitochondria, where it serves as a sensor for various metabolic stressors including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrially localized STAT3 largely exerts its effects through direct or indirect regulation of the activity of the electron transport chain (ETC). It has been assumed that the amounts of STAT3 in the mitochondria are static. We showed that various stimuli, including oxidative stress and cytokines, triggered a signaling cascade that resulted in a rapid loss of mitochondrially localized STAT3. Recovery of the mitochondrial pool of STAT3 over time depended on phosphorylation of Ser727 in STAT3 and new protein synthesis. Under these conditions, mitochondrially localized STAT3 also became competent to bind to cyclophilin D (CypD). Binding of STAT3 to CypD was mediated by the amino terminus of STAT3, which was also important for reducing mitochondrial ROS production after oxidative stress. These results outline a role for mitochondrially localized STAT3 in sensing and responding to external stimuli. PMID:28351946

  19. Importance of Selecting Appropriate Wavelength, While Quantifying Growth and Production of Quorum Sensing Regulated Pigments in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chinmayi; Kothari, Vijay; Patel, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Pigment production is regulated by quorum-sensing (QS) in certain bacteria which are being widely used as model organisms in different QS labs. This paper emphasizes importance of selecting an appropriate wavelength for quantification of bacterial growth and pigmentation. While screening different natural/synthetic preparations for their possible QSmodulating potential, it becomes very much necessary to establish that the observed effect is truly QS-associated, and not falsely inflated owing to inaccurate quantification of bacterial cell density/ pigment intensity. Pigments were extracted in suitable organic solvents, whereas quantification of bacterial growth and extracted pigments was done photometrically. Findings reported in this paper, suggest that while quantifying cell density in a pigmented bacterial suspension, such a wavelength (e.g. 764 nm) should be selected at which pigment interference is either absent or minimum. Additionally, importance of appropriate dilution of the bacterial cell suspensions, prior to photometric measurement has been highlighted. This work indicates that while working with pigmented bacteria, it is important to pay attention to the absorption spectrum of the pigment(s) involved, and also to dilute the dense bacterial suspensions appropriately prior to measuring optical density, so as to avoid any major deviation of OD from the proportionality to the cell density. Besides presenting the experimental data in this paper, patents regarding measurement of cell growth, as well as those indicating the potential of commercialization of various aspects of QS research have been mentioned.

  20. Ornithine Decarboxylase-Mediated Production of Putrescine Influences Ganoderic Acid Biosynthesis by Regulating Reactive Oxygen Species in Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Gao; Tian, Jia-Long; Liu, Rui; Cao, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Tian-Jun; Ren, Ang; Shi, Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2017-10-15

    Putrescine is an important polyamine that participates in a variety of stress responses. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of putrescine. A homolog of the gene encoding ODC was cloned from Ganoderma lucidum In the ODC -silenced strains, the transcript levels of the ODC gene and the putrescine content were significantly decreased. The ODC -silenced strains were more sensitive to oxidative stress. The content of ganoderic acid was increased by approximately 43 to 46% in the ODC -silenced strains. The content of ganoderic acid could be recovered after the addition of exogenous putrescine. Additionally, the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was significantly increased by approximately 1.3-fold in the ODC -silenced strains. The ROS content was significantly reduced after the addition of exogenous putrescine. The gene transcript levels and the activities of four major antioxidant enzymes were measured to further explore the effect of putrescine on the intracellular ROS levels. Further studies showed that the effect of the ODC-mediated production of putrescine on ROS might be a factor influencing the biosynthesis of ganoderic acid. Our study reports the role of putrescine in large basidiomycetes, providing a basis for future studies of the physiological functions of putrescine in microbes. IMPORTANCE It is well known that ODC and the ODC-mediated production of putrescine play an important role in resisting various environmental stresses, but there are few reports regarding the mechanisms underlying the effect of putrescine on secondary metabolism in microorganisms, particularly in fungi. G. lucidum is gradually becoming a model organism for studying environmental regulation and metabolism. In this study, a homolog of the gene encoding ODC was cloned in Ganoderma lucidum We found that the transcript level of the ODC gene and the content of putrescine were significantly decreased in the ODC -silenced strains. The content of

  1. Use of field-portable XRF analyzers for rapid screening of toxic elements in FDA-regulated products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Peter T; Jacobs, Richard; Baker, Peter E; Ferguson, Kelly; Webber, Siri

    2009-04-08

    compared to existing methods such as ICP-MS. It concludes with a discussion of a number of different FDA applications and case studies in which XRF has been used to screen, identify, and in some cases quantify toxic elements in various products. This work clearly demonstrates that XRF analyzers are an exceedingly valuable tool for routine and nonroutine elemental analysis investigations, both in the laboratory and in the field. In the future, it is hoped that both field-portable and laboratory-grade XRF analyzers will see more widespread use for investigational and forensic-type applications of food and other regulated consumer products.

  2. Study of the effect of plant growth regulators, size, and cultivar of the grape inflorescence explant on production of phenolic compounds in an in vitro condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighi Azam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Phenolic compounds are a large number of secondary metabolites that have useful and desirable effects in the field of agriculture, medicine, and food. This research was aimed to achieve methods of in vitro propagation of grapevine in order to apply biotechnologies for correction, growth, and optimization of products and compounds of the cultivated plant in relation to phenol ratio. Methods: In this interventional study, the effects of cultivar and size of the inflorescence explant and the gibberellin hormone in two levels, benzylaminopurine, and auxin hormones in three levels with three replicates per treatment were evaluated in relation to phenol ratio, in order to evaluate the effect of plant growth regulators, the type and size of the grape inflorescence explant on the phenol production. Results: The type of plant growth regulators affected phenolic substances production. The production of phenolic substances decreased in a medium with the highest concentration of growth regulators, 4 and 2.5 μM concentration of benzylaminopurine, and 4.9 μM of auxin. Production of phenolic substances increased in the free-plant hormone medium. In smaller samples tendency to turn brown was more regarding high amount of the sugar. Conclusion: The plant sample and the cultivar as important factors in producing phenol environment are induced by environmental stimuli like sugar, light, temperature, stress, ozone, and wound and can be actually applied to increase phenol production.

  3. Human-derived gut microbiota modulates colonic secretion in mice by regulating 5-HT3receptor expression via acetate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Yogesh; Schmidt, Bradley A; Linden, David R; Larson, Eric D; Grover, Madhusudan; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico; Kashyap, Purna C

    2017-07-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)], an important neurotransmitter and a paracrine messenger in the gastrointestinal tract, regulates intestinal secretion by its action primarily on 5-HT 3 and 5-HT 4 receptors. Recent studies highlight the role of gut microbiota in 5-HT biosynthesis. In this study, we determine whether human-derived gut microbiota affects host secretory response to 5-HT and 5-HT receptor expression. We used proximal colonic mucosa-submucosa preparation from age-matched Swiss Webster germ-free (GF) and humanized (HM; ex-GF colonized with human gut microbiota) mice. 5-HT evoked a significantly greater increase in short-circuit current (Δ I sc ) in GF compared with HM mice. Additionally, 5-HT 3 receptor mRNA and protein expression was significantly higher in GF compared with HM mice. Ondansetron, a 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist, inhibited 5-HT-evoked Δ I sc in GF mice but not in HM mice. Furthermore, a 5-HT 3 receptor-selective agonist, 2-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine hydrochloride, evoked a significantly higher Δ I sc in GF compared with HM mice. Immunohistochemistry in 5-HT 3A -green fluorescent protein mice localized 5-HT 3 receptor expression to enterochromaffin cells in addition to nerve fibers. The significant difference in 5-HT-evoked Δ I sc between GF and HM mice persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX) but was lost after ondansetron application in the presence of TTX. Application of acetate (10 mM) significantly lowered 5-HT 3 receptor mRNA in GF mouse colonoids. We conclude that host secretory response to 5-HT may be modulated by gut microbiota regulation of 5-HT 3 receptor expression via acetate production. Epithelial 5-HT 3 receptor may function as a mediator of gut microbiota-driven change in intestinal secretion. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We found that gut microbiota alters serotonin (5-HT)-evoked intestinal secretion in a 5-HT 3 receptor-dependent mechanism and gut microbiota metabolite acetate alters 5-HT 3 receptor expression in

  4. Close teamwork between Nrf2 and peroxiredoxins 1 and 6 for the regulation of prostaglandin D2 and E2 production in macrophages in acute inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tetsuro

    2015-11-01

    Inflammation is a complex biological self-defense reaction triggered by tissue damage or infection by pathogens. Acute inflammation is regulated by the time- and cell type-dependent production of cytokines and small signaling molecules including reactive oxygen species and prostaglandins. Recent studies have unveiled the important role of the transcription factor Nrf2 in the regulation of prostaglandin production through transcriptional regulation of peroxiredoxins 1 and 6 (Prx1 and Prx6) and lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS). Prx1 and Prx6 are multifunctional proteins important for cell protection against oxidative stress, but also work together to facilitate production of prostaglandins E2 and D2 (PGE2 and PGD2). Prx1 secreted from cells under mild oxidative stress binds Toll-like receptor 4 and induces NF-κB activation, important for the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal PGE synthase-1 (mPGES-1) expression. The activated MAPKs p38 and ERK phosphorylate Prx6, leading to NADPH oxidase-2 activation, which contributes to production of PGD2 by hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (H-PGDS). PGD2 and its end product 15-deoxy-∆(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) activate Nrf2 thereby forming a positive feedback loop for further production of PGD2 by L-PGDS. Maintenance of cellular glutathione levels is an important role of Nrf2 not only for cell protection but also for the synthesis of prostaglandins, as mPGES-1 and H-PGDS require glutathione for their activities. This review is aimed at describing the functions of Prx1 and Prx6 in the regulation of PGD2 and PGE2 production in acute inflammation in macrophages and the importance of 15d-PGJ2 as an intrinsic Nrf2 activator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Issues with monitoring the safety of psychoactive products under a legal regulated market for new psychoactive substances ('legal highs') in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychert, Marta; Wilkins, Chris; Witten, Karen

    2017-09-01

    New Zealand's Psychoactive Substances Act (2013) established the world's first regulated market for 'low risk' psychoactive products ('legal highs'). Under an interim PSA regime, 47 existing products were permitted to be continued to be sold. To explore issues with the implementation of regulatory systems to monitor the safety of products on the legal market under the interim Psychoactive Substances Act regime. Semi-structured interviews with 30 key stakeholders, including industry, government agency, health and drug service professionals were conducted, transcribed and analysed thematically. In retrospect stakeholders questioned the decision to approve strong synthetic cannabinoid smoking products, noting their health risks because of product formulation, inconsistent manufacturing practices and smoking as the means of administration. Industry actors claimed the decision to approve synthetic cannabinoid smokeable products prevented potentially safer products from gaining market share. The system for withdrawing approved products which were subsequently found to be harmful was criticised for the poor quality of data available, limited engagement with health professionals and the slowness of product withdrawal. Many of the problems with the regime were attributed to the urgency under which the legal market under the interim Psychoactive Substances Act was established and implemented. The selection of 'safer' products, implementation of the product monitoring system, and engagement with health professionals may have benefited from more time and resources. An incremental approach to establishing the new market may have made the regulatory management of the new regime more workable. [Rychert M, Wilkins C, Witten K. Issues with monitoring the safety of psychoactive products under a legal regulated market for new psychoactive substances ('legal highs') in New Zealand. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;00:000-000]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  6. The T Cell Response to Major Grass Allergens Is Regulated and Includes IL-10 Production in Atopic but Not in Non-Atopic Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domdey, A.; Liu, A.; Millner, A.

    2010-01-01

    from healthy and grass-allergic donors and stimulated with the major grass allergens Phl p 1 or Phl p 5. The effects of endogenous IL-10 and/or TGF-beta on proliferation and cytokine production were determined by use of blocking antibodies. In addition, the number of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells...... and their expression of chemokine receptors were investigated by flow cytometry. Results: Phl p 1 and Phl p 5 induced IL-10 production, which down-regulated proliferation and cytokine production, in PBMC cultures from atopic but not from non-atopic donors. Comparable frequencies of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells were present...

  7. Removal of the effect of ammonium on the regulation of nitrogenase enzyme in Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM1710 for improved hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekgoez, Guelsah; Guenduez, Ufuk [Middle East Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Biology; Eroglu, Inci [Middle East Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rakhely, Gabor [Szeged Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biotechnology

    2010-07-01

    Photofermentative biohydrogen production by purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria is a renewable and clean way of producing hydrogen. Hydrogen production by PNS bacteria, Rhodobacter capsulatus, is mediated mainly by nitrogenases, which primarily fix molecular nitrogen to ammonium and produce hydrogen as byproduct. The reaction catalyzed by nitrogenases requires a lot of energy. Hence, there is a complex regulation on nitrogenase enzyme complex, consequently, on hydrogen production. Whenever ammonium, which is the end product of nitrogen fixation reaction, is found in the environment, hydrogen production stops. GlnB and GlnK proteins are the critical regulatory proteins in ammonium dependent regulation of the nitrogenase gene expression. In this study, the aim is to release the ammonium regulation on nitrogenase enzyme by inactivating glnB and glnK genes. For this purpose, relevant recombinant vectors were constructed; R.capsulatus glnB- strain was obtained. The double R.capsulatus glnB{sup -}glnK{sup -} strain, able to produce hydrogen independent of ammonium concentration of the environment is to be obtained. (orig.)

  8. CXCL1 is a negative regulator of mast cell chemotaxis to airway smooth muscle cell products in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhouri, H; Moir, L M; Armour, C L; Hughes, J M

    2014-03-01

    Activated mast cells (MC) numbers on airway smooth muscle (ASM) are increased in eosinophilic asthma. In vitro, asthmatic cytokine-stimulated ASM cell-conditioned medium (CM) induces more MC chemotaxis than CM from nonasthmatic ASM cells. Intriguingly the nonasthmatic ASM CM inhibits MC chemotaxis to the asthmatic ASM CM. However, the inhibitory factor(s) in the nonasthmatic ASM CM is still to be identified. To identify the factor(s) released by nonasthmatic ASM cells that inhibits MC chemotaxis. Confluent, serum-starved ASM cells from donors with and without asthma were stimulated with IL-1β and T-helper (Th)1 (TNFα and IFNγ) or Th2 (IL-4, IL-13) cytokines, or left unstimulated. CM samples were collected after 24 h, and a potential inhibitory factor identified using cytokine protein arrays. Its production was assessed using ELISA and RT-PCR and inhibitory role investigated in MC chemotaxis and Ca(2+) mobilization assays. Only CXCL1 was produced in greater amounts by nonasthmatic than asthmatic ASM cells following Th1 and Th2 cytokine stimulation. CXCL1 mRNA expression was also increased. Exogenous rh-CXCL1 significantly inhibited MC intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and chemotaxis to either CXCL10, CXCL8 or CM collected from asthmatic ASM cells following Th1 or Th2 cytokine stimulation. Neutralizing CXCL1 in nonasthmatic ASM CM or blocking its receptor significantly promoted MC chemotaxis. CXCL1 was a major factor regulating MC chemotaxis in vitro. Its differential release by ASM cells may explain the differences observed in MC localization to the ASM of people with and without asthma. CXCL1 inhibition of MC recruitment to the ASM may lead to new targets to limit asthma pathophysiology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Regulation of neurotoxin production and sporulation by a Putative agrBD signaling system in proteolytic Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksley, Clare M; Davis, Ian J; Winzer, Klaus; Chan, Weng C; Peck, Michael W; Minton, Nigel P

    2010-07-01

    A significant number of genome sequences of Clostridium botulinum and related species have now been determined. In silico analysis of these data revealed the presence of two distinct agr loci (agr-1 and agr-2) in all group I strains, each encoding putative proteins with similarity to AgrB and AgrD of the well-studied Staphylococcus aureus agr quorum sensing system. In S. aureus, a small diffusible autoinducing peptide is generated from AgrD in a membrane-located processing event that requires AgrB. Here the characterization of both agr loci in the group I strain C. botulinum ATCC 3502 and of their homologues in a close relative, Clostridium sporogenes NCIMB 10696, is reported. In C. sporogenes NCIMB 10696, agr-1 and agr-2 appear to form transcriptional units that consist of agrB, agrD, and flanking genes of unknown function. Several of these flanking genes are conserved in Clostridium perfringens. In agreement with their proposed role in quorum sensing, both loci were maximally expressed during late-exponential-phase growth. Modulation of agrB expression in C. sporogenes was achieved using antisense RNA, whereas in C. botulinum, insertional agrD mutants were generated using ClosTron technology. In comparison to the wild-type strains, these strains exhibited drastically reduced sporulation and, for C. botulinum, also reduced production of neurotoxin, suggesting that both phenotypes are controlled by quorum sensing. Interestingly, while agr-1 appeared to control sporulation, agr-2 appeared to regulate neurotoxin formation.

  10. Crosstalk between virulence loci: regulation of Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) by products of the std fimbrial operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Garrido, Javier; Casadesús, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Invasion of intestinal epithelial cells is a critical step in Salmonella infection and requires the expression of genes located in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). A key factor for SPI-1 expression is DNA adenine (Dam) methylation, which activates synthesis of the SPI-1 transcriptional activator HilD. Dam-dependent regulation of hilD is postranscriptional (and therefore indirect), indicating the involvement of unknown cell functions under Dam methylation control. A genetic screen has identified the std fimbrial operon as the missing link between Dam methylation and SPI-1. We show that all genes in the std operon are part of a single transcriptional unit, and describe three previously uncharacterized ORFs (renamed stdD, stdE, and stdF). We present evidence that two such loci (stdE and stdF) are involved in Dam-dependent control of Salmonella SPI-1: in a Dam(-) background, deletion of stdE or stdF suppresses SPI-1 repression; in a Dam(+) background, constitutive expression of StdE and/or StdF represses SPI-1. Repression of SPI-1 by products of std operon explains the invasion defect of Salmonella Dam(-) mutants, which constitutively express the std operon. Dam-dependent repression of std in the ileum may be required to permit invasion, as indicated by two observations: constitutive expression of StdE and StdF reduces invasion of epithelial cells in vitro (1,000 fold) and attenuates Salmonella virulence in the mouse model (>60 fold). In turn, crosstalk between std and SPI-1 may play a role in intestinal infections by preventing expression of SPI-1 in the caecum, an intestinal compartment in which the std operon is known to be expressed.

  11. SIRT1 attenuates PAF-induced MMP-2 production via down-regulation of PAF receptor expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun H; Bae, Jin U; Lee, Seung J; Park, So Y; Kim, Chi D

    2015-09-01

    Silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1) is known as a key regulator in the protection of various vascular disorders, however, no direct evidences have been reported in the progression of atherosclerosis. Considering the pivotal role of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in plaque destabilization, this study investigated the role of SIRT1 on MMP-2 production in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine). In VSMCs stimulated with resveratrol, SIRT1 activator, PAF receptor (PAFR) was internalized and then its protein levels were diminished. It was attenuated in cells pretreated with proteasome or lysosome inhibitor. Also, the degradation of PAFR in SIRT1-stimulated cells was significantly attenuated by β-arrestin2 depletion. In cells treated with nicotinamide, SIRT1 deacetylase inhibitor, PAFR internalization by resveratrol or reSIRT1 was inhibited, demonstrating that deacetylation of SIRT1 is an important step in SIRT1-induced PAFR down-regulation. Moreover, PAF-induced MMP-2 production in VSMCs and aorta was attenuated by resveratrol. In the aorta of SIRT1 transgenic mice, the PAF-induced MMP-2 expression was prominently attenuated compared to that in wild type mice. Taken together, it was suggested that SIRT1 down-regulated PAFR in VSMCs via β-arrestin2-mediated internalization and degradation, leading to an inhibition of PAF-induced MMP-2 production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sirtuin-3 (Sirt3) regulates skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling via altered mitochondrial oxidation and reactive oxygen species production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Enxuan; Emanuelli, Brice; Hirschey, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Sirt3 is a member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized in mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial function. Sirt3 expression in skeletal muscle is decreased in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and regulated by feeding, fasting, and caloric restriction. Sirt3 knockout...

  13. A systems biology approach to investigate the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by Clostridium acetobutylicum in continuous culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahl Hubert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium acetobutylicum is an anaerobic bacterium which is known for its solvent-producing capabilities, namely regarding the bulk chemicals acetone and butanol, the latter being a highly efficient biofuel. For butanol production by C. acetobutylicum to be optimized and exploited on an industrial scale, the effect of pH-induced gene regulation on solvent production by C. acetobutylicum in continuous culture must be understood as fully as possible. Results We present an ordinary differential equation model combining the metabolic network governing solvent production with regulation at the genetic level of the enzymes required for this process. Parameterizing the model with experimental data from continuous culture, we demonstrate the influence of pH upon fermentation products: at high pH (pH 5.7 acids are the dominant product while at low pH (pH 4.5 this switches to solvents. Through steady-state analyses of the model we focus our investigations on how alteration in gene expression of C. acetobutylicum could be exploited to increase butanol yield in a continuous culture fermentation. Conclusions Incorporating gene regulation into the model of solvent production by C. acetobutylicum enables an accurate representation of the pH-induced switch to solvent production to be obtained and theoretical investigations of possible synthetic-biology approaches to be pursued. Steady-state analyses suggest that, to increase butanol yield, alterations in the expression of single solvent-associated genes are insufficient; a more complex approach targeting two or more genes is required.

  14. Epithelium derived interleukin 15 regulates intraepithelial lymphocyte Th1 cytokine production, cytotoxicity, and survival in coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, A Di; Ciccocioppo, R; Cupelli, F; Cinque, B; Millimaggi, D; Clarkson, M M; Paulli, M; Cifone, M G; Corazza, G R

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims Epithelium derived interleukin (IL)‐15 signalling via IL‐15Rα is critical for the development, activation, and survival of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). We aimed to better understand the IL‐15 driven effects on IEL underlying mucosal damage and lymphomagenesis in coeliac disease (CD). Methods Enterocytes, IEL, and lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were isolated from 46 patients with uncomplicated CD (25 untreated and 21 treated) and 22 controls. IL‐15 and IL‐15Rα expression were determined by immunoblotting. Secretion of IL‐15, interferon γ (IFN‐γ), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF‐α), and granzyme B into cell culture supernatants was assessed by ELISA. The ability of IL‐15 to regulate IEL proliferation, perforin/granzyme dependent cytotoxicity, and apoptosis was tested by adding different combinations of IL‐15, IL‐15 blocking antibody, or chloroquine to IEL cultured alone or with Caco‐2 cells as target. IL‐15 mucosal levels were also determined by ELISA in five patients with complicated CD (two ulcerative jejunoileites, one refractory sprue, and two enteropathy associated T cell lymphomas) tested for T cell receptor γ chain clonality. Results IL‐15 was overexpressed in untreated CD enterocytes and LPMC, and in the mucosa of complicated CD patients and uncomplicated untreated CD patients, where its levels correlated with the degree of mucosal damage. Enterocytes from untreated, but not treated, CD patients and controls secreted IL‐15. Untreated CD IEL, characterised by higher IL‐15Rα expression, showed increased proliferation, production of IFN‐γ and TNF‐α, and perforin/granzyme dependent cytotoxicity, and a decreased propensity to apoptosis in response to IL‐15. Conclusions Our findings suggest that IL‐15 plays a crucial role in the generation of epithelial damage in active CD. Its promotion of IEL survival in CD may predispose to the emergence of T cell clonal proliferations. Blocking

  15. An IgaA/UmoB Family Protein from Serratia marcescens Regulates Motility, Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis, and Secondary Metabolite Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Nicholas A; Brothers, Kimberly M; Callaghan, Jake D; Passerini, Angelina M; Sigindere, Cihad; Hill, Preston J; Liu, Xinyu; Wozniak, Daniel J; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2018-03-15

    Secondary metabolites are an important source of pharmaceuticals and key modulators of microbe-microbe interactions. The bacterium Serratia marcescens is part of the Enterobacteriaceae family of eubacteria and produces a number of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we screened for novel regulators of secondary metabolites synthesized by a clinical isolate of S. marcescens and found mutations in a gene for an uncharacterized UmoB/IgaA family member here named gumB Mutation of gumB conferred a severe loss of the secondary metabolites prodigiosin and serratamolide. The gumB mutation conferred pleiotropic phenotypes, including altered biofilm formation, highly increased capsular polysaccharide production, and loss of swimming and swarming motility. These phenotypes corresponded to transcriptional changes in fimA , wecA , and flhD Unlike other UmoB/IgaA family members, gumB was found to be not essential for growth in S. marcescens , yet igaA from Salmonella enterica , yrfF from Escherichia coli , and an uncharacterized predicted ortholog from Klebsiella pneumoniae complemented the gumB mutant secondary metabolite defects, suggesting highly conserved function. These data support the idea that UmoB/IgaA family proteins are functionally conserved and extend the known regulatory influence of UmoB/IgaA family proteins to the control of competition-associated secondary metabolites and biofilm formation. IMPORTANCE IgaA/UmoB family proteins are found in members of the Enterobacteriaceae family of bacteria, which are of environmental and public health importance. IgaA/UmoB family proteins are thought to be inner membrane proteins that report extracellular stresses to intracellular signaling pathways that respond to environmental challenge. This study introduces a new member of the IgaA/UmoB family and demonstrates a high degree of functional similarity between IgaA/UmoB family proteins. Moreover, this study extends the phenomena controlled by Iga

  16. Toll like receptor-2 regulates production of glial-derived neurotrophic factors in murine intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Paola; Gobbo, Serena; Caputi, Valentina; Spagnol, Lisa; Schirato, Giulia; Pasqualin, Matteo; Levorato, Elia; Palù, Giorgio; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Castagliuolo, Ignazio

    2015-09-01

    Gut microbiota-innate immunity axis is emerging as a key player to guarantee the structural and functional integrity of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota, derangement in signaling of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and modifications in the neurochemical coding of the ENS have been associated with a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Indeed, TLR2 activation by microbial products controls the ENS structure and regulates intestinal neuromuscular function. However, the cellular populations and the molecular mechanisms shaping the plasticity of enteric neurons in response to gut microbes are largely unexplored. In this study, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), enteric glial cells (EGCs) and macrophages/dendritic cells (MΦ/DCs) were isolated and cultured from the ileal longitudinal muscle layer of wild-type (WT) and Toll-like receptor-2 deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. Quantification of mRNA levels of neurotrophins at baseline and following stimulation with TLR ligands was performed by RT-PCR. To determine the role of neurotrophins in supporting the neuronal phenotype, we performed co-culture experiments of enteric neurons with the conditioned media of cells isolated from the longitudinal muscle layer of WT or TLR2(-/-) mice. The neuronal phenotype was investigated evaluating the expression of βIII-tubulin, HuC/D, and nNOS by immunocytochemistry. As detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, SMCs expressed mRNA coding TLR1-9. Among the tested cell populations, un-stimulated SMCs were the most prominent sources of neurotrophins. Stimulation with TLR2, TLR4, TLR5 and TLR9 ligands further increased Gdnf, Ngf, Bdnf and Lif mRNA levels in SMCs. Enteric neurons isolated from TLR2(-/-) mice exhibited smaller ganglia, fewer HuC/D(+ve) and nNOS(+ve) neurons and shorter βIII-tubulin axonal networks as compared to neurons cultured from WT mice. The co-culture with the conditioned media from WT-SMCs but not with

  17. Functional characterization of a three-component regulatory system involved in quorum sensing-based regulation of peptide antibiotic production in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Bettina H; Quadri, Luis E N

    2006-10-20

    Quorum sensing is a form of cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to control a wide range of physiological processes in a population density-dependent manner. Production of peptide antibiotics is one of the processes regulated by quorum sensing in several species of Gram-positive bacteria, including strains of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. This bacterium and its peptide antibiotics are of interest due to their potential applications in food preservation. The molecular bases of the quorum sensing phenomenon controlling peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum remain poorly understood. The present study was aimed at gaining a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism involved in quorum sensing-mediated regulation of peptide antibiotic (bacteriocin) production by C. maltaromaticum. We report the functional analyses of the CS (autoinducer)-CbnK (histidine protein kinase)-CbnR (response regulator) three-component regulatory system and the three regulated promoters involved in peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum LV17B. CS-CbnK-CbnR system-dependent activation of carnobacterial promoters was demonstrated in both homologous and heterologous hosts using a two-plasmid system with a beta-glucuronidase (GusA) reporter read-out. The results of our analyses support a model in which the CbnK-CbnR two-component signal transduction system is necessary and sufficient to transduce the signal of the peptide autoinducer CS into the activation of the promoters that drive the expression of the genes required for production of the carnobacterial peptide antibiotics and the immunity proteins that protect the producer bacterium. The CS-CbnK-CbnR triad forms a three-component regulatory system by which production of peptide antibiotics by C. maltaromaticum LV17B is controlled in a population density-dependent (or cell proximity-dependent) manner. This regulatory mechanism would permit the bacterial population to synchronize the production of peptide

  18. "Their Packaging Has Always Been Like a Power": A Qualitative Study of U.S. Smokers' Perceptions of Cigarette Pack Visual Design Features to Inform Product Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph G L; Averett, Paige E; Blanchflower, Tiffany; Landi, Nunzio; Gregory, Kyle R

    2017-10-17

    Cigarette packaging matters to consumer behavior. However, it is less clear which changes to packaging design would be salient for adult smokers. Such information is critically important to regulators in the United States who are charged with reviewing new tobacco products for their impact on population health. In this qualitative study, U.S. adult smokers ( n = 33) participated in six telephone-based focus groups in March 2017. Separate groups were comprised of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) participants; participants with less than four years of post-secondary education; a mix of LGB and straight participants; and, the general population. All groups were purposely selected for diversity. Open thematic coding identified salient design elements used on cigarette packaging. Smokers articulated design elements' use, meaning, and links with consumer behaviors. Three themes were identified: (1) the power of color, (2) supporting color with other design elements (e.g., logos/images, typography, the pack itself), and (3) the combined product brand experience of multiple design elements. Participants linked design elements to product characteristics and to consumer behavior (e.g., purchase). As the Food and Drug Administration is charged with regulating tobacco products, these findings suggest the importance of considering the cigarette pack part of the characteristics of a product.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide potentiates interleukin-1β-induced nitric oxide production via enhancement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Sun-Oh; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Oh, Gi-Su; Jeong, Gil-Saeng; Lee, Bok-Soo; Lee, Seoul; Kim, Du Yong; Rhew, Hyun Yul; Lee, Kang-Min; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and nitric oxide (NO) are endogenously synthesized from L-cysteine and L-arginine, respectively. They might constitute a cooperative network to regulate their effects. In this study, we investigated whether H 2 S could affect NO production in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Although H 2 S by itself showed no effect on NO production, it augmented IL-β-induced NO production and this effect was associated with increased expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. IL-1β activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and this activation was also enhanced by H 2 S. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by the selective inhibitor U0126 inhibited IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation, iNOS expression, and NO production either in the absence or presence of H 2 S. Our findings suggest that H 2 S enhances NO production and iNOS expression by potentiating IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation through a mechanism involving ERK1/2 signaling cascade in rat VSMCs

  20. Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spring, Martin; Johnes, Geraint; Hald, Kim Sundtoft

    Productivity is increasingly critical for developed economies. It has always been important: as Paul Krugman puts it, “Productivity isn’t everything, but in the long run it is almost everything. A country’s ability to improve its standard of living over time depends almost entirely on its ability...... to raise its output per worker”(Krugman, 1994). Analyses of productivity have, by and large, been the preserve of economists. Operations Management (OM) is rooted in a similar concern for the efficient use of scarce resources; Management Accounting (MA) is concerned with the institutionalised measurement...... and management of productivity. Yet the three perspectives are rarely connected. This paper is a sketch of a literature review seeking to identify, contrast and reconcile these three perspectives. In so doing, it aims to strengthen the connections between policy and managerial analyses of productivity....

  1. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production: Progress report, February 1, 1987-February 1, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeikus, J.G.; Shen, Gwo-Jenn.

    1988-01-01

    These studies concern the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that control carbon and electron flow in anaerobic bacteria that conserve energy when coupling hydrogen consumption to the production of acetic, propionic, or butyric acids. Two acidogens, Propionispira arboris and Butyribacterium methylotrophicum were chosen as model systems to understand the function of oxidoreductases and electron carriers in the regulation of hydrogen metabolism and single carbon metabolism. In P. arboris, H 2 consumption was linked to the inhibition of CO 2 production and an increase in the propionate/acetate rate; whereas, H 2 consumption was linked to a stimulation of CO 2 consumption and an increase in the butyrate/acetate ratio in B. methylotrophicum. We report studies on the enzymes involved in the regulation of singe carbon metabolism, the enzyme activities and pathways responsible for conversion of multicarbon components to acetate and propionate or butyrate, and how low pH inhibits H 2 and acetic acid production in Sarcina ventriculi as a consequence of hydrogenase regulation. 9 refs

  2. The legal regulation of information and communications technologies as specific forms of a production factor for capital in the food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Hes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Information and communications technologies (ICT are usually given attention primarily from the standpoint of the technical aspects. However the legal aspects of this specific area cannot be forgotten, as they significantly influence the efficacy and usefulness to entrepreneurial subjects i.e. the conditions for making business transactions. ICT are one of the factors that markedly influence agricultural primary production and the food industry as well as all other branches of the economy. Therefore it is necessary to analyse the effect Community legal regulations for electronic transactions have on resource utility. The aim of the paper is to analyse the state of the legal regulation of information and communication technologies in the food industry in the CR in comparison with Community law. Currently a basic overall source of law for the ICT area does not exist in the CR in an integral form. This branch of law is regulated complementarily in a whole number of varying legal regulations. With regards to the specifics of the media used in the ICT framework it is essential to resolve certain issues differently from the general regulations.The paper has resulted from the institutional research intention MSM 6046070906 “The Economics of Resources from Czech Agriculture and their Efficient Use in the Framework of Multifunctional Agri-food Systems“.

  3. Important updates introduced by the new regulation on the industrial and sanitary inspection of products of animal origin: Decree no. 9.013 of March 29, 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Modesto Júnior

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Various legal devices regulate the food hygiene inspections of animals origin in Brazil. Among the most important legislation was Decree no. 30,691, of March 29, 1952, which was replaced on March 29, 2017, by Decree no. 9,013. Objective: Thus, considering the relevant importance of this regulation for national agribusiness and consumer health, the present work aimed to evaluate the updates and changes of the new regulation in comparison to its predecessor. Method: For this purpose, a revision of the legislation on health inspection published by the federal government was carried out, through the search of databases in federal government portals for a better understanding of the subject and as a comparative form. Results: The new regulation is less robust than its previous one, presenting 542 articles. The main updates innovations were the insertion of degrees of risk in establishments, simplification of labels and stamps, more modern laboratorial analysis such as molecular biology, distinction of requirements according to the size of production, more severe penalties for companies which break the law, concern for animal welfare and the environment. Conclusions: In this way, updating the regulation was necessary, and brought important innovations with modern concepts, new technological processes and food safety, better suited to the current reality of Brazil.

  4. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  5. The regulation mechanisms of soluble starch and glycerol for production of azaphilone pigments in Monascus purpureus FAFU618 as revealed by comparative proteomic and transcriptional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zi-Rui; Zhou, Wen-Bin; Yang, Xue-Ling; Tong, Ai-Jun; Hong, Jia-Li; Guo, Wei-Ling; Li, Tian-Tian; Jia, Rui-Bo; Pan, Yu-Yang; Lin, Jun; Lv, Xu-Cong; Liu, Bin

    2018-04-01

    Monascus spp. have been used for thousands of years as a traditional food additive in China. This mold can produce many different types of commercially valuable secondary metabolites of biological activity. Soluble starch and glycerol are the two principal carbon sources universally utilized by Monascus for the production of beneficial metabolites. In this study, the effects and regulation mechanisms of soluble starch and glycerol for M. purpureus FAFU618 on Monascus azaphilone pigments (MonAzPs) were investigated through ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS), comparative proteomics and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The production of intracellular and extracellular pigments was significantly different between the soluble starch group (SSG) and glycerol group (GCG). Additionally, the components of intracellular pigments revealed by UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS showed that Monascin and Ankaflavin increased significantly in the GCG, while Rubropunctatin and Monascorubrin increased in the SSG. Differentially expressed proteins of mycelia between SSG and GCG were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. We identified 27 proteins with statistically altered expression, of which 18 proteins associated with the EMP (glycolytic pathway), translation, energy generation, proteolysis, etc. were up-regulated, and 9 proteins, including ribosomal proteins, heat shock proteins (HSPs) and others, were down-regulated in GCG. Meanwhile, the expression levels of MonAzP biosynthetic genes were also analyzed by RT-qPCR, and the results showed that mppA, mppC, mppR1 and mppR2 were down-regulated, whereas genes MpPKS5, MpFasA2, MpFasB2, mppB, mppD and mppE were up-regulated. Collectively, these findings illustrate that the regulation of MonAzPs is not only closely related to the expression levels of certain proteins in the polyketide synthesis pathway

  6. A Descriptive Longitudinal Study of Changes in Vape Shop Characteristics and Store Policies in Anticipation of the 2016 FDA Regulations of Tobacco Products, Including E-Cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheila; Escobedo, Patricia; Garcia, Robert; Cruz, Tess Boley; Unger, Jennifer B; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Meza, Leah; Sussman, Steve

    2018-02-11

    After proposing the "Deeming Rule" in 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) began regulating the manufacturing, marketing, and sales of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) products as tobacco products in 2016. The current study conducted vape shop store observations and surveyed Los Angeles-area shop employees (assessing their beliefs, awareness, and perceptions of e-cigarettes and related FDA regulations) at two time points one year apart to better understand what vape shop retailers would do given FDA's soon-to-be-enacted Deeming Rule. The study also compared retailer beliefs/awareness/actions and store characteristics immediately after the Deeming Rule proposal versus a year after the Rule had been proposed, right before its enactment. Two data collection waves occurred before the Deeming Rule enactment, with Year 1 surveying 77 shops (2014) and Year 2 surveying 61 shops (2015-2016). Between the data collection points, 16 shops had closed. Among the shops that were open at both time points, the majority (95% in Year 1; 74% in Year 2) were aware of some FDA regulations or other policies applying to vape shops. However, overall awareness of FDA regulations and state/local policies governing e-cigarettes significantly decreased from Year 1 to Year 2. At both time points, all shops offered customers free puffs of nicotine-containing e-liquids (prohibited by the then upcoming Deeming Rule). Perceptions of e-cigarette safety also significantly decreased between the years. Exploring vape shop retailer perceptions and store policies (i.e., free puffs/samples displays, perceptions of e-cigarette safety, etc.) over time will help the FDA assess the needs of the vape shop community and develop more effective retailer education campaigns and materials targeted to increase compliance with the newly enacted regulations.

  7. A Descriptive Longitudinal Study of Changes in Vape Shop Characteristics and Store Policies in Anticipation of the 2016 FDA Regulations of Tobacco Products, Including E-Cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available After proposing the “Deeming Rule” in 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA began regulating the manufacturing, marketing, and sales of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette products as tobacco products in 2016. The current study conducted vape shop store observations and surveyed Los Angeles–area shop employees (assessing their beliefs, awareness, and perceptions of e-cigarettes and related FDA regulations at two time points one year apart to better understand what vape shop retailers would do given FDA’s soon-to-be-enacted Deeming Rule. The study also compared retailer beliefs/awareness/actions and store characteristics immediately after the Deeming Rule proposal versus a year after the Rule had been proposed, right before its enactment. Two data collection waves occurred before the Deeming Rule enactment, with Year 1 surveying 77 shops (2014 and Year 2 surveying 61 shops (2015–2016. Between the data collection points, 16 shops had closed. Among the shops that were open at both time points, the majority (95% in Year 1; 74% in Year 2 were aware of some FDA regulations or other policies applying to vape shops. However, overall awareness of FDA regulations and state/local policies governing e-cigarettes significantly decreased from Year 1 to Year 2. At both time points, all shops offered customers free puffs of nicotine-containing e-liquids (prohibited by the then upcoming Deeming Rule. Perceptions of e-cigarette safety also significantly decreased between the years. Exploring vape shop retailer perceptions and store policies (i.e., free puffs/samples displays, perceptions of e-cigarette safety, etc. over time will help the FDA assess the needs of the vape shop community and develop more effective retailer education campaigns and materials targeted to increase compliance with the newly enacted regulations.

  8. Peculiarities of toxic effects exerted by hexyl ether of 5-aminolevulinic acid and grounds for working our regulations of its safe production and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.К. Vlasenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Our research object was hexyl ether of 5-aminolevulinic acid applied as plants growth regulator which was synthe-sized with an original technology by Bioorganic Chemistry Institute of Belarus National Academy of science. Our research goal was to determine peculiarities of toxic effects exerted by this new plants protector on experimental models in vivo/in vitro and to give grounds for hygienic standards of its contents in various media which were to provide its safe production and application. We conducted our research with the use of toxicological, physiological, hematological, biochemical, immu-nologic, cytogenetic, cytological, and statistical methods. We were the first to perform toxicological assessment of this new plants growth regulator under different regimes, doses and ways of introduction into laboratory animals' bodies and it helped us to detect its toxicometric parameters and peculiarities of its biological effects which became apparent through skin-resorptive and cumulative properties, irritating impacts on mucous tunics, moderate reproductive toxicity without sub-stantial signs of gonadotropic, mutagenic, and allergenic impacts on a body. We detected that toxic impacts exerted by the examined substance on a body was combined with membrane-tropic and cytotoxic effects. We determined criteria and limit-ing parameters of hazardous effects exerted by hexyl ether of 5-aminolevulinic acid in the course of a chronic experiment, and it gave us grounds for fixing allowable daily dose for a man and for working out a number of regulations on the sub-stance contents in environmental objects (working area air, water, and soil, in food raw materials, and in food products (grain, rape, rape and linen oil. The obtained results were used as a basis for fixing 9 hygienic standards and were used for the state registration of this plant growth regulator; it will provide its safe production and application in agriculture.

  9. MuRF1 activity is present in cardiac mitochondria and regulates reactive oxygen species production in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattox, Taylor A; Young, Martin E; Rubel, Carrie E

    2014-01-01

    MuRF1 is a previously reported ubiquitin-ligase found in striated muscle that targets troponin I and myosin heavy chain for degradation. While MuRF1 has been reported to interact with mitochondrial substrates in yeast two-hybrid studies, no studies have identified MuRF1's role in regulating mitoc...

  10. Self regulation initiative in heavy vehicle transport to address road safety, accelerated road deterioration and transport productivity in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nordengen, Paul A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available with inadequate vehicle maintenance, driver fatigue and poor driver health, contributes significantly to South Africa’s poor road safety record. The Heavy Vehicle Accreditation Scheme (LAP) is an initiative to introduce self-regulation, as opposed to legal...

  11. Role of exercise-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in the regulation of energy homeostasis in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Pedersen, Maria; Krabbe, Karen S

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to regulate neuronal development and plasticity and plays a role in learning and memory. Moreover, it is well established that BDNF plays a role in the hypothalamic pathway that controls body weight and energy homeostasis. Recent evidence...

  12. Effect of the amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding domain of the Fur regulator on production of pyoverdine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valešová, Renata; Palyzová, Andrea; Marešová, Helena; Štěpánek, Václav; Babiak, Petr; Kyslík, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2013), s. 311-317 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500200703 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : FERRIC UPTAKE REGULATOR * STARVATION SIGMA-FACTOR * MEDIATED IRON TRANSPORT Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.145, year: 2013

  13. CodY, a pleiotropic regulator, influences multicellular behaviour and efficient production of virulence factors in Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindback, Toril; Mols, Maarten; Basset, Coraline; Granum, Per Einar; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kovacs, Akos T.; Lindbäck, Toril

    In response to nutrient limitation in the environment, the global transcriptional regulator CodY modulates various pathways in low G+C Gram-positive bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis CodY triggers adaptation to starvation by secretion of proteases coupled to the expression of amino acid transporters.

  14. The FlbA-regulated predicted transcription factor Fum21 of Aspergillus niger is involved in fumonisin production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aerts, David; Hauer, Esther E.; Ohm, Robin A.

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus niger secretes proteins throughout the colony except for the zone that forms asexual spores called conidia. Inactivation of flbA that encodes a regulator of G-protein signaling results in colonies that are unable to reproduce asexually and that secrete proteins throughout the mycelium...

  15. Receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE) positively regulates CD36 expression and reactive oxygen species production in human monocytes in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthis, A; Hatzitolios, A; Fidani, S; Befani, C; Giannakoulas, G; Koliakos, G

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) engagement of a monocyte surface receptor (RAGE) induces atherosclerosis. AGEs also act as CD36 ligands. We studied reactive oxygen species (ROS) and CD36 expression after siRNA inhibition of RAGE expression in human monocytes. We isolated monocytes from: a) 10 type 2 diabetics, and b) 5 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. CD36 expression and ROS production were evaluated before and after RAGE knockdown. After incubation of monocytes with AGE + bovine serum albumin (BSA), CD36 expression and intracellular ROS increased significantly in all groups. In RAGE-knockdown monocytes, AGE-induced CD36 expression and ROS generation were also significantly inhibited. Blocking RAGE expression using siRNA in human monocytes led to a significant inhibition of CD36 expression and ROS production, suggesting a positive interaction between RAGE, CD36 expression and ROS generation in monocytes.

  16. Negative Regulation of Interferon-β Production by Alternative Splicing of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 3 in Ducks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3, an intracellular signal transducer, is identified as an important component of Toll-like receptors and RIG-I-like receptors induced type I interferon (IFN signaling pathways. Previous studies have clarified TRAF3 function in mammals, but little is known about the role of TRAF3 in ducks. Here, we cloned and characterized the full-length duck TRAF3 (duTRAF3 gene and an alternatively spliced isoform of duTRAF3 (duTRAF3-S lacking the fragment encoding amino acids 217–319, from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs. We found that duTRAF3 and duTRAF3-S played different roles in regulating IFN-β production in DEFs. duTRAF3 through its TRAF domain interacted with duMAVS or duTRIF, leading to the production of IFN-β. However, duTRAF3-S, containing the TRAF domain, was unable to bind duMAVS or duTRIF due to the intramolecular binding between the N- and C-terminal of duTRAF3-S that blocked the function of its TRAF domain. Further analysis identified that duTRAF3-S competed with duTRAF3 itself for binding to duTRAF3, perturbing duTRAF3 self-association, which impaired the assembly of duTRAF3-duMAVS/duTRIF complex, ultimately resulted in a reduced production of IFN-β. These findings suggest that duTRAF3 is an important regulator of duck innate immune signaling and reveal a novel mechanism for the negative regulation of IFN-β production via changing the formation of the homo-oligomerization of wild molecules, implying a novel regulatory role of truncated proteins.

  17. The sensitivity and significance analysis of parameters in the model of pH regulation on lactic acid production by Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Zeng, Xiangmiao; Qiao, Lei; Li, Xisheng; Yang, Yubo; Dai, Cuihong; Hou, Aiju; Xu, Dechang

    2014-01-01

    The excessive production of lactic acid by L. bulgaricus during yogurt storage is a phenomenon we are always tried to prevent. The methods used in industry either control the post-acidification inefficiently or kill the probiotics in yogurt. Genetic methods of changing the activity of one enzyme related to lactic acid metabolism make the bacteria short of energy to growth, although they are efficient ways in controlling lactic acid production. A model of pH-induced promoter regulation on the production of lactic acid by L. bulgaricus was built. The modelled lactic acid metabolism without pH-induced promoter regulation fitted well with wild type L. bulgaricus (R2LAC = 0.943, R2LA = 0.942). Both the local sensitivity analysis and Sobol sensitivity analysis indicated parameters Tmax, GR, KLR, S, V0, V1 and dLR were sensitive. In order to guide the future biology experiments, three adjustable parameters, KLR, V0 and V1, were chosen for further simulations. V0 had little effect on lactic acid production if the pH-induced promoter could be well induced when pH decreased to its threshold. KLR and V1 both exhibited great influence on the producing of lactic acid. The proposed method of introducing a pH-induced promoter to regulate a repressor gene could restrain the synthesis of lactic acid if an appropriate strength of promoter and/or an appropriate strength of ribosome binding sequence (RBS) in lacR gene has been designed.

  18. Transcription factor VdCmr1 is required for pigment production, protection from UV irradiation, and regulates expression of melanin biosynthetic genes in Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonglin; Hu, Xiaoping; Fang, Yulin; Anchieta, Amy; Goldman, Polly H; Hernandez, Gustavo; Klosterman, Steven J

    2018-04-01

    Verticillium dahliae is a soilborne fungus that causes vascular wilt diseases on numerous plant species worldwide. The production of darkly melanized microsclerotia is crucial in the disease cycle of V. dahliae, as these structures allow for long-term survival in soil. Previously, transcriptomic and genomic analysis identified a cluster of genes in V. dahliae that encodes some dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin biosynthetic pathway homologues found in related fungi. In this study, we explored the roles of cluster-specific transcription factor VdCmr1, as well as two other genes within the cluster encoding a polyketide synthase (VdPKS1) and a laccase (VdLac1), enzymes at initial and endpoint steps in DHN melanin production. The results revealed that VdCmr1 and VdPKS1 are required for melanin production, but neither is required for microsclerotia production. None of the three genes were required for pathogenesis on tobacco and lettuce. Exposure of ΔVdCmr1 and wild-type strains to UV irradiation, or to high temperature (40 °C), revealed an approx. 50 % reduction of survival in the ΔVdCmr1 strain, relative to the wild-type strain, in response to either condition. Expression profiles revealed that expression of some melanin biosynthetic genes are in part dependent on VdCmr1. Combined data indicate VdCmr1 is a key regulator of melanin biosynthesis, and that via regulation of melanogenesis, VdCmr1 affects survival of V. dahliae in response to abiotic threats. We conclude with a model showing regulation of VdCmr1 by a high osmolarity glycerol response (Hog)-type MAP kinase pathway.

  19. VanT, a homologue of Vibrio harveyi LuxR, regulates serine, metalloprotease, pigment, and biofilm production in Vibrio anguillarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxatto, Antony; Chalker, Victoria J; Lauritz, Johan; Jass, Jana; Hardman, Andrea; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel; Milton, Debra L

    2002-03-01

    Vibrio anguillarum possesses at least two N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing circuits, one of which is related to the luxMN system of Vibrio harveyi. In this study, we have cloned an additional gene of this circuit, vanT, encoding a V. harveyi LuxR-like transcriptional regulator. A V. anguillarum Delta vanT null mutation resulted in a significant decrease in total protease activity due to loss of expression of the metalloprotease EmpA, but no changes in either AHL production or virulence. Additional genes positively regulated by VanT were identified from a plasmid-based gene library fused to a promoterless lacZ. Three lacZ fusions (serA::lacZ, hpdA-hgdA::lacZ, and sat-vps73::lacZ) were identified which exhibited decreased expression in the Delta vanT strain. SerA is similar to 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenases and catalyzes the first step in the serine-glycine biosynthesis pathway. HgdA has identity with homogentisate dioxygenases, and HpdA is homologous to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenases (HPPDs) involved in pigment production. V. anguillarum strains require an active VanT to produce high levels of an L-tyrosine-induced brown color via HPPD, suggesting that VanT controls pigment production. Vps73 and Sat are related to Vibrio cholerae proteins encoded within a DNA locus required for biofilm formation. A V. anguillarum Delta vanT mutant and a mutant carrying a polar mutation in the sat-vps73 DNA locus were shown to produce defective biofilms. Hence, a new member of the V. harveyi LuxR transcriptional activator family has been characterized in V. anguillarum that positively regulates serine, metalloprotease, pigment, and biofilm production.

  20. FRET ratiometric probes reveal the chiral-sensitive cysteine-dependent H2S production and regulation in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lv; Yi, Long; Song, Fanbo; Wei, Chao; Wang, Bai-Fan; Xi, Zhen

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous signalling molecule with multiple biological functions. In order to visualize and quantify the endogenous in situ production of H2S in living cells, here we developed two new sulphide ratiometric probes (SR400 and SR550) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) strategy for live capture of H2S. The FRET-based probes show excellent selectivity toward H2S in a high thiol background under physiological buffer. The probe can be used to in situ visualize cysteine-dependent H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. The ratiometric imaging studies indicated that D-Cys induces more H2S production than that of L-Cys in mitochondria of human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). The cysteine mimics propargylglycine (PPG) has also been found to inhibit the cysteine-dependent endogenous H2S production in a chiral-sensitive manner in living cells. D-PPG inhibited D-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than L-PPG, while, L-PPG inhibited L-Cys-dependent H2S production more efficiently than D-PPG. Our bioimaging studies support Kimura's discovery of H2S production from D-cysteine in mammalian cells and further highlight the potential of D-cysteine and its derivatives as an alternative strategy for classical H2S-releasing drugs.

  1. Increasing l-isoleucine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum by overexpressing global regulator Lrp and two-component export system BrnFE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L; Shi, F; Hu, X; Chen, C; Wang, X

    2013-05-01

    To increase the l-isoleucine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum by overexpressing the global regulator Lrp and the two-component export system BrnFE. The brnFE operon and the lrp gene were cloned into the shuttle vector pDXW-8 individually or in combination. The constructed plasmids were transformed into an l-isoleucine-producing strain C. glutamicum JHI3-156, and the l-isoleucine production in these different strains was analysed and compared. More l-isoleucine was produced when only Lrp was expressed than when only BrnFE was expressed. Significant increase in l-isoleucine production was observed when Lrp and BrnFE were expressed in combination. Compared to the control strain, l-isoleucine production in JHI3-156/pDXW-8-lrp-brnFE increased 63% in flask cultivation, and the specific yield of l-isoleucine increased 72% in fed-batch fermentation. Both Lrp and BrnFE are important to enhance the l-isoleucine production in C. glutamicum. The results provide useful information to enhance l-isoleucine or other branched-chain amino acid production in C. glutamicum. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Analysis co-regulation model of safety of fishery products in Morocco through the example of “histamine”, “parasites” and “sulphites” dangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dahani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-regulation in food safety represents the shared responsibility between food business operators and the competent authority (CA to ensure food safety and to comply with the health requirements of importing countries. The evolution of food regulation on one hand and the quality assurance of the veterinary services of the ONSSA according to the ISO 17020 standard on the other hand, need studying the regulation model adopted at national level. The objective of this work is to analyze the main health risks associated with fishery products from a co-regulatory perspective. The hazards targeted by this study are histamine, parasites and sulfites. The approach is based on structured interviews with fishery products professionals and veterinary inspectors responsible for control and certification. The main hazards are controlled by adopting health control plans (PMS by the professionals within the establishments as well as the official control carried out by the inspecting veterinarians. The PMS implementation can produce conflicting injunctions for the veterinary inspectors of the competent authority.

  3. production

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    answered satisfactorily. An additional important factor in discouraging collaborative work in animal and grassland production is, without doubt, the complexity of work in this field compared with much of that in the individual discipline and, in particular, the com- plexity of work on forage as a source of nutrients for live- stock.

  4. Proposed federal petroleum products and allied petroleum products storage tank systems regulations under CEPA 1999 : report of consultation sessions February 2003 to September 2003 : summary of input from participants and response from Environment Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-04-01

    Between February and September of 2003, Environment Canada held a series of consultation sessions on a set of proposed regulations in order to eliminate the contamination of groundwater and soil caused by petroleum products and allied petroleum products stored by the federal house in storage tank systems. This document presents a summary of comments, issues, ideas and perspectives raised throughout consultation sessions. It also outlines Environment Canada's responses to generated input. Sessions took place in each of Environment Canada's five regions. A full description of the consultation procedures and methodology was provided. The document provides a rationale for cases where Environment Canada has rejected or only partially accepted stakeholder recommendations. A list of general prohibitions and obligations was provided along with details of registration and tagging; provincially-approved installers and installation procedures; monitoring and leak detection; operation and maintenance; upgrading; withdrawal, re-use and removal of storage tank systems; report of releases; and an environmental emergency plan and record keeping. First Nation issues were also discussed. Several changes to proposed regulations have been made during the course of the consultations, including an extension of timelines for compliance with proposed regulations; the definition of a storage tank system is now defined as the delivery point first connection to the discharge of the pump; and records are now required for only 7 years as opposed to the life of the tank. It was also stated that a draft regulation will be published in the Canadian Gazette, followed by a 60 day comment period. The final regulation will be published a few months later

  5. Potency determination of factor VIII and factor IX for new product labelling and postinfusion testing: challenges for caregivers and regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodt, J; Hubbard, A R; Wicks, S J; Gray, E; Neugebauer, B; Charton, E; Silvester, G

    2015-07-01

    A workshop organized by the European Medicines Agency and the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and HealthCare was held in London, UK on November 28-29, 2013, to provide an overview of the current knowledge of the characterization of new factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX) concentrates with respect to potency assays and testing of postinfusion material. The objective was to set the basis for regulatory authorities' discussion on the most appropriate potency assay for the individual products, and European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) discussion on whether to propose revision of the Ph. Eur. monographs with respect to potency assays in the light of information on new FVIII and FIX concentrates. The workshop showed that for all products valid assays vs. the international concentrate standards were obtained and potency could be expressed in International Units. The Ph. Eur. chromogenic potency assay gave valid assay results which correlate with in vivo functionality of rFVIII products. For some modified rFVIII products and all modified rFIX products, one-stage clotting assay methods result in different potencies depending on the activated partial thromboplastin time reagent. As a consequence, monitoring of patients' postinfusion levels is challenging but it was pointed out that manufacturers are responsible for providing the users with appropriate information for use and laboratory testing of their product. Strategies to avoid misleading determination of patents' plasma levels, e.g. information on suitable assays, laboratory standards or correction factors were discussed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impacts of Climate Change on Regulated Streamflow, Hydrologic Extremes, Hydropower Production, and Sediment Discharge in the Skagit River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Yeun; Hamlet, Alan F.; Grossman, Eric E.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the impacts of climate change on the hydrologic response of the Skagit River are likely to be substantial under natural (i.e. unregulated) conditions. To assess the combined effects of changing natural flow and dam operations that determine impacts to regulated flow, a new integrated daily-time-step reservoir operations model was constructed for the Skagit River Basin. The model was used to simulate current reservoir operating policies for historical flow conditions and for projected flows for the 2040s (2030–2059) and 2080s (2070–2099). The results show that climate change is likely to cause substantial seasonal changes in both natural and regulated flow, with more flow in the winter and spring, and less in summer. Hydropower generation in the basin follows these trends, increasing (+ 19%) in the winter/ spring, and decreasing (- 29%) in the summer by the 2080s. The regulated 100-year flood is projected to increase by 23% by the 2040s and 49% by the 2080s. Peak winter sediment loading in December is projected to increase by 335% by the 2080s in response to increasing winter flows, and average annual sediment loading increases from 2.3 to 5.8 teragrams (+ 149%) per year by the 2080s. Regulated extreme low flows (7Q10) are projected to decrease by about 30% by the 2080s, but remain well above natural low flows. Both current and proposed alternative flood control operations are shown to be largely ineffective in mitigating increasing flood risks in the lower Skagit due to the distribution of flow in the basin during floods.

  7. GntR family regulator SCO6256 is involved in antibiotic production and conditionally regulates the transcription of myo-inositol catabolic genes in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingjun; Gao, Wenyan; Li, Shuxian; Pan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Gang

    2016-03-01

    SCO6256 belongs to the GntR family and shows 74% identity with SCO6974, which is the repressor of myo-inositol catabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Disruption of SCO6256 significantly enhanced the transcription of myo-inositol catabolic genes in R2YE medium. The purified recombinant SCO6256 directly bound to the upstream regions of SCO2727, SCO6978 and SCO6985, as well as its encoding gene. Footprinting assays demonstrated that SCO6256 bound to the same sites in the myo-inositol catabolic gene cluster as SCO6974. The expression of SCO6256 was repressed by SCO6974 in minimal medium with myo-inositol as the carbon source, but not in R2YE medium. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assays demonstrated that SCO6974 and SCO6256 interacted with each other; and both of the proteins controlled the transcription of myo-inositol catabolic genes in R2YE medium. These results indicated SCO6256 regulates the transcription of myo-inositol catabolic genes in coordination with SCO6974 in R2YE medium. In addition, SCO6256 negatively regulated the production of actinorhodin and calcium-dependent antibiotic via control of the transcription of actII-ORF4 and cdaR. SCO6256 bound to the upstream region of cdaR and the binding sequence was proved to be TTTCGGCACGCAGACAT, which was further confirmed through base substitution. Four putative targets (SCO2652, SCO4034, SCO4237 and SCO6377) of SCO6256 were found by screening the genome sequence of Strep. coelicolor A3(2) based on the conserved binding motif, and confirmed by transcriptional analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. These results revealed that SCO6256 is involved in the regulation of myo-inositol catabolic gene transcription and antibiotic production in Strep. coelicolor A3(2).

  8. Regulation of nitrogen uptake and assimilation: Effects of nitrogen source, root-zone pH, and aerial CO2 concentration on growth and productivity of soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, C. D.; Tolley-Henry, L.

    1989-01-01

    An important feature of controlled-environment crop production systems such as those to be used for life support of crews during space exploration is the efficient utilization of nitrogen supplies. Making decisions about the best sources of these supplies requires research into the relationship between nitrogen source and the physiological processes which regulate vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Work done in four areas within this research objective is reported: (1) experiments on the effects of root-zone pH on preferential utilization of NO3(-) versus NH4(+) nitrogen; (2) investigation of processes at the whole-plant level that regulate nitrogen uptake; (3) studies of the effects of atmospheric CO2 and NO3(-) supply on the growth of soybeans; and (4) examination of the role of NO3(-) uptake in enhancement of root respiration.

  9. Tec family kinases Itk and Rlk / Txk in T lymphocytes: cross-regulation of cytokine production and T-cell fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; Kraus, Zachary J; Schwartzberg, Pamela L

    2011-06-01

    Developing thymocytes and T cells express the Tec kinases Itk, Rlk/Txk and Tec, which are critical modulators of T-cell receptor signaling, required for full activation of phospholipase Cγ, and downstream Ca(2+) and ERK-mediated signaling pathways. Over the last 10 years, data have implicated the Tec family kinases Itk and Rlk/Txk as important regulators of cytokine production by CD4(+) effector T-cell populations. Emerging data now suggest that the Tec family kinases not only influence cytokine-producing T-cell populations in the periphery, but also regulate the development of distinct innate-type cytokine-producing T-cell populations in the thymus. Together, these results suggest that the Tec family kinases play critical roles in helping shape immune responses via their effects on the differentiation and function of distinct cytokine-producing, effector T-cell populations. Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS. No claim to original US government works.

  10. Endothelial NO and O2•− Production Rates Differentially Regulate Oxidative, Nitroxidative and Nitrosative Stress in the Microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Saptarshi; Kavdia, Mahendra

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction causes an imbalance in endothelial NO and O2•− production rates and increased peroxynitrite formation. Peroxynitrite and its decomposition products cause multiple deleterious effects including tyrosine nitration of proteins, superoxide dismutase (SOD) inactivation and tissue damage. Studies have shown that peroxynitrite formation during endothelial dysfunction is strongly dependent on the NO and O2•− production rates. Previous experimental and modeling studies examining the role of NO and O2•− production imbalance on peroxynitrite formation showed different results in biological and synthetic systems. However, there is a lack of quantitative information about the formation and biological relevance of peroxynitrite in oxidative, nitroxidative and nitrosative stress conditions in the microcirculation. We developed a computational biotransport model to examine the role of endothelium NO and O2•− production on the complex biochemical NO and O2•− interactions in the microcirculation. We also modeled the effect of variability in SOD expression and activity during oxidative stress. The results showed that peroxynitrite concentration increased with increase in either O2•− to NO or NO to O2•− production rate ratios (QO2•−/QNO or QNO/QO2•−, respectively). The peroxynitrite concentrations were similar for both production rate ratios indicating that peroxynitrite related nitroxidative and nitrosative stresses may be similar in endothelial dysfunction or iNOS induced NO production. The endothelial peroxynitrite concentration increased with increase in both QO2•−/QNO or QNO/QO2•− ratios at SOD concentrations 0.1–100 μM. The absence of SOD may not mitigate the extent of peroxynitrite mediated toxicity as we predicted insignificant increase in peroxynitrite levels beyond QO2•−/QNO and QNO/QO2•−ratio of 1. The results support the experimental observations of biological systems and show that peroxynitrite

  11. Enhancing monellin production by Pichia pastoris at low cell induction concentration via effectively regulating methanol metabolism patterns and energy utilization efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Luqiang; Tu, Tingyong; Huai, Qiangqiang; Sun, Jiaowen; Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xin; Shi, Zhongping; Ding, Jian

    2017-01-01

    In heterologous protein productions by P. pastoris, methanol induction is generally initiated when cell concentration reaches very high density. The alternative strategy by initiating methanol induction at lower cells concentration was also reported to be effective in easing DO control, reducing toxic by-metabolites accumulation and increasing targeted proteins titers. However, the methanol/energy regulation mechanisms are seldom reported. We theoretically analyzed the methanol/energy metabolisms in protein expression process with the strategies of initiating induction at higher or lower cells concentrations, using monellin production as a prototype. When initiating induction at lower cells concentration and controlling induction temperature at 30°C, monellin concentration reached the highest levels of 2.62~2.71 g/L, which was 2.5~4.9 fold of those obtained with the strategy of initiating induction at higher cells concentration. With the desired induction strategy, 1) carbon metabolism ratio directing into the precursors synthesis route for monellin production reached the highest level of 65%, carbon metabolism ratios towards to precursors synthesis and ATP regeneration routes were regulated at relatively balanced levels; 2) monellin synthesis was completely cell growth associated, with the largest associated coefficient and higher specific growth rate; 3) theoretical NADH (energy) utilization efficiency η was the highest, and η stayed high levels (≥0.8) during most period (89%) within induction phase to supply sufficient energy in supporting monellin synthesis.

  12. Retinoic Acid Modulates Interferon-γ Production by Hepatic Natural Killer T Cells via Phosphatase 2A and the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Heng-Kwei

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite converted from vitamin A, plays an active role in immune function, such as defending against infections and immune regulation. Although RA affects various types of immune cells, including antigen-presenting cells, B lymphocytes, and T lymphocytes, whether it affects natural killer T (NKT) cells remain unknown. In this study, we found that RA decreased interferon (IFN)-γ production by activated NKT cells through T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD28. We also found that RA reduced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, but increased phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity in TCR/CD28-stimulated NKT cells. The increased PP2A activity, at least partly, contributed to the reduction of ERK phosphorylation. Since inhibition of ERK activation decreases IFN-γ production by TCR/CD28-stimulated NKT cells, RA may downregulate IFN-γ production by TCR/CD28-stimulated NKT cells through the PP2A-ERK pathway. Our results demonstrated a novel function of RA in modulating the IFN-γ expression by activated NKT cells. PMID:25343668

  13. The use of transformed Escherichia coli for experimental angiogenesis induced by regulated in situ production of vascular endothelial growth factor--an alternative gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celec, Peter; Gardlík, Roman; Pálffy, Roland; Hodosy, Július; Stuchlík, Stanislav; Drahovská, Hana; Stuchlíková, Martina; Minárik, Gabriel; Lukács, Ján; Jurkovicová, Ingrid; Hulín, Ivan; Turna, Ján; Jakubovský, Ján; Kopáni, Martin; Danisovic, Lubos; Jandzík, Dávid; Kúdela, Matús; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu

    2005-01-01

    Defects in angiogenesis (blood vessel formation) are responsible for two most important causes of death in developed countries (ischemic heart disease and cancer). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in physiological and pathological regulation of angiogenesis. In the last years several studies have indicated the possibilities of VEGF in the therapy of ischemic heart disease. However, especially VEGF gene therapy (naked DNA, plasmids and adenovirus mediated) is associated with adverse side effects regarding the expression regulation. To prepare bacterial strains producing VEGF using plasmids containing the VEGF cDNA for the use in experimental angiogenesis. Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) was transformed with Bluescript vector containing the inserts with cDNA sequences coding VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF121, VEGF164, VEGF189). Selection of recombinants was achieved by cultivating E. coli cells on ampicillin-added medium. The expression of target genes in the T7 expression system was induced by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell lysates showed the presence of polypeptides of molecular weight corresponding with known values of VEGF isoforms. Blood vessel formation induced by bacterial VEGF production was proved in vivo in mice seven days after intraperitoneal injection of transformed bacteria by light microscopy. CONCLUSION AND HYPOTHESIS: In summary, E. coli strain expressing VEGF was prepared and its biological effect confirmed. Bacteria, which produce angiogenic factors, provide a new modality for experimental angiogenesis and may be also suitable for clinical use. The in situ production of therapeutic proteins using optimalized prokaryotic expression systems can represent a useful tool for treatment based on molecular biomedicine. The main advantage of the described approach lies in the enhanced regulation control--bacterial expression can be regulated positively (induction by exogenous

  14. Plain packaging and indirect expropriation of trademark rights under BITs: does FCTC help to establish a right to regulate tobacco products?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chang-Fa

    2012-12-01

    Recently the giant tobacco company Philip Morris served its notice to launch an investor-to-state dispute settlement proceeding against the Australian Government for its introduction of plain packaging requirements on tobacco products. It is an important event in the field of intellectual property, investment and international health law. The fundamental questions involved are whether the restriction of trademark rights as a result of the plain packaging requirement is a compensable indirect expropriation under BITs or whether it falls within the scope of government's right to regulate and thus become not compensable. This paper is of the view that the requirement of plain packaging will deprive the essential value or core function of trademark rights and thus constitutes an indirect expropriation under BITs. However, such indirect expropriation meets the public interest requirement and the necessity requirement. The paper further argues that sovereign States have an inherent right to regulate domestic economic activities. Since the pain packaging requirements provided in the FCTC Guidelines are expected to protect the value of human lives and health, the protected values clearly outweigh the affected commercial interests of tobacco companies. Also the justification for host States to adopt a plain packaging policy is strong. Thus, the interpreters of BITs need to pay higher respect to the host State's sovereign power concerning its right to regulate tobacco products for a legitimate purpose. The conclusion of the paper is that the host States should enjoy a defense of the right to regulate to refuse compensation. The author believes that this is the only reasonable conclusion to avoid possible conflicts between different treaty systems (BITs and the FCTC) and between different legal systems and fields (trademark law, investment law and international health law).

  15. Citrus fruit flavor and aroma biosynthesis: isolation, functional characterization, and developmental regulation of Cstps1, a key gene in the production of the sesquiterpene aroma compound valencene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon-Asa, Liat; Shalit, Moshe; Frydman, Ahuva; Bar, Einat; Holland, Doron; Or, Etti; Lavi, Uri; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Eyal, Yoram

    2003-12-01

    Citrus fruits possess unique aromas rarely found in other fruit species. While fruit flavor is composed of complex combinations of soluble and volatile compounds, several low-abundance sesquiterpenes, such as valencene, nootkatone, alpha-sinensal, and beta-sinensal, stand out in citrus as important flavor and aroma compounds. The profile of terpenoid volatiles in various citrus species and their importance as aroma compounds have been studied in detail, but much is still lacking in our understanding of the physiological, biochemical, and genetic regulation of their production. Here, we report on the isolation, functional expression, and developmental regulation of Cstps1, a sesquiterpene synthase-encoding gene, involved in citrus aroma formation. The recombinant enzyme encoded by Cstps1 was shown to convert farnesyl diphosphate to a single sesquiterpene product identified as valencene by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Phylogenetic analysis of plant terpene synthase genes localized Cstps1 to the group of angiosperm sesquiterpene synthases. Within this group, Cstps1 belongs to a subgroup of citrus sesquiterpene synthases. Cstps1 was found to be developmentally regulated: transcript was found to accumulate only towards fruit maturation, corresponding well with the timing of valencene accumulation in fruit. Although citrus fruits are non-climacteric, valencene accumulation and Cstps1 expression were found to be responsive to ethylene, providing further evidence for the role of ethylene in the final stages of citrus fruit ripening. Isolation of the gene encoding valencene synthase provides a tool for an in-depth study of the regulation of aroma compound biosynthesis in citrus and for metabolic engineering for fruit flavor characteristics.

  16. Legal regulation of the production and trade of medical devices and medical equipment in the EU and US: experience for Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkov, Vitalii; Kotvitska, Alla; Harkusha, Andrii

    2017-01-01

    The need for effective legal regulation of production and sale of medical products in Ukraine due to its social effect is obvious and requires a high level of clarity. The experience of more advanced countries in this area, given the way chosen by Ukraine to harmonize our laws with EU legislation, is certainly could be a useful source of information. The urgency of issues need further intensification of national legal reforms. Some key points on concept of legal regulation of abovementioned sphere is a base of this study. Legislation of Ukraine, European Union, United States of America, Guidelines, developed by European Commission & Food and Drug Administration's (FDA), recommendations represented by international voluntary group and scientific works. This article is based on dialectical, comparative, analytic, synthetic and comprehensive research methods. This study provide a possibility to state that main difference of regulatory systems in EU and US is that the legal framework of the EU is more flexible. This flexibility is grounded on main principle that only basic quality requirements for medical devices is defined by legislative acts however more detailed requirements are defined in standards, technical regulations, specifications, which are discretionary in nature. Contractors are free to choose any technical solution that provides compliance with the essential requirements, they can choose among different conformity assessment procedures and between accredited conformity assessment bodies to which they want to apply. The contractors themselves is interested to pass the conformity assessment procedure and have the right to put a conformity mark on their medical device because it will give them a real competitive advantage. In contrast, US State regulatory system provides strict control over business entities and law act establishes the quality requirements of medical products. The only body that can authorize the introduction of medical products and perform

  17. Regulation of Fatty Acid Production and Release in Benthic Algae: Could Parallel Allelopathy Be Explained with Plant Defence Theories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joey L; Ten-Hage, Loïc; Leflaive, Joséphine

    2018-04-01

    Many organisms produce chemical compounds, generally referred as secondary metabolites, to defend against predators and competitors (allelopathic compounds). Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the interaction between environmental factors and secondary metabolites production. However, microalgae commonly use simple metabolites having a role in primary metabolism as allelopathic compounds. The aim of this study was to determine whether classical theories of plant chemical defences could be applied to microalgae producing allelochemicals derived from the primary metabolism. Our study was designed to investigate how growth phase, algal population density, nutrient limitation and carbon assimilation affect the production and release of allelopathic free fatty acids (FFAs) among other FFAs. The model species used was Uronema confervicolum, a benthic filamentous green alga that produces two allelopathic FFAs (linoleic and α-linolenic acids) inhibiting diatom growth. FFAs have been quantified in algal biomass and in culture medium. Our results were analysed according to two classical plant defence theories: the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) and the optimal defence theory (ODT), based on the metabolic capacities for defence production and on the need for defence, respectively. While a higher production of allelopathic compounds under increased light conditions supports the use of GDBH with this microalga, the observation of a negative feedback mechanism mostly supports ODT. Therefore, both theories were insufficient to explain all the observed effects of environmental factors on the production of these allelochemicals. This highlights the needs of new theories and models to better describe chemical interactions of microalgae.

  18. Regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genetic engineering on the production of acetate esters and higher alcohols during Chinese Baijiu fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Ma, Hong-Xia; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2017-06-01

    Acetate esters and higher alcohols greatly influence the quality and flavor profiles of Chinese Baijiu (Chinese liquor). Various mutants have been constructed to investigate the interactions of ATF1 overexpression, IAH1 deletion, and BAT2 deletion on the production of acetate esters and higher alcohols. The results showed that the overexpression of ATF1 under the control of the PGK1 promoter with BAT2 and IAH1 double-gene deletion led to a higher production of acetate esters and a lower production of higher alcohols than the overexpression of ATF1 with IAH1 deletion or overexpression of ATF1 with BAT2 deletion. Moreover, deletion of IAH1 in ATF1 overexpression strains effectively increased the production of isobutyl acetate and isoamyl acetate by reducing the hydrolysis of acetate esters. The decline in the production of higher alcohol by the ATF1 overexpression strains with BAT2 deletion is due to the interaction of ATF1 overexpression and BAT2 deletion. Mutants with varying abilities of producing acetate esters and higher alcohols were developed by genetic engineering. These strains have great potential for industrial application.

  19. High efficiency cell-recycle continuous sodium gluconate production by Aspergillus niger using on-line physiological parameters association analysis to regulate feed rate rationally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fei; Li, Chao; Wang, Zejian; Zhao, Wei; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a system of cell-recycle continuous fermentation for sodium gluconate (SG) production by Aspergillus niger (A. niger) was established. Based on initial continuous fermentation result (100.0h) with constant feed rate, an automatic feedback strategy to regulate feed rate using on-line physiological parameters (OUR and DO) was proposed and applied successfully for the first time in the improved continuous fermentation (240.5h). Due to less auxiliary time, highest SG production rate (31.05±0.29gL(-1)h(-1)) and highest yield (0.984±0.067molmol(-1)), overall SG production capacity (975.8±5.8gh(-1)) in 50-L fermentor of improved continuous fermentation increased more than 300.0% compared to that of batch fermentation. Improvement of mass transfer and dispersed mycelia morphology were the two major reasons responsible for the high SG production rate. This system had been successfully applied to industrial fermentation and SG production was greatly improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcription and translation products of the cytolysin gene psm-mec on the mobile genetic element SCCmec regulate Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Kaito

    Full Text Available The F region downstream of the mecI gene in the SCCmec element in hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA contains two bidirectionally overlapping open reading frames (ORFs, the fudoh ORF and the psm-mec ORF. The psm-mec ORF encodes a cytolysin, phenol-soluble modulin (PSM-mec. Transformation of the F region into the Newman strain, which is a methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strain, or into the MW2 (USA400 and FRP3757 (USA300 strains, which are community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA strains that lack the F region, attenuated their virulence in a mouse systemic infection model. Introducing the F region to these strains suppressed colony-spreading activity and PSMα production, and promoted biofilm formation. By producing mutations into the psm-mec ORF, we revealed that (i both the transcription and translation products of the psm-mec ORF suppressed colony-spreading activity and promoted biofilm formation; and (ii the transcription product of the psm-mec ORF, but not its translation product, decreased PSMα production. These findings suggest that both the psm-mec transcript, acting as a regulatory RNA, and the PSM-mec protein encoded by the gene on the mobile genetic element SCCmec regulate the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus.

  1. Characterization of the SigD regulon of C. difficile and its positive control of toxin production through the regulation of tcdR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imane El Meouche

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile intestinal disease is mediated largely by the actions of toxins A (TcdA and B (TcdB, whose production occurs after the initial steps of colonization involving different surface or flagellar proteins. In B. subtilis, the sigma factor SigD controls flagellar synthesis, motility, and vegetative autolysins. A homolog of SigD encoding gene is present in the C.difficile 630 genome. We constructed a sigD mutant in C. difficile 630 ∆erm to analyze the regulon of SigD using a global transcriptomic approach. A total of 103 genes were differentially expressed between the wild-type and the sigD mutant, including genes involved in motility, metabolism and regulation. In addition, the sigD mutant displayed decreased expression of genes involved in flagellar biosynthesis, and also of genes encoding TcdA and TcdB as well as TcdR, the positive regulator of the toxins. Genomic analysis and RACE-PCR experiments allowed us to characterize promoter sequences of direct target genes of SigD including tcdR and to identify the SigD consensus. We then established that SigD positively regulates toxin expression via direct control of tcdR transcription. Interestingly, the overexpression of FlgM, a putative anti-SigD factor, inhibited the positive regulation of motility and toxin synthesis by SigD. Thus, SigD appears to be the first positive regulator of the toxin synthesis in C. difficile.

  2. Assessment of an Impact of Mechanical Regulation on Selected Morphometric and Productive Parameters of Invasive Species Solidago Canadensis Population in Agricultural Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Končeková Lýdia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Repeated mowing is considered as one of the effective control methods against species of the genus Solidago. This paper evaluates the impact of the repeated mowing on selected morphometric and productive characteristics of the invasive neophyte Solidago canadensis in the district of Rimavská Sobota in Central Slovakia. Permanent research plots (PRPs were established within anthropogenic habitat on an abandoned land that was divided into two variants. In the first variant, the mechanical regulation - mowing was applied. The second variant was without the regulation. The mechanical regulation of the populations was carried out in June and August during the growing season 2011. The results showed that the mechanical regulation did not have a clear impact on the population density. The decreasing trend of the number of shoots within the mowed variant was found only in one research plot (PRP3. The other plots showed an increase in the number of individuals by 2.7 and 32.7% between the mowings. Statistically highly significant differences in terms of the mowing impact on the height of the individuals were found in all PRPs. The difference in the weight of dry aboveground biomass between the mowings was 221.87 g, which represents 36.41%. Double the difference (48.8% was recorded in the dry weight of the underground biomass in the regulated stand compared with the unregulated stand (165.1 and 322.5 g/m2, respectively. Although there was a short-term success achieved by the application of the two mowings during the growing period, the pursued objective was not reached.

  3. Auxin-cytokinin interaction and variations in their metabolic products in the regulation of organogenesis in two Eucomis species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aremu, A. O.; Plačková, Lenka; Pěnčík, Aleš; Novák, Ondřej; Doležal, Karel; Van Staden, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 6 (2016), s. 883-890 ISSN 1871-6784 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA MŠk LK21306; GA ČR GA14-34792S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : in-vitro propagation * plant-growth regulators * arabidopsis-thaliana * quantitative-analysis * mass-spectrometry * isotope-dilution * biosynthesis * gradients * cultures * hormones * Asparagaceae * Indole-3-acetic acid * Phytohormones * meta-Topolin * Ornamentals * Rooting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.813, year: 2016

  4. Features of CRISPR-Cas Regulation Key to Highly Efficient and Temporally-Specific crRNA Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andjela Rodic

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial immune systems, such as CRISPR-Cas or restriction-modification (R-M systems, affect bacterial pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance by modulating horizontal gene flow. A model system for CRISPR-Cas regulation, the Type I-E system from Escherichia coli, is silent under standard laboratory conditions and experimentally observing the dynamics of CRISPR-Cas activation is challenging. Two characteristic features of CRISPR-Cas regulation in E. coli are cooperative transcription repression of cas gene and CRISPR array promoters, and fast non-specific degradation of full length CRISPR transcripts (pre-crRNA. In this work, we use computational modeling to understand how these features affect the system expression dynamics. Signaling which leads to CRISPR-Cas activation is currently unknown, so to bypass this step, we here propose a conceptual setup for cas expression activation, where cas genes are put under transcription control typical for a restriction-modification (R-M system and then introduced into a cell. Known transcription regulation of an R-M system is used as a proxy for currently unknown CRISPR-Cas transcription control, as both systems are characterized by high cooperativity, which is likely related to similar dynamical constraints of their function. We find that the two characteristic CRISPR-Cas control features are responsible for its temporally-specific dynamical response, so that the system makes a steep (switch-like transition from OFF to ON state with a time-delay controlled by pre-crRNA degradation rate. We furthermore find that cooperative transcription regulation qualitatively leads to a cross-over to a regime where, at higher pre-crRNA processing rates, crRNA generation approaches the limit of an infinitely abrupt system induction. We propose that these dynamical properties are associated with rapid expression of CRISPR-Cas components and efficient protection of bacterial cells against foreign DNA. In terms of synthetic

  5. ANKS1B Gene Product AIDA-1 Controls Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission by Regulating GluN2B Subunit Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindi, Jaafar O; Chávez, Andrés E; Cvejic, Svetlana; Calvo-Ochoa, Erika; Castillo, Pablo E; Jordan, Bryen A

    2015-06-17

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are key mediators of glutamatergic transmission and synaptic plasticity, and their dysregulation has been linked to diverse neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. While normal NMDAR function requires regulated expression and trafficking of its different subunits, the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are not fully understood. Here we report that the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain associated-1 protein (AIDA-1), which associates with NMDARs and is encoded by ANKS1B, a gene recently linked to schizophrenia, regulates synaptic NMDAR subunit composition. Forebrain-specific AIDA-1 conditional knock-out (cKO) mice exhibit reduced GluN2B-mediated and increased GluN2A-mediated synaptic transmission, and biochemical analyses show AIDA-1 cKO mice have low GluN2B and high GluN2A protein levels at isolated hippocampal synaptic junctions compared with controls. These results are corroborated by immunocytochemical and electrophysiological analyses in primary neuronal cultures following acute lentiviral shRNA-mediated knockdown of AIDA-1. Moreover, hippocampal NMDAR-dependent but not metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent plasticity is impaired in AIDA-1 cKO mice, further supporting a role for AIDA-1 in synaptic NMDAR function. We also demonstrate that AIDA-1 preferentially associates with GluN2B and with the adaptor protein Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase and kinesin KIF17, which regulate the transport of GluN2B-containing NMDARs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to synapses. Consistent with this function, GluN2B accumulates in ER-enriched fractions in AIDA-1 cKO mice. These findings suggest that AIDA-1 regulates NMDAR subunit composition at synapses by facilitating transport of GluN2B from the ER to synapses, which is critical for NMDAR plasticity. Our work provides an explanation for how AIDA-1 dysfunction might contribute to neuropsychiatric conditions, such as schizophrenia. Copyright

  6. Equatorial Pacific peak in biological production regulated by nutrient and upwelling during the late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Etourneau

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The largest increase in export production in the eastern Pacific of the last 5.3 Myr (million years occurred between 2.2 and 1.6 Myr, a time of major climatic and oceanographic reorganization in the region. Here, we investigate the causes of this event using reconstructions of export production, nutrient supply and oceanic conditions across the Pliocene–Pleistocene in the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP for the last 3.2 Myr. Our results indicate that the export production peak corresponds to a cold interval marked by high nutrient supply relative to consumption, as revealed by the low bulk sedimentary 15N/14N (δ15N and alkenone-derived sea surface temperature (SST values. This ∼0.6 million year long episode of enhanced delivery of nutrients to the surface of the EEP was predominantly initiated through the upwelling of nutrient-enriched water sourced in high latitudes. In addition, this phenomenon was likely promoted by the regional intensification of upwelling in response to the development of intense Walker and Hadley atmospheric circulations. Increased nutrient consumption in the polar oceans and enhanced denitrification in the equatorial regions restrained nutrient supply and availability and terminated the high export production event.

  7. Gene regulation of UDP-galactose synthesis and transport: Potential rate limiting processes in initiation of milk production in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactose synthesis is believed to be rate-limiting for milk production. However, understanding the molecular events controlling lactose synthesis in humans is still rudimentary. We have utilized our established model of the RNA isolated from breast milk fat globule from 7 healthy exclusively breastfe...

  8. Autonomous control of metabolic state by a quorum sensing (QS)-mediated regulator for bisabolene production in engineered E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Min Woo, Han; Tian, Tian

    2017-01-01

    I-luxR genes, and four variants of the Response plasmid, which carry bisabolene producing pathway genes under the control of the PluxI promoter, were designed for optimization of bisabolene production. Furthermore, a chromosome-integrated QS strain was engineered with the best combination of Sensor...

  9. Endogenous Cannabinoid Production in the Rat Female Reproductive Tract Is Regulated by Changes in the Hormonal Milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Heather B.; Allard, Cassandra

    2011-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system is emerging as an important component of female reproductive tract physiology. The eCBs anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), and N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly) were measured in the rat reproductive tract at five time points in the four-day estrous cycle, in acyclic retired breeders (RB), after ovariectomy (OVX), OVX + estrogen (E2), OVX + progesterone (P4), or OVX with E2+P4. eCBs were measured in the uterus, uterine adipose, ovaries, and ovarian adipose using HPLC/MS/MS. Levels of AEA, 2-AG, and NAGly were highest in the estrus phase of the estrous cycle in the uterus, whereas, only NAGly had differences in production in the ovaries across the cycle. All eCBs were lower in RB ovaries; however, the production of eCBs in the uterus of RB and OVX groups was more varied with NAGly showing the lowest levels of production in these groups. Levels of AEA in uterine fat were significantly higher or equivalent to levels in the uterus. However, levels of 2-AG and NAGly were dramatically lower in uterine fat verses the organ. Ovarian fat had significantly lower levels of all three eCBs. These data provide evidence that the hormonal milieu plays a significant and complex role in the production of eCBs in the female rat reproductive tract.

  10. The BnGRF2 gene (GRF2-like gene from Brassica napus) enhances seed oil production through regulating cell number and plant photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Hua, Wei; Yang, Hong-Li; Zhan, Gao-Miao; Li, Rong-Jun; Deng, Lin-Bin; Wang, Xin-Fa; Liu, Gui-Hua; Wang, Han-Zhong

    2012-06-01

    Seed yield and oil content are two important agricultural characteristics in oil crop breeding, and a lot of functional gene research is being concentrated on increasing these factors. In this study, by differential gene expression analyses between rapeseed lines (zy036 and 51070) which exhibit different levels of seed oil production, BnGRF2 (Brassica napus growth-regulating factor 2-like gene) was identified in the high oil-producing line zy036. To elucidate the possible roles of BnGRF2 in seed oil production, the cDNA sequences of the rapeseed GRF2 gene were isolated. The Blastn result showed that rapeseed contained BnGRF2a/2b which were located in the A genome (A1 and A3) and C genome (C1 and C6), respectively, and the dominantly expressed gene BnGRF2a was chosen for transgenic research. Analysis of 35S-BnGRF2a transgenic Arabidopsis showed that overexpressed BnGRF2a resulted in an increase in seed oil production of >50%. Moreover, BnGRF2a also induced a >20% enlargement in extended leaves and >40% improvement in photosynthetic efficiency because of an increase in the chlorophyll content. Furthermore, transcriptome analyses indicated that some genes associated with cell proliferation, photosynthesis, and oil synthesis were up-regulated, which revealed that cell number and plant photosynthesis contributed to the increased seed weight and oil content. Because of less efficient self-fertilization induced by the longer pistil in the 35S-BnGRF2a transgenic line, Napin-BnGRF2a transgenic lines were further used to identify the function of BnGRF2, and the results showed that seed oil production also could increase >40% compared with the wild-type control. The results suggest that improvement to economically important characteristics in oil crops may be achieved by manipulation of the GRF2 expression level.

  11. Free fatty acid production in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is enhanced by deletion of the cyAbrB2 transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Akihito; Sato, Yusuke; Saito, Yujiro; Kaneko, Yasuko; Takimura, Yasushi; Hagihara, Hiroshi; Hihara, Yukako

    2016-02-20

    The cyAbrB2 (Sll0822) transcriptional regulator in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is involved in coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and its deletion causes distinct phenotypes such as decreased expression levels of nitrogen-regulated genes and high accumulation of glycogen granules. From the viewpoint of metabolic engineering, the highly accumulated glycogen granules in the ΔcyabrB2 mutant could be a valuable source for the production of biofuels. Here, by disruption of the aas gene (slr1609) encoding acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase and introduction of a gene encoding thioesterase from Umbellularia californica (UcTE), we conferred the ability of production and secretion of free fatty acids on the ΔcyabrB2 mutant. Notable features of the resulting ΔcyabrB2Δaas::UcTE strain compared with ΔcyabrB2 by RNA-seq analysis were decrease in expression levels of genes related to uptake and subsequent metabolism of nitrogen and carbon and increase in the expression level of sigE encoding a group 2 sigma factor. These changes in gene expression profile were not observed when the same genetic modification was introduced in the wild-type background. The ΔcyabrB2Δaas::UcTE strain showed two-folds higher free fatty acid productivity on a per OD730 basis compared with the Δaas::UcTE strain, without expense of the accumulated glycogen granules. This shows the potential of the ΔcyabrB2 mutant as the platform of biofuel production. The effective utilization of the accumulated glycogen must be the next task to be pursued. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Alsin and SOD1G93A Proteins Regulate Endosomal Reactive Oxygen Species Production by Glial Cells and Proinflammatory Pathways Responsible for Neurotoxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Spencer, Netanya Y.; Pantazis, Nicholas J.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated enhanced Nox2-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) by microglia in the pathogenesis of motor neuron death observed in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this context, ALS mutant forms of SOD1 enhance Rac1 activation, leading to increased Nox2-dependent microglial ROS production and neuron cell death in mice. It remains unclear if other genetic mutations that cause ALS also function through similar Nox-dependent pathways to enhance ROS-mediate motor neuron death. In the present study, we sought to understand whether alsin, which is mutated in an inherited juvenile form of ALS, functionally converges on Rac1-dependent pathways acted upon by SOD1G93A to regulate Nox-dependent ROS production. Our studies demonstrate that glial cell expression of SOD1G93A or wild type alsin induces ROS production, Rac1 activation, secretion of TNFα, and activation of NFκB, leading to decreased motor neuron survival in co-culture. Interestingly, coexpression of alsin, or shRNA against Nox2, with SOD1G93A in glial cells attenuated these proinflammatory indicators and protected motor neurons in co-culture, although shRNAs against Nox1 and Nox4 had little effect. SOD1G93A expression dramatically enhanced TNFα-mediated endosomal ROS in glial cells in a Rac1-dependent manner and alsin overexpression inhibited SOD1G93A-induced endosomal ROS and Rac1 activation. SOD1G93A expression enhanced recruitment of alsin to the endomembrane compartment in glial cells, suggesting that these two proteins act to modulate Nox2-dependent endosomal ROS and proinflammatory signals that modulate NFκB. These studies suggest that glial proinflammatory signals regulated by endosomal ROS are influenced by two gene products known to cause ALS. PMID:21937428

  13. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-κB translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca 2+ mobilization. ► Moderate acidification activates NF-κB nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. ► Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. ► Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca 2+ entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca 2+ entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca 2+ release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-κB was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-κB. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca 2+ mobilization, activating NF-κB nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  14. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Junying, E-mail: jyli04@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  15. l-Arginine-Dependent Epigenetic Regulation of Interleukin-10, but Not Transforming Growth Factor-β, Production by Neonatal Regulatory T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Tsai, Ching-Chang; Chang, Ling-Sai; Huang, Hsin-Chun; Cheng, Hsin-Hsin; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Yang, Kuender D.; Hsu, Te-Yao

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of diseases in humans, including trauma, certain cancers, and infection, are known to be associated with l-arginine deficiency. In addition, l-arginine must be supplemented by diet during pregnancy to aid fetal development. In conditions of l-arginine depletion, T cell proliferation is impaired. We have previously shown that neonatal blood has lower l-arginine levels than adult blood, which is associated with poor neonatal lymphocyte proliferation, and that l-arginine enhances neonatal lymphocyte proliferation through an interleukin (IL)-2-independent pathway. In this study, we have further investigated how exogenous l-arginine enhances neonatal regulatory T-cells (Tregs) function in relation to IL-10 production under epigenetic regulation. Results showed that cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) produced higher levels of IL-10 than adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by phytohemagglutinin stimulation but not by anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation. Addition of exogenous l-arginine had no effect on transforming growth factor-β production by PBMCs or CBMCs, but enhanced IL-10 production by neonatal CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs. Further studies showed that IL-10 promoter DNA hypomethylation, rather than histone modification, corresponded to the l-arginine-induced increase in IL-10 production by neonatal CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that l-arginine modulates neonatal Tregs through the regulation of IL-10 promoter DNA methylation. l-arginine supplementation may correct the Treg function in newborns with l-arginine deficiency. PMID:28487700

  16. l-Arginine-Dependent Epigenetic Regulation of Interleukin-10, but Not Transforming Growth Factor-β, Production by Neonatal Regulatory T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuender D. Yang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of diseases in humans, including trauma, certain cancers, and infection, are known to be associated with l-arginine deficiency. In addition, l-arginine must be supplemented by diet during pregnancy to aid fetal development. In conditions of l-arginine depletion, T cell proliferation is impaired. We have previously shown that neonatal blood has lower l-arginine levels than adult blood, which is associated with poor neonatal lymphocyte proliferation, and that l-arginine enhances neonatal lymphocyte proliferation through an interleukin (IL-2-independent pathway. In this study, we have further investigated how exogenous l-arginine enhances neonatal regulatory T-cells (Tregs function in relation to IL-10 production under epigenetic regulation. Results showed that cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs produced higher levels of IL-10 than adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs by phytohemagglutinin stimulation but not by anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation. Addition of exogenous l-arginine had no effect on transforming growth factor-β production by PBMCs or CBMCs, but enhanced IL-10 production by neonatal CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs. Further studies showed that IL-10 promoter DNA hypomethylation, rather than histone modification, corresponded to the l-arginine-induced increase in IL-10 production by neonatal CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that l-arginine modulates neonatal Tregs through the regulation of IL-10 promoter DNA methylation. l-arginine supplementation may correct the Treg function in newborns with l-arginine deficiency.

  17. Fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of glial metabolism, inhibits the up-regulation of NOS expression, activity and NO production in the spinal cord induced by formalin test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Cai; Chen, Wei-Na; Li, Shu-Qin; Cai, Jin-Song; Li, Wen-Bin; Xian, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Yu-Yan; Zhang, Min; Li, Qing-Jun

    2009-02-01

    Previous experiments have suggested that nitric oxide plays an important role in nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. In order to explore the involvement of glia in the NO-mediated nociceptive transmission, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of fluorocitrate (FC), an inhibitor of glial metabolism, on NOS expression and activity and NO production in the spinal cord during the process of peripheral inflammatory pain and hyperalgesia induced by formalin test in rats. Sixty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into sham, formalin, formalin + normal saline (NS), and formalin + FC groups. The NOS expression, NOS activity and NO production was detected by NADPH-d histochemistry staining, NOS and NO assay kit, respectively. It was found that formalin test significantly up-regulated NOS expression and activity and NO production in the laminae I-II of the dorsal horn and the grey matter around the central canal in the lumbar spinal cord at 1 h after the formalin test. Selective inhibition of glia metabolism with intrathecal administration of FC (1 nmol) significantly inhibited the up-regulation in NOS expression and activity and NO production normally induced by the formalin test, which was represented with decreases in the number and density of the NADPH-d positive cells in the dorsal horn and grey matter around the central canal, and decrease in density of NADPH-d positive neuropil in the dorsal horn in formalin + FC group compared with formalin group. The results suggested that glia may be involved in the NO-mediated nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord.

  18. Ethylene signalling is involved in regulation of phosphate starvation-induced gene expression and production of acid phosphatases and anthocyanin in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, Mingguang

    2010-11-30

    With the exception of root hair development, the role of the phytohormone ethylene is not clear in other aspects of plant responses to inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation. The induction of AtPT2 was used as a marker to find novel signalling components involved in plant responses to Pi starvation. Using genetic and chemical approaches, we examined the role of ethylene in the regulation of plant responses to Pi starvation. hps2, an Arabidopsis mutant with enhanced sensitivity to Pi starvation, was identified and found to be a new allele of CTR1 that is a key negative regulator of ethylene responses. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), the precursor of ethylene, increases plant sensitivity to Pi starvation, whereas the ethylene perception inhibitor Ag+ suppresses this response. The Pi starvation-induced gene expression and acid phosphatase activity are also enhanced in the hps2 mutant, but suppressed in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-5. By contrast, we found that ethylene signalling plays a negative role in Pi starvation-induced anthocyanin production. These findings extend the roles of ethylene in the regulation of plant responses to Pi starvation and will help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying these responses. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Macrophage Transactivation for Chemokine Production Identified as a Negative Regulator of Granulomatous Inflammation Using Agent-Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moyo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular activation in trans by interferons, cytokines, and chemokines is a commonly recognized mechanism to amplify immune effector function and limit pathogen spread. However, an optimal host response also requires that collateral damage associated with inflammation is limited. This may be particularly so in the case of granulomatous inflammation, where an excessive number and/or excessively florid granulomas can have significant pathological consequences. Here, we have combined transcriptomics, agent-based modeling, and in vivo experimental approaches to study constraints on hepatic granuloma formation in a murine model of experimental leishmaniasis. We demonstrate that chemokine production by non-infected Kupffer cells in the Leishmania donovani-infected liver promotes competition with infected KCs for available iNKT cells, ultimately inhibiting the extent of granulomatous inflammation. We propose trans-activation for chemokine production as a novel broadly applicable mechanism that may operate early in infection to limit excessive focal inflammation.

  20. Regulation of human mononuclear phagocyte migration by cell surface-binding proteins for advanced glycation end products.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, A M; Yan, S D; Brett, J; Mora, R; Nowygrod, R; Stern, D

    1993-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of proteins occurs at an accelerated rate in diabetes and can lead to the formation of advanced glycation end products of proteins (AGEs), which bind to mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) and induce chemotaxis. We have isolated two cell surface-associated binding proteins that mediate the interaction of AGEs with bovine endothelial cells. One of these proteins is a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of receptors (termed receptor for AGEs or RAGE); and the second is ...