WorldWideScience

Sample records for cba brookhaven colliding beam accelerator

  1. Super High Energy Colliding Beam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    This lecture presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evolution of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 kilometer tunnel of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachie in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particle.

  2. Report of the Review Committee on the BNL colliding beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) proposal by BNL for a pp collider of 400 GeV /times/ 400 GeV with a maximum luminosity /Brit pounds/ = 2 /times/ 10 33 was reviewed by a DOE team, including consultants, on April 11--15, 1983. No major flaws were found that would prevent, in principle, the proposed collider from reaching its design goals. BNL has made sufficient progress in their superconducting magnet RandD program that, although there is not yet a magnet of the CBA baseline design, the Committee believes the design can be achieved. However, to ensure prompt completion of the project, substantial RandD needs to be carried out in short order, particularly on the timely and cost-effective production of magnets, reliability of quench protection, and determination of cryogenic heat loads

  3. RF Beam control system for the Brookhaven relativistic heavy ion collider, RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; Delong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency

  4. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.; Newman, S.

    1984-01-01

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  5. Accelerator timing at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oerter, B.; Conkling, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    Accelerator timing at Brookhaven National Laboratory has evolved from multiple coaxial cables transmitting individual pulses in the original Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) design, to serial coded transmission as the AGS Booster was added. With the implementation of this technology, the Super Cycle Generator (SCG) which synchronizes the AGS, Booster, LINAC, and Tandem accelerators was introduced. This paper will describe the timing system being developed for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

  6. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies

  7. Preliminary cryogenic loads requirements for the electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, R.; Ravikumar, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    The proposed electron ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory will consist of using one existing hadron ring and developing a new electron accelerator. This paper presents the cryogenic loads for the hadron ring’s superconducting magnets as well as related upgrades to handle the additional loads. The cryogenic loads for the superconducting RF injector/accelerator and storage ring for the electron beam are summarized. The proposed cryogenic plant, and the configuration and flow distribution of the related cryogenic systems are also presented.

  8. The Quest for High Luminosity in Hadron Colliders (413th Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Wolfram

    2006-01-01

    In 1909, by bombarding a gold foil with alpha particles from a radioactive source, Ernest Rutherford and coworkers learned that the atom is made of a nucleus surrounded by an electron cloud. Ever since, scientists have been probing deeper and deeper into the structure of matter using the same technique. With increasingly powerful machines, they accelerate beams of particles to higher and higher energies, to penetrate more forcefully into the matter being investigated and reveal more about the contents and behavior of the unknown particle world. To achieve the highest collision energies, projectile particles must be as heavy as possible, and collide not with a fixed target but another beam traveling in the opposite direction. These experiments are done in machines called hadron colliders, which are some of the largest and most complex research tools in science. Five such machines have been built and operated, with Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) currently the record holder for the total collision energy. One more such machine is under construction. Colliders have two vital performance parameters on which their success depends: one is their collision energy, and the other, the number of particle collisions they can produce, which is proportional to a quantity known as the luminosity. One of the tremendous achievements in the world's latest collider, RHIC, is the amazing luminosity that it produces in addition to its high energy. To learn about the performance evolution of these colliders and the way almost insurmountable difficulties can be overcome, especially in RHIC, join Wolfram Fischer, a physicist in the Collider-Accelerator (C-A) Department, who will give the next Brookhaven Lecture, on 'The Quest for High Luminosity in Hadron Colliders.'

  9. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  10. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e + e - interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL

  11. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  12. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  13. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle

  14. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-propagating Laser Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennady Shvets; Nathaniel J. Fisch; Alexander Pukhov

    2001-01-01

    Generation of accelerating plasma waves using two counter-propagating laser beams is considered. Colliding-beam accelerator requires two laser pulses: the long pump and the short timing beam. We emphasize the similarities and differences between the conventional laser wakefield accelerator and the colliding-beam accelerator (CBA). The highly nonlinear nature of the wake excitation is explained using both nonlinear optics and plasma physics concepts. Two regimes of CBA are considered: (i) the short-pulse regime, where the timing beam is shorter than the plasma period, and (ii) the parametric excitation regime, where the timing beam is longer than the plasma period. Possible future experiments are also outlined

  15. Operational experience on the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1994-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is a laser-electron linear accelerator complex designed to provide high brightness beams for testing of advanced acceleration concepts and high power pulsed photon sources. Results of electron beam parameters attained during the commissioning of the nominally 45 MeV energy machine are presented

  16. Possibilities for relativistic heavy ion collisions at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.O.; Hahn, H.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1980 there has been considerable interest at Brookhaven in exploiting the existence of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, CBA, earlier referred to as Isabelle, for the generation of heavy ion collisions at very high energies. The only requirement for a heavy ion collider would have been for an energy booster for the Tandem accelerator and a tunnel and magnet transport system to the AGS. For a few million dollars heavy ions up to nearly 200 GeV/amu could be collided with luminosities of 10 27 to 10 28 /cm 2 sec in experimental halls with ideal facilities for heavy ion physics studies. Although the CBA project has been stopped, it is still true that Brookhaven has in place enormous advantages for constructing a heavy ion collider. This paper describes a design that exploits those advantages. It uses the tunnel and other civil construction, the refrigerator, vacuum equipment, injection line components, and the magnet design for which there is expertise and a production facility in place. The result is a machine that appears quite different than would a machine designed from first principles without access to these resources but one which is of high performance and of very attractive cost

  17. The Colliding Beams Sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Sequencer (CBS) is a computer program used to operate the pbar-p Collider by synchronizing the applications programs and simulating the activities of the accelerator operators during filling and storage. The Sequencer acts as a meta-program, running otherwise stand alone applications programs, to do the set-up, beam transfers, acceleration, low beta turn on, and diagnostics for the transfers and storage. The Sequencer and its operational performance will be described along with its special features which include a periodic scheduler and command logger. 14 refs., 3 figs

  18. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of γϵx = 3x10-6 m-rad and γϵy = 3x10-8 m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  19. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  20. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of γε x = 3x10 -6 m-rad and γε y = 3x10 -8 m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ''fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future

  1. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  2. Analytical researches on the accelerating structures, wakefields, and beam dynamics for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.

    1996-01-01

    The research works presented in this memoir are oriented not only to the R and D programs towards future linear colliders, but also to the pedagogic purposes. The first part of this memoir (from Chapter 2 to Chapter 9) establishes an analytical framework of the disk-loaded slow wave accelerating structures with can be served as the advanced courses for the students who have got some basic trainings in the linear accelerator theories. The analytical formulae derived in this part describe clearly the properties of the disk-loaded accelerating structures, such as group velocity, shunt impedance, coupling coefficients κ and β, loss factors, and wake fields. The second part (from Chapter 11 to Chapter 13) gives the beam dynamics simulations and the final proposal of an S-Band Superconducting Linear Collider (SSLC) which is aimed to avoid the dark current problem in TESLA project. This memoir has not included all the works conducted since April 1992, such as beam dynamics simulations for CLIC Test Facility (CFT-2) and the design of High Charge Structures (HCS) (11π/12 mode) for CFT-2, in order to make this memoir more harmonious, coherent and continuous. (author)

  3. Brookhaven National Laboratory electron beam test stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikin, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Kponou, A.; Prelec, K.; Snydstrup, L.

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of the electron beam test stand (EBTS) project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory is to build a versatile device to develop technologies that are relevant for a high intensity electron beam ion source (EBIS) and to study the physics of ion confinement in a trap. The EBTS will have all the main attributes of EBIS: a 1-m-long, 5 T superconducting solenoid, electron gun, drift tube structure, electron collector, vacuum system, ion injection system, appropriate control, and instrumentation. Therefore it can be considered a short prototype of an EBIS for a relativistic heavy ion collider. The drift tube structure will be mounted in a vacuum tube inside a open-quotes warmclose quotes bore of a superconducting solenoid, it will be at room temperature, and its design will employ ultrahigh vacuum technology to reach the 10 -10 Torr level. The first gun to be tested will be a 10 A electron gun with high emission density and magnetic compression of the electron beam. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  4. NOVOSIBIRSK/STANFORD: colliding linac beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Plans to use colliding beams from linear accelerators are being considered at Novosibirsk and Stanford. The VLEPP scheme proposed for Novosibirsk and the Stanford single pass collider scheme are described. (W.D.L.).

  5. The Brookhaven ATF low-emittance beam line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.J.; Kirk, H.G.

    1991-01-01

    One component of the experimental program at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) consists of a class of experiments which will study the acceleration of electrons through micron-size structures which are exposed in coincidence to a 100 GW CO 2 laser beam. These experiments require the development and control of an electron beam with geometric emittances on the order of 10 -10 m-rad and intensities on the order of 10 6 electrons. In this paper, the authors describe the strategies for producing such beams and the effects of higher-order aberrations. Particle tracking results are presented for the final-focus system

  6. The rise of colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1992-06-01

    It is a particular pleasure for me to have this opportunity to review for you the rise of colliding beams as the standard technology for high-energy-physics accelerators. My own career in science has been intimately tied up in the transition from the old fixed-target technique to colliding-beam work. I have led a kind of double life both as a machine builder and as an experimenter, taking part in building and using the first of the colliding-beam machines, the Princeton-Stanford Electron-Electron Collider, and building the most recent advance in the technology, the Stanford Linear Collider. The beginning was in 1958, and in the 34 years since there has been a succession of both electron and proton colliders that have increased the available center-of-mass energy for hard collisions by more than a factor of 1000. For the historians here, I regret to say that very little of this story can be found in the conventional literature. Standard operating procedure for the accelerator physics community has been publication in conference proceedings, which can be obtained with some difficulty, but even more of the critical papers are in internal laboratory reports that were circulated informally and that may not even have been preserved. In this presentation I shall review what happened based on my personal experiences and what literature is available. I can speak from considerable experience on the electron colliders, for that is the topic in which I was most intimately involved. On proton colliders my perspective is more than of an observer than of a participant, but I have dug into the literature and have been close to many of the participants

  7. Superconductivity and future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1963-01-01

    For 50 years particle accelerators employing accelerating cavities and deflecting magnets have been developed at a prodigious rate. New accelerator concepts and hardware ensembles have yielded great improvements in performance and GeV/$. The great idea for collective acceleration resulting from intense auxiliary charged-particle beams or laser light may or may not be just around the corner. In its absence, superconductivity (SC) applied both to rf cavities and to magnets opened up the potential for very large accelerators without excessive energy consumption and with other economies, even with the cw operation desirable for colliding beams. HEP has aggressively pioneered this new technology: the Fermilab single ring 1 TeV accelerator - 2 TeV collider is near the testing stage. Brookhaven National Laboratory's high luminosity pp 2 ring 800 GeV CBA collider is well into construction. Other types of superconducting projects are in the planning stage with much background R and D accomplished. The next generation of hadron colliders under discussion involves perhaps a 20 TeV ring (or rings) with 40 TeV CM energy. This is a very large machine: even if the highest practical field B approx. 10T is used, the radius is 10x that of the Fermilab accelerator. An extreme effort to get maximum GeV/$ may be crucial even for serious consideration of funding

  8. RHIC and quark matter: proposal for a relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This document describes the Brookhaven National Laboratory Proposal for the construction of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The construction of this facility represents the natural continuation of the laboratory's role as a center for nuclear and high-energy physics research and extends and uses the existing AGS, Tandem Van de Graaff and CBA facilities at BNL in a very cost effective manner. The Administration and Congress have approved a project which will provide a link between the Tandem Van de Graaf and the AGS. Completion of this project in 1986 will provide fixed target capabilities at the AGS for heavy ions of about 14 GeV/amu with masses up to approx. 30 (sulfur). The addition of an AGS booster would extend the mass range to the heaviest ions (A approx. 200, e.g., gold); its construction could start in 1986 and be completed in three years. These two new AGS experimental facilities can be combined with the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to extend the energy range to 100 x 100 GeV/amu for the heaviest ions. BNL proposes to start construction of RHIC in FY 86 with completion in FY 90 at a total cost of 134 M$

  9. Doing More with Less: Cost-effective, Compact Particle Accelerators (489th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, Dejan [BNL Collider-Accelerator Department

    2013-10-22

    Replace a 135-ton magnet used for cancer-fighting particle therapies with a magnet that weighs only two tons? Such a swap is becoming possible thanks to new particle accelerator advances being developed by researchers at Brookhaven Lab. With an approach that combines techniques used by synchrotron accelerators with the ability to accept more energy, these new technologies could be used for more than fighting cancer. They could also decrease the lifecycle of byproducts from nuclear power plants and reduce costs for eRHIC—a proposed electron-ion collider for Brookhaven Lab that researchers from around the world would use to explore the glue that holds together the universe’s most basic building blocks and explore the proton-spin puzzle. During this lecture, Dr. Trbojevic provides an overview of accelerator technologies and techniques—particularly a non-scaling, fixed-focused alternating gradient—to focus particle beams using fewer, smaller magnets. He discusses how these technologies will benefit eRHIC and other applications, including particle therapies being developed to combat cancer.

  10. Early operating experience with the Brookhaven National Laboratory radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, H.; Clifford, T.; Giordano, S.; Khiari, F.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Puglisi, M.; Warner, P.

    1984-05-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory polarized H - injection program for the AGS utilizes a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for acceleration between the polarized H - source and the Alvarez Linac. The RFQ accelerator is now in operation with low beam currents. The results of low and high power rf testing will be reported together with initial results of operation in the polarized H - beam line

  11. Advanced R ampersand D for electron and photon beams at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, H.G.

    1989-08-01

    The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility consists of a 50-MeV linear accelerator and a laser system capable of generating short (a few picoseconds) laser pulses at both UV (266 nm) and infrared (10 μm) wavelengths. With these systems in place, the ATF has unique capabilities for the study of fundamental interactions between charged-particle beams and intense electromagnetic radiation. The principal research goals of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) axe the following. Laser Acceleration Program: We wig study the principles and techniques of particle acceleration at ultra-high frequencies (up to 30 THz) and with very high acceleration gradients (up to 1 GV/m). Production of Coherent Radiation: We wish to develop the next generation of photon sources with features like (a) short pulses (picoseconds or less), (b) coherence, and (c) high peak power. All of these attributes can be provided by free-electron lasers. High-brightness sources: A common denominator for the above programs is the need for electron beams with very small transverse and longitudinal emittances. We will devote a substantial amount of our resources to the production and understanding of electron beams that have these attributes. We will build advanced electron sources such as switched-power devices and rf guns with photocathodes. Important applications of this line of research include the development of high-luminosity linear colliders and free-electron lasers in the XUV regime

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility: research highlights and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2014-08-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has served as a user facility for accelerator science for over a quarter of a century. In fulfilling this mission, the ATF offers the unique combination of a high-brightness 80 MeV electron beam that is synchronized to a 1 TW picosecond CO2 laser. We unveil herein our plan to considerably expand the ATF's floor space with an upgrade of the electron beam's energy to 300 MeV and the CO2 laser's peak power to 100 TW. This upgrade will propel the ATF even further to the forefront of research on advanced accelerators and radiation sources, supporting the most innovative ideas in this field. We discuss emerging opportunities for scientific breakthroughs, including the following: plasma wakefield acceleration studies in research directions already active at the ATF; laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA), where the longer laser wavelengths are expected to engender a proportional increase in the beam's charge while our linac will assure, for the first time, the opportunity to undertake detailed studies of seeding and staging of the LWFA; proton acceleration to the 100-200 MeV level, which is essential for medical applications; and others.

  13. Linear collider accelerator physics issues regarding alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require more stringent alignment tolerances than those for the SLC with regard to the accelerating structures, quadrupoles, and beam position monitors. New techniques must be developed to achieve these tolerances. A combination of mechanical-electrical and beam-based methods will likely be needed

  14. Brookhaven: RHIC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heppelman, Steve

    1990-01-01

    Last year, Brookhaven's proposal for a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider - RHIC - was scrutinized by the US Department of Energy and deemed to be ready for construction funding. The hope is that the money will be voted soon so that construction can get underway at the start of the new US financial year in October. The 3.8 kilometre RHIC tunnel was completed ten years ago for the doomed Isabelle/CBA proton collider project

  15. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  16. ISABELLE: a 200 + 200 GeV colliding beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.

    1977-01-01

    Plans are under way for the construction of a pair of intersecting storage rings providing for colliding beams of protons of energy at least 200 GeV. The rings (circumference 2.62 km) will contain superconducting magnets constructed with braided Nb--Ti filamentary wire, with a peak field of 4.0 T corresponding to an energy of 200 GeV. A current of 10 A of protons will be injected at 29 GeV from the existing AGS accelerator at Brookhaven, using the energy stacking technique similar to that employed at the CERN ISR; subsequently the stored beam will be accelerated gradually in the storage rings. Six intersection areas will be provided for experiments. They are designed to provide flexibility in beam characteristics for different experiments. The maximum luminosity at full energy is expected to be 1.0 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 , at 29 GeV it will be approximately 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . Recent work with prototype magnets indicates that fields of 5.0 T can be produced. This has led to an alternative design of somewhat larger rings (circumference 3.77 km) that should be capable of providing colliding beams at 400 + 400 GeV

  17. BROOKHAVEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Neutrino physics has been an integral part of the Brookhaven research programme for much of the Laboratory's 46-year history. Milestones have been the determination of the helicity of neutrinos (1958), the establishment of the existence of two kinds of neutrinos (1962) for which Leon Lederman, Mel Schwartz and Jack Steinberger were awarded the 1988 Nobel Physics Prize, the discovery of charmed baryons in the 7' Bubble Chamber in 1975, and the ongoing measurements by Ray Davis and collaborators of solar neutrinos, first reported in 1968. There have also been significant contributions to the understanding of neutral currents in exclusive hadron and electron channels. In addition some of the earliest, and to date best, accelerator limits on electron muon neutrino oscillations are from Brookhaven experiments. The Laboratory is also the 'B' in the IMB underground experiment, built to search for proton decay and which caught neutrinos from the SN 1987a supernova. At present Brookhaven is heavily involved in the Gallex project in the Gran Sasso and recently a new collaboration has received scientific approval for a long baseline experiment to search for muon neutrino oscillations via muon neutrino disappearance

  18. Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    INSTR17, the International Conference on Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics, will be held in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, on 27 February – 4 March, 2017. The conference covers novel methods of particle detection used in various experiments at particle accelerators as well as in astrophysics. It is organized in close relationship with the Vienna Conference on Instrumentation (last held in 2016) and the Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors (last held in 2015). The deadline for registration and abstract submission is 15 January. For more details visit the conference website instr17.inp.nsk.su. Will be published in: JINST

  19. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group. Progress report, March 1, 1992--October 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  20. Magic Lenses for RHIC: Compensating Beam-beam Interaction (488th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun [BNL Collider-Accelerator Department

    2013-07-17

    Scientists at Brookhaven Lab’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) smash atomic particles together to understand more about why the physical world works the way it does. Increasing rates of particle collisions, or luminosity, at RHIC is no small challenge, but the results—more data for better clues—are crucial for scientists trying answer big questions about the origins of matter and mass. When scientists at RHIC collide protons, they don’t hope for a head-on crash by focusing only two particles roaring toward each other from opposite directions. For all intents and purposes, that would be impossible. The scientists can smash protons because they significantly increase the likelihood of collisions by steering hundreds of billions clumped into bunches, which at RHIC are about 3.5 meters long and less than 1 millimeter tall. The particles of these bunches are all positively charged, so when they interact, they repel outwardly—think how magnets repel when their same poles are pushed together. Although this decreases the density of each bunch, reducing luminosity, scientists in Brookhaven Lab’s Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) have a solution. After more than seven years of development, the scientists have designed an electron-lens system that uses electrons’ negative charges to attract positively charged proton bunches and minimize their repelling tendencies. Combined with other upgrades to the RHIC accelerator complex, these lenses are important components in efforts towards the major task of doubling the luminosity for proton-proton collisions.

  1. The RF beam control system for the Brookhaven AGS synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron completes the injector chain for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. It enables the AGS to accelerate all heavy ions to 14 GeV/c for collider operation and also in the intensity of the AGS for fixed-target experiments by a factor of four. The ultra-high vacuum enables acceleration of partially stripped ions from the Tandem Van de Graaff to energies sufficient for complete stripping. For high intensities, it accelerates the 200 MeV linac beam in four batches of three bunches per AGS cycle. At 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per batch, it has the same space charge tune spread as the AGS at 200 MeV. This variety of applications means the Booster must accommodate a very wide range of particle masses and intensities. Since it operates in a Pulse-by-Pulse Modulation mode at 7.5 Hz, the computer controlled functions of time and magnetic field, and the 64 timing triggers of the beam control system take on unique values for each of four PPM users. Beams of {sup 197}Au{sup +33} ions and protons have been accelerated in the same PPM cycle.

  2. The RF beam control system for the Brookhaven AGS synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    The new 1.5 GeV Booster synchrotron completes the injector chain for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC. It enables the AGS to accelerate all heavy ions to 14 GeV/c for collider operation and also in the intensity of the AGS for fixed-target experiments by a factor of four. The ultra-high vacuum enables acceleration of partially stripped ions from the Tandem Van de Graaff to energies sufficient for complete stripping. For high intensities, it accelerates the 200 MeV linac beam in four batches of three bunches per AGS cycle. At 1.5 {times} 10{sup 13} protons per batch, it has the same space charge tune spread as the AGS at 200 MeV. This variety of applications means the Booster must accommodate a very wide range of particle masses and intensities. Since it operates in a Pulse-by-Pulse Modulation mode at 7.5 Hz, the computer controlled functions of time and magnetic field, and the 64 timing triggers of the beam control system take on unique values for each of four PPM users. Beams of {sup 197}Au{sup +33} ions and protons have been accelerated in the same PPM cycle.

  3. Status of the visible Free-Electron Laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fisher, A.S.; Friedman, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Kirk, H.; Kramer, S.; Lin, L.; Rogers, J.T.; Sheehan, J.F.; van Steenbergen, A.; Woodle, M.; Xie, J.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, R.; Bhowmik, A.

    1991-01-01

    The 500 nm Free-Electron Laser (ATF) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. We present an overview of the ATF, a high-brightness, 50-MeV, electron accelerator and laser complex which is a users' facility for accelerator and beam physics. A number of laser acceleration and FEL experiments are under construction at the ATF. The visible FEL experiment is based on a novel superferric 8.8 mm period undulator. The electron beam parameters, the undulator, the optical resonator, optical and electron beam diagnostics are discussed. The operational status of the experiment is presented. 22 refs., 7 figs

  4. Acceleration of polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1998-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian snakes are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible. A similar scheme is being studied for the 800 GeV HERA proton accelerator

  5. Large Hadron Collider sets proton-acceleration record

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    "The Large Hadron Collider, the largest atom smasher in the world, broke the record for proton acceleration Monday, sending beams of the particles at 1.18 trillion electron volts, scientists said" (1 paragraph)

  6. The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Preparation and delivery of ion beams for space radiation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Kevin; Ahrens, Leif; Hung Chiang, I; Gardner, Christopher; Gassner, David; Hammons, Lee; Harvey, Margaret; Kling, Nicholas; Morris, John; Pile, Phillip; Rusek, Adam; Sivertz, Mike, E-mail: sivertz@bnl.gov; Steski, Dannie; Tsoupas, Nick; Zeno, Keith

    2010-06-21

    The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was commissioned in October 2002 and became operational in July 2003. The NSRL was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing space radiation research as part of the NASA space program. The NSRL can accept a wide variety of ions from BNL's Collider Accelerator Department (CAD) Booster accelerator. These ion beams are extracted from the accelerator with kinetic energies ranging from 0.05 to 3 GeV/nucleon. Many different beam conditions have been produced for experiments at NSRL. The facilities at BNL and the design of the NSRL facility permit a wide variety of beams to be produced with a great degree of flexibility in the delivery of ion beams to experiments. In this report we will describe the facility and its performance over the eight experimental run periods that have taken place since it became operational. We will also describe the current and future capabilities of the NSRL.

  7. Linear accelerator development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of operating experience on the 200 MeV Proton Injector Linace of the A.G.S. emphasizing developments in field phase and amplitude control and beam diagnostics. Developments in auxilliary use of the machine are also described

  8. TRISTAN, electron-positron colliding beam project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    In this report e + e - colliding beam program which is now referred to as TRISTAN Project will be described. A brief chronology and outline of TRISTAN Project is given in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 of this article gives a discussion of physics objectives at TRISTAN. Chapter 3 treats the overall description of the accelerators. Chapter 4 describes design of each of the accelerator systems. In Chapter 5, detector facilities are discussed in some detail. A description of accelerator tunnels, experimental areas, and utilities are given in Chapter 6. In the Appendix, the publications on the TRISTAN Project are listed. (author)

  9. ISABELLE: a 400 x 400 GeV proton--proton colliding beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design report is presented for the construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE, to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At this major research facility beams of protons with energies up to 400 GeV will be collided in six experimental areas. At each area particle physicists will install detector apparatus to study the interaction and reaction products for such very high energy collisions. The proposal results from several years of study and development work on such a facility. Topics discussed include: (1) introduction and summary of the proposal; (2) physics at ISABELLE (including physics objectives and typical experiments and detectors); description of ISABELLE (overview; magnetic ring structure and lattice characteristics; performance; beam transfer, stacking, and acceleration; magnet system; refrigeration system; vacuum system; power supplies, instrumentation, and control system; physical plant and experimental halls; and operation and safety); and (3) cost estimate and schedule.

  10. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  11. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Okamura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.

    2012-01-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  12. Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Organizers of the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    2012-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the Seventh International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders. This school is a continuation of the series of schools which began six years ago.  The first school was held in 2006 in Sokendai, Japan, the second in 2007 in Erice, Italy, the third in 2008 in Oakbrook Hills, USA, the fourth in 2009 in Huairou, China, the fifth in 2010 in Villars-sur-Ollon, Switzerland, and the sixth in 2011 in Pacific Grove, USA.   The school is organized by the International Linear Collider (ILC) Global Design Effort (GDE), the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) Beam Dynamics Panel. The school this year will take place at the Radisson Blu Hotel, Indore, India from November 27 to December 8, 2012. It is hosted by the Raja Ramanna Center for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) and sponsored by a number of funding agencies and institutions around the world including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. National Science...

  13. A systems study of an RF power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Deadrick, F.

    1994-11-01

    A systems study, including physics, engineering and costing, has been conducted to assess the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a RF power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. Several key issues associated with a realizable RK-TBA system have been addressed, and corresponding schemes have been developed and examined quantitatively. A point design example has been constructed to present a concrete conceptual design which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. The overall efficiency of RF production for such a power source is estimated to be 36%, and the cost of the full system is estimated to be less than 1 billion dollars

  14. Scientists at Brookhaven contribute to the development of a better electron accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Scientists working at Brookhaven have developed a compact linear accelerator called STELLA (Staged Electron Laser Acceleration). Highly efficient, it may help electron accelerators become practical tools for applications in industry and medicine, such as radiation therapy (1 page)

  15. Simulation of Electron Beam Dynamics in the 22 MeV Accelerator for a Coherent Electron Cooling Proof of Principle Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Justin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CeC) offers a potential new method of cooling hadron beams in colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) or the future electron ion collider eRHIC. A 22 MeV linear accelerator is currently being built as part of a proof of principle experiment for CeC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this thesis we present a simulation of electron beam dynamics including space charge in the 22 MeV CeC proof of principle experiment using the program ASTRA (A Space charge TRacking Algorithm).

  16. Photon collider beam simulation with CAIN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The CAIN simulation program was used to study the outgoing beam profile for the photon collider at ILC. The main aim of the analysis was to verify the feasibility of the photon linear collider running with 20 mrad electron beam crossing angle. The main problem is the distorted electron beam, which has to be removed from ...

  17. The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want 'more'. In the mid-50's the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments

  18. The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want `more`. In the mid-50`s the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments.

  19. A microwiggler Free-Electron Laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.; Kirk, H.; Pellegrini, C.; van Steenbergen, A.; Bhowmik, A.; Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA

    1989-01-01

    We report the design and status of an FEL experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. A 50 MeV high brightness electron beam will be utilized for an oscillator experiment in the visible wavelength region. The microwiggler to be used is a superferric planar undulator with a 0.88 cm period, 60 cm length and K = 0.35. The optical cavity is a 368 cm long stable resonator with broadband dielectric coated mirrors. 8 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Staging optics considerations for a plasma wakefield acceleration linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrøm, C.A., E-mail: c.a.lindstrom@fys.uio.no [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Adli, E. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Allen, J.M.; Delahaye, J.P.; Hogan, M.J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Joshi, C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Muggli, P. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, 80805 Munich (Germany); Raubenheimer, T.O.; Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration offers acceleration gradients of several GeV/m, ideal for a next-generation linear collider. The beam optics requirements between plasma cells include injection and extraction of drive beams, matching the main beam beta functions into the next cell, canceling dispersion as well as constraining bunch lengthening and chromaticity. To maintain a high effective acceleration gradient, this must be accomplished in the shortest distance possible. A working example is presented, using novel methods to correct chromaticity, as well as scaling laws for a high energy regime.

  1. From heavy ions to light sources at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory, recovered from the debacle of the cancelled CBA proton-proton collider project, is now more than busy with an excellent physics programme at the 33 GeV Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and with solid projects for the years to come. (orig.).

  2. ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERG,J.S

    2000-04-07

    The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.

  3. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  4. Digital transverse beam dampers from the Brookhaven AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.A.; Castillo, V.; Roser, T.; Van Asselt, W.; Witkover, R.; Wong, V.

    1995-01-01

    A wide band, digital damper system has been developed and is in use at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The system consists of vertical and horizontal capacitive pickups, analog and digital processing electronics, four 500 Watt wide band power amplifiers, and two pairs of strip line beam kickers. The system is currently used to damp transverse coherent instabilities and injection errors, in both planes, for protons and all species of heavy ions. This paper discusses the system design and operation, particularly with regard to stabilization of the high intensity proton beam. The analog and digital signal processing techniques used to achieve optimum results are discussed. Operational data showing the effect of the damping are presented

  5. Beam vacuum system of Brookhaven's muon storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hseuth, H.C.; Snydstrup, L.; Mapes, M.

    1995-01-01

    A storage ring with a circumference of 45 m is being built at Brookhaven to measure the g-2 value of the muons to an accuracy of 0.35 ppm.. The beam vacuum system of the storage ring will operate at 10 -7 Torr and has to be completely non-magnetic. It consists of twelve sector chambers. The chambers are constructed of aluminum and are approximately 3.5 m in length with a rectangular cross-section of 16.5 cm high by 45 cm at the widest point. The design features, fabrication techniques and cleaning methods for these chambers are described. The beam vacuum system will be pumped by forty eight non-magnetic distributed ion pumps with a total pumping speed of over 2000 ell/sec. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure distribution in the muon storage region are presented

  6. NLC. A test accelerator for the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.F.; Burke, D.L.; Callin, R.; Caryotakis, G.; Cassel, R.; Clark, S.L.; Deruyter, H.; Fant, K.; Fuller, R.; Heifets, S.; Hoag, H.; Humphrey, R.; Kheifets, S.; Koontz, R.; Kroll, N.M.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Paterson, J.M.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; Rifkin, J.; Spencer, J.; Tantawi, S.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Vylet, V.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Yeremian, A.; Youngman, B.

    1993-01-01

    At SLAC, we are pursuing the design of a Next Linear Collider (NLC) which would begin with a center-of-mass energy of 0.5 TeV, and be upgradable to at least 1.0 TeV. To achieve this high energy, we have been working on the development of a high-gradient 11.4-GHz (X-band) linear accelerator for the main linac of the collider. In this paper, we present the design of a 'Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator' (NLCTA). The goal of the NLCTA is to incorporate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures, RF pulse compression systems and klystrons into a short linac which will then be a test bed for beam dynamics issues related to high-gradient acceleration. (orig.)

  7. Final environmental impact statement. Proton--Proton Storage Accelerator Facility (ISABELLE), Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1978-08-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement for a proposed research facility (ISABELLE) to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is presented. It was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) following guidelines issued for such analyses. In keeping with DOE policy, this statement presents a concise and issues-oriented analysis of the significant environmental effects associated with the proposed action. ISABELLE is a proposed physics research facility where beams of protons collide providing opportunities to study high energy interactions. The facility would provide two interlaced storage ring proton accelerators, each with an energy up to 400 GeV intersecting in six experimental areas. The rings are contained in a tunnel with a circumference of 3.8 km (2.3 mi). The facility will occupy 250 ha (625 acres) in the NW corner of the existing BNL site. A draft Environmental Impact Statement for this proposed facility was issued for public review and comment by DOE on February 21, 1978. The principal areas of concern expressed were in the areas of radiological impacts and preservation of cultural values. After consideration of these comments, appropriate actions were taken and the text of the statement has been amended to reflect the comments. The text was annotated to indicate the origin of the comment. The Appendices contain a glossary of terms and listings of metric prefixes and conversions and symbols and abbreviations.

  8. Final environmental impact statement. Proton--Proton Storage Accelerator Facility (ISABELLE), Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    An Environmental Impact Statement for a proposed research facility (ISABELLE) to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is presented. It was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) following guidelines issued for such analyses. In keeping with DOE policy, this statement presents a concise and issues-oriented analysis of the significant environmental effects associated with the proposed action. ISABELLE is a proposed physics research facility where beams of protons collide providing opportunities to study high energy interactions. The facility would provide two interlaced storage ring proton accelerators, each with an energy up to 400 GeV intersecting in six experimental areas. The rings are contained in a tunnel with a circumference of 3.8 km (2.3 mi). The facility will occupy 250 ha (625 acres) in the NW corner of the existing BNL site. A draft Environmental Impact Statement for this proposed facility was issued for public review and comment by DOE on February 21, 1978. The principal areas of concern expressed were in the areas of radiological impacts and preservation of cultural values. After consideration of these comments, appropriate actions were taken and the text of the statement has been amended to reflect the comments. The text was annotated to indicate the origin of the comment. The Appendices contain a glossary of terms and listings of metric prefixes and conversions and symbols and abbreviations

  9. POLARIZED BEAMS: 2 - Partial Siberian Snake rescues polarized protons at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haixin

    1994-01-01

    To boost the level of beam polarization (spin orientation), a partial 'Siberian Snake' was recently used to overcome imperfection depolarizing resonances in the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This 9-degree spin rotator recently permitted acceleration with no noticeable polarization loss. The intrinsic AGS depolarizing resonances (which degrade the polarization content) had been eliminated by betatron tune jumps, but the imperfection resonances were compensated by means of harmonic orbit corrections. However, at high energies these orbit corrections are difficult and tedious and a Siberian Snake became an attractive alternative

  10. High intensity proton acceleration at the Brookhaven AGS -- An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    1997-01-01

    The AGS accelerator complex is into its third year of 60+ x 10 12 (teraproton = Tp) per cycle operation. The hardware making up the complex as configured in 1997 is briefly mentioned. The present level of accelerator performance is discussed. This includes beam transfer efficiencies at each step in the acceleration process, i.e. losses; which are a serious issue at this intensity level. Progress made in understanding beam behavior at the Linac-to-Booster (LtB) injection, at the Booster-to-AGS (BtA) transfer as well as across the 450 ms AGS accumulation porch is presented. The state of transition crossing, with the gamma-tr jump is described. Coherent effects including those driven by space charge are important at all of these steps

  11. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set

  12. Status of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Accelerator Physics issues, such as the dynamical aperture, the beam lifetime and the current--intensity limitation are carefully studied for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The single layer superconducting magnets, of 8 cm coil inner diameter, satisfying the beam stability requirements have also been successfully tested. The proposal has generated wide spread interest in the particle and nuclear physics. 1 ref., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Self colliding beams ('migma') and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Maglic, Bogdan C; Mazarakis, M; Miller, R A; Nering, J; Powell, C; Treglio, J

    1975-01-01

    While much of the early work on colliding beams was done in the US, the lead on the development of this technique is now held by Europe. The most spectacular being the only colliding of nuclei in the intersecting storage rings at CERN. The idea of using colliding beams for fusion is nearly as old as is the interest in fusion as a source of power, but the problems of low reaction rate and high Coulomb scattering initially seemed insurmountable. The authors describe recent work done at the Fusion Energy Corporation which attempts to overcome these problems. (9 refs).

  14. The beam-beam limit in asymmetric colliders: Optimization of the B-factory parameter base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a general theory of the beam-beam limit in symmetric and asymmetric lepton ring colliders. It shows how the beam-beam limit in these accelerators affects the maximum attainable luminosity and presents a specific algorithm for parameter base optimization. It is shown that the special problems inherent in asymmetric colliders derive not from the asymmetry, but from the fact that the two beams must be in different rings. Computer simulation experiments are used to demonstrate the various phenomena discussed in the theory

  15. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Review of the modifications and upgrades since 2002 and planned improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Than, R.; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter; Arenius, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory continues its multi-year program to improve the operational efficiency, reliability, and stability of the cryogenic system, which also resulted in an improved beam availability of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper summarizes the work and changes made after each phase over the past four years to the present, as well as proposed future improvements. Power usage dropped from an initial 9.4 MW to the present 5.1 MW and is expected to drop below 5 MW after the completion of the remaining proposed improvements. The work proceeded in phases, balancing the Collider's schedule of operation, time required for the modifications and budget constraints. The main changes include process control, compressor oil removal and management, elimination of the use of cold compressors and two liquid-helium storage tanks, insulation of the third liquid-helium storage tank, compressor-bypass flow reduction and the addition of a load turbine (Joule-Thomson)

  16. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  17. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  18. Transverse mode coupling instability of colliding beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. White

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In high brightness circular colliders, coherent and incoherent beam dynamics are dominated by beam-beam interactions. It is generally assumed that the incoherent tune spread introduced by the beam-beam interactions is sufficiently large to cure any instabilities originating from impedance. However, as the two counterrotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes and therefore modify the coherent beam dynamics and stability conditions. In this case, coherent beam-beam effects and impedance cannot be treated independently and their interplay should be taken into account in any realistic attempt to study the beam stability of colliding beams. Due to the complexity of these physics processes, numerical simulations become an important tool for the analysis of this system. Two approaches are proposed in this paper: a fully self-consistent multiparticle tracking including particle-in-cell Poisson solver for the beam-beam interactions and a linearized model taking into account finite bunch length effects. To ensure the validity of the results a detailed benchmarking of these models was performed. It will be shown that under certain conditions coherent beam-beam dipole modes can couple with higher order headtail modes and lead to strong instabilities with characteristics similar to the classical transverse mode coupling instability originating from impedance alone. Possible cures for this instability are explored both for single bunch and multibunch interactions. Simulation results and experimental evidences of the existence of this instability at the LHC will be presented for the specific case of offset collisions.

  19. Engineering conceptual design of the relativistic Klystron two-beam accelerator based power source for 1-TeV next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, L.; Deadrick, F.; Peters, C.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S.

    1995-04-01

    Ultra-high gradient radio frequency linacs require efficient and reliable power sources. The induction linac has proven to be a reliable source of low energy, high current and high brightness electron beams. The low energy beam is bunched, transported through resonant transfer cavities in which it radiates microwave energy that is coupled to an adjacent high energy accelerator. The low energy beam is maintained at a constant energy by periodic induction accelerator cells. This paper describes the engineering aspects of the induction accelerator based relativistic klystron. The physics issues are covered in another paper at this conference

  20. Seismic upgrading of the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years the High Flux Beam Research (HFBR) reactor facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was upgraded from 40 to 50 MW power level. The reactor plant was built in the early sixties to the seismic design requirements of the period, using the static load approach. While the plant power level was upgraded, the seismic design was also improved according to current design criteria. This included the development of new floor response spectra for the facility and an overall seismic analysis of those systems important to the safe shutdown of the reactor. Items included in the reanalysis are the containment building with its internal structure, the piping systems, tanks, equipment, and heat exchangers. This paper describes the procedure utilized in developing the floor response spectra for the existing facility. Also included in the paper are the findings and recommendations, based on the seismic analysis, regarding the seismic adequacy of structural and mechanical systems vital to achieving the safe shutdown of the reactor. 11 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  1. Beam-beam limit in e+e- circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Cai, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2004-01-01

    Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be ξ∼0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns

  2. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    1996-02-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (i.e. photons). Often, they are brought into interaction with each other (e.g. in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (e.g. in fixed target physics, synchrotron radiation sciences, neutron scattering experiments, laser chemistry and physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams—always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades—nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and radio frequency cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider paradigms, to name a few. We will illustrate this progress via a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use—the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We will close with an outline of future opportunities and outlook.

  3. Beam Dynamics Challenges for Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The luminosity of hadron colliders rises with the beam intensity, until some limit is encountered, mostly due to head-on and long-range beam-beam interaction, due to electron cloud, or due to conventional impedance sources. Also beam losses caused by various mechanisms may affect the performance. The limitations can be alleviated, if not overcome, by a proper choice of beam parameters and by dedicated compensation schemes. Examples include alternating crossing at several interaction points, electromagnetic wires, super-bunches, electron lenses, clearing electrodes, and nonlinear collimation. I discuss such mitigating measures and related research efforts, with special emphasis on the LHC and its upgrade.

  4. Transverse equilibria in linear collider beam-beam collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Chen, Pisin

    1991-01-01

    It has been observed in simulations of the beam-beam interaction in linear colliders that a near equilibrium pinched state of the colliding beams develops when the disruption parameter is large (D much-gt 1). In this state the beam transverse density distributions are peaked at center, with long tails. The authors present here an analytical model of the equilibrium approached by the beams, that of a generalized Bennett pinch which develops through collisionless damping due to the strong nonlinearity of the beam-beam interaction. In order to calculate the equilibrium pinched beam size, an estimation of the rms emittance growth is made which takes into account the partial adiabaticity of the collision. This pinched beam size is used to derive the luminosity enhancement factors whose scaling is in agreement with the simulation results for both D and thermal factor A = σ z /β * large, and explains the previously noted cubic relationship between round and flat beam enhancement factors

  5. Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This document presents the scientific justification and the conceptual design for the {open_quotes}Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator{close_quotes} (NLCTA) at SLAC. The goals of the NLCTA are to integrate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures and rf systems being developed for the Next Linear Collider, to measure the growth of the {open_quotes}dark current{close_quotes} generated by rf field emission in the accelerator, to demonstrate multi-bunch beam-loading energy compensation and suppression of higher-order deflecting modes, and to measure any transverse components of the accelerating field. The NLCTA will be a 42-meter-long beam line consisting, consecutively, of a thermionic-cathode gun, an X-band buncher, a magnetic chicane, six 1.8-meter-long sections of 11.4-GHz accelerator structure, and a magnetic spectrometer. Initially, the unloaded accelerating gradient will be 50 MV/m. A higher-gradient upgrade option eventually would increase the unloaded gradient to 100 MV/m.

  6. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083092; Burkart, Florian; Schmidt, Rudiger; Shutov, A; Wollmann, Daniel; Piriz, A

    2016-01-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850  km/h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC...

  7. ISABELLE: a proton-proton colliding beam facility. [Proposal for the construction of ISABELLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-04-01

    A proposal is presented for the construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE, to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At this major research facility, colliding beams of protons will be produced and studied by particle physicists. This proposal combines the interests of these particle physicists in exploring a new energy regime with the challenge of building a new research instrument. The proposal results from several years of considering such devices in parallel with extensive developmental work. The proposal is divided into several major parts. Following an introduction is an overall summary of the proposal covering its highlights. Part II contains a thorough discussion of the physics objectives that can be addressed by the storage ring. It begins with an explanation of current theoretical concepts that occupy the curiosity of high energy physicists. Then follows a brief discussion of possible experiments that might be assembled at the interaction regions to test these concepts. The third part of the proposal goes into the details of the design of the intersecting storage accelerators. It begins with a description of the entire facility and the design of the magnet ring structure. The processes of proton beam accumulation and acceleration are thoroughly described. The discussion then turns to the design of the components and subsystems for the accelerator. The accelerator elements are described followed by a description of the physical plant. The cost estimate and time scales are displayed in Part IV. Here the estimate has been based on the experience gained from working with the prototype units at the laboratory. The appendices are an important part of the proposal. The parameter list for the 200 x 200 GeV ISABELLE is carefully documented. An example of a possible research program can be found in an appendix. The performance of prototype units is documented in one of the appendices.

  8. Stability diagram of colliding beams

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, X; Mounet, N; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the beam-beam interactions on the stability of impedance mode is discussed. The detuning is evaluated by the means of single particle tracking in arbitrarily complex collision configurations, including lattice non-linearities, and used to numerically evaluate the dispersion integral. This approach also allows the effect of non-Gaussian distributions to be considered. Distributions modified by the action of external noise are discussed.

  9. Beam Dynamics Simulation for the CTF3 Drive Beam Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A new CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN will serve to study the drive beam generation for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). CTF3 has to accelerate a 3.5 A electron beam in almost fully-loaded structures. The pulse contains more than 2000 bunches, one in every second RF bucket, and has a length of more than one microsecond. Different options for the lattice of the drive-beam accelerator are presented, based on FODO-cells and triplets as well as solenoids. The transverse stability is simulated, including the effects of beam jitter, alignment and beam-based correction.

  10. 9th International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This school is a continuation of the series of schools that began nine years ago: Japan 2006, Italy 2007, United States 2008, China 2009, Switzerland 2010, United States 2011, India 2012 and Turkey 2013. Based on needs from the accelerator community, the Linear Collider Collaboration (LCC) and ICFA Beam Dynamics Panel are organising the Ninth International Accelerator School for Linear Colliders. The school will present instruction in TeV-scale linear colliders including the ILC, CLIC and other advanced accelerators. An important change of this year’s school from previous LC schools is that it will also include the free electron laser (FEL), a natural extension for applications of the ILC/CLIC technology. The school is offered to graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and junior researchers from around the world. We welcome applications from physicists who are considering changing to a career in accelerator physics and technology. This school adopts an in depth approach. A selective course on the FEL has b...

  11. Design and Principles of Synchrotrons and Circular Colliders: Beam Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    CERN

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '6.10 Beam Cooling' of the Chapter '6 Design and Principles of Synchrotrons and Circular Colliders' with the content: 6.10 Beam Cooling 6.10.1 Introduction 6.10.2 Beam Cooling Techniques 6.10.2.1 Radiation Cooling 6.10.2.2 Microwave Stochastic Cooling 6.10.2.3 Electron Cooling 6.10.2.4 Laser Cooling 6.10.2.5 Ionisation Cooling 6.10.2.6 Cooling of Particles in Traps

  12. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  13. Beam induced hydrodynamic tunneling in the future circular collider components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A future circular collider (FCC has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t at a typical speed of 850  km/h. Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2 iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the “hydrodynamic tunneling.” These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  14. MEQALAC development at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammel, G.; Brodowski, J.; Keane, J.; Maschke, A.; Meier, E.; Mobley, R.; Sanders, R.

    1981-01-01

    A novel method of transporting and accelerating high brightness ion beams, called MEQALAC, has been developed at Brookhaven. The concept and its motivation will be described first, with reference to other sources for detail, and then the performance of two operating MEQALAC's will be presented

  15. Operation of the Brookhaven national laboratory accelerator test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Botke, I.; Chou, T.S.; Fernow, R.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Malone, R.; Palmer, R.; Parsa, Z.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; Van Steenbergen, A.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yu, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program. (Author) 5 refs., 4 figs., tab

  16. Operation of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Botke, I.; Chou, T.S.; Fernow, R.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Malone, R.; Palmer, R.; Parsa, Z.; Pogorelsky, I.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; van Steenbergen, A.; Wang, X.J.; Woodle, M.; Yu, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    Early operation of the 50 MeV high brightness electron linac of the Accelerator Test Facility is described along with experimental data. This facility is designed to study new linear acceleration techniques and new radiation sources based on linacs in combination with free electron lasers. The accelerator utilizes a photo-excited, metal cathode, radio frequency electron gun followed by two travelling wave accelerating sections and an Experimental Hall for the study program

  17. Development and applications of super high energy collider accelerators. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evaluation of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab, and the large harden collider (LHD) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 Kilometer tunnel of the large electron positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the superconducting supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 Kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachile in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particles. 12 figs., 1 tab

  18. Detectors for CBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggett, N.; Gordon, H.A.; Palmer, R.B.; Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1983-05-01

    We discuss some current approaches to a large solid angle detector. An alternative approach for utilizing the high rate of events at CBA is to design special purpose detectors for specific physics goals which can be pursued within a limited solid angle. In many cases this will be the only way to proceed, and then high luminosity has a different significance. The total rate in the restricted acceptance is less likely to be a problem, while the need for high luminosity to obtain sufficient data is obvious. Eight such experiments from studies carried out in the community are surveyed. Such experiments could be run on their own or in combination with others at the same intersection, or even with a large solid angle detector, if a window can be provided in the larger facility. The small solid angle detector would provide the trigger and special information, while the facility would provide back-up information on the rest of the event. We consider some possibilities of refurbishing existing detectors for use at CBA. This discussion is motivated by the fact that there is a growing number of powerful detectors at colliding beam machines around the world. Their builders have invested considerable amounts of time, money and ingenuity in them, and may wish to extend the useful lives of their creations, as new opportunities arise

  19. Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency measurements in (p,2p ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency measurements in (p,2p) reactions at large Q. 2. ALAN S CARROLL. Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA. Abstract. In this contribution we summarize the results of two experiments to measure the trans- parency of nuclei in ...

  20. Staged electron laser accelerator (STELLA) experiment at brookhaven ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Steenbergen, A. van; Gallardo, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    The STELLA experiment is being prepared at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (STF). The goal of the experiment is to demonstrate quasi-monochromatic inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) of electrons bunched to the laser wavelength period. Microbunches on the order of 2 {mu}m in length separated by 10.6 {mu}m will be produced using an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) accelerator driven by a CO{sub 2} laser. The design and simulations for two phases of this experiment including demonstration of 10 MeV and 100 MeV acceleration are presented. (author)

  1. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e + e - physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs

  2. Magnet design for the splitter/combiner regions of CBETA, the Cornell-Brookhaven Energy-Recovery-Linac Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittendon, J. A. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Burke, D. C. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Fuentes, Y. L.P. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mayes, C. E. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Smolenski, K. W. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2017-01-06

    The Cornell-Brookhaven Energy-Recovery-Linac Test Accelerator (CBETA) will provide a 150-MeV electron beam using four acceleration and four deceleration passes through the Cornell Main Linac Cryomodule housing six 1.3-GHz superconducting RF cavities. The return path of this 76-m-circumference accelerator will be provided by 106 fixed-field alternating-gradient (FFAG) cells which carry the four beams of 42, 78, 114 and 150 MeV. Here we describe magnet designs for the splitter and combiner regions which serve to match the on-axis linac beam to the off-axis beams in the FFAG cells, providing the path-length adjustment necessary to energy recovery for each of the four beams. The path lengths of the four beamlines in each of the splitter and combiner regions are designed to be adapted to 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-pass staged operations. Design specifi- cations and modeling for the 24 dipole and 32 quadrupole electromagnets in each region are presented. The CBETA project will serve as the first demonstration of multi-pass energy recovery using superconducting RF cavities with FFAG cell optics for the return loop.

  3. Operational status of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, A.S.; Gallardo, J.; Jialin, Xie; Kirk, H.G.; Malone, R.G.; Parsa, Z.; Palmer, R.B.; Rao, T.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Tsang, T.Y.F.; Ulc, S.; van Steenbergen, A.; Woodle, M.; Zhang, R.S.; Bigio, I.; Kurnit, N.; Shimada, T.; McDonald, K.T.; Russel, D.P.; Jiang, Z.Y.; Pellegrini, C.; Wang, X.J.

    1990-01-01

    Initial design parameters and early operational results of a 50 MeV high brightness electron linear accelerator are described. The system utilizes a radio frequency electron gun operating at a frequency of 2.856 GHz and a nominal output energy of 4.5 MeV followed by two, 2π/3 mode, disc loaded, traveling wave accelerating sections. The gun cathode is photo excited with short (6 psec) laser pulses giving design peak currents of a few hundred amperes. The system will be utilized to carry out infra-red FEL studies and investigation of new high gradient accelerating structures

  4. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  5. The first picosecond terawatt CO2 laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M.

    1998-02-01

    The first terawatt picosecond CO 2 laser will be brought to operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility in 1998. System consists of a single-mode TEA oscillator, picosecond semiconductor optical switch, multi-atmosphere. The authors report on design, simulation, and performance tests of the 10 atm final amplifier that allows for direct multi-joule energy extraction in a picosecond laser pulse

  6. Accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1990-10-01

    Polarization hadron experiments at high energies continue to generate surprises. Many questions remain unanswered or unanswerable within the frame work of QCD. These include such basic questions as to why at high energies the polarization analyzing power in pp elastic scattering remains high, why hyperons are produced with high polarizations etc. It is, therefore, interesting to investigate the possibilities of accelerating and storing polarized beams in high energy colliders. On the technical side the recent understanding and confirmation of the actions of partial and multiple Siberian snakes made it possible to contemplate accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams to multi-TeV energies. In this paper, we will examine the equipment, the operation and the procedure required to obtain colliding beams of polarized protons at TeV energies

  7. Operational status of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chou, T.S.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Princeton Univ., NJ

    1989-01-01

    Design and operation of a 50 MeV Electron Linear Accelerator utilizing a low emittance (γ var epsilon = 5 to 10 mm-mrad) radio frequency gun operating at an output energy of 5 MeV and a charge of 1 nC is described. Design calculations and early radio frequency measurements and operational experience with the electron gun utilizing a dummy copper cathode in place of the proposed photocathode emitter are given. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  8. Controlling multibunch beam breakup in TeV linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.A.; Ruth, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    To obtain luminosities near 10 34 cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/ in a TeV linear collider, it will probably be essential to accelerate many bunches per RF fill in order to increase the energy transfer efficiency. In this paper we study the transverse dynamics of multiple bunches in a linac, and we examine the effects of several methods of controlling the beam blow-up that would otherwise be induced by transverse dipole wake fields. The methods we study are: damping the transverse modes, adjusting the frequency of the dominant transverse modes so that bunches may be placed near zero-crossings of the transverse wake, and bunch-to-bunch variation of the transverse focusing. We study the utility of these cures in the main linacs of an example of a TeV collider. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  10. Beam dynamics design of the Compact Linear Collider Drive Beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajari, Sh. Sanaye; Shaker, H.; Doebert, S.

    2015-01-01

    In the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) the RF power for the acceleration of the Main Beam is extracted from a high-current Drive Beam that runs parallel to the main linac. The longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics of the Drive Beam injector has been studied in detail and optimized. The injector consists of a thermionic gun followed by a bunching system, some accelerating structures, and a magnetic chicane. The bunching system contains three sub-harmonic bunchers, a prebuncher, and a traveling wave buncher all embedded in a solenoidal magnetic field. The main characteristic of the Drive Beam injector is the phase coding process done by the sub-harmonic bunching system operating at half the acceleration frequency. This process is essential for the frequency multiplication of the Drive Beam. During the phase coding process the unwanted satellite bunches are produced that adversely affects the machine power efficiency. The main challenge is to reduce the population of particles in the satellite bunches in the presence of strong space-charge forces due to the high beam current. The simulation of the beam dynamics has been carried out with PARMELA with the goal of optimizing the injector performance compared to the existing model studied for the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The emphasis of the optimization was on decreasing the satellite population, the beam loss in the magnetic chicane and limiting the beam emittance growth in transverse plane

  11. FUTURE LEPTON COLLIDERS AND LASER ACCELERATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Future high energy colliders along with their physics potential, and relationship to new laser technology are discussed. Experimental approaches and requirements for New Physics exploration are also described

  12. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future

  13. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  14. Design of beam optics for the future circular collider e^{+}e^{-} collider rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Oide

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A beam optics scheme has been designed for the future circular collider-e^{+}e^{-} (FCC-ee. The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [P. Raimondi, D. Shatilov, and M. Zobov, arXiv:physics/0702033; P. Raimondi, M. Zobov, and D. Shatilov, in Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC-2007, Albuquerque, NM (IEEE, New York, 2007, p. TUPAN037.] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles, by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So-called “tapering” of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh [A. Chancé et al., Proceedings of IPAC’16, 9–13 May 2016, Busan, Korea, TUPMW020 (2016.] as closely as possible. Sufficient transverse/longitudinal dynamic aperture (DA has been obtained, including major dynamical effects, to assure an adequate beam lifetime in the presence of beamstrahlung and top-up injection. In particular, a momentum acceptance larger than ±2% has been obtained, which is better than the momentum acceptance of typical collider rings by about a factor of 2. The effects of the detector solenoids including their compensation elements are taken into account as well as synchrotron radiation in all magnets. The optics presented in this paper is a step toward a full conceptual design for the collider. A number of issues

  15. Acceleration of polarized protons and deuterons in the ion collider ring of JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratenko, A. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Kondratenko, M. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Filatov, Yu. N. [Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Moscow (Russian Federation); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasily S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The figure-8-shaped ion collider ring of Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is transparent to the spin. It allows one to preserve proton and deuteron polarizations using weak stabilizing solenoids when accelerating the beam up to 100 GeV/c. When the stabilizing solenoids are introduced into the collider's lattice, the particle spins precess about a spin field, which consists of the field induced by the stabilizing solenoids and the zero-integer spin resonance strength. During acceleration of the beam, the induced spin field is maintained constant while the resonance strength experiences significant changes in the regions of "interference peaks". The beam polarization depends on the field ramp rate of the arc magnets. Its component along the spin field is preserved if acceleration is adiabatic. We present the results of our theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of the spin dynamics during acceleration of protons and deuterons in the JLEIC ion collider ring. We demonstrate high stability of the deuteron polarization in figure-8 accelerators. We analyze a change in the beam polarization when crossing the transition energy.

  16. Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160109; Støvneng, Jon Andreas

    2017-08-15

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strength of the beam-beam interactions will be higher after the upgrade to the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, and also in the next generation of machines, as the Future Circular Hadron Collider. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and drives resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. For this thesis, a new code named CABIN (Cuda-Accelerated Beam-beam Interaction) has been developed to study the limitations caused by the impact of strong beam-beam interactions. In particular, the evolution of the beam emittance and beam intensity has been monitored to study the impact quantitatively...

  17. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  18. Laser beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Parallel intense photon (laser, microwave, etc.) beams /omega/sub //0, k/sub 0/ and /omega/sub //1, k/sub 1/ shone on a plasma with frequency separation equal to the plasma frequency /omega/sub //p is capable of accelerating plasma electrons to high energies in large flux. The photon beat excites through the forward Raman scattering large amplitude plasmons whose phase velocity is equal to (/omega/ /sub 0/-/omega/sub //1)/(k/sub 0/-k/sub 1/), close to c in an underdense plasma. The multiple forward Raman instability produces smaller and smaller frequency and group velocity of photons; thus the photons slow down in the plasma by emitting accelerated electrons (inverse Cherenkov process). 6 refs

  19. Flat beams in a 50 TeV hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Harrison, M.; Pilat, F.; Syphers, M.

    1997-01-01

    The basic beam dynamics of a next generation 50 x 50 TeV hadron collider based on a high field magnet approach have been outlined over the past several years. Radiation damping not only produces small emittances, but also flat beams, just as in electron machines. Based on open-quotes Snowmass 96close quotes parameters, we investigate the issues associated with flat beams in very high energy hadron colliders

  20. Long-Term Dietary Folate Deficiency Accelerates Progressive Hearing Loss On CBA/Ca Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Martinez-Vega

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dietary folic acid deficiency induced early hearing loss in C57BL/6J mice after two-months, corroborating the epidemiological association previously described between vitamin deficiency and this sensory impairment. However, this strain is prone to early hearing loss, and hence we decided to analyze whether the effects exerted by folate deprivation follow the same pattern in a mouse strain such as CBA/Ca, which is resistant to hearing impairment. Here, we show results of a long-term study on hearing carried out on CBA/Ca mice subjected to dietary folate deprivation. Systemic changes included decreased serum folate levels, hyperhomocysteinemia and signs of anemia in the group fed the folate-deficient diet. Initial signs of hearing loss were detected in this strain after 8-months of vitamin deficiency, and correlated with histological damage in the cochleae. In conclusion, the data presented reinforce the importance of adequate folic acid levels for the auditory system and suggest that the impact of dietary deficiencies may depend on the genetic background.

  1. Long-Term Dietary Folate Deficiency Accelerates Progressive Hearing Loss on CBA/Ca Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Vega, Raquel; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Partearroyo, Teresa; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Pajares, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary folic acid deficiency induced early hearing loss in C57BL/6J mice after 2-months, corroborates the epidemiological association previously described between vitamin deficiency and this sensory impairment. However, this strain is prone to early hearing loss, and hence we decided to analyze whether the effects exerted by folate deprivation follow the same pattern in a mouse strain such as CBA/Ca, which is resistant to hearing impairment. Here, we show results of a long-term study on hearing carried out on CBA/Ca mice subjected to dietary folate deprivation. Systemic changes included decreased serum folate levels, hyperhomocysteinemia and signs of anemia in the group fed with folate-deficient (FD) diet. Initial signs of hearing loss were detected in this strain after 8-months of vitamin deficiency, and correlated with histological damage in the cochleae. In conclusion, the data presented reinforce the importance of adequate folic acid levels for the auditory system and suggest that the impact of dietary deficiencies may depend on the genetic background. PMID:27630560

  2. Ion Accelerator Merges Several Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, G.

    1984-01-01

    Intense ion beam formed by merging multiple ion beamlets into one concentrated beam. Beamlet holes in graphite screen and focusing grids arranged in hexagonal pattern. Merged beam passes through single hole in each of aluminum accelerator and decelerator grids. Ion extraction efficiency, beam intensity, and focusing improved.

  3. Experimental support at proton--proton colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, K.

    1977-01-01

    Proton--proton colliding beam facilities have a number of special features which increase the importance of support for experiments when compared to fixed target accelerators: (1) the laboratory system is very close to the center-of-mass system; this affects the geometry and general size of the experiments; (2) the primary p--p interaction is inaccessible, that is, it takes place in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber; and (3) the experiment detection system is necessarily inside the machine structure and becomes very closely linked to it in many respects. An overall picture is given of experimental support based on experience at the CERN ISR under the following headings: Experimental Areas, Scheduling, Intersection Vacuum Chambers, Machine Background, and Magnets for Experiments. The first two of these topics concern the requirements in space and time of an experiment, while the last three are all related to the close interaction between experiment and machine

  4. Vacuum laser acceleration using a radially polarized CO sub 2 laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Y; He, P

    1999-01-01

    Utilizing the high-power, radially polarized CO sub 2 laser and high-quality electron beam at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility, a vacuum laser acceleration scheme is proposed. In this scheme, optics configuration is simple, a small focused beam spot size can be easily maintained, and optical damage becomes less important. At least 0.5 GeV/m acceleration gradient is achievable by 1 TW laser power.

  5. Seismic hazard studies for the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costantino, C.J.; Heymsfield, E.; Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a calculation to determine the site specific seismic hazard appropriate for the deep soil site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which is to be used in the risk assessment studies being conducted for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). The calculations use as input the seismic hazard defined for the bedrock outcrop by a study conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Variability in site soil properties were included in the calculations to obtain the seismic hazard at the ground surface and compare these results with those using the generic amplification factors from the LLNL study

  6. Precision measurements of the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider] beam energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, J.; King, M.; Von Zanthier, C.

    1989-03-01

    A method of precisely determining the beam energy in high energy linear colliders has been developed using dipole spectrometers and synchrotron radiation detectors. Beam lines implementing this method have been installed on the Stanford Linear Collider. An absolute energy measurement with an accuracy of better than δE/E = 5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/ can be achieved on a pulse-to-pulse basis. The operation of this system will be described. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Beam Trajectory control of the future Compact LInear Collider beam

    CERN Document Server

    Balik, G; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L; Caron, B; Deleglise, G; Jeremie, A; Le Breton, R; Lottin, J; Pacquet, L

    2011-01-01

    The future Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) currently under design at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) would create high-energy particle collisions between electrons and positrons, and provide a tool for scientists to address many of the most compelling questions about the fundamental nature of matter, energy, space and time. In accelerating structure, it is well-established that vibrations generated by the ground motion constitute the main limiting factors for reaching the luminosity of 10^34 cm-2s-1. Several methods have been proposed to counteract this phenomena and active vibration controls based on the integration of mechatronic systems into the machine structure is probably one of the most promising. This paper studies the strategy of the vibration suppression. Active vibration control methods, such as optimized parameter of a numerical compensator, adaptive algorithm with real time control are investigated and implemented in the simulation layout. The requirement couldn’t be achieved w...

  8. Development of a beam condition monitor for use in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L; Ilgner, C; MacPherson, A; Oh, A; Pernegger, H; Pritchard, T; Stone, R; Worm, S

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will collide two counter rotating proton beams, each with a store energy about 350MJ; enough to melt 550kg of copper. If there is failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor last increments of particle flux near the interaction point and if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control, to dump the beams. Due to its radiation hardness and minimal services requirements, synthetic CVD diamond is being considered as BCM sensor option. (12 refs).

  9. PREVENTING POLLUTION USING ISO 14001 AT A PARTICLE ACCELERATOR THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRIGGS, S.L.K.; MUSOLINO, S.V.

    2001-01-01

    In early 1997 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) discovered that the spent fuel pool of their High Flux Beam Reactor was leaking tritium into the groundwater. Community members, activist groups, politicians and regulators were outraged with the poor environmental management practices at BNL. The reactor was shut down and the Department of Energy (DOE) terminated the contract with the existing Management Company. At this same time, a major new scientific facility, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), was nearing the end of construction and readying for commissioning. Although environmental considerations had been incorporated into the design of the facility; some interested parties were skeptical that this new facility would not cause significant environmental impacts. RHIC management recognized that the future of its operation was dependent on preventing pollution and allaying concerns of its stakeholders. Although never done at a DOE National Laboratory before Brookhaven Science Associates, the new management firm, committed to implementing an Environmental Management System (EMS) and RHIC managers volunteered to deploy it within their facility on an extremely aggressive schedule. Several of these IS0 requirements contribute directly to preventing pollution, an area where particular emphasis was placed. This paper describes how Brookhaven used the following key IS0 14001 elements to institutionalize Pollution Prevention concepts: Environmental Policy, Aspects, Objectives and Targets, Environmental Management Program, Structure and Responsibility, Operational Controls, Training, and Management Review. In addition, examples of implementation at the RHIC Project illustrate how BNL's premiere facility was able to demonstrate to interested parties that care had been taken to implement technological and administrative controls to minimize environmental impacts, while at the same time reduce the applicability of regulatory requirements to their operations

  10. Construction of a new Tevatron collider beam abort dump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, B.; Crawford, C.

    1991-01-01

    As part of the Collider upgrade a new abort system is to be installed in the Tevatron at AO. It consists of two sets of fast kickers and two 90% full aperture graphite beam dumps. This system will abort both protons and antiprotons. Details of the beam dump design and construction are presented

  11. Upgrades of the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hungyuan B.; Brugger, R.M.; Rorer, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    The first epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) was installed in 1988 and produced a neutron beam that was satisfactory for the development of NCT with epithermal neutrons. This beam was used routinely until 1992 when the beam was upgraded by rearranging fuel elements in the reactor core to achieve a 50% increase in usable flux. Next, after computer modeling studies, it was proposed that the Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} moderator material in the shutter that produced the epithermal neutrons could be rearranged to enhance the beam further. However, this modification was not started because a better option appeared, namely to use fission plates to move the source of fission neutrons closer to the moderator and the patient irradiation position to achieve more efficient moderation and production of epithermal neutrons. A fission plate converter (FPC) source has been designed recently and, to test the concept, implementation of this upgrade has started. The predicted beam parameters will be 12 x 10{sup 9} n{sub epi}/cm{sup 2}sec accompanying with doses from fast neutrons and gamma rays per epithermal neutron of 2.8 x 10{sup -11} and < 1 x 10{sup -11} cGycm{sup 2}/n, respectively, and a current-to-flux ratio of epithermal neutrons of 0.78. This conversion could be completed by late 1996.

  12. Nonlinear interaction of colliding beams in particle storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, J C; Month, M

    1979-01-01

    When two beams of high energy particles moving in opposite directions are brought into collision, a large amount of energy is available for the production of new particles. However to obtain a sufficiently high event rate for rare processes, such as the production of the intermediate vector boson (Z/sub 0/ and W/sup + -/), large beam currents are also required. Under this circumstance, the high charge density of one beam results in a classical electromagnetic interaction on the particles in the other beam. This very nonlinear space charge force, caled the beam-beam force, limits the total circulating charge and, thereby, the ultimate performance of the colliding ring system. The basic nature of the beam-beam force is discussed, indicating how it is quite different in the case of continuous beams, which cross each other at an angle as compared to the case of bunched beams which collide head-on. Some experimental observations on the beam-beam interaction in proton-proton and electron-positron beams are then reviewed and interpreted. An important aspect of the beam-beam problem in storage rings is to determine at what point in the analysis of the particle dynamics is it relevant to bring in the concepts of stochasticity, slow diffusion, and resonance overlap. These ideas are briefly discussed.

  13. Photon collider beam simulation with CAIN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the laser pulse and the beam–beam interaction, is presented in figure 1. Energy flow obtained from the simulation was scaled to the average beam power. After the. Compton scattering, most of the incident electron beam power is transfered to the photon beam. However, the high-energy photons are very well-collimated ...

  14. Tevatron's complex collider cousins

    CERN Multimedia

    Fischer, W

    2004-01-01

    Letter referring to Schwarzschild's story "Disappointing performance and tight budgets confront Fermilab with tough decisions" and contesting that the Tevatron is not the most complex accelerator operating. They use the examples of CERN's SPS collider, HERA at DESY and the RHIC at Brookhaven (1/4 page)

  15. Beam dynamics for induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    An induction linac uses pulsed power that is applied directly, without any intervening resonant cavities, to accelerate a charged particle pulse. This approach can accommodate a large multiple-beam focusing lattice capable of transporting a large total beam current with a long pulse duration, which may be compressed while accelerating as well as afterward. The mean accelerating gradient is relatively low (less than about 1.5 MV/m), but the potential efficiency of energy transfer can be large up to about 50%. A multiple-beam induction linac is therefore a natural candidate accelerator for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver. However, the accelerated beams must meet stringent requirements on occupied phase space volume in order to be focused accurately and with small radius onto the fusion target. Dynamical considerations in the beam injector and linac, as well as in the final compression, final focus, and the fusion chamber, determine the quality of the driver beams as they approach the target. Requirements and tolerances derived from beam dynamics strongly influence the linac configuration and component design. After a summary of dynamical considerations, two major topics are addressed here: transportable current limits, which determine the choice of focal system for the linac, and longitudinal control of the beams, which are potentially destabilized by their interaction with the pulsed power system

  16. Dedicated search for the time evolution of an electron neutrino beam at the Brookhaven AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bionta, R.; LoSecco, J.; Ong, R.; Stone, J.; Sulak, L.; Watts, R.; Cortez, B.; Foster, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment dedicated to the study of the time evolution of a neutrino beam enriched with ν/sub e/'s is suggested as feasible. It appears that the highest fluxes can be achieved with current beam lines at the Brookhaven AGS or the CERN PS. A configuration optimized for good sensitivity to neutrino eigenmass differences from 1 eV to 20 eV and mixing (Pontecorvo) angles down to 15 0 (comparable to the Cabibbo angle) is considered. The ν/sub e/ beam is formed using K/sub e3/ 0 decays. A simultaneously produced ν/sub μ/ beam from K/sub μ3/ 0 decay serves as the normalizer. Pion generated ν/sub μ/'s are suppressed to limit background. A massive detector is employed to obtain sufficient statistical power. It consists of a series of seven water Cerenkov modules (each with 180T fiducial mass), judiciously spaced along the ν line to provide flight paths from 40 m to 1000 m. The detector elements duplicate a recently developed technology that is eminently suited to this investigation. Simulation and reconstruction of neutrino events in a detector similar to the one suggested show sufficient resolution in angle, energy, position and event timing relative to the beam

  17. Online calculation of the Tevatron collider luminosity using accelerator instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, A.A.

    1997-07-01

    The luminosity of a collision region may be calculated if one understands the lattice parameters and measures the beam intensities, the transverse and longitudinal emittances, and the individual proton and antiproton beam trajectories (space and time) through the collision region. This paper explores an attempt to make this calculation using beam instrumentation during Run 1b of the Tevatron. The instrumentation used is briefly described. The calculations and their uncertainties are compared to luminosities calculated independently by the Collider Experiments (CDF and D0)

  18. A Concept of Plasma Wake Field Acceleration Linear Collider (PWFA-LC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seryi, Andrei; Hogan, Mark; Pei, Shilun; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tenenbaum, Peter; Katsouleas, Tom; Huang, Chengkun; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren; Muggli, Patric

    2009-01-01

    Plasma Wake-Field Acceleration (PWFA) has demonstrated acceleration gradients above 50 GeV/m. Simulations have shown drive/witness bunch configurations that yield small energy spreads in the accelerated witness bunch and high energy transfer efficiency from the drive bunch to the witness bunch, ranging from 30% for a Gaussian drive bunch to 95% for a shaped longitudinal profile. These results open the opportunity for a linear collider that could be compact, efficient and more cost effective that the present microwave technologies. A concept of a PWFA-based Linear Collider (PWFA-LC) has been developed and is described in this paper. The drive beam generation and distribution, requirements on the plasma cells, and optimization of the interaction region parameters are described in detail. The R and D steps needed for further development of the concept are also outlined.

  19. CLIC Drive Beam Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wegner, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Travelling structures for accelerating the high-current (4.2 A) CLIC Drive Beam to an energy of 2.37 GeV are presented. The structures are optimised for efficiency (full beam loading operation) and a desired filling time. Higher order modes are studied and are reduced by detuning along the structure and by damping with silicon carbide loads.

  20. Simulation of Head-on Beam-Beam Limitations in Future High Energy Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) project calls for studies in a new regime of beam-beam interactions. While the emittance damping due to synchrotron radiation is still slower than in past or existing lepton colliders, it is significantly larger than in other hadron colliders. The slow reduction of the emittance is profitable for higher luminosity in term of transverse beam size at the interaction points and also to mitigate long-range beam-beam effects, potentially allowing for a reduction of the crossing angle between the beams during the operation. In such conditions, the strength of head-on beam-beam interactions increases, potentially limiting the beam brightness. 4D weak-strong and strong-strong simulations are performed in order to assess these limitations.

  1. Photon collider beam simulation with CAIN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    low-energy electrons are deflected to much larger angles by the interaction with the opposite electron bunch, as shown in figure 2 (right). 4. Detector magnetic field. The largest contribution to the outgoing beam smearing is due to the interactions between two electron beams. Nevertheless, a cone with an opening angle of ...

  2. BROOKHAVEN: Switched power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Hosted by Brookhaven's Center for Accelerator Physics, a recent workshop on switched power techniques attracted a group of specialists to Shelter Island, New York, location of several important physics meetings, including the famous 1947 sessions which helped mould modern quantum electrodynamics. The current interest in switched power stemmed from a series of papers by W. Willis of CERN, starting in 1984. The idea is for stored electrical energy to be suddenly switched on to a transmission line, producing a very short (about 10 ps) electromagnetic pulse in a region traversed by a particle beam

  3. Linear accelerators for high energies. A report on the 1962 conference at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blewett, John P.

    1963-01-01

    The linear accelerator was invented very early in the history of particle accelerators, but it has been one of the latest accelerators to be exploited. This is principally because of the very large quantities of radio-frequency power required to attain respectable energies in a reasonable distance. Radar developments during World War II resulted in production of the necessary megawatt oscillators or amplifiers, and linear accelerators, both for electrons and positive ions, are now operating in several centers. The electron linear accelerator has been extended to billion-volt energies, and in the Stanford two-mile version it will soon set new energy records between 20 and 40 BeV. The proton linear accelerator has had a less spectacular history. The highest energy yet achieved in a proton linac is about 70 MeV (at the University of Minnesota). Smaller proton linacs are in use as injectors for proton-synchrotrons, but no machine has been built or is under construction for the range above 100 MeV. This is because synchro-cyclotrons for this energy range are much cheaper and have been preferred for this reason, in spite of the fact that the beam from a synchro-cyclotron cannot be nearly as intense or as well collimated as the beam from a linear accelerator.

  4. SciDAC Advances in Beam Dynamics Simulation: From Light Sources to Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, J.; Borland, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Kabel, A.; /Argonne; Li, R.; /Jefferson Lab; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stern, E.; /Fermilab; Wang, Y.; /Argonne; Wasserman, H.; /LBL, Berkeley; Zhang, Y.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS).' Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation are described. Also presented are number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities (e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, and ELIC). Particle accelerators are some of most important tools of scientific discovery. They are widely used in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and other basic and applied sciences to study the interaction of elementary particles, to probe the internal structure of matter, and to generate high-brightness radiation for research in materials science, chemistry, biology, and other fields. Modern accelerators are complex and expensive devices that may be several kilometers long and may consist of thousands of beamline elements. An accelerator may transport trillions of charged particles that interact electromagnetically among themselves, that interact with fields produced by the accelerator components, and that interact with beam-induced fields. Large-scale beam dynamics simulations on massively parallel computers can help provide understanding of these complex physical phenomena, help minimize design cost, and help optimize machine operation. In this paper, we report on beam dynamics simulations in a variety of accelerators ranging from next generation light sources to high-energy ring colliders that have been studied during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project.

  5. Correlation of superconductor strand, cable, and dipole critical currents in CBA magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.; Garber, M.; Sampson, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration between vendor critical current data for 0.0268'' diameter superconductor strand supplied to Fermilab, and the BNL 10 -12 Ωcm critical current specification is presented. Vendor critical current data for over 400 Fermilab type billets are shown, both as supplied by the vendor and converted to BNL units. Predictions of cable critical current are made using the sum of the critical currents of the 23 strands, where all strands from the same half billet are assigned the same critical current. The measured critical current shows excellent correlation to the predicted value and is approximately 14 +- 2 percent below it. Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) full length dipoles reach the conductor critical current limit, essentially without training. Magnet performance is predictable from the measured critical current of a short sample of cable to within 2%

  6. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED BEAMS USING MULTIPLE STRONG PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROSER, T.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.

    2004-01-01

    Acceleration of polarized protons in the energy range of 5 to 25 GeV is particularly difficult since depolarizing spin resonances are strong enough to cause significant depolarization but full Siberian snakes cause intolerably large orbit excursions. Using a 20-30% partial Siberian snake both imperfection and intrinsic resonances can be overcome. Such a strong partial Siberian snake was designed for the Brookhaven AGS using a dual pitch helical superconducting dipole. Multiple strong partial snakes are also discussed for spin matching at beam injection and extraction

  7. Numerical Integration of the Vlasov Equation of Two Colliding Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Zorzano-Mier, M P

    2000-01-01

    In a circular collider the motion of particles of one beam is strongly perturbed at the interaction points by the electro-magnetic field associated with the counter-rotating beam. For any two arbitrary initial particle distributions the time evolution of the two beams can be known by solving the coupled system of two Vlasov equations. This collective description is mandatory when the two beams have similar strengths, as in the case of LEP or LHC. The coherent modes excited by this beam-beam interaction can be a strong limitation for the operation of LHC. In this work, the coupled Vlasov equations of two colliding flat beams are solved numerically using a finite difference scheme. The results suggest that, for the collision of beams with equal tunes, the tune shift between the $\\sigma$- and $\\pi$- coherent dipole mode depends on the unperturbed tune $q$ because of the deformation that the so-called dynamic beta effect induces on the beam distribution. Only when the unperturbed tune $q\\rightarrow 0.25$ this tun...

  8. Precise and fast beam energy measurement at the international linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viti, Michele

    2010-02-01

    The international Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with a center-of-mass energy between 200 and 500 GeV and a peak luminosity of 2 . 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . For the physics program at this machine, an excellent bunch-by-bunch control of the beam energy is mandatory. Several techniques are foreseen to be implemented at the ILC in order to achieve this request. Energy spectrometers upstream and downstream of the electron/positron interaction point were proposed and the present default option for the upstream spectrometer is a beam position monitor based (BPM-based) spectrometer. In 2006/2007, a prototype of such a device was commissioned at the End Station A beam line at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in order to study performance and reliability. In addition, a novel method based on laser Compton backscattering has been proposed, since as proved at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), complementary methods are necessary to cross-check the results of the BPM-based spectrometer. In this thesis, an overview of the experiment at End Station A is given, with emphasis on the performance of the magnets in the chicane and first energy resolution estimations. Also, the novel Compton backscattering method is discussed in details and found to be very promising. It has the potential to bring the beam energy resolution well below the requirement of ΔE b /E b =10 -4 . (orig.)

  9. Installation and testing of an optimized epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Kalef-Ezra, J.; Saraf, S.K.; Fiarman, S.; Ramsey, E.; Wielopolski, L.; Laster, B.; Wheeler, F. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Ioannina Univ. (Greece); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA). Health Science Center; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Various calculations indicate that an optimized epithermal neutron beam can be produced by moderating fission neutrons either with a combination of Al and D{sub 2}O, or with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We have designed, installed and tested an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} moderated epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). The epithermal neutron fluence rate of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-sec produces a peak thermal neutron fluence rate of 1.9 to 2.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-sec in a tissue equivalent (TE) phantom head, depending on the configuration. Thus a single therapy treatment of 5 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} can be delivered in 30--45 minutes. All irradiation times are given for a BMRR power of 3 MW, which is the highest power which can be delivered continuously. 18 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Scraping beam halo in {mu} {sup +} {mu} {sup minus} colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozhdin, A.; Mokhov, N.; Johnstone, C.; Wan, W.; Garren, A.

    1998-01-01

    Beam halo scraping schemes have been explored in the 50 x 50 GeV and 2 x 2 TeV {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders using both absorbers and electrostatic deflectors. Utility sections have been specially designed into the rings for scraping. Results of realistic STRUCT- MARS Monte-Carlo simulations show that for the low-energy machine a scheme with a 5 m long steel absorber suppresses losses in the interaction region by three orders of magnitude. The same scraping efficiency at 2 TeV is achieved only by complete extraction of beam halo from the machine. The effect of beam-induced power dissipation in the collider superconducting magnets and detector backgrounds is shown both for the first few turns after injection and for the rest of the cycle.

  11. Report of the ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 'Accelerators for a Higgs Factory: Linear vs. Circular' (HF2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, Alain; Chou, Weiren; Gao, Jie; Schulte, Daniel; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a summary report of the ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 'Accelerators for a Higgs Factory: Linear vs. Circular' (HF2012). It discusses four types of accelerators as possible candidates for a Higgs factory: linear e+e- colliders, circular e+e- colliders, muon collider and photon colliders. The comparison includes: physics reach, performance (energy and luminosity), upgrade potential, technology maturity and readiness, and technical challenges requiring further R&D.

  12. Combined phenomena of beam-beam and beam-electron cloud interactionsin circular e^{+}e^{-} colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito Ohmi

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available An electron cloud causes various effects in high intensity positron storage rings. The positron beam and the electron cloud can be considered a typical two-stream system with a certain plasma frequency. Beam-beam interaction is another important effect for high luminosity circular colliders. Colliding two beams can be considered as a two-stream system with another plasma frequency. We study the combined phenomena of the beam-electron cloud and beam-beam interactions from a viewpoint of two complex two-stream effects with two plasma frequencies.

  13. Low voltage electron beam accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochi, Masafumi [Iwasaki Electric Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    Widely used electron accelerators in industries are the electron beams with acceleration voltage at 300 kV or less. The typical examples are shown on manufactures in Japan, equipment configuration, operation, determination of process parameters, and basic maintenance requirement of the electron beam processors. New electron beam processors with acceleration voltage around 100 kV were introduced maintaining the relatively high dose speed capability of around 10,000 kGy x mpm at production by ESI (Energy Science Inc. USA, Iwasaki Electric Group). The application field like printing and coating for packaging requires treating thickness of 30 micron or less. It does not require high voltage over 110 kV. Also recently developed is a miniature bulb type electron beam tube with energy less than 60 kV. The new application area for this new electron beam tube is being searched. The drive force of this technology to spread in the industries would be further development of new application, process and market as well as the price reduction of the equipment, upon which further acknowledgement and acceptance of the technology to societies and industries would entirely depend. (Y. Tanaka)

  14. Low voltage electron beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochi, Masafumi

    2003-01-01

    Widely used electron accelerators in industries are the electron beams with acceleration voltage at 300 kV or less. The typical examples are shown on manufactures in Japan, equipment configuration, operation, determination of process parameters, and basic maintenance requirement of the electron beam processors. New electron beam processors with acceleration voltage around 100 kV were introduced maintaining the relatively high dose speed capability of around 10,000 kGy x mpm at production by ESI (Energy Science Inc. USA, Iwasaki Electric Group). The application field like printing and coating for packaging requires treating thickness of 30 micron or less. It does not require high voltage over 110 kV. Also recently developed is a miniature bulb type electron beam tube with energy less than 60 kV. The new application area for this new electron beam tube is being searched. The drive force of this technology to spread in the industries would be further development of new application, process and market as well as the price reduction of the equipment, upon which further acknowledgement and acceptance of the technology to societies and industries would entirely depend. (Y. Tanaka)

  15. Analysis of Beam-Beam Kink Instability in a Linac-Ring Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Lebedev; J. Bisognano; R. Li; B. Yunn

    2001-01-01

    A linac-ring collision scheme was considered in recent proposals of electron-gold colliders (eRHIC) and polarized-electron light-ion colliders (EPIC). The advantages of using an energy-recovered linac for the electron beam is that it avoids the limitation of beam-beam tune shift inherent in a storage ring, pertains good beam quality and easy manipulation of polarization. However, the interaction of the ion beam in the storage ring with the electron beam from the linac acts analogously to a transverse impedance, and can induce unstable behavior of the ion beam similar to the strong head-tail instability. In this paper, this beam-beam kink instability with head-tail effect is analyzed using the linearized Vlasov equation, and the threshold of transverse mode coupling instability is obtained

  16. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Martin; Ekerfelt, Henrik; Persson, Anna; Lundh, Olle

    2016-01-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second p...

  17. Radio frequency systems for present and future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raka, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Rf systems are described for the FNAL Main Ring and Tevatron Ring, CERN SPS and LEP, and HERA proton acceleration system, CERN PS e + e/sup minus/ acceleration system, and CERN EPA monochromatic cavity. Low impedance rf systems in CERN ISR, the Brookhaven CBA, and SSC are also discussed

  18. Industrial applications of electron beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braid, W.G. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The use of electron beam accelerators for crosslinking polyolefins for shrinking food packaging is discussed. Irradiation procedures, accelerator characteristics, and industrial operations are described

  19. Simulation prediction and experiment setup of vacuum laser acceleration at Brookhaven National Lab-Accelerator Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, L., E-mail: leishao@ucla.edu [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cline, D.; Ding, X. [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ho, Y.K.; Kong, Q.; Xu, J.J. [Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Pogorelsky, I.; Yakimenko, V.; Kusche, K. [BNL-ATF, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2013-02-11

    This paper presents the pre-experiment plan and prediction of the first stage of vacuum laser acceleration (VLA) collaborating by UCLA, Fudan University and ATF-BNL. This first stage experiment is a proof-of-principle to support our previously posted novel VLA theory. Simulations show that based on ATF's current experimental conditions the electron beam with initial energy of 15 MeV can get net energy gain from an intense CO{sub 2} laser beam. The difference in electron beam energy spread is observable by the ATF beam line diagnostics system. Further, this energy spread expansion effect increases along with an increase in laser intensity. The proposal has been approved by the ATF committee and the experiment will be our next project.

  20. Beam Loss Calibration Studies for High Energy Proton Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stockner, M

    2007-01-01

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a proton collider with injection energy of 450 GeV and collision energy of 7 TeV. Superconducting magnets keep the particles circulating in two counter rotating beams, which cross each other at the Interaction Points (IP). Those complex magnets have been designed to contain both beams in one yoke within a cryostat. An unprecedented amount of energy will be stored in the circulating beams and in the magnet system. The LHC outperforms other existing accelerators in its maximum beam energy by a factor of 7 and in its beam intensity by a factor of 23. Even a loss of a small fraction of the beam particles may cause the transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state of the coil or cause physical damage to machine components. The unique combination of these extreme beam parameters and the highly advanced superconducting technology has the consequence that the LHC needs a more efficient beam cleaning and beam loss measurement system than previous accelerators....

  1. Beam transport through electrostatic accelerators and matching into post accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Ion beam transport through electrostatic acceleration is briefly reviewed. Topics discussed include injection, matching into the low-energy acceleration stage, matching from the terminal stripper into the high-energy stage, transport to a post accelerator, space charge, bunching isochronism, dispersion and charge selection. Beam transport plans for the proposed Vivitron accelerator are described. (orig.)

  2. Studies of polarized beam acceleration and Siberian Snakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1992-01-01

    We studied depolarization mechanisms of polarized proton acceleration in high energy accelerators with snakes and found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two. Thus the available betatron tune space becomes smaller. Some constraints on polarized beam colliders were also examined

  3. High resolution silicon detectors for colliding beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Bedeschi, F.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Raso, G.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.

    1984-01-01

    Resolution and linearity of the position measurement of Pisa multi-electrode silicon detectors are presented. The detectors are operated in slightly underdepleted mode and take advantage of their intrinsic resistivity for resistive charge partition between adjacent strips. 22 μm resolution is achieved with readout lines spaced 300 μm. Possible applications in colliding beam experiments for the detection of secondary vertices are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Symmetrization of the beam-beam interaction in an asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.H.

    1990-07-01

    This paper studies the idea of symmetrizing both the lattice and the beams of an asymmetric collider, and discusses why this regime should be within the parametric reach of the design in order to credibly ensure its performance. Also examined is the effectiveness of a simple compensation method using the emittance as a free parameter and that it does not work in all cases. At present, when there are no existing asymmetric colliders, it seems prudent to design an asymmetric collider so as to be similar to a symmetric one (without relying on a particular theory of the asymmetric beam-beam interaction that has not passed tests of fidelity). Nevertheless, one must allow for the maximum possible flexibility and freedom in adjusting those parameters that affect luminosity. Such a parameter flexibility will be essential in tuning the collider to the highest luminosity

  5. Renormalization theory of beam-beam interaction in electron-positron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.H.

    1989-07-01

    This note is devoted to explaining the essence of the renormalization theory of beam-beam interaction for carrying out analytical calculations of equilibrium particle distributions in electron-positron colliding beam storage rings. Some new numerical examples are presented such as for betatron tune dependence of the rms beam size. The theory shows reasonably good agreements with the results of computer simulations. 5 refs., 6 figs

  6. Wakefield damping in a pair of X-band accelerators for linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger M. Jones

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the means to damp the wakefield left behind ultrarelativistic charges. In particular, we focus on a pair of traveling wave accelerators operating at an X-band frequency of 11.424 GHz. In order to maximize the efficiency of acceleration, in the context of a linear collider, multiple bunches of charged particles are accelerated within a given pulse of the electromagnetic field. The wakefield left behind successive bunches, if left unchecked, can seriously disturb the progress of trailing bunches and can lead to an appreciable dilution in the emittance of the beam. We report on a method to minimize the influence of the wakefield on trailing bunches. This method entails detuning the characteristic mode frequencies which make up the electromagnetic field, damping the wakefield, and interleaving the frequencies of adjacent accelerating structures. Theoretical predictions of the wakefield and modes, based on a circuit model, are compared with experimental measurements of the wakefield conducted within the ASSET facility at SLAC. Very good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment and this allows us to have some confidence in designing the damping of wakefields in a future linear collider consisting of several thousand of these accelerating structures.

  7. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

  8. High gradient tests of SLAC Linear Collider Accelerator Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.W.; Deruyter, H.; Eichner, J.; Fant, K.H.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Loewen, R.; Menegat, L.

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes the current SLAC R ampersand D program to develop room temperature accelerator structures for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The structures are designed to operate at 11.4 GHz at an accelerating gradient in the range of 50 to 100 MV/m. In the past year a 26 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, a 75 cm constant-impedance traveling-wave section, and a 1.8 m traveling-wave section with detuned deflecting modes have been high-power tested. The paper presents a brief description of the RF test setup, the design and manufacturing details of the structures, and a discussion of test results including field emission, RF processing, dark current spectrum and RF breakdown

  9. Demonstration of two-beam acceleration in CTF II

    CERN Document Server

    Bossart, Rudolf; Carron, G; Chanudet, M; Chautard, F; Delahaye, J P; Godot, J C; Hutchins, S; Kamber, I; Martínez, C; Suberlucq, Guy; Tenenbaum, P G; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter

    1999-01-01

    The second phase of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF II) at CERN has demon-strated the feasibility of two-beam acceleration at 30 GHz using a high-charge drive beam, running paral lel to the main beam, as the RF power source. To date accelerating gradients of 59 MV/m at 30 GHz have been achieved. In CTF II, the two beams are generated by 3 GHz RF photo-injectors and are acceler ated in 3 GHz linacs, before injection into the 30 GHz modules. The drive beam linac has to accelerate a 16 ns long train of 48 bunches, each with a nominal charge of 13.4 nC. To cope with the very su bstantial beam-loading special accelerating structures are used (running slightly off the bunch repetition frequency). A magnetic chicane compresses the bunches to less than 5 ps fwhm, this is needed for efficient 30 GHz power generation. The 30 GHz modules are fully-engineered representative sections of CLIC, they include a 30 GHz decelerator for the drive beam, a 30 GHz accelerator for the main beam, high resolution...

  10. MD 979: Beta-beating measurements on colliding beams

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves Jorge, Patrik; Pieloni, Tatiana; Buffat, Xavier; Carlier, Felix Simon; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Fol, Elena; Langner, Andy Sven; Medina Medrano, Luis Eduardo; Olexa, Jakub; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Valuch, Daniel; Wegscheider, Andreas; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The HL-LHC high brightness beams will give a large β-beating due to the head-on and long-range interactions since a beam-beam parameter of 0.01 per Interaction Point (IP) is expected. The β-heating induced by two head-on collision reaches 15%. A third IP, i.e. IP8, could bring the β-heating up to 24%. The aim of the Machine Development (MD) study was to test optics measurements with AC dipole and ADT on colliding beams at injection and to implement a correction of the β-heating due to to head-on collision in the two experiments IP1&5. Int his note, we summarize the first results of this test performed in the LHC.

  11. Determination of beam intensity and position in a particle accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, G

    2011-01-01

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors...

  12. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Raich, Uli

    2011-10-04

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN†, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)‡. The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam posi...

  13. BROOKHAVEN: Booster boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    After three months of intensive dedicated machine studies, Brookhaven's new Booster accelerated 5 x 10 13 protons over four cycles, about 85% of the design intensity. This was made possible by careful matching of Linac beam into the Booster and by extensive resonance stop band corrections implemented during Booster acceleration. The best single cycle injection into the AGS Alternating Gradient Synchrotron was 1.14 x 10 13 protons from the Booster. 1.05 x 10 13 protons were kept in the AGS, a 92% combined efficiency of extraction, transfer, and injection. The maximum injected 1994 shutdown period, enabling the 1994 physics run to make use of the full Booster intensity and go for the stated AGS objective of 4x10 13 protons per pulse

  14. Beam-beam instability driven by wakefield effects in linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, R; Schulte, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The vertical beam profile distortions induced by wakefield effects in linear colliders (the so-called ``banana effect'') generate a beam-beam instability at the collision point when the vertical disruption parameter is large. We illustrate this effect in the case of the TESLA linear collider project. We specify the tolerance on the associated emittance growth, which translates into tolerances on injection jitter and, for a given tuning procedure, on structure misalignments. We look for possible cures based on fast orbit correction at the interaction point and using a fast luminosity monitor.

  15. The Next Generation of Heavy Ion Sources (447th Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Imagine if, by staying in your lane when driving on the expressway, you could help fight cancer or provide a new, clean energy source. You would clench the steering wheel with both hands and stay in your lane, right? Unlike driving on the expressway where you intentionally avoid hitting other cars, scientists sometimes work to steer particle beams into head-on collisions with other oncoming particle beams. However, the particles must be kept 'in their lanes' for cleaner, more frequent collisions. Some scientists propose starting the whole process by using lasers to heat a fixed target as a way to get particles with higher charge, which are more steerable. These scientists believe the new methods could be used to develop particle beams for killing cancer cells or creating usable energy from fusion. Join Masahiro Okamura of Brookhaven's Collider-Accelerator Department for the 447th Brookhaven Lecture, titled 'The Next Generation of Heavy Ion Sources.' Okamura will explain how lasers can be used to create plasma, neutral mixtures of positive ions and negative electrons, from different materials, and how using this plasma leads to beams with higher charge states and currents. He will also discuss how this efficient, simpler method of producing particle beams might be used for cancer therapy, to develop new energy sources, or in synchrotrons.

  16. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    compared the RBE characteristics of the MIT Reactor M67 clinical beam, The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor clinical beam (both of which were used in Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT) and the MIT LABA BNCS beam. Additional research initiated under this program involved an investigation of the potential of BNCT for the prevention of restenosis and the development of accelerator-based fast neutron brachytherapy. A total of 10 student research theses (2 Undergraduate, 4 Masters, and 4 Doctoral) were completed as part of this research program.

  17. Simulations of coherent beam-beam modes at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Zorzano-Mier, M P

    2000-01-01

    The transverse coherent motion of two colliding proton beams at the Large Hadron Collider is studied by multiparticle tracking. We use the beam-beam force for a Gaussian beam distribution with variable barycenters and rms beam sizes, and optionally include the effect of long-range collisions and external impedance. The simulation yields the coherent and incoherent oscillation frequencies, the emittance growth of either beam, and evidence for the existence or lack of Landau damping. For head-on collisions of beams with equal sizes, we find that the pi -mode frequency lies outside of the continuum frequency spread, if the ratio of the beam-beam parameters exceeds 0.6, in accordance with predictions. For smaller ratios of the beam- beam parameters, or if, for equal beam-beam parameters, the beam sizes are widely different, the pi mode is Landau damped. When long- range collisions are also included, undamped coherent modes do still exist outside the continuum, both with and without alternating crossing planes at ...

  18. Multi-beam linear accelerator EVT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teryaev, Vladimir E., E-mail: vladimir_teryaev@mail.ru [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Kazakov, Sergey Yu. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A novel electron multi-beam accelerator is presented. The accelerator, short-named EVT (Electron Voltage Transformer) belongs to the class of two-beam accelerators. It combines an RF generator and essentially an accelerator within the same vacuum envelope. Drive beam-lets and an accelerated beam are modulated in RF modulators and then bunches pass into an accelerating structure, comprising uncoupled with each other and inductive tuned cavities, where the energy transfer from the drive beams to the accelerated beam occurs. A phasing of bunches is solved by choice correspond distances between gaps of the adjacent cavities. Preliminary results of numerical simulations and the initial specification of EVT operating in S-band, with a 60 kV gun and generating a 2.7 A, 1.1 MV beam at its output is presented. A relatively high efficiency of 67% and high design average power suggest that EVT can find its use in industrial applications.

  19. Acceleration of 14C beams in electrostatic accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowton, L.J.; Tesmer, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Operational problems in the production and acceleration of 14 C beams for nuclear structure research in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Van de Graaff accelerators are discussed. Methods for the control of contamination in ion sources, accelerators and personnel are described. Sputter source target fabrication techniques and the relative beam production efficiencies of various types of bound particulate carbon sputter source targets are presented

  20. Application of International Linear Collider superconducting cavities for acceleration of protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Ostroumov

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Beam acceleration in the International Linear Collider (ILC will be provided by 9-cell 1300 MHz superconducting (SC cavities. The cavities are designed for effective acceleration of charged particles moving with the speed of light and are operated on π-mode to provide a maximum accelerating gradient. A significant research and development effort has been devoted to develop ILC SC technology and its rf system which resulted in excellent performance of ILC cavities. Therefore, the proposed 8-GeV proton driver in Fermilab is based on ILC cavities above ∼1.2  GeV. The efficiency of proton beam acceleration by ILC cavities drops fast for lower velocities and it was proposed to develop squeezed ILC-type (S-ILC cavities operating at 1300 MHz and designed for β_{G}=0.81, geometrical beta, to accelerate protons or H^{-} from ∼420  MeV to 1.2 GeV. This paper discusses the possibility of avoiding the development of new β_{G}=0.81 cavities by operating ILC cavities on 8/9π-mode of standing wave oscillations.

  1. Accelerating polarized beams in Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper, we will examine the totality of equipment, manpower and cost necessary to obtain a polarized proton beam in the Tevatron. We will not, however, be concerned with the acquisition and acceleration of polarized /bar p/ beams. Furthermore we will consider only a planar main ring without overpass, although it is expected that Siberian snake schemes could be made to apply equally well to non-planar machines. In addition to not wanting to tackle here the task of reformulating the theory for a non-planar closed orbit, we also anticipate that as part of the Tevatron upgrade the main ring will in the not too distant future, be replaced by a planar main injector situated in a separate tunnel. 4 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  2. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-09-11

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles. At Fermilab, we are planning to install an electron lens in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA, a 40-m ring for 150-MeV electrons) as one of the proof-of-principle implementations of nonlinear integrable optics to achieve large tune spreads and more stable beams without loss of dynamic aperture.

  3. Precise and fast beam energy measurement at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viti, Michele

    2010-02-15

    The international Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with a center-of-mass energy between 200 and 500 GeV and a peak luminosity of 2 . 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. For the physics program at this machine, an excellent bunch-by-bunch control of the beam energy is mandatory. Several techniques are foreseen to be implemented at the ILC in order to achieve this request. Energy spectrometers upstream and downstream of the electron/positron interaction point were proposed and the present default option for the upstream spectrometer is a beam position monitor based (BPM-based) spectrometer. In 2006/2007, a prototype of such a device was commissioned at the End Station A beam line at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in order to study performance and reliability. In addition, a novel method based on laser Compton backscattering has been proposed, since as proved at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), complementary methods are necessary to cross-check the results of the BPM-based spectrometer. In this thesis, an overview of the experiment at End Station A is given, with emphasis on the performance of the magnets in the chicane and first energy resolution estimations. Also, the novel Compton backscattering method is discussed in details and found to be very promising. It has the potential to bring the beam energy resolution well below the requirement of {delta}E{sub b}/E{sub b}=10{sup -4}. (orig.)

  4. Enhanced creation of high energy particles in colliding laser beams

    OpenAIRE

    Kuchiev, Michael; Ingham, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The creation of particles by two colliding strong laser beams is considered. It is found that the electron-positron pairs created in the laser field via the Schwinger mechanism may recollide after one or several oscillations in the field. Their collision can take place at high energy, which the pair gains from the field. As a result, high energy gamma quanta can be created by inelastic scattering or annihilation of the pair. Moreover, heavy particles such as muon pairs may also be created via...

  5. Tuning of the Compact Linear Collider Beam Delivery System

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, H; Inntjore Levinsen, Y; Latina, A; Tomas, R; Snuverink, J

    2014-01-01

    Tuning the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) BeamDelivery System (BDS), and in particular the Final Focus (FF), is a challenging task. In simulations without misalignments, the goal is to reach 120%o f the nominal luminosity target, in order to allow for 10% loss due to static imperfections, and another 10% loss from dynamic imperfections. Various approaches have been considered to correct the magnet misalignments, including 1-1 correction, Dispersion Free Steering (DFS), and several minimization methods utilizing multipole movers. In this paper we report on the recent advancements towards a feasible tuning approach that reaches the required luminosity target.

  6. Parallel beam dynamics simulation of linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we describe parallel particle-in-cell methods for the large scale simulation of beam dynamics in linear accelerators. These techniques have been implemented in the IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code. IMPACT is being used to study the behavior of intense charged particle beams and as a tool for the design of next-generation linear accelerators. As examples, we present applications of the code to the study of emittance exchange in high intensity beams and to the study of beam transport in a proposed accelerator for the development of accelerator-driven waste transmutation technologies

  7. SimTrack: A compact c++ library for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    SimTrack is a compact c++ library of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam-beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam-beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam-beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  8. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  9. Resolving beam transport problems in electrostatic accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews problem areas in beam transmission which are frequently encountered during the design, operation and upgrading of electrostatic accelerators. Examples are provided of analytic procedures that clarify accelerator ion optics and lead to more effective beam transport. Suggestions are made for evaluating accelerator design with the goal of improved performance

  10. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Helene Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  11. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator \\& in the Technical Design Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  12. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.II: Accelerator Baseline Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); et al.

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  13. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  14. The Smallest Drops of the Hottest Matter? New Investigations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (493rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickles, Anne [BNL Physics Department

    2014-03-19

    Pool sharks at the billiards hall know that sometimes you aim to rocket the cue ball for a head-on collision, and other times, a mere glance will do. Physicists need to know more than a thing or two about collision geometry too, as they sift through data from the billions of ions that smash together at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Determining whether ions crash head-on or just glance is crucial for the physicists analyzing data to study quark-gluon plasma—the ultra-hot, "perfect" liquid of quarks and gluons that existed more than 13 billion years ago, before the first protons and neutrons formed. For these physicists, collision geometry data provides insights about quark-gluon plasma's extremely low viscosity and other unusual properties, which are essential for understanding more about the "strong force" that holds together the nucleus, protons, and neutrons of every atom in the universe. Dr. Sickles explains how physicists use data collected at house-sized detectors like PHENIX and STAR to determine what happens before, during, and after individual particle collisions among billions at RHIC. She also explains how the ability to collide different "species" of nuclei at RHIC—including protons and gold ions today and possibly more with a proposed future electron-ion collider upgrade (eRHIC)—enables physicists to probe deeper into the mysteries of quark-gluon plasma and the strong force.

  15. Heavy ion beam loss mechanisms at an electron-ion collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer R. Klein

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There are currently several proposals to build a high-luminosity electron-ion collider, to study the spin structure of matter and measure parton densities in heavy nuclei, and to search for gluon saturation and new phenomena like the colored glass condensate. These measurements require operation with heavy nuclei. We calculate the cross sections for two important processes that will affect accelerator and detector operations: bound-free pair production and Coulomb excitation of the nuclei. Both of these reactions have large cross sections, 28–56 mb, which can lead to beam ion losses, produce beams of particles with altered charge:mass ratio, and produce a large flux of neutrons in zero degree calorimeters. The loss of beam particles limits the sustainable electron-ion luminosity to levels of several times 10^{32}/cm^{2}/s.

  16. Flat-beam Rf photocathode sources for linear collider applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Laser driven rf photocathodes represent a recent advance in high-brightness electron beam sources. The authors investigate here a variation on these devices, that obtained by using a ribbon laser pulse to illuminate the cathode, yielding a flat beam (σ x much-gt σ y ) which has asymmetric emittances at the cathode proportional to the beam size each transverse dimension. The flat-beam geometry mitigates space charge forces which lead to intensity dependent transverse and longitudinal emittance growth, thus limiting the beam brightness. The fundamental limit on achievable emittance and brightness is set by the transverse momentum distribution and peak current density of the photoelectrons (photon energy and cathode material dependent effects) and appears to allow, taking into account space charge and rf effects, normalized emittances ε x -5 m-rad and ε -6 m-rad, with Q = 5 nC and σ z = 1 mm. These source emittances are adequate for superconducting linear collider applications, and could preclude the use of a damping ring for the electrons in these schemes

  17. 2014 Joint International Accelerator School: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    CERN Document Server

    JAS - Joint US-CERN-Japan-Russia Accelerator School

    2016-01-01

    Many particle accelerators operate with very high beam power and very high energy stored in particle beams as well as in magnet systems. In the future, the beam power in high intensity accelerators will further increase. The protection of the accelerator equipment from the consequences of uncontrolled release of the energy is essential. This was the motivation for organizing a first school on beam losses and accelerator protection (in general referred to as machine protection). During the school the methods and technologies to identify, mitigate, monitor and manage the technical risks associated with the operation of accelerators with high-power beams or subsystems with large stored energy were presented. At the completion of the school the participants should have been able to understand the physical phenomena that can damage machine subsystems or interrupt operations and to analyze an accelerator facility to produce a register of technical risks and the corresponding risk mitigation and management strategie...

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EPITHERMAL NEUTRON BEAM FOR BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY AT THE BROOKHAVEN MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HOLDEN,N.E.

    2002-08-18

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  19. Laser-driven acceleration with Bessel beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imasaki, Kazuo; Li, Dazhi

    2005-01-01

    A new approach of laser-driven acceleration with Bessel beam is described. Bessel beam, in contrast to the Gaussian beam, shows diffraction-free'' characteristics in its propagation, which implies potential in laser-driven acceleration. But a normal laser, even if the Bessel beam, laser can not accelerate charged particle efficiently because the difference of velocity between the particle and photon makes cyclic acceleration and deceleration phase. We proposed a Bessel beam truncated by a set of annular slits those makes several special regions in its travelling path, where the laser field becomes very weak and the accelerated particles are possible to receive no deceleration as they undergo decelerating phase. Thus, multistage acceleration is realizable with high gradient. In a numerical computation, we have shown the potential of multistage acceleration based on a three-stage model. (author)

  20. Review of linear collider beam-beam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P.

    1989-01-01

    Three major effects from the interaction of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// beams---disruption, beamstrahlung, and electron-positron pair creation---are reviewed. For the disruption effects we discuss the luminosity enhancement factor, the maximum and rms disruption angles, and the ''kink instability''. All the results are obtained from computer simulations. Scaling laws for the numerical results and theoretical explanations of the computer acquired phenomena are offered wherever possible. For the beamstrahlung effects we concentrate only on the final electron energy spectrum resulting from multiple photon radiation process, and the deflection angle associated with low energy particles. For the effects from electron-positron pair creation, both coherent and incoherent processes of beamstrahlung pair creation are discussed. In addition to the estimation on total number of such pairs, we also look into the energy spectrum and the deflection angle. 17 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Reble, a radially converging electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1976-01-01

    The Reble accelerator at Sandia Laboratories is described. This accelerator was developed to provide an experimental source for studying the relevant diode physics, beam propagation, beam energy deposition in a gas using a radially converging e-beam. The nominal parameters for Reble are 1 MV, 200 kA, 20 ns e-beam pulse. The anode and cathode are concentric cylinders with the anode as the inner cylinder. The radial beam can be propagated through the thin foil anode into the laser gas volume. The design and performance of the various components of the accelerator are presented

  2. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  3. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  4. Beam dynamics issues of high-luminosity asymmetric collider rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Machines for use in high-energy physics are advancing along two frontiers. First, there is the frontier of energy, currently being pressed by the Fermilab collider (p bar p), and SLC and LEP (e + e - ) and in the near future by HERA (ep), the LHC, and the SSC (pp). Second, there is the frontier of intensity, currently being pressed by a variety of low-energy machines and, at higher energies, by various linacs such as those at KEK. Fermilab, GSI, and LAMPF (p) and CEBAF (e - ). In the future there should be, along this frontier, various ''factories'' such as those for Kaons at TRIUMF, and those proposed for var-phi mesons, τ-charm particles, and B mesons. It is with the intensity frontier that these proceedings are concerned. The elementary particle motivation to study the nonconservation of PC in the B-stringB system (which topic is not covered in these Proceedings, but is treated extensively in the literature) has motivated the study of very high intensity asymmetric collider rings. It was for this purpose that a Workshop on Beam Dynamics Issues of High-Luminosity Asymmetric Collider Rings was held, in Berkeley, during February 12--16, 1990. A general introduction to the subject has been given in an article which is reprinted here as an Appendix. The nonexpert may wish to start there. The volume consists of four parts. The first part consists of Summaries; first an overall summary of the Workshop and then, second, more detailed summaries from each of the working groups. The second part consists of the Invited Talks at the workshop. The third part contains various Contributed Papers, most of which represent work that came out of the workshop. Finally, there are, in the fourth part, brief Summaries of the Various Proposed B-Factory Projects in the world

  5. Construction and operation of a 10 MeV electron accelerator and associated experimental facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this environmental impact statement is to determine whether there would be significant environmental impacts associated with the construction of an experimental facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory for radiation chemistry research and operation of the 10-MeV electron accelerator proposed for it. The document describes the need for action, alternative actions, the affected environment, and potential environmental impacts

  6. Preliminary design of the beam screen cooling for the Future Circular Collider of hadron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kotnig, C

    2015-01-01

    Following recommendations of the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. This study considers an option for a very high energy (100 TeV) hadron-hadron collider located in a quasi-circular underground tunnel having a circumference of 80 to 100 km. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy hadron beam increases by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the LHC. To reduce the entropic load on the superconducting magnets' refrigeration system, beam screens are indispensable to extract the heat load at a higher temperature level. After illustrating the decisive constraints of the beam screen's refrigeration design, this paper presents a preliminary design of the length of a continuous cooling loop comparing helium and neon, for different cooling channel geometries with emphasis on the cooling length limitations and the exergetic efficiency.

  7. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  8. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  9. Generation of multi-branch beam with thermionic gun for the Japan linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, T.; Akemoto, M.; Matsumonto, H.; Urakawa, J.; Yoshioka, M.; Akiyama, H.

    1992-01-01

    We report on the development of a thermionic gun that is capable of producing multi-bunch beam to be used at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility for the Japan Linear Collider project. Two types of grid pulse generators have been developed. One is an avalanche pulse generator. A Y-646E cathode was successfully operated to generate double-bunch beam with a pulse width shorter than 700 ps, bunch spacing 1.4 ns, and a peak current 4.3 A. The other grid pulse generator is a fast ECL circuit with an RF power amplifier. Generation of 20-pulse trains with 2.1 ns time spacing has been demonstrated. (Author) 4 refs., 6 figs

  10. Tests of an environmental and personnel safe cleaning process for Brookhaven National Laboratory accelerator and storage ring components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Lee, R.; Mitchell, G.; Quade, W.

    1997-01-01

    A large measure of the successful operation of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for over a decade can be attributed to the cleaning of its ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) components during and after construction. A new UHV cleaning process, which has to be environmentally and personnel safe, is needed to replace the harsh, unfriendly process which is still in use. Dow Advanced Cleaning Systems was contracted to develop a replacement process without the use of harsh chemicals and which must clean vacuum surfaces as well as the existing process. Acceptance of the replacement process was primarily based on photon stimulated desorption (PSD) measurements of beam tube samples run on NSLS beam line U10B. One meter long beam tube samples were fabricated from aluminum, 304 stainless steel, and oxygen-free copper. Initially, coupon samples were cleaned and passed preliminary testing for the proposed process. Next, beam tube samples of each material were cleaned, and the PSD measured on beam line U10B using white light with a critical energy of 487 eV. Prior to cleaning, the samples were contaminated with a mixture of cutting oils, lubricants, vacuum oils, and vacuum grease. The contaminated samples were then baked. Samples of each material were also cleaned with the existing process after the same preparation. Beam tube samples were exposed to between 10 22 and 10 23 photons per meter for a PSD measurement. Desorption yields for H 2 , CO, CO 2 , CH 4 , and H 2 O are reported for both the existing cleaning and for the replacement cleaning process. Preliminary data, residual gas scans, and PSD results are given and discussed. The new process is also compared with new cleaning methods developed in other laboratories. After modification, the new UHV cleaning process was accepted by BNL

  11. A Beam Interlock System for CERN High Energy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Benjamin; Schmidt, R

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (The European Organisation for Nuclear Research) is one of the largest and most complicated machines envisaged to date. The LHC has been conceived and designed over the course of the last 25 years and represents the cutting edge of accelerator technology with a collision energy of 14TeV, having a stored beam energy over 100 times more powerful than the nearest competitor. Commissioning of the machine is already nderway and operation with beam is intended for Autumn 2007, with 7TeV operation expected in 2008. The LHC is set to answer some of the fundemental questions in theoretical physics, colliding particles with such high energy that the inner workings of the quantum world can be revealed. Colliding particles together at such high energy makes very high demands on machine operation and protection. The specified beam energy requires strong magnetic fields that are made in superconducting dipole magnets, these magnets are kept only around two degrees above absolute zero...

  12. HOM-Free Linear Accelerating Structure for e+ e- Linear Collider at C-Band

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, K

    2003-01-01

    HOM-free linear acceleration structure using the choke mode cavity (damped cavity) is now under design for e sup + e sup - linear collider project at C-band frequency (5712 MHz). Since this structure shows powerful damping effect on most of all HOMs, there is no multibunch problem due to long range wakefields. The structure will be equipped with the microwave absorbers in each cells and also the in-line dummy load in the last few cells. The straightness tolerance for 1.8 m long structure is closer than 30 (micro)m for 25% emittance dilution limit, which can be achieved by standard machining and braising techniques. Since it has good vacuum pumping conductance through annular gaps in each cell, instabilities due to the interaction of beam with the residual-gas and ions can be minimized.

  13. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  14. PHENIX Conceptual Design Report. An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamiya, Shoji; Aronson, Samuel H.; Young, Glenn R.; Paffrath, Leo

    1993-01-29

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e{mu} coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study {pi}{sup 0} and {eta} production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the {phi} meson (via K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decay), jets, and two-boson correlations. The measurements are made down to small cross sections to allow the study of high p{sub T} spectra, and J/{psi} and {Upsilon} production. The PHENIX collaboration consists of over 300 scientists, engineers, and graduate students from 43 institutions in 10 countries. This large international collaboration is supported by US resources and significant foreign resources.

  15. U.S. Accelerator Contribution to the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lamm, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    In 1998, the United States entered into an agreement with CERN to help build the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with contributions to the accelerator and to the large HEP detectors. To accomplish this, the US LHC Accelerator Project was formed, encompassing expertise from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Contributions from the US LHC Accelerator project included superconducting high gradient quadrupoles and beam separation dipoles for the four interaction regions and the RF section; feedboxes for cryogenic, power and instrumentation distribution; neutral and hadron beam absorbers in the high luminosity regions; design of the inner triplet cryogenic system; beam tracking studies utilizing the design IR magnet field quality and magnet alignment; particle heat deposition studies in the IR’s; and short sample characterization of superconducting cables used in the arc dipoles and quadrupoles. This report is a summary of the...

  16. ACCELERATED SITE TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT COMPARABILITY OF ISOCS INSTRUMENT IN RADIONUCLIDE CHARACTERICATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALB,P.; LUCKETT,L.; MILLER,K.; GOGOLAK,C.; MILIAN,L.

    2001-03-01

    This report describes a DOE Accelerated Site Technology Deployment project being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory to deploy innovative, radiological, in situ analytical techniques. The technologies are being deployed in support of efforts to characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) facility, which is currently undergoing decontamination and decommissioning. This report focuses on the deployment of the Canberra Industries In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) and assesses its data comparability to baseline methods of sampling and laboratory analysis. The battery-operated, field deployable gamma spectrometer provides traditional spectra of counts as a function of gamma energy. The spectra are then converted to radionuclide concentration by applying innovative efficiency calculations using monte carlo statistical methods and pre-defined geometry templates in the analysis software. Measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides has been accomplished during characterization of several BGRR components including the Pile Fan Sump, Above Ground Ducts, contaminated cooling fans, and graphite pile internals. Cs-137 is the predominant gamma-emitting radionuclide identified, with smaller quantities of Co-60 and Am-241 detected. The Project used the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual guidance and the Data Quality Objectives process to provide direction for survey planning and data quality assessment. Analytical results have been used to calculate data quality indicators (DQI) for the ISOCS measurements. Among the DQIs assessed in the report are sensitivity, accuracy, precision, bias, and minimum detectable concentration. The assessment of the in situ data quality using the DQIs demonstrates that the ISOCS data quality can be comparable to definitive level laboratory analysis when the field instrument is supported by an appropriate Quality Assurance Project Plan. A discussion of the results obtained by ISOCS analysis of

  17. Deadline pressure and human error: a study of human failures on a particle accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiagha, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    The decline in industrial efficiency may be linked to decreased reliability of complex automatic systems. This decline threatens the viability of complex organizations in industrialized economies. Industrial engineering techniques that minimize system failure by increasing the reliability of systems hardware are well developed in comparison with those available to reduce human operator errors. The problem of system reliability and the associated costs of breakdown can be reduced if we understand how highly skilled technical personnel function in complex operations and systems. The purpose of this research is to investigate how human errors are affected by deadline pressures, technical communication and other socio-dynamic factors. Through the analysis of a technologically complex particle accelerator prototype at Brookhaven National Laboratory, two failure mechanisms: (1) physical defects in the production process and (2) human operator errors were identified. Two instruments were used to collect information on human failures: objective laboratory data and a human failure questionnaire. The results of human failures from the objective data were used to test for the deadline hypothesis and also to validate the human failure questionnaire. To explain why the human failures occurred, data were collected from a four-part, closed choice questionnaire administered to two groups of scientists, engineers, and technicians, working together against a deadline to produce an engineering prototype of a particle accelerator

  18. Why Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    or ¯pp collider is a synchrotron machine, where the particle and antiparticle beams are accelerated inside the same vacuum pipe (figure 1) using the same set of bending mag- nets and accelerating cavities (not shown). Thanks to their equal mass and opposite charge, the two beams go round in identical orbits on top of ...

  19. Distinguishing new physics scenarios at a linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V.; Paver, N.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous nonstandard dynamics dominated by very high mass exchanges are described at current and future accelerator energies by appropriate contactlike effective interactions among the standard model particles. Correspondingly, they can manifest themselves only through deviations of the cross sections from the standard model predictions. If one such deviation were observed, it would be important to definitely identify, to a given confidence level, the actual source among the various possible nonstandard interactions that, in principle, can explain it. Here we estimate the identification reach on different new physics effective interactions, obtainable from angular distributions of lepton pair production processes at the planned electron-positron International Linear Collider with polarized beams. For each nonstandard model, such an identification reach defines the range in the relevant heavy mass scale parameter where it can be unambiguously distinguished from the other nonstandard models as the source of corrections to the standard model cross sections, in case these are observed. The effective interactions for which we estimate the expected identification reach are the interactions based on gravity in large extra dimensions, in TeV -1 extra dimensions and the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interactions. The availability of both beams polarized at the International Linear Collider turns out, in many cases, to dramatically enhance the identification sensitivity

  20. Low-level RF signal processing for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, S.; Ziomek, C.; Adolphsen, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the X-band accelerator system for the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA), the Low Level RF (LLRF) drive system must be very phase stable, but concurrently, be very phase agile. Phase agility is needed to make the Stanford Linear Doubler (SLED) power multiplier systems Energy work and to shape the RF waveforms to compensate beam loading in the accelerator sections. Similarly, precision fast phase and amplitude monitors are required to view, track, and feed back on RF signals at various locations throughout the system. The LLRF is composed of several subsystems: the RF Reference System generates and distributes a reference 11.424 GHz signal to all of the RF stations, the Signal Processing Chassis creates the RF waveforms with the appropriate phase modulation, and the Phase Detector Assembly measures the amplitude and phase of monitor3ed RF signals. The LLRF is run via VXI instrumentation. These instruments are controlled using HP VEE graphical programming software. Programs have been developed to shape the RF waveform, calibrate the phase modulators and demodulators, and display the measured waveforms. This paper describes these and other components of the LLRF system

  1. Next generation of electron-positron colliding beam machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1979-03-01

    The contribution of electron-positron colliding beam experiments to high-energy physics in the 1970's has been prodigious. From the research done with the two highest-energy e + e - machines of the present generation of these devices, have come such things as the discovery and illumination of the properties of the psi family, charmed particles, a new heavy lepton, non-ambigious evidence for hadronic jets, etc. The rapid pace of new developments in physics from such machines comes about for two reasons. First, the electron-positron annihilation process at present energies is particularly simple and well understood, making the problem of determining the quantum numbers and properties of new particles particularly simple. Second, in electron-positron annihilation all final states are on a relatively equal footing, and small production cross sections are compensated for by a lack of confusing background. For example, the rate of production of charmed particles at the SPEAR storage ring at SLAC and the DORIS storage ring at DESY is 3 or 4 orders of magnitude less than the rate of production at FNAL and the SPS. Yet these particles were first found at the storage rings where the background cross sections are comparable to the signal cross section, and have not yet been observed directly by their hadronic decays at the proton machines where the background cross sections are 4 orders of magnitude larger than the signal cross sections. The machines PEP at SLAC and PETRA at DESY will soon be operating at 35 to 40 GeV cm to explore new regions of energy. Studies of electron-positron annihilation at much higher energies than presently planned have a great deal to teach, not only about particle structure and dynamics, but also about the nature of the weak interaction. Some of the physics which can be done with such machines is discussed with a view toward getting an idea of the minimum required energy for the new generation of colliding beam devices

  2. Accelerated ion beam research at ATOMKI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, A.Z.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the studies on accelerated ion beams at ATOMKI and their technical background, their use from chemical analysis to biological, medical, geological, archaeological applications, their advance from material science to micromachining. (TRA)

  3. International Linear Collider Accelerator Physics R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollin, George D.; Davidsaver, Michael; Haney, Michael J.; Kasten, Michael; Chang, Jason; Chodash, Perry; Dluger, Will; Lang, Alex; Liu, Yehan

    2008-01-01

    ILC work at Illinois has concentrated primarily on technical issues relating to the design of the accelerator. Because many of the problems to be resolved require a working knowledge of classical mechanics and electrodynamics, most of our research projects lend themselves well to the participation of undergraduate research assistants. The undergraduates in the group are scientists, not technicians, and find solutions to problems that, for example, have stumped PhD-level staff elsewhere. The ILC Reference Design Report calls for 6.7 km circumference damping rings (which prepare the beams for focusing) using 'conventional' stripline kickers driven by fast HV pulsers. Our primary goal was to determine the suitability of the 16 MeV electron beam in the AO region at Fermilab for precision kicker studies. We found that the low beam energy and lack of redundancy in the beam position monitor system complicated the analysis of our data. In spite of these issues we concluded that the precision we could obtain was adequate to measure the performance and stability of a production module of an ILC kicker, namely 0.5%. We concluded that the kicker was stable to an accuracy of ∼2.0% and that we could measure this precision to an accuracy of ∼0.5%. As a result, a low energy beam like that at AO could be used as a rapid-turnaround facility for testing ILC production kicker modules. The ILC timing precision for arrival of bunches at the collision point is required to be 0.1 picosecond or better. We studied the bunch-to-bunch timing accuracy of a 'phase detector' installed in AO in order to determine its suitability as an ILC bunch timing device. A phase detector is an RF structure excited by the passage of a bunch. Its signal is fed through a 1240 MHz high-Q resonant circuit and then down-mixed with the AO 1300 MHz accelerator RF. We used a kind of autocorrelation technique to compare the phase detector signal with a reference signal obtained from the phase detector's response

  4. Simulation of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ohgaki

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available We study a method of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams for future linear colliders. Using a Monte Carlo code, we evaluate the effects of the laser-electron interaction for transverse cooling. The optics with and without chromatic correction for the cooling are examined. The laser-Compton cooling for Japan Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider at E_{0}=2 GeV is considered.

  5. Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

  6. Properties of the accelerator-produced beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chambers, F.W.; Cole, A.G.; Fawley, W.M.; Struve, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    Obtaining detailed knowledge of the condition of the electron beam delivered to the experimental tank is of prime importance in the attempt to correlate the propagation data with theory. There are many interesting and unique features of the beam delivered by Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) to the experimental tank

  7. Mid-IR lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators and colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Kimura, W. D.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators driven by solid-state, near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional RF accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO2 lasers. We show that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of electron acceleration at a low plasma density and high bunch charge. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and offspring applications validate our reported ongoing efforts in advancing the enabling CO2 laser technology.

  8. Activation of the IFMIF prototype accelerator and beam dump by deuterons and protons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simakov, S. P.; Bém, Pavel; Burjan, Václav; Fischer, U.; Forrest, R.A.; Götz, Miloslav; Honusek, Milan; Klein, H.; Kroha, Václav; Novák, Jan; Sauer, A.; Šimečková, Eva; Tiede, R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 83, 10-12 (2008), s. 1543-1547 ISSN 0920-3796 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : IFMIF * Protons and deuterons accelerator * Beam dump Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.828, year: 2008

  9. Studies of beam dynamics in relativistic klystron two-beam accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidia, Steven M.

    1999-11-01

    Two-beam accelerators (TBAs) based upon free-electron lasers (FELs) or relativistic klystrons (RK-TBAs) have been proposed as efficient power sources for next generation high-energy linear colliders. Studies have demonstrated the possibility of building TBAs from X-band (~8-12 GHz) through Ka band (~ 30-35 GHz) frequency regions. Provided that further prototyping shows stable beam propagation with minimal current loss and production of good quality, high-power rf fields, this technology is compatible with current schemes for electron-positron colliders in the multi-TeV center-of-mass scale. A new method of simulating the beam dynamics in accelerators of this type has been developed in this dissertation. There are three main components to this simulation. The first is a tracking algorithm to generate nonlinear transfer maps for pushing noninteracting particles through the external fields. The second component is a 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) algorithm that solves a set of Helmholtz equations for the self-fields, including the conducting boundary condition, and generates impulses that are interleaved with the nonlinear maps by means of a split-operation algorithm. The Helmholtz equations are solved by a multi-grid algorithm. The third component is an equivalent circuit equation solver that advances the modal rf cavity fields in time due to excitation by the modulated beam. The RTA project is described, and the simulation code is used to design the latter portions of the experiment. Detailed calculations of the beam dynamics and of the rf cavity output are presented and discussed. A beamline design is presented that will generate nearly 1.2 GW of power from 40 input, gain, and output rv cavities over a 10 m distance. The simulations show that beam current losses are acceptable, and that longitudinal and transverse focusing techniques are sufficient capable of maintaining a high degree of beam quality along the entire beamline. Additional experimental efforts are also

  10. Superconducting magnets at Brookhaven National Laboratory. AGS high energy unseparated beam line dipoles and ISABELLE ring magnet prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInturff, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    In the last two years the ISABELLE Division of Brookhaven National Laboratory has constructed various superconducting dipoles in their search for the optimum magnet on which to base the storage ring design. Data taken for two of the larger size systems that have been completed to date are reported. The first system is composed of four large superconducting dipoles used in the 20 0 bend of the multiparticle spectrometer (MPS) beam line of the 30 GeV Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). These 25 cm inner diameter (i.d.) dipoles bend the High Energy Unseparated Beam (HEUB) 5 0 each and have a stored energy of one Megajoule which can and is internally dissipated. The four magnets have operated in excess of 4.0 T after a few training quenches. The single layer cosine theta turns distribution dipoles have been operating under the direction of the ''AGS'' control computer for about six months. These magnets are of a similar design even though certain details are not identical to the ''ISABELLE'' prototype ring magnets. During the same time period, six full-size ring dipoles and one ring quadrupole have been completed with a seventh dipole under construction

  11. Guassian beams and electron acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, M.; Castillo, R.; Osman, F.; Evans, P.; Stiat-Gardener, T.; Hora, H.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: A guassian solution to the free space wave equation to fourth order is derived using the Fourier transform method. Higher order solutions can be generated, as needed, using the convolution method. These results are used to investigate the acceleration of an electron in a laser field. The acceleration is determined if energy is transferred to a relativistic electron, this energy transfer can be determined by calculating the change in the potential of the electron

  12. Performance of the Brookhaven photocathode rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.; Ingold, G.; Kirk, H.G.; Leung, K.P.; Malone, R.; Pogorelsky, I.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Rogers, J.; Tsang, T.; Sheehan, J.; Ulc, S.; Woodle, M.; Xie, J.; Zhang, R.S.; Lin, L.Y.; McDonald, K.T.; Russell, D.P.; Hung, C.M.; Wang, X.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) uses a photocathode rf gun to provide a high-brightness electron beam intended for FEL and laser-acceleration experiments. The rf gun consists of 1 1/2 cells driven at 2856 MHz in π-mode with a maximum cathode field of 100 MV/m. To achieve long lifetimes, the photocathode development concentrates on robust metals such as copper, yttrium and samarium. We illuminate these cathodes with a 10-ps, frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser. We describe the initial operation of the gun, including measurements of transverse and longitudinal emittance, quantum efficiencies, and peak current. The results are compared to models

  13. Transport and acceleration of low-emittance electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, H.

    1989-01-01

    Linear accelerators for colliders and for free-electron lasers require beams with both high brightness and low emittance. Their transport and acceleration is limited by single-particle effects originating from injection jitter, from the unavoidable position jitter of components, and from chromaticity. Collective phenomena, essentially due to wake fields acting within the bunch, are most severe in the case of high-frequency structures, i.e. a small aperture. Whilst, in the past, the transverse wake-field effects were believed to be most serious, we know that they can even be beneficial when inducing a corresponding spread in betatron oscillation either by an energy spread along the bunch or by an RF focusing system acting on the bunch scale. This paper evaluates the different effects by simple analytical means after making use of the smooth focusing approximation and the two-particle model. Numerical simulation results are used for verification. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Manipulation of hadron beams with bent crystals in circular accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, R; Redaelli, S; Scandale, W

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years the understanding and use of coherent interactions of charged particles with ordered crystal lattices has achieved excellent results. Improving collimation of hadron beams in circular accelerators, like the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the European Council for Nuclear Research (CERN), it is one of the possible applications. The aim of the UA9 experiment is to demonstrate the feasibility of a two-stage collimation system in the CERN-SPS : the first stage is a bent crystal oriented for an optimal channeling of the incoming halo particles; the second stage is a massive absorber. Two crystals were installed in the LHC last year and a test of crystal assisted collimation at the highest energy will be possible as early as 2015. Finally, the UA9 Collaboration is investigating extraction of particles from a circular accelerator, based on bent crystals.

  15. Beam tomography or ART in accelerator physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.

    1978-11-01

    Projections of charged particle beam current density have been used for many years as a measure of beam position and size. The conventional practice of obtaining only two projections, usually in the horizontal and vertical planes, puts a severe limit on the detail that can be recovered from the projections. A third projection provides sufficient improvement to justify the addition of a wire to the conventional wire scanner in certain cases. A group of programs using algebraic reconstruction techniques was written to reconstruct beam current density from beam projections obtained at three or more specific or arbitrary angles around the beam. A generalized program, which makes use of arbitrary 2 x 2 transfer matrices between projections, can be used to reconstruct transverse or longitudinal emittance from appropriate projections. Reconstruction examples of beam current density and transverse and longitudinal emittance using experimental data from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator beam are given

  16. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  17. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The US-CERN-JAPAN-RUSSIA Joint International Accelerator School is organising a course on Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection to be held in Newport Beach, California, USA from 5-14 November, 2014.    This school is intended for physicists and engineers who are or may be engaged in the design, construction, and/or operation of accelerators with high power photon or particle beams and/or accelerator sub-systems with large stored energy. Application deadlines are 15 August and 4 September. Further information on this Joint School can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/JAS/Newport%20Beach%202014/NPBadvert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/287647/ http://uspas.fnal.gov/programs/JAS/JAS14.shtml

  18. Optimisation analysis and improvement of the effective beam sizes in Accelerator Test Facility 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082063; Kisiel, Adam

    2016-10-20

    A lepton linear collider is considered by the accelerator and particle physics communities as an appropriate machine to perform high precision particle physics research in the TeV energy regime. There are two proposals for the future e+e- linear collider: the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC), both developed by two wide international collaborations with strong overlap between them. Both designs satisfy the particle physics requirements. At the TeV energy regime the cross sections of many processes of interest are small, therefore large luminosities on the order of 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1} at the interaction point (IP) are required to deliver the required event rates. The luminosity inversely depends on the transverse size of the colliding beams which restricts the beam sizes at the IP to the nanometer level. The strong focusing of the beams occurs in the final focus system (FFS), the most inner part of a linear collider, where the beams are focused at the IP by means of t...

  19. Neutrino and muon physics in the collider mode of future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rujula, A. de; Rueckl, R.

    1984-01-01

    Extracted beams and fixed target facilities at future colliders (the SSC and the LHC) may be (respectively) impaired by economic and 'ecological' considerations. Neutrino and muon physics in the multi-TeV range would appear not to be an option for these machines. We partially reverse this conclusion by estimating the characteristics of the 'prompt' νsub(μ), νsub(e), νsub(tau) and μ beams necessarily produced (for free) at the pp or anti pp intersections. The neutrino beams from a high luminosity (pp) collider are not much less intense than the neutrino beam from the collider's dump, but require no muon shielding. The muon beams from the same intersections are intense and energetic enough to study μp and μN interactions with considerable statistics and a Q 2 -coverage well beyond the presently available one. The physics program allowed by these lepton beams is a strong advocate of machines with the highest possible luminosity: pp (not anti pp) colliders. (orig.)

  20. Beam-based alignment and tuning procedures for e+e- collider final focus systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Odian, A.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto

    1991-01-01

    For future linear colliders, with very small emittances and beam sizes and demanding tolerances on final focus system alignment and magnet errors, it becomes increasingly important to use the beam as a diagnostic tool. The authors report here procedures they have identified and will be implemented in the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC incorporating (1) quadrupole strength changes, (2) central orbit modifications, (3) spot size measurements, and (4) beam stability monitoring

  1. Beam-based alignment and tuning procedures for e+e- collider final focus systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Odian, A.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto, N.

    1991-05-01

    For future linear colliders, with very small emittances and beam sizes and demanding tolerances on final focus system alignment and magnet errors, it becomes increasingly important to use the beam as a diagnostic tool. We report here procedures we have identified and will be implemented in the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC incorporating (1) quadrupole strength changes, (2) central orbit modifications, (3) spot size measurements, and (4) beam stability monitoring. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Expected damage to accelerator equipment due to the impact of the full LHC beam: beam instrumentation, experiments and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, Florian

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the biggest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world, designed to collide two proton beams with particle momentum of 7 TeV/c each. The stored energy of 362MJ in each beam is sufficient to melt 500 kg of copper or to evaporate about 300 liter of water. An accidental release of even a small fraction of the beam energy can cause severe damage to accelerator equipment. Reliable machine protection systems are necessary to safely operate the accelerator complex. To design a machine protection system, it is essential to know the damage potential of the stored beam and the consequences in case of a failure. One (catastrophic) failure would be, if the entire beam is lost in the aperture due to a problem with the beam dumping system. This thesis presents the simulation studies, results of a benchmarking experiment, and detailed target investigation, for this failure case. In the experiment, solid copper cylinders were irradiated with the 440GeV proton beam delivered by the ...

  3. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC

  4. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. H.; Barr, G. W.; Vandevender, J. P.; White, R. A.; Johnson, D. L.

    1980-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-1 (PBFA-1). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion is discussed.

  5. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed

  6. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajec- tory and orbit measurement system of the PS dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors (BPMs) and an analogue signal processing chain to acquire the trajectory of one single particle bunch out of many, over two consecutive turns at a maximum rate of once every 5ms. The BPMs were in good condition, however the electronics was aging and ...

  7. Beam dynamics analysis of femtosecond microbunches produced by the staged electron laser acceleration experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhou

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Preservation of the femtosecond (fs microbunches, created during laser acceleration, is a crucial step to enable staging of the laser acceleration process. This paper focuses on the optimization of the beam dynamics of fs microbunches transported through the staged electron laser acceleration (STELLA-II experiment being carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility. STELLA-II consists of an inverse free electron laser (IFEL untapered undulator, which acts as an electron beam energy modulator; a magnetic chicane, which acts as a buncher; a second IFEL tapered undulator, which acts as an accelerator; and a dipole, which serves as an energy spectrometer. When the energy-modulated macrobunch traverses through the chicane and a short drift space, microbunches of order fs in duration (i.e., ∼3  fs FWHM are formed. The 3-fs microbunches are accelerated by interacting with a high-power CO_{2} laser beam in the following tapered undulator. These extremely short microbunches may experience significant space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation effects when traversing the STELLA-II transport line. These effects are analyzed and the safe operating conditions are determined. With less than 0.5-pC microbunch charge, both microbunch debunching and emittance growth are negligible, and the energy-spread increase is less than 5%. These results are also useful for the laser electron acceleration project at SLAC and in possible future programs where the fs microbunches are employed for other purposes.

  8. Accelerators in industrial electron beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    High power electron beam accelerators are being used for a variety of industrial processes. Such machines can process a wide range of products at very high thruput rates and at very low unit processing costs. These industrial accelerators are now capable of producing up to 200 kW of electron beam power at 4.0 MV and 100 kW at 5.0 MV. At this writing, even larger units are contemplated. The reliability of these high power devices also makes it feasible to consider bremsstrahlung (x-ray) processing as well. In addition to the advance of accelerator technology, microprocessor control systems now provide the capability to coordinate all the operations of the irradiation facility, including the accelerator, the material handling system, the personnel safety system and various auxiliary services. Facility designs can be adapted to many different industrial processes, including use of the dual purpose electron/x-ray accelerator, to ensure satisfactory product treatment with good dose uniformity, high energy efficiency and operational safety and simplicity. In addition, equipment manufacturers like RDI are looking beyond their conventional DC accelerator technology; looking at high power 10-12 MeV linear accelerators with power levels up to 25 kW or more. These high power linear accelerators could be the ideal processing tool for many sterilization and food irradiation applications. (author)

  9. Beam Position Monitor and Energy Analysis at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, David Juarez [Univ. of Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-08-01

    Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility has produced its first beam with an energy of 20 MeV. This energy is obtained by the acceleration at the Electron Gun and the Capture Cavity 2 (CC2). When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one International Liner Collider (ILC)-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We calculated the total energy of the beam and the corresponding energy to the Electron Gun and CC2. Subsequently, a Beam Position Monitors (BPM) error analysis was done, to calculate the device actual resolution.

  10. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed

  11. The 12-GeV/c beam transfer and absorber lines for the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, N.; McGill, J.; Gerig, R.; Brown, K.

    1994-08-01

    The beam optics of the 12-GeV/c proton beam transfer line between the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) at the Superconducting Super Collider is presented. The beam is extracted from the LEB vertically and is injected into the MEB through a vertical Lambertson magnet and a horizontal kicker. The beamline has high flexibility for amplitude and dispersion function matching. Effects of various errors in the transfer line are studied, and a beam position correction scheme is proposed. The beam optics of the 12-GeV/c absorber line transporting the beam from the LEB to an absorber during the LEB commissioning is also presented

  12. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bruce

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the time evolution of the heavy-ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from run-7, colliding 100  GeV/nucleon ^{197}Au^{79+} beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multiparticle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the rf bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future ^{208}Pb^{82+} beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  13. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy-ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from run-7), colliding 100GeV/nucleon Au79+197 beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multiparticle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the rf bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb82+208 beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  14. Beam-Based Nonlinear Optics Corrections in Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Malitsky, Nikolay; Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, which gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 3 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non linear correction techniques.

  15. BEAM-BASED NON-LINEAR OPTICS CORRECTIONS IN COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PILAT, R.; LUO, Y.; MALITSKY, N.; PTITSYN, V.

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, that gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 4 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non-linear correction techniques

  16. BEAM-BASED NON-LINEAR OPTICS CORRECTIONS IN COLLIDERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PILAT, R.; LUO, Y.; MALITSKY, N.; PTITSYN, V.

    2005-05-16

    A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, that gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 4 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non-linear correction techniques.

  17. Assessing Risk in Costing High-energy Accelerators: from Existing Projects to the Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    High-energy accelerators are large projects funded by public money, developed over the years and constructed via major industrial contracts both in advanced technology and in more conventional domains such as civil engineering and infrastructure, for which they often constitute one-of markets. Assessing their cost, as well as the risk and uncertainty associated with this assessment is therefore an essential part of project preparation and a justified requirement by the funding agencies. Stemming from the experience with large circular colliders at CERN, LEP and LHC, as well as with the Main Injector, the Tevatron Collider Experiments and Accelerator Upgrades, and the NOvA Experiment at Fermilab, we discuss sources of cost variance and derive cost risk assessment methods applicable to the future linear collider, through its two technical approaches for ILC and CLIC. We also address disparities in cost risk assessment imposed by regional differences in regulations, procedures and practices.

  18. Reliability of the beam loss monitors system for the large hadron collider at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guaglio, G.

    2005-12-01

    The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out. The reliability figures of the BLMS have been calculated using a commercial software package (Isograph.). The effect of the variation of the parameters on the obtained results has been evaluated with a sensitivity analysis. The reliability model has been extended by the results of radiation tests. Design improvements, like redundant optical transmission, have been implemented in an iterative process. The proposed system is compliant with the reliability requirements. The model uncertainties are given by the limited knowledge of the thresholds levels of the superconductive magnets and of the locations of the losses along the ring. The implemented model allows modifications of the system, following the measuring of the hazard rates during the LHC life. It can also provide reference numbers to other accelerators which will implement similar technologies. (author)

  19. Beam profile for Malaysian electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar Ghazali; Muhamad Zahidee Taat

    2007-01-01

    This paper comprises of two calculations that require in designing a dose profile for an electron accelerator machine before its fabrication. The first is to calculate the beam deflection due to changes of high voltage (HV) supply as well as the deflection coil currents so that the electron beam will only scan at the window foil of 18 cm length and 6 cm width. Secondly, we also require to calculate the beam profile at 50 mm underneath the window foil. The electron gun that produces a beam of 10 mm diameter has to be oscillated in a sawtooth wave for the prescribed window size at frequencies of 50 Hz and 400 Hz along the length and width directions respectively. For the beam deflection, we apply a basic formula from Lorentz force law to obtain a set of HV supply and the coil current that is suitable for both deflections and this result can assist in designing the coil current against HV changes via an electronic controller. The dose profile was calculated using the RMS current formulation along the length direction. We found that the measured and the calculated RMS currents are in comparable for the case of 1 MeV, 50 mA accelerator facility that is going to be installed at Nuclear Malaysia complex. A similar measurement will be carried out for our locally designed accelerator of 150 KeV, 10 mA after fabrication and installation of the machine are completed. (Author)

  20. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 3.I: Accelerator R&D in the Technical Design Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barish, Barry; Buesser, Karsten; Burrows, Philip; Carwardine, John; Clark, Jeffrey; Durand, Hélène Mainaud; Dugan, Gerry; Elsen, Eckhard; Enomoto, Atsushi; Foster, Brian; Fukuda, Shigeki; Gai, Wei; Gastal, Martin; Geng, Rongli; Ginsburg, Camille; Guiducci, Susanna; Harrison, Mike; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kershaw, Keith; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Victor; List, Benno; Liu, Wanming; Michizono, Shinichiro; Nantista, Christopher; Osborne, John; Palmer, Mark; Paterson, James McEwan; Peterson, Thomas; Phinney, Nan; Pierini, Paolo; Ross, Marc; Rubin, David; Seryi, Andrei; Sheppard, John; Solyak, Nikolay; Stapnes, Steinar; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Toge, Nobu; Walker, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Akira; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  1. Realistic Approach for Beam Dynamics Simulation with Synchrotron Radiation in High Energy Circular Lepton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Glukhov, S A

    2017-01-01

    In extremely high energy circular lepton colliders, correct consideration of synchrotron radiation is important for beam dynamics simulation. We developed a fast precise effective method to track particles in a realistic lattice when the radiation effects are distributed along the orbit. In the present paper we study an effect of decreasing dynamic aperture due to radiation from quadrupole lenses in the FCC-ee lepton collider.

  2. A high luminosity superconducting mini collider for Phi meson production and particle beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.; Cline, D.; Kolonko, J.; Anderson, C.; Barletta, W.; Chargin, A.; Cornacchia, M.; Dalbacka, G.; Halbach, K.; Lueng, E.; Kimball, F.; Madura, D.; Patterson, L.

    1991-01-01

    A 510MeV electron-positron collider has been proposed at UCLA to study particle beam physics and Phi-Meson physics, at luminosities larger than 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . The collider consists of a single compact superconducting storage ring (SMC), with bending field of 4 T and a current larger than 1 A. The authors discuss the main characteristics of this system and its major technical components: superconducting dipoles, RF, vacuum, injection

  3. Spin Transparency Mode in the NICA Collider with Solenoid Siberian Snakes for Proton and Deuteron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2017-12-01

    Two solenoid Siberian Snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in spin transparency mode of the NICA collider. The snake solenoids with a total field integral of 2×50 T·m are placed into the straight sections of the NICA collider. It allows one to control polarization of protons and deuterons up to 13.5 GeV/c and 4 GeV/c respectively. The snakes introduce a strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Snakes are presented.

  4. Stabilization of Nanometre-Size Particle Beams in the Final Focus System of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S

    2003-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) study at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is developing the design of a 3 TeV e+ e- linear collider. The discovery reach of this machine depends on obtaining a luminosity of 1035 cm_2s_1, which will be done by colliding beams with transverse spot sizes in the nanometre range ≈ 60 × 0:7 nm2). Tolerances on fast mechanical stability of the focusing quadrupoles reach the 0.2 nm level. The serious concern of magnet stabilization for future linear colliders has been addressed by building a CERN test stand on magnet stability, bringing together state-of-the-art stabilization technology, latest equipment for vibration measurements and realistic magnet prototypes. For the first time an accelerator magnet was successfully stabilized to the sub-nanometre level, reducing its vibrations level by one order of magnitude with respect to the supporting ground. The best measurements indicate transverse RMS vibration amplitudes (above 4 Hz) of (0.79+0.08) nm ho...

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Department Nuclear Science and Technology Nonproliferation and National Security Nuclear & Particle Physics Collider-Accelerator Instrumentation Physics Superconducting Magnet RIKEN BNL Research Center Computational Sciences Computer Science and Mathematics BNL Scientific Data and Computing Center ...

  6. A Novel Method and Error Analysis for Beam Optics Measurements and Corrections at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Langner, Andy Sven; Rossbach, Jörg; Tomás, Rogelio

    2017-02-17

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently the world's largest particle accelerator with the highest center of mass energy in particle collision experiments. The control of the particle beam focusing is essential for the performance reach of such an accelerator. For the characterization of the focusing properties at the LHC, turn-by-turn beam position data is simultaneously recorded at numerous measurement devices (BPMs) along the accelerator, while an oscillation is excited on the beam. A novel analysis method for these measurements ($N$-BPM method) is developed here, which is based on a detailed analysis of systematic and statistical error sources and their correlations. It has been applied during the commissioning of the LHC for operation at an unprecedented energy of 6.5 TeV. In this process a stronger focusing than its design specifications has been achieved. This results in smaller transverse beam sizes at the collision points and allows for a higher rate of particle collisions. For the derivation of ...

  7. Accelerator complex for unstable beams at INS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomizawa, M.; Arai, S.; Doi, M.; Katayama, T.; Niki, K.; Tokuda, N.; Yoshizawa, M.

    1992-11-01

    The construction of the prototype facility of the Exotic arena in the Japan Hadron Project (JHP) is started in 1992 at the Institute for Nuclear Study (INS), University of Tokyo. The purpose of this facility is to study the various technical problems of the Exotic arena, and to perform the experiment on nuclear and astrophysics with unstable nuclear beam. The unstable nuclei produced by bombarding a thick target with 40 MeV proton beam from the existing SF cyclotron are ionized in the ion sources, mass-analyzed by an ISOL, and transported to the accelerator complex. The accelerator complex consists of a split coaxial RFQ and an interdigital H type linac. The construction of accelerator will be completed in fiscal year 1994. The development of the SCRFQ and the IH linac which is suitable to the post-accelerator of the SCRFQ are reported. Charge stripper and the beam matching between the SCRFQ and the IH linac are explained. A buncher is necessary for the matching of longitudinal phase space between the SCRFQ and the IH linac. (K.I.)

  8. Accelerator beam application in science and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, M.

    1996-01-01

    Various accelerator beams are being used widely in science and industry. The area of their applications is so wide and rapidly expanding. This paper focuses on recent efforts made in the field of radiation chemistry, especially in materials development using electron and ion beams. Concerning the applications of electron beams, synthesis of SiC fibers, improvement of radiation resistance of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and preparation of an adsorbent for uranium recovery from sea water were described. In the synthesis of SiC, the electron beams were used effectively to cross-link precursor fibers to prevent their deformation upon heating for their pyrolysis to SiC fibers. The improvement of radiation resistance of PTFE was resulted successfully by its crosslinking. As to the preparation of the adsorbent for uranium recovery, chelating resins containing amidoxime groups were shown to work as a good adsorbent of uranium from sea water. The Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI completed the accelerator facility named TIARA for R and D of ion beam applications three years ago. Some results were presented on the studies about radiation effects on solar cells and LSIs for space use and synthesis of functional materials. Radiation resistance of solar cells was tested with both electron and proton beams using a beam scanning technique for the irradiation to a wide area, and ultra-fast transient current induced by heavy ion microbeam was measured for studies on mechanisms of single event upset (SEU) in LSIs. In the synthesis of organic functional materials, a temperature responsive particle track membrane was developed. Techniques for RBS and NRA using heavy ion beams were established for analyzing structures of multi-layered materials. Single crystalline thin film of diamond was successfully formed on Si substrate under the deposition of mass separated C-12 ions of 100 eV. (author)

  9. Beam Phase Detection for Proton Therapy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Getta, Markus; Kolesov, Sergej; Pupeter, Nico; Stephani, Thomas; Timmer, J

    2005-01-01

    The industrial application of proton cyclotrons for medical applications has become one of the important contributions of accelerator physics during the last years. This paper describes an advanced vector demodulating technique used for non-destructive measurements of beam intensity and beam phase over 360°. A computer controlled I/Q-based phase detector with a very large dynamic range of 70 dB permits the monitoring of beam intensity, phase and eventually energy for wide range of beam currents down to -130 dBm. In order to avoid interference from the fundamental cyclotron frequency the phase detection is performed at the second harmonic frequency. A digital low pass filter with adjustable bandwidth and steepness is implemented to improve accuracy. With a sensitivity of the capacitive pickup in the beam line of 30 nV per nA of proton beam current at 250 MeV, accurate phase and intensity measurements can be performed with beam currents down to 3.3 nA.

  10. Production of an Accelerated Oxygen-14 Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, James; O'Neil, James P.; Cerny, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was Carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 108 ions/sec have been utilized for experiments. Development of Oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 seconds and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of Oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, Oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has been built and is operational, and initial tests of accelerating an Oxygen-14 beam have been performed

  11. Production of an accelerated oxygen-14 beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; O'Neil, J.P.; Cerny, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 10 8 ions/s have been utilized for experiments. Development of oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 s and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has been built and is operational, and initial tests of accelerating an oxygen-14 beam have been performed

  12. Adiabatic matching section for plasma accelerated beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Floettmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An adiabatic matching section is discussed as option to control the divergence and emittance growth of a beam exiting a plasma channel. Based on a general analytical solution of a focusing channel with varying focusing strength, a focusing profile is proposed which allows for a fast expansion of the beam size while keeping the emittance growth minimal. The solution is also applicable to other cases, e.g., the matching of a positron source to the downstream accelerating section, which are, however, not discussed in this contribution.

  13. CTF3 Drive Beam Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2002-01-01

    The 3 GHz drive beam accelerator of the CLIC Test Facility CTF3, currently under construction at CERN, will be equipped with 16 novel SICA (Slotted Iris – Constant Aperture) accelerating structures. The slotted irises couple out the potentially disruptive induced transverse HOM energy to integrated silicon carbide loads (dipole mode Q's below 20). The use of nose cones for detuning allows a constant inner aperture (34 mm). The structures will be 1.2 m long and consist of 34 cells. A first 6 cell prototype structure has been tested successfully up to power levels of 100 MW (nominal: 30 MW), corresponding to surface electric field levels of 180 MV/m.

  14. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.

    1993-01-01

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications

  15. Beam Dynamics Studies for a Laser Acceleration Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Palmer, Dennis T; Siemann, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The NLC Test Accelerator at SLAC was built to address various beam dynamics issues for the Next Linear Collider. An S-Band RF gun, originally proposed for the NLCTA, is being installed together with a large-angle extraction line at 60 MeV. This is followed by a matching section, final focus and buncher for the laser acceleration experiment, E163. The laser-electron interaction area is followed by a broad range, high resolution spectrometer (HES) for electron bunch analysis. The RF gun is discussed in another paper. We discuss only the beam dynamics and high resolution analysis system at 6 MeV based on using Parmela and high-order Transport for bunch charges from 50 pC to 1 nC. Beyond the diagnostics, this system uses the emittance compensating solenoids and a low energy, high resolution spectrometer (LES) to help tune for best operating point and match to the linac. Optical symmetries in the design of the 25.5° extraction line provide 1:1 phase space transfer without linear dispersion or use of sextu...

  16. A novel method and error analysis for beam optics measurements and corrections at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Andy Sven

    2017-02-03

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently the world's largest particle accelerator with the highest center of mass energy in particle collision experiments. The control of the particle beam focusing is essential for the performance reach of such an accelerator. For the characterization of the focusing properties at the LHC, turn-by-turn beam position data is simultaneously recorded at numerous measurement devices (BPMs) along the accelerator, while an oscillation is excited on the beam. A novel analysis method for these measurements (N-BPM method) is developed here, which is based on a detailed analysis of systematic and statistical error sources and their correlations. It has been applied during the commissioning of the LHC for operation at an unprecedented energy of 6.5TeV. In this process a stronger focusing than its design specifications has been achieved. This results in smaller transverse beam sizes at the collision points and allows for a higher rate of particle collisions. For the derivation of the focusing parameters at many synchrotron light sources, the change of the beam orbit is observed, which is induced by deliberate changes of magnetic fields (orbit response matrix). In contrast, the analysis of turn-by-turn beam position measurements is for many of these machines less precise due to the distance between two BPMs. The N-BPM method overcomes this limitation by allowing to include the measurement data from more BPMs in the analysis. It has been applied at the ALBA synchrotron light source and compared to the orbit response method. The significantly faster measurement with the N-BPM method is a considerable advantage in this case. Finally, an outlook is given to the challenges which lie ahead for the control of the beam focusing at the HL-LHC, which is a future major upgrade of the LHC.

  17. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  18. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized

  19. Beam Transport Testing for the Production Accelerator Arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-02-14

    The beam transport system is designed to deliver an electron beam from the accelerator to the target. The design of the beam line depends on beam parameter (energy, energy spread, etc.) and target geometry. Elements of the beam transport system should provide transportation, focusing, and positioning of the beam onto the target surface.

  20. Particle trapping and beam transport issues in laser driven accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwenael, Fubiani; Wim, Leemans; Eric, Esarey

    2000-10-01

    The LWFA and colliding pulses [1][2] sheme are capable of producing very compact electron bunches where the longitudinal size is much smaller than the transverse size. In this case, even if the electrons are relativistic, space charge force can affect the longitudinal and transverse bunch properties [3][4]. In the Self-modulated regime and the colliding pulse sheme, electrons are trapped from the background plasma and rapidly accelerated. We present theoretical studies of the generation and transport of electron bunches in LWFAs. The space charge effect induced in the bunch is modelled assuming the bunch is ellipsoid like. Beam transport in vacuum, comparison between gaussian and waterbag distribution, comparison between envelope model and PIC simulation will be discussed. This work is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy & Nuclear Physics, High Energy Physics Division, of the U.S Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 [1]E.Esarey et al.,IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-24,252 (1996); W.P. Leemans et al, ibidem, 331. [2]D. Umstadter et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2073 (1996); E.Esarey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2682 (1997); C.B Schroeder et al., Phys. Rev. E59, 6037 (1999) [3]DESY M87-161 (1987); DESY M88-013 (1988) [4] R.W. Garnett and T.P Wangler, IEEE Part. Acce. Conf. (1991)

  1. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter Gregory [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  2. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research

  3. Simulations of multistage intense ion beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, S.A.; Poukey, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    An analytic theory for magnetically insulated, multistage acceleration of high intensity ion beams, where the diamagnetic effect due to electron flow is important, has been presented by Slutz and Desjarlais. The theory predicts the existence of two limiting voltages called V 1 (W) and V 2 (W), which are both functions of the injection energy qW of ions entering the accelerating gap. As the voltage approaches V 1 (W), unlimited beam-current density can penetrate the gap without the formation of a virtual anode because the dynamic gap goes to zero. Unlimited beam current density can penetrate an accelerating gap above V 2 (W), although a virtual anode is formed. It was found that the behavior of these limiting voltages is strongly dependent on the electron density profile. The authors have investigated the behavior of these limiting voltages numerically using the 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAGIC. Results of these simulations are consistent with the superinsulated analytic results. This is not surprising, since the ignored coordinate eliminates instabilities known to be important from studies of single stage magnetically insulated ion diodes. To investigate the effect of these instabilities the authors have simulated the problem with the 3-D PIC code QUICKSILVER, which indicates behavior that is consistent with the saturated model

  4. The positioning device of beam probes for accelerator LUE-200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becher, Yu.; Kalmykov, A.V.; Minashkin, M.F.; Sumbaev, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    The description of a device for the positioning of sliding beam probes which is the part of the beam diagnostic system for the LUE-200 electron linac of IREN installation is presented. The device provides remote control of input-output operation of beam probes of five diagnostic stations established in an accelerating tract and in the beam transportation channel of the accelerator

  5. Investigation of beam self-polarization in the future e+e− circular collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075800

    2016-10-24

    The use of resonant depolarization has been suggested for precise beam energy measurements (better than 100 keV) in the eþe− Future Circular Collider (FCC-eþe−) for Z and WW physics at 45 and 80 GeV beam energy respectively. Longitudinal beam polarization would benefit the Z peak physics program; however it is not essential and therefore it will be not investigated here. In this paper the possibility of selfpolarized leptons is considered. Preliminary results of simulations in presence of quadrupole misalignments and beam position monitors (BPMs) errors for a simplified FCC-eþe− ring are presented.

  6. Fast and Precise Beam Energy Measurement using Compton Backscattering at e+e- Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminskiy, V V; Muchnoi, N Yu; Zhilich, V N

    2017-01-01

    The report describes a method for a fast and precise beam energy measurement in the beam energy range 0.5-2 GeV and its application at various e+e- colliders. Low-energy laser photons interact head-on with the electron or positron beam and produce Compton backscattered photons whose energy is precisely measured by HPGe detector. The method allows measuring the beam energy with relative accuracy of ∼2-5.10-5. The method was successfully applied at VEPP-4M, VEPP-3, VEPP-2000 (BINP, Russia) and BEPC-II (IHEP, China).

  7. Proceedings of the 2. International Linear Collider Test-beam workshop - LCTW'09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormser, G.; Poeschl, R.; Takeshi, M.; Yu, J.; Hauptman, J.; Jeans, D.; Velthuis, J.; Repond, J.; Stanitzki, M.; Chefdeville, M.; Pauletta, G.; Hauptman, J.; Kulis, S.; Charpy, A.; Rivera, R.; Turchetti, M.; Vos, M.; Dehmelt, K.; Settles, R.; Decotigny, D.; Killenberg, M.; Haas, D.; Gaede, F.; Graf, N.; Wing, M.; Gaede, F.; Karstensen, S.; Meyners, N.; Hast, C.; Vrba, V.; Takeshita, T.; Kawagoe, K.; Linssen, L.; Ramberg, E.; Demarteau, M.; Fisk, H.E.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Videau, H.; Boudry, V.; Hauptman, J.; Lipton, R.; Nelson, T.

    2009-01-01

    At this workshop detector and simulation experts have described and discussed the necessary ILC (International Linear Collider) detector research and development program in view of its need for test beams. This workshop has provided an opportunity to evaluate the capabilities and shortcomings of existing facilities in the context of planned test beam activities. This document gathers together the slides of the presentations. The presentations have been classified into 4 topics: -) plans of sub-detectors - calorimetry, silicon and gaseous tracking, -) data acquisition, -) test beam facilities, and -) resources and infrastructure for future test beams

  8. Experience with High-Intensity Beam Scraping and Tail Population at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Burkart, F; Bruce, R; Mirarchi, D; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The population of beam tails at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a source of concern for the operation at higher beam energies and intensities when even small fractions of the beam could represent a potential danger is case of slow or fast losses, e.g. caused by orbit transients or by collimator movements. Different studies have been performed using the technique of collimator scans to probe the beam tail population in different conditions. The experience accumulated during the operation at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV is reviewed.

  9. Beam-Based Error Identification and Correction Methods for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)692826; Tomas, Rogelio; Nilsson, Thomas

    2014-06-10

    Modern particle accelerators have tight tolerances on the acceptable deviation from their desired machine parameters. The control of the parameters is of crucial importance for safe machine operation and performance. This thesis focuses on beam-based methods and algorithms to identify and correct errors in particle accelerators. The optics measurements and corrections of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which resulted in an unprecedented low β-beat for a hadron collider is described. The transverse coupling is another parameter which is of importance to control. Improvement in the reconstruction of the coupling from turn-by-turn data has resulted in a significant decrease of the measurement uncertainty. An automatic coupling correction method, which is based on the injected beam oscillations, has been successfully used in normal operation of the LHC. Furthermore, a new method to measure and correct chromatic coupling that was applied to the LHC, is described. It resulted in a decrease of the chromatic coupli...

  10. Accelerating polarized beams at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing resonances. During acceleration, a depolarizing resonance is crossed whenever the spin precession frequency equals the frequency with which spin-perturbing magnetic fields are encountered. There are two main types of depolarizing resonances corresponding to the possible sources of such fields: imperfection resonances, which are driven by magnet errors and misalignments, and intrinsic resonances, driven by the focusing fields. The resonance conditions are usually expressed in terms of the spin tune ν s , which is defined as the number of spin precessions per revolution. For an ideal planar accelerator, where orbiting particles experience only the vertical guide field, the spin tune is equal to Gγ, where G = 1.7928 is the anomalous magnetic moment of the proton and γ is the relativistic Lorentz factor. The resonance condition for imperfection depolarizing resonances arise when ν s = Gγ = n, where n is an integer. Imperfection resonances are therefore separated by only 523 MeV energy steps. The condition for intrinsic resonances is ν s = Gγ = kP ± ν y , where k is an integer, ν y is the vertical betatron tune and P is the superperiodicity. For the AGS, P = 12 and ν y ∼ 8.8. For most of the time during the acceleration cycle, the precession direction, or stable spin direction, coincides with the main vertical magnetic field. Close to a resonance, the stable spin direction is perturbed away from the vertical direction by the resonance driving fields. When a polarized beam is accelerated through an isolated resonance, the final polarization can be calculated analytically

  11. Design of four-beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shota; Murata, Aki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu

    2017-09-01

    The multi-beam acceleration method is an acceleration technique for low-energy high-intensity heavy ion beams, which involves accelerating multiple beams to decrease space charge effects, and then integrating these beams by a beam funneling system. At the Tokyo Institute of Technology a two beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator was developed using a two beam laser ion source with direct plasma injection scheme. This system accelerated a carbon ion beam with a current of 108 mA (54 mA/channel × 2) from 5 up to 60 keV/u. In order to demonstrate that a four-beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator is suitable for high-intensity heavy ion beam acceleration, we have been developing a four-beam prototype. A four-beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator consists of sixteen RFQ electrodes (4 × 4 set) with stem electrodes installed alternately on the upper and lower ridge electrodes. As a part of this development, we have designed a four-beam IH-RFQ linear accelerator using three dimensional electromagnetic simulation software and beam tracking simulation software. From these simulation results, we have designed the stem electrodes, the center plate and the side shells by evaluating the RF properties such as the resonance frequency, the power loss and the electric strength distribution between the RFQ electrodes.

  12. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities

  13. Impact of the 7 TeV/c Large Hadron Collider proton beam on a copper target

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Goddard, B; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kain, V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Temporal, M

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will allow for collision between two 7 TeV/c proton beams, each comprising 2808 bunches with 1.1*10/sup 11 / protons per bunch, traveling in opposite direction. The bunch length is 0.5 ns and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns so that the duration of the entire beam is about 89 mu s. The beam power profile in the transverse direction is a Gaussian with a standard deviation of 0.2 mm. The energy stored in each beam is about 350 MJ that is sufficient to melt 500 kg of copper. In case of a failure in the machine protection systems, the entire beam could impact directly onto an accelerator equipment. A first estimate of the scale of damage resulting from such a failure has been assessed for a solid copper target hit by the beam by carrying out three- dimensional energy deposition calculations and two-dimensional numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of the target. This work has shown that the penetration depth of the LHC protons will be be...

  14. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  15. Selected topics in particle accelerators: Proceedings of the CAP meetings. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1995-01-01

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Center for Accelerator Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory Editing and changes to the authors' contributions in this Report were made only to fulfill the publication requirements. This volume includes notes and transparencies on nine presentations: ''The Energy Exchange and Efficiency Consideration in Klystrons'', ''Some Properties of Microwave RF Sources for Future Colliders + Overview of Microwave Generation Activity at the University of Maryland'', ''Field Quality Improvements in Superconducting Magnets for RHIC'', ''Hadronic B-Physics'', ''Spiking Pulses from Free Electron Lasers: Observations and Computational Models'', ''Crystalline Beams in Circular Accelerators'', ''Accumulator Ring for AGS ampersand Recent AGS Performance'', ''RHIC Project Machine Status'', and ''Gamma-Gamma Colliders.''

  16. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  17. The LACARA Vacuum Laser Accelerator Experiment: Beam Positioning and Alignment in a Strong Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Marshall, T. C.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Wang, Changbiao; LaPointe, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    LACARA (laser cyclotron auto-resonance accelerator) is a vacuum laser accelerator of electrons that is under construction at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is expected that the experiment will be assembled by September 2006; this paper presents progress towards this goal. According to numerical studies, as an electron bunch moves along the LACARA solenoidal magnetic field (∼5.2 T, length ∼1 m), it will be accelerated from 50 to ∼75 MeV by interacting with a 0.8 TW Gaussian-mode circularly polarized optical pulse provided by the ATF CO2 10.6μm laser system. The LACARA laser transport optics must handle 10 J and be capable of forming a Gaussian beam inside the solenoid with a 1.4 mm waist and a Rayleigh range of 60 cm. The electron optics must transport a bunch having input emittance of 0.015 mm-mrad and 100 μm waist through the magnet. Precision alignment between the electron beam and the solenoid magnetic axis is required, and a method to achieve this is described in detail. Emittance- filtering may be necessary to yield an accelerated bunch having a narrow (∼1%) energy-spread

  18. Asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Colestock, P.; Goderre, G.; Johnson, D.; Martin, P.; Holt, J.; Kaplan, D.

    1993-01-01

    The study of CP violation in beauty decay is one of the key challenges facing high energy physics. Much work has not yielded a definitive answer how this study might best be performed. However, one clear conclusion is that new accelerator facilities are needed. Proposals include experiments at asymmetric electron-positron colliders and in fixed-target and collider modes at LHC and SSC. Fixed-target and collider experiments at existing accelerators, while they might succeed in a first observation of the effect, will not be adequate to study it thoroughly. Giomataris has emphasized the potential of a new approach to the study of beauty CP violation: the asymmetric proton collider. Such a collider might be realized by the construction of a small storage ring intersecting an existing or soon-to-exist large synchrotron, or by arranging collisions between a large synchrotron and its injector. An experiment at such a collider can combine the advantages of fixed-target-like spectrometer geometry, facilitating triggering, particle identification and the instrumentation of a large acceptance, while the increased √s can provide a factor > 100 increase in beauty-production cross section compared to Tevatron or HERA fixed-target. Beams crossing at a non-zero angle can provide a small interaction region, permitting a first-level decay-vertex trigger to be implemented. To achieve large √s with a large Lorentz boost and high luminosity, the most favorable venue is the high-energy booster (HEB) at the SSC Laboratory, though the CERN SPS and Fermilab Tevatron are also worth considering

  19. Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

  20. Calculation of integrated luminosity for beams stored in the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A model for calculating the integrated luminosity of beams stored in the Tevatron collider will be presented. The model determines the instantaneous luminosity by calculating the overlap integral of bunched beams passing through the interaction region. The calculation accounts for the variation in beam size due to the beta functions and also for effects due to finite longitudinal emittance and non-zero dispersion in the interaction region. The integrated luminosity is calculated for the beams as they evolve due to processes including collisions and intrabeam scattering. The model has been applied to both the extant and upgraded Tevatron collider, but is not limited to them. The original motivation for developing the computer model was to determine the reduction in luminosity due to beams with non-zero longitudinal emittances. There are two effects: the transverse beam size is increased where the dispersion is non-zero; the finite length of the beam bunch combined with an increasing β function results in an increased transverse beam size at the ends of the bunch. The derivation of a sufficiently useful analytic expression for the luminosity proved to be intractable. Instead, a numerical integration computer program was developed to calculate the luminosity in the presence of a finite longitudinal emittance. The program was then expanded into a model which allows the luminosity to vary due to changes in emittances and reduction in bunch intensities. At that point, it was not difficult to calculate the integrated luminosity. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Numerical Verification of the Power Transfer and Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Candel, Arno; NG, C; Rawat, V; Schussman, G; Ko, K; Syratchev, I; Grudiev, A; Wuensch, W

    2011-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its two-beam accelerator (TBA) concept envisions complex 3D structures, which must be modeled to high accuracy so that simulation results can be directly used to prepare CAD drawings for machining. The required simulations include not only the fundamental mode properties of the accelerating structures but also the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), as well as the coupling between the two systems. Time-domain simulations will be performed to understand pulse formation, wakefield damping, fundamental power transfer and wakefield coupling in these structures. Applying SLAC’s parallel finite element code suite, these large-scale problems will be solved on some of the largest supercomputers available. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel two-beam accelerator scheme.

  2. Orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Siberian snakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A D; Butenko, A V; Kekelidze, V D; Mikhaylov, V A; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yu N; Kondratenko, A M

    2016-01-01

    Two solenoid Siberian snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in the “spin transparency” mode of the NICA collider. The field integrals of the solenoid snakes for protons and deuterons at maximum momentum of 13.5 GeV/c are equal to 2×50 T·m and 2×160 T·m respectively. The snakes introduce strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in NICA collider with solenoid snakes are presented. (paper)

  3. Reactor - and accelerator-based filtered beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, A.J.; Harvey, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The neutrons produced in high flux nuclear reactors and in accelerator, induced fission and spallation reactions, represent the most intense sources of neutrons available for research. However, the neutrons from these sources are not monoenergetic, covering the broad range extending from 10 -3 eV up to 10 7 eV or so. In order to make quantitative measurements of the effects of neutrons and their dependence on neutron energy it is desirable to have mono-energetic neutron sources. The paper describes briefly methods of obtaining mono-energetic neutrons and different methods of filtration. This is followed by more detailed discussion of neutron window filters and a summary of the filtered beam facilities using this technique. The review concludes with a discussion of the main applications of filtered beams and their present and future importance

  4. Production of an accelerated oxygen-14 beam

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, J; Cerny, J

    2003-01-01

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 10 sup 8 ions/s have been utilized for experiments. Development of oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 s and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has bee...

  5. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-01

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed

  6. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-08

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed.

  7. E-Beam Driven Accelerators: Working Group Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggli, P.; Southern California U.; Ng, J.S.T.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    The working group has identified the parameters of an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The new design brings the center of mass energy of the collider from 1 to 2 TeV. The afterburner is located in the final focus section of the collider, operates at a gradient of ∼4 GeV/m, and is only about 125 m long. Very important issues remain to be addressed, and include the physics and design of the positron side of the afterburner, as well as of the final focus system. Present plasma wakefield accelerator experiments have reached a level of maturity and of relevance to the afterburner, that make it timely to involve the high energy physics and accelerator community in the afterburner design process. The main result of this working group is the first integration of the designs of a future linear collider and an afterburner

  8. First Beam and High-Gradient Cryomodule Commissioning Results of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Darren; et al.

    2015-06-01

    The advanced superconducting test accelerator at Fermilab has accelerated electrons to 20 MeV and, separately, the International Linear Collider (ILC) style 8-cavity cryomodule has achieved the ILC performance milestone of 31.5 MV/m per cavity. When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one ILC-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We report on the results of first beam, the achievement of our cryomodule to ILC gradient specifications, and near-term future plans for the facility.

  9. A beam-matching concept for medical linear accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöström, David; Bjelkengren, Ulf; Ottosson, Wiviann

    2009-01-01

    not revealed by the vendor-defined acceptance criteria, whereas the other six accelerators were satisfactorily matched. The beam-matching acceptance criteria defined by the vendor are not strict enough to guarantee optimal beam-match. Deviations related to dose calculations and to beam-matched accelerators may...

  10. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  11. Femtosecond planar electron beam source for micron-scale dielectric wake field accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Marshall

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A new accelerator, LACARA (laser-driven cyclotron autoresonance accelerator, under construction at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is to be powered by a 1 TW CO_{2} laser beam and a 50 MeV injected electron pulse. LACARA will produce inside a 2 m, 6 T solenoid a 100 MeV gyrating electron bunch, with ∼3% energy spread, approximately 1 psec in length with particles advancing in phase at the laser frequency, executing one cycle each 35 fsec. A beamstop with a small off axis channel will transmit a short beam pulse every optical cycle, thereby producing a train of about 30, 3.5 fsec long, 1–3 pC microbunches for each laser pulse. We describe here a novel accelerator, a micron-scale dielectric wake field accelerator driven by a 500 MeV LACARA-type injector that takes the output train of microbunches and transforms them into a near-rectangular cross section having a narrow dimension of ∼10 μm and height of ∼150 μm using a magnetic quadrupole; these bunches may be injected into a planar dielectric-lined waveguide (slightly larger than the bunch where cumulative buildup of wake fields can lead to an accelerating gradient >1 GV/m. This proposed vacuum-based wake field structure is physically rigid and capable of microfabrication accuracy, factors important in staging a large number of accelerator modules. Furthermore, the accelerating gradients it promises are comparable with those for plasma accelerators. A LACARA unit for preparing suitable bunches at 500 MeV is described. Physics issues are discussed, including bunch spreading and transport, bunch shaping, coherent diffraction radiation from the aperture, dielectric breakdown, and bunch stability in the rectangular wake field structure.

  12. Beam dynamics of the interaction region solenoid in a linear collider due to a crossing angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tenenbaum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Future linear colliders may require a nonzero crossing angle between the two beams at the interaction point (IP. This requirement in turn implies that the beams will pass through the strong interaction region solenoid with an angle, and thus that the component of the solenoidal field perpendicular to the beam trajectory is nonzero. The interaction of the beam and the solenoidal field in the presence of a crossing angle will cause optical effects not observed for beams passing through the solenoid on axis; these effects include dispersion, deflection of the beam, and synchrotron radiation effects. For a purely solenoidal field, the optical effects which are relevant to luminosity exactly cancel at the IP when the influence of the solenoid’s fringe field is taken into account. Beam size growth due to synchrotron radiation in the solenoid is proportional to the fifth power of the product of the solenoidal field, the length of the solenoid, and the crossing angle. Examples based on proposed linear collider detector solenoid configurations are presented.

  13. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Previtali, Valentina [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bruce, Roderik [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Redaelli, Stefano [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, Adriana [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salvachua Ferrando, Belen [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  14. Particle accelerators, colliders, and the story of high energy physics charming the cosmic snake

    CERN Document Server

    Jayakumar, Raghavan

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic mythological Cosmic Serpent, Ouroboros, is said to be coiled in the depths of the sea, surrounding the Earth with its tail in its mouth. In physics, this snake is a metaphor for the Universe, where the head, symbolizing the largest entity – the Cosmos – is one with the tail, symbolizing the smallest – the fundamental particle. Particle accelerators, colliders and detectors are built by physicists and engineers to uncover the nature of the Universe while discovering its building blocks. “Charming the Cosmic Snake” takes the readers through the science behind these experimental machines: the physics principles that each stage of the development of particle accelerators helped to reveal, and the particles they helped to discover. The book culminates with a description of the Large Hadron Collider, one of the world’s largest and most complex machines operating in a 27-km circumference tunnel near Geneva. That collider may prove or disprove many of our basic theories about the nature of matt...

  15. Physics with very high energy e+e- colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, L.; Cundy, D.; Darriulat, P.; Ellis, J.; Field, J.; Fischer, H.; Gabathuler, E.; Gaillard, M.K.; Hoffmann, H.; Johnson, K.; Keil, E.; Palmonari, F.; Preparata, G.; Richter, B.; Rubbia, C.; Steinberger, J.; Willis, W.; Winter, K.; Wiik, B.

    1976-01-01

    This report consists of a collection of documents produced by a Study Group on Large Electron-Positron Storage Rings (LEP). The reactions of interest in the weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions are discussed. The technical feasibility of the relevant experiments is investigated by attempting, in each case, the design of an experimental set-up. Event rates are estimated using currently prevailing theoretical models and by extrapolation of results at present accelerators. A number of technical reports previously issued by members of the LEP Design Study Group are included as appendices. (author)

  16. Challenges in future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S

    2002-01-01

    For decades, electron-positron colliders have been complementing proton-proton colliders. But the circular LEP, the largest e/sup -/e /sup +/ collider, represented an energy limit beyond which energy losses to synchrotron radiation necessitate moving to e/sup -/e/sup + / linear colliders (LCs), thereby raising new challenges for accelerator builders. Japanese-American, German, and European collaborations have presented options for the "Future Linear Collider " (FLC). Key accelerator issues for any FLC option are the achievement of high enough energy and luminosity. Damping rings, taking advantage of the phenomenon of synchrotron radiation, have been developed as the means for decreasing beam size, which is crucial for ensuring a sufficiently high rate of particle-particle collisions. Related challenges are alignment and stability in an environment where even minute ground motion can disrupt performance, and the ability to monitor beam size. The technical challenges exist within a wider context of socioeconomi...

  17. Beam emittance and the effects of the rf, space charge and wake fields: Application to the ATF photoelectron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Laser driven photoelectron guns are of interest for use in new methods of accelerations, future development of Linear Colliders and new experiments such as Free Electron laser (IFEL). Such guns are potential source of low emittance-high current and short bunch length electron beams, where the emitted electrons are accelerated quickly to a relativistic energy by a strong rf, electric field in the cavity. We present a brief overview of the beam dynamic studies, e.g. emittance for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ATF high brightness photocathode radio frequency gun (now in operation), and show the effects of the rf, Space Charge, and Wake fields on the photoelectrons. 4 refs., 7 figs

  18. Intense γ-ray generation for a polarized positron beam in a linear collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyahara

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available γ-ray generation by Compton backscattering in an optical lens series with periodic focal points is considered to produce a polarized positron beam for a linear collider. The lens series is composed of 20 unit cells with a length of 210 mm. Each lens has a hole to pass an electron beam with an energy of 5.8 GeV and the generated γ rays. It is shown by diffraction analysis that laser beam loss in the series is very small, and the beam size is periodically reduced to 26 μm. Electron beam size is reduced to 34 μm in a superconducting solenoid with a field of 15 T. To get a required γ-ray yield of 7×10^{15} γ/s, only one circularly polarized CO_{2} laser source with a power of 24 kW is needed.

  19. Proton external beam in the TANDAR Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, R.; Schuff, J.A.; Perez de la Hoz, A.; Debray, M.E.; Hojman, D.; Kreiner, A.J.; Kesque, J.M.; Saint-Martin, G.; Oppezzo, O.; Bernaola, O.A.; Molinari, B.L.; Duran, H.A.; Policastro, L.; Palmieri, M.; Ibanez, J.; Stoliar, P.; Mazal, A.; Caraballo, M.E.; Burlon, A.; Cardona, M.A.; Vazquez, M.E.; Salfity, M.F.; Ozafran, M.J.; Naab, F.; Levinton, G.; Davidson, M.; Buhler, M.

    1998-01-01

    An external proton beam has been obtained in the TANDAR accelerator with radiological and biomedical purposes. The protons have excellent physical properties for their use in radiotherapy allowing a very good accuracy in the dose spatial distribution inside the tissue so in the side direction as in depth owing to the presence of Bragg curve. The advantage of the accuracy in the dose localization with proton therapy is good documented (M. Wagner, Med. Phys. 9, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. 10, 831 (1983); M.R. Raju, Rad. Res. 145, 391 (1996)). It was obtained external proton beams with energies between 15-25 MeV, currents between 2-10 p A and a uniform transversal sections of 40 mm 2 approximately. It was realized dosimetric evaluations with CR39 and Makrofol foliation. The irradiations over biological material contained experiences In vivo with laboratory animals, cellular and bacterial crops. It was fixed the optimal conditions of position and immobilization of the Wistar rats breeding for the In vivo studies. It was chosen dilutions and sowing techniques adequate for the exposition at the cellular and bacterial crops beam. (Author)

  20. Design of the Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure made from two halves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Milling on two longitudinally split halves is one method to manufacture accelerating structures. This method is simple and allows one to avoid electromagnetic fields at bonding joints, making it attractive in manufacturing high-gradient accelerating structures. An X-band structure design with strong wakefield damping based on this manufacturing approach is studied in this work as an alternative design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC main linac accelerating structures. The geometry of the structure is optimized to greatly reduce the surface fields, improve the efficiency, and suppress the wakefield. This structure features the baseline design of the CLIC main linac with additional advantages. This study may serve as a reference for designing other high frequency-band corrugated structures.

  1. Laser-driven acceleration with Bessel and Gaussian beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafizi, B.; Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of enhancing the energy gain in laser-driven accelerators by using Bessel laser beams is examined. Scaling laws are derived for the propagation length, acceleration gradient, and energy gain in various accelerators for both Gaussian and Bessel beam drivers. For equal beam powers, the energy gain can be increased by a factor of N 1/2 by utilizing a Bessel beam with N lobes, provided that the acceleration gradient is linearly proportional to the laser field. This is the case in the inverse free electron laser and the inverse Cherenkov accelerators. If the acceleration gradient is proportional to the square of the laser field (e.g., the laser wakefield, plasma beat wave, and vacuum beat wave accelerators), the energy gain is comparable with either beam profile. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Effects of RF breakdown on the beam in a CLIC prototype accelerator structure

    CERN Document Server

    Palaia, A; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V; Farabolini, W

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of RF breakdown in high-gradient accelerator structures on the accelerated beam is an extremely relevant aspect in the development of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and is one of the main issues addressed at the Two-beam Test Stand at the CLIC Test Facility 3 at CERN. During a RF breakdown large electro-magnetic fields are generated and produce parasitic magnetic fields which interact with the accelerated beam affecting its orbit and energy. We discuss here measurements of such effects observed on an electron beam accelerated in a CLIC prototype structure. Measurements of the trajectory of bunch-trains on a nanosecond time-scale showed fast changes in correspondence of breakdown which we compare with measurements of the relative beam spots on a scintillating screen. We identify different breakdown scenarios for which we offer an explanation based also on measurements of the power at the input and output ports of the accelerator structure. Finally we present the distribution of th...

  3. High-gradient two-beam accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu Kazakov

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel cavity structure is described that could be the basis for a two-beam, high-gradient, accelerator. Versions of the structure could be used for acceleration of beams of electrons, positrons, muons, protons, or heavier ions; with either electron or proton drive beams. The structure embodies cavities that are excited in several harmonically related eigenmodes, such that rf fields reach their peak values only during small portions of each basic rf period. This feature could help raise breakdown and pulse heating thresholds. The two-beam accelerator structure comprises chains of these cavities. In this configuration, no transfer elements are needed to couple rf energy from the drive beam to the accelerated beam, since both beams traverse the same cavities. Purposeful cavity detuning is used to provide much smaller deceleration for a high-current drive beam, than acceleration for a low-current accelerated beam, i.e., to provide a high transformer ratio. A self-consistent theory is presented to calculate idealized acceleration gradient, transformer ratio, and efficiency for energy transfer from the drive beam to the accelerated beam, for either parallel or antiparallel motion of the beams. The theory has been cast in dimensionless quantities so as to facilitate optimization with respect to efficiency, acceleration gradient, or transformer ratio, and to illuminate the interdependence of these parameters. Means for dramatically shortening the structure fill time are also described. However, no beam dynamics analysis is presented, so the range of parameters within which this new acceleration concept can be used will remain uncertain until it is established that stable beam transport along the structure using an appropriate focusing system is possible.

  4. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  5. Progress on optimization of the nonlinear beam dynamics in the MEIC collider rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosochkov, Y. M.; Cai, Y.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.; Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Lin, F.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  6. Progress on Optimization of the Nonlinear Beam Dynamics in the MEIC Collider Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli

    2015-09-01

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  7. Development of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] trim coil beam tube assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaritka, J.; Kelly, E.; Schneider, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses ≅9600 dipole magnets. The magnets have been carefully designed to exhibit minimal magnetic field harmonics. However, because of superconductor magnetization effects, iron saturation and conductor/coil positioning errors, certain harmonic errors are possible and must be corrected by use of multipole correctors called trim coils. For the most efficient use of axial space in the magnet, and lowest possible current, a distributed internal correction coil design is planned. The trim coil assembly is secured to the beam tube, a uhv tube with special strength, size, conductivity and vacuum. The report details the SSC trim coil/beam tube assembly specifications, history, and ongoing development

  8. Beam-related machine protection for the CERN Large Hadron Collider experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Appleby

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva stores 360 MJ per beam of protons at the top machine energy. This amount of energy storage presents a considerable challenge to the machine protection systems designed to protect both the machine and the six LHC experiments. This paper provides an overview of the machine protection systems relevant to the protection of the experiments, and demonstrates their operation and level of protection through a series of injection and stored beam failure scenarios. We conclude that the systems provide sufficient coverage for the protection of the experiments as far as reasonably possible.

  9. Progress in advanced accelerator concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-08-01

    A review is given of recent progress in this field, drawing heavily upon material presented at the Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts, The Abbey, June 12--18, 1994. Attention is addressed to (1) plasma based concepts, (2) photo-cathodes, (3) radio frequency sources and Two-Beam Accelerators, (4) near and far-field schemes (including collective accelerators), (5) beam handling and conditioning, and (6) exotic collider concepts (such as photon colliders and muon colliders)

  10. Specialized beam diagnostic measurements for an ADTT accelerator funnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John Douglas

    1995-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has proposed several CW-proton-beam facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) with beam-current densities greater than 5 mA/mm 2 . The primary beam-diagnostics-instrumentation requirement for these facilities is to provide sufficient beam information to understand and minimize beam-loss. To accomplish this task, the beam diagnostics instrumentation must measure beam parameters such as the projected centroids and profiles, total integrated current, and particle loss. Because of the high specific energy loss in materials at beam energies less than 20 MeV, interceptive measurements such as wire scanners or fluors cannot be used to determine beam profiles or centroids. Therefore, noninterceptive techniques must be used for on-line diagnosis of high-intensity CW beam at low energies. The beam funnel area of these proposed accelerator facilities provide a particular interesting beam measurement challenge. In this area of the accelerator, beam measurements must also sense how well the two funnel input-beams are matched to each other in phase space. This paper will discuss some of the measurement requirements for these proposed accelerator facilities and the various noninterceptive techniques to measure dual-beam funnel operation

  11. Specialized beam diagnostic measurements for an ADTT accelerator funnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has proposed several CW-proton-beam facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) with beam-current densities greater than 5 mA/mm 2 . The primary beam-diagnostics-instrumentation requirement for these facilities is to provide sufficient beam information to understand and minimize beam-loss. To accomplish this task, the beam diagnostics instrumentation must measure beam parameters such as the projected centroids and profiles, total integrated current, and particle loss. Because of the high specific energy loss in materials at beam energies less than 20 MeV, interceptive measurements such as wire scanners or fluors cannot be used to determine beam profiles or centroids. Therefore, noninterceptive techniques must be used for on-line diagnosis of high-intensity CW beam at low energies. The beam funnel area of these proposed accelerator facilities provide a particular interesting beam measurement challenge. In this area of the accelerator, beam measurements must also sense how well the two funnel-input-beams are matched to each other in phase space. This paper will discuss some of the measurement requirements for these proposed accelerator facilities and the various noninterceptive techniques to measure dual-beam funnel operation

  12. Specialized beam diagnostic measurements for an ADTT accelerator funnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1995-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has proposed several CW-proton-beam facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) with beam-current densities greater than 5 mA/mm{sup 2}. The primary beam-diagnostics-instrumentation requirement for these facilities is to provide sufficient beam information to understand and minimize beam-loss. To accomplish this task, the beam diagnostics instrumentation must measure beam parameters such as the projected centroids and profiles, total integrated current, and particle loss. Because of the high specific energy loss in materials at beam energies less than 20 MeV, interceptive measurements such as wire scanners or fluors cannot be used to determine beam profiles or centroids. Therefore, noninterceptive techniques must be used for on-line diagnosis of high-intensity CW beam at low energies. The beam funnel area of these proposed accelerator facilities provide a particular interesting beam measurement challenge. In this area of the accelerator, beam measurements must also sense how well the two funnel-input-beams are matched to each other in phase space. This paper will discuss some of the measurement requirements for these proposed accelerator facilities and the various noninterceptive techniques to measure dual-beam funnel operation.

  13. Electromagnetic fields and beam dynamics simulation for the superstructure of tesla linear collider considering field asymmetry caused by hom and power couplers

    CERN Document Server

    Lalayan, M V; Sobenin, N P; Shvedunov, V I; Zavadtsev, A A; Dohlus, M

    2001-01-01

    Some features of accelerating section field computation presented by the development of power and high order mode couplers for TESLA linear collider are considered. The devices mentioned produce electromagnetic field asymmetry in the beam area, thus causing transverse kick. For this kick and its influence on beam under acceleration parameters estimation the dynamics modelling calculations were done. 3D-simulation code MAFIA was used for field computation. These data were further used in beam dynamics calculations by means of TRMTrace code. Standing wave mode was simulated while considering HOM couplers, and travelling wave in case of power couplers. Transverse kicks and focussing forces are calculated for one HOM coupler design and two coaxial FM couplers.

  14. Experimental demonstration of 3D accelerating beam arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianghua; Li, Runze; Yan, Shaohui; Yao, Baoli; Gao, Peng; Han, Guoxia; Lei, Ming

    2016-04-10

    Accelerating beams have attracted much attention in the frontiers of optical physics and technology owing to their unique propagation dynamics of nondiffracting, self-healing, and freely accelerating along curved trajectories. Such behaviors essentially arise from the particular phase factor occurring in their spatial frequency spectrum, e.g., the cubic phase associated to the spectrum of Airy beam. In this paper, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a sort of accelerating beam arrays, which are composed of spatially separated accelerating beams. By superimposing kinoforms of multifocal patterns into the spatial frequency spectrum of accelerating beams, different types of beam arrays, e.g., Airy beam arrays and two-main-lobe accelerating beam arrays, are generated and measured by scanning a reflection mirror near the focal region along the optical axis. The 3D intensity patterns reconstructed from the experimental data present good agreement with the theoretical counterparts. The combination of accelerating beams with optical beam arrays proposed here may find potential applications in various fields such as optical microscopes, optical micromachining, optical trapping, and so on.

  15. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Cullinan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC requires beam position monitors (BPMs with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3 at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2/3  ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  16. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Li, H.

    1995-04-01

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Q ext and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes

  17. Accelerators course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA; Métral, E

    2006-01-01

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges

  18. The international linear collider. Technical design report. Vol. 3.2. Accelerator baseline design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolphsen, Chris; Barone, Maura; Barish, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: General parameters with layout and systems overview, main linac and SCRF technology, electron source, damping rings, ring to main linac, beam delivery system and machine detector interface, global accelerator control systems, availability with commissioning and operations, conventional facilities and siting, possible upgrade and staging options, project implementation planning, construction schedule, ILC TDR value estimate. (HSI)

  19. Accelerated Electron-Beam Formation with a High Capture Coefficient in a Parallel Coupled Accelerating Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernousov, Yu. D.; Shebolaev, I. V.; Ikryanov, I. M.

    2018-01-01

    An electron beam with a high (close to 100%) coefficient of electron capture into the regime of acceleration has been obtained in a linear electron accelerator based on a parallel coupled slow-wave structure, electron gun with microwave-controlled injection current, and permanent-magnet beam-focusing system. The high capture coefficient was due to the properties of the accelerating structure, beam-focusing system, and electron-injection system. Main characteristics of the proposed systems are presented.

  20. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  1. Beam and spin dynamics of hadron beams in intermediate-energy ring accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrach, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis beam and spin dynamics of ring accelerators are described. After a general theoretical treatment methods for the beam optimization and polarization conservation are discussed. Then experiments on spin manipulation at the COSY facility are considered. Finally the beam simulation and accelerator lay-out for the HESR with regards to the FAIR experiment are described. (HSI)

  2. Beam dynamics simulation of a double pass proton linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kilean; Qiang, Ji

    2017-04-01

    A recirculating superconducting linear accelerator with the advantage of both straight and circular accelerator has been demonstrated with relativistic electron beams. The acceleration concept of a recirculating proton beam was recently proposed [J. Qiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 795, 77 (2015, 10.1016/j.nima.2015.05.056)] and is currently under study. In order to further support the concept, the beam dynamics study on a recirculating proton linear accelerator has to be carried out. In this paper, we study the feasibility of a two-pass recirculating proton linear accelerator through the direct numerical beam dynamics design optimization and the start-to-end simulation. This study shows that the two-pass simultaneous focusing without particle losses is attainable including fully 3D space-charge effects through the entire accelerator system.

  3. Beam dynamics simulation of a double pass proton linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilean Hwang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A recirculating superconducting linear accelerator with the advantage of both straight and circular accelerator has been demonstrated with relativistic electron beams. The acceleration concept of a recirculating proton beam was recently proposed [J. Qiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 795, 77 (2015NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2015.05.056] and is currently under study. In order to further support the concept, the beam dynamics study on a recirculating proton linear accelerator has to be carried out. In this paper, we study the feasibility of a two-pass recirculating proton linear accelerator through the direct numerical beam dynamics design optimization and the start-to-end simulation. This study shows that the two-pass simultaneous focusing without particle losses is attainable including fully 3D space-charge effects through the entire accelerator system.

  4. Stochastic cooling in the CERN ISR during p-p colliding beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschardt, E.; Studer, M.

    1983-01-01

    When the ISR is used as a p - p collider a high-intensity proton beam in R1 collides with a low-intensity antiproton beam in R2 for periods of up to two weeks. The luminosity lifetime is increased with a vertical stochastic cooling system in R1 designed for currents up to 10 A with a total bandwidth of 3.3 GHz. Cooling rates up to 0.7%/hr have been obtained. The R2 antiprotons are cooled vertically with a 100-600 MHz system which decreases the initial beam height by up to a factor of 7 and increases the luminosity by a factor of 1.3 to 1.4. A momentum cooling system in R2 (frequency range 55-155 MHz) creates empty space within the antiproton stacking aperture. This allows several stacks from the antiproton accumulator to be stored in the ISR. With this system which uses the Palmer method it has been proven experimentally that momentum cooling and horizontal betatron cooling are obtained simultaneously if the betatron phase between pick-up and exciter is an odd number of half-betatron wavelengths. The cooling rate of the momentum cooling system which is powerlimited is typically 4%/hr at 26 GeV/c. The layout of the cooling system is shown schematically. The position of the various elements is mainly determined by the available free space and the lattice parameters. Future applications include vertical cooling of antiprotons in all three planes in an experiment where a circulating 3.5-7.5 GeV/c antiproton beam collides with a hydrogen gas jet target

  5. Characteristics of particle beam acceleration on KUMS tandem electrostatic accelerator 5SDH-2

    OpenAIRE

    谷池, 晃; 古山, 雄一; 北村, 晃

    2006-01-01

    The KUMS tandem electrostatic accelerator, 5SDH-2, was installed in 1996. Ten years have passed since it installed and we obtain some data for accelerator operations. We report the particle beam characteristics such as relation between beam species and switcher magnet current, and dependence of ion charge fraction on stripper gas thickness. We also try to generate nitrogen ion beams, and low energy ion beams.

  6. Low emittance design of the electron gun and the focusing channel of the Compact Linear Collider drive beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dayyani Kelisani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN, the power for the main linacs is extracted from a drive beam generated from a high current electron source. The design of the electron source and its subsequent focusing channel has a great impact on the beam dynamic considerations of the drive beam. We report the design of a thermionic electron source and the subsequent focusing channels with the goal of production of a high quality beam with a very small emittance.

  7. Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on the Beam Size in Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosochkov, Y.

    2004-08-05

    In this paper, the authors discuss the optics effects of the realistic detector solenoid field on beam size at the Interaction Point (IP) of a future Linear Collider and their compensation. It is shown that most of the adverse effects on the IP beam size arise only from the part of the solenoid field which overlaps and extends beyond the final focusing quadrupoles. It is demonstrated that the most efficient and local compensation can be achieved using weak antisolenoids near the IP, while a correction scheme which employs only skew quadrupoles is less efficient, and compensation with strong antisolenoids is not appropriate. One of the advantages of the proposed antisolenoid scheme is that this compensation works well over a large range of the beam energy

  8. MEV Energy Electrostatic Accelerator Ion Beam Emittance Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    I.G. Ignat’ev; M.I. Zakharets; S.V. Kolinko; D.P. Shulha

    2014-01-01

    The testing equipment was designed, manufactured and tried out permitting measurements of total current, current profile and emittance of an ion beam extracted from the ion beam. MeV energy electrostatic accelerator ion H + beam emittance measurement results are presented.

  9. Enhancing the accelerated beam current in the booster synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. April 2016 physics pp. 847–860. Enhancing the accelerated beam current in the booster synchrotron by optimizing the transport line beam propagation ... method. The measured parameters have been used for beam transport line optimization and twiss parameters ... model WATEC 127 LH (CCIR) has been used.

  10. Application of virtual instrument in accelerator beam measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Guoqing; China Science and Technology Univ., Hefei; Yu Xiaoqi; Zhang Pengfei

    2007-01-01

    Virtual instrument is a novel computer-based technical method of measurement, which has got rapidly development and has been applied in many fields because of a variety of advantages. In this paper we mainly introduce application of virtual instrument in accelerator beam measurement system. Beam measurement system is an important part of accelerator technology and has important effect on accelerator debugging, running and machine research. Adopting new measurement methods and increasing accuracy of measurement directly affect accelerator debugging and running. Now many accelerators have been adopted virtual instrument system. (authors)

  11. Characteristics of an electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Schechter, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    An electron-beam rocket pellet accelerator has been designed, built, assembled, and tested as a proof-of-principle (POP) apparatus. The main goal of accelerators based on this concept is to use intense electron-beam heating and ablation of a hydrogen propellant stick to accelerate deuterium and/or tritium pellets to ultrahigh speeds (10 to 20 km/s) for plasma fueling of next-generation fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER). The POP apparatus is described and initial results of pellet acceleration experiments are presented. Conceptual ultrahigh-speed pellet accelerators are discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs

  12. Beam instrumentation in a multidisciplinary accelerator facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, J.M.; Boon, S.N.; Dermois, O.C.; Kiewiet, H.H.

    Some recently developed beam diagnostic devices for the beam lines of the AGOR cyclotron are reviewed. The range of applications is from low background nuclear physics experiments at "zero degree" to radiation therapy with proton beams. In particular a method to improve beam quality and the

  13. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  14. Energy doubler for a linear collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of using short plasma sections several meters in length to double the energy of a linear collider just before the collision point is proposed and modeled. In this scenario the beams from each side of a linear collider are split into pairs of microbunches with the first driving a plasma wake that accelerates the second. The luminosity of the doubled collider is maintained by employing plasma lenses to reduce the spot size before collision.

  15. The operational procedure of an electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Cheol; Choi, Hwa Lim; Yang, Ki Ho; Han, Young Hwan; Kim, Sung Chan

    2008-12-01

    The KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy of Research Institute) high-power electron beam irradiation facility, operating at the energies between 0.3 MeV and 10 MeV, has provided irradiation services to users in industries, universities, and institute in various fields. This manual is for the operation of an electron beam which is established in KAERI, and describes elementary operation procedures of electron beam between 0.3 Mev and 10 MeV. KAERI Electron Accelerator facility(Daejeon, Korea) consists of two irradiators: one is a low-energy electron beam irradiator operated by normal conducting RF accelerator, the other is medium-energy irradiator operated by superconducting RF accelerator. We explain the check points of prior to operation, operation procedure of this facility and the essential parts of electron beam accelerator

  16. Ion beam characteristics of a gas filled accelerator tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, R.S.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Boers, J.E.; Shope, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    A gas filled tube used to produce a pulsed neutron flux with the D(T, 4 He)n reaction is described. Deuterium and tritium ions generated in a reflex discharge are extracted and accelerated to 100 keV by means of an accelerator electrode onto a deutero-tritide target electrode. The electrodes are designed to focus the ion beam onto the target. Total tube currents consisting of extracted ions, unsuppressed secondary electrons, and ions generated by interactions with the background gas are typically 100mA. Characteristics of the extracted ion beam are discussed. Accelerating voltages greater than 50kV are required to focus the beam through the accelerator aperture for configurations that give beams with the proper energy density at the target. The perveance of the beam is defined. Maximum perveance values are 2 to 10 nanopervs. Tube focussing and neutron production characteristics are described

  17. Transverse wakefield effects in the two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selph, F.; Sessler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transverse wakefield effects in the high-gradient accelerating structure of the two-beam accelerator (TBA) are analyzed theoretically using three different models. The first is a very simple two-particle model, the second is for a beam with uniform charge distribution, constant betatron wavelength, and a linear wake approximation. Both of these models give analytic scaling laws. The third model has a Gaussian beam (represented by 11 superparticles), energy variation across the bunch, acceleration, variation of betatron focusing with energy, and variation of the wakefield from linearity. The three models are compared, and the third model is used to explore the wakefield effects when accelerator parameters such as energy, energy spread, injection energy, accelerating gradient, and betatron wavelength are varied. Also explored are the sensitivity of the beam to the wakefield profile to the longitudinal charge distribution. Finally, in consideration of wakefield effects, possible parameters of a TBA are presented. (orig./HSI)

  18. Cryogenic Beam Screens for High-Energy Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Baglin, V; Tavian, L; van Weelderen, R

    2013-01-01

    Applied superconductivity has become a key enabling technology for high-energy particle accelerators, thus making them large helium cryogenic systems operating at very low temperature. The circulation of high-intensity particle beams in these machines generates energy deposition in the first wall through different processes. For thermodynamic efficiency, it is advisable to intercept these beam-induced heat loads, which may be large in comparison with cryostat heat in-leaks, at higher temperature than that of the superconducting magnets of the accelerator, by means of beam screens located in the magnet apertures. Beam screens may also be used as part of the ultra-high vacuum system of the accelerator, by sheltering the gas molecules cryopumped on the beam pipe from impinging radiation and thus avoiding pressure runaway. Space being extremely tight in the magnet apertures, cooling of the long, slender beam screens also raises substantial problems in cryogenic heat transfer and fluid flow. We present sizing rule...

  19. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 μs, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at ∼ 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 μs pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz

  20. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Hammons, L.; Johnson, E.C.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Xu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs) with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM) damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC) temperatures in a prototype research and development (R and D) five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF) cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R and D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  1. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Hammons, L.; Johnson, E. C.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Xu, Wencan

    2010-12-01

    Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs) with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM) damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC) temperatures in a prototype research and development (R&D) five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF) cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R&D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  2. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hahn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC temperatures in a prototype research and development (R&D five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R&D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  3. High-gradient two-beam electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-11-04

    The main goal for this project was to design, build, and evaluate a detuned-cavity, collinear, two-beam accelerator structure. Testing was to be at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory, under terms of a sub-grant from Omega-P to Yale. Facilities available at Yale for this project include a 6-MeV S-band RF gun and associated beam line for forming and transporting a ~1 A drive beam , a 300 kV beam source for use as a test beam, and a full panoply of laboratory infrastructure and test equipment. During the first year of this project, availability and functionality of the 6-MeV drive beam and 300 kV test beam were confirmed, and the beam line was restored to a layout to be used with the two-beam accelerator project. Major efforts during the first year were also focused on computational design and simulation of the accelerator structure itself, on beam dynamics, and on beam transport. Effort during the second year was focussed on building and preparing to test the structure, including extensive cold testing. Detailed results from work under this project have been published in twelve archival journal articles, listed in Section IV of the technical report.

  4. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1  μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  5. Quark search at the CBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.; Morse, W.M.; Adair, R.K.; Kasha, H.; Schmidt, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment to search for quarks at the CBA is described. The cross sections for the production of massive quark-antiquark pairs in nucleon-nucleon interactions is estimated, and the experimental design and procedures are described

  6. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyojae, E-mail: lkcom@ibs.re.kr; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  7. Realization of beam polarization at the linear collider and its application to EW processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Sollova, F.

    2006-07-15

    The use of beam polarization at the future ILC e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will benefit the physics program significantly. This thesis explores three aspects of beam polarization: the application of beam polarization to the study of electroweak processes, the precise measurement of the beam polarization, and finally, the production of polarized positrons at a test beam experiment. In the first part of the thesis the importance of beam polarization at the future ILC is exhibited: the benefits of employing transverse beam polarization (in both beams) for the measurement of triple gauge boson couplings (TGCs) in the W-pair production process are studied. The sensitivity to anomalous TGC values is compared for the cases of transverse and longitudinal beam polarization at a center of mass energy of 500 GeV. Due to the suppressed contribution of the t-channel {nu} exchange, the sensitivity is higher for longitudinal polarization. For some physics analyses the usual polarimetry techniques do not provide the required accuracy for the measurement of the beam polarization (around 0.25% with Compton polarimetry). The second part of the thesis deals with a complementary method to measure the beam polarization employing physics data acquired with two polarization modes. The process of single-W production is chosen due to its high cross section. The expected precision for 500 fb{sup -1} and W{yields}{mu}{nu} decays only, is {delta}P{sub e{sup -}}/P{sub e{sup -}}=0.26% and {delta}P{sub e{sup +}}/P{sub e{sup +}}=0.33%, which can be further improved by employing additional W-decay channels. The first results of an attempt to produce polarized positrons at the E-166 experiment are shown in the last part of the thesis. The E-166 experiment, located at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC's LINAC employs a helical undulator to induce the emission of circularly polarized gamma rays by the beam electrons. These gamma rays are converted into longitudinally polarized electron

  8. Accelerator complex for a radioactive ion beam facility at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolen, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the superconducting heavy ion linac ATLAS is an ideal post-accelerator for radioactive beams, plans are being developed for expansion of the facility with the addition of a driver accelerator, a production target/ion source combination, and a low q/m pre-accelerator for radioactive ions. A working group including staff from the ANL Physics Division and current ATLAS users are preparing a radioactive beam facility proposal. The present paper reviews the specifications of the accelerators required for the facility

  9. JAERI electrostatic accelerators for multiple ion beam application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tajima, Satoshi; Takada, Isao

    1993-01-01

    An electrostatic accelerators facility of a 3MV tandem accelerator, a 3MV single-ended accelerator and a 400kV ion implanter was completed mainly for materials science and biotechnology research at JAERI, Takasaki. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously for multiple beam application in triple and dual beam modes. The single-ended machine was designed to satisfy an extremely high voltage stability of ±1x10 -5 to provide a submicron microbeam stably. The measured voltage stability and ripple were within the designed value. (author)

  10. Beam equipment electromagnetic interaction in accelerators: simulation and experimental benchmarking

    CERN Document Server

    Passarelli, Andrea; Vaccaro, Vittorio Giorgio; Massa, Rita; Masullo, Maria Rosaria

    One of the most significant technological problems to achieve the nominal performances in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) concerns the system of collimation of particle beams. The use of collimators crystals, exploiting the channeling effect on extracted beam, has been experimentally demonstrated. The first part of this thesis is about the optimization of UA9 goniometer at CERN, this device used for beam collimation will replace a part of the vacuum chamber. The optimization process, however, requires the calculation of the coupling impedance between the circulating beam and this structure in order to define the threshold of admissible intensity to do not trigger instability processes. Simulations have been performed with electromagnetic codes to evaluate the coupling impedance and to assess the beam-structure interaction. The results clearly showed that the most concerned resonance frequencies are due solely to the open cavity to the compartment of the motors and position sensors considering the crystal in o...

  11. Application trends for electrostatic ion beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, G. A.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1930 to 1960 electrostatic accelerators were used primarily for nuclear structure research. This has changed dramatically in the decades that followed. This talk will discuss the applications and their effect on accelerator design and performance. The most recent use for electrostatic accelerators is in the field of pharmacokinetics, which is discussed with a tentative look for the future. (Author)

  12. The Radiological Situation in the Beam-Cleaning Sections of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Brugger, Markus; Stevenson, Graham

    2003-01-01

    This thesis contributes to radiological assessments of the design and operation of the Large Hadron Collider currently under construction at CERN. In particular, the scope of this thesis is to examine the beam cleaning insertions - two of the main loss regions of the LHC where beam particles which would otherwise cause unwanted losses at different places of the machine are purposely intercepted. Two critical issues with regard to the protection of personnel and environment are studied: remanent dose rates due to induced radioactivity and airborne radioactivity. Although a detailed estimate of remanent dose rates is important for an optimization of later maintenance interventions only very limited information on remanent dose rates to be expected around the collimators was available so far. This thesis is an attempt to extend the knowledge considerably, especially by applying a new calculational method. Since this new approach is used for the first time in the design of the LHC a careful benchmarking with expe...

  13. For information - Université de Genève : Accelerator Physics Challenges for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2005-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE Faculte des sciences Section de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet - 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél : (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Mercredi 16 March SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE à 17h00 - Auditoire Stückelberg Accelerator Physics Challenges for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN Prof. Olivier Bruning / CERN The Large Hadron Collider project at CERN will bring the energy frontier of high energy particle physics back to Europe and with it push the accelerator technology into uncharted teritory. The talk presents the LHC project in the context of the past CERN accelerator developments and addresses the main challenges in terms of technology and accelerator physics. Information: http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: A. Cervera Villanueva

  14. Muon Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert B. Palmer; A. Sessler; A. Skrinsky; A. Tollestrup; A.J. Baltz; P. Chen; W-H. Cheng; Y. Cho; E. Courant; Richard C. Fernow; Juan C. Gallardo; A. Garren; M. Green; S. Kahn; H. Kirk; Y. Y. Lee; F. Mills; N. Mokhov; G. Morgan; David Neuffer; R. Noble; J. Norem; M. Popovic; L. Schachinger; G. Silvestrov; D. Summers; I. Stumer; M. Syphers; Yagmur Torun; D. Trbojevic; W. Turner; A. Van Ginneken; T. Vsevolozhskaya; R. Weggel; E. Willen; David Winn; J. Wurtele

    1994-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity(mu)(sup+)(mu)(sup -) colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed

  15. Study of a microwave power source for a two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houck, T.L.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of a microwave power source suitable for driving a linear e + e - collider is reported. The power source is based on the Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept, is driven by a 5-MeV, 1-kA induction accelerator electron beam, and operates at X-band frequencies. The development of a computer code to simulate the transverse beam dynamics of an intense relativistic electron beam transiting a system of microwave resonant structures is presented. This code is time dependent with self-consistent beam-cavity interactions and uses realistic beam parameters. Simulations performed with this code are compared with analytical theory and experiments. The concept of spacing resonant structures at distances equal to the betatron wavelength of the focusing system to suppress the growth of transverse instabilities is discussed. Simulations include energy spread over the beam to demonstrate the effect of Landau damping and establish the sensitivity of the betatron wavelength spacing scheme to errors in the focusing system. The design of the Reacceleration Experiment is described in detail and includes essentially all the issues related to a full scale RK-TBA microwave source. A total combined power from three output structures in excess of 170 MW with an amplitude stability of ±4% over a 25 ns pulse was achieved. The results of the experiment are compared to simulations used during the design phase to validate the various codes and methods used. The primary issue for the RK-TBA concept is identified as transverse beam instability associated with the excitation of higher order modes in the resonant structures used for extracting microwave power from the modulated beam. This work represents the first successful experimental demonstration of repeated cycles of microwave energy extraction from and reacceleration of a modulated beam

  16. Revealing the large extra dimension effective interaction at an e+e- collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.; Paver, N.

    2007-01-01

    Several types of new physics scenarios are represented by contactlike effective interactions. An example is the exchange of nonstandard quanta of very large mass scales, beyond the kinematical limit for direct production set by the available collider energy. This kind of interactions can be revealed only through deviations of observables from the standard model predictions. If such deviations were observed, the relevant source should be identified among the possible models that could explain them. Here, we assess the expected 'identification reach' on the ADD model of gravity in large compactified extra dimensions, against the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interaction. As basic observables we take the differential cross sections for fermion-pair production at a 0.5-1 TeV electron-positron linear collider with both beams longitudinally polarized. For the four-fermion contact interaction, we assume a general linear combination of the individual models with definite chiralities, with arbitrary coupling constants. In this sense, the estimated identification reach on the ADD model can be considered as 'model independent'. In the analysis, we give estimates also for the expected ''discovery reaches'' on the various scenarios. We emphasize the substantial role of beams polarization in enhancing the sensitivity to the contactlike interactions under consideration

  17. Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Large Hadron Collider to 2025 and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Florio, Massimo; Sirtori, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Social cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of projects has been successfully applied in different fields such as transport, energy, health, education, and environment, including climate change. It is often argued that it is impossible to extend the CBA approach to the evaluation of the social impact of research infrastructures, because the final benefit to society of scientific discovery is generally unpredictable. Here, we propose a quantitative approach to this problem, we use it to design an empirically testable CBA model, and we apply it to the the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the highest-energy accelerator in the world, currently operating at CERN. We show that the evaluation of benefits can be made quantitative by determining their value to users (scientists, early-stage researchers, firms, visitors) and non-users (the general public). Four classes of contributions to users are identified: knowledge output, human capital development, technological spillovers, and cultural effects. Benefits for non-users can be ...

  18. Beam operation aspects for the MYRRHA linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biarrotte, J.L.; Uriot, D.; Medeiros Romao, L.; Vandeplassche, D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of transmutation in a 100 MWth accelerator-driven System (ADS) by building a new flexible irradiation complex in Mol (Belgium). The MYRRHA Facility requires a 600 MeV accelerator delivering a maximum proton flux of 4 mA in continuous operation with an additional requirement for exceptional reliability. This paper describes the current status of this ADS accelerator design and focuses on the specific aspects related to beam operation such as beam time structure requirements, beam power control and ramp-up strategies, beam reconfiguration schemes in fault cases and beam instrumentation needs. (authors)

  19. TRISTAN-II at Brookhaven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.; Stelts, M.L.; Manzella, V.; Gill, R.; Wohn, F.; Hill, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The mass separator TRISTAN has been moved to Brookhaven HFBR. A flux of up to 10 11 neutrons/cm 2 /sec will be available on target, and improvements in the ion source and beam optics have been made. A computer system with a CAMAC interface allows data collection from eight independent sources, while a PDP-11/34 computer is available for extensive off-line analysis

  20. Beam manipulation and acceleration with Dielectric-Lined Waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The development of next-generation TeV+ electron accelerators will require either immense footprints based on conventional acceleraton techniques or the development of new higher{gradient acceleration methods. One possible alternative is beam-driven acceleration in a high-impedance medium such as a dielectric-lined-waveguide (DLW), where a highcharge bunch passes through a DLW and can excite gradients on the order of GV/m. An important characteristic of this acceleration class is the transformer ratio which characterizes the energy transfer of the scheme. This dissertation discusses alternative methods to improve the transformer ratio for beam-driven acceleration and also considers the use of DLWs for beam manipulation at low energy.

  1. ISABELLE accelerator software, control system, and beam diagnostic philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.; Humphrey, J.W.; Niederer, J.; Poole, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The ISABELLE Project combines two large proton accelerators with two storage rings in the same facility using superconducting magnet technology. This combination leads to severe constraints on beam loss in magnets and involves complex treatment of magnetic field imperfections and correction elements. The consequent demands placed upon beam diagnostics, accelerator model programs, and the computer oriented control system are discussed in terms of an illustrative operation scenario

  2. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian M.

    2009-01-29

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  3. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian M.

    2009-01-01

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  4. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This book describes the conceptual design of, and the planning for, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), which will be a high-intensity, continuous-wave electron linear accelerator (linac) for nuclear physics. Its principal scientific goal is to understand the quark structure, behavior, and clustering of individual nucleons in the nuclear medium, and simultaneously to understand the forces governing this behavior. The linac will consist of 1 GeV of accelerating structure, split into two antiparallel 0.5-GeV segments. The segments will be connected by a beam transport system to circulate the electron beams from one segment to the other for up to four complete passes of acceleration. The maximum beam energy will be 4 GeV at a design current of 200 microamperes. The accelerator complex will also include systems to extract three continuous beams from the linac and to deliver them to three experimental halls equipped with detectors and instrumentation for nuclear physics research. The accelerating structure will be kept superconducting within insulated cryostats filled with liquid helium produced at a central helium refrigerator and distributed to the cryostats via insulated transfer lines. An injector, instrumentation and controls for the accelerator, radio-frequency power systems, and several support facilities will also be provided. A cost estimate based on the Work Breakdown Structure has been completed. Assuming a five-year construction schedule starting early in FY 1987, the total estimated cost is $236 million (actual year dollars), including contingency

  5. Final implementation, commissioning, and performance of embedded collimator beam position monitors in the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Baud, Guillaume; Bruce, Roderik; Gasior, Marek; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Olexa, Jakub; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Valloni, Alessandra; Wenninger, Jorg

    2017-08-01

    During Long Shutdown 1, 18 Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimators were replaced with a new design, in which beam position monitor (BPM) pick-up buttons are embedded in the collimator jaws. The BPMs provide a direct measurement of the beam orbit at the collimators, and therefore can be used to align the collimators more quickly than using the standard technique which relies on feedback from beam losses. Online orbit measurements also allow for reducing operational margins in the collimation hierarchy placed specifically to cater for unknown orbit drifts, therefore decreasing the β* and increasing the luminosity reach of the LHC. In this paper, the results from the commissioning of the embedded BPMs in the LHC are presented. The data acquisition and control software architectures are reviewed. A comparison with the standard alignment technique is provided, together with a fill-to-fill analysis of the measured orbit in different machine modes, which will also be used to determine suitable beam interlocks for a tighter collimation hierarchy.

  6. Final implementation, commissioning, and performance of embedded collimator beam position monitors in the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Valentino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During Long Shutdown 1, 18 Large Hadron Collider (LHC collimators were replaced with a new design, in which beam position monitor (BPM pick-up buttons are embedded in the collimator jaws. The BPMs provide a direct measurement of the beam orbit at the collimators, and therefore can be used to align the collimators more quickly than using the standard technique which relies on feedback from beam losses. Online orbit measurements also allow for reducing operational margins in the collimation hierarchy placed specifically to cater for unknown orbit drifts, therefore decreasing the β^{*} and increasing the luminosity reach of the LHC. In this paper, the results from the commissioning of the embedded BPMs in the LHC are presented. The data acquisition and control software architectures are reviewed. A comparison with the standard alignment technique is provided, together with a fill-to-fill analysis of the measured orbit in different machine modes, which will also be used to determine suitable beam interlocks for a tighter collimation hierarchy.

  7. Beam-Induced Multipactoring and Electron-Cloud Effects in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Scandale, Walter; Zimmermann, F

    2009-01-01

    In the beam pipe of high-energy proton or positron accelerators an “electron cloud” can be generated by a variety of processes, e.g. by residual-gas ionization, by photoemission from synchrotron radiation, and, most importantly, by secondary emission via a beam-induced multipactoring process. The electron cloud commonly leads to a degradation of the beam vacuum by several orders of magnitude, to fast beam instabilities, to beam-size increases, and to fast or slow beam losses. At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the cloud electrons could also give rise to an additional heat load inside cold superconducting magnets. In addition to the direct heat deposition from incoherently moving electrons, a potential “magnetron effect” has been conjectured, where electrons would radiate coherently when moving in a strong magnetic field under the simultaneous influence of a beam-induced electric “wake” field that may become resonant with the cyclotron frequency. Electron-cloud effects are already being observed w...

  8. Mechanisms and control of beam halo formation in intense microwave sources and accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Pakter, R.

    2000-05-01

    Halo formation and control in space-charge-dominated electron and ion beams are investigated in parameter regimes relevant to the development of high-power microwave (HPM) sources and high-intensity electron and ion linear accelerators. In particular, a mechanism for electron beam halo formation is identified in high-power periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing klystron amplifiers. It is found in self-consistent simulations that large-amplitude current oscillations induce mismatched beam envelope oscillations and electron beam halo formation. Qualitative agreement is found between simulations and the 50 MW 11.4 GHz PPM focusing klystron experiment at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) (D. Sprehn, G. Caryotakis, E. Jongewaard, and R. M. Phillips, "Periodic permanent magnetic development for linear collider X-band klystrons," Proceedings of the XIXth International Linac Conference, Argonne National Laboratory Report ANL-98/28, 1998, p. 689). Moreover, a new class of cold-fluid corkscrewing elliptic beam equilibria is discovered for ultrahigh-brightness, space-charge dominated electron or ion beam propagation through a linear focusing channel consisting of uniform solenoidal magnetic focusing fields, periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing fields, and/or alternating-gradient quadrupole magnetic focusing fields in an arbitrary arrangement including field tapering. As an important application of such new cold-fluid corkscrewing elliptic beam equilibria, a technique is developed and demonstrated for controlling of halo formation and beam hollowing in a rms-matched ultrahigh-brightness ion beam as it is injected from an axisymmetric Pierce diode into an alternating-gradient magnetic quadrupole focusing channel.

  9. Induction Accelerator Technology Choices for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitner, M.A.; Celata, C.M.; Lee, E.P.; Logan, B.G.; Sabbi, G.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    Over the next three years the research program of the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory (HIF-VNL), a collaboration among LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, is focused on separate scientific experiments in the injection, transport and focusing of intense heavy ion beams at currents from 100 mA to 1 A. As a next major step in the HIF-VNL program, we aim for a complete 'source-to-target' experiment, the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX). By combining the experience gained in the current separate beam experiments IBX would allow the integrated scientific study of the evolution of a single heavy ion beam at high current (∼1 A) through all sections of a possible heavy ion fusion accelerator: the injection, acceleration, compression, and beam focusing.This paper describes the main parameters and technology choices of the planned IBX experiment. IBX will accelerate singly charged potassium or argon ion beams up to 10 MeV final energy and a longitudinal beam compression ratio of 10, resulting in a beam current at target of more than 10 Amperes. Different accelerator cell design options are described in detail: Induction cores incorporating either room temperature pulsed focusing-magnets or superconducting magnets

  10. Rapidly accelerating Mathieu and Weber surface plasmon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libster-Hershko, Ana; Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

    2014-09-19

    We report the generation of two types of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams which are solutions of the nonparaxial Helmholtz equation in two dimensions. These beams preserve their shape while propagating along either elliptic (Mathieu beam) or parabolic (Weber beam) trajectories. We show that owing to the nonparaxial nature of the Weber beam, it maintains its shape over a much larger distance along the parabolic trajectory, with respect to the corresponding solution of the paraxial equation-the Airy beam. Dynamic control of the trajectory is realized by translating the position of the illuminating free-space beam. Finally, the ability of these beams to self-heal after blocking obstacles is demonstrated as well.

  11. Effect of μe universality violation in muon pair production on colliding electron-positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guliev, N.A.; Dzhafarov, I.G.; Mekhtiev, B.I.

    1981-01-01

    The muonic pair production in colliding electron-positron beams is treated assuming the electron and muon weak interaction constants to be different. General formulae for the differential and total cross sections applicable at arbitrary energies of the colliding beams are obtained taking simultaneously into account arbitrary polarizations of the incident particles and longitudinal polarization of the muon (μ - ). It is shown that study of some polarization characteristics of a given reaction allows to distinguish possible weak interaction μe universality breaking effects. The revealing effects are analysed in the framework of unified gauge SU(2)xU(1) models, of weak and electromagnetic interactions [ru

  12. Development of new electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Jiro

    1976-01-01

    Approximately two decades have elapsed since electron accelerators were first employed in industry. It is widely used in the fields of chemical and food industries and the prevention of pollution. The accelerators for industrial use are limited to those obtainable high current or high output, low cost and easy handling. The low energy (up to 2 or 3 MeV) accelerators applicable to industry include the rectification type (Cockcroft, Dynamitron, Van de Graaff etc.), the AC transformer type (resonance transformer, cascade transformer) and the transformer type. As the accelerators of higher energy (more than 3 MeV), there exist the linear accelerator and the electromagnetic induction type. The linear accelerators are widely employed for industrial and medical uses as the large output can be obtained. Though various types of accelerators are used in industry, more increasing demands in accordance with the diversification of application are not always satisfied. As it seems that the realization of a new accelerator of improved performance and cost requires long time, it may be important to perform the standardization by dividing the energy and output ranges. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  13. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adonin, A A; Hollinger, R

    2014-02-01

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  14. Improved beam-energy calibration technique for heavy ion accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrero, A.M.J.; Garcia, A.; Gil, Salvador

    1989-01-01

    A simple technique for beam energy calibration of heavy-ion accelerators is presented. A thin hydrogenous target was bombarded with 12 C and 19 F, and the energies of the protons knocked out, elastically were measured at several angles using two detectors placed at equal angles on opposite sides of the beam. The use of these two detectors cancels the largest errors due to uncertainties in the angle and position at which the beam hits the target. An application of this energy calibration method to an electrostatic accelerator is described and the calibration constant of the analyzing magnet was obtained with an estimated error of 0.4 (Author) [es

  15. Biological Effects of Particles with Very High Energy Deposition on Mammalian Cells Utilizing the Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Janapriya; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wang, Minli

    2013-01-01

    High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and secondary protons and neutrons, and secondaries from protons in SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk to astronauts due to induction of DNA damage and oxidative stress. Experiments with high energy particles mimicking the space environment for estimation of radiation risk are being performed at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL. Experiments with low energy particles comparing to high energy particles of similar LET are of interest for investigation of the role of track structure on biological effects. For this purpose, we report results utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at BNL. The primary objective of our studies is to elucidate the influence of high vs low energy deposition on track structure, delta ray contribution and resulting biological responses. These low energy ions are of special relevance as these energies may occur following absorption through the spacecraft and shielding materials in human tissues and nuclear fragments produced in tissues by high energy protons and neutrons. This study will help to verify the efficiency of these low energy particles and better understand how various cell types respond to them.

  16. High energy gain electron beam acceleration by 100TW laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Shuji; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    A laser wakefield acceleration experiment using a 100TW laser is planed at JAERI-Kansai. High quality and short pulse electron beams are necessary to accelerate the electron beam by the laser. Electron beam - laser synchronization is also necessary. A microtron with a photocathode rf-gun was prepared as a high quality electron injector. The quantum efficiency (QE) of the photocathode of 2x10 -5 was obtained. A charge of 100pC from the microtron was measured. The emittance and pulse width of the electron beam was 6π mm-mrad and 10ps, respectively. In order to produce a short pulse electron beam, and to synchronize between the electron beam and the laser pulse, an inverse free electron laser (IFEL) is planned. One of problems of LWFA is the short acceleration length. In order to overcome the problem, a Z-pinch plasma waveguide will be prepared as a laser wakefield acceleration tube for 1 GeV acceleration. (author)

  17. Development of a Beam-Beam Simulation Code for e+e- Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    BEPC will be upgraded into BEPCII, and the luminosity will be about 100 times higher. We developed a three dimensional strong-strong PIC code to study the beam-beam effects in BEPCII. The transportation through the arc is the same as that in Hirata's weak-strong code. The beam-beam force is computed directly by solving the Poisson equation using the FACR method, and the boundary potential is computed by circular convolution. The finite bunch length effect is included by longitudinal slices. An interpolation scheme is used to reduce the required slice number in simulations. The standard message passing interface (MPI) is used to parallelize the code. The computing time increases linearly with (n+1), where n is the slice number. The calculated luminosity of BEPCII at the design operating point is less than the design value. The best area in the tune space is near (0.505,0.57) according to the survey, where the degradation of luminosity can be improved.

  18. Test of the beam effect on vacuum arc occurrence in a high-gradient accelerating structure for the CLIC project

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2130409; Gagliardi, Martino

    A new generation of lepton colliders capable of reaching TeV energies is pres- ently under development, and to succeed in this task it is necessary to show that the technology for such a machine is available. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a possible design option among the future lepton collider projects. It consists of two normal-conducting linacs. Accelerating structures with a gradient of the order of 100 MV/m are necessary to reach the required high energies within a reasonable machine length. One of the strictest require- ments for such accelerating structures is a relatively low occurrence of vacuum arcs. CLIC prototype structures have been tested in the past, but only in absence of beam. In order to proof the feasibility of the high gradient technology for building a functional collider, it is necessary to understand the effect of the beam presence on the vacuum breakdowns. Tests of this type have never been performed previously. The main goal of this work is to provide a first measurement of t...

  19. High-current beam transport in electrostatic accelerator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramian, G.; Elais, L.

    1987-01-01

    The UCSB Free Electron Laser (FEL) has successfully demonstrated the use of a commercial 6 megavolt electrostatic accelerator as a high current beam source in a recirculating configuration. The accelerator, manufactured by National Electrostatics Corp. (NEC), Middleton WI, uses two standard high gradient accelerator tubes. Suppression of ion multiplication was accomplished by NEC with apertures and a shaped electrostatic field. This field shaping has fortuitously provided a periodically reversing radial field component with sufficient focusing strength to transport electron beams of up to 3 Amps current. Present two-stage FEL work requires a 20 Amp beam and proposed very high voltage FEL designs require currents as high as 100 Amps. A plan to permit transport of such high current beams by the addition of solenoidal focussing elements is described

  20. Experimental demonstration of dielectric structure based two beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, W.; Conde, M. E.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P.; Sun, X.; Zou, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the experimental results of the dielectric based two beam accelerator (step-up transformer). By using a single high charge beam, we have generated and extracted a high power RF pulse from a 7.8 GHz primary dielectric structure and then subsequently transferred to a second accelerating structure with higher dielectric constant and smaller transverse dimensions. We have measured the energy change of a second (witness) beam passing through the acceleration stage. The measured gradient is >4 times the deceleration gradient. The detailed experiment of set-up and results of the measurements are dimmed. Future plans for the development of a 100 MeV demonstration accelerator based on this technique is presented

  1. The IFUSP microtron accelerator beam transport line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Paulo Beolchi

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the electron optical project of the IFUSP microtron beam transport line is presented, including the operational values for the parameters of the dipolar and quadrupolar electromagnets, as well as their location along the beam line. Analytical calculations and computer simulations were performed to obtain these results, and a programming tool was developed in order to analyze the beam parameters and to help studying racetrack microtrons. The electron optical simulations were split into two different study cases: the microtron booster, and the transfer line. In the first case, it was determined the main operational parameters of a microtron working far from its usual stability conditions. In the latter, it was done the basic design of the linking line between the booster and main (not yet built) microtrons, and between them and the experimental hall, with a total path length of approximately 32 m including large horizontal and vertical deflections with variable beam energy. (author)

  2. Characterizing New Physics with Polarized Beams at High-Energy Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fuks, Benjamin; Rojo, Juan; Schienbein, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    The TeV energy region is currently being explored by both the ATLAS and CMS experiments of the Large Hadron Collider and phenomena beyond the Standard Model are extensively searched for. Large fractions of the parameter space of many models have already been excluded, and the ranges covered by the searches will certainly be increased by the upcoming energy and luminosity upgrades. If new physics has to be discovered in the forthcoming years, the ultimate goal of the high-energy physics program will consist of fully characterizing the newly-discovered degrees of freedom in terms of properties such as their masses, spins and couplings. The scope of this paper is to show how the availability of polarized beams at high-energy proton-proton colliders could yield a unique discriminating power between different beyond the Standard Model scenarios. We first discuss in a model-independent way how this discriminating power arises from the differences between polarized and unpolarized parton distribution functions. We t...

  3. Dual branch high voltage pulse generator for the beam extraction of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonthond, J; Ducimetière, L; Jansson, U; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    2002-01-01

    The LHC beam extraction kicker system, MKD, is composed of 15 fast kicker magnets per beam to extract the particles in one turn from the collider and to dispose them, after dilution, on an external absorber. Each magnet is powered by a separate pulse generator. The original single branch generator consisted of a discharge capacitor in series with a solid state closing switch left bracket 1 right bracket operating at 30 kV. In combination with a parallel freewheel diode stack this generator produced a current pulse of 2.7 mus rise time, 18.5 kA amplitude and about 1.8 ms fall time, of which only about 90 mus are needed to dump the beam. The freewheel diode circuit is equipped with a flat top current droop compensation network, consisting of a low voltage, low stray inductance, high current discharge capacitor. Extensive reliability studies have meanwhile suggested to further increase the operational safety of this crucial system by equipping each generator with two parallel branches. This paper presents the re...

  4. Accidental beam loss in superconducting accelerators: Simulations, consequences of accidents and protective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozhdin, A.; Mokhov, N.; Parker, B.

    1994-02-01

    The consequences of an accidental beam loss in superconducting accelerators and colliders of the next generation range from the mundane to rather dramatic, i.e., from superconducting magnet quench, to overheating of critical components, to a total destruction of some units via explosion. Specific measures are required to minimize and eliminate such events as much as practical. In this paper we study such accidents taking the Superconducting Supercollider complex as an example. Particle tracking, beam loss and energy deposition calculations were done using the realistic machine simulation with the Monte-Carlo codes MARS 12 and STRUCT. Protective measures for minimizing the damaging effects of prefire and misfire of injection and extraction kicker magnets are proposed here

  5. Measurements of electron beam emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility damping ring operated in multibunch modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Honda

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the measurement results of electron beam emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility damping ring operated in multibunch modes. The measurements were carried out with an upgraded laser wire beam profile monitor. The monitor has now a vertical wire as well as a horizontal one and is able to make much faster measurements thanks to an increased effective laser power inside the cavity. The measured emittance shows no large bunch-to-bunch dependence in either the horizontal or vertical directions. The values of the vertical emittance are similar to those obtained in the single-bunch operation. The present results are an important step toward the realization of a high-energy linear collider.

  6. Experiments of an intense H{sup -} ion beam acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, A.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Asano, E.; Kawamoto, T.; Akiyama, R.; Kuroda, T.

    1995-08-01

    An intense H{sup -} beam of a single beamlet is extracted from a large multicusp plasma source operated with cesium seeding. The H{sup -} beams are accelerated up to 100keV by a single-stage or a two-stage electrode system. Spatial profiles of the beams are measured calorimetrically and a minimum beam divergence angle of 5mrad is achieved at a H{sup -} current density of 30mA/cm{sup 2} with a beam energy of 100keV. A ratio of an acceleration current to a H{sup -} current increases abruptly when a H{sup -} current saturates in the space charge limited region. This enhancement is mainly due to secondary electrons caused by the intersection of H{sup -} beams with an extraction grid. When an operating gas pressure decreases, the ratio of the acceleration current to the H{sup -} current decreases. This is related to a stripping loss of H{sup -} ions in the electrodes. A beam divergence angle becomes minimum when a ratio of V{sub acc} to V{sub ext} is set at a optimum value of 1.6 in the single-stage acceleration. This ratio is almost the same as that in the double-stage acceleration, where the optimum ratio of E{sub acc1}/E{sub ext} is 1.5. In the optimum E{sub acc1}/E{sub ext} ratio the divergence angle is not affected by V{sub acc2}. The divergence angle can be reduced by changing V{sub acc2} even if the ratio of E{sub acc1}/E{sub ext} is not optimized. The beam steering effect by permanent magnets buried in an extraction grid is observed in nine beamlets experiments. A simple calculation of a single particle trajectory gives a good approximation of the beam deflection angle. (author).

  7. Design of MgB2 superconducting dipole magnet for particle beam transport in accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, A.B.; Zangenberg, N.; Baurichter, A.

    2006-01-01

    . The existing markets of superconducting technology is within highly specialized scientific areas such as magnetic confinement in fusion energy, sample environment in neutron scattering and large scale acceleratorssuch as the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at Cern, or in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR...... for the collaborating company Danfysik A/S, which has a strongtradition in building resistive magnets for particle accelerators[4]. A technology transfer project was formulated at the end of 2005 with the purpose to collect the knowledge about the MgB2 superconductor gained in the STVF program and in the European...... in a dipole magnet for guiding particle beams in a small scale accelerator is examined with the purpose to build lighter and smaller than the present resistive magnets. Here the criticalcurrent density of primarily MgB2 will be compared with current density determined by specifications similar to the Tevatron...

  8. Parametric emittance measurements of electron beams produced by a laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, S. K.; van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Lehe, R.; Tsai, H.-E.; Swanson, K. K.; Steinke, S.; Nakamura, K.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2018-05-01

    Laser plasma accelerators (LPA) offer an exciting possibility to deliver high energy, high brightness electrons beams in drastically smaller distance scales than is typical for conventional accelerators. As such, LPAs draw considerable attention as potential drivers for next generation light sources and for a compact linear collider. In order to asses the viability of an LPA source for a particular application, the brightness of the source should be properly characterized. In this paper, we present charge dependent transverse emittance measurements of LPA sources using both ionization injection and shock induced density down ramp injection, with the latter delivering smaller transverse emittances by a factor of two when controlling for charge density. The single shot emittance method is described in detail with a discussion on limitations related to second order transport effects. The direct role of space charge is explored through a series of simulations and found to be consistent with experimental observations.

  9. Bifurcation and chaos of an axially accelerating viscoelastic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaodong; Chen Liqun

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates bifurcation and chaos of an axially accelerating viscoelastic beam. The Kelvin-Voigt model is adopted to constitute the material of the beam. Lagrangian strain is used to account for the beam's geometric nonlinearity. The nonlinear partial-differential equation governing transverse motion of the beam is derived from the Newton second law. The Galerkin method is applied to truncate the governing equation into a set of ordinary differential equations. By use of the Poincare map, the dynamical behavior is identified based on the numerical solutions of the ordinary differential equations. The bifurcation diagrams are presented in the case that the mean axial speed, the amplitude of speed fluctuation and the dynamic viscoelasticity is respectively varied while other parameters are fixed. The Lyapunov exponent is calculated to identify chaos. From numerical simulations, it is indicated that the periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic motions occur in the transverse vibrations of the axially accelerating viscoelastic beam

  10. Radiation reaction induced spiral attractors in ultra-intense colliding laser beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The radiation reaction effects on electron dynamics in counter-propagating circularly polarized laser beams are investigated through the linearization theorem and the results are in great agreement with numeric solutions. For the first time, the properties of fixed points in electron phase-space were analyzed with linear stability theory, showing that center nodes will become attractors if the classical radiation reaction is considered. Electron dynamics are significantly affected by the properties of the fixed points and the electron phase-space densities are found to be increasing exponentially near the attractors. The density growth rates are derived theoretically and further verified by particle-in-cell simulations, which can be detected in experiments to explore the effects of radiation reaction qualitatively. The attractor can also facilitate realizing a series of nanometer-scaled flying electron slices via adjusting the colliding laser frequencies.

  11. Semiconductor devices as track detectors in high energy colliding beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, T

    1980-01-01

    In considering the design of experiments for high energy colliding beam facilities one quickly sees the need for better detectors. The full exploitation of machines like ISABELLE will call for detector capabilities beyond what can be expected from refinements of the conventional approaches to particle detection in high energy physics experiments. Over the past year or so there has been a general realization that semiconductor device technology offers the possibility of position sensing detectors having resolution elements with dimensions of the order of 10 microns or smaller. Such a detector could offer enormous advantages in the design of experiments, and the purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the possibilities and some of the problems.

  12. Pair production of exotic particles at pp(p-barp) colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, G.V.; Pirogov, Yu.F.; Rudakov, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    A complete set of differential cross sections has been obtained in Born approximation for pair production of exotic particles with various spins J=0, 1/2, 1 and quantum numbers (colored and colorless) both in qq-bar and gg-collisions. The connection of the unitarity of vector boson processes with gauge invariance, factorization properties of non-Abelian gauge amplitudes and the presence of kinematic zeros is used. Besides, the problem of admissibility of massless limit for these processes is being discussed. The yield of exotic particle pairs at pp(p-barp) colliding beams in TeV energy range have been calculated and limits for the accessible mass range have been found

  13. Semiconductor devices as track detectors in high energy colliding beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.

    1980-01-01

    In considering the design of experiments for high energy colliding beam facilities one quickly sees the need for better detectors. The full exploitation of machines like ISABELLE will call for detector capabilities beyond what can be expected from refinements of the conventional approaches to particle detection in high energy physics experiments. Over the past year or so there has been a general realization that semiconductor device technology offers the possibility of position sensing detectors having resolution elements with dimensions of the order of 10 microns or smaller. Such a detector could offer enormous advantages in the design of experiments, and the purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the possibilities and some of the problems

  14. Effect of accelerating gap geometry on the beam breakup instability in linear induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Marder, B.M.; Coleman, P.D.; Clark, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The electron beam in a linear induction accelerator is generally susceptible to growth of the transverse beam breakup instability. In this paper we analyze a new technique for reducing the transverse coupling between the beam and the accelerating cavities, thereby reducing beam breakup growth. The basic idea is that the most worrisome cavity modes can be cutoff by a short section of coaxial transmission line inserted between the cavity structure and the accelerating gap region. We have used the three-dimensional simulation code SOS to analyze this problem. In brief, we find that the technique works, provided that the lowest TE mode cutoff frequency in the coaxial line is greater than the frequency of the most worrisome TM mode of the accelerating cavity

  15. A single-beam deuteron compact accelerator for neutron generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Wagner Leite; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de

    2011-01-01

    Portable neutron generators are devices composed by small size accelerators that produce neutrons through fusion between hydrogen isotopes. These reactions are characterized by appreciable cross section at energies at the tens of keV, which enables device portability. The project baselines follow the same physical and engineering principles of any other particle accelerators. The generator consists of a gas reservoir, apparatus for ion production, few electrodes to accelerate and focus the ion beam, and a metal hydride target where fusion reactions occur. Neutron generator applications include geophysical measurements, indus- trial process control, environmental, research, nation's security and mechanical structure analysis.This article presents a design of a compact accelerator for d-d neutron generators, describing the physical theory applied to the deuteron extraction system, and simulating the ion beam transport in the accelerator. (author)

  16. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, T. J., Jr.; Crandall, K. R.; Hamm, R. W.; Hansborough, L. D.; Hoeberling, R. F.; Jameson, R. A.; Knapp, E. A.; Mueller, D. W.; Potter, J. M.; Stokes, R. H.

    The philosophy used in developing the PIGMI (pion generator for medical irradiation) technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. This allowed the elimination of the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements are described.

  17. Final Cooling for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Castillo, John Gabriel [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-05-01

    To explore the new energy frontier, a new generation of particle accelerators is needed. Muon colliders are a promising alternative, if muon cooling can be made to work. Muons are 200 times heavier than electrons, so they produce less synchrotron radiation, and they behave like point particles. However, they have a short lifetime of 2.2 $\\mathrm{\\mu s}$ and the beam is more difficult to cool than an electron beam. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) was created to develop concepts and technologies required by a muon collider. An important effort has been made in the program to design and optimize a muon beam cooling system. The goal is to achieve the small beam emittance required by a muon collider. This work explores a final ionization cooling system using magnetic quadrupole lattices with a low enough $\\beta^{\\star} $ region to cool the beam to the required limit with available low Z absorbers.

  18. Long-pulse beam acceleration of MeV-class H(-) ion beams for ITER NB accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, N; Kashiwagi, M; Taniguchi, M; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Yamanaka, H; Inoue, T; Kojima, A; Hanada, M

    2014-02-01

    In order to realize neutral beam systems in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor whose target is to produce a 1 MeV, 200 A/m(2) during 3600 s D(-) ion beam, the electrostatic five-stages negative ion accelerator so-called "MeV accelerator" has been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. To extend pulse length, heat load of the acceleration grids was reduced by controlling the ion beam trajectory. Namely, the beam deflection due to the residual magnetic field of filter magnet was suppressed with the newly developed extractor with a 0.5 mm off-set aperture displacement. The new extractor improved the deflection angle from 6 mrad to 1 mrad, resulting in the reduction of direct interception of negative ions from 23% to 15% of the total acceleration power, respectively. As a result, the pulse length of 130 A/m(2), 881 keV H(-) ion beam has been successfully extended from a previous value of 0.4 s to 8.7 s. This is the first long pulse negative ion beam acceleration over 100 MW/m(2).

  19. Beam current control system for a high-voltage accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razin, G.I.; Val'tman, D.S.; Timofeev, V.E.

    1979-01-01

    A flowsheet of the beam current control system for commercial accelerators is given. Setting and stabilization of a given beam current value are accomplished by the automatic change of a current of a diode electron gun heater or potential of a qrid of three-electrode gun. Beam current coming to an electron-optical converter generates a control signal supplying electron gun. The system operates in the beam current stabilization regime as well as in the radiation dose stabilization regime. The system response amounts to [ru

  20. Error-Induced Beam Degradation in Fermilab's Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Phil S.

    2007-01-01

    In Part I, three independent models of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron are presented. All three models are constructed to investigate and explore the effects of unavoidable machine errors on a proton beam under the influence of space-charge effects. The first is a stochastic noise model. Electric current fluctuations arising from power supplies are ubiquitous and unavoidable and are a source of instabilities in accelerators of all types. A new noise module for generating the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) stochastic noise is first created and incorporated into the existing Object-oriented Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT-FNAL) package. After being convinced with a preliminary model that the noise, particularly non-white noise, does matter to beam quality, we proceeded to measure directly current ripples and common-mode voltages from all four Gradient Magnet Power Supplies (GMPS). Then, the current signals are Fourier-analyzed. Based upon the power spectra of current signals, we tune up the Ornstein-Uhlnbeck noise model. As a result, we are able to closely match the frequency spectra between current measurements and the modeled O-U stochastic noise. The stochastic noise modeled upon measurements is applied to the Booster beam in the presence of the full space-charge effects. This noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the stochastic noise, impinging upon the beam and coupled to the space-charge effects, can substantially enhance the beam degradation process throughout the injection period. The second model is a magnet misalignment model. It is the first time to utilize the latest beamline survey data for building a magnet-by-magnet misalignment model. Given as-found survey fiducial coordinates, we calculate all types of magnet alignment errors (station error, pitch, yaw, roll, twists, etc.) are implemented in the model. We then follow up with statistical analysis to understand how each type of alignment errors are

  1. Computer codes for beam dynamics analysis of cyclotronlike accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V.

    2017-12-01

    Computer codes suitable for the study of beam dynamics in cyclotronlike (classical and isochronous cyclotrons, synchrocyclotrons, and fixed field alternating gradient) accelerators are reviewed. Computer modeling of cyclotron segments, such as the central zone, acceleration region, and extraction system is considered. The author does not claim to give a full and detailed description of the methods and algorithms used in the codes. Special attention is paid to the codes already proven and confirmed at the existing accelerating facilities. The description of the programs prepared in the worldwide known accelerator centers is provided. The basic features of the programs available to users and limitations of their applicability are described.

  2. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  3. Ion collective acceleration and high current beam transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomenskij, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of investigation of high-current beam (HCB) transport in vacuum channels with dielectric walls (VCDW) are presented. It is shown, that HCB transport can be realized not only in rectilinear dielectric channels, but also in curvili also in curvilitear oges. In particular, it proved to be possible to bend the beam with parameters 50 kA, 400 keV by 90 deg. A problem of negative ion intense beam production is considered. It is shown, that in magnetic insulation diodes hydrogen ion currents of about several kA are obtained at current densities 10 A/cm 2 . Results of collective ion acceleration in VCDW are given. Two regions with different physical mechanisms of ion acceleration should be distinguished. In the first region (''plasma''), corresponding to HCB motion in VCDW ion generation and their acceleration in quasipotential field of HCB up to the energy of the order of electrons or less takes place. In the second region (''beam''), corresponding to joint motion of ''extracted'' ions and HCB electrons, ion acceleration takes place in the fields of waves, which can be excited due to the mechanism of two-beam instability type. Considerable contribution can also be made by stochastic mechanism of ion acceleration

  4. Electron Accelerators for Radioactive Ion Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lia Merminga

    2007-10-10

    The summary of this paper is that to optimize the design of an electron drive, one must: (a) specify carefully the user requirements--beam energy, beam power, duty factor, and longitudinal and transverse emittance; (b) evaluate different machine options including capital cost, 10-year operating cost and delivery time. The author is convinced elegant solutions are available with existing technology. There are several design options and technology choices. Decisions will depend on system optimization, in-house infrastructure and expertise (e.g. cryogenics, SRF, lasers), synergy with other programs.

  5. Measurement of deuteron beam polarization before and after acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ramazani Moghaddam Arani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Beam polarization measurement in scattering experiments with a high accuracy and the lowest possible cost is an important issue. In this regard, deuteron beam polarization was measured in the low-energy beam line easily with a relatively low cost procedure and in a very short time by Lamb Shift Polarimeter (LSP. Also, the beam polarization has been measured in high-energy beam line with BINA. In low-energy line, a polarized beam of deuterons delivered by POLIS was decelerated and focused on LSP detection system. Three resonances between 52mT and 63mT show the distribution of different spin states of polarized deuteron beam. In high-energy beam line, polarization can be measured employing BINA via the H(d,dp reaction. The asymmetry ratio, was obtained as a function of azimuthal angle, φ, for several polar scattering angles. Knowing values of the analyzing powers, the ratio has been used to extract the polarization results. The obtained results show that polarization of deuteron beam that is accelerated up to the energy of 130 MeV is almost the same before and after acceleration

  6. Economy in utilizing electron beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masao

    1980-01-01

    As the typical industrialized processes using electron beam irradiation, the following items may be given: the manufacture of cables covered with cross-linking polyethylene or PVC, heat-contracting material, cross-linking polyethylene foam, etc., and the curing of coatings or surface finishes. The results of investigating economy in these processes are described. First, the running cost of electron beam irradiation equipments is calculated. The result shows that, in general, the unit cost of the equipments becomes small with increasing output, therefore the selection of large power equipments may be advantageous for economy. Other important factors concerning the equipments are the reliability and lifetime which are being improved every year and the improvement of the operational efficiency of the equipments. Next, the comparison of cost was made for each industrialized process of the cables covered with cross-linking polyethylene, polyethylene foam, and the curing of coatings. In general, the processing cost is smaller and the depreciation cost is larger in electron beam irradiation process as compared with conventional processes. In addition, since the productive capacity is larger in electron beam process it is preponderant when the amount of production is large. In the industrialized examples, unique processes or features which are not obtainable by other methods are attained. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Controlled acceleration of superimposed Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a mechanism for generating superpositions of non-canonical, higherorder Bessel beams, which are characterized by the anisotropy of the optical vortex on the propagation axis, known as the morphology parameter. We implement a...

  8. Electron-beam rocket acceleration of hydrogen pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.C.; Foster, C.A.; Milora, S.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Whealton, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    A proof-of-principle device for characterizing electron-beam rocket pellet acceleration has been developed and operated during the last few years. Experimental data have been collected for thousands of accelerated hydrogen pellets under a variety of beam conditions. One intact hydrogen pellet was accelerated to a speed of 578 m/s by an electron beam of 10 kV, 0.8 A, and I ms. The collected data reveal the significant finding that the measured bum velocity of bare hydrogen pellets increases with the square of the beam voltage in a way that is qualitatively consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the neutral gas shielding (NGS) model. The measured bum velocity increases with the beam current or power and then saturates at values two to three times greater than that predicted by the NGS model. The discrepancy may result from low pellet strength and large beam-pellet interaction areas. Moreover, this feature may be the cause of the low measured exhaust velocity, which often exceeds the sonic velocity of the ablated gas. Consistent with the NGS model, the measured exhaust velocity increases in direct proportion to the beam current and in inverse proportion to the beam voltage. To alleviate the pellet strength problem, experiments have been performed with the hydrogen ice contained in a lightweight rocket casing or shell. Pellets in such sabots have the potential to withstand higher beam powers and achieve higher thrust-coupling efficiency. Some experimental results are reported and ways of accelerating pellets to higher velocity are discussed

  9. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of an Intense Positron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, B

    2004-04-21

    The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is an advanced accelerator concept which possess a high acceleration gradient and a long interaction length for accelerating both electrons and positrons. Although electron beam-plasma interactions have been extensively studied in connection with the PWFA, very little work has been done with respect to positron beam-plasma interactions. This dissertation addresses three issues relating to a positron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator. These issues are (a) the suitability of employing a positron drive bunch to excite a wake; (b) the transverse stability of the drive bunch; and (c) the acceleration of positrons by the plasma wake that is driven by a positron bunch. These three issues are explored first through computer simulations and then through experiments. First, a theory is developed on the impulse response of plasma to a short drive beam which is valid for small perturbations to the plasma density. This is followed up with several particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations which study the experimental parameter (bunch length, charge, radius, and plasma density) range. Next, the experimental setup is described with an emphasis on the equipment used to measure the longitudinal energy variations of the positron beam. Then, the transverse dynamics of a positron beam in a plasma are described. Special attention is given to the way focusing, defocusing, and a tilted beam would appear to be energy variations as viewed on our diagnostics. Finally, the energy dynamics imparted on a 730 {micro}m long, 40 {micro}m radius, 28.5 GeV positron beam with 1.2 x 10{sup 10} particles in a 1.4 meter long 0-2 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 3} plasma is described. First the energy loss was measured as a function of plasma density and the measurements are compared to theory. Then, an energy gain of 79 {+-} 15 MeV is shown. This is the first demonstration of energy gain of a positron beam in a plasma and it is in good agreement with the predictions

  10. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  11. Environmental radiation effects from muon and tau colliders and their impact on facility licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2012-11-01

    Although contemporary accelerators only affect their local radiation environment, muon and tau colliders produce radiation profiles that extend far beyond their site boundaries. These radiation profiles affect the licensing and siting of these planned accelerators. The analysis presented herein suggests that a linear collider concept with the lepton beams collided in air offers a means to limit the environmental radiation effects from these accelerators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of molecular ion beams from a tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faibis, A.; Goldring, G.; Hass, M.; Kaim, R.; Plesser, I.; Vager, Z.

    1981-01-01

    A large variety of positive molecular ion beams can be produced by gaseous charge exchange in the terminal of a tandem accelerator. After acceleration the molecules are usually dissociated by passage through a thin foil. Measurements of the break-up products provide a way to study both the structure of incident ions and the effects of electronic potentials on the internuclear interaction inside the foil. Beam intensities of a few picoamperes are quite adequate for these measurements, and the relatively high energy obtained by use of a tandem accelerator has the advantage of minimizing multiple scattering effects in the foil. The main difficulty in using the molecular beams lies in the large magnetic rigidity of singly-charged heavy molecular ions

  13. Sixth international workshop on linear colliders. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakawa, Junji

    1995-08-01

    The sixth international workshop on linear colliders (LC95) was held by KEK at Tsukuba Center for Institute. In the workshop 8 parallel working group were organized: WG1 (beam sources and injection linacs), WG2 (damping rings and bunch compressors), WG3 (a: RF sources and structures, b: superconducting cavities, c: two beam accelerators), WG4 (beam dynamics in main linacs), WG5 (final focus and integration regions), WG6 (beam instrumentation), WG7 (overall parameters and construction techniques), WG8 (gamma-gamma collider and miscellaneous). This issue compiles materials which were used in the workshop. (J.P.N.)

  14. Sixth international workshop on linear colliders. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakawa, Junji [ed.

    1995-08-01

    The sixth international workshop on linear colliders (LC95) was held by KEK at Tsukuba Center for Institute. In the workshop 8 parallel working group were organized: WG1 (beam sources and injection linacs), WG2 (damping rings and bunch compressors), WG3 (a: RF sources and structures, b: superconducting cavities, c: two beam accelerators), WG4 (beam dynamics in main linacs), WG5 (final focus and integration regions), WG6 (beam instrumentation), WG7 (overall parameters and construction techniques), WG8 (gamma-gamma collider and miscellaneous). This issue compiles materials which were used in the workshop. (J.P.N.).

  15. Complex calculation and improvement of beam shaping and accelerating system of the ''Sokol'' small-size electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonenko, A.V.; Pistryak, V.M.; Zats, A.V.; Levchenko, Yu.Z.; Kuz'menko, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    Features of charged particle accelerated beam shaping in the electrostatic part of the ''Sokol'' small-size accelerator are considered in complex taking into account the electrode real geometry. Effect of the extracting, accelerating electorde potential and accelerator total voltage on beam behaviour is investigated. A modified variation of the beam shaping system, allowing to decrease 2 times the required interval of accelerating electrode potential adjustment and to decrease the beam size in the starting acceleration region, is presented. It permits to simplify the construction and to improve accelerator operation. Comparison of experimental and calculational data on the beam in the improved accelerator variation is carried out. Effect of peripheral parts of accelerating tube electrodes on the beam is investigated

  16. Polarized electron sources for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    Linear colliders require high peak current beams with low duty factors. Several methods to produce polarized e - beams for accelerators have been developed. The SLC, the first linear collider, utilizes a photocathode gun with a GaAs cathode. Although photocathode sources are probably the only practical alternative for the next generation of linear colliders, several problems remain to be solved, including high voltage breakdown which poisons the cathode, charge limitations that are associated with the condition of the semiconductor cathode, and a relatively low polarization of ≤5O%. Methods to solve or at least greatly reduce the impact of each of these problems are at hand

  17. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  18. Positron beam production with a deuteron accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Cassidy, D B; Shefer, R E; Klinkowstein, R; Hughey, B J

    2002-01-01

    A graphite target was bombarded with 1.5 MeV deuterons, producing the isotope sup 1 sup 3 N, which is a positron emitter. Using the activated material a slow positron beam with an intensity of 0.7 (0.14)x10 sup 5 s sup - sup 1 was produced. A (saturated) sup 1 sup 3 N yield of 63 (11) MBq/mu A was observed, with 1.5 MeV deuterons, which is consistent with previous calculations and experiments. Our results show that, with the method we outline, positron beams with an average intensity of up to 1x10 sup 8 s sup - sup 1 may be produced.

  19. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams Generating High-Energy-Density Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, IV; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. This data has been used as input to a sophisticated two--dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1~m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy de...

  20. Beam Instabilities in Circular Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067185

    2017-01-01

    The theory of impedance-induced bunched-beam coherent instabilities is reviewed following Laclare's formalism, adding the effect of an electronic damper in the transverse plane. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are discussed, both low-intensity and high-intensity regimes are analysed, both longitudinal and transverse planes are studied, and both short-bunch and long-bunch regimes are considered. Observables and mitigation measures are also examined.

  1. Beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration in drifting intense relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, K.F.; Hintze, W.

    1976-01-01

    Collective ion acceleration at the injection of a relativistic electron beam into a low-pressure gas or a plasma is discussed and its strong dependence on the beam-front dynamics is shown. A simple one-dimensional model taking explicitly into account the motion and ionizing action of the ions in the beam-front region is developed for the calculation of the beam drift velocity. The obtained pressure dependence is in good agreement with experimental data. The energy distribution is shown of the ions accelerated in the moving potential well of the space charge region. Scaling laws for the beam-front dynamics and ion acceleration are derived. (J.U.)

  2. Overview of the Beam diagnostics in the Medaustron Accelerator:Design choices and test Beam commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Osmic, F; Gyorgy, A; Kerschbaum, A; Repovz, M; Schwarz, S; Neustadt, W; Burtin, G

    2012-01-01

    The MedAustron centre is a synchrotron based accelerator complex for cancer treatment and clinical and non-clinical research with protons and light ions, currently under construction in Wiener Neustadt, Austria. The accelerator complex is based on the CERN-PIMMS study [1] and its technical implementation by the Italian CNAO foundation in Pavia [2]. The MedAustron beam diagnostics system is based on sixteen different monitor types (153 devices in total) and will allow measuring all relevant beam parameters from the source to the irradiation rooms. The monitors will have to cope with large intensities and energy ranges. Currently, one ion source, the low energy beam transfer line and the RFQ are being commissioned in the Injector Test Stand (ITS) at CERN. This paper gives an overview of all beam monitors foreseen for the MedAustron accelerator, elaborates some of the design choices and reports the first beam commissioning results from the ITS.

  3. An Expert System For Tuning Particle-Beam Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, Darrel L.; Brand, Hal R.; Maurer, William J.; Searfus, Robert M.; Hernandez, Jose E.

    1989-03-01

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script.

  4. Numerical calculation of beam coupling impedances in synchrotron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenichen, Lukas

    2016-07-01

    Beams of charged particles are of interest in various fields of research including particle and nuclear physics, material and medical science and many more. In synchrotron accelerators the accelerating section is passed periodically. A closed loop trajectory is enforced, by increasing the frequency of the accelerating electric field and the magnitude of the dipolar magnetic guide field synchronously. A synchrotron therefore consists of a circular assembly of various beamline elements which serve the purposes of accelerating and guiding the particle beam. For the flawless operation of such a machine it has to be assured that the particles perform a controlled motion along predefined trajectories. Amongst others, the fulfillment of the corresponding stability criteria is in close conjuction with the so-called beam coupling impedances which are an important figure of merit for collective effects in synchrotron accelerators. This work focuses on analytical and numerical methods for the calculation of beam coupling impedances. One of the primary objectives is to gain a better understanding of the electrodynamics related to charged particle beams, furthermore to recapitulate the mathematical description of charged particle beams in both time and frequency domain and finally establish the links between actual physics and numerical modeling. Analytical methods are usually restricted to symmetrical geometry and may solely serve for the approximate determination of the field distribution in real geometries or to validate certain numerical methods. More accurate prognosis is only possible with three-dimensional simulation models. Numerical simulation techniques have been established in the second half of the last century accompanying the evolution of many particle accelerators. Classical time domain codes were the prevailing simulation tools where the actual process of the particle motion sequence is reproduced. For the present case of a heavy ion synchrotron accelerator

  5. Harp, a short pulse, high current electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestwich, K.R.

    1974-01-01

    A 3 MV, 800 kA, 24 ns electron beam accelerator is described and the results of initial switching experiments are discussed. The generator will provide a source for studying the physics of processes leading to electron beam driven, inertially confined fusion. The major components of the accelerator are two diodes with a common anode, twelve oil-dielectric Blumleins with low jitter (less than 2 ns) multichannel switches, three intermediate storage capacitors, a trigger pulse generator and two Marx generators. (U.S.)

  6. Calculations of beam dynamics in Sandia linear electron accelerators, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poukey, J.W.; Coleman, P.D.

    1985-03-01

    A number of code and analytic studies were made during 1984 which pertain to the Sandia linear accelerators MABE and RADLAC. In this report the authors summarize the important results of the calculations. New results include a better understanding of gap-induced radial oscillations, leakage currents in a typical MABE gas, emittance growth in a beam passing through a series of gaps, some new diocotron results, and the latest diode simulations for both accelerators. 23 references, 30 figures, 1 table

  7. High quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, S M; Issac, R C; Welsh, G H; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Anania, M P; Cipiccia, S; Manahan, G G; Aniculaesei, C; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Burgess, R T L; Vieux, G; Jaroszynski, D A [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W A [SUPA, Division of Electronic Engineering and Physics, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A M [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); Van der Geer, S B; De Loos, M J, E-mail: m.wiggins@phys.strath.ac.u [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    High quality electron beams have been produced in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by femtosecond laser pulses with a peak power of 26 TW. Electrons are produced with an energy up to 150 MeV from the 2 mm gas jet accelerator and the measured rms relative energy spread is less than 1%. Shot-to-shot stability in the central energy is 3%. Pepper-pot measurements have shown that the normalized transverse emittance is {approx}1{pi} mm mrad while the beam charge is in the range 2-10 pC. The generation of high quality electron beams is understood from simulations accounting for beam loading of the wakefield accelerating structure. Experiments and self-consistent simulations indicate that the beam peak current is several kiloamperes. Efficient transportation of the beam through an undulator is simulated and progress is being made towards the realization of a compact, high peak brilliance free-electron laser operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength ranges.

  8. Distribution uniformity of laser-accelerated proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun-Gao; Zhu, Kun; Tao, Li; Xu, Xiao-Han; Lin, Chen; Ma, Wen-Jun; Lu, Hai-Yang; Zhao, Yan-Ying; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Chen, Jia-Er; Yan, Xue-Qing

    2017-09-01

    Compared with conventional accelerators, laser plasma accelerators can generate high energy ions at a greatly reduced scale, due to their TV/m acceleration gradient. A compact laser plasma accelerator (CLAPA) has been built at the Institute of Heavy Ion Physics at Peking University. It will be used for applied research like biological irradiation, astrophysics simulations, etc. A beamline system with multiple quadrupoles and an analyzing magnet for laser-accelerated ions is proposed here. Since laser-accelerated ion beams have broad energy spectra and large angular divergence, the parameters (beam waist position in the Y direction, beam line layout, drift distance, magnet angles etc.) of the beamline system are carefully designed and optimised to obtain a radially symmetric proton distribution at the irradiation platform. Requirements of energy selection and differences in focusing or defocusing in application systems greatly influence the evolution of proton distributions. With optimal parameters, radially symmetric proton distributions can be achieved and protons with different energy spread within ±5% have similar transverse areas at the experiment target. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575011, 61631001) and National Grand Instrument Project (2012YQ030142)

  9. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J.

    2013-07-01

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  10. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  11. eγ and γγ colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Isamu

    1994-01-01

    The results that can be expected by eγ and γγ colliders in future are summarized. eγ and γγ colliders have many fine possibilities, and are the economical selection for utilizing future e + e - colliders more effectively. eγ and γγ colliders were proposed by former USSR researchers at the beginning of 1980s, but recently, the prospect of realizing future e + e - collision type linear accelerator projects has become high, they have become to be considered seriously as the option of remodeling them. The high energy photon beam of eγ and γγ colliders is obtained by causing Compton reverse scattering, irradiating laser beam to the electron beam of e + e - accelerators. The production of γ-beam is explained. As for the physics noteworthy in eγ colliders, abnormal gauge coupling, the formation of Higgs particles, excited leptons, lepto-quark, supersymmetric particles and top quark are explained. As the physics noteworthy in γγ colliders, the formation of Higgs particles which is most interesting in γγ colliders, abnormal gauge coupling, top quark, Yukawa coupling, Higgs pair formation and other particles are enumerated. The linear e + e - accelerators of TeV range including JLC have the performance to be remodeled to eγ and γγ colliders, and the prospect of realizing them has become high. Their possibility of realization is discussed. (K.I.)

  12. Beam dynamics in stripline linear induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Stripline (parallel plate transmission line) pulsed power modules have been considered for application to advanced high current linear accelerators. Some advantages of the stripline designs include compact size, easy maintenance, and most importantly, the small number of switches required (one switch per 2 MeV). The principle drawback of stripline designs is that they impart a NET transverse force to particles in the gap. This is shown to result in randomized transverse momentum, and NET, constructive transverse guiding center motion. In this paper, a semi-quantitative analysis of several facets of the problem is presented

  13. Dynamics and transport of laser-accelerated particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Stefan

    2010-04-19

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation and optimization of beam transport elements in the context of the steadily growing field of laser-driven particle acceleration. The first topic is the examination of the free vacuum expansion of an electron beam at high current density. It could be shown that particle tracking codes which are commonly used for the calculation of space charge effects will generate substantial artifacts in the regime considered here. The artifacts occurring hitherto predominantly involve insufficient prerequisites for the Lorentz transformation, the application of inadequate initial conditions and non negligible retardation artifacts. A part of this thesis is dedicated to the development of a calculation approach which uses a more adequate ansatz calculating space charge effects for laser-accelerated electron beams. It can also be used to validate further approaches for the calculation of space charge effects. The next elements considered are miniature magnetic quadrupole devices for the focusing of charged particle beams. General problems involved with their miniaturization concern distorting higher order field components. If these distorting components cannot be controlled, the field of applications is very limited. In this thesis a new method for the characterization and compensation of the distorting components was developed, which might become a standard method when assembling these permanent magnet multipole devices. The newly developed characterization method has been validated at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) electron accelerator. Now that we can ensure optimum performance, the first application of permanent magnet quadrupole devices in conjunction with laser-accelerated ion beams is presented. The experiment was carried out at the Z-Petawatt laser system at Sandia National Laboratories. A promising application for laser-accelerated electron beams is the FEL in a university-scale size. The first discussion of all relevant aspects

  14. Dynamics and transport of laser-accelerated particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation and optimization of beam transport elements in the context of the steadily growing field of laser-driven particle acceleration. The first topic is the examination of the free vacuum expansion of an electron beam at high current density. It could be shown that particle tracking codes which are commonly used for the calculation of space charge effects will generate substantial artifacts in the regime considered here. The artifacts occurring hitherto predominantly involve insufficient prerequisites for the Lorentz transformation, the application of inadequate initial conditions and non negligible retardation artifacts. A part of this thesis is dedicated to the development of a calculation approach which uses a more adequate ansatz calculating space charge effects for laser-accelerated electron beams. It can also be used to validate further approaches for the calculation of space charge effects. The next elements considered are miniature magnetic quadrupole devices for the focusing of charged particle beams. General problems involved with their miniaturization concern distorting higher order field components. If these distorting components cannot be controlled, the field of applications is very limited. In this thesis a new method for the characterization and compensation of the distorting components was developed, which might become a standard method when assembling these permanent magnet multipole devices. The newly developed characterization method has been validated at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI) electron accelerator. Now that we can ensure optimum performance, the first application of permanent magnet quadrupole devices in conjunction with laser-accelerated ion beams is presented. The experiment was carried out at the Z-Petawatt laser system at Sandia National Laboratories. A promising application for laser-accelerated electron beams is the FEL in a university-scale size. The first discussion of all relevant aspects

  15. Collective acceleration of electrons and ions in a high current relativistic electron beam. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nation, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes work carried out on DOE contract number DE-AC02-80ER10569 during the period December 15, 1979 to May 31, 1992. The original purpose of this research was to investigate the use of slow space charge waves on weakly relativistic electron beams for ion acceleration. The work had three major objectives: development of a suitable ion injector, growth and study of the properties of slow space charge waves on an electron beam, and a combination of the two components into a suitable proof-of-principle demonstration of the wave accelerator. Work focused on the first two of these objectives. Control of the space charge waves' phase velocity was not obtained to the degree required for a working accelerator, so the project was duly terminated in favor of a program which focused on generating ultra high power microwave signals suitable for use in the next linear collider. Work done to develop suitable efficient, inexpensive, phase-stable microwave sources, with peak powers of up to 1 GW in the X band in pulses shorter than 1 ns, is described. Included are lists of the journal and conference papers resulting from this work, as well as a list of graduate students who completed their Ph.D. studies on the projects described in this report

  16. Electron lenses for super-colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the operating principles and technology of electron lenses in supercolliders.  Electron lenses are a novel instrument for high energy particle accelerators, particularly for the energy-frontier superconducting hadron colliders, including the Tevatron, RHIC, LHC and future very large hadron colliders.  After reviewing the issues surrounding beam dynamics in supercolliders, the book offers an introduction to the electron lens method and its application.  Further chapters describe the technology behind the electron lenses which have recently been proposed, built and employed for compensation of beam-beam effects and for collimation of high-energy high-intensity beams, for compensation of space-charge effects and several other applications in accelerators. The book will be an invaluable resource for those involved in the design, construction and operation of the next generation of hadron colliders.

  17. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...

  18. Perspex in the verification routines for accelerator beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.; Genis S, R.

    1998-01-01

    It is analyzed the use of a perspex solid phantom, adequately referred to a water phantom, as an auxiliary alternative for the daily stability verification routines or constance of radiation beam, as an option in the case of radiotherapy installations with high charge of accelerator working and with basic dosimetry equipment. (Author)

  19. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects due to Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders.

    CERN Document Server

    Furuseth, Sondre

    2017-01-01

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. This report discusses results from an implementation of the weak-strong model, studying the effects of head-on beam-beam interactions. The assumptions has been shown to be valid for configurations where the growth and losses of the beam are small. The tracking has been done using an original code which applies graphic cards to reduce the computation time. The bunches in the beams have been modelled cylindrically symmetrical, based on a Gaussian distribution in three dimensions. This choice fits well with bunches...

  20. Muon collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A.; Caspi, S.; Chen, P.; Cheng, W.-H.; Cho, Y.; Cline, D.B.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.C.; Garren, A.; Gordon, H.; Green, M.A.; Gupta, R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnstone, C.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Kycia, T.; Lee, Y.; Lissauer, D.; Luccio, A.; McInturff, A.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.V.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.-Y.; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Norum, B.; Oide, K.; Parsa, Z.; Polychronakos, V.; Popovic, M.; Rehak, P.; Roser, T.; Rossmanith, R.; Scanlan, R.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Stumer, I.; Summers, D.; Syphers, M.; Takahashi, H.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; Van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Willis, W.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.; Zhao, Y. [Brookhaven Nat. Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)]|[BINP, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]|[Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)]|[Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4815 (United States)]|[Center for Advanced Accelerators, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1547 (United States)]|[CEBAF, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)]|[University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States)]|[KEK, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-Ken 305 (Japan)]|[DESY, Hamburg (Germany)]|[University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 38677 (United States)]|[SUNY, Stony Brook, NY 11974 (United States)]|[Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)]|[Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)]|[Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06430-5195 (United States)]|[UC Berkele

    1996-11-01

    The construction principles of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-colliders are discussed. After a presentation of the properties of some collider ring candidate designs, the methods for {mu}{sup {+-}} production are described. Then the principles of beam cooling for such colliders are considered. Finally the components of a collider storage rings are described, whereby also polarization is considered. (HSI).

  1. Charged beam dynamics, particle accelerators and free electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe; Sabia, Elio; Artioli, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    Charged Beam Dynamics, Particle Accelerators and Free Electron Lasers summarises different topics in the field of accelerators and of Free Electron Laser (FEL) devices. It is intended as a reference manual for the different aspects of FEL devices, explaining how to design both a FEL device and the accelerator providing the driving beam. It covers both theoretical and experimental aspects, allowing researchers to attempt a first design of a FEL device in different operating conditions. It provides an analysis of what is already available, what is needed, and what the challenges are to determine new progress in this field. All chapters contain complements and exercises that are designed in such a way that the reader will gradually acquire self-confidence with the matter treated in the book.

  2. Dosimetry for electron beam from Microtron accelerator using chemical dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Praveen; Nairy, Rajesha; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Narayana, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The Microtron is a simple, compact, low cost electron accelerator with excellent beam quality and it can accelerate electrons to relativistic energies. The variable energy Microtron at Mangalore University is used for R and D programmes in basic and applied areas of physics, chemistry, materials science, biological sciences, medical science and industry. While studying the effects of radiation, it is essential to have complete knowledge of absorbed dose. In the present study the absorbed dose and the uniformity of dose distribution at various points due to 8 MeV electron beam from Microtron accelerator has been calculated using different chemical dosimeters. From the dosimetry studies for Microtron accelerator, it is observed that the absorbed doses measured at various dose ranges from 2 Gy to 25 kGy using FBX dosimeters at very low doses, Fricke at intermediate doses and alanine and glutamine at higher doses, varied linearly with increasing electron counts. From the dosimetry studies it is observed that there is a linear relation between dose and electron numbers over a wide range of absorbed doses. It is evaluated that the electron counts of about 1.15 x 10 14 corresponds to an absorbed dose of 100 Gy. Fricke dosimetry was carried out to measure the uniformity in dose distribution at a distance of 30 cm from the beam exit window of the accelerator to ensure the availability of uniform irradiation field size. It is observed that a field size of about 4 x 4 cm is available at 30 cm distance from the beam exit window over which the dose distribution is uniform. The sample size during radiological studies using Microtron was restricted to less than 4 x 4 cm dimension at 30 cm distance from the beam exit window to ensure uniform dose distribution to the sample

  3. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams generating high-energy-density matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/ c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. These data have been used as input to a sophisticated two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1 m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy deposition region will extend to a length of about 35 m over the beam duration. This is due to the fact that first few tens of bunches deposit sufficient energy that leads to high pressure that generates an outgoing radial shock wave. Shock propagation leads to continuous reduction in the density at the target center that allows the protons delivered in subsequent bunches to penetrate deeper and deeper into the target. This phenomenon has also been seen in case of heavy-ion heated targets [N. A. Tahir, A. Kozyreva, P. Spiller, D. H. H. Hoffmann, and A. Shutov, Phys. Rev. E 63, 036407 (2001)]. This effect needs to be considered in the design of a sacrificial beam stopper. These simulations have also shown that the target is severely damaged and is converted into a huge sample of high-energy density (HED) matter. In fact, the inner part of the target is transformed into a strongly coupled plasma with fairly uniform physical conditions. This work, therefore, has

  4. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling and Prospects for Muon Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Rolland P; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Barzi, Emanuela; Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, S A; Del Frate, Licia; Derbenev, Yaroslav S; Gonin, Ivan V; Hanlet, Pierrick M; Hartline, Robert; Kaplan, Daniel; Kuchnir, Moyses; Moretti, Alfred; Neuffer, David V; Paul, Kevin; Popovic, Milorad; Roberts, Thomas; Romanov, Gennady; Turrioni, Daniele; Yarba, Victor; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2005-01-01

    A six-dimensional(6D)cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas* is used to achieve the small transverse emittances demanded by a high-luminosity muon collider. This helical cooling channel**(HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange. Simulations verify the analytic predictions and have shown a 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m HCC segment. Using three such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost six orders of magnitude. After this, two new post-cooling ideas can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to one or two mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. In this report we discuss the status of and the plans for the HCC simulation and engineering efforts. We also describe the new post-cooling id...

  5. Beam Dynamics Design Studies of a Superconducting Radioactive Ion Beam Post-accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, MA; Pasini, M

    2011-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE project at CERN proposes a superconducting upgrade to increase the energy range and quality of the radioactive ion beams produced at ISOLDE, which are currently post- accelerated by the normal conducting REX linac. The specification and design choices for the HIE-ISOLDE linac are outlined along with a comprehensive beam dynamics study undertaken to understand and mitigate the sources of beam emittance dilution. The dominant cause of transverse emittance growth was attributed to the coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motions through the phase dependence of the rf defocusing force in the accelerating cavities. A parametric resonance induced by the coupling was observed and its excitation surveyed as a function of trans- verse phase advance using numerical simulations and analytic models to understand and avoid the regions of transverse beam instability. Other sources of emittance growth were studied and where necessary ameliorated, including the beam steering force in the quarter-wa...

  6. HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KING, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    A plausible ''straw-man'' scenario and collider ring parameter sets are presented for future energy frontier muon colliders in symbiotic facilities with e + e - and hadron colliders: 1.6-10 TeV ''mu-linear colliders'' (mu-LC) where the muons are accelerated in the linacs of a TeV-scale linear e + e - collider, and a 100 TeV Very Large Muon Collider (VLMC) that shares a facility with a 200 TeV Very Large Hadron collider (VLHC) and a 140 TeV muon-proton collider

  7. Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)—positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis—produces commercially...

  8. 'Geant Simulation of Muon Cooling Rings,' 'Ionization Cooling Ring for Muons,' 'Geant Simulation of Six-Dimensional Cooling of Muon Beams in Ring Coolers,' 'Recent Progress in Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Research Within the Muon Collaboration,' 'Towards the Higgs Factory/Muon Collider,' 'Status of R and D on Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders,' 'Feasibility Study-II of a Muon-Based Neutrino Source,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'Higgs Factory Muon Collider,' 'A Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory,' 'A Feasibility Study of a Neutrino Source Based on a Muon Storage Ring,' 'Status of Muon Collider Research and Development and Future Plans,'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. G. Hanson and A. Klier; R. Palmer,; Amit Klier and Gail G. Hanson,; Mohammad M. Alsharo, et al,; G. Hanson,; G. Hanson,; S. Ozaki, R. Palmer, M.S. Zisman, and J. Gallardo, eds.,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; D.B. Cline and G.G. Hanson,; N. Holtkamp and D. Finley, eds.; C.M. Ankenbrandt

    2006-01-01

    now under way. The International Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Scoping Study (ISS) began at the NuFact05 Workshop in June 2005 with the goals of elaborating the physics case, defining the baseline options for such a facility and its neutrino detectors, and identifying the required R and D program to lay the foundations for a complete design study proposal, and an International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory is beginning. These studies entail iterative cost and technical difficulty evaluations, thereby providing guidelines for the advancing R and D program. One of the central subsystems of a neutrino factory or muon collider is the muon cooling system. The muon beam is cooled to increase the phase space density and allow the muons to pass through smaller apertures, thus reducing the cost of the following accelerator systems. This cooling is accomplished through ionization cooling, in which the beam is passed through liquid hydrogen absorbers and then accelerated in RF cavities to restore the longitudinal momentum. Ionization cooling was proposed more than twenty years ago But has not yet been demonstrated in practice. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) seeks to build and operate a muon-cooling device of a design proposed in Feasibility Study-II. In addition to cooling the muons, MICE includes apparatus to measure the performance of the device. The experiment will be carried out by a collaboration of physicists from the U.S., Europe, and Japan at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the U.K. MICE will begin operation in late 2007. Successful performance of the MICE experiment will provide the understanding needed to design a complete neutrino factory, in which the muons are cooled, accelerated, circulated in a storage ring, and decay to produce the neutrino beam. The first neutrino factory might be built in the U.S., Europe, or Japan. A Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) has recently been organized at Fermilab

  9. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuernberg, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. In this work, an experimental method to fully reconstruct laser-accelerated proton beam parameters, called radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy (RIS), was developed. Since the proton beam expansion is a plasma expansion with accompanying electrons, a low-energy electron spectrometer was developed, built and tested to study the electron distribution matching to the proton beam energy distribution. Two experiments were carried out at the VULCAN Petawatt laser with the aim of showing dynamic control and enhancement of proton acceleration using multiple or defocused laser pulses. Irradiating the target with a long pulse, low-intensity laser (10 12 W/cm 2 ) prior to the main pulse (∝ns), an optimum pre-plasma density scale length of 60 μm is generated leading to an enhancement of the maximum proton energy (∝25%), the proton flux (factor of 3) and the beam uniformity. Proton beams were generated more efficiently than previously by driving thinner target foils at a lower intensity over a large area. The optimum condition was a 2 μm foil irradiated with an intensity of 10 19 W/cm 2 onto a 60 μm spot. Laser to proton beam efficiencies of 7.8% have been achieved (2.2% before) - one of the highest conversion efficiencies ever achieved. In the frame of this work, two separate experiments at the TRIDENT laser system have shown that these laser-accelerated proton beams, with their high number of particles in a short pulse duration, are well-suited for creating isochorically heated matter in extreme conditions. Besides the manipulation of the proton beam parameters directly during the generation, the primary aim of this thesis was the capture, control and transport of laser-accelerated proton beams by a solenoidal magnetic field lense for further purpose. In a joint project proposal, the laser and plasma physics group of the Technische Universitat

  10. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuernberg, Frank

    2010-11-15

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. In this work, an experimental method to fully reconstruct laser-accelerated proton beam parameters, called radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy (RIS), was developed. Since the proton beam expansion is a plasma expansion with accompanying electrons, a low-energy electron spectrometer was developed, built and tested to study the electron distribution matching to the proton beam energy distribution. Two experiments were carried out at the VULCAN Petawatt laser with the aim of showing dynamic control and enhancement of proton acceleration using multiple or defocused laser pulses. Irradiating the target with a long pulse, low-intensity laser (10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) prior to the main pulse ({proportional_to}ns), an optimum pre-plasma density scale length of 60 {mu}m is generated leading to an enhancement of the maximum proton energy ({proportional_to}25%), the proton flux (factor of 3) and the beam uniformity. Proton beams were generated more efficiently than previously by driving thinner target foils at a lower intensity over a large area. The optimum condition was a 2 {mu}m foil irradiated with an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} onto a 60 {mu}m spot. Laser to proton beam efficiencies of 7.8% have been achieved (2.2% before) - one of the highest conversion efficiencies ever achieved. In the frame of this work, two separate experiments at the TRIDENT laser system have shown that these laser-accelerated proton beams, with their high number of particles in a short pulse duration, are well-suited for creating isochorically heated matter in extreme conditions. Besides the manipulation of the proton beam parameters directly during the generation, the primary aim of this thesis was the capture, control and transport of laser-accelerated proton beams by a solenoidal magnetic field lense for further purpose. In a joint project proposal, the laser and

  11. Brookhaven FASTBUS ADC's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.P.; Black, J.K.; Blatt, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    A high energy physics experiment has been performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory on k/sub L/ 0 → 2π 0 decays employing a large (> 200 element) lead glass array as an electromagnetic calorimeter. To acquire pulse height information from the detector we have constructed ADC modules in the context of the Brookhaven Fastbus data acquisition system. Digitization (8 bits) and encoding, including pedestal subtraction and data sparsing, is achieved for each 16 channel module in 6 μsec

  12. Probing anomalous Higgs couplings at an eγ collider using unpolarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Debajyoti; Mamta

    2007-01-01

    We examine the sensitivity of e γ colliders (based on e + e - linear colliders of c.m. energy 500 GeV) to the anomalous couplings of the Higgs to W-boson via the process e - γ → νWH. This has the advantage over e + e - collider in being able to dissociate WWH vertex from ZZH. We are able to construct several dynamical variables which may be used to constrain the various couplings in the WWH vertex. (author)

  13. SETI and muon collider

    OpenAIRE

    Silagadze, Z. K.

    2008-01-01

    Intense neutrino beams that accompany muon colliders can be used for interstellar communications. The presence of multi-TeV extraterrestrial muon collider at several light-years distance can be detected after one year run of IceCube type neutrino telescopes, if the neutrino beam is directed towards the Earth. This opens a new avenue in SETI: search for extraterrestrial muon colliders.

  14. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-04-21

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map

  15. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map

  16. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  17. Beam position measurement system at the Fermilab main accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1975-01-01

    The beam position system of the Fermilab Main Ring contains one horizontal and one vertical Electrostatic Beam Pickup in each of the 96 cells of the machine. A pair of 75 ohm cables transmits the induced signal from the machine tunnel to the nearest service building. In each of the 24 service buildings, there is a solid-state multiplexer and a beam position detector which processes the A-B signal pairs to produce an intensity-normalized voltage proportional to beam displacement. This voltage is digitized, read into buffer of the Lockheed MAC A, and in turn transferred to the Xerox 530. Horizontal or vertical orbits can be obtained in 50 millisec. Orbits are obtained at injection and at a Main Ring Sample time, if requested, anywhere on the acceleration cycle. Injection orbits can be flattened automatically by a program that sets dipole trim magnets. (auth)

  18. Synchrotron accelerator technology for proton beam therapy with high accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramoto, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Proton beam therapy was applied at the beginning to head and neck cancers, but it is now extended to prostate, lung and liver cancers. Thus the need for a pencil beam scanning method is increasing. With this method radiation dose concentration property of the proton beam will be further intensified. Hitachi group has supplied a pencil beam scanning therapy system as the first one for M. D. Anderson Hospital in United States, and it has been operational since May 2008. Hitachi group has been developing proton therapy system to correspond high-accuracy proton therapy to concentrate the dose in the diseased part which is located with various depths, and which sometimes has complicated shape. The author described here on the synchrotron accelerator technology that is an important element for constituting the proton therapy system. (K.Y.)

  19. Heavy-ion beams required for the RIA accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Pardo, Richard C; Nolen, J A; Rehm, K E; Savard, Guy

    2004-01-01

    A class of experiments which will be representative of the expected initial fields of study at the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility (RIA), are discussed. Improvement in the understanding of the rapid neutron capture process that is responsible for the creation of most stable nuclei heavier than the iron-region nuclei, will be the most important areas of research with RIA. RIA will provide beams of nuclei far from stability at low energies and with excellent beam quality, similar to the properties of stable beams available from facilities such as ATLAS. A total of 21 driver beams are identified which are necessary to provide optimal population of the r-process path, and provide good production of light neutron-rich nuclei. (Edited abstract) 15 Refs.

  20. Acceleration of Polarized Protons to High Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1999-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. However, the acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian Snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian Snakes and polarimeters are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible. A similar scheme is being studied for the 800 GeV HERA proton accelerator

  1. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices

  2. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  3. Charge exchange studies with Gold ions at the Brookhaven Booster and AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, L.A.; Hseuh, H.C.; Roser, T.

    1994-01-01

    Efficient acceleration of Gold ions to ll GeV/nucleon places strong constraints on the vacuum and also on the choice of thickness and material of the necessary stripping foils. Results of a number of detailed experimental studies performed with the Gold beam at the Brookhaven Booster and AGS to determine the relevant electron stripping and pick-up probabilities are presented. Of particular interest is the lifetime of the relatively low energy, partially stripped Gold beam in the Booster and the stripping efficiency to Helium-like AU +77 for injection into the AGS

  4. Muon Colliders: the Ultimate Neutrino Beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that muon decays in straight sections of muon collider rings will naturally produce highly collimated neutrino beams that can be several orders of magnitude stronger than the beams at existing accelerators. We discuss possible experimental setups and give a very brief overview of the physics potential from such beamlines. Formulae are given for the neutrino event rates at both short and long baseline neutrino experiments in these beams

  5. Impact of large beam-induced heat loads on the transient operation of the beam screens and the cryogenic plants of the Future Circular Collider (FCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Rodrigues, H.; Tavian, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) under study at CERN will produce 50-TeV high-energy proton beams. The high-energy particle beams are bent by 16-T superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K and distributed over a circumference of 80 km. The circulating beams induce 5 MW of dynamic heat loads by several processes such as synchrotron radiation, resistive dissipation of beam image currents and electron clouds. These beam-induced heat loads will be intercepted by beam screens operating between 40 and 60 K and induce transients during beam injection. Energy ramp-up and beam dumping on the distributed beam-screen cooling loops, the sector cryogenic plants and the dedicated circulators. Based on the current baseline parameters, numerical simulations of the fluid flow in the cryogenic distribution system during a beam operation cycle were performed. The effects of the thermal inertia of the headers on the helium flow temperature at the cryogenic plant inlet as well as the temperature gradient experienced by the beam screen has been assessed. Additionally, this work enabled a thorough exergetic analysis of different cryogenic plant configurations and laid the building-block for establishing design specification of cold and warm circulators.

  6. Proposal of 99.99%-aluminum/7N01-Aluminum clad beam tube for high energy booster of Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Hajime

    1994-01-01

    Proposal of 99.99% pure aluminum/7N01 aluminum alloy clad beam tube for high energy booster in Superconducting Super Collider is described. This aluminum clad beam tube has many good performances, but a eddy current effect is large in superconducting magnet quench collapse. The quench test result for aluminum clad beam tube is basically no problem against magnet quench collapse. (author)

  7. Radial carpet beams: A class of nondiffracting, accelerating, and self-healing beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Saifollah; Khazaei, Ali Mohammad; Hebri, Davud

    2018-03-01

    Self-accelerating shape-invariant beams are attracting major attention, presenting applications in many areas such as laser manipulation and patterning, light-sheet microscopy, and plasma channels. Moreover, optical lattices are offering many applications, including quantum computation, quantum phase transition, spin-exchange interaction, and realization of magnetic fields. We report observation of a class of accelerating and self-healing beams which covers the features required by all the aforementioned applications. These beams are accelerating, shape invariant, and self-healing for more than several tens of meters, have numerous phase anomalies and unprecedented patterns, and can be feasibly tuned. Diffraction of a plane wave from radial phase gratings generates such beams, and due to their beauty and structural complexity we have called them "carpet" beams. By tuning the value of phase variations over the grating, the resulting carpet patterns are converted into two-dimensional optical lattices with polar symmetry. Furthermore, the number of spokes in the radial grating, phase variation amplitude, and wavelength of the impinging light beam can also be adjusted to obtain additional features. We believe that radial carpet beams and lattices might find more applications in optical micromanipulation, optical lithography, super-resolution imaging, lighting design, optical communication through atmosphere, etc.

  8. Electromagnetic Design and Optimization of Directivity of Stripline Beam Position Monitors for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Draskovic, Drasko; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Lefèvre, Thibaut; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary electromagnetic design of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the High Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN. The design is fitted into a new octagonal shielded Beam Screen for the low-beta triplets and is optimized for high directivity. It also includes internal Tungsten absorbers, required to reduce the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets. The achieved broadband directivity in wakefield solver simulations presents significant improvement over the directivity of the current stripline BPMs installed in the LHC.

  9. Feasibility study of aluminum beam tube for the collider: An option for no-coating and no-liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, W.

    1994-07-01

    This report proposes to use a single-layer beam tube made of high strength, high resistivity aluminum alloy (such as 7039-T61 or A7N01) to replace the double-layer copper coated stainless steel tube in the SSC Collider. The main reasons are: (1) a potential saving of about $23 million which is basically the baseline cost of the copper coating and (2) the use of an extruded aluminum tube consisting of a beam chamber and a pumping chamber may solve the vacuum problem without any liner

  10. Subharmonic beam-loading in electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    The intention of operating an electron linear accelerator subharmonically beam loaded for free electron laser application requires justification of the beam-loaded energy gain equation. The mode of operation typically planned is 5 to 10 nanocoulombs single RF cycle pulses at 25 to 50 nanosecond intervals. This inquiry investigates the details of this sort of beam loading and discusses the performance achievable. Several other investigations of single bunch beam loading have been undertaken, notably at SLAC, where it has been found experimentally that the beam-loading varies directly as the bunch charge and independently of its energy; that investigation also included radiation effects of the wake field and losses owing to parasitic effects of higher order modes. In the case of beam loading where there are multiple pulses transiting at the same time, and spaced far enough apart that significant RF power is introduced between pulses, the energy gain may be calculated by dividing the waveguide into a number of segments, each equal in length to the integral of the interpulse time and the local group velocity. Equations which reveal that the net energy gain in the steady state is the sum of the energy gains in these segments, which compute the initial field intensity, and which calculate the energy gain in the subharmonic case on the basis of the equivalent beam current are presented

  11. Beam dynamics simulation of the Spallation Neutron Source linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, H.; Billen, J.H.; Bhatia, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    The accelerating structure for Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) consists of a radio-frequency-quadrupole-linac (RFQ), a drift-tube-linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity-drift-tube-linac (CCDTL), and a coupled-cavity-linac (CCL). The linac is operated at room temperature. The authors discuss the detailed design of linac which accelerates an H - pulsed beam coming out from RFQ at 2.5 MeV to 1000 MeV. They show a detailed transition from 402.5 MHz DTL with a 4 βλ structure to a CCDTL operated at 805 MHz with a 12 βλ structure. After a discussion of overall feature of the linac, they present an end-to-end particle simulation using the new version of the PARMILA code for a beam starting from the RFQ entrance through the rest of the linac. At 1000 MeV, the beam is transported to a storage ring. The storage ring requires a large (±500-keV) energy spread. This is accomplished by operating the rf-phase in the last section of the linac so the particles are at the unstable fixed point of the separatrix. They present zero-current phase advance, beam size, and beam emittance along the entire linac

  12. In a spin at Brookhaven spin physics

    CERN Document Server

    Makdisi, Y I

    2003-01-01

    The mysterious quantity that is spin took centre stage at Brookhaven for the SPIN2002 meeting last September. The 15th biennial International Spin Physics Symposium (SPIN2002) was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on 9-14 September 2002. Some 250 spin enthusiasts attended, including experimenters and theorists in both nuclear and high-energy physics, as well as accelerator physicists and polarized target and polarized source experts. The six-day symposium included 23 plenary talks and 150 parallel talks. SPIN2002 was preceded by a one-day spin physics tutorial for students, postdocs, and anyone else who felt the need for a refresher course. (2 refs).

  13. Determination of beam characteristic parameters for a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, D.A. de.

    1978-01-01

    A mechanism to determine electron beam characteristic parameters of a linear accelerator was constructed. The mechanism consists in an electro-calorimeter and an accurate optical densitometer. The following parameters: mean power, mean current, mean energy/particle, pulse Width, pulse amplitude dispersion, and pulse frequency, operating the 2 MeV linear accelerator of CBPF (Brazilian Center pf Physics Researches). The optical isodensity curves of irradiated glass lamellae were obtained, providing information about focus degradation penetration direction in material and the reach of particle. The point to point dose distribution in the material from optical density curves were obtained, using a semi empirical and approached model. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Development of compact low energy election beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Ichiro

    1996-01-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries has developed new compact accelerator jointly with its affiliated company RPC industries and some of which have already been in use in industries. Named WIPL, or WIP, which stands for Wire Ion Plasma, this accelerator is almost half the size of existing accelerators yet with performance as high as well enough to cope with industrial requirements. Background of our determination to develop such accelerator was that there prevails fairly good numbers of small laboratory units but only small numbers of production machines are in use. The main reason which brought such environment was that those production units were husky and costly. To overcome such problem and to turn situation in favor we launched the development programme and eventually succeeded to complete WIPL. Unique feature of WIPL was materialized by adopting special method of generating electrons. Unlike existing accelerators which use heated filaments WIPL utilizes the system using electron emission by bombardment of cathode plate by helium ions as electron source. Electrons are to be generated in following manner. 1) Thin helium gas is introduced in plasma chamber in which wire(s) for applying electric power. When power is supplied helium gas is turned into helium plasma by electric field. 2) Being energized by separate high voltage power source cathode plate is charged minus simultaneously. 3) Plus charged helium ions in plasma are then accelerated toward cathode plate and hit the surface. 4) Cathode plate emits electrons by bombardment and emitted electrons are compelled by the field and accelerated to the direction which helium ion came. Since such system no longer requires insulated transformers and control system for controlling electron beam current used in filament type machines equipment becomes remarkably small and economical. We really hope that this machine is accepted widely and contributes for exploiting the new horizon of electron beam market. (author)

  15. Superconducting muon collider concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.

    1996-01-01

    High energy colliding beam machines for elementary particle research have grown so costly that funding for them has become problematical. The physics they would explore, however, remains compelling, so that new methods must be found to reach high energy if this physics is to be studied. One such new approach is the muon collider. This machine could reach multi-TeV collision energies with good luminosity at an affordable cost. The scenario for producing μ + μ - collisions is shown schematically in a figure. A high intensity proton synchrotron delivers protons in sharply defined bunches onto a stationary target with an energy of 30 GeV. Many pions are produced that decay into muons; both are collected in a solenoid magnet system with useful energies in the range 0.1--1.0 GeV. The muons are then cooled, i.e. their transverse momentum as well as the spread in their longitudinal momentum is reduced. In this way, a bunch of protons is turned into a bunch of positive or negative muons suitable for acceleration and collision. The energy of the muons at this stage is only 0.02 GeV. Acceleration is accomplished in a series of recirculating linac accelerators, similar to the approach used in CEBAF. Upon reaching 2,000 GeV (2 TeV) of energy, the muons are transferred into a ring where positive and negative muons, transferred in successive bunches, collide and the collisions studied in a suitable detector. About 25% of the muons originally collected survive into the collider ring, and here they live for an average of ∼ 1,000 revolutions. At this point, the surviving muons are dumped and new bunches are injected. This paper describes in abbreviated form the main features and parameters of the presently envisioned muon collider, most of it taken from the latter two reports

  16. Million revolution accelerator beam instrument for logging and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Saltmarsh, C.; Talman, R.

    1988-03-01

    A data acquisition and analysis instrument for the processing of accelerator beam position monitor (BPM) signals has been assembled and used preliminarily for beam diagnosis of the Fermilab accelerators. Up to eight BPM (or other analogue) channels are digitized and transmitted to an acquisition Sun workstation and from there both to a monitor workstation and a workstation for off-line (but immediate) data analysis. A coherent data description format permits fast data object transfers to and from memory, disk and tape, across the Sun ethernet. This has helped the development of both general purpose and experiment-specific data analysis, presentation and control tools. Flexible software permits immediate graphical display in both time and frequency domains. The instrument acts simultaneously as a digital oscilloscope, as a network analyzer and as a correlating, noise-reducing spectrum analyzer. 2 refs., 3 figs

  17. Advanced Surface Polishing For Accelerator Technology Using Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Z.; Norem, J.; Hassanein, A.; Wu, A. T.

    2009-03-01

    A gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) technology was successfully applied to surface treatment of Cu, stainless steel, Ti, and Nb samples and to Nb rf-cavities by using accelerated cluster ion beams of Ar, O2 and combinations of them, with accelerating voltages up to 35 kV. DC field emission (dark current) measurements and electron microscopy were used to investigate metal surfaces treated by GCIB. The experimental results showed that GCIB technique can significantly reduce the number of field emitters and can change the structure of the Nb oxide layer on the surface. The RF tests of the GCIB-treated Nb rf-cavities showed improvement of the quality factor Q at 4.5 K. The superconducting gap was also enhanced by using the oxygen GCIB irradiation exposure.

  18. Design consideration of relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator for suppression of beam-break-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Houck, T.L.; Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.

    1994-03-01

    It is demonstrated in this simulation study that by using the scheme of operating rf extraction structures on the betatron nodes of electron drive beam in conjunction with adequate de-Q-ing, appropriate choice of geometries for the rf structures (reducing transverse impedence) and/or staggered tuning we can suppress the overall growth of transverse instabilities to 4 e-folds in a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator with 200 extraction cavities

  19. Concept of a staged FEL enabled by fast synchrotron radiation cooling of laser-plasma accelerated beam by solenoidal magnetic fields in plasma bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seryi, Andrei; Lesz, Zsolt; Andreev, Alexander; Konoplev, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    A novel method for generating GigaGauss solenoidal fields in a laser-plasma bubble, using screw-shaped laser pulses, has been recently presented. Such magnetic fields enable fast synchrotron radiation cooling of the beam emittance of laser-plasma accelerated leptons. This recent finding opens a novel approach for design of laser-plasma FELs or colliders, where the acceleration stages are interleaved with laser-plasma emittance cooling stages. In this concept paper, we present an outline of what a staged plasma-acceleration FEL could look like, and discuss further studies needed to investigate the feasibility of the concept in detail.

  20. Application of Waveguide Mode Diagnostics for Remote Sensing in Accelerator Beam Pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Kroyer, T; Caspers, Friedhelm

    2005-01-01

    In this work, two remote sensing systems using waveguide modes in beam pipes of CERN accelerators are studied. The first is an application of time domain reflectometry in waveguides. Since the emergence of unexpected obstacles in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam screen may lead to major disturbances, it is highly desirable to have a tool for detection and localization of such a fault. Waveguide mode time domain reflectometry using the synthetic pulse technique has been selected for this purpose. The system is based on a vector network analyzer using the fundamental TE and TM mode on the LHC beam-screen. Numerical signal processing is used to remove waveguide dispersion. Two modes of operation for the Reflectometer are proposed, the Assembly Version for inspection during the installation of LHC and the In Situ Version for measurements with the machine under vacuum. Coupling structures for both versions were designed and simulated, and tests on lines of up to 400 m length were performed. The second remote s...