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Sample records for cb1 endocanabinoide cnr1

  1. Roles of G1359A polymorphism of the cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR1 on weight loss and adipocytokines after a hypocaloric diet Papel del polimorfismo G1359A del gen del receptor endocanabinoide tipo 1 (CNR1 en la perdida de peso y adipocitoquinas tras una dieta hipocalórica

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    D. A. De Luis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A intragenic biallelic polymorphism (1359 G/A of the CB1 gene resulting in the substitution of the G to A at nucleotide position 1359 in codon 435 (Thr, was reported as a common polymorphism in Caucasian populations. Intervention studies with this polymorphism have not been realized. Objective: We decided to investigate the role of the polymorphism (G1359A of CB1 receptor gene on adipocytokines response and weight loss secondary to a lifestyle modification (Mediterranean hypocaloric diet and exercise in obese patients. Design: A population of 94 patients with obesity was analyzed. Before and after 3 months on a hypocaloric diet, an anthropometric evaluation, an assessment of nutritional intake and a biochemical analysis were performed. The statistical analysis was performed for the combined G1359A and A1359A as a group and wild type G1359G as second group, with a dominant model. Results: Forty seven patients (50% had the genotype G1359G (wild type group and 47 (50% patients G1359A (41 patients, 43.6% or A1359A (6 patients, 6.4% (mutant type group had the genotype. In wild and mutant type groups, weight, body mass index, fat mass, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure decreased. In mutant type group, resistin (4.15 ± 1.7 ng/ml vs. 3.90 ± 2.1 ng/ml: P Antecedentes: Un polimorfismo intragénico (1359 G / A del gen del receptor CB1 que produce la sustitución en la posición 1359 en el codón 435 (Thr, se ha descrito como un polimorfismo común en poblaciones caucásicas. No se han realizado estudios de intervención dietética teniendo en cuenta este polimorfismo. Objetivo: Se decidió investigar el papel del polimorfismo (G1359A del gen del receptor CB1 en la respuesta a las adipocitoquinas y la pérdida de peso secundaria a una modificación de estilo de vida (dieta mediterránea hipocalórica y ejercicio en pacientes obesos. Diseño: Se analizó una población de 94 pacientes con obesidad. Antes y tras 3 meses con una

  2. Presynaptic CB1 cannabinoid receptors control serotonin release in the rodent frontal cortex!

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    Teixeira, Filipe Alberto Marques

    2011-01-01

    Os CB1Rs desempenham um papel preponderante na plasticidade sináptica, metabolismo cerebral, neurogénese, e morte celular; fazendo com que o sistema endocanabinoide seja um alvo atrativo em doenças neurológicas e psiquiátricas. Os CB1Rs estão implicados na patogénese de uma série de desordens de humor e psicoses, sendo então um dos nossos objectivos mapear a possível presença e papel fisiológico dos CB1R em terminais nervosos frontocorticais, noradrenérgicos (positivos para dop...

  3. Association Study of Two Cannabinoid Receptor Genes, CNR1 and CNR2, with Methamphetamine Dependence

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    Okahisa, Y; Kodama, M; Takaki, M; Inada, T; Uchimura, N; Yamada, M; Iwata, N; Iyo, M; Sora, I; Ozaki, N; Ujike, H

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the endocannabinoid system plays significant roles in the vulnerability to psychiatric disorders including drug abuse. To examine the possible association of the CNR1 and CNR2 genes, which encode cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, with methamphetamine dependence, we investigated three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs806379, rs1535255, rs2023239) in intron 2 of the CNR1 gene and a nonsynonymous SNP, Q63R, in the CNR2 gene. The study samples consisted of 223 patients with methamphetamine dependence and 292 age- and sex- matched controls. There were no significant differences between the patients and controls in genotypic or allelic distribution of any SNP of the CNR1 and CNR2 genes. We also analyzed the clinical features of methamphetamine dependence. Rs806379 of the CNR1 gene showed a significant association with the phenotype of latency of psychosis after the first consumption of methamphetamine. Patients with the T allele or T-positive genotypes (T/T or A/T) may develop a rapid onset of psychosis after methamphetamine abuse. The present study suggests a possibility that genetic variants of the CNR1 gene may produce a liability to the complication of psychotic state after abuse of methamphetamine; however, our findings need to be confirmed by future replications. PMID:21886587

  4. Loss of cannabinoid receptor CB1 induces preterm birth.

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    Haibin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preterm birth accounting approximate 10% of pregnancies in women is a tremendous social, clinical and economic burden. However, its underlying causes remain largely unknown. Emerging evidence suggests that endocannabinoid signaling via cannabinoid receptor CB1 play critical roles in multiple early pregnancy events in both animals and humans. Since our previous studies demonstrated that loss of CB1 defers the normal implantation window in mice, we surmised that CB1 deficiency would influence parturition events. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Exploiting mouse models with targeted deletion of Cnr1, Cnr2 and Ptgs1 encoding CB1, CB2 and cyclooxygenase-1, respectively, we examined consequences of CB1 or CB2 silencing on the onset of parturition. We observed that genetic or pharmacological inactivation of CB1, but not CB2, induced preterm labor in mice. Radioimmunoassay analysis of circulating levels of ovarian steroid hormones revealed that premature birth resulting from CB1 inactivation is correlated with altered progesterone/estrogen ratios prior to parturition. More strikingly, the phenotypic defects of prolonged pregnancy length and parturition failure in mice missing Ptgs1 were corrected by introducing CB1 deficiency into Ptgs1 null mice. In addition, loss of CB1 resulted in aberrant secretions of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and corticosterone during late gestation. The pathophysiological significance of this altered corticotrophin-releasing hormone-driven endocrine activity in the absence of CB1 was evident from our subsequent findings that a selective corticotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist was able to restore the normal parturition timing in Cnr1 deficient mice. In contrast, wild-type females receiving excessive levels of corticosterone induced preterm birth. CONCLUSIONS: CB1 deficiency altering normal progesterone and estrogen levels induces preterm birth in mice. This defect is independent of prostaglandins produced by

  5. Cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein Crip1a modulates CB1 receptor signaling in mouse hippocampus.

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    Guggenhuber, Stephan; Alpar, Alan; Chen, Rongqing; Schmitz, Nina; Wickert, Melanie; Mattheus, Tobias; Harasta, Anne E; Purrio, Martin; Kaiser, Nadine; Elphick, Maurice R; Monory, Krisztina; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J; Harkany, Tibor; Lutz, Beat; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 receptor (Cnr1, CB1R) mediates a plethora of physiological functions in the central nervous system as a presynaptic modulator of neurotransmitter release. The recently identified cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1a (Cnrip1a, CRIP1a) binds to the C-terminal domain of CB1R, a region known to be important for receptor desensitization and internalization. Evidence that CRIP1a and CB1R interact in vivo has been reported, but the neuroanatomical distribution of CRIP1a is unknown. Moreover, while alterations of hippocampal CRIP1a levels following limbic seizures indicate a role in controlling excessive neuronal activity, the physiological function of CRIP1a in vivo has not been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the spatial distribution of CRIP1a in the hippocampus and examined CRIP1a as a potential modulator of CB1R signaling. We found that Cnrip1a mRNA is co-expressed with Cnr1 mRNA in pyramidal neurons and interneurons of the hippocampal formation. CRIP1a protein profiles were largely segregated from CB1R profiles in mossy cell terminals but not in hippocampal CA1 region. CB1R activation induced relocalization to close proximity with CRIP1a. Adeno-associated virus-mediated overexpression of CRIP1a specifically in the hippocampus revealed that CRIP1a modulates CB1R activity by enhancing cannabinoid-induced G protein activation. CRIP1a overexpression extended the depression of excitatory currents by cannabinoids in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and diminished the severity of chemically induced acute epileptiform seizures. Collectively, our data indicate that CRIP1a enhances hippocampal CB1R signaling in vivo. PMID:25772509

  6. CB1 expression is attenuated in Fallopian tube and decidua of women with ectopic pregnancy.

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    Andrew W Horne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Embryo retention in the Fallopian tube (FT is thought to lead to ectopic pregnancy (EP, a considerable cause of morbidity. In mice, genetic/pharmacological silencing of cannabinoid receptor Cnr1, encoding CB1, causes retention of embryos in the oviduct. The role of the endocannabinoids in tubal implantation in humans is not known. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Timed FT biopsies (n = 18 were collected from women undergoing gynecological procedures for benign conditions. Endometrial biopsies and whole blood were collected from women undergoing surgery for EP (n = 11; management of miscarriage (n = 6, and termination of pregnancy (n = 8. Using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, CB1 mRNA and protein expression levels/patterns were examined in FT and endometrial biopsies. The distribution of two polymorphisms of CNR1 was examined by TaqMan analysis of genomic DNA from the whole blood samples. In normal FT, CB1 mRNA was higher in luteal compared to follicular-phase (p<0.05. CB1 protein was located in smooth muscle of the wall and of endothelial vessels, and luminal epithelium of FT. In FT from women with EP, CB1 mRNA expression was low. CB1 mRNA expression was also significantly lower (p<0.05 in endometrium of women with EP compared to intrauterine pregnancies (IUP. Although of 1359G/A (rs1049353 polymorphisms of CNR1 gene suggests differential distribution of genotypes between the small, available cohorts of women with EP and those with IUP, results were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: CB1 mRNA shows temporal variation in expression in human FT, likely regulated by progesterone. CB1 mRNA is expressed in low levels in both the FT and endometrium of women with EP. We propose that aberrant endocannabinoid-signaling in human FT leads to EP. Furthermore, our finding of reduced mRNA expression along with a possible association between polymorphism genotypes of the CNR1 gene and EP, suggests a possible genetic predisposition to EP that

  7. Rs6454674, Rs806368 and Rs1049353 CNR1 Gene Polymorphisms in Turkish Bipolar Disorder Patients: A Preliminary Study

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    Gokay Alpak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in clinical practice. The etiology of the BD is not thoroughly understood. Endocannabinoid system, which is involved in regulation of emotion, stress, memory, and cognition, may have an important role in the pathophysiology of BD. Mutations on the cannabinoid-1 receptor (CNR1 gene are associated with several psychiatric disorders. The main cannabinoid (CB receptor is CB1 and its activation inhibits neuronal depolarization. One previous study showed rs1049353 polymorphism of CNR1 gene is associated with major depression but not with BD. In this study, we aimed to investigate the rs6454674, rs806368 and rs1049353 CNR1 gene polymorphisms in Turkish BD patients. A total of 96 patients and 58 healthy controls were included in the current case-control study. Blood samples of study participants were collected into sterile tubes and processed to obtain genomic DNA. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis were done by digesting the PCR products with HpyCH4III and BseGI enzymes for the rs6454674 and rs806368 restriction sites, respectively. Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP analysis was also performed. Among three polymorphisms investigated in this study, only rs6454674 polymorphism was significantly different between BD patients and controls (rs6454674 T/G; p=0.042, rs806368 T/C; p>0.05, rs1049353 A/G; p>0.05. Furthermore, we found that the mean of the yearly manic attacks was statistically higher in patients who have heterozygote (0.91+/-0.67 rs6454674 T/G polymorphisms compared to those with homozygote (p=0.043 polymorphism. The post-hoc analysis showed that the main differences were between the heterozygotes genotype and non-mutant (GG homozygotes (0.42+/-0.31; p=0.037 but not in homozygote mutant genotype (0.74+/-0.74; p=0.149. When patients were compared with the other clinical parameters, and mutated alleles and genotypes for each polymorphism, we did not

  8. Variation in the human cannabinoid receptor CNR1 gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces

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    Chakrabarti Bhismadev

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From an early age, humans look longer at preferred stimuli and also typically look longer at facial expressions of emotion, particularly happy faces. Atypical gaze patterns towards social stimuli are common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC. However, it is unknown whether gaze fixation patterns have any genetic basis. In this study, we tested whether variations in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1 gene are associated with gaze duration towards happy faces. This gene was selected because CNR1 is a key component of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in processing reward, and in our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, we found that variations in CNR1 modulate the striatal response to happy (but not disgust faces. The striatum is involved in guiding gaze to rewarding aspects of a visual scene. We aimed to validate and extend this result in another sample using a different technique (gaze tracking. Methods A total of 30 volunteers (13 males and 17 females from the general population observed dynamic emotional expressions on a screen while their eye movements were recorded. They were genotyped for the identical four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CNR1 gene tested in our earlier fMRI study. Results Two SNPs (rs806377 and rs806380 were associated with differential gaze duration for happy (but not disgust faces. Importantly, the allelic groups associated with a greater striatal response to happy faces in the fMRI study were associated with longer gaze duration at happy faces. Conclusions These results suggest that CNR1 variations modulate the striatal function that underlies the perception of signals of social reward, such as happy faces. This suggests that CNR1 is a key element in the molecular architecture of perception of certain basic emotions. This may have implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions marked by atypical eye contact and facial emotion processing

  9. Evidence for association between polymorphisms in the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CNR1) gene and cannabis dependence

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    Agrawal, Arpana; Wetherill, Leah; Dick, Danielle M; Xuei, Xiaoling; Hinrichs, Anthony; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Nurnberger, John I.; Schuckit, Marc; Laura J Bierut; Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    Genomic studies of cannabis use disorders have been limited. The cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) on chromosome 6q14–15 is an excellent candidate gene for cannabis dependence due to the important role of the G-protein coupled receptor encoded by this gene in the rewarding effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Previous studies have found equivocal evidence for an association between SNPs in CNR1 and a general vulnerability to substance use disorders. We investigate the association between 9 SN...

  10. Exploração farmacológica do sistema endocanabinoide: novas perspectivas para o tratamento de transtornos de ansiedade e depressão? Pharmacological exploitation of the endocannabinoid system: new perspectives for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders?

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    Viviane M. Saito

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este artigo revisa o sistema endocanabinoide e as respectivas estratégias de intervenções farmacológicas. MÉTODO: Realizou-se uma revisão da literatura sobre o sistema endocanabinoide e a sua farmacologia, considerando-se artigos originais ou de revisão escritos em inglês. DISCUSSÃO: Canabinoides são um grupo de compostos presentes na Cannabis Sativa (maconha, a exemplo do Δ9-tetraidrocanabinol e seus análogos sintéticos. Estudos sobre o seu perfil farmacológico levaram à descoberta do sistema endocanabinoide do cérebro de mamíferos. Este sistema é composto por pelo menos dois receptores acoplados a uma proteína G, CB1 e CB2, pelos seus ligantes endógenos (endocanabinoides; a exemplo da anandamida e do 2-araquidonoil glicerol e pelas enzimas responsáveis por sintetizá-los e metabolizá-los. Os endocanabinoides representam uma classe de mensageiros neurais que são sintetizados sob demanda e liberados de neurônios pós-sinápticos para restringir a liberação de neurotransmissores clássicos de terminais pré-sinápticos. Esta sinalização retrógrada modula uma diversidade de funções cerebrais, incluindo ansiedade, medo e humor, em que a ativação de receptores CB1 pode exercer efeitos dos tipos ansiolítico e antidepressivo em estudos préclínicos. CONCLUSÃO: Experimentos com modelos animais sugerem que drogas que facilitam a ação dos endocanabinoides podem representar uma nova estratégia para o tratamento de transtornos de ansiedade e depressão.OBJECTIVE: The present review provides a brief introduction into the endocannabinoid system and discusses main strategies of pharmacological interventions. METHOD: We have reviewed the literature relating to the endocannabinoid system and its pharmacology; both original and review articles written in English were considered. DISCUSSION: Cannabinoids are a group of compounds present in Cannabis Sativa (hemp, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and their synthetic

  11. An Information Theoretical Study of the Epistasis Between the CNR1 1359 G/A Polymorphism and the Taq1A and Taq1B DRD2 Polymorphisms: Assessing the Susceptibility to Cannabis Addiction in a Turkish Population.

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    Isir, Aysun Baransel; Baransel, Cesur; Nacak, Muradiye

    2016-04-01

    Addiction is a complex, multi-factorial disease, and thus, analyzing genetic variants at multiple loci and gene-gene interactions among them (epistasis) can provide crucial clues about causative factors of addiction which cannot be detected with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association studies. In this study, we discuss the interaction between the 1359 G/A polymorphism of the CNR1 gene and the DRD2 gene polymorphisms and the net effect of any possible epistasis on the cannabis addiction phenotype in a Turkish population. Using bivariate synergy and mutual information concepts as a means of capturing the magnitude of interaction between marker pairs, the present study not only confirms the A1 marker allele as a risk factor but also reveals a finer-grained association between A and B markers which manifests itself both as a preventive and a risk factor. Our results indicate that the increased phenotype of cases require an individual to be either heterozygous at both loci or homozygous at locus B with homozygous risk factor A1A1 present. We hypothesize that overlapping expressions of CB1 and D2R is the cause of CB1-D2R interactions in cases of substance abuse and the different polymorphisms of CNR1 and DRD2 genes may have decisive roles in the nature of these interactions in terms of promoting or alleviating the cannabis addiction risk factor of the individual. PMID:26833047

  12. Risperidone treatment increases CB1 receptor binding in rat brain

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    Secher, Anna; Husum, Henriette; Holst, Birgitte;

    2010-01-01

    showed that risperidone treatment altered CB(1) receptor binding in the rat brain. Risperidone-induced adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in the clinic may be explained by increased CB(1) receptor density in brain regions involved in appetite and regulation of metabolic function....... positively correlated with visceral fat mass. Risperidone treatment increased CB(1) receptor binding in the arcuate nucleus (40%), hippocampus (25-30%) and amygdala (35%) without concurrent alterations in the CB(1) receptor mRNA. Risperidone treatment increased adiponectin mRNA. CONCLUSION: The present study...

  13. CNR1 genotype influences HDL-cholesterol response to change in dietary fat intake.

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    Heidi J Silver

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Success in further reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD is threatened by the increasing prevalence of obesity-related atherogenic dyslipidemia. HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C level is inversely correlated with CVD risk; each 1 mg/dl decrease in HDL-C is associated with a 6% reduction in risk. We previously showed that a common CNR1 haplotype, H3 (frequency 20%, is protective against the reduction in HDL-C that typically accompanies weight gain. In the present study, we extend that observation by reporting the effect of CNR1 haplotype on HDL-C response to modification of dietary fat intake in weight maintenance and weight loss. METHODS: Six haplotype tagging SNPs that cover the CNR1 gene locus were genotyped in 590 adults of varying body mass index (cohort 1 is 411 males with BMI 18.5-30.0 kg/m(2; cohort 2 is 71 females with BMI18.5-30.0 kg/m(2; and cohort 3 is 108 females with BMI 30-39.9 kg/m(2. Dietary intakes were modified so that fat intake in the "high fat" condition was 15-20% greater than in the "low fat" condition, and lipid profiles were compared between carriers versus noncarriers for each of the five commonly observed CNR1 haplotypes (H1-H5. RESULTS: In normal to overweight subjects on eucaloric diets, the H3 haplotype was significantly associated with short-term high fat diet induced changes in HDL-C level in females (carriers 5.9 mg/dl>noncarriers, p = 0.007. The H3 haplotype was also significantly associated with HDL-C level after 16 weeks on high fat calorie restricted diet in obese females (carriers 6.8 mg/dl>noncarriers, p = 0.009. CONCLUSION: Variability within the CNR1 gene locus contributes to gender-related differences in the HDL-cholesterol response to change in dietary fat intake. Functional characterization of this relationship in vitro may offer insights that potentially yield therapeutic guidance targeting dietary macronutrient composition, a direction much needed in the current epidemic of

  14. CB1 receptor signaling regulates social anxiety and memory.

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    Litvin, Y; Phan, A; Hill, M N; Pfaff, D W; McEwen, B S

    2013-07-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system regulates emotion, stress, memory and cognition through the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 ) receptor. To test the role of CB1 signaling in social anxiety and memory, we utilized a genetic knockout (KO) and a pharmacological approach. Specifically, we assessed the effects of a constitutive KO of CB1 receptors (CB1 KOs) and systemic administration of a CB1 antagonist (AM251; 5 mg/kg) on social anxiety in a social investigation paradigm and social memory in a social discrimination test. Results showed that when compared with wild-type (WT) and vehicle-treated animals, CB1 KOs and WT animals that received an acute dose of AM251 displayed anxiety-like behaviors toward a novel male conspecific. When compared with WT animals, KOs showed both active and passive defensive coping behaviors, i.e. elevated avoidance, freezing and risk-assessment behaviors, all consistent with an anxiety-like profile. Animals that received acute doses of AM251 also showed an anxiety-like profile when compared with vehicle-treated animals, yet did not show an active coping strategy, i.e. changes in risk-assessment behaviors. In the social discrimination test, CB1 KOs and animals that received the CB1 antagonist showed enhanced levels of social memory relative to their respective controls. These results clearly implicate CB1 receptors in the regulation of social anxiety, memory and arousal. The elevated arousal/anxiety resulting from either total CB1 deletion or an acute CB1 blockade may promote enhanced social discrimination/memory. These findings may emphasize the role of the eCB system in anxiety and memory to affect social behavior. PMID:23647582

  15. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells

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    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  16. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells.

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    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  17. SISTEMA ENDOCANABINOIDE: MODIFICANDO LOS FACTORES DE RIESGO CARDIOVASCULAR Endocannabinoid system: modifying cardiovascular risk factors

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    John Edwin Feliciano Alfonso

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La necesidad de alcanzar un tratamiento óptimo para el tabaquismo, la obesidad y sus comorbilidades, conocidos factores de riesgo cardiovascular, ha fomentado la búsqueda de objetivos terapéuticos novedosos. Es el caso del sistema endocanabinoide, involucrado en diversos fenómenos fisiológicos entre los que se encuentran el refuerzo de ciertos comportamientos y la regulación del apetito. La sobreactivación de este sistema altera la homeostasis corporal predisponiendo a dependencias o a un aumento en la ingesta alimentaria, lo que puede traducirse en tabaquismo u obesidad. La intervención farmacológica sobre el sistema endocanabinoide puede contribuir al manejo de estos factores de riesgo cardiovascular, teniendo en cuenta que a tales beneficios se suman otros independientes de la suspensión del tabaquismo o la reducción de peso, como el aumento del colesterol de alta densidad, la disminución de triglicéridos y la mejoría del control glucémico en pacientes con diabetes. Ensayos clínicos controlados aleatorizados adelantados en poblaciones con diferentes características, han evaluado la utilidad de la regulación farmacológica del sistema endocanabinoide; confirmando su eficacia en personas con factores de riesgo cardiovascular establecidos.The need for an optimal treatment for smoking, obesity and their comorbidities, well-known cardiovascular risk factors; has prompted the search for novel therapeutic targets. This is the case of the endocannabinoid system, involved in several physiological phenomena including the reinforcement of certain behaviors and the regulation of appetite.

  18. Neurobiologia da Cannabis: do sistema endocanabinoide aos transtornos por uso de Cannabis

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    José Luis G. Pinho Costa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Diante das lacunas na efetividade das terapêuticas para transtornos por uso de Cannabis, a droga ilícita mais consumida no mundo, este trabalho propõe-se a rever os conhecimentos sobre o substrato neuroanatômico, biomolecular e celular do sistema endocanabinoide, descrever os mecanismos de neuroplasticidade dependente dos canabinoides e relacioná-los com a neurobiologia dos transtornos por uso de Cannabis (abuso e dependência. MÉTODOS: Recorreu-se às bases de dados Medline, Scopus e ISI Web of Knowledge; as palavras-chave pesquisadas foram "Cannabis", "neurobiology", "endocannabinoid system", "endocannabinoids", "receptors, cannabinoid", "neuronal plasticity", "long-term synaptic depression", "long-term potentiation", "marijuana abuse" e "tetrahydrocannabinol". Foram incluídos 80 trabalhos nesta revisão. DISCUSSÃO: A distribuição neuroanatômica, celular e biomolecular do sistema endocanabinoide adequa-se perfeitamente às suas funções de neuromodulação (via neuroplasticidade e metaplasticidade, nomeadamente em vias relacionadas aos transtornos por uso de substâncias. Os canabinoides exógenos perturbam essas funções. CONCLUSÃO: O sistema endocanabinoide contribui para a definição de setpoints em diversas vias neuronais, incluindo vias cruciais na instalação de transtornos por uso de substâncias; com o uso de Cannabis, esses setpoints tornar-se-ão mais permissivos, facilitando os transtornos por uso de Cannabis. Os avanços no entendimento da neurobiologia da Cannabis abrem uma janela de oportunidades para novas estratégias terapêuticas nos transtornos por uso de Cannabis.

  19. CB1 cannabinoid receptor modulates MDMA acute responses and reinforcement

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    Touri??o Raposo, Clara; Ledent, Catherine; Maldonado, Rafael; Valverde Granados, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Background: 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a popular recreational drug widely abused by young people. The endocannabinoid system is involved in the addictive processes induced by different drugs of abuse. However, the role of this system in the pharmacological effects of MDMA has not been yet clarified. Methods: Locomotion, body temperature and anxiogenic-like responses were evaluated after acute MDMA administration in CB1 knockout mice. Additionally, MDMA rewarding propertie...

  20. Differential Control of Cocaine Self-Administration by GABAergic and Glutamatergic CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors.

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    Martín-García, Elena; Bourgoin, Lucie; Cathala, Adeline; Kasanetz, Fernando; Mondesir, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Rodriguez, Ana; Reguero, Leire; Fiancette, Jean-François; Grandes, Pedro; Spampinato, Umberto; Maldonado, Rafael; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) modulates numerous neurobehavioral processes and is therefore explored as a target for the treatment of several mental and neurological diseases. However, previous studies have investigated CB1 by targeting it globally, regardless of its two main neuronal localizations on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In the context of cocaine addiction this lack of selectivity is critical since glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal transmission is involved in different aspects of the disease. To determine whether CB1 exerts different control on cocaine seeking according to its two main neuronal localizations, we used mutant mice with deleted CB1 in cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1) or in forebrain GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1). In Glu-CB1, gene deletion concerns the dorsal telencephalon, including neocortex, paleocortex, archicortex, hippocampal formation and the cortical portions of the amygdala. In GABA-CB1, it concerns several cortical and non-cortical areas including the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, thalamic, and hypothalamic nuclei. We tested complementary components of cocaine self-administration, separating the influence of primary and conditioned effects. Mechanisms underlying each phenotype were explored using in vivo microdialysis and ex vivo electrophysiology. We show that CB1 expression in forebrain GABAergic neurons controls mouse sensitivity to cocaine, while CB1 expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons controls associative learning processes. In accordance, in the nucleus accumbens, GABA-CB1 receptors control cocaine-induced dopamine release and Glu-CB1 receptors control AMPAR/NMDAR ratio; a marker of synaptic plasticity. Our findings demonstrate a critical distinction of the altered balance of Glu-CB1 and GABA-CB1 activity that could participate in the vulnerability to cocaine abuse and addiction. Moreover, these novel insights advance our understanding of CB1 neuropathophysiology. PMID:26612422

  1. Brain regional differences in CB1 receptor adaptation and regulation of transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Lazenka, M.F.; Selley, D.E.; Sim-Selley, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed throughout the brain and mediate the central effects of cannabinoids, including Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of marijuana. Repeated THC administration produces tolerance to cannabinoid-mediated effects, although the magnitude of tolerance varies by effect. Consistent with this observation, CB1R desensitization and downregulation, as well induction of immediate early genes (IEGs), varies by brain region. Zif268...

  2. CHROMENOPYRAZOLES: NON-PSYCHOACTIVE AND SELECTIVE CB1 CANNABINOID AGONISTS WITH PERIPHERAL ANTINOCICEPTIVE PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Cumella, Jose; Hernández-Folgado, Laura; Girón, Rocio; Sánchez, Eva; Morales, Paula; Hurst, Dow P.; Gómez-Cañas, Maria; Gómez-Ruiz, Maria; Pinto, Diana C. G. A.; Goya, Pilar; Reggio, Patricia H; Martin, María Isabel; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Artur M. S. Silva; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    The unwanted psychoactive effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists have limited their development as medicines. These CB1 mediated side effects are due to the fact that CB1 receptors are largely expressed in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Since it is known that CB1 receptors are also located peripherally, there is a growing interest in targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the brain. A library of chromenopyrazoles designed in analogy to the classical cannabinoid cannabinol were s...

  3. Reversible disruption of pre-pulse inhibition in hypomorphic-inducible and reversible CB1-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Franca Marongiu

    Full Text Available Although several genes are implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, in animal models for such a severe mental illness only some aspects of the pathology can be represented (endophenotypes. Genetically modified mice are currently being used to obtain or characterize such endophenotypes. Since its cloning and characterization CB1 receptor has increasingly become of significant physiological, pharmacological and clinical interest. Recently, its involvement in schizophrenia has been reported. Among the different approaches employed, gene targeting permits to study the multiple roles of the endocannabinoid system using knockout ((-/- mice represent a powerful model but with some limitations due to compensation. To overcome such a limitation, we have generated an inducible and reversible tet-off dependent tissue-specific CB1(-/- mice where the CB1R is re-expressed exclusively in the forebrain at a hypomorphic level due to a mutation (IRh-CB1(-/- only in absence of doxycycline (Dox. In such mice, under Dox(+ or vehicle, as well as in wild-type (WT and CB1(-/-, two endophenotypes motor activity (increased in animal models of schizophrenia and pre-pulse inhibition (PPI of startle reflex (disrupted in schizophrenia were analyzed. Both CB1(-/- and IRh-CB1(-/- showed increased motor activity when compared to WT animals. The PPI response, unaltered in WT and CB1(-/- animals, was on the contrary highly and significantly disrupted only in Dox(+ IRh-CB1(-/- mice. Such a response was easily reverted after either withdrawal from Dox or haloperidol treatment. This is the first Inducible and Reversible CB1(-/- mice model to be described in the literature. It is noteworthy that the PPI disruption is not present either in classical full CB1(-/- mice or following acute administration of rimonabant. Such a hypomorphic model may provide a new tool for additional in vivo and in vitro studies of the physiological and pathological roles of cannabinoid system in

  4. Association of cannabis use during adolescence, prefrontal CB1 receptor signaling and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eCaballero

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R is the G-protein coupled receptor responsible for the majority of the endocannabinoid signaling in the human brain. It is widely distributed in the limbic system, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, which are areas responsible for cognition, memory, and motor control. Because of this widespread distribution, it is not surprising that drugs that co-opt CB1R have expected behavioral outcomes consistent with dysregulated signaling from these areas (e.g. memory loss, cognitive deficits, etc. In the context of this review, we present evidence for the role of CB1R signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC, an area involved in executive functions, with emphasis on the developmental regulation of CB1R signaling in the acquisition of mature PFC function. We further hypothesize how alterations of CB1R signaling specifically during adolescent maturation might confer liability to psychiatric disorders.

  5. Dopamine-dependent CB1 receptor dysfunction at corticostriatal synapses in homozygous PINK1 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeo, G; Schirinzi, T; Maltese, M; Martella, G; Rapino, C; Fezza, F; Mastrangelo, N; Bonsi, P; Maccarrone, M; Pisani, A

    2016-02-01

    Recessive mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) gene cause early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the interaction between endocannabinoid (eCB) and dopaminergic transmission at corticostriatal synapses in PINK1 deficient mice. Whole-cell patch-clamp and conventional recordings of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) were made from slices of PINK1(-/-), heterozygous PINK1(+/-) mice and wild-type littermates (PINK1(+/+)). In PINK1(+/+) mice, CB1 receptor (CB1R) activation reduced spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). Likewise, CB1R agonists (ACEA, WIN55,212-3 and HU210) induced a dose-dependent reduction of cortically-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potential (eEPSP) amplitude. While CB1R agonists retained their inhibitory effect in heterozygous PINK1(+/-) mice, conversely, in PINK1(-/-) mice they failed to modulate sEPSC amplitude. Similarly, CB1R activation failed to reduce eEPSP amplitude in PINK1(-/-) mice. Parallel biochemical measurements revealed no significant difference in the levels of the two main eCBs, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA) in PINK1(-/-) striata. Similarly, no change was observed in the enzymatic activity of both fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), responsible for eCB hydrolysis. Instead, a significant reduction of binding ability of CB1R agonists was found in PINK1(-/-) mice. Notably, the CB1R-dependent inhibition of synaptic activity was restored either by amphetamine or after chronic treatment with the D2 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole. Additionally, CB1R binding activity returned to control levels after chronic pretreatment with quinpirole. Consistent with the hypothesis of a close interplay with dopaminergic neurotransmission, our findings show a CB1R dysfunction at corticostriatal synapses in PINK1(-/-), but not in PINK1(+/-) mice, and provide a mechanistic link to the distinct plasticity deficits observed in both genotypes. PMID

  6. Behavioral phenotypes of mice lacking cannabinoid CB1 receptors in different neuronal subpopulations

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardes Terzian, Ana Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in social behavior are found in almost all psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety, depression, autism and schizophrenia. Thus, comprehension of the neurobiological basis of social interaction is important to better understand numerous pathologies and improve treatments. Several evidences suggest that an alteration of cannabinoid CB1 receptor function could be involved in the pathophysiology of such disorders. However, the role of CB1 receptor is still unclear and its localizatio...

  7. Elevated Brain Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Availability in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    OpenAIRE

    Neumeister, Alexander; Normandin, Marc D.; Pietrzak, Robert H.; Piomelli, Daniele; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Gujarro-Anton, Ana; Potenza, Marc N.; Bailey, Christopher R.; Lin, Shu-fei; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Ropchan, Jim; Henry, Shannan; Corsi-Travali, Stefani; Carson, Richard E; Huang, Yiyun

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and their attending cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1) have been implicated in animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, their specific role has not been studied in people with PTSD. Herein, we present an in vivo imaging study using positron emission tomography (PET) and the CB1-selective radioligand [11C]OMAR in individuals with PTSD, and healthy controls with lifetime histories of trauma (trauma controls [TC]) and those without such histories (healthy c...

  8. Cannabinoid-induced mesenteric vasodilation through an endothelial site distinct from CB1 or CB2 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Járai, Zoltán; Wagner, Jens A.; Varga, Károly; Lake, Kristy D.; Compton, David R.; Martin, Billy R.; Zimmer, Anne M.; Bonner, Tom I.; Buckley, Nancy E.; Mezey, Eva; Razdan, Raj K; Zimmer, Andreas; Kunos, George

    1999-01-01

    Cannabinoids, including the endogenous ligand arachidonyl ethanolamide (anandamide), elicit not only neurobehavioral but also cardiovascular effects. Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, have been cloned, and studies with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A have implicated peripherally located CB1 receptors in the hypotensive action of cannabinoids. In rat mesenteric arteries, anandamide-induced vasodilation is inhibited by SR141716A, but other potent CB1 receptor agonists, suc...

  9. Peripheral and central CB1 cannabinoid receptors control stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Gomis-González, Maria; Srivastava, Raj Kamal; Cutando, Laura; Ortega-Alvaro, Antonio; Ruehle, Sabine; Remmers, Floortje; Bindila, Laura; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-08-30

    Stressful events can generate emotional memories linked to the traumatic incident, but they also can impair the formation of nonemotional memories. Although the impact of stress on emotional memories is well studied, much less is known about the influence of the emotional state on the formation of nonemotional memories. We used the novel object-recognition task as a model of nonemotional memory in mice to investigate the underlying mechanism of the deleterious effect of stress on memory consolidation. Systemic, hippocampal, and peripheral blockade of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors abolished the stress-induced memory impairment. Genetic deletion and rescue of CB1 receptors in specific cell types revealed that the CB1 receptor population specifically in dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH)-expressing cells is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation, but CB1 receptors present in other neuronal populations are not involved. Strikingly, pharmacological manipulations in mice expressing CB1 receptors exclusively in DBH(+) cells revealed that both hippocampal and peripheral receptors mediate the impact of stress on memory consolidation. Thus, CB1 receptors on adrenergic and noradrenergic cells provide previously unrecognized cross-talk between central and peripheral mechanisms in the stress-dependent regulation of nonemotional memory consolidation, suggesting new potential avenues for the treatment of cognitive aspects on stress-related disorders. PMID:27528659

  10. Nicotine reinforcement is reduced by cannabinoid CB1 receptor blockade in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonnet, Amelie; Cador, Martine; Caille, Stephanie

    2013-11-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors control the motivational properties and reinforcing effects of nicotine. Indeed, peripheral administration of a CB1 receptor antagonist dramatically decreases both nicotine taking and seeking. However, the neural substrates through which the cannabinoid CB1 receptors regulate the voluntary intake of nicotine remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we sought to determine whether central injections of a CB1 receptor antagonist delivered either into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or the nucleus accumbens (NAC) may alter nicotine intravenous self-administration (IVSA). Rats were first trained to self-administer nicotine (30 μg/kg/0.1 ml). The effect of central infusions of the CB1 antagonist AM 251 (0, 1 and 10 μg/0.5 μl/side) on nicotine-taking behavior was then tested. Intra-VTA infusions of AM 251 dose dependently reduced IVSA with a significant decrease for the dose 10 μg/0.5 μl/side. Moreover, operant responding for water was unaltered by intra-VTA AM 251 at the same dose. Surprisingly, intra-NAC delivery of AM 251 did not alter nicotine behavior at all. These data suggest that in rats chronically exposed to nicotine IVSA, the cannabinoid CB1 receptors located in the VTA rather than in the NAC specifically control nicotine reinforcement and, subsequently, nicotine-taking behavior. PMID:22784230

  11. Distribution of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the rat amygdaloid complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puškaš Laslo A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The amygdaloid complex (AK has a very important role in the modulation of endocrine and visceral functions, in complex behavioral mechanisms such as defense, feeding, aggression, affects, reproduction, memory and learning. The aim of this study was to determine the precise distribution of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the rat AK, using the immunohistochemical (ABC method. According to our results, CB1-immunoreactivity in the rat AK was highest in the medial nucleus. Slightly lower immunoreactivity was found in the basolateral nucleus. Moderate density of CB1 receptors occurred in the central, basomedial, lateral and posterior nuclei of the AK. CB1-immunoreactivity in all of these nuclei was present in the form of discrete spot-like precipitates of unequal size and appearance. These precipitates exhibited three different patterns: 1. elongated columns or lines, 2. complete or incomplete rings and 3. in a small number of AK regions CB1-immunoreactivity was separately dispersed in the form of single spot-like precipitates between more complex columns and rings of precipitates. Considering the functional importance of amygdala and the distribution of CB1 receptors in the AK we could conclude that our findings suggest a role for cannabinoids in modulating responses of the AK to stress and fear as well as to pain.

  12. Further evidence for association of polymorphisms in the CNR1 gene with cocaine addiction: confirmation in an independent sample and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Toni-Kim; Bloch, Paul J; Ambrose-Lanci, Lisa M; Ferraro, Thomas N; Berrettini, Wade H; Kampman, Kyle M; Dackis, Charles A; Pettinati, Helen M; O'Brien, Charles P; Oslin, David W; Lohoff, Falk W

    2013-07-01

    Genetic research on cocaine dependence (CD) may help clarify our understanding of the disorder as well as provide insights for effective treatment. As endocannabinoid signaling and dopamine neurotransmission have been shown to be involved in drug reward, genes related to these systems are plausible candidates for susceptibility to CD. The cannabinoid receptor 1 protein regulates both the endocannabinoid and dopaminergic neurobiological systems, and polymorphisms in the cannabinoid receptor gene, CNR1, have been associated previously with substance dependence. In this study, we attempt to replicate findings associating CNR1 with CD in African Americans. Cocaine-addicted individuals (n=860) and unaffected controls (n=334) of African descent were genotyped for two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CNR1 (rs6454674, rs806368). We observed a significant difference in genotype frequencies between cases and controls for both SNPs (P≤0.042). A meta-analysis was also performed combining our data with that of Zuo et al. who also studied these polymorphisms in African American cocaine addicts (total n=1253 cases versus 543 controls). When our data were combined, rs6454674 increased in significance to P=0.027; however, rs806368 was no longer significant. This study confirms the association between rs6454674 and CD. However, because there is considerable co-morbidity of CD with other drugs of abuse, additional studies are necessary to determine whether polymorphisms in CNR1 induce a general susceptibility to substance dependence or are specific to cocaine addiction. Furthermore, as this population consists of American individuals of African descent, the possibility of population stratification should not be excluded. PMID:21790903

  13. CB1 receptor blockade counters age-induced insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipina, Christopher; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Davidova, Anastasija; Mitchell, Sharon E; Storey-Gordon, Emma; Hambly, Catherine; Irving, Andrew J; Speakman, John R; Hundal, Harinder S

    2016-04-01

    The endocannabinoid system can modulate energy homeostasis by regulating feeding behaviour as well as peripheral energy storage and utilization. Importantly, many of its metabolic actions are mediated through the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), whose hyperactivation is associated with obesity and impaired metabolic function. Herein, we explored the effects of administering rimonabant, a selective CB1R inverse agonist, upon key metabolic parameters in young (4 month old) and aged (17 month old) adult male C57BL/6 mice. Daily treatment with rimonabant for 14 days transiently reduced food intake in young and aged mice; however, the anorectic response was more profound in aged animals, coinciding with a substantive loss in body fat mass. Notably, reduced insulin sensitivity in aged skeletal muscle and liver concurred with increased CB1R mRNA abundance. Strikingly, rimonabant was shown to improve glucose tolerance and enhance skeletal muscle and liver insulin sensitivity in aged, but not young, adult mice. Moreover, rimonabant-mediated insulin sensitization in aged adipose tissue coincided with amelioration of low-grade inflammation and repressed lipogenic gene expression. Collectively, our findings indicate a key role for CB1R in aging-related insulin resistance and metabolic dysfunction and highlight CB1R blockade as a potential strategy for combating metabolic disorders associated with aging. PMID:26757949

  14. Peripherally Selective Cannabinoid 1 Receptor (CB1R) Agonists for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzman, Herbert H; Shiner, Craig; Hirt, Erin E; Gilliam, Anne F; Thomas, Brian F; Maitra, Rangan; Snyder, Rod; Black, Sherry L; Patel, Purvi R; Mulpuri, Yatendra; Spigelman, Igor

    2016-08-25

    Alleviation of neuropathic pain by cannabinoids is limited by their central nervous system (CNS) side effects. Indole and indene compounds were engineered for high hCB1R affinity, peripheral selectivity, metabolic stability, and in vivo efficacy. An epithelial cell line assay identified candidates with <1% blood-brain barrier penetration for testing in a rat neuropathy induced by unilateral sciatic nerve entrapment (SNE). The SNE-induced mechanical allodynia was reversibly suppressed, partially or completely, after intraperitoneal or oral administration of several indenes. At doses that relieve neuropathy symptoms, the indenes completely lacked, while the brain-permeant CB1R agonist HU-210 (1) exhibited strong CNS side effects, in catalepsy, hypothermia, and motor incoordination assays. Pharmacokinetic findings of ∼0.001 cerebrospinal fluid:plasma ratio further supported limited CNS penetration. Pretreatment with selective CB1R or CB2R blockers suggested mainly CB1R contribution to an indene's antiallodynic effects. Therefore, this class of CB1R agonists holds promise as a viable treatment for neuropathic pain. PMID:27482723

  15. Inclusive prompt χ _{c,b}(1^{++}) production at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvaev, A. G.; Khoze, V. A.; Martin, A. D.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    We study the prompt production of the χ _c(1^+) and χ _b(1^+) mesons at high energies. Unlike χ (0^+,2^+) production, χ (1^+) mesons cannot be created at LO via the fusion of two on-mass-shell gluons, that is, gg→ χ _{c,b}(1^+) are not allowed. However, the available experimental data show that the cross sections for χ _c(1^+) and χ _c(2^+) are comparable. We therefore investigate four other χ (1^+) production mechanisms: namely, (i) the standard NLO process gg→ χ _{c,b}(1^+)+g, (ii) via gluon virtuality, (iii) via gluon reggeisation and, finally, (iv) the possibility to form χ _{c,b}(1^+) by the fusion of three gluons, where one extra gluon comes from another parton cascade, as in the Double Parton Scattering processes.

  16. The Structure–Function Relationships of Classical Cannabinoids: CB1/CB2 Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bow, Eric W.; Rimoldi, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoids are members of a deceptively simple class of terpenophenolic secondary metabolites isolated from Cannabis sativa highlighted by (−)-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), eliciting distinct pharmacological effects mediated largely by cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) signaling. Since the initial discovery of THC and related cannabinoids, synthetic and semisynthetic classical cannabinoid analogs have been evaluated to help define receptor binding modes and structure–CB1/CB2 functional activity relationships. This perspective will examine the classical cannabinoids, with particular emphasis on the structure–activity relationship of five regions: C3 side chain, phenolic hydroxyl, aromatic A-ring, pyran B-ring, and cyclohexenyl C-ring. Cumulative structure–activity relationship studies to date have helped define the critical structural elements required for potency and selectivity toward CB1 and CB2 and, more importantly, ushered the discovery and development of contemporary nonclassical cannabinoid modulators with enhanced physicochemical and pharmacological profiles. PMID:27398024

  17. The Structure-Function Relationships of Classical Cannabinoids: CB1/CB2 Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bow, Eric W; Rimoldi, John M

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoids are members of a deceptively simple class of terpenophenolic secondary metabolites isolated from Cannabis sativa highlighted by (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), eliciting distinct pharmacological effects mediated largely by cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) signaling. Since the initial discovery of THC and related cannabinoids, synthetic and semisynthetic classical cannabinoid analogs have been evaluated to help define receptor binding modes and structure-CB1/CB2 functional activity relationships. This perspective will examine the classical cannabinoids, with particular emphasis on the structure-activity relationship of five regions: C3 side chain, phenolic hydroxyl, aromatic A-ring, pyran B-ring, and cyclohexenyl C-ring. Cumulative structure-activity relationship studies to date have helped define the critical structural elements required for potency and selectivity toward CB1 and CB2 and, more importantly, ushered the discovery and development of contemporary nonclassical cannabinoid modulators with enhanced physicochemical and pharmacological profiles. PMID:27398024

  18. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor inhibition decreases vascular smooth muscle migration and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration triggered by inflammatory stimuli and chemoattractants such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are key events in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Cannabinoids may modulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types through cannabinoid receptors. Here we investigated the effects of CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A), which has recently been shown to have anti-atherosclerotic effects both in mice and humans, on PDGF-induced proliferation, migration, and signal transduction of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). PDGF induced Ras and ERK 1/2 activation, while increasing proliferation and migration of HCASMCs, which were dose dependently attenuated by CB1 antagonist, rimonabant. These findings suggest that in addition to improving plasma lipid alterations and decreasing inflammatory cell migration and inflammatory response, CB1 antagonists may exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and restenosis by decreasing vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

  19. Inclusive prompt χ{sub c,b}(1{sup ++}) production at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuvaev, A. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina, 188300, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Khoze, V. A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina, 188300, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, DH1 3LE, Durham (United Kingdom); Martin, A. D., E-mail: a.d.martin@durham.ac.uk [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, DH1 3LE, Durham (United Kingdom); Ryskin, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina, 188300, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, DH1 3LE, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    We study the prompt production of the χ{sub c}(1{sup +}) and χ{sub b}(1{sup +}) mesons at high energies. Unlike χ(0{sup +},2{sup +}) production, χ(1{sup +}) mesons cannot be created at LO via the fusion of two on-mass-shell gluons, that is, gg→χ{sub c,b}(1{sup +}) are not allowed. However, the available experimental data show that the cross sections for χ{sub c}(1{sup +}) and χ{sub c}(2{sup +}) are comparable. We therefore investigate four other χ(1{sup +}) production mechanisms: namely, (i) the standard NLO process gg→χ{sub c,b}(1{sup +})+g, (ii) via gluon virtuality, (iii) via gluon reggeisation and, finally, (iv) the possibility to form χ{sub c,b}(1{sup +}) by the fusion of three gluons, where one extra gluon comes from another parton cascade, as in the Double Parton Scattering processes.

  20. Dual intracellular signaling pathways mediated by the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, B; Portier, M; Kernéis, A; Delpech, M; Carillon, C; Le Fur, G; Ferrara, P; Shire, D

    1999-06-25

    It has long been established that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor transduces signals through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/Go inhibitory pathway. Although there have been reports that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor can also mediate an increase in cyclic AMP levels, in most cases the presence of an adenylyl cyclase costimulant or the use of very high amounts of agonist was necessary. Here, we present evidence for dual coupling of the cannabinoid CB receptor to the classical pathway and to a pertussis toxin-insensitive adenylyl cyclase stimulatory pathway initiated with low quantities of agonist in the absence of any costimulant. Treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor with the cannabinoid CP 55,940, {(-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hyd roxypropyl) cyclohexan-1-ol} resulted in cyclic AMP accumulation in a dose-response manner, an accumulation blocked by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor-specific antagonist SR 141716A, {N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-me thyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide hydrochloride}. In CHO cells coexpressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and a cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-luciferase reporter gene system, CP 55,940 induced luciferase expression by a pathway blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-89). Under the same conditions the peripheral cannabinoid CB2 receptor proved to be incapable of inducing cAMP accumulation or luciferase activity. This incapacity allowed us to study the luciferase activation mediated by CB /CB2 chimeric constructs, from which we determined that the first and second internal loop regions of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were involved in transducing the pathway leading to luciferase gene expression. PMID:10422789

  1. Neural endocannabinoid CB1 receptor expression, social status, and behavior in male European starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, M Susan; Cordes, Melissa A; Rodriguez, Jonathan D; Stevenson, Sharon A; Riters, Lauren V

    2016-08-01

    Many species modify behavior in response to changes in resource availability or social status; however, the neural mechanisms underlying these modifications are not well understood. Prior work in male starlings demonstrates that status-appropriate changes in behavior involve brain regions that regulate social behavior and vocal production. Endocannabinoids are ubiquitously distributed neuromodulators that are proposed to play a role in adjusting behavior to match social status. As an initial step to provide insight into this hypothesis we observed flocks of male starlings in outdoor aviaries during the breeding season. We used quantitative real-time PCR to measure expression of endocannabinoid CB1 receptors in brain regions involved in social behavior and motivation (lateral septum [LS], ventral tegmental area [VTA], medial preoptic nucleus [POM]) and vocal behavior (Area X and robust nucleus of the arcopallium; RA). Males with nesting sites sang to females and displaced other males more than males without nesting sites. They also had higher levels of CB1 receptor expression in LS and RA. CB1 expression in LS correlated positively with agonistic behaviors. CB1 expression in RA correlated positively with singing behavior. CB1 in VTA also correlated positively with singing when only singing birds were considered. These correlations nicely map onto the well-established role of LS in agonistic behavior and the known role of RA in song production and VTA in motivation and song production. Studies are now needed to precisely characterize the role of CB1 receptors in these regions in the production of status-appropriate social behaviors. PMID:27206544

  2. Calculation of the CB1 burnup credit benchmark reaction rates with MCNP4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first calculational VVER-440 burnup credit benchmark CB1 in 1996. VTT Energy participated in the calculation of the CB1 benchmark with three different codes: CASMO-4, KENO-VI and MCNP4B. However, the reaction rates and the fission ν were calculated only with CASMO-4. Now, the neutron absorption and production reaction rates and the fission ν values have been calculated at VTT Energy with the MCNP4B Monte Carlo code using the ENDF60 neutron data library. (author)

  3. Mapping the Structural Requirements in the CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor Transmembrane Helix II for Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Kapur, Ankur; Samaniego, Patrick; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Abood, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains of the CB1 receptor are important for ligand recognition and signal transduction. We used site-directed mutagenesis to identify the role of two novel and adjacent residues in the transmembrane helix II domain, Ile2.62 and Asp2.63. We investigated the role of the conserved, negatively charged aspartate at position 2.63 in cannabinoid receptor (CB1) function by substituting it with asparagine (D2.63N) and glutamate (D2.63E). In addition, the effe...

  4. CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Kinase and Phosphatase Activity during Extinction of Conditioned Fear in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamprath, Kornelia; Hermann, Heike; Lutz, Beat; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cannich, Astrid; Wotjak, Carsten T.

    2004-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) play a central role in both short-term and long-term extinction of auditory-cued fear memory. The molecular mechanisms underlying this function remain to be clarified. Several studies indicated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase with its downstream effector AKT, and…

  5. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Bouskila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression patterns of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R are well documented in rodents and primates. In vervet monkeys, CB1R is present in the retinal neurons (photoreceptors, horizontal cells, bipolar cells, amacrine cells, and ganglion cells and CB2R is exclusively found in the retinal glia (Müller cells. However, the role of these cannabinoid receptors in normal primate retinal function remains elusive. Using full-field electroretinography in adult vervet monkeys, we recorded changes in neural activity following the blockade of CB1R and CB2R by the intravitreal administration of their antagonists (AM251 and AM630, resp. in photopic and scotopic conditions. Our results show that AM251 increases the photopic a-wave amplitude at high flash intensities, whereas AM630 increases the amplitude of both the photopic a- and b-waves. In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function.

  6. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha; Beierschmitt, Amy; Palmour, Roberta; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The expression patterns of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) are well documented in rodents and primates. In vervet monkeys, CB1R is present in the retinal neurons (photoreceptors, horizontal cells, bipolar cells, amacrine cells, and ganglion cells) and CB2R is exclusively found in the retinal glia (Müller cells). However, the role of these cannabinoid receptors in normal primate retinal function remains elusive. Using full-field electroretinography in adult vervet monkeys, we recorded changes in neural activity following the blockade of CB1R and CB2R by the intravitreal administration of their antagonists (AM251 and AM630, resp.) in photopic and scotopic conditions. Our results show that AM251 increases the photopic a-wave amplitude at high flash intensities, whereas AM630 increases the amplitude of both the photopic a- and b-waves. In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function. PMID:27069692

  7. Homology Modeling and Docking Studies of Cannabinoid Receptor CB1%大麻素受体CB1三维结构的同源模建及其对接研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂国刚; 李少华

    2011-01-01

    大麻素CB1受体属于G蛋白偶联受体.以牛视紫红质的晶体结构为模板,利用同源模建法对CB1受体的三维结构进行了模拟,并采用分子动力学方法对模型进行了修正和优化.在此基础上,分析了活性位点的组成和结构,研究了拮抗剂利莫那班与CBi受体的对接,明确了CB1受体与利莫那班结合时起重要作用的氨基酸残基.发现利莫那班与CB1受体残基Lys192形成氢键相互作用是CB1受体拮抗剂的重要分子作用基础.%CB1 receptor belongs to G protein-coupled receptor.Using bovine rhodopsin as structural template, the 3D structure of CB1 receptor was built by homology modeling, and refined using molecular dynamics method.On the basis of the modeling, the components and strncture of active site in CB1 receptor were analyzed, and the docking of rimonabant with CB1 receptor was investigated.The binding pattern revealed important residues that interacted with the rimonabant.The hydrogen bonding interaction between Lys192 and rimonabant is crucial for CB1 receptor antagonist.

  8. Further evidence for association between genetic variants in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene and cocaine dependence: Confirmation in an independent sample and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Toni-Kim; Bloch, Paul J.; Ambrose-Lanci, Lisa M; Doyle, Glenn A.; Ferraro, Thomas N.; BERRETTINI, WADE H.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Dackis, Charles A.; Pettinati, Helen M.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Oslin, David W.; Lohoff, Falk W.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic research on cocaine dependence may help clarify our understanding of the disorder as well as provide insights for effective treatment. Since endocannabinoid signaling and dopamine neurotransmission have been shown to be involved with drug reward, genes related to these systems are plausible candidates for susceptibility to cocaine dependence. The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) protein regulates both the endocannabinoid and dopaminergic neurobiological systems, and polymorphisms in the c...

  9. Oleamide is a selective endogenous agonist of rat and human CB1 cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Leggett, James D; Aspley, S; Beckett, S R G; D'Antona, A M; Kendall, D A

    2004-01-01

    The ability of the endogenous fatty acid amide, cis-oleamide (ODA), to bind to and activate cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors was investigated.ODA competitively inhibited binding of the nonselective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP55,940 and the selective CB1 antagonist [3H]SR141716A to rat whole-brain membranes with Ki values of 1.14 μM (0.52–2.53 μM, Hill slope=0.80, n=6) and 2.63 μM (0.62–11.20 μM, Hill slope=0.92, n=4), respectively. AEA inhibited [3H]CP55,940 binding in rat whole-brain membran...

  10. Beyond radio-displacement techniques for identification of CB1 ligands: the first application of a fluorescence-quenching assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Agostino; Lembo, Francesca; Novellino, Ettore; Stornaiuolo, Mariano; Marinelli, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 Receptor (CB1) belongs to the GPCR family and it has been targeted, so far, for the discovery of drugs aimed at the treatment of neuropathic pain, nausea, vomit, and food intake disorders. Here, we present the development of the first fluorescent assay enabling the measurement of kinetic binding constants for CB1 orthosteric ligands. The assay is based on the use of T1117, a fluorescent analogue of AM251. We prove that T1117 binds endogenous and recombinant CB1 receptors with nanomolar affinity. Moreover, T1117 binding to CB1 is sensitive to the allosteric ligand ORG27569 and thus it is applicable to the discovery of new allosteric drugs. The herein presented assay constitutes a sustainable valid alternative to the expensive and environmental impacting radiodisplacement techniques and paves the way for an easy, fast and cheap high-throughput drug screening toward CB1 for identification of new orthosteric and allosteric modulators. PMID:24441508

  11. The CB1 receptor as an important mediator of hedonic reward processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friemel, Chris M; Zimmer, Andreas; Schneider, Miriam

    2014-09-01

    The endocannabinoid (ECB) system has emerged recently as a key mediator for reward processing. It is well known that cannabinoids affect appetitive learning processes and can induce reinforcing and rewarding effects. However, the involvement of the ECB system in hedonic aspects of reward-related behavior is not completely understood. With the present study, we investigated the modulatory role of the ECB system on hedonic perception, measured by the pleasure attenuated startle (PAS) paradigm for a palatable food reward. Here, a conditioned odor is thought to induce a pleasant affective state that attenuates an aversive reflex-the acoustic startle response. Modulatory effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist SR1411716 and the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55 212-2 on PAS were examined in rats. PAS was also measured in CB1 receptor knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Pharmacological inhibition as well as the absence of CB1 receptors was found to reduce PAS, whereas WIN 55 212-2 administration increased PAS. Finally, presentation of a conditioned reward cue was found to induce striatal FosB/ΔFosB expression in WT mice, but not in KO mice, indicating a reduced stimulation of reward-related brain regions in conditioned KO mice by odor presentation. We here show that in addition to our previous studies in rats, PAS may also serve as a valuable and suitable measure to assess hedonic processing in mice. Our data further indicate that the ECB system, and in particular CB1 receptor signaling, appears to be highly important for the mediation of hedonic aspects of reward processing. PMID:24718372

  12. On the Role of Cannabinoid CB1- and μ-Opioid Receptors in Motor Impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    Wiskerke, Joost; van Mourik, Yvar; Schetters, Dustin; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; Pattij, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies using a rat 5-choice serial reaction time task have established a critical role for dopamine D2 receptors in regulating increments in motor impulsivity induced by acute administration of the psychostimulant drugs amphetamine and nicotine. Here we investigated whether cannabinoid CB1 and/or μ-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine-induced impulsivity, given recent findings indicating that both receptor systems mediate amphetamine-induced motor impulsivity. Results showed th...

  13. Cannabis reinforcement and dependence: role of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Ziva D; Haney, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    Awareness of cannabis dependence as a clinically relevant issue has grown in recent years. Clinical and laboratory studies demonstrate that chronic marijuana smokers can experience withdrawal symptoms upon cessation of marijuana smoking and have difficulty abstaining from marijuana use. This paper will review data implicating the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in regulating the behavioral effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannobinol (THC), the primary psycho-active component of cannabis, across a range of sp...

  14. Attenuation of morphine antinociceptive tolerance by cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Ahmet; Yildirim, Kemal; Ozdemir, Ercan; Bagcivan, Ihsan; Gursoy, Sinan; Durmus, Nedim

    2015-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists may be useful for their potential to increase or prolong opioid analgesia while attenuating the development of opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AM251 (a selective CB1 antagonist) and JTE907 (a selective CB2 antagonist) on morphine analgesia and tolerance in rats. Adult male Wistar albino rats weighing 205-225 g were used in these experiments. To constitute morphine tolerance, we used a 3 day cumulative dosing regimen. After the last dose of morphine was injected on day 4, morphine tolerance was evaluated by analgesia tests. The analgesic effects of morphine (5 mg/kg), ACEA (a CB1 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), JWH-015 (a CB2 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), AM251 (1 mg/kg) and JTE907 (5 mg/kg) were considered at 30-min intervals (0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min) by tail-flick and hot-plate analgesia tests. Our findings indicate that ACEA and JWH907 significantly increased morphine analgesia and morphine antinociceptive tolerance in the analgesia tests. In contrast, the data suggested that AM251 and JTE907 significantly attenuated the expression of morphine tolerance. In conclusion, we observed that co-injection of AM251 and JTE907 with morphine attenuated expression of tolerance to morphine analgesic effects and decreased the morphine analgesia. PMID:25894754

  15. Inclusive prompt χ{sub c,b}(1{sup ++}) production at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuvaev, A.G. [NRC Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Khoze, V.A.; Ryskin, M.G. [NRC Kurchatov Institute, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); University of Durham, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Martin, A.D. [University of Durham, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    We study the prompt production of the χ{sub c}(1{sup +}) and χ{sub b}(1{sup +}) mesons at high energies. Unlike χ(0{sup +},2{sup +}) production, χ(1{sup +}) mesons cannot be created at LO via the fusion of two on-mass-shell gluons, that is, gg → χ{sub c,b}(1{sup +}) are not allowed. However, the available experimental data show that the cross sections for χ{sub c}(1{sup +}) and χ{sub c}(2{sup +}) are comparable. We therefore investigate four other χ(1{sup +}) production mechanisms: namely, (i) the standard NLO process gg → χ{sub c,b}(1{sup +}) + g, (ii) via gluon virtuality, (iii) via gluon reggeisation and, finally, (iv) the possibility to form χ{sub c,b}(1{sup +}) by the fusion of three gluons, where one extra gluon comes from another parton cascade, as in the Double Parton Scattering processes. (orig.)

  16. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  17. Benzyl-1,2,4-triazoles as CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor Ligands: Preparation and In Vitro Pharmacological Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Folgado, Laura; Decara, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Goya, Pilar; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we have identified 3-alkyl-1,5-diaryl-1H-1,2,4-triazoles to be a novel class of cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) antagonists. In order to expand the number of cannabinoid ligands with a central 1,2,4-triazole scaffold, we have synthesized a novel series of 1-benzyl-1H-1,2,4-triazoles, and some of them were evaluated by CB1R radioligand binding assays. Compound 12a showed the most interesting pharmacological properties, possessing a CB1R affinity in the nanomolar range. PMID:27127651

  18. Functional residues essential for the activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Padgett, Lea

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed X-ray crystal structures of active state G-protein-coupled receptors have opened the way for detailed examination of the movement of the transmembrane (TM) helices and the specific residues involved in the receptor activation upon ligand binding. Previous modeling studies have indicated that the brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptor binds with a ligand at least in part through a hydrophobic tail on the ligand. This interaction is believed to be similar to the rotameric toggle switch proposed for the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR). In the present study, an active state model for the CB1 receptor, guided by the X-ray structure of the active state for β2AR, was constructed with HU210 bound as a ligand. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to provide a smooth progression between inactive and active states of the receptor. This model was compared with our previously published CB1 receptor model to identify the functional residues that play key roles in triggering receptor conformational changes upon agonist binding. Movements in TM helices and functional residues are discussed. W279(5.43), contributing to an inward movement of the fifth TM helix (TM5) to the helical core, could serve as another rotameric switch for receptor activation. V282(5.46), interacting with the ligand's hydrophobic C3 alkyl chain, appears to play a key role in TM5 inward movement centered at L286(5.50) and subsequent coupling to V204(3.40). V204(3.40), closely interacting with the TM5 and TM6 hydrophobic patch residues in the middle of the receptor, particularly I290(5.54) and L352(6.44), appears to facilitate helical rearrangements, leading to the breakage of the ionic lock and the rotameric change of Y397(7.53), which are key features of the active state. PMID:23332708

  19. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 mediates baseline and activity-induced survival of new neurons in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Anke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis is a particular example of brain plasticity that is partially modulated by the endocannabinoid system. Whereas the impact of synthetic cannabinoids on the neuronal progenitor cells has been described, there has been lack of information about the action of plant-derived extracts on neurogenesis. Therefore we here focused on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD fed to female C57Bl/6 and Nestin-GFP-reporter mice on proliferation and maturation of neuronal progenitor cells and spatial learning performance. In addition we used cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 deficient mice and treatment with CB1 antagonist AM251 in Nestin-GFP-reporter mice to investigate the role of the CB1 receptor in adult neurogenesis in detail. Results THC and CBD differed in their effects on spatial learning and adult neurogenesis. CBD did not impair learning but increased adult neurogenesis, whereas THC reduced learning without affecting adult neurogenesis. We found the neurogenic effect of CBD to be dependent on the CB1 receptor, which is expressed over the whole dentate gyrus. Similarly, the neurogenic effect of environmental enrichment and voluntary wheel running depends on the presence of the CB1 receptor. We found that in the absence of CB1 receptors, cell proliferation was increased and neuronal differentiation reduced, which could be related to CB1 receptor mediated signaling in Doublecortin (DCX-expressing intermediate progenitor cells. Conclusion CB1 affected the stages of adult neurogenesis that involve intermediate highly proliferative progenitor cells and the survival and maturation of new neurons. The pro-neurogenic effects of CBD might explain some of the positive therapeutic features of CBD-based compounds.

  20. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor inverse agonists and neutral antagonists: Effects on food intake, food-reinforced behavior and food aversions

    OpenAIRE

    Salamone, John D.; McLaughlin, Peter J; Sink, Kelly; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Parker, Linda A

    2007-01-01

    Drugs that interfere with cannabinoid CB1 receptor transmission suppress a number of food-related behaviors, and these compounds are currently being assessed for their potential utility as appetite suppressants. In addition to rimonabant (SR141716A), several other compounds have been evaluated, including AM251 and AM1387. Biochemical studies indicate that most of the drugs assessed thus far have been CB1 inverse agonists, and these drugs all act to suppress food intake and disrupt food-reinfo...

  1. Localization and function of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in the anterolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagore Puente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST is involved in behaviors related to natural reward, drug addiction and stress. In spite of the emerging role of the endogenous cannabinoid (eCB system in these behaviors, little is known about the anatomy and function of this system in the anterolateral BNST (alBNST. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed morphological characterization of the localization of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1 receptor a necessary step toward a better understanding of the physiological roles of the eCB system in this region of the brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have combined anatomical approaches at the confocal and electron microscopy level to ex-vivo electrophysiological techniques. Here, we report that CB1 is localized on presynaptic membranes of about 55% of immunopositive synaptic terminals for the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGluT1, which contain abundant spherical, clear synaptic vesicles and make asymmetrical synapses with alBNST neurons. About 64% of vGluT1 immunonegative synaptic terminals show CB1 immunolabeling. Furthermore, 30% and 35% of presynaptic boutons localize CB1 in alBNST of conditional mutant mice lacking CB1 mainly from GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1-KO mice and mainly from cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1-KO mice, respectively. Extracellular field recordings and whole cell patch clamp in the alBNST rat brain slice preparation revealed that activation of CB1 strongly inhibits excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study supports the anterolateral BNST as a potential neuronal substrate of the effects of cannabinoids on stress-related behaviors.

  2. The cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 increases intracellular calcium via CB1 receptor coupling to Gq/11 G proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Lauckner, Jane E.; Hille, Bertil; Mackie, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Central nervous system responses to cannabis are primarily mediated by CB1 receptors, which couple preferentially to Gi/o G proteins. Here, we used calcium photometry to monitor the effect of CB1 activation on intracellular calcium concentration. Perfusion with 5 μM CB1 aminoalkylindole agonist, WIN55,212-2 (WIN), increased intracellular calcium by several hundred nanomolar in human embryonic kidney 293 cells stably expressing CB1 and in cultured hippocampal neurons. The increase was blocked ...

  3. Novel selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist MJ08 with potent in vivo bioactivity and inverse agonistic effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei CHEN; Cheng XU; Hong-ying LIU; Long LONG; Wei ZHANG; Zhi-bing ZHENG; Yun-de XIE; Li-li WANG; Song LI

    2011-01-01

    To characterize the biological profiles of M J08,a novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist.Methods:Radioligand binding assays were performed using rat brain and spleen membrane preparations.CB1 and CB2 receptor redistribution and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]1) assays were performed with IN CELL Analyzer.Inverse agonism was studied using intracellular cAMP assays,and in guinea-pig ileum and mouse vas deferens smooth muscle preparations.In vivo pharmacologic profile was assessed in diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice.Results:In radioligand binding assay,M J08 selectively antagonized CB1 receptor (IC50=99.9 nmol/L).In EGFP-CB1_U20S cells,its IC50 value against CB1 receptor activation was 30.23 nmol/L (SR141716A:32.16 nmol/L).WIN 55,212-2 (1 μmol/L) increased [Ca2+]1 in the primary cultured hippocampal neuronal cells and decreased cAMP accumulation in CHO-hCB1 cells.M J08 (10 nmol/L-1O μmol/L)blocked both the WIN 55,212-2-induced effects.Furthermore,M J08 reversed the inhibition of electrically evoked twitches of mouse vas deferens by WIN 55,212-2 (pA2=10.29±1.05).M J08 and SR141716A both showed an inverse agonism activity by markedly promoting the contraction force and frequency of guinea pig ileum muscle.M J08 significantly increased the cAMP level in CHO-hCB1 cells with an EC50 value of 78.6 nmol/L,which was lower than the EC50 value for SR141716A (159.2 nmol/L).Besides the more potent pharmacological effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonism in DIO mice,such as reducing food intake,decreasing body weight,and ameliorating dyslipidemia,M J08 (10 mg/kg) unexpectedly raised the fasted blood glucose in vivo.Conclusion:M J08 is a novel,potent and selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist with potent bioactive responses in vitro and in vivo that may be useful for disclosure the versatile nature of CB1 receptors.

  4. Activation of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R promotes neurogenesis in murine subventricular zone cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Xapelli

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in the modulation of adult neurogenesis. Here, we describe the effect of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R activation on self-renewal, proliferation and neuronal differentiation in mouse neonatal subventricular zone (SVZ stem/progenitor cell cultures. Expression of CB1R was detected in SVZ-derived immature cells (Nestin-positive, neurons and astrocytes. Stimulation of the CB1R by (R-(+-Methanandamide (R-m-AEA increased self-renewal of SVZ cells, as assessed by counting the number of secondary neurospheres and the number of Sox2+/+ cell pairs, an effect blocked by Notch pathway inhibition. Moreover, R-m-AEA treatment for 48 h, increased proliferation as assessed by BrdU incorporation assay, an effect mediated by activation of MAPK-ERK and AKT pathways. Surprisingly, stimulation of CB1R by R-m-AEA also promoted neuronal differentiation (without affecting glial differentiation, at 7 days, as shown by counting the number of NeuN-positive neurons in the cultures. Moreover, by monitoring intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+]i in single cells following KCl and histamine stimuli, a method that allows the functional evaluation of neuronal differentiation, we observed an increase in neuronal-like cells. This proneurogenic effect was blocked when SVZ cells were co-incubated with R-m-AEA and the CB1R antagonist AM 251, for 7 days, thus indicating that this effect involves CB1R activation. In accordance with an effect on neuronal differentiation and maturation, R-m-AEA also increased neurite growth, as evaluated by quantifying and measuring the number of MAP2-positive processes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CB1R activation induces proliferation, self-renewal and neuronal differentiation from mouse neonatal SVZ cell cultures.

  5. MicroRNA let-7d is a target of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and controls cannabinoid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarlone, Anna; Börner, Christine; Martín-Gómez, Laura; Jiménez-González, Ada; García-Concejo, Adrián; García-Bermejo, María L; Lorente, Mar; Blázquez, Cristina; García-Taboada, Elena; de Haro, Amador; Martella, Elisa; Höllt, Volker; Rodríguez, Raquel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Kraus, Jürgen; Guzmán, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor, the molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is one of the most abundant metabotropic receptors in the brain. Cannabis is widely used for both recreational and medicinal purposes. Despite the ever-growing fundamental roles of microRNAs in the brain, the possible molecular connections between the CB1 receptor and microRNAs are surprisingly unknown. Here, by using reporter gene constructs that express interaction sequences for microRNAs in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that CB1 receptor activation enhances the expression of several microRNAs, including let-7d. This was confirmed by measuring hsa-let-7d expression levels. Accordingly, knocking-down CB1 receptor in zebrafish reduced dre-let-7d levels, and knocking-out CB1 receptor in mice decreased mmu-let-7d levels in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Conversely, knocking-down let-7d increased CB1 receptor mRNA expression in zebrafish, SH-SY5Y cells and primary striatal neurons. Likewise, in primary striatal neurons chronically exposed to a cannabinoid or opioid agonist, a let-7d-inhibiting sequence facilitated not only cannabinoid or opioid signaling but also cannabinoid/opioid cross-signaling. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a bidirectional link between the CB1 receptor and a microRNA, namely let-7d, and thus unveil a new player in the complex process of cannabinoid action. PMID:27179908

  6. The interactive role of CB(1) and GABA(B) receptors in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Masoumeh; Komaki, Alireza; Karamian, Ruhollah; Shahidi, Siamak; Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Asadbegi, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission is a cellular process underlying learning and memory. Cannabinoids are known to be powerful modulators of this kind of synaptic plasticity. Changes in GABAergic inhibition have also been shown to affect synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. GABA receptor type B (GABAB) and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) exhibit overlapping anatomical localization in some brain areas including the hippocampus. CB1 and GABAB are also localized to the same cells and share a common signaling pathway in some brain areas. In this study, we examined the hippocampal effects of co-administrating AM251 and CGP55845, which are CB1 and GABAB antagonists, respectively, on LTP induction in the dentate gyrus (DG) of rats. LTP in the hippocampal area was induced by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the perforant path. Our results showed that HFS coupled with administration of the CB1 antagonist increased both the population spike (PS) amplitude and field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP). Conversely, the GABAB antagonist decreased these parameters along with decreased LTP induction. We also demonstrated that the co-administration of CB1 and GABAB antagonists had different effects on the PS amplitude and fEPSP slope. It is likely that GABAB receptor antagonists modulate cannabinoid outputs that cause a decrease in synaptic plastisity, while in the simultaneous consumption of two antagonists, CB1 antagonists can alter the release of GABA which in turn results in enhancement of LTP induction. These findings suggest that there are functional interactions between the CB1 and GABAB receptor in the hippocampus. PMID:26611204

  7. Beyond the CB1 Receptor: Is Cannabidiol the Answer for Disorders of Motivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlebnik, Natalie E; Cheer, Joseph F

    2016-07-01

    The Cannabis sativa plant has been used to treat various physiological and psychiatric conditions for millennia. Current research is focused on isolating potentially therapeutic chemical constituents from the plant for use in the treatment of many central nervous system disorders. Of particular interest is the primary nonpsychoactive constituent cannabidiol (CBD). Unlike Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), CBD does not act through the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor but has many other receptor targets that may play a role in psychiatric disorders. Here we review preclinical and clinical data outlining the therapeutic efficacy of CBD for the treatment of motivational disorders such as drug addiction, anxiety, and depression. Across studies, findings suggest promising treatment effects and potentially overlapping mechanisms of action for CBD in these disorders and indicate the need for further systematic investigation of the viability of CBD as a psychiatric pharmacotherapy. PMID:27023732

  8. Neurophysiological evidence for the presence of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soni, Neeraj; Satpathy, Shankha; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana, which acts within the endocannabinoid (eCB) system as an agonist of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), exhibits addictive properties and has powerful actions on the state of arousal of an organism. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT), as a component of the reticular activating...... system, is involved in cortical activation and is important in the development of drug addiction-associated behaviours. Therefore, eCBs might exert behavioural effects by actions on the LDT; however, it is unknown whether eCBs have actions on neurons in this nucleus. Accordingly, whole-cell voltage- and...... changes the firing frequency and synaptic activity of neurons in this nucleus. Therefore, endogenous eCB transmission could play a role in processes involving the LDT, such as cortical activation and motivated behaviours and, further, behavioural actions of marijuana are probably mediated, in part, via...

  9. Palmitoylethanolamide attenuates PTZ-induced seizures through CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Iraj; Rostampour, Mohammad; Shabani, Mohammad; Naderi, Nima; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Babaei, Parvin; Khakpour-Taleghani, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders. Though there are effective medications available to reduce the symptoms of the disease, their side effects have limited their usage. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) has been shown to attenuate seizure in different animal models. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in this attenuation. Male wistar rats were used for the current experiment. PTZ was injected to induce chemical kindling in animals. After verification of kindling in animals, treatment was performed with PEA, AM251 and AM630 in different groups. Latency to induce seizure, seizure stages and latency and duration of fifth stage of seizure was recorded for each animal. Injection of PTZ led to seizure in the animals. Pretreatment with PEA increased the latency to initiate seizures and reduced the duration of seizure. Pretreatment with different dosages of AM251 had contrary effects so that at lower doses they increased the seizure in animals but at higher doses led to the attenuation of seizure. AM630 increased seizures in a dose dependent manner. Combination of the antagonists increased the seizure parameters and attenuated the effect of PEA on seizure. PEA attenuated the PTZ-induced seizures and pretreatment with CB1 and CB2 antagonists diminished this effect of PEA, but still PEA was effective, which might be attributed to the contribution of other receptors in PEA anti-epileptic properties. Findings of the current study implied that endocannabinoid signaling pathway might have an important role in the effects of PEA. PMID:26370914

  10. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ Regulates Hepatic CB1 Receptor-Mediated Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Sun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Jina; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Sung Jin; Jeong, Won-Il; Lee, Chul-Ho; Harris, Robert A.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), a stress inducible hepatokine, is synthesized in the liver and plays important roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism of hepatic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression is largely unknown. Results Activation of the hepatic CB1 receptor by arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a CB1 receptor selective agonist, significantly increased FGF21 gene expression. Overexpression of estrogen-related receptor (ERR) γ increased FGF21 gene expression and secretion both in hepatocytes and mice, whereas knockdown of ERRγ decreased ACEA-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Moreover, ERRγ, but not ERRα and ERRβ, induced FGF21 gene promoter activity. In addition, deletion and mutation analysis of the FGF21 promoter identified a putative ERRγ-binding motif (AGGTGC, a near-consensus response element). A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed direct binding of ERRγ to the FGF21 gene promoter. Finally, GSK5182, an ERRγ inverse agonist, significantly inhibited hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated FGF21 gene expression and secretion. Conclusion Based on our data, we conclude that ERRγ plays a key role in hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of FGF21 gene expression and secretion. PMID:27455076

  11. Mapping CB1 cannabinoid receptors with [3H]OMAR in the Flinders rodent model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nahimi, A.; Gjedde, A.; Wong, D. F.;

    2012-01-01

    H]OMAR, a highly selective CB1 receptor antagonist (Horti et al, 2006) in the Flinders rodent model of depression. Methods: The Flinders sensitive line (FSL) (N = 5-6) was used as a model of depression and the Flinders resistant line (FRL) (N= 6-8) served as controls (Wegener et al. 2010). In these......Background: The endocannabinoid system regulates cognitive and emotional processes and pathology of this system is implicated in psychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. The precise role of the endocannabinoid system in psychiatric disorders remains unclear, but changes in...... expression of CB1 receptors and subsequent altered modulation of monoamines is suggested in depression (Esteban & Garcia-Sevilla, 2011). CB1 receptor agonists, such as WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940 regulate synthesis and release of monoamines and are suggested as a novel therapy in the treatment of depression...

  12. Mead ethanolamide, a novel eicosanoid, is an agonist for the central (CB1) and peripheral (CB2) cannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priller, J; Briley, E M; Mansouri, J; Devane, W A; Mackie, K; Felder, C C

    1995-08-01

    The recently discovered endogenous agonist for the cannabinoid receptor, anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide), can be formed enzymatically by the condensation of arachidonic acid with ethanolamine. 5Z,8Z,11Z-Eicosatrienoic acid (mead acid) has been found to substitute for arachidonic acid in the sn-2 position of phospholipids and accumulate during periods of dietary fatty acid deprivation in rats. In the present study, the chemically synthesized ethanolamide of mead acid was evaluated as a potential agonist at the two known subtypes of cannabinoid receptor: CB1 (central) and CB2 (peripheral). This compound was equipotent to anandamide in competing with [3H]CP55,940 binding to plasma membranes prepared from L cells expressing the human CB1 receptor and from ATt-20 cells expressing the human CB2 receptor. Mead ethanolamide was also equipotent to anandamide in inhibiting forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in cells expressing the CB1 receptor. It inhibited N-type calcium currents with a lower potency than anandamide. Mead and arachidonic acid were equally efficacious as substrates for the enzymatic synthesis of their respective ethanolamides in rat and adult human hippocampal P2 membranes. Palmitic acid was not an effective substrate for the enzymatic synthesis of palmitoyl ethanolamide. Mead ethanolamide exhibits several characteristics of a novel agonist to CB1 and CB2 receptors and may represent another candidate endogenous ligand for the CB1 receptor. Due to the anticonvulsant properties of GABA and the positional similarity of L-serine to ethanolamine in membrane phospholipids, these compounds were synthetically coupled to arachidonic acid, and their resulting arachidonamides were tested as potential cannabinoid agonists. The arachidonamides of GABA and L-serine were inactive in both binding and functional assays at the CB1 receptor. PMID:7651362

  13. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria Lakiotaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids, and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins’ expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n=43 and malignant (n=44 lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells’ proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p=0.0010 and p=0.0005, resp.. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p=0.0097 and p=0.0110, resp.. In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p=0.0301. Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p=0.1165, lymphatic (p=0.1989, and vascular invasion (p=0.0555, as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p=0.1165, at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia.

  14. Anandamide drives cell cycle progression through CB1 receptors in a rat model of synchronized liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; Pallottini, Valentina; Martini, Chiara; Petrosino, Stefania; Proto, Maria Chiara; Vitale, Mario; Laezza, Chiara; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    The endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid receptor signaling by endocannabinoids, is involved in a wide range of functions and physiopathological conditions. To date, very little is known concerning the role of the endocannabinoids in the control and regulation of cell proliferation. An anti-proliferative action of CB1 signaling blockade in neurogenesis and angiogenesis argues in favor of proliferation-promoting functions of endocannabinoids through CB1 receptors when pro-growth signals are present. Furthermore, liver regeneration, a useful in vivo model of synchronized cell proliferation, is characterized by a peak of anandamide that elicits through CB1 receptor, the expression of critical mitosis genes. The aim of this study was to focus on the timing of endocannabinoid signaling changes during the different phases of the cell cycle, exploiting the rat liver regeneration model following partial hepatectomy, the most useful to study synchronized cell cycle in vivo. Hepatic regeneration led to increased levels of anandamide and endocannabinoid-like molecules oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with a concomitant increase in CB1 mRNA levels, whose protein expression peaked later during the S phase. Blocking of CB1 receptor with a low dose of the selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716 (0.7 mg/kg/dose) affected cell cycle progression reducing the expression of PCNA, and through the inhibition of pERK and pSTAT3 pathways. These results support the notion that the signaling mediated by anandamide through CB1 receptor may be important for the entry and progression of cells into the cell cycle and hence for their proliferation under mitogenic signals. PMID:25684344

  15. Dose-dependent effects of celecoxib on CB-1 agonist-induced antinociception in the mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Zarrindast

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: Endocannabinoid produce analgesia that is comparable which of opioids. The mechanism of antinociceptive effects of (∆ - 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC is suggested to be through cyclooxygenase (COX pathway. In the present work, the effect of two extreme dose ranges of celecoxib (mg/kg and ng/kg, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 antagonist, on arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA, a selective CB1 agonist induced antinociception in mice was examined. "nMethods: We have investigated the interaction between celecoxib, at the doses of mg/kg (50, 100, 200 and 400 i.p.  and ultra low dose (ULD (25 and 50 ng/kg, i.p., on the antinociceptive effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of ACPA (0.004, 0.0625 and 1 μg/mice, using formalin test in mice. "nResults: I.C.V. administration of ACPA induced antinociception. Intraperitoneal administration of celecoxib (mg/kg and its ULD (ng/kg attenuated and potentiated, ACPA antinociceptive effects, respectively. "nConclusion: It is concluded that the mg/kg doses of COX-2 antagonist showed opposite effects compare to the ultra-low dose of the drug.

  16. CB1 and CB2 receptors are novel molecular targets for Tamoxifen and 4OH-Tamoxifen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prather, Paul L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); FrancisDevaraj, FeAna; Dates, Centdrika R.; Greer, Aleksandra K.; Bratton, Stacie M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Ford, Benjamin M.; Franks, Lirit N. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Radominska-Pandya, Anna, E-mail: RadominskaAnna@uams.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Tamoxifen produces cytotoxicity via estrogen-receptor (ER) independent mechanisms. •Tamoxifen binds to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and acts as an inverse agonist. •CB1 and CB2 receptors are novel molecular targets for Tamoxifen. •ER-independent effects for Tamoxifen may be mediated via CB1 and/or CB2 receptors. -- Abstract: Tamoxifen (Tam) is classified as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and is used for treatment of patients with ER-positive breast cancer. However, it has been shown that Tam and its cytochrome P450-generated metabolite 4-hydroxy-Tam (4OH-Tam) also exhibit cytotoxic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells. These observations suggest that Tam and 4OH-Tam can produce cytotoxicity via estrogen receptor (ER)-independent mechanism(s) of action. The molecular targets responsible for the ER-independent effects of Tam and its derivatives are poorly understood. Interestingly, similar to Tam and 4OH-Tam, cannabinoids have also been shown to exhibit anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells, and estrogen can regulate expression levels of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs). Therefore, this study investigated whether CBRs might serve as novel molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam. We report that both compounds bind to CB1 and CB2Rs with moderate affinity (0.9–3 μM). Furthermore, Tam and 4OH-Tam exhibit inverse activity at CB1 and CB2Rs in membrane preparations, reducing basal G-protein activity. Tam and 4OH-Tam also act as CB1/CB2R-inverse agonists to regulate the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase in intact cells, producing concentration-dependent increases in intracellular cAMP. These results suggest that CBRs are molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam and may contribute to the ER-independent cytotoxic effects reported for these drugs. Importantly, these findings also indicate that Tam and 4OH-Tam might be used as structural scaffolds for development of novel

  17. Local activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the urinary bladder reduces the inflammation-induced sensitization of bladder afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervero Fernando

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of cannabinoid agonists is known to reduce pain induced by bladder inflammation and to modulate cystometric parameters in vivo. We have previously reported that intravesical administration of a cannabinoid agonist reduces the electrical activity of bladder afferents under normal conditions. However, the effects of local activation of bladder cannabinoid receptors on afferent activity during inflammation are unknown. This study was aimed to assess the effects of intravesical administration of a cannabinoid agonist on the discharges of afferent fibers in inflamed bladders ex vivo. We also characterized the expression of CB1 receptors in the bladder and their localization and co-expression with TRPV1, a marker of nociceptive afferents. Results Compared to untreated animals, afferent fiber activity in inflamed bladders was increased for intravesical pressures between 10 and 40 mmHg. Local treatment with a non selective cannabinoid agonist (AZ12646915 significantly reduced the afferent activity at intravesical pressures above 20 mmHg. This effect was blocked by AM251 but not by AM630 (selective for CB1 and CB2 respectively. Finally, CB1 was co-expressed with TRPV1 in control and inflamed bladders. Conclusion These results demonstrate that sensitization of bladder afferents induced by inflammation is partly suppressed by intravesical activation of cannabinoid receptors, an effect that appears to be mediated by CB1 receptors. Also, TRPV1 positive fibers were found to co-express CB1, supporting the hypothesis of a direct action of the cannabinoid agonist on nociceptive afferents. Taken together, these results indicate a peripheral modulation by the cannabinoid system of bladder hypersensitivity during inflammation.

  18. The Effect of Hypoxia on G Protein Coupled (CB1 Receptor Gene Expression in Cortical B50 Neurons in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Ibegbu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia adversely affects cells and tissues, and neuronal cells in particular have been shown to be more susceptible to the injurious effects of hypoxia in which they may begin to die when oxygen supply is reduced or completely eliminated. Cannabinoid (CB1 receptor agonists have been shown to elicit several Central Nervous System (CNS effects, mediated via G protein-coupled receptors. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of hypoxia on G protein coupled receptor (CB1 gene expression in cortical neuronal B50 cell lines in culture. The B50 cells were cultured in normoxia (21% O2; 5% CO2 and hypoxia (5% O2; 5% CO2, and were treated with cannabinoid agonists to determine their effects on hypoxia-induced changes. Three cannabinoid agonists [Win55,212-2 mesylate (Win, arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA and 2- arachidonylglycerol (2-AG], were administered to the cells as treatment for 48 hours after 48hours of initial culture for a total of 96hours of culture in hypoxic conditions at concentrations of 10, 50 and 100 nM . The levels of G-protein coupled receptor (CB1 mRNAs were assessed using RT-PCR. The results showed that hypoxia induced morphological changes in B5 0 cells in hypoxia while the CB1 RT-PCR mRNA levels showed no appreciable changes in normal, hypoxic and treated cells. The results show that B50 neuronal cells are susceptible to damage and injurious effects of hypoxia, as are most brain cells and the cannabinoid agonist treatments showed there were no changes in the level of CB1 receptor gene expression due to hypoxia or agonist treatment in neuronal B50 cells in culture.

  19. Hydroxytyrosol Inhibits Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Gene Expression in 3T3-L1 Preadipocyte Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutino, Valeria; Orlando, Antonella; Russo, Francesco; Notarnicola, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line is a well characterized cell model for studying the adipocyte status and the molecular mechanisms involved in differentiation of these cells. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes have the ability to synthesize and degrade endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and their differentiation into adipocytes increases the expression of cannabinoid (CB1) and PPAR-γ receptors. Clinically, the blocking stimulation of the endocannabinoid pathway has been one of the first approaches proposed to counteract the obesity and obesity-associated diseases (such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cancer). In this connection, here we studied in cultured 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes the effects of n-3-PUFA, α-Linolenic acid (OM-3), n-6-PUFA, Linoleic acid (OM-6), and hydroxytyrosol (HT) on the expression of CB1 receptor gene and the adipogenesis-related genes PPAR-γ, Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) and Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL). HT was able to inhibit 3T3-L1 cell differentiation by down-regulating cell proliferation and CB1 receptor gene expression. HT exhibited anti-adipogenic effects, whereas OM-3 and OM-6 exerted an inhibitory action on cell proliferation associated with an induction of the preadipocytes differentiation and CB1 receptor gene expression. Moreover, the expression of FAS and LPL genes resulted increased after treatment with both HT and OM-3 and OM-6. The present study points out that the intake of molecules such as HT, contained in extra virgin olive oil, may be considered also in view of antiobesity and antineoplastic properties by acting directly on the adipose tissue and modulating CB1 receptor gene transcription. PMID:26189725

  20. Beneficial metabolic effects of CB1R anti-sense oligonucleotide treatment in diet-induced obese AKR/J mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Tang

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of evidence supports pleiotropic metabolic roles of the cannibinoid-1 receptor (CB1R in peripheral tissues such as adipose, liver, skeletal muscle and pancreas. To further understand the metabolic consequences of specific blockade of CB1R function in peripheral tissues, we performed a 10-week-study with an anti-sense oligonucleotide directed against the CB1R in diet-induced obese (DIO AKR/J mice. DIO AKR/J mice were treated with CB1R ASO Isis-414930 (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/kg/week or control ASO Isis-141923 (25 mg/kg/week via intraperitoneal injection for 10 weeks. At the end of the treatment, CB1R mRNA from the 25 mg/kg/week CB1R ASO group in the epididymal fat and kidney was decreased by 81% and 63%, respectively. Body weight gain was decreased in a dose-dependent fashion, significantly different in the 25 mg/kg/week CB1R ASO group (46.1±1.0 g vs veh, 51.2±0.9 g, p<0.05. Body fat mass was reduced in parallel with attenuated body weight gain. CB1R ASO treatment led to decreased fed glucose level (at week 8, 25 mg/kg/week group, 145±4 mg/dL vs veh, 195±10 mg/dL, p<0.05. Moreover, CB1R ASO treatment dose-dependently improved glucose excursion during an oral glucose tolerance test, whereas control ASO exerted no effect. Liver steatosis was also decreased upon CB1R ASO treatment. At the end of the study, plasma insulin and leptin levels were significantly reduced by 25 mg/kg/week CB1R ASO treatment. SREBP1 mRNA expression was decreased in both epididymal fat and liver. G6PC and fatty acid translocase/CD36 mRNA levels were also reduced in the liver. In summary, CB1R ASO treatment in DIO AKR/J mice led to improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. The beneficial effects of CB1R ASO treatment strongly support the notion that selective inhibition of the peripheral CB1R, without blockade of central CB1R, may serve as an effective approach for treating type II diabetes, obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  1. Exploração farmacológica do sistema endocanabinoide: novas perspectivas para o tratamento de transtornos de ansiedade e depressão? Pharmacological exploitation of the endocannabinoid system: new perspectives for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders?

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Viviane M; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Fabrício A. Moreira

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Este artigo revisa o sistema endocanabinoide e as respectivas estratégias de intervenções farmacológicas. MÉTODO: Realizou-se uma revisão da literatura sobre o sistema endocanabinoide e a sua farmacologia, considerando-se artigos originais ou de revisão escritos em inglês. DISCUSSÃO: Canabinoides são um grupo de compostos presentes na Cannabis Sativa (maconha), a exemplo do Δ9-tetraidrocanabinol e seus análogos sintéticos. Estudos sobre o seu perfil farmacológico levaram à desc...

  2. GABABR-Dependent Long-Term Depression at Hippocampal Synapses between CB1-Positive Interneurons and CA1 Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jappy, Dave; Valiullina, Fliza; Draguhn, Andreas; Rozov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Activity induced long lasting modifications of synaptic efficacy have been extensively studied in excitatory synapses, however, long term plasticity is also a property of inhibitory synapses. Inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region can be subdivided according to the compartment they target on the pyramidal cell. Some interneurons preferentially innervate the perisomatic area and axon hillock of the pyramidal cells while others preferentially target dendritic branches and spines. Another characteristic feature allowing functional classification of interneurons is cell type specific expression of different neurochemical markers and receptors. In the hippocampal CA1 region, nearly 90% of the interneurons expressing cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1R) also express cholecystokinin (CCK). Therefore, the functional presence of CB1 receptors can be used for identification of the inhibitory input from CCK positive (CCK+) interneurons to CA1 pyramidal cells. The goal of this study was to explore the nature of long term plasticity at the synapses between interneurons expressing CB1Rs (putative CCK+) and pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region of the hippocampus in vitro. We found that theta burst stimulation triggered robust long-term depression (LTD) at this synapse. The locus of LTD induction was postsynaptic and required activation of GABAB receptors. We also showed that LTD at this synaptic connection involves GABABR-dependent suppression of adenylyl cyclase and consequent reduction of PKA activity. In this respect, CB1+ to pyramidal cell synapses differ from the majority of the other hippocampal inhibitory connections where theta burst stimulation results in long-term potentiation. PMID:26858602

  3. On the role of cannabinoid CB1- and µ-opioid receptors in nicotine-induced motor impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    TommyPattij

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies using a rat 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) have established a critical role for dopamine D2 receptors in regulating increments in motor impulsivity induced by acute administration of the psychostimulant drugs amphetamine and nicotine. Here we investigated whether cannabinoid CB1 and/or µ-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine-induced impulsivity, given recent findings indicating that both receptor systems mediate amphetamine-induced motor impulsivity. Re...

  4. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and mTORC1 signalling pathways interact to modulate glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez-Silva, Francisco J; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Haissaguerre, Magalie; Ruz-Maldonado, Inmaculada; Lhamyani, Said; El Bekay, Rajaa; Tabarin, Antoine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an intercellular signalling mechanism that is present in the islets of Langerhans and plays a role in the modulation of insulin secretion and expansion of the β-cell mass. The downstream signalling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a key intracellular pathway involved in energy homeostasis and is known to importantly affect the physiology of pancreatic islets. We investigated the possible relationship between cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor signalling and the mTORC1 pathway in the endocrine pancreas of mice by using pharmacological analysis as well as mice genetically lacking the CB1 receptor or the downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase p70S6K1. In vitro static secretion experiments on islets, western blotting, and in vivo glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) at 0.1 µM while increasing phosphorylation of p70S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) within the islets. Specific pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 by 3 nM rapamycin, as well as genetic deletion of p70S6K1, impaired the CB1-antagonist-mediated decrease in GSIS. In vivo experiments showed that 3 mg/kg body weight rimonabant decreased insulin levels and induced glucose intolerance in lean mice without altering peripheral insulin sensitivity; this effect was prevented by peripheral administration of low doses of rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg body weight), which increased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a functional interaction between the ECS and the mTORC1 pathway within the endocrine pancreas and at the whole-organism level, which could have implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic β-cell diseases. PMID:26563389

  5. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and mTORC1 signalling pathways interact to modulate glucose homeostasis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Bermudez-Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system (ECS is an intercellular signalling mechanism that is present in the islets of Langerhans and plays a role in the modulation of insulin secretion and expansion of the β-cell mass. The downstream signalling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signalling is a key intracellular pathway involved in energy homeostasis and is known to importantly affect the physiology of pancreatic islets. We investigated the possible relationship between cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor signalling and the mTORC1 pathway in the endocrine pancreas of mice by using pharmacological analysis as well as mice genetically lacking the CB1 receptor or the downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase p70S6K1. In vitro static secretion experiments on islets, western blotting, and in vivo glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS at 0.1 µM while increasing phosphorylation of p70S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6 within the islets. Specific pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 by 3 nM rapamycin, as well as genetic deletion of p70S6K1, impaired the CB1-antagonist-mediated decrease in GSIS. In vivo experiments showed that 3 mg/kg body weight rimonabant decreased insulin levels and induced glucose intolerance in lean mice without altering peripheral insulin sensitivity; this effect was prevented by peripheral administration of low doses of rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg body weight, which increased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a functional interaction between the ECS and the mTORC1 pathway within the endocrine pancreas and at the whole-organism level, which could have implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic β-cell diseases.

  6. Distribution of CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Relationship with Mu-Opioid Receptors in the Rat Periaqueductal Gray

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson-Poe, A R; Morgan, M.M.; Aicher, S.A.; Hegarty, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is part of a descending pain modulatory system that, when activated, produces widespread and profound antinociception. Microinjection of either opioids or cannabinoids into the PAG elicits antinociception. Moreover, microinjection of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor agonist HU-210 into the PAG enhances the antinociceptive effect of subsequent morphine injections, indicating a direct relationship between these two systems. The objective of this study was to charac...

  7. CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonism promotes remodeling and cannabinoid treatment prevents endothelial dysfunction and hypotension in rats with myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Jens A.; Hu, Kai; Karcher, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Schäfer, Andreas; Laser, Martin; Han, Hong; Ertl, Georg

    2003-01-01

    To study the long-term effects of altered cannabinoid receptor activity on myocardial and vascular function, Wistar rats were treated with the selective CB1 antagonist AM-251 (0.5 mg kg−1 d−1), the potent synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 (50 μg kg−1 d−1) or vehicle for 12 weeks after coronary artery ligation or sham operation.AM-251 further reduced the pressure-generating capacity, shifted the pressure volume curve to the right (P

  8. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor drives corticospinal motor neuron differentiation through the Ctip2/Satb2 transcriptional regulation axis

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-Alonso, Javier; Aguado, Tania; Wu, Chia-Shan; Palazuelos, Javier; Hofmann, Clementine; Garcez, Patricia; Guillemot, Francois; Lu, Hui-Chen; Lutz, Beat; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2012-01-01

    The generation and specification of pyramidal neuron subpopulations during development relies on a complex network of transcription factors. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor is the major molecular target of endocannabinoids and marijuana active compounds. This receptor has been shown to influence neural progenitor proliferation and axonal growth, but its involvement in neuronal differentiation and the functional impact in the adulthood caused by altering its signaling during brain development are...

  9. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially regulate CB1 receptor function at glutamatergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stacey L; Alexander, Nancy J; Bluett, Rebecca J; Patel, Sachin; McCool, Brian A

    2016-09-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system has been suggested to play a key role in ethanol preference and intake, the acute effects of ethanol, and in the development of withdrawal symptoms following ethanol dependence. Ethanol-dependent alterations in glutamatergic signaling within the lateral/basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) are critical for the development and expression of withdrawal-induced anxiety. Notably, the eCB system significantly regulates both glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic activity within the BLA. Chronic ethanol exposure significantly alters eCB system expression within regions critical to the expression of emotionality and anxiety-related behavior, including the BLA. Here, we investigated specific interactions between the BLA eCB system and its functional regulation of synaptic activity during acute and chronic ethanol exposure. In tissue from ethanol naïve-rats, a prolonged acute ethanol exposure caused a dose dependent inhibition of glutamatergic synaptic activity via a presynaptic mechanism that was occluded by CB1 antagonist/inverse agonists SR141716a and AM251. Importantly, this acute ethanol inhibition was attenuated following 10 day chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE). CIE exposure also significantly down-regulated CB1-mediated presynaptic inhibition at glutamatergic afferent terminals but spared CB1-inhibition of GABAergic synapses arising from local inhibitory-interneurons. CIE also significantly elevated BLA N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA or anandamide) levels and decreased CB1 receptor protein levels. Collectively, these data suggest a dynamic regulation of the BLA eCB system by acute and chronic ethanol. PMID:26707595

  10. A novel non-CB1/TRPV1 endocannabinoid-mediated mechanism depresses excitatory synapses on hippocampal CA1 interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Jeffrey G.; Gibson, Helen E.; Jensen, Tyron; Nugent, Fereshteh; Walther, Curtis; Blickenstaff, Jacob; Kauer, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) mediate various forms of synaptic plasticity at excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain. The eCB anandamide binds to several receptors including the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). We recently identified that TRPV1 is required for long-term depression at excitatory synapses on hippocampal stratum radiatum interneurons. Here we performed whole-cell patch clamp recordings from CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons in...

  11. Candidate PET radioligands for cannabinoid CB1 receptors: [18F]AM5144 and related pyrazole compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The mammalian brain contains abundant G protein-coupled cannabinoid CB1 receptors that respond to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient of cannabis. The availability of a positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand would facilitate studies of the addictive and medicinal properties of compounds that bind to this receptor. Among the known classes of ligands for CB1 receptors, the pyrazoles are attractive targets for radiopharmaceutical development because they are antagonists and are generally less lipophilic than the other classes. Methods: A convenient high-yield synthesis of N-(4-[18F]fluorophenyl)-5-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)- 1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM5144) was devised by coupling the appropriate pyrazole-3-carboxyl chloride compound with 4-[18F]fluoroaniline. The labeled precursor was synthesized from 1-[18F]fluoro-4-nitrobenzene in 60% radiochemical yield for 10 min using an improved procedure involving sodium borohydride reduction with cobalt chloride catalysis. The product was purified by HPLC to give a specific activity >400 mCi/μmol and a radiochemical purity >95%, and a PET study was conducted in a baboon. Results: Although the regional uptake of AM5144 in baboon brain was consistent with binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors, absolute uptake at 1 receptor ligands is not surprising because of their high lipophilicity as compared with most brain PET radiotracers. However, for nine pyrazole compounds for which rodent data are available, brain uptake and calculated logP values are not correlated. Thus, high logP values should not preclude evaluation of radiotracers for targets such as the CB1 receptor that may require very lipophilic ligands

  12. NESS038C6, a novel selective CB1 antagonist agent with anti-obesity activity and improved molecular profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastinu, Andrea; Pira, Marilena; Pani, Luca; Pinna, Gérard Aimè; Lazzari, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    The present work aims to study the effects induced by a chronic treatment with a novel CB1 antagonist (NESS038C6) in C57BL/6N diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice. Mice treated with NESS038C6 and fed with a fat diet (NESS038C6 FD) were compared with the following three reference experimental groups: DIO mice fed with the same fat diet used for NESS038C6 and treated with vehicle or the reference CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant, "VH FD" and "SR141716 FD", respectively; DIO mice treated with vehicle and switched to a normal diet (VH ND). NESS038C6 chronic treatment (30 mg/kg/day for 31 days) determined a significant reduction in DIO mice weight relative to that of VH FD. The entity of the effect was comparable to that detected in both SR141716 FD and VH ND groups. Moreover, if compared to VH FD, NESS038C6 FD evidenced: (i) improvement of cardiovascular risk factors; (ii) significant decrease in adipose tissue leptin expression; (iii) increase in mRNA expression of hypothalamic orexigenic peptides and a decrease of anorexigenic peptides; (iv) expression increase of metabolic enzymes and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α in the liver; (v) normalization of monoaminergic transporters and neurotrophic expression in mesolimbic area. However, in contrast to the case of rimonabant, the novel CB1 antagonist improved the disrupted expression profile of genes linked to the hunger-satiety circuit, without altering monoaminergic transmission. In conclusion, the novel CB1 antagonist compound NESS038C6 may represent a useful candidate agent for the treatment of obesity and its metabolic complications, without or with reduced side effects relative to those instead observed with rimonabant. PMID:22771813

  13. CB1 antagonism produces behaviors more consistent with satiety than reduced reward value in food-maintained responding in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Emily E; Jagielo-Miller, Julia E; Vemuri, V Kiran; Makriyannis, Alexandros; McLaughlin, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists are widely known to reduce motivation for food, but it is not known whether they induce satiety or reduce reward value of food. It may therefore be necessary to compare effects of altered satiety and reward food value in the same appetitive task, and determine whether CB1 antagonism produces a behavior pattern similar to either, both, or neither. A fine-grained analysis of fixed-ratio 10 (FR10) responding for palatable food initially included number and duration of, and between, all lever presses and food tray entries in order to differentiate the pattern of suppression of prefeeding from that caused by reducing the reward value of the pellets with quinine. Discriminant function analysis then determined that these manipulations were best differentiated by effects on tray entries, pellet retrieval latencies, and time of the first response. At 0.5 mg/kg, AM 6527 produced similar effects to reducing reward value, but at 1.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, effects were more similar to those when animals were satiated. We conclude that AM 6527 both reduced reward value and enhanced satiety, but as dose increased, effects on satiety became much more prominent. These findings contribute to knowledge about the behavioral processes affected by CB1 antagonism. PMID:27005309

  14. Gz mediates the long-lasting desensitization of brain CB1 receptors and is essential for cross-tolerance with morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz María

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the systemic administration of cannabinoids produces antinociception, their chronic use leads to analgesic tolerance as well as cross-tolerance to morphine. These effects are mediated by cannabinoids binding to peripheral, spinal and supraspinal CB1 and CB2 receptors, making it difficult to determine the relevance of each receptor type to these phenomena. However, in the brain, the CB1 receptors (CB1Rs are expressed at high levels in neurons, whereas the expression of CB2Rs is marginal. Thus, CB1Rs mediate the effects of smoked cannabis and are also implicated in emotional behaviors. We have analyzed the production of supraspinal analgesia and the development of tolerance at CB1Rs by the direct injection of a series of cannabinoids into the brain. The influence of the activation of CB1Rs on supraspinal analgesia evoked by morphine was also evaluated. Results Intracerebroventricular (icv administration of cannabinoid receptor agonists, WIN55,212-2, ACEA or methanandamide, generated a dose-dependent analgesia. Notably, a single administration of these compounds brought about profound analgesic tolerance that lasted for more than 14 days. This decrease in the effect of cannabinoid receptor agonists was not mediated by depletion of CB1Rs or the loss of regulated G proteins, but, nevertheless, it was accompanied by reduced morphine analgesia. On the other hand, acute morphine administration produced tolerance that lasted only 3 days and did not affect the CB1R. We found that both neural mu-opioid receptors (MORs and CB1Rs interact with the HINT1-RGSZ module, thereby regulating pertussis toxin-insensitive Gz proteins. In mice with reduced levels of these Gz proteins, the CB1R agonists produced no such desensitization or morphine cross-tolerance. On the other hand, experimental enhancement of Gz signaling enabled an acute icv administration of morphine to produce a long-lasting tolerance at MORs that persisted for more than

  15. AAV vector-mediated overexpression of CB1 cannabinoid receptor in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus protects against seizure-induced excitoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Guggenhuber

    Full Text Available The CB1 cannabinoid receptor is the most abundant G-protein coupled receptor in the brain and a key regulator of neuronal excitability. There is strong evidence that CB1 receptor on glutamatergic hippocampal neurons is beneficial to alleviate epileptiform seizures in mouse and man. Therefore, we hypothesized that experimentally increased CB1 gene dosage in principal neurons would have therapeutic effects in kainic acid (KA-induced hippocampal pathogenesis. Here, we show that virus-mediated conditional overexpression of CB1 receptor in pyramidal and mossy cells of the hippocampus is neuroprotective and moderates convulsions in the acute KA seizure model in mice. We introduce a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV genome with a short stop element flanked by loxP sites, for highly efficient attenuation of transgene expression on the transcriptional level. The presence of Cre-recombinase is strictly necessary for expression of reporter proteins or CB1 receptor in vitro and in vivo. Transgenic CB1 receptor immunoreactivity is targeted to glutamatergic neurons after stereotaxic delivery of AAV to the dorsal hippocampus of the driver mice NEX-cre. Increased CB1 receptor protein levels in hippocampal lysates of AAV-treated Cre-mice is paralleled by enhanced cannabinoid-induced G-protein activation. KA-induced seizure severity and mortality is reduced in CB1 receptor overexpressors compared with AAV-treated control animals. Neuronal damage in the hippocampal CA3 field is specifically absent from AAV-treated Cre-transgenics, but evident throughout cortical areas of both treatment groups. Our data provide further evidence for a role of increased CB1 signaling in pyramidal hippocampal neurons as a safeguard against the adverse effects of excessive excitatory network activity.

  16. Alterations in Corticolimbic Dendritic Morphology and Emotional Behavior in Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor–Deficient Mice Parallel the Effects of Chronic Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Matthew N.; Hillard, Cecilia J.; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2011-01-01

    Many changes produced by chronic stress are similar to those seen in cannabinoid CB1 receptor–deficient mice. In the current study, we examined both anxiety-like behavior and dendritic complexity within the prefrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala (BLA) in wild-type and CB1 receptor–deficient mice, under basal conditions and following exposure to 21 days of protracted restraint stress. CB1 receptor–deficient mice exhibited increased indices of anxiety in the elevated plus maze under basal c...

  17. Effects of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor agonism and antagonism on SKF81297-induced dyskinesia and haloperidol-induced dystonia in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten V; Peacock, Linda P; Werge, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs may cause extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), such as dyskinesia and dystonia. These effects are believed to involve dysfunctional striatal dopamine transmission. Patients with schizophrenia show increased prevalence of cannabis abuse and this has been linked to severity of EPS....... Endocannabinoids modulate striatal dopamine activity via type 1 cannabinoid (CB(1)) receptors, and studies in rats and humans suggest beneficial effects of CB(1) ligands on EPS. The present study explored the effects of CB(1) receptor ligands on oral dyskinesia induced by the dopamine D(1) receptor agonist SKF...

  18. Mice Expressing a "Hyper-Sensitive" Form of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) Are Neither Obese Nor Diabetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, David J; Zee, Michael L; Davis, Brian J; Haskins, Chris P; Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Amin, Randa; Henderson-Redmond, Angela N; Mackie, Ken; Czyzyk, Traci A; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence implicate the endocannabinoid signaling system in the modulation of metabolic disease. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of CB1 in rodents leads to reduced body weight, resistance to diet-induced obesity, decreased intake of highly palatable food, and increased energy expenditure. Cannabinoid agonists stimulate feeding in rodents and increased levels of endocannabinoids can disrupt lipid metabolism. Therefore, the hypothesis that sustained endocannabinoid signaling can lead to obesity and diabetes was examined in this study using S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing a desensitization-resistant CB1 receptor. These mice display exaggerated and prolonged responses to acute administration of phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and endocannabinoids. As a consequence these mice represent a novel model for determining the effect of enhanced endocannabinoid signaling on metabolic disease. S426A/S430A mutants consumed equivalent amounts of both high fat (45%) and low fat (10%) chow control diet compared to wild-type littermate controls. S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice fed either high or low fat control diet displayed similar fasting blood glucose levels and normal glucose clearance following a 2 g/kg glucose challenge. Furthermore, S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice consumed similar amounts of chow following an overnight fast. While both THC and JZL195 significantly increased food intake two hours after injection, this increase was similar between the S426A/S430A mutant and wildtype control mice Our results indicate that S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing the desensitization-resistant form of CB1 do not exhibit differences in body weight, food intake, glucose homeostasis, or re-feeding following a fast. PMID:27501235

  19. Cannabinoid effects on CB1 receptor density in the adolescent brain: an autoradiographic study using the synthetic cannabinoid HU210.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Victoria S; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2010-11-01

    The short- and long-term behavioral effects of cannabinoids differ in adolescent and adult rodents. Few studies though have examined the underlying neurochemical changes that occur in the brain following adolescent cannabinoid exposure. In this study, we examined the effect of treatment with the synthetic cannabinoid, HU210, on CB1 receptor density in the brain and on body weight in adolescent male rats. Rats were treated daily with 25, 50, or 100 μg/kg HU210 for 4 or 14 days, or received a single dose of 100 μg/kg HU210 and sacrificed 24 h later. Receptor density was investigated using in vitro autoradiography with the CB1 receptor ligand [(3)H] CP55,940. In contrast to adult animals treated under the same paradigm in a previous study, adolescents continued on average, to gain weight over the course of the study. Weight gain was slowest in the 100 μg/kg group and improved dose dependently with controls gaining the most weight. Following the acute dose of HU210, a trend for a reduction in [(3)H] CP55,940 binding and a significant effect of treatment was observed. Statistically significant, dose-dependent, region-specific decreases in binding were observed in all brain regions examined following 4 and 14 days treatment. The pattern of CB1 receptor downregulation was similar to that observed in adults treated with cannabinoids in previous studies; however, its magnitude was smaller in adolescents. This reduced compensatory response may contribute to some acute behavioral effects, the pharmacological cross-tolerance and the long-lasting, adverse psychological consequences of cannabinoid exposure during adolescence. PMID:20842718

  20. Low Temperature Creep of a Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-2Cb-1Ta-0.8Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, H. P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the analysis of low temperature creep of titanium alloys in order to establish design limitations due to the effect of creep. The creep data on a titanium Ti-6Al-2Cb-1Ta-0.8Mo are used in the analysis. A creep equation is formulated to determine the allowable stresses so that creep at ambient temperatures can be kept within an acceptable limit during the service life of engineering structures or instruments. Microcreep which is important to design of precision instruments is included in the discussion also.

  1. Basolateral amygdala CB1 cannabinoid receptors are involved in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofogh, Sattar Norouzi; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sardari, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol and morphine are largely co-abused and affect memory formation. The present study intended to investigate the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol. Adult male Wistar rats received bilateral cannulation of the BLA, and memory retrieval was measured in step-through type passive avoidance apparatus. Our results showed that post-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of morphine (6mg/kg) induced amnesia. Pre-test administration of ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) significantly improved morphine-induced memory impairment, suggesting that there is cross state-dependent memory retrieval between morphine and ethanol. It should be considered that pre-test administration of ethanol (0.1 and 0.5g/kg, i.p.) by itself had no effect on memory retrieval in the passive avoidance task. Interestingly, pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of different doses of WIN55,212-2 (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3μg/rat), a non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, plus an ineffective dose of ethanol (0.1g/kg, i.p.) improved morphine-induced memory impairment. Intra-BLA microinjection of AM251 (0.4-0.6ng/rat), a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, inhibited the improved effect of ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) on morphine response. Pre-test intra-BLA microinjection of WIN55,212-2 or AM251 had no effect on memory retrieval or morphine-induced amnesia. Taken together, it can be concluded that morphine and ethanol can induce state-dependent memory retrieval. In addition, the BLA endocannabinoid system mediates via CB1 receptors the functional interaction of morphine and ethanol state-dependent memory retrieval which may depend on the rewarding effects of the drugs. PMID:27327764

  2. HU210-induced downregulation in cannabinoid CB1 receptor binding strongly correlates with body weight loss in the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Victoria S; Wang, Hongqin; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2009-07-01

    In vitro autoradiography was used to examine changes in cannabinoid CB1 receptors (targeted with [(3)H] CP55,940) in rats treated with the potent cannabinoid agonist HU210. Animals were administered with HU210 (25, 50, 100 microg/kg) for 4 or 14 days or received a single 100 microg/kg injection of HU210 and sacrificed 24 h later. The acute dose resulted in a decrease in binding in the caudate putamen and hippocampus. A dose dependent, region-specific reduction (P HU210. PMID:19169813

  3. Influence of G1359A polimorphysm of the cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR1 on insulin resistance and adipokines in patients with non alcoholic fatty liver disease Influencia del polimorfismo G1359a del gen del receptor cannabinoide (CNR1 sobre la resistencia a la insulina y adipocinas en pacientes con enfermedad hepática no alcohólica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Aller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the evidence that endogenous cannabinoid system plays a role in metabolic aspects of body weight and metabolic syndrome components such as non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of this polymorphism on insulin resistance, liver histological changes, anthropometric parameters and adipocytokines in patients with NAFLD. Material and methods: A population of 71 patients with NAFLD was recruited in a cross sectional study. A biochemical analysis of serum was measured. Genotype of G1359A polymorphism of CB1 receptor gene CB1 receptor was studied. Forty one patients (36.9% had the genotype G1359G (wild type group and twenty nine (26.1% patients G1359A or A1359A (mutant type group. Results: Twenty four 24 patients (32,3% had a Brunt grade > 4 and 12 patients (17% had a significative fibrosis (F > = 2. HOMA values were higher in wild type group than mutant type group. Adiponectin and visfatin levels were higher in mutant type group. Moreover, TNF-alpha and resistin levels were higher in wild type group than mutant type group. Patients with mutant genotype showed less frequently elevated levels of AST. AST > 40 UI/L was detected in 28.5% of patients in the mutant vs. 53% of patients with wild genotype, p = 4 less frequently than patients with wild type group (28.5%vs 7.1%. Conclusion: A variant of the polymorphism G1359A CBR1 is associated with lower levels of HOMA, TNF-alpha, resistin and higher levels of adiponectin than patients with the wild variant of this polymorphism. Besides, patients with A allele variant shown lower Brunt grade in liver biopsy.Antecedentes: Teniendo en cuenta la evidencia de que el sistema cannabinoide endógeno juega un papel importante en aspectos metabólicos, peso corporal y componentes del síndrome metabólico como la enfermedad hepática NO alcohólica (EHNA. El objetivo de nuestro estudio fue investigar la influencia de este polimorfismo en

  4. Endocannabinoid System Contributes to Liver Injury and Inflammation by Activation of Bone Marrow-Derived Monocytes/Macrophages in a CB1-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Ping; Yang, Le; Tian, Lei; Wang, Lin; Jia, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Xin; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic injury undergoes significant increases in endocannabinoidsand infiltrations of macrophages, yet the concrete mechanisms of changes in endocannabinoids and the functions of macrophage-expressed cannabinoid receptors (CBs) are unclear. Biosynthetic and degradative enzymes of endocannabinoids revealed a significant change in human fibrotic liver. Meanwhile, we showed dynamic changes of these enzymes and CBs (CB1 and CB2) from 1 to 56 d in carbon tetrachloride-induced murine liver injury. Biosynthetic enzymes (N-acylphosphatidyl-ethanolamine selective phospholipase D and diacylglycerol lipase-α) and CBs were markedly increased, whereas degradative enzymes (fatty acid amidohydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase) were downregulated. Moreover, these enzymes intimately correlated with the fibrosis parameter [procollagen α1(III)]. Bone marrow-derived monocytes/macrophages (BMM) expressed CBs. Interestingly, CB1 but not CB2 mediated BMM migration through a Boyden chambers assay, and the effect depended on the G(α)i/o/RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. ICR mice were lethally irradiated and received BM transplants from enhanced GFP transgenic mice. Four weeks later, mice of BM reconstruction were subjected to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. In the chimeric murine model, we found that blockade of CB1 by administration of a CB1 antagonist inhibited the recruitment of BMM into injured liver using immunofluorescence staining and FACS, but it did not have effects on migration of T cells and dendritic cells without CB1 expression. Furthermore, activation of CB1 enhanced cytokine expression of BMM. In vivo, inhibition of CB1 attenuated the inflammatory cytokine level through real-time RT-PCR and cytometric bead array, ameliorating hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we identify inactivation of BMM-expressed CB1 as a therapeutic strategy for reducing hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26320250

  5. AAV-mediated overexpression of the CB1 receptor in the mPFC of adult rats alters cognitive flexibility, social behavior and emotional reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias eKlugmann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid (ECB system is strongly involved in the regulation of cognitive processing and emotional behavior and evidence indicates that ECB signaling might affect these behavioral abilities by modulations of prefrontal cortical functions. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the CB1 receptor in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC on cognitive flexibility and emotional behavior. Therefore, the CB1 receptor was overexpressed by adeno-associated virus (AAV vector-mediated gene transfer specifically in the mPFC of adult Wistar rats. Animals were then tested in different anxiety-related paradigms for emotional reactivity (e.g. elevated plus maze (EPM, light/dark emergence test (EMT, social interaction and the attentional set shift task (ASST - an adaptation of the human Wisconsin card sorting test - for cognitive abilities and behavioral flexibility. A subtle increase in exploratory behavior was found in CB1 receptor overexpressing animals (CB1-R compared to empty vector injected controls (Empty in the EMT and EPM, although general locomotor activity did not differ between the groups. During social interaction testing, social contact behavior towards the unknown conspecific was found to be decreased, whereas social withdrawal was increased in CB1-R animals and they showed an inadequate increase in exploratory behavior compared to control animals. In the ASST, impaired reversal learning abilities were detected in CB1-R animals compared to controls, indicating reduced behavioral flexibility. In conclusion, upregulation of the CB1 receptor specifically in the rat mPFC induces alterations in emotional reactivity, leads to inadequate social behavior and impairs cognitive flexibility. These findings might be relevant for neuropsychiatric disorders, since higher cortical CB1 receptor expression levels as well as similar behavioral impairments as observed in the present study have been described in schizophrenic patients.

  6. Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor activation stimulates neurite outgrowth and inhibits capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) influx in an in vitro model of diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Challapalli, Sarat C; Smith, Paula J W

    2009-08-01

    Cannabinoid CB(1) receptors mediate, in part, the neuroprotectant properties of endocannabinoids, and altered signalling via the CB(1) receptor may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. We investigated CB(1) receptor function in PC12 cells differentiated into a neuronal phenotype with nerve growth factor (NGF, 50 ng/ml) in 5.5 and 50 mM concentrations of glucose. High glucose was associated with impaired NGF-induced neurite outgrowth (P HU210 (0.03-3 microM) increased neurite length in a concentration-dependent manner (P HU210 (1 microM) inhibited capsaicin-induced calcium transients to a similar degree in cells cultured in high glucose (40%) versus normal (43%) (P HU210-mediated rescue of neurite outgrowth and inhibition of calcium influx was blocked by the selective CB(1) antagonist AM251 (1 microM), but not by the selective CB(2) antagonist AM630 (1 microM), confirming the role of CB(1) receptors. High glucose treatment did not significantly elevate endocannabinoid levels. These results suggest that high glucose concentrations are associated with decreased expression, but preserved function of CB(1) receptors in nerve cells. PMID:19501110

  7. On the role of cannabinoid CB1- and µ-opioid receptors in nicotine-induced motor impulsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TommyPattij

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies using a rat 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT have established a critical role for dopamine D2 receptors in regulating increments in motor impulsivity induced by acute administration of the psychostimulant drugs amphetamine and nicotine. Here we investigated whether cannabinoid CB1 and/or µ-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine-induced impulsivity, given recent findings indicating that both receptor systems mediate amphetamine-induced motor impulsivity. Results showed that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A, but not the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, reduced nicotine-induced premature responding. In contrast, SR141716A did not affect impulsivity following a challenge with the dopamine transporter inhibitor GBR 12909, a form of drug-induced impulsivity that was previously found to be dependent on µ-opioid receptor activation. Finally, unlike SR141716A and the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride, naloxone did not affect impulsivity when the intertrial interval was lengthened from 5 to 7s, i.e. under conditions of heightened cognitive load resulting in higher levels of premature responding. Together, these findings indicate that nicotine-induced motor impulsivity is cannabinoid, but not opioid receptor-dependent. These data confirm that the endogenous cannabinoid, dopamine, and opioid systems each play important, but distinct roles in regulating motor impulsivity. The rather complex interplay between these neurotransmitter systems modulating impulsivity will be discussed in terms of the differential involvement of mesocortical and mesolimbic neurocircuitry.

  8. CB1 receptors in the formation of the different phases of memory-related processes in the inhibitory avoidance test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Biala, Grażyna

    2016-03-15

    The endocannabinoid system, through the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) receptors modulates many physiological functions, including different aspects of memory-related processes. The aim of the present experiments was to explore the role of the endocannabinoid system, through CB1 receptors in the different stages of short-term (acquisition, retention and retrieval) and long-term (acquisition, consolidation and retrieval) memory-related responses, using the inhibitory avoidance (IA) test in mice. Our results revealed that an acute injection of oleamide (10 and 20mg/kg), a CB1 receptor agonist, impairs the short-term or/and long-term acquisition, retention/consolidation, retrieval memory and learning processes in the IA test in mice. In turn, in this test an acute injection of AM 251 (1 and 3mg/kg), a CB1 receptor antagonist, improves the short-term or/and long-term memory stages, described above. Moreover, this memory impairment induced by effective dose of oleamide (20mg/kg) is reversed by non-effective dose of AM 251 (0.25mg/kg) in the IA task, which proves the selectivity of oleamide to CB1 receptors and confirms that the CB1 receptor-related mechanism is one of the possible mechanisms, responsible for memory and learning responses. Obtained results provide clear evidence that the endocannabinoid system, through CB1 receptors, participates in the different stages of short- and long-term memory-related behavior. This knowledge may open in the future new possibilities for the development of CB-based therapies, especially for memory impairment human disorders. PMID:26711911

  9. A2A adenosine receptor antagonism enhances synaptic and motor effects of cocaine via CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Tozzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cocaine increases the level of endogenous dopamine (DA in the striatum by blocking the DA transporter. Endogenous DA modulates glutamatergic inputs to striatal neurons and this modulation influences motor activity. Since D2 DA and A2A-adenosine receptors (A2A-Rs have antagonistic effects on striatal neurons, drugs targeting adenosine receptors such as caffeine-like compounds, could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. In this study, we analyzed the electrophysiological effects of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists in striatal slices and the motor effects produced by this pharmacological modulation in rodents. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Concomitant administration of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists reduced glutamatergic synaptic transmission in striatal spiny neurons while these drugs failed to produce this effect when given in isolation. This inhibitory effect was dependent on the activation of D2-like receptors and the release of endocannabinoids since it was prevented by L-sulpiride and reduced by a CB1 receptor antagonist. Combined application of cocaine and A2A-R antagonists also reduced the firing frequency of striatal cholinergic interneurons suggesting that changes in cholinergic tone might contribute to this synaptic modulation. Finally, A2A-Rs antagonists, in the presence of a sub-threshold dose of cocaine, enhanced locomotion and, in line with the electrophysiological experiments, this enhanced activity required activation of D2-like and CB1 receptors. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides a possible synaptic mechanism explaining how caffeine-like compounds could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine.

  10. Contrasting effects of lithium chloride and CB1 receptor blockade on enduring changes in the valuation of reward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eHernandez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available When an organism has been trained to respond for a reward, its learned behavior can be characterized as goal-directed or habitual based on whether or not it is susceptible to reward devaluation. Here, we evaluated whether instrumental responding for brain stimulation reward (BSR can devalued using a paradigm traditionally used for natural rewards. Rats were trained to lever press for BSR. Subsequently, BSR was paired with either lithium chloride (LiCl, 5 mg/kg, i.p, a pro-emetic, or AM251, a CB1 receptor antagonist (3 mg/kg, i.p.. Pairings of BSR with these two compounds or their respective vehicle were performed in a novel environment so that only unconditional effects of BSR were affected by the pharmacological manipulations. Subsequently, in a probe test, all rats were returned in the drug-free state to the boxes where they had received training instrumental responding was reassessed in the absence of BSR delivery. LiCl produced enduring decreases in the number of responses during the test session, whereas AM251 had no effect. These results show that instrumental responding for BSR is susceptible to devaluation, in accord with the proposal that this behavior is supported at least in part by associations between the response and the rewarding outcome. Furthermore, they suggest that the reward modulation observed in studies involving the use of CB1 receptor antagonists arises from changes in the organism’s motivation rather than due to drug-induced changes in the intrinsic value of reward.

  11. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB1 cannabinoid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • OX1 and OX2 orexin and CB1 cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX1 orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB1 cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX1, OX2 and CB1 receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP2 green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB1 receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP2 to CB1 produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX1–OX2 interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB1 receptors, dimerization could be an effective way of forming signal complexes with optimal cannabinoid concentrations available for

  12. Continuation of the VVER burnup credit benchmark. Evaluation of CB1 results, overview of CB2 results to date, and specification of CB3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculational benchmark focused on VVER-440 burnup credit, similar to that of the OECD/NEA/NSC Burnup Credit Benchmark Working Group, was proposed on the 96'AER Symposium. Its first part, CB1, was specified there whereas the second part, CB2, was specified a year later, on 97'AER Symposium in Zittau. A final statistical evaluation is presented of CB1 results and summarizes the CB2 results obtained to date. Further, the effect of an axial burnup profile of VVER-440 spent fuel on criticality ('end effect') is proposed to be studied in the CB3 benchmark problem of an infinite array of VVER-440 spent fuel rods. (author)

  13. Influence of the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM 251, on the regional haemodynamic effects of WIN-55212-2 or HU 210 in conscious rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, S. M.; March, J. E.; Kemp, P. A.; Bennett, T.

    2002-01-01

    In conscious, freely-moving, male, Sprague-Dawley rats, the regional haemodynamic responses to the synthetic cannabinoids, WIN-55212-2 and HU 210, were compared. The possible involvement of cannabinoid, CB1-receptors, or β2-adrenoceptors in the responses to WIN-55212-2 and HU 210 were investigated using the CB1-receptor antagonist, AM 251, or the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist, ICI 118551, respectively.Both WIN-55212-2 (150 μg kg−1) and HU 210 (100 μg kg−1) had pressor, renal, and mesenteric vaso...

  14. Stress induces analgesia via orexin 1 receptor-initiated endocannabinoid/CB1 signaling in the mouse periaqueductal gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Jung; Chang, Lu-Yang; Ho, Yu-Cheng; Teng, Shu-Fang; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Mackie, Ken; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-06-01

    The orexin system consists of orexin A/hypocretin 1 and orexin B/hypocretin 2, and OX1 and OX2 receptors. Our previous electrophysiological study showed that orexin A in the rat ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) induced antinociception via an OX1 receptor-initiated and endocannabinoid-mediated disinhibition mechanism. Here, we further characterized antinociceptive effects of orexins in the mouse vlPAG and investigated whether this mechanism in the vlPAG can contribute to stress-induced analgesia (SIA) in mice. Intra-vlPAG (i.pag.) microinjection of orexin A in the mouse vlPAG increased the hot-plate latency. This effect was mimicked by i.pag. injection of WIN 55,212-2, a CB1 agonist, and antagonized by i.pag. injection of the antagonist of OX1 (SB 334867) or CB1 (AM 251), but not OX2 (TCS-OX2-29) or opioid (naloxone), receptors. [Ala(11), D-Leu(15)]-orexin B (i.pag.), an OX2 selective agonist, also induced antinociception in a manner blocked by i.pag. injection of TCS-OX2-29, but not SB 334867 or AM 251. Mice receiving restraint stress for 30 min showed significantly longer hot-plate latency, more c-Fos-expressing orexin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and higher orexin levels in the vlPAG than unrestrained mice. Restraint SIA in mice was prevented by i.pag. or intraperitoneal injection of SB 334867 or AM 251, but not TCS-OX2-29 or naloxone. These results suggest that during stress, hypothalamic orexin neurons are activated, releasing orexins into the vlPAG to induce analgesia, possibly via the OX1 receptor-initiated, endocannabinoid-mediated disinhibition mechanism previously reported. Although activating either OX1 or OX2 receptors in the vlPAG can lead to antinociception, only OX1 receptor-initiated antinociception is endocannabinoid-dependent. PMID:26907809

  15. Blockade of Cannabinoid CB1 receptor attenuates the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference along with a downregulation of ERK, CREB phosphorylation, and BDNF expression in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo; Wang, Na; Chen, Bo; Wang, Yi'nan; He, Jing; Cai, Xintong; Zhang, Hongbo; Wei, Shuguang; Li, Shengbin

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) is highly expressed in the mesocorticolimbic system and associated with drug craving and relapse. Clinical trials suggest that CB1R antagonists may represent new therapies for drug addiction. However, the downstream signaling of CB1R is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between CB1R and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus in morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), which is used to assess the morphine-induced reward memory. The protein level of CB1R, ERK, CREB, and BDNF were detected by western blotting. Additionally, a CB1R antagonist, AM251, was used to study whether blockade of CB1R altered the CPP and above-mentioned molecules. We found an increase of CB1R expression in the NAc and hippocampus of the mice following morphine CPP, but not those after repeated morphine in home cage without context exposure (NO-CPP). Both morphine CPP and NO-CPP induced an upregulation of ERK, CREB phosphorylation and BDNF expression. Furthermore, pretreatment with AM251 before morphine attenuated the CPP acquisition and CB1R expression as well as the activation of ERK-CREB-BDNF cascade. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that (1) Repeated morphine with context exposures but not merely the pharmacological effects of morphine increased CB1R expression both in the NAc and hippocampus. (2) CB1R antagonist mediated blockade of ERK-CREB-BDNF signaling activation in the NAc and hippocampus may be an important mechanism underlying the attenuation of morphine CPP. PMID:27461790

  16. Blockade of Nicotine and Cannabinoid Reinforcement and Relapse by a Cannabinoid CB1-Receptor Neutral Antagonist AM4113 and Inverse Agonist Rimonabant in Squirrel Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Charles W; Redhi, Godfrey H; Vemuri, Kiran; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Le Foll, Bernard; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R; Justinova, Zuzana

    2016-08-01

    Nicotine, the main psychoactive component of tobacco, and (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, play major roles in tobacco and marijuana dependence as reinforcers of drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior. Drugs that act as inverse agonists of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the brain can attenuate the rewarding and abuse-related effects of nicotine and THC, but their clinical use is hindered by potentially serious side effects. The recently developed CB1-receptor neutral antagonists may provide an alternative therapeutic approach to nicotine and cannabinoid dependence. Here we compare attenuation of nicotine and THC reinforcement and reinstatement in squirrel monkeys by the CB1-receptor inverse agonist rimonabant and by the recently developed CB1-receptor neutral antagonist AM4113. Both rimonabant and AM4113 reduced two effects of nicotine and THC that play major roles in tobacco and marijuana dependence: (1) maintenance of high rates of drug-taking behavior, and (2) priming- or cue-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior in abstinent subjects (models of relapse). In contrast, neither rimonabant nor AM4113 modified cocaine-reinforced or food-reinforced operant behavior under similar experimental conditions. However, both rimonabant and AM4113 reduced cue-induced reinstatement in monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine, suggesting the involvement of a common cannabinoid-mediated mechanism in the cue-induced reinstatement for different drugs of abuse. These findings point to CB1-receptor neutral antagonists as a new class of medications for treatment of both tobacco dependence and cannabis dependence. PMID:26888056

  17. Design, Synthesis, Binding and Docking-Based 3D-QSAR Studies of 2-Pyridylbenzimidazoles—A New Family of High Affinity CB1 Cannabinoid Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Iturriaga-Vásquez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel 2-pyridylbenzimidazole derivatives was rationally designed and synthesized based on our previous studies on benzimidazole 14, a CB1 agonist used as a template for optimization. In the present series, 21 compounds displayed high affinities with Ki values in the nanomolar range. JM-39 (compound 39 was the most active of the series (KiCB1 = 0.53 nM, while compounds 31 and 44 exhibited similar affinities to WIN 55212-2. CoMFA analysis was performed based on the biological data obtained and resulted in a statistically significant CoMFA model with high predictive value (q2 = 0.710, r2 = 0.998, r2pred = 0.823.

  18. Continuation of the WWER burnup credit benchmark: evaluation of CB1 results, overview of CB2 results to date, and specification of CB3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculational benchmark focused on WWER-440 burnup credit, simular to that of the OECD/NEA/NSC Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark Working Group, was proposed on the 96'AER Symposium. Its first part, CB1, was specified there whereas the second part, CB2, was specified a year later, on 97'AER Symposium in Zittau. This paper brings a final statistical evaluation of CB1 results and summarizes the CB2 results obtained to date. Further, the effect of an axial burnup profile of WWER-440 spent fuel on criticality ('end effect') is proposed to be studied in the CB3 benchmark problem of an infinite array of WWER-440 spent fuel rods as specified in the paper. (Authors)

  19. Effects of long-term aging on ductility of the columbium alloys C-103, Cb-1Zr, and Cb-752 and the molybdenum alloy Mo-TZM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine if aging embrittlement occurs in the columbium alloys C-103, CB-1Zr, and Cb-752 or in the molybdenum alloy Mo-TZM. Results showed that aging embrittlement does not occur in C-103, Cb-1Zr, or Mo-TZM during long-term (1000 hr) aging at temperatures in the range 700 to 1025 C. In contrast, aging embrittlement did occur in the Cb-752 alloy after similar aging at 900 C. A critical combination of the solute additions W and Zr in Cb-752 led to Zr segregation at grain boundaries during long-term aging. This segregation subsequently resulted in embrittlement as indicated by an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature from below -1960 C to about -150 C.

  20. Involvement of M1 and CB1 receptors in the anxiogenic-like effects induced by neostigmine injected into the rat prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogaça, M V; Fedoce, A G; Ferreira-Junior, N C; Guimarães, F S; Resstel, L B

    2016-04-01

    The prelimbic (PL) medial prefrontal cortex is a brain region highly involved in the control of emotional responses, being modulated by several neurotransmitter systems, including the cholinergic and endocannabinoid. Activation of muscarinic type 1 (M1) receptors in the brain induces retrograde suppression of inhibition through the induction of endocannabinoid release, which, in turn, activates cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors. No study so far, however, has been conducted to investigate if the cholinergic and endocannabinoid systems interact in the PL to modulate anxiety-related behaviors. Thus, the present work aimed at verifying if intra-PL administration of neostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, would produce changes in anxiety-like behavior and if these effects are mediated by M1 and CB1 receptor activation. Independent groups of animals received bilateral injections of vehicle, the M1 receptor antagonist pirenzepine (0.06, 0.6, and 6 nmol), the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (0.1 nmol), or the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme inhibitor URB597 (1, 3, and 10 pmol), followed by vehicle or neostigmine (0.01, 0.1, and 1 nmol), and were submitted to the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test. Neostigmine (1 nmol) decreased open arm exploration of the maze. This anxiogenic-like effect was reproduced in another anxiety-related animal model, the light-dark box. Previous injection of pirenzepine or AM251 abolished this response in the EPM, whereas URB597 had no effect. These results suggest that CB1 and M1 receptors interact in the PL to control anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:26873081

  1. Arginine Catabolism by Sourdough Lactic Acid Bacteria: Purification and Characterization of the Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis CB1

    OpenAIRE

    De Angelis, Maria; Mariotti, Liberato; Rossi, Jone; Servili, Maurizio; Fox, Patrick F.; Rollán, Graciela; Gobbetti, Marco

    2002-01-01

    The cytoplasmic extracts of 70 strains of the most frequently isolated sourdough lactic acid bacteria were screened initially for arginine deiminase (ADI), ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC), and carbamate kinase (CK) activities, which comprise the ADI (or arginine dihydrolase) pathway. Only obligately heterofermentative strains such as Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis CB1; Lactobacillus brevis AM1, AM8, and 10A; Lactobacillus hilgardii 51B; and Lactobacillus fructivorans DD3 and DA106 showed al...

  2. CB1 cannabinoid receptor stimulation modulates transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 activities in calcium influx and substande P release in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ohshita, Kyoko

    2005-01-01

    Cannabinoids have been reported to have analgesic properties in animals of acute nociception or of inflammatory and neuropathic pain models, but the mechanisms by which they exert such alleviative effects are not yet fully understood. We investigated whether the CB1- cannabinoid-receptor agonist HU210 modulates the capsaicin-induced 45Ca2+ influx and substance P like-immunoreactivity (SPLI) release in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. HU210 attenuated the capsaicin-induced 45Ca2+...

  3. Involvement of Central Endothelin ETA and Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors and Arginine Vasopressin Release in Sepsis Induced by Cecal Ligation and Puncture in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite-Avalca, Mariane C G; Lomba, Luis A; Bastos-Pereira, Amanda L; Brito, Haissa O; Fraga, Daniel; Zampronio, Aleksander R

    2016-09-01

    We previously reported that endothelin-1 (ET-1) reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory currents in vasopressinergic magnocellular cells through the activation of endothelin ETA receptors in rat brain slices. This effect was abolished by a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, suggesting the involvement of endocannabinoids. The present study investigated whether the blockade of ETA or CB1 receptors during the phase of increased levels of ET-1 after severe sepsis increases the survival rate of animals concomitantly with an increase in plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels. Sepsis was induced in male Wistar rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Treatment with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (Rim; 10 and 20 mg/kg, orally) 4 h after CLP (three punctures) significantly increased the survival rate compared with the CLP per vehicle group. Intracerebroventricular treatment with the ETA receptor antagonist BQ123 (100 pmol) or with Rim (2 μg) 4 and 8 h after CLP but not the ETB receptor antagonist BQ788 (100 pmol), also significantly improved the survival rate. Sham-operated and CLP animals that were treated with Rim had significantly lower core temperature than CLP animals. However, oral treatment with Rim did not change bacterial count in the peritoneal exudate, neutrophil migration to the peritoneal cavity, leucopenia or increased plasma interleukin-6 levels induced by CLP. Both Rim and BQ123 also increased AVP levels 12 h after CLP. The blockade of central CB1 and ETA receptors in the late phase of sepsis increased the survival rate, reduced body temperature and increased the circulating AVP levels. PMID:26925810

  4. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB1 receptor, but not by the CB2 receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB1 receptor, but not by the CB2 receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB1 receptors

  5. Male and female rats differ in brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor density and function and in behavioural traits predisposing to drug addiction: effect of ovarian hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Maria Paola; Fadda, Paola; Casu, Angelo; Spano, Maria Sabrina; Casti, Alberto; Fratta, Walter; Fattore, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Sex-dependent differences are frequently observed in the biological and behavioural effects of substances of abuse, including cannabis. We recently demonstrated a modulating effect of sex and oestrous cycle on cannabinoid-taking and seeking behaviours. Here, we investigated the influence of sex and oestrogen in the regulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor density and function, measured by [(3)H]CP55940 and CP55940-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding autoradiography, respectively, in the prefrontal cortex (Cg1 and Cg3), caudate- putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus of male and cycling female rats, as well as ovariectomised (OVX) rats and OVX rats primed with oestradiol (10 µg/rat) (OVX+E). CB1 receptor density was significantly lower in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of cycling females than in males and in OVX females, a difference that appeared to be oestradiol-dependent, because it was no more evident in the OVX+E group. CP55940-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding was significantly higher in the Cg3 of OVX rats relative to cycling and OVX+E rats. No difference was observed in CB1 receptor density or function in any of the other brain areas analysed. Finally, sex and oestradiol were also found to affect motor activity, social behaviour and sensorimotor gating in rats tested in locomotor activity boxes, social interaction and prepulse inhibition tasks, respectively. Our findings provide biochemical evidence for sex- and hormone- dependent differences in the density and function of CB1 receptors in selected brain regions, and in behaviours associated with greater vulnerability to drug addiction, revealing a more vulnerable behavioural phenotype in female than in male rats. PMID:23829370

  6. Imaging the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in humans with [11C]OMAR: assessment of kinetic analysis methods, test-retest reproducibility, and gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normandin, Marc D; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Mason, N Scott; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Henry, Shannan; Williams, Wendol A; Carson, Richard E; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun

    2015-08-01

    The Radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR was developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1R). The objectives of the present study were to evaluate kinetic analysis methods, determine test-retest reliability, and assess gender differences in receptor availability. Dynamic PET data were acquired in 10 human subjects, and analyzed with one-tissue (1T) and two-tissue (2T) compartment models and by the Logan and multilinear analysis (MA1) methods to estimate regional volume of distribution (VT). The 2T model inclusive of a vascular component (2TV) and MA1 were the preferred techniques. Test-retest reliability of VT was good (mean absolute deviation ~9%; intraclass correlation coefficient ~0.7). Tracer parent fraction in plasma was lower in women (PMA1 method and demonstrate the utility of this tracer for in vivo imaging of CB1R. In addition, results from the present study indicate that gender difference in receptor binding should be taken into consideration when [(11)C]OMAR is used to quantify CB1R availability in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25833345

  7. CB1 receptor antagonism prevents long-term hyperexcitability after head injury by regulation of dynorphin-KOR system and mGluR5 in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Chang; Zhao, Baotian; Wei, Naili; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Kai

    2016-09-01

    Both endocannabinoids and dynorphin are feedback messengers in nervous system that act at the presynaptic nerve terminal to inhibit transmitter release. Many studies showed the cannabinoid-opioid cross-modulation in antinociception, hypothermia, sedation and reward. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of early application of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor antagonism SR141716A after brain injury on dynorphin-κ opioid receptor (KOR) system and the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in a rat model of fluid percussion injury (FPI). Firstly, seizure latency induced by pentylenetetrazole was significantly prolonged 6 weeks after brain injury in group of SR141716A treatment. Then, PCR and western blot showed that SR141716A inhibited the long-term up-regulation of CB1 receptors in hippocampus. However, SR141716A resulted in long-term potentiation of dynorphin release and did not influence the up-regulation of KOR in hippocampus after brain injury. Furthermore, SR141716A reverse the overexpression of mGluR5 in the late stage of brain injury. We propose that during the induction of epileptogenesis after brain injury, early application of CB1 receptor antagonism could prevent long-term hyperexcitability by up-regulation of dynorphin-KOR system and prevention of mGluR5 induced epileptogenesis in hippocampus. PMID:27262683

  8. Effects of CP 55,940 — agonist of CB1 cannabinoid receptors on ghrelin and somatostatin producing cells in the rat pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Lewandowska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids participate in the modulation of numerous functions in the human organism, increasing the sense of hunger, affecting carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and controlling systemic energy balance mechanisms. Moreover, they influence the endocrine system functions, acting via two types of receptors, CB1 and CB2. The aim of the present study was to examine the number, distribution and activity of ghrelin and somatostatin producing endocrine cells in the pancreas of rats after a single administration of selective CP 55,940 agonist of CB1 receptor. The study was performed on 20 rats. Neuroendocrine cells were identified by immunohistochemical reactions, involving specific antibodies against ghrelin and somatostatin. The distribution and number of ghrelin- and somatostatin-immunoreactive cells were separately studied in five pancreas islets of each section. A performed analysis showed a decreased number of somatostatin-immunoreactive cells and a weak immunoreactivity of ghrelin and somatostatin containing neuroendocrine cells in the pancreatic islets of experimental rats, compared to control animals. The obtained results suggest that a single administration of a selective CP 55,940 agonist of CB1 receptor influences the immunoreactivity of endocrine cells with ghrelin and somatostatin expression in the pancreas islets.

  9. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor inhibition blunts adolescent-typical increased binge alcohol and sucrose consumption in male C57BL/6J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoglia, Abigail E.; Holstein, Sarah E.; Eastman, Vallari R.; Hodge, Clyde W.

    2016-01-01

    Increased binge alcohol consumption has been reported among adolescents as compared to adults in both humans and rodent models, and has been associated with serious long-term health consequences. However, the neurochemical mechanism for age differences in binge drinking between adolescents and adults has not been established. The present study was designed to evaluate the mechanistic role of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in adolescent and adult binge drinking. Binge consumption was established in adolescent and adult male C57BL/6J mice by providing access to 20% alcohol or 1% sucrose for 4 h every other day. Pretreatment with the CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM-251 (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) in a Latin square design dose-dependently reduced adolescent alcohol consumption to adult levels without altering adult intake. AM-251 (3 mg/kg) also reduced adolescent but not adult sucrose consumption. Adolescent reductions in alcohol and sucrose were not associated with alterations in open-field locomotor activity or thigmotaxis. These findings point to age differences in CB1 receptor activity as a functional mediator of adolescent-typical increased binge drinking as compared to adults. Developmental alterations in endocannabinoid signaling in the adolescent brain may therefore be responsible for the drinking phenotype seen in this age group. PMID:26800788

  10. 大麻素CB1受体对大鼠视网膜神经节细胞诱发动作电位的作用%Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors modulates evoked action potentials in rat retinal ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋淑霞; 李倩; 王霄汉; 李芳; 王中峰

    2013-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB 1Rs) regulates a variety of physiological functions in the vertebrate retina through modulating various types of ion channels.The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of this receptor on cell excitability of rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in retinal slices using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques.The results showed that under current-clamped condition perfusing WIN55212-2 (WIN,5 μmol/L),a CB1R agonist,did not significantly change the spontaneous firing frequency and resting membrane potential of RGCs.In the presence of cocktail synaptic blockers,including excitatory postsynaptic receptor blockers CNQX and D-APV,and inhibitory receptor blockers bicuculline and strychnine,perfusion of WIN (5 μmol/L)hardly changed the frequencies of evoked action potentials by a series of positive current injection (from +10 to +100 pA).Phaseplane plot analysis showed that both average threshold voltage for triggering action potential and delay time to reach threshold voltage were not affected by WIN.However,WIN significantly decreased +dV/dtmax and-dV/dtmax of action potentials,suggestive of reduced rising and descending velocities of action potentials.The effects of WIN were reversed by co-application of SR141716,a CB1R selective antagonist.Moreover,WIN did not influence resting membrane potential of RGCs with synaptic inputs being blocked.These results suggest that activation of CB1Rs may regulate intrinsic excitability of rat RGCs through modulating evoked action potentials.%激活大麻素CB1受体(CB1Rs)通过调控多种离子通道,从而调节脊椎动物视网膜的功能.本文旨在利用膜片钳全细胞记录技术,在大鼠视网膜薄片上研究CB1Rs对神经节细胞兴奋性的作用.结果显示,在电流钳制状态下,灌流CB1R激动剂WIN55212-2 (WIN,5μmol/L)对神经节细胞的自发动作电位发放频率和静息膜电位均没有显著影响.在灌流液中加入CNQX,D-APV,bicuculline

  11. The endocannabinoid system and its role in schizophrenia: a systematic review of the literature O sistema endocanabinoide e seu papel na esquizofrenia: uma revisão sistemática da literatura

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    Rodrigo Ferretjans

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder whose mechanisms have remained only partially elucidated. The current proposals regarding its biological basis, such as the dopaminergic hypothesis, do not fully explain the diversity of its symptoms, indicating that other processes may be involved. This paper aims to review evidence supporting the involvement of the endocannabinoid system (ECS, a neurotransmitter group that is the target of Cannabis sativa compounds, in this disorder. METHODS: A systematic review of original papers, published in English, indexed in PubMed up to April, 2012. RESULTS: Most studies employed genetics and histological, neuroimaging or neurochemical methods - either in vivo or post-mortem - to investigate whether components of the ECS are compromised in patients. Overall, the data show changes in cannabinoid receptors in certain brain regions as well as altered levels in endocannabinoid levels in cerebrospinal fluid and/or blood. CONCLUSIONS: Although a dysfunction of the ECS has been described, results are not entirely consistent across studies. Further data are warrant to better define a role of this system in schizophrenia.OBJETIVO: A esquizofrenia é um transtorno psiquiátrico cujos mecanismos permanecem apenas parcialmente elucidados. As atuais propostas relativas à base biológica, tais como a hipótese dopaminérgica, não explicam por completo a diversidade de seus sintomas, o que indica que outros processos podem estar envolvidos. Este artigo tem como objetivo revisar indícios que sustentem o envolvimento do sistema endocanabinoide (SECB, um grupo de neurotransmissoresalvo dos compostos da Cannabis sativa, nesse transtorno. MÉTODOS: Revisão sistemática dos artigos originais, publicados em inglês e indexados no PubMed até abril de 2012. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos estudos empregou métodos neuroquímicos ou de neuroimagem genéticos e histológicos - tanto in vivo quanto post-mortem - para investigar se

  12. Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids is neuroprotective in malonate-lesioned rats, an inflammatory model of Huntington's disease: role of CB1 and CB2 receptors.

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    Valdeolivas, Sara; Satta, Valentina; Pertwee, Roger G; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Sagredo, Onintza

    2012-05-16

    We have investigated whether a 1:1 combination of botanical extracts enriched in either Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) or cannabidiol (CBD), which are the main constituents of the cannabis-based medicine Sativex, is neuroprotective in Huntington's disease (HD), using an experimental model of this disease generated by unilateral lesions of the striatum with the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate. This toxin damages striatal neurons by mechanisms that primarily involve apoptosis and microglial activation. We monitored the extent of this damage and the possible preservation of the striatal parenchyma by treatment with a Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids using different histological and biochemical markers. Results were as follows: (i) malonate increased the volume of edema measured by in vivo NMR imaging and the Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids partially reduced this increase; (ii) malonate reduced the number of Nissl-stained cells, while enhancing the number of degenerating cells stained with FluoroJade-B, and the Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids reversed both effects; (iii) malonate caused a strong glial activation (i.e., reactive microglia labeled with Iba-1, and astrogliosis labeled with GFAP) and the Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids attenuated both responses; and (iv) malonate increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and the neurotrophin IGF-1, and both responses were attenuated after the treatment with the Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids. We also wanted to establish whether targets within the endocannabinoid system (i.e., CB(1) and CB(2) receptors) are involved in the beneficial effects induced in this model by the Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids. This we did using selective antagonists for both receptor types (i.e., SR141716 and AM630) combined with the Sativex-like phytocannabinoid combination. Our results indicated that the effects of this

  13. Localization of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and the 2-AG synthesizing (DAGLα and degrading (MAGL, FAAH enzymes in cells expressing the Ca2+-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus

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    Patricia eRivera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The retrograde suppression of the synaptic transmission by the endocannabinoid sn-2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG is mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptors and requires the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and the activation of specific 2-AG synthesizing (i.e. DAGLα enzymes. However, the anatomical organization of the neuronal substrates that express 2-AG/CB1 signaling system-related molecules associated with selective Ca2+-binding proteins (CaBPs is still unknown. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the expression of the 2-AG/CB1 signaling system (CB1 receptor, DAGLα, MAGL and FAAH and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. CB1, DAGLα and MAGL labeling was mainly localized in fibers and neuropil, which were differentially organized depending on the hippocampal CaBPs-expressing cells. CB1+ fiber terminals localized in all hippocampal principal cell layers were tightly attached to calbindin+ cells (granular and pyramidal neurons, and calretinin+ and parvalbumin+ interneurons. DAGLα neuropil labeling was selectively found surrounding calbindin+ principal cells in the dentate gyrus and CA1, and in the calretinin+ and parvalbumin+ interneurons in the pyramidal cell layers of the CA1/3 fields. MAGL+ terminals were only observed around CA1 calbindin+ pyramidal cells, CA1/3 calretinin+ interneurons and CA3 parvalbumin+ interneurons localized in the pyramidal cell layers. Interestingly, calbindin+ pyramidal cells expressed FAAH specifically in the CA1 field. The identification of anatomically related-neuronal substrates that expressed 2-AG/CB1 signaling system and selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the cannabinoid signaling associated with hippocampal functions.

  14. Rapid glucocorticoid-induced activation of TRP and CB1 receptors causes biphasic modulation of glutamate release in gastric-related hypothalamic preautonomic neurons

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    BretN.Smith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids rapidly regulate synaptic input to neuroendocrine cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN by inducing the retrograde release of endogenous messengers. Here we investigated the rapid effects of dexamethasone (DEX on excitatory synaptic input to feeding-related, preautonomic PVN neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. In ~50% of identified gastric-related preautonomic PVN neurons, DEX elicited a biphasic synaptic response characterized by an initial rapid and transient increase in the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs, followed by a decrease in mEPSC frequency within 9 min; remaining cells displayed only a decrease in mEPSC frequency. The late-phase decrease in mEPSC frequency was mimicked by the cannabinoid receptor agonists anandamide and WIN 55,212-2, and it was blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. The biphasic DEX effect was mimicked by anandamide (AEA. The early increase in mEPSCs was mimicked by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 receptors with capsaicin and by activation of TRPV4 receptors with 4-α-PDD. The increase was reduced, but not blocked, by selective TRPV1 antagonists and in TRPV1-knockout mice; it was blocked completely by the broad-spectrum TRPV antagonist ruthenium red and by combined application of selective TRPV1 and TRPV4 antagonists. The DEX effects were prevented entirely by intracellular infusion of the G-protein inhibitor, GDPβS. Thus, DEX biphasically modulates synaptic glutamate onto a subset of gastric-related PVN neurons, which is likely mediated by induction of a retrograde messenger. The effect includes a TRPV1/4 receptor-mediated transient increase and subsequent CB1 receptor-mediated suppression of glutamate release. Multiphasic modulation of glutamate input to PVN neurons represents a previously unappreciated complexity of control of autonomic output by glucocorticoids and eCBs.

  15. Enhanced self-administration of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 in olfactory bulbectomized rats: evaluation of possible serotonergic and dopaminergic underlying mechanisms

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    Petra eAmchova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression has been associated with drug consumption, including heavy or problematic cannabis use. According to an animal model of depression and substance use disorder comorbidity, we combined the olfactory bulbectomy model of depression with intravenous drug self-administration procedure to verify whether depressive-like rats displayed higher voluntary intake of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN, 12.5 µg/kg/infusion. To this aim, olfactory-bulbectomized (OBX and sham-operated (SHAM Lister Hooded rats were allowed to self-administer WIN by lever-pressing under a continuous (FR-1 schedule of reinforcement in 2h daily sessions. Data showed that both OBX and SHAM rats developed stable WIN intake; yet, responses in OBX were constantly higher than in SHAM rats soon after the first week of training. In addition, OBX rats took significantly longer to extinguish the drug-seeking behaviour after vehicle substitution. Acute pre-treatment with serotonin 5HT1B receptor agonist, CGS-12066B (2.5-10 mg/kg, did not significantly modify WIN intake in OBX and SHAM Lister Hooded rats. Furthermore, acute pre-treatment with CGS-12066B (10 and 15 mg/kg did not alter responses in parallel groups of OBX and SHAM Sprague Dawley rats self-administering methamphetamine under higher (FR-2 reinforcement schedule with nose-poking as operandum. Finally, dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens of OBX rats did not increase in response to a WIN challenge, as in SHAM rats, indicating a dopaminergic dysfunction in bulbectomized rats. Altogether, our findings suggest that a depressive state may alter cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist-induced brain reward function and that a dopaminergic rather than a 5-HT1B mechanism is likely to underlie enhanced WIN self-administration in OBX rats.

  16. L-type channel inhibition by CB1 cannabinoid receptors is mediated by PTX-sensitive G proteins and cAMP/PKA in GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons.

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    Hoddah, Hanaa; Marcantoni, Andrea; Comunanza, Valentina; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    Using immortalized hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons, which express the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) and three Ca2+ channel types (T, R and L), we found that the CB1R agonist WIN 55,212-2 inhibited the voltage-gated Ca2+ currents by about 35%. The inhibition by WIN 55,212-2 (10 microM) was reversible and prevented by nifedipine (3 microM), suggesting a selective action on L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs). WIN 55,212-2 action exhibited all the features of voltage-independent Ca2+ channel modulation: (1) no changes of the activation kinetics, (2) equal depressive action at all potentials and (3) no facilitation following strong prepulses. At variance with WIN 55,212-2, the CB1R inverse agonist AM-251 (10 microM) caused 20% increase of Ca2+ currents. The inhibition of LTCCs by WIN 55,212-2 was prevented by overnight PTX-incubation and by intracellular perfusion with GDP-beta-S. The latter caused also a 20% Ca2+ current up-regulation. WIN 55,212-2 action was also prevented by application of the PKA-blocker H89 or by loading the neurons with 8-CPT-cAMP. Our results suggest that LTCCs in GT1-7 neurons are partially inhibited at rest due to a constitutive CB1R activity removed by AM-251 and GDP-beta-S. Activation of CB1R via PTX-sensitive G proteins and cAMP/PKA pathway selectively depresses LTCCs that critically control the synchronized spontaneous firing and pulsatile release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in GT1-7 neurons. PMID:19818494

  17. Double Dissociation of Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition and CB1 Antagonism in the Central Amygdala, Basolateral Amygdala, and the Interoceptive Insular Cortex on the Affective Properties of Acute Naloxone-Precipitated Morphine Withdrawal in Rats.

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    Wills, Kiri L; Petrie, Gavin N; Millett, Geneva; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Rock, Erin M; Niphakis, Micah J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Parker, Linda A

    2016-06-01

    Both CB1 receptor antagonism and agonism, in particular by 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG), have been shown to reduce somatic symptoms of morphine withdrawal (MWD). Here we evaluated the effects of both systemic pretreatment with the monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor MJN110 (which selectively elevates 2-AG) and central administration of both MJN110 and the CB1 antagonist (AM251) on the affective properties of MWD. Acute MWD induced place aversion occurs when naloxone is administered 24 h following a single exposure to a high dose of morphine. Systemic pretreatment with the MAGL inhibitor, MJN110, prevented the aversive effects of acute MWD by a CB1 receptor-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, in a double dissociation, AM251 infusions into the central amygdala, but MJN110 infusions into the basolateral amygdala, interfered with the naloxone-precipitated MWD induced place aversion. As well, MJN110, but not AM251, infusions into the interoceptive insular cortex (a region known to be activated in acute MWD) also prevented the establishment of the place aversion by a CB1 mechanism of action. These findings reveal the respective sites of action of systemically administered MJN110 and AM251 in regulating the aversive effects of MWD. PMID:26647976

  18. Synergistic effect between prelimbic 5-HT3 and CB1 receptors on memory consolidation deficit in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats: An isobologram analysis.

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    Ahmadi-Mahmoodabadi, N; Nasehi, M; Emam Ghoreishi, M; Zarrindast, M-R

    2016-03-11

    The serotonergic system has often been defined as a neuromodulator system, and is specifically involved in learning and memory via its various receptors. Serotonin is involved in many of the same processes affected by cannabinoids. The present study investigated the influence of bilateral post-training intra-prelimbic (PL) administrations of serotonergic 5-hydroxytryptamine type-3 (5-HT3) receptor agents on arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) (cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist)-induced amnesia, using the step-through inhibitory avoidance (IA) task to assess memory in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The results indicated that sole intra-PL microinjection of ACPA (0.1 and 0.5μg/rat) and 5-HT3 serotonin receptor agonist (m-Chlorophenylbiguanide hydrochloride, m-CPBG; 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1μg/rat) impaired, whereas Y-25130 (a selective 5-HT3 serotonin receptor antagonist; 0.001 and 0.01 and 0.1μg/rat) did not alter IA memory consolidation, by itself. Moreover, intra-PL administration of subthreshold dose of m-CPBG (0.0005μg/rat) potentiated, while Y-25130 (0. 1μg/rat) restored ACPA-induced memory consolidation deficit. The isobologram analysis showed that there is a synergistic effect between ACPA and m-CPBG on memory consolidation deficit. These findings suggest that 5-HT3 receptor mechanism(s), at least partly, play(s) a role in modulating the effect of ACPA on memory consolidation in the PL area. PMID:26701293

  19. Effect of the CB1 cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 on the acquisition and reinstatement of MDMA-induced conditioned place preference in mice

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    Miñarro José

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous reports indicate that MDMA users consume other psychoactive drugs, among which cannabis is one of the most common. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, using the conditioned place preference, the effect of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 on the rewarding effects of MDMA in mice. Methods In the first experiment adolescent mice were initially conditioned with 1.25, 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of MDMA or 0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg of WIN and subsequently with both drugs. Reinstatement of the extinguished preference by priming doses was performed in the groups that showed CPP. In the second experiment, animals were conditioned with 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of MDMA and, after extinction, reinstatement of the preference was induced by 0.5 or 0.1 mg/kg of WIN. Results A low dose of WIN 55212-2 (0.1 mg/kg increased the rewarding effects of low doses of MDMA (1.25 mg/kg, although a decrease in the preference induced by MDMA (5 and 2.5 mg/kg was observed when the dose of WIN 55212-2 was raised (0.5 mg/kg. The CB1 antagonist SR 141716 also increased the rewarding effects of the lowest MDMA dose and did not block the effects of WIN. Animals treated with the highest WIN dose plus a non-neurotoxic dose of MDMA exhibited decreases of striatal DA and serotonin in the cortex. On the other hand, WIN 55212-2-induced CPP was reinstated by priming injections of MDMA, although WIN did not reinstate the MDMA-induced CPP. Conclusions These results confirm that the cannabinoid system plays a role in the rewarding effects of MDMA and highlights the risks that sporadic drug use can pose in terms of relapse to dependence. Finally, the potential neuroprotective action of cannabinoids is not supported by our data; on the contrary, they are evidence of the potential neurotoxic effect of said drugs when administered with MDMA.

  20. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alter...

  1. Pharmacological blockade of either, cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors, prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rats.

    OpenAIRE

    EDUARDO eBLANCO-CALVO; PATRICIA eRIVERA; SERGIO eARRABAL; ANTONIO eVARGAS; FRANCISCO JAVIER ePAVON; ANTONIA eSERRANO; PABLO eGALEANO; LETICIA eRUBIO; JUAN eSUAREZ; FERNANDO eRODRIGUEZ DE FONSECA

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse such as cocaine has been recently linked to alterations on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulated this proliferative response since pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors by modulating not only neurogenesis but also cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation . To this...

  2. A Theoretical Study of the Relationships between Electronic Structure and CB1 and CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Binding Affinity in a Group of 1-Aryl-5-(1-H-pyrrol-1-yl-1-H-pyrazole-3-carboxamides

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    Francisco Salgado-Valdés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of a search for model-based relationships between hCB1 and hCB2 receptor binding affinity and molecular structure for a group of 1-aryl-5-(1-H-pyrrol-1-yl-1-H-pyrazole-3-carboxamides. The wave functions and local atomic reactivity indices were obtained at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p levels of theory with full geometry optimization. Interaction pharmacophores were generated for both receptors. The main conclusions of this work are as follows. (1 We obtained statistically significant equations relating the variation of hCB1 and hCB2 receptor binding affinities with the variation of definite sets of local atomic reactivity indices. (2 The interaction of the molecules with the hCB1 and hCB2 receptors seems to be highly complex and mainly orbital controlled. (3 The interaction mechanisms seem to be different for each type of receptor. This study, contrarily to the statistically backed ones, is able to provide a microscopic insight of the mechanisms involved in the binding process.

  3. Pharmacological blockade of either, cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors, prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rats.

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    EDUARDO eBLANCO-CALVO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Addiction to major drugs of abuse such as cocaine has been recently linked to alterations on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulated this proliferative response since pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors by modulating not only neurogenesis but also cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation . To this end we examined if pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg affects cell proliferation (labeled with BrdU, found in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ. In addition, we measured cell apoptosis (monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and glial activation ( by analizing the expression of GFAP and Iba-1 in the striatum and hippocampus, during acute or repeated (4 days cocaine administration (20 mg/kg. Results showed that acute cocaine decreased the number of BrdU+ cells in SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SVZ only. Both acute and repeated cocaine increased the number of cleaved caspase-3+, GFAP+ and Iba1+ cells in the hippocampus, an effect counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant that increased the number of BrdU+, GFAP+ and Iba1+ cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that changes on neurogenic, apoptotic and gliosis processes, which were produced as a consequence of repeated cocaine administration, were normalized by the pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restoring effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with a prevention of the induction of conditioned locomotion, but not of cocaine-induced sensitization.

  4. Involvement of prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex in panic-like elaborated defensive behaviour and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei: role of the endocannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renato Leonardo de; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-09-01

    It has been shown that GABAA receptor blockade in the dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei (DMH and VMH, respectively) induces elaborated defensive behavioural responses accompanied by antinociception, which has been utilized as an experimental model of panic attack. Furthermore, the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) has been related to emotional reactions and the processing of nociceptive information. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of the PL cortex and the participation of local cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the elaboration of panic-like reactions and in innate fear-induced antinociception. Elaborated fear-induced responses were analysed during a 10-min period in an open-field test arena. Microinjection of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline into the DMH/VMH evoked panic-like behaviour and fear-induced antinociception, which was decreased by microinjection of the non-selective synaptic contact blocker cobalt chloride in the PL cortex. Moreover, microinjection of AM251 (25, 100 or 400 pmol), an endocannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, into the PL cortex also attenuated the defensive behavioural responses and the antinociception that follows innate fear behaviour elaborated by DMH/VMH. These data suggest that the PL cortex plays an important role in the organization of elaborated forward escape behaviour and that this cortical area is also involved in the elaboration of innate fear-induced antinociception. Additionally, CB1 receptors in the PL cortex modulate both panic-like behaviours and fear-induced antinociception elicited by disinhibition of the DMH/VMH through microinjection of bicuculline. PMID:23521775

  5. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 (a non-selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist) on the protective action of various classical antiepileptic drugs in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model

    OpenAIRE

    Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Wlaz, Aleksandra; Kondrat-Wrobel, Maria W.; Tutka, Piotr; Jarogniew J Luszczki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of WIN 55,212-2 (WIN—a non-selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonist) on the anticonvulsant effects of various classical antiepileptic drugs (clobazam, clonazepam, phenobarbital and valproate) in the mouse 6 Hz-induced psychomotor seizure model. Limbic (psychomotor) seizure activity was evoked in albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration) delivered via ocular electrodes. Drug-related adverse effects were...

  6. The disease-modifying effects of a Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are preferentially due to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol acting through CB1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Martet, Miguel; Feliú, Ana; Espejo-Porras, Francisco; Mecha, Miriam; Carrillo-Salinas, Francisco J; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Guaza, Carmen; de Lago, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Sativex(®), an equimolecular combination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-botanical drug substance (Δ(9)-THC-BDS) and cannabidiol-botanical drug substance (CBD-BDS), is a licensed medicine that may be prescribed for alleviating specific symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) such as spasticity and pain. However, further evidence suggest that it could be also active as disease-modifying therapy given the immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties of their two major components. In this study, we investigated this potential in the experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) model of MS in mice. We compared the effect of a Sativex-like combination of Δ(9)-THC-BDS (10 mg/kg) and CBD-BDS (10 mg/kg) with Δ(9)-THC-BDS (20 mg/kg) or CBD-BDS (20 mg/kg) administered separately by intraperitoneal administration to EAE mice. Treatments were initiated at the time that symptoms appear and continued up to the first relapse of the disease. The results show that the treatment with a Sativex-like combination significantly improved the neurological deficits typical of EAE mice, in parallel with a reduction in the number and extent of cell aggregates present in the spinal cord which derived from cell infiltration to the CNS. These effects were completely reproduced by the treatment with Δ(9)-THC-BDS alone, but not by CBD-BDS alone which only delayed the onset of the disease without improving disease progression and reducing the cell infiltrates in the spinal cord. Next, we investigated the potential targets involved in the effects of Δ(9)-THC-BDS by selectively blocking CB(1) or PPAR-γ receptors, and we found a complete reversion of neurological benefits and the reduction in cell aggregates only with rimonabant, a selective CB(1) receptor antagonist. Collectively, our data support the therapeutic potential of Sativex as a phytocannabinoid formulation capable of attenuating EAE progression, and that the active compound was Δ(9)-THC-BDS acting through CB(1

  7. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned locomotion

  8. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation. To this end, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of either CB1 (Rimonabant, 3 mg/kg) or CB2 receptors (AM630, 3 mg/kg) would affect cell proliferation [the cells were labeled with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)] in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle and the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ). Additionally, we measured cell apoptosis (as monitored by the expression of cleaved caspase-3) and glial activation [by analyzing the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1] in the striatum and hippocampus during acute and repeated (4 days) cocaine administration (20 mg/kg). The results showed that acute cocaine exposure decreased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the SVZ and SGZ. In contrast, repeated cocaine exposure reduced the number of BrdU-ir cells only in the SVZ. Both acute and repeated cocaine exposure increased the number of cleaved caspase-3-, GFAP- and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus, and this effect was counteracted by AM630 or Rimonabant, which increased the number of BrdU-, GFAP-, and Iba1-ir cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that the changes in neurogenic, apoptotic and gliotic processes that were produced by repeated cocaine administration were normalized by pharmacological blockade of CB1 and CB2. The restorative effects of cannabinoid receptor blockade on hippocampal cell proliferation were associated with the prevention of the induction of conditioned

  9. Calculation of the phase diagrams of ferrimagnetic alloys A cB 1- c and application to transition metal-rare-earth Fe cGd 1- c and Fe cTb 1- c materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, M.; Virlouvet, A.; Khater, A.

    1999-07-01

    A theoretical model is presented for the calculation of the magnetic properties of generalised spin ferrimagnetic random substitutional alloys A cB 1- c with antiferromagnetic coupling between the A and B spin species. In particular, we study in an effective field method the phase diagrams of these systems as a function of the alloy concentration c, for given magnetic exchange constants. The model is applied with no adjustable parameters to the transition metal-rare-earth Fe cGd 1- c and Fe cTb 1- c alloys, using the appropriate spins for the Fe, Gd and Tb ions. We report a coherent and an overall qualitative agreement between theory and experiment in the complete range of concentrations 1⩾ c⩾0, for the first time to our knowledge, and determine consequently for these materials a set of ionic exchange constants that are invariant with respect to the alloy concentration. To our knowledge this is the first time that approximate but seemingly reliable exchange constants for the two alloys have been derived.

  10. Mise en évidence de deux nouvelles fonctions du système endocannabinoïde dans la physiopathologie de la stéatose hépatique : propriétés stéatogènes du récepteur CB2 et profibrogéniques du récepteur CB1

    OpenAIRE

    Deveaux, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    Les cannabinoïdes présents dans la marijuana agissent par l'intermédiaire de deux récepteurs, CB1 et CB2, qui sont également activés par des molécules endogènes, les endocannabinoïdes. Les récepteurs CB1, majoritairement exprimés dans le cerveau, relaient les effets psychoactifs du cannabis, mais exercent également de nombreux effets périphériques. Les récepteurs CB2 prédominent dans les cellules du système immunitaire et interviennent notamment dans la régulation de la réponse immune et infl...

  11. Dissociation between the panicolytic effect of cannabidiol microinjected into the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, and fear-induced antinociception elicited by bicuculline administration in deep layers of the superior colliculus: The role of CB1-cannabinoid receptor in the ventral mesencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Juliana Almeida; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Almada, Rafael Carvalho; de Souza Crippa, José Alexandre; Cecílio Hallak, Jaime Eduardo; Zuardi, Antônio Waldo; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-07-01

    Many studies suggest that the substantia nigra, pars reticulata (SNpr), a tegmental mesencephalic structure rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and cannabinoid receptor-containing neurons, is involved in the complex control of defensive responses through the neostriatum-nigral disinhibitory and nigro-tectal inhibitory GABAergic pathways during imminently dangerous situations. The aim of the present work was to investigate the role played by CB1-cannabinoid receptor of GABAergic pathways terminal boutons in the SNpr or of SNpr-endocannabinoid receptor-containing interneurons on the effect of intra-nigral microinjections of cannabidiol in the activity of nigro-tectal inhibitory pathways. GABAA receptor blockade in the deep layers of the superior colliculus (dlSC) elicited vigorous defensive behaviour. This explosive escape behaviour was followed by significant antinociception. Cannabidiol microinjection into the SNpr had a clear anti-aversive effect, decreasing the duration of defensive alertness, the frequency and duration of defensive immobility, and the frequency and duration of explosive escape behaviour, expressed by running and jumps, elicited by transitory GABAergic dysfunction in dlSC. However, the innate fear induced-antinociception was not significantly changed. The blockade of CB1 endocannabinoid receptor in the SNpr decreased the anti-aversive effect of canabidiol based on the frequency and duration of defensive immobility, the frequency of escape expressed by running, and both the frequency and duration of escape expressed by jumps. These findings suggest a CB1 mediated endocannabinoid signalling in cannabidiol modulation of panic-like defensive behaviour, but not of innate fear-induced antinociception evoked by GABAA receptor blockade with bicuculline microinjection into the superior colliculus, with a putative activity in nigro-collicular GABAergic pathways. PMID:25841876

  12. Polymorphisms in the endocannabinoid receptor 1 in relation to fat mass distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, M; Nielsen, T L; Wraae, K; Hagen, C; Piters, E; Beckers, S; De Freitas, F; Brixen, K; Van Hul, W; Andersen, M

    2010-01-01

    Both animal and human studies have associated the endocannabinoid system with obesity and markers of metabolic dysfunction. Blockade of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) caused weight loss and reduction in waist size in both obese and type II diabetics. Recent studies on common variants of the CB1...... receptor gene (CNR1) and the link to obesity have been conflicting. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether selected common variants of the CNR1 are associated with measures of obesity and fat distribution....

  13. Estudio teórico de endocanabinoides análogos a anandamida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos García Sánchez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available From computational methods, we studied a total of 90 reactions designed by the research group of AAUCTU pharmochemical aimed at determin- ing the possible synthesis and pharmacological activity of anandamide derivatives in Parkinson’s disease. We propose two types of reaction. In the first, part of arachidonic acid and is intended to replace the hydroxyl group by different species (14 in total. In the second part of an arylethanolamine structure in which substitutions are made position and functional group (16 in total. Each of the reactions is carried out under the influence of different media such as thionyl chloride, SOCl2-, NN-Diciclohexilcarboiimida-DCC-and-CH3CN-Acetonitrile. To deter- mine which of the proposed reaction pathways, provides the best con- ditions in terms of favorability, time and performance calculations were made AB-Initio and DFT (Density functional theory, using the 3-21G basis. The results confirm that 16 of the studied reactions are the most via- ble and calculations by DFT methodology are those with higher correla- tion between the theoretical and the experimental.

  14. Paper del receptor de cannabinoides 1 (CB1) a la Cirrosi experimental efecte del bloqueig de CB1 sobre les complicacions de la cirrosi

    OpenAIRE

    Òdena Garcia, Gemma

    2012-01-01

    Descripció del recurs: el 01 setembre 2012 La cirrosi és una malaltia crònica, difusa i considerada irreversible, caracteritzada per l'alteració de l'arquitectura vascular hepàtica provocada pel reemplaçament del teixit parenquimàtic per teixit fibròtic, així com per l'aparició de nòduls de regeneració. Aquesta destrucció del teixit hepàtic i la seva substitució per teixit fibrós provoca un augment marcat de la resistència al flux de la vena porta, així com una greu alteració de la funció ...

  15. Hybrid inhibitor of peripheral cannabinoid-1 receptors and inducible nitric oxide synthase mitigates liver fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyi; Cao, Zongxian; Jourdan, Tony; Erdelyi, Katalin; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Szanda, Gergő; Liu, Jie; Park, Joshua K.; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Rosenberg, Avi Z.; Liow, Jeih-San; Lorenz, Robin G.; Pacher, Pal; Innis, Robert B.; Kunos, George

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis, a consequence of chronic liver injury and a way station to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, lacks effective treatment. Endocannabinoids acting via cannabinoid-1 receptors (CB1R) induce profibrotic gene expression and promote pathologies that predispose to liver fibrosis. CB1R antagonists produce opposite effects, but their therapeutic development was halted due to neuropsychiatric side effects. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) also promotes liver fibrosis and its underlying pathologies, but iNOS inhibitors tested to date showed limited therapeutic efficacy in inflammatory diseases. Here, we introduce a peripherally restricted, orally bioavailable CB1R antagonist, which accumulates in liver to release an iNOS inhibitory leaving group. In mouse models of fibrosis induced by CCl4 or bile duct ligation, the hybrid CB1R/iNOS antagonist surpassed the antifibrotic efficacy of the CB1R antagonist rimonabant or the iNOS inhibitor 1400W, without inducing anxiety-like behaviors or CB1R occupancy in the CNS. The hybrid inhibitor also targeted CB1R-independent, iNOS-mediated profibrotic pathways, including increased PDGF, Nlrp3/Asc3, and integrin αvβ6 signaling, as judged by its ability to inhibit these pathways in cnr1−/− but not in nos2−/− mice. Additionally, it was able to slow fibrosis progression and to attenuate established fibrosis. Thus, dual-target peripheral CB1R/iNOS antagonists have therapeutic potential in liver fibrosis.

  16. Adolescent social rejection alters pain processing in a CB1 receptor dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Peggy; Pätz, Monique; Spanagel, Rainer; Schneider, Miriam

    2016-07-01

    Experiences of social rejection represent a major source of distress and in particular peer rejection during adolescence has been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Moreover, experimentally induced acute social rejection alters pain perception in humans, implicating overlapping neurocircuits for social and physical pains. We recently demonstrated that rearing of adolescent Wistar rats with inadequate, less playful play partners (Fischer 344) persistently decreases pain sensitivity, although the detailed mechanisms mediating the aversiveness during the social encounter remained unsettled. With the present study we examined the behavioral performance during acute interaction of female adolescent Wistar rats with either age-matched same-strain partners or rats from the Fischer 344 strain. We here identify the low responsiveness upon playful attacks, which appears to be characteristic for social play in the Fischer 344 strain, as one of the main aversive components for adolescent Wistar animals during cross-strain encounters, which subsequently diminishes thermal pain reactivity. A detailed behavioral analysis further revealed increased ultrasonic vocalization at 50kHz and an increased frequency of playful attacks for adolescent Wistar animals paired with a Fischer 344 rat compared to same-strain control pairs. Finally, an acute injection of a subthreshold dose of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist SR141716 before the social encounter abolished enhanced play-soliciting behavior in Wistar/Fischer 344 pairs as well as the behavioral consequences of the rejection experience in adolescent Wistar rats, further emphasizing an important modulatory role of the endocannabinoid system in mediating the effects of social behavior and social pain. PMID:27157075

  17. COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF CHLOPYRIFOS IN WILD TYPE AND CANNABINIOID CB1 RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in ti...

  18. Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

  19. SIR-C/X-SAR data calibration and ground truth campaign over the NASA-CB1 test-site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the Space Shuttle Endeavour mission in October 1994, a remote-sensing campaign was carried out with the objectives of both radiometric and polarimetric calibration and ground truth data acquisition of bare soils. This paper presents the results obtained in the experiment. Polarimetric cross-talk and channel imbalance values, as well as radiometric calibration parameters, have been found to be within the science requirements for SAR images. Regarding ground truth measurements, a wide spread in the height rms values and correlation lengths has been observed, which was motivated a critical revisiting of surface parameters descriptors

  20. New horizons on the role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in palatable food intake, obesity and related dysmetabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristino, L; Palomba, L; Di Marzo, V

    2014-01-01

    Excessive consumption of high-energy, palatable food contributes to obesity, which results in the metabolic syndrome, heart disease, type-2 diabetes and death. Current knowledge on the function of the hypothalamus as the brain ‘feeding centre' recognizes this region as the main regulator of body weight in the central nervous system. Because of their intrinsically fast and adaptive activities, feeding-controlling neural circuitries are endowed with synaptic plasticity modulated by neurotransmitters and hormones that act at different hierarchical levels of integration. In the hypothalamus, among the chemical mediators involved in this integration, endocannabinoids (eCBs) are ideal candidates for the fast (that is, non-genomic), stress-related fine-tuning of neuronal functions. In this article, we overview the role of the eCB system (ECS) in the control of energy intake, and particularly in the consumption of high-energy, palatable food, and discuss how such a role is affected in the brain by changes in the levels of feeding-regulated hormones, such as the adipose tissue-derived anorexigenic mediator leptin, as well as by high-fat diets. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuronal control of feeding behaviours by eCBs offers many potential opportunities for novel therapeutic approaches against obesity. Highlights of the latest advances in the development of strategies that minimize central ECS overactivity in ‘western diet'-driven obesity are discussed.

  1. Methanandamide attenuates cocaine-induced hyperthermia in rats by a cannabinoid CB1-dopamine D2 receptor mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Bruce A.; Kim, Esther; Unterwald, Ellen M.; Rawls, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    Evidence implicates anandamide in dopamine-related cocaine function. In the present study, we investigated the effect of methanandamide (5 mg/kg, i.p.), a stable anandamide analog, on the hyperthermia and hyperactivity induced by a fixed dose of cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). Cocaine administered to rats produced hyperthermia and hyperactivity whereas methanandamide was ineffective. For combined administration, methanandamide attenuated the hyperthermia, but not hyperactivity, induced by cocaine. ...

  2. C-B1-03: The Association of Optimal Lifestyle Adherence with Emotional Health Indicators Among Active Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Kottke, Thomas; Pronk, Nico

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims: Adherence to an optimal lifestyle defined as adequate physical activity (=150 minutes per week), no use of tobacco, moderate alcohol use (=1 drink/d for women or =2 drinks/d for men), and eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day has been associated with as much as 14 years of increased longevity and improved functional health status. Unfortunately, adherence to these four behaviors is relatively low in the United States. Furthermore, it is unclear the extent ...

  3. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 mediates baseline and activity-induced survival of new neurons in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Müller Anke; Tauber Svantje; Ramirez-Rodriguez Gerardo; Leal-Galicia Perla; Fabel Klaus; Bick-Sander Anika; Wolf Susanne A; Melnik Andre; Waltinger Tim P; Ullrich Oliver; Kempermann Gerd

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis is a particular example of brain plasticity that is partially modulated by the endocannabinoid system. Whereas the impact of synthetic cannabinoids on the neuronal progenitor cells has been described, there has been lack of information about the action of plant-derived extracts on neurogenesis. Therefore we here focused on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) fed to female C57Bl/6 and Nestin-GFP-reporter mice on proliferatio...

  4. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists do not decrease, but may increase, acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen eZheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus has been suggested to arise from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory areas of the brain and anti-epileptic drugs are sometimes used to provide relief from tinnitus. Recently, the anti-epileptic properties of the cannabinoid drugs have gained increasing interest; however, the use of cannabinoids as a form of treatment for tinnitus is controversial. In the present study, we tested whether a combination of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC and cannabidiol (CBD, delivered in a 1:1 ratio, could affect tinnitus perception in a rat model of acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus. Following sham treatment or acoustic trauma, the animals were divided into the following groups: 1 sham (i.e. no acoustic trauma with vehicle treatment; 2 sham with drug treatment (i.e. delta-9-THC + CBD; 3 acoustic trauma-exposed exhibiting tinnitus, with drug treatment; and 4 acoustic trauma-exposed exhibiting no tinnitus, with drug treatment. The animals received either the vehicle or the cannabinoid drugs every day, 30 min before the tinnitus behavioural testing. Acoustic trauma caused a significant increase in the auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds in the exposed animals, indicating hearing loss; however, there was a partial recovery over 6 months. Acoustic trauma did not always result in tinnitus; however among those that did exhibit tinnitus, some of them had tinnitus at multiple frequencies while others had it only at a single frequency. The cannabinoids significantly increased the number of tinnitus animals in the exposed-tinnitus group, but not in the sham group. The results suggest that cannabinoids may promote the development of tinnitus, especially when there is pre-existing hearing damage.

  5. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization in guinea-pig carotid, rat mesenteric and porcine coronary arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Chataigneau, T; Félétou, M; Thollon, C; N. Villeneuve; Vilaine, J- P; Duhault, J; Vanhoutte, P M

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether or not the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations of the vascular smooth muscle cells (observed in the presence of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase and cyclo-oxygenase) can be attributed to the production of an endogenous cannabinoid.Membrane potential was recorded in the guinea-pig carotid, rat mesenteric and porcine coronary arteries by intracellular microelectrodes.In the rat mesenteric artery, the cannabinoid receptor antagoni...

  6. Preparation of iodine-123 labeled AM251: a potential SPECT radioligand for the brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the synthesis and labeling with iodine-123 of N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251). This compound is an analog of the recently described cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716A, in which a 4-chlorophenyl group is replaced by 4-iodophenyl. Labeling in good yield (62%) and radiochemical purity (> 95%), and high specific activity (> 2500 Ci/mmol) was achieved by an iododestannylation reaction using the tributyltin precursor, no carrier added I-123 iodide, and chloramine-T. (author)

  7. SIR-C/X-SAR data calibration and ground truth campaign over the NASA-CB1 test-site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notarnicola, C.; Posa, F.; Refice, A.; Sergi, R.; Smacchia, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia and Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Bari (Italy); Casarano, D. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Rotondella, MT (Italy); De Carolis, G.; Mattia, F. [Istituto di Tecnologia Informatica Spaziale-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Centro di Geodesia Spaziale G. Colombo, Terlecchia, MT (Italy); Schena, V.D. [Alenia Spazio, Rome (Italy)

    2001-02-01

    During the Space Shuttle Endeavour mission in October 1994, a remote-sensing campaign was carried out with the objectives of both radiometric and polarimetric calibration and ground truth data acquisition of bare soils. This paper presents the results obtained in the experiment. Polarimetric cross-talk and channel imbalance values, as well as radiometric calibration parameters, have been found to be within the science requirements for SAR images. Regarding ground truth measurements, a wide spread in the height rms values and correlation lengths has been observed, which was motivated a critical revisiting of surface parameters descriptors.

  8. CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors Increase Neuronal Precursor Proliferation through AKT/Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β/β-Catenin Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Trazzi, Stefania; Steger, Martin; Mitrugno, Valentina Maria; Bartesaghi, Renata; Ciani, Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of many physiological effects in the central and peripheral nervous system. Recent findings have demonstrated the presence of a functional endocannabinoid system within neuronal progenitors located in the hippocampus and ventricular/subventricular zone that participates in the regulation of cell proliferation. It is presently unknown whether the endocannabinoid system exerts a widespread effect on neuronal precursors from different neur...

  9. Preparation of iodine-123 labeled AM251: a potential SPECT radioligand for the brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Ruoxi; Makriyannis, Alexandros [Connecticut Univ., Molecular and Cell Biology Dept., Storrs, CT (United States); Gatley, S.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Medical Dept., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    We report the synthesis and labeling with iodine-123 of N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251). This compound is an analog of the recently described cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716A, in which a 4-chlorophenyl group is replaced by 4-iodophenyl. Labeling in good yield (62%) and radiochemical purity (> 95%), and high specific activity (> 2500 Ci/mmol) was achieved by an iododestannylation reaction using the tributyltin precursor, no carrier added I-123 iodide, and chloramine-T. (author).

  10. New horizons on the role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in palatable food intake, obesity and related dysmetabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristino, L; Palomba, L; Di Marzo, V

    2014-07-01

    Excessive consumption of high-energy, palatable food contributes to obesity, which results in the metabolic syndrome, heart disease, type-2 diabetes and death. Current knowledge on the function of the hypothalamus as the brain 'feeding centre' recognizes this region as the main regulator of body weight in the central nervous system. Because of their intrinsically fast and adaptive activities, feeding-controlling neural circuitries are endowed with synaptic plasticity modulated by neurotransmitters and hormones that act at different hierarchical levels of integration. In the hypothalamus, among the chemical mediators involved in this integration, endocannabinoids (eCBs) are ideal candidates for the fast (that is, non-genomic), stress-related fine-tuning of neuronal functions. In this article, we overview the role of the eCB system (ECS) in the control of energy intake, and particularly in the consumption of high-energy, palatable food, and discuss how such a role is affected in the brain by changes in the levels of feeding-regulated hormones, such as the adipose tissue-derived anorexigenic mediator leptin, as well as by high-fat diets. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuronal control of feeding behaviours by eCBs offers many potential opportunities for novel therapeutic approaches against obesity. Highlights of the latest advances in the development of strategies that minimize central ECS overactivity in 'western diet'-driven obesity are discussed. PMID:27152162

  11. Gene : CBRC-HSAP-06-0074 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-06-0074 6 A Cannabinoids receptors CB1b CNR1_PANTR 0.0 100% ref|NP_057167.2| central c ... o sapiens] emb|CAB96726.1| cannabinoid receptor 1 (brain ) [Homo sapiens] gb|AAO67710.1| cannabinoid recepto ... mo sapiens] gb|AAI00970.1| Cannabinoid receptor 1 (brain ) [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI00971.1| Cannabinoid recepto ... r 1 (brain ) [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI00969.1| Cannabinoid recepto ... r 1 (brain ) [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW48574.1| cannabinoid recepto ...

  12. Effects of chronic exercise on the endocannabinoid system in Wistar rats with high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamelin, François-Xavier; Aucouturier, Julien; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Mazzarella, Enrico; Aveta, Teresa; Leriche, Melissa; Dupont, Erwan; Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Montel, Valérie; Bastide, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Heyman, Elsa

    2016-06-01

    The endocannabinoid system is dysregulated during obesity in tissues involved in the control of food intake and energy metabolism. We examined the effect of chronic exercise on the tissue levels of endocannabinoids (eCBs) and on the expression of genes coding for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) (Cnr1 and Cnr2, respectively) in the subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissues and in the soleus and extensor digitorim longus (EDL) muscles, in rats fed with standard or high-fat diet. Twenty-eight male Wistar rats were placed on high-fat diet or standard diet (HFD and Ctl groups, respectively) during 12 weeks whereafter half of each group was submitted to an exercise training period of 12 weeks (HFD + training and Ctl + training). Tissue levels of eCBs were measured by LC-MS while expressions of genes coding for CB1 and CB2 receptors were investigated by qPCR. High-fat diet induced an increase in anandamide (AEA) levels in soleus and EDL (p < 0.02). In soleus of the HFD group, these changes were accompanied by elevated Cnr1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels (p < 0.05). In EDL, exercise training allowed to reduce significantly this diet-induced AEA increase (p < 0.005). 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) levels were decreased and increased by high-fat diet in SAT and EDL, respectively (p < 0.04), but not affected by exercise training. Unlike the HFD + training group, 2-AG levels in soleus were also decreased in the HFD group compared to Ctl (p < 0.04). The levels of eCBs and Cnr1 expression are altered in a tissue-specific manner following a high-fat diet, and chronic exercise reverses some of these alterations. PMID:26880264

  13. CB-1 receptors modulate the effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram on extracellular serotonin levels in the rat prefrontal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, Jelle; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.; Hofland, Corry M.; Westerink, Ben H. C.

    2011-01-01

    A large percentage of depressed individuals use drugs of abuse, like cannabis. This study investigates the impact of cannabis on the pharmacological effects of the antidepressant citalopram. Using microdialysis in the prefrontal cortex of rats we monitored serotonin levels before and after cannabino

  14. Creep-fatigue interaction of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-2Cb-1Ta-0.8Mo at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, H. P.; Mcdonald, B. A.; Arora, O. P.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the mutual influence of creep and fatigue in the case of Ti-6211, which represents a new weldable, stress-corrosion resistant alloy. Attention is given to the effect of creep on fatigue, the effect of fatigue on creep, and microstructural studies. It is found that prior creep in the amounts investigated, from 0.2 percent to 2.7 percent, is beneficial to low-cycle fatigue life. Hold time at peak strain is found to be beneficial to low-cycle fatigue life. Hold time at constant stress has no effect on low-cycle fatigue when specimens are cycled only once between hold times; but increasing fatigue loading for 50 or more cycles between hold times can prolong the fatigue life. There is an acceleration of creep by cyclic loading when comparison of cyclic and static creep is based on mean stress.

  15. Human lung-resident macrophages express CB1 and CB2 receptors whose activation inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiano, Rosaria I; Loffredo, Stefania; Borriello, Francesco; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Orlando, Pierangelo; Secondo, Agnese; Granata, Francescopaolo; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Varricchi, Gilda; Santini, Mario; Triggiani, Massimo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Marone, Gianni

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are pivotal effector cells in immune responses and tissue remodeling by producing a wide spectrum of mediators, including angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 has been suggested as a new strategy to modulate angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We investigated whether human lung-resident macrophages express a complete endocannabinoid system by assessing their production of endocannabinoids and expression of cannabinoid receptors. Unstimulated human lung macrophage produce 2-arachidonoylglycerol,N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine,N-palmitoyl-ethanolamine, andN-oleoyl-ethanolamine. On LPS stimulation, human lung macrophages selectively synthesize 2-arachidonoylglycerol in a calcium-dependent manner. Human lung macrophages express cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2, and their activation induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species generation. Cannabinoid receptor activation by the specific synthetic agonists ACEA and JWH-133 (but not the endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol) markedly inhibits LPS-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and angiopoietins and modestly affects IL-6 secretion. No significant modulation of TNF-α or IL-8/CXCL8 release was observed. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A by human monocyte-derived macrophages is not modulated by activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2. Given the prominent role of macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling in many tumors, we identified the expression of cannabinoid receptors in lung cancer-associated macrophages. Our results demonstrate that cannabinoid receptor activation selectively inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors from human lung macrophage but not from monocyte-derived macrophages. Activation of cannabinoid receptors on tissue-resident macrophages might be a novel strategy to modulate macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling in cancer and chronic inflammation. PMID:26467187

  16. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors fail to cause relaxation, but couple via Gi/Go to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in carotid artery smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Holland, Michael; Challiss, R. A. John; Standen, Nicholas B.; Boyle, John P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize which cannabinoid receptors, if any, are present on rat carotid artery smooth muscle. Additionally, the effects of cannabinoids on carotid artery tone, on cyclic AMP accumulation and on forskolin-induced relaxation were examined in the same tissue.Stimulation of carotid arteries with forskolin (10 μM) significantly increased cyclic AMP accumulation, an effect that was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the cannabinoid receptor ago...

  17. Kannabinoid tip 1 reseptör (CB1) ve terapötik yaklaşımlara genel bakış-I

    OpenAIRE

    Çınar, Reşat; Gündüz Çınar, Özge

    2011-01-01

    Although marihuana has been used for many years, clarifications on its biological mechanisms are still going on. Δ9-Tetrahidrokannabinol (THC) the psychoactive component of marihuana, synthetic analogs and endogenous lipid derivatives bind to cannabinoid receptor. The endocannabinoid system is very important in the pathophysiological conditions due to their role for regulation of the homeostasis mainly in the central nervous system and the periphery. The endocannabinoid system and its therape...

  18. Characterization of a shortened model of diet alternation in female rats: effects of the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant on food intake and anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasio, Angelo; Rice, Kenner C; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of eating disorders and obesity in western societies is epidemic and increasing in severity. Preclinical research has focused on the development of animal models that can mimic the maladaptive patterns of food intake observed in certain forms of eating disorders and obesity. This study was aimed at characterizing a recently established model of palatable diet alternation in female rats. For this purpose, females rats were fed either continuously with a regular chow diet (Chow/Chow) or intermittently with a regular chow diet for 2 days and a palatable, high-sucrose diet for 1 day (Chow/Palatable). Following diet cycling, rats were administered rimonabant (0, 0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg intraperitoneally) during access to either palatable diet or chow diet and were assessed for food intake and body weight. Finally, rats were pretreated with rimonabant (0, 3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and tested in the elevated plus maze during withdrawal from the palatable diet. Female rats with alternating access to palatable food cycled their intake, overeating during access to the palatable diet and undereating upon returning to the regular chow diet. Rimonabant treatment resulted in increased chow hypophagia and anxiety-like behavior in Chow/Palatable rats. No effect of drug treatment was observed on the compulsive eating of palatable food in the diet-cycled rats. The results of this study suggest that withdrawal from alternating access to the palatable diet makes individuals vulnerable to the anxiogenic effects of rimonabant and provides etiological factors potentially responsible for the emergence of severe psychiatric side-effects following rimonabant treatment in obese patients. PMID:25011007

  19. Novel mGluR- and CB1R-independent suppression of GABA release caused by a contaminant of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, DHPG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Lafourcade

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are ubiquitous throughout the body, especially in brain, where they mediate numerous effects. MGluRs are classified into groups of which group I, comprising mGluRs 1 and 5, is especially important in neuronal communication. Group I actions are often investigated with the selective agonist, S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG. Despite the selectivity of DHPG, its use has often led to contradictory findings. We now report that a particular commercial preparation of DHPG can produce mGluR-independent effects. These findings may help reconcile some discrepant reports. METHODS: We carried out electrophysiological recordings in the rat in vitro hippocampal slice preparation, focusing mainly on pharmacologically isolated GABA(A-receptor-mediated synaptic currents. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While preparations of DHPG from three companies suppressed GABAergic transmission in an mGluR-dependent way, one batch had an additional, unusual effect. Even in the presence of antagonists of mGluRs, it caused a reversible, profound suppression of inhibitory transmission. This mGluR-independent action was not due to a higher potency of the compound, or its ability to cause endocannabinoid-dependent responses. Field potential recordings revealed that glutamatergic transmission was not affected, and quantal analysis of GABA transmission confirmed the unusual effect was on GABA release, and not GABA(A receptors. We have not identified the responsible factor in the DHPG preparation, but the samples were 99% pure as determined by HPLC and NMR analyses. CONCLUSIONS: In certain respects our observations with the anomalous batch strikingly resemble some published reports of unusual DHPG effects. The present findings could therefore contribute to explaining discrepancies in the literature. DHPG is widely employed to study mGluRs in different systems, hence rigorous controls should be performed before conclusions based on its use are drawn.

  20. Cannabinoid regulation of brain reward processing with an emphasis on the role of CB1 receptors: a step back into the future

    OpenAIRE

    George ePanagis; Brian eMackey; Styliani eVlachou

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the endocannabinoid system has been implicated in a large variety of functions, including a crucial modulation of brain reward circuits and the regulation of motivational processes. Importantly, behavioural studies have shown that cannabinoid compounds activate brain reward mechanisms and circuits in a similar manner to other drugs of abuse, such as nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and heroin, although the conditions under which cannabinoids exert their rewarding effects may b...

  1. Polymorphisms in the endocannabinoid receptor 1 in relation to fat mass distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Frost; Nielsen, T L; Wraae, K;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Both animal and human studies have associated the endocannabinoid system with obesity and markers of metabolic dysfunction. Blockade of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) caused weight loss and reduction in waist size in both obese and type II diabetics. Recent studies on common variants......806381, rs10485179 and rs1049353 were genotyped, and body fat and fat distribution were assessed by the use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging in a population-based study comprising of 783 Danish men, aged 20-29 years. RESULTS: The rs806381 polymorphism was significantly...... associated with visceral fat mass (FM) only, whereas the rs1049353 was significantly and directly associated with visceral and intermuscular FM. None of the SNPs analysed were associated with total body FM or subcutaneous FM. CONCLUSION: The results point towards a link between common variants of the CNR1...

  2. Pharmacological blockade of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) alters neural proliferation, apoptosis and gliosis in the rat hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum in a negative energy context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Patricia; Bindila, Laura; Pastor, Antoni; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; de la Torre, Rafael; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids participate in the control of neurogenesis, neural cell death and gliosis. The pharmacological effect of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which limits the endocannabinoid degradation, was investigated in the present study. Cell proliferation (phospho-H3(+) or BrdU(+) cells) of the main adult neurogenic zones as well as apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3(+)), astroglia (GFAP(+)), and microglia (Iba1(+) cells) were analyzed in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum of rats intraperitoneally treated with URB597 (0.3 mg/kg/day) at one dose/4-days resting or 5 doses (1 dose/day). Repeated URB597 treatment increased the plasma levels of the N-acylethanolamines oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide and arachidonoylethanolamine, reduced the plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, and induced a transitory body weight decrease. The hippocampi of repeated URB597-treated rats showed a reduced number of phospho-H3(+) and BrdU(+) subgranular cells as well as GFAP(+), Iba1(+) and cleaved caspase-3(+) cells, which was accompanied with decreased hippocampal expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene Cnr1 and Faah. In the hypothalami of these rats, the number of phospho-H3(+), GFAP(+) and 3-weeks-old BrdU(+) cells was specifically decreased. The reduced striatal expression of CB1 receptor in repeated URB597-treated rats was only associated with a reduced apoptosis. In contrast, the striatum of acute URB597-treated rats showed an increased number of subventricular proliferative, astroglial and apoptotic cells, which was accompanied with increased Faah expression. Main results indicated that FAAH inhibitor URB597 decreased neural proliferation, glia and apoptosis in a brain region-dependent manner, which were coupled to local changes in Faah and/or Cnr1 expression and a negative energy context. PMID:25870539

  3. Epigenetic and Proteomic Expression Changes Promoted by Eating Addictive-Like Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancino, Samantha; Burokas, Aurelijus; Gutiérrez-Cuesta, Javier; Gutiérrez-Martos, Miriam; Martín-García, Elena; Pucci, Mariangela; Falconi, Anastasia; D'Addario, Claudio; Maccarrone, Mauro; Maldonado, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    An increasing perspective conceptualizes obesity and overeating as disorders related to addictive-like processes that could share common neurobiological mechanisms. In the present study, we aimed at validating an animal model of eating addictive-like behavior in mice, based on the DSM-5 substance use disorder criteria, using operant conditioning maintained by highly palatable chocolate-flavored pellets. For this purpose, we evaluated persistence of food-seeking during a period of non-availability of food, motivation for food, and perseverance of responding when the reward was associated with a punishment. This model has allowed identifying extreme subpopulations of mice related to addictive-like behavior. We investigated in these subpopulations the epigenetic and proteomic changes. A significant decrease in DNA methylation of CNR1 gene promoter was revealed in the prefrontal cortex of addict-like mice, which was associated with an upregulation of CB1 protein expression in the same brain area. The pharmacological blockade (rimonabant 3 mg/kg; i.p.) of CB1 receptor during the late training period reduced the percentage of mice that accomplished addiction criteria, which is in agreement with the reduced performance of CB1 knockout mice in this operant training. Proteomic studies have identified proteins differentially expressed in mice vulnerable or not to addictive-like behavior in the hippocampus, striatum, and prefrontal cortex. These changes included proteins involved in impulsivity-like behavior, synaptic plasticity, and cannabinoid signaling modulation, such as alpha-synuclein, phosphatase 1-alpha, doublecortin-like kinase 2, and diacylglycerol kinase zeta, and were validated by immunoblotting. This model provides an excellent tool to investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the vulnerability to develop eating addictive-like behavior. PMID:25944409

  4. Prophylactic Tetracycline Does Not Diminish the Severity of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Inhibitor Induced Rash: Results from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (Supplementary N03CB)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Aminah; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Kugler, John W.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Novotny, Paul J.; Wender, Donald B.; Gross, Howard M.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previous studies suggest tetracycline and other antibiotics lessen the severity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor-induced rash. This study sought to confirm such findings. METHODS Patients starting an EGFR inhibitor were eligible for this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study and had to be rash-free. They were then randomly assigned to tetracycline 500 milligrams orally twice a day for 28 days versus a placebo. Rash development and severity (monthly physician assessment and weekly patient-reported questionnaires), quality of life (SKINDEX-16), and adverse events were monitored during the 4-week intervention and then for an additional 4 weeks. The primary objective was to compare the incidence of grade 2 or worse rash between study arms; 32 patients per group provided a 90% probability of detecting a 40% difference in incidence with a type I error rate of 0.05 (2-sided). RESULTS 65 patients were enrolled, and groups were balanced on baseline characteristics. During the first 4 weeks, healthcare provider-reported data found that 27 tetracycline-treated patients (82%) and 24 placebo-exposed patients (75%) developed a rash. This rash was a grade 2+ in 17 (52%) and 14 (44%), respectively (p=0.62). Comparable grade 2+ rash rates were observed during weeks 5 through 8 as well as with patient-reported rash data throughout the study period. Quality of life was comparable across study arms, and tetracycline was well tolerated. CONCLUSION Although previous studies suggest otherwise, this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled did not find that tetracycline lessened rash incidence or severity in patients who were taking EGFR inhibitors. PMID:20820817

  5. Tetracycline to Prevent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor-Induced Skin Rashes: Results of a Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N03CB)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Aminah; Rowland, Kendrith; Sloan, Jeff A.; Gross, Howard M.; Fishkin, Paul A.; Kahanic, Stephen P.; Novotny, Paul J.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Johnson, David B.; Tschetter, Loren K.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors are effective cancer therapies, but they cause a rash in greater than 50% of patients. This study tested tetracycline for rash prevention. METHODS This placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial enrolled patients who were starting cancer treatment with an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor. Patients could not have had a rash at enrollment. All were randomly assigned to either tetracycline 500 milligrams orally twice a day for 28 days versus a placebo. Patients were monitored for rash (monthly physician assessment and weekly patient-reported questionnaires), quality of life (SKINDEX-16), and adverse events. Monitoring occurred during the 4-week intervention and then for an additional 4 weeks. The primary objective was to compare the incidence of rash between study arms, and 30 patients per arm provided a 90% probability of detecting a 40% difference in incidence with a p-value of 0.05 (2-sided). RESULTS Sixty-one evaluable patients were enrolled, and arms were well balanced on baseline characteristics, rates of drop out, and rates of discontinuation of the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor. Rash incidence was comparable across arms. Physicians reported that 16 tetracycline-treated patients (70%) and 22 placebo-exposed patients (76%) developed a rash (p=0.61). Tetracycline appears to have lessened rash severity, although high drop out rates invite caution in interpreting findings. By week 4, physician-reported grade 2 rash occurred in 17% of tetracycline-treated patients (n=4) and in 55% of placebo-exposed patients (n=16); (p=0.04). Tetracycline-treated patients reported better scores, as per the SKINDEX-16, on certain quality of life parameters, such as skin burning or stinging, skin irritation, and being bothered by a persistence/recurrence of a skin condition. Adverse events were comparable across arms. CONCLUSION Tetracycline did not prevent epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-induced rashes and cannot be clinically recommended for this purpose. However, preliminary observations of diminished rash severity and improved quality of life suggest this antibiotic merits further study. PMID:18543329

  6. Bisphenol A Induces Fatty Liver by an Endocannabinoid-Mediated Positive Feedback Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, Andrea; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Maradonna, Francesca; Gioacchini, Giorgia; Allarà, Marco; Radaelli, Giuseppe; Overby, Darryl R; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Carnevali, Oliana

    2016-05-01

    The xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA) is a widespread plasticizer detectable within several ecosystems. BPA is considered a metabolic disruptor, affecting different organs; however, little is known about its mechanism of action in the liver, in which it triggers triglyceride accumulation. Adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to BPA developed hepatosteatosis, which was associated with an increase in the liver levels of the obesogenic endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide and a concomitant decrease in palmitoylethanolamide. These changes were associated with variations in the expression of key endocannabinoid catabolic and metabolic enzymes and an increase in the expression of the endocannabinoid receptor cnr1. Acute and chronic in vitro treatments with nano- and micromolar BPA doses showed increased anandamide levels in line with decreased activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase, the main anandamide hydrolytic enzyme, and induced triglyceride accumulation in HHL-5 cells in a CB1-dependent manner. We conclude that BPA is able to produce hepatosteatosis in zebrafish and human hepatocytes by up-regulating the endocannabinoid system. PMID:27014939

  7. Relation of C358A polymorphism of the endocannabinoid degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH with obesity and insulin resistance Relación del polimorfismo C358A del enzima del sistema endocanabinoide (hidrolasa amida acida con la obesidad y la resistencia a la insulina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. de Luis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Recently, it has been demonstrated that the polymorphism 385 C->A of FAAH (fatty acid amide hydrolase was associated with overweight and obesity. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship of missense polymorphism (cDNA 385 C-A of FAAH gene on obesity anthropometric parameters, cardiovascular risk factors and adipocytokines. Methods: A population of 279 females with obesity (body mass index 30 was analyzed. An indirect calorimetry, tetrapolar electrical bioimpedance, blood pressure, a serial assessment of nutritional intake with 3 days written food records and biochemical analysis (lipid profile, adipocytokines, insulin, CRP and lipoprotein-a were performed. The statistical analysis was performed for the combined C385A and A385A as a group and wild type C385C as second group. Results: One hundred and ninety four patients (69.5% had the genotype C385C (wild type group and 76 (27.2% patients had the genotype C358A or A358A (9 patients, 3.2% (mutant type group. No differences were detected between groups in anthropometric parameters and dietary intakes. Triglycerides (118.9 ± 59.9 mg/dl vs 107.4 + 51.3 mg/dl;p Antecedentes y objetivos: Recientemente, se ha demostrado que el polimorfismo 385 C/A, de FAAH (hidrolasa amida de ácidos grasos se asocia con el sobrepeso y la obesidad. El objetivo de nuestro estudio fue investigar la relación de este polimorfismo del gen de FAAH con parámetros antropométricos, factores de riesgo cardiovascular y adipocitoquinas. Métodos: Una población de 279 mujeres con obesidad (índice de masa corporal> 30 fue analizada. Se realizaron las siguientes determinaciones; calorimetría indirecta, bioimpedancia eléctrica, presión arterial, una evaluación de la ingesta nutricional de 3 días, así como un análisis bioquímico (perfil lipídico, adipocitoquinas, insulina, proteina C reactiva y lipoproteína-(a. El análisis estadístico se realizó combinando C385A y A385A como grupo mutante y C385C como grupo salvaje. Resultados: Un total de 194 pacientes (69,5% tenían el genotipo C385C (genotipo salvaje y 76 (27,2% pacientes tenían el genotipo C358A y 9 pacientes (3,2% el genotipo A358A, formando estos dos el grupo de genotipo mutante. No se detectaron diferencias entre los grupos en los parámetros antropométricos y la ingesta dietética. Sin embargo los pacientes con genotipo salvaje presentaron valores más elevado de triglicéridos (118,9 ± 59,9 mg/dl vs 107,4 + 51,3 mg/dl; p < 0,05, glucosa (100,4 ± 19,9 mg/dl vs 94,8 + 11,5mg/dl; p < 0,05, HOMA (3,74 ± 2,2 vs 3,39 + 2,7; p < 0,05 y de interleukina-6 (3,3 ± 1,4 pg/ml vs 1,4 ± 2,1 pg/ml; p < 0,05 fueron mayores en el grupo de tipo salvaje que el grupo de tipo mutante. Conclusión: El principal hallazgo de este trabajo es la asociación del genotipo mutante (A358C y A358A de FAAH con un mejor perfil cardiovascular (triglicéridos, glucosa, interleucina 6 y HOMA que los pacientes portadores del genotipo salvaje.

  8. Neuron-type specific cannabinoid-mediated G protein signalling in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindel, Frauke; Lerner, Raissa; Häring, Martin; Ruehle, Sabine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Monory, Krisztina

    2013-03-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is expressed in different neuronal populations in the mammalian brain. In particular, CB1 on GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons exerts different functions and display different pharmacological properties in vivo. This suggests the existence of neuron-type specific signalling pathways activated by different subpopulations of CB1. In this study, we analysed CB1 expression, binding and signalling in the hippocampus of conditional mutant mice, bearing CB1 deletion in GABAergic (GABA-CB1-KO mice) or cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1-KO mice). Compared to their wild-type littermates, Glu-CB1-KO displayed a small decrease of CB1 mRNA amount, immunoreactivity and [³H]CP55,940 binding. Conversely, GABA-CB1-KO mice showed a drastic reduction of these parameters, confirming that CB1 is present at much higher density on hippocampal GABAergic interneurons than glutamatergic neurons. Surprisingly, however, saturation analysis of HU210-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγS binding demonstrated that 'glutamatergic' CB1 is more efficiently coupled to G protein signalling than 'GABAergic' CB1. Thus, the minority of CB1 on glutamatergic neurons is paradoxically several fold more strongly coupled to G protein signalling than 'GABAergic' CB1. This selective signalling mechanism raises the possibility of designing novel cannabinoid ligands that differentially activate only a subset of physiological effects of CB1 stimulation, thereby optimizing therapeutic action. PMID:23289830

  9. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Koolman, Anniek H; de Boer, Pieter T; Bos, Trijnie; Bleeker, Aycha; Bloks, Vincent W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/-) mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods: We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and q...

  10. Antagonism of Dopamine Receptor 2 Long Affects Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Signaling in a Cell Culture Model of Striatal Medium Spiny Projection Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagher, Amina M; Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2016-06-01

    Activation of dopamine receptor 2 long (D2L) switches the signaling of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) from Gαi to Gαs, a process thought to be mediated through CB1-D2L heteromerization. Given the clinical importance of D2 antagonists, the goal of this study was to determine if D2 antagonists could modulate CB1 signaling. Interactions between CB1 and D2L, Gαi, Gαs, and β-arrestin1 were studied using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer 2 (BRET(2)) in STHdh(Q7/Q7) cells. CB1-dependent extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, CREB phosphorylation, and CB1 internalization following cotreatment of CB1 agonist and D2 antagonist were quantified. Preassembled CB1-Gαi complexes were detected by BRET(2) Arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a selective CB1 agonist, caused a rapid and transient increase in BRET efficiency (BRETEff) between Gαi-Rluc and CB1-green fluorescent protein 2 (GFP(2)), and a Gαi-dependent increase in ERK phosphorylation. Physical interactions between CB1 and D2L were observed using BRET(2) Cotreatment of STHdh(Q7/Q7) cells with ACEA and haloperidol, a D2 antagonist, inhibited BRETEff signals between Gαi-Rluc and CB1-GFP(2) and reduced the EMax and pEC50 of ACEA-mediated Gαi-dependent ERK phosphorylation. ACEA and haloperidol cotreatments produced a delayed and sustained increase in BRETEff between Gαs-Rluc and CB1-GFP(2) and increased the EMax and pEC50 of ACEA-induced Gαs-dependent cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation. In cells expressing CB1 and D2L treated with ACEA, binding of haloperidol to D2 receptors switched CB1 coupling from Gαi to Gαs In addition, haloperidol treatment reduced ACEA-induced β-arrestin1 recruitment to CB1 and CB1 internalization. D2 antagonists allosterically modulate cannabinoid-induced CB1 coupling, signaling, and β-arrestin1 recruitment through binding to CB1-D2L heteromers. These findings indicate that D2 antagonism, like D2 agonists, change agonist-mediated CB1 coupling and

  11. Lack of association of genetic variants in genes of the endocannabinoid system with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Herpertz-Dahlmann Beate; Herzog Wolfgang; Scherag André; Nguyen Thuy; Kirschner Jeanette; Brönner Günter; Reichwald Kathrin; Müller Timo; Lichtner Peter; Meitinger Thomas; Platzer Matthias; Schäfer Helmut; Hebebrand Johannes; Hinney Anke

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Several lines of evidence indicate that the central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) as well as the major endocannabinoid degrading enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) are implicated in mediating the orexigenic effects of cannabinoids. The aim of this study was to analyse whether nucleotide sequence variations in the CNR1, FAAH, NAAA and MGLL genes are associated with anorexia nervosa (A...

  12. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oosterveer Maaike H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and quantified lipogenic and lipolytic activities in fat tissues of CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice fed a high-fat (HF or a high-fat/fish oil (HF/FO diet as compared to animals receiving a low-fat chow diet. Comparison between HF diet and HF/FO diet allowed to investigate the influence of dietary fat quality on adipose tissue biology in relation to CB1 functioning. Results The adiposity-resistant phenotype of the CB1-/- mice was characterized by reduced fat mass and adipocyte size in HF and HF/FO-fed CB1-/- mice in parallel to a significant increase in energy expenditure as compared to CB1+/+ mice. The expression levels of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation markers were however maintained in these animals. Consistent with unaltered lipogenic gene expression, the fatty acid synthesis rates in adipose tissues from CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice were unchanged. Whole-body and adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase (LPL activities were also not altered in CB1-/- mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that protection against diet-induced adiposity in CB1-deficient mice is not related to changes in adipocyte function per se, but rather results from increased energy dissipation by oxidative and non-oxidative pathways.

  13. Interaction between the cholecystokinin and endogenous cannabinoid systems in cued fear expression and extinction retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Mallory E; Ressler, Kerry J

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is thought to develop, in part, from improper inhibition of fear. Accordingly, one of the most effective treatment strategies for PTSD is exposure-based psychotherapy. Ideally, neuroscience would inform adjunct therapies that target the neurotransmitter systems involved in extinction processes. Separate studies have implicated the cholecystokinin (CCK) and endocannabinoid systems in fear; however, there is a high degree of anatomical colocalization between the cannabinoid 1 receptor (Cnr1) and CCK in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region critical for emotion regulation. Although most research has focused on GABA and GABAergic plasticity as the mechanism by which Cnr1 mediates fear inhibition, we hypothesize that a functional interaction between Cnr1 and CCKB receptor (CCKBR) is critical for fear extinction processes. In this study, systemic pharmacological manipulation of the cannabinoid system modulated cued fear expression in C57BL/6J mice after consolidation of auditory fear conditioning. Knockout of the CCKBR, however, had no effect on fear- or anxiety-like behaviors. Nonetheless, administration of a Cnr1 antagonist increased freezing behavior during a cued fear expression test in wild-type subjects, but had no effect on freezing behavior in CCKBR knockout littermates. In addition, we found that Cnr1-positive fibers form perisomatic clusters around CCKBR-positive cell bodies in the BLA. These CCKBR-positive cells comprise a molecularly heterogenous population of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. These findings provide novel evidence that Cnr1 contributes to cued fear expression via an interaction with the CCK system. Dysfunctional Cnr1-CCKBR interactions might contribute to the etiology of, or result from, fear-related psychiatric disease. PMID:25176168

  14. Mapping Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Allosteric Site(s): Critical Molecular Determinant and Signaling Profile of GAT100, a Novel, Potent, and Irreversibly Binding Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprairie, Robert B; Kulkarni, Abhijit R; Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Hurst, Dow P; Lynch, Diane; Reggio, Patricia H; Janero, David R; Pertwee, Roger G; Stevenson, Lesley A; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Thakur, Ganesh A

    2016-06-15

    One of the most abundant G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in brain, the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R), is a tractable therapeutic target for treating diverse psychobehavioral and somatic disorders. Adverse on-target effects associated with small-molecule CB1R orthosteric agonists and inverse agonists/antagonists have plagued their translational potential. Allosteric CB1R modulators offer a potentially safer modality through which CB1R signaling may be directed for therapeutic benefit. Rational design of candidate, druglike CB1R allosteric modulators requires greater understanding of the architecture of the CB1R allosteric endodomain(s) and the capacity of CB1R allosteric ligands to tune the receptor's information output. We have recently reported the synthesis of a focused library of rationally designed, covalent analogues of Org27569 and PSNCBAM-1, two prototypic CB1R negative allosteric modulators (NAMs). Among the novel, pharmacologically active CB1R NAMs reported, the isothiocyanate GAT100 emerged as the lead by virtue of its exceptional potency in the [(35)S]GTPγS and β-arrestin signaling assays and its ability to label CB1R as a covalent allosteric probe with significantly reduced inverse agonism in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay as compared to Org27569. We report here a comprehensive functional profiling of GAT100 across an array of important downstream cell-signaling pathways and analysis of its potential orthosteric probe-dependence and signaling bias. The results demonstrate that GAT100 is a NAM of the orthosteric CB1R agonist CP55,940 and the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide for β-arrestin1 recruitment, PLCβ3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, cAMP accumulation, and CB1R internalization in HEK293A cells overexpressing CB1R and in Neuro2a and STHdh(Q7/Q7) cells endogenously expressing CB1R. Distinctively, GAT100 was a more potent and efficacious CB1R NAM than Org27569 and PSNCBAM-1 in all signaling assays and did not exhibit the inverse

  15. Isolation of 57Co-cobalamin coenzymes at high specific activity from Streptomyces griseus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of radio-labelled cobalamins in Streptomyces griseus grown in medium containing 57Co-cobalt chloride has been estimated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography and bioautography. 57Co-Methylcobalamin (Me[57Co]Cb1) was the major form in the mycelium together with smaller amounts of 57Co-adenosylcobalamin (Ado[57Co]Cb1) and 57Co-hydroxocobalamin (OH[57Co]Cb1). The OH[57Co]Cb1 was detected in three forms having, respectively, anionic, cationic and neutral properties. A simple technique has been developed to isolate and purify Me[57CO]Cb1 and Ado[57Co]Cb1 from the mycelium using column chromatography on ion-exchange celluloses. Small quantities of each cobalamin coenzyme have been obtained at 90-96% purity and specific activities of 190-230 μCi/μg. (Auth.)

  16. Peripheral Cannabinoid-1 Receptor Inverse Agonism Reduces Obesity by Reversing Leptin Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Joseph; Cinar, Resat; Liu, Jie; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Wesley, Daniel; Jourdan, Tony; Szanda, Gergö; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Chedester, Lee; Liow, Jeih-San; Innis, Robert B.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Chorvat, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity-related leptin resistance manifests in loss of leptin’s ability to reduce appetite and increase energy expenditure. Obesity is also associated with increased activity of the endocannabinoid system, and CB1 receptor (CB1R) inverse agonists reduce body weight and the associated metabolic complications, although adverse neuropsychiatric effects halted their therapeutic development. Here we show that in mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), the peripherally restricted CB1R inverse agonist...

  17. Feeding Induced by Cannabinoids Is Mediated Independently of the Melanocortin System

    OpenAIRE

    Sinnayah, Puspha; Jobst, Erin E.; Rathner, Joseph A.; Caldera-Siu, Angela D.; Tonelli-Lemos, Luciana; Eusterbrock, Aaron J.; Enriori, Pablo J.; Pothos, Emmanuel N.; Grove, Kevin L.; Cowley, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana, stimulate appetite, and cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1-R) antagonists suppress appetite and promote weight loss. Little is known about how CB1-R antagonists affect the central neurocircuitry, specifically the melanocortin system that regulates energy balance. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that peripherally administered CB1-R antagonist (AM251) or agonist equally suppressed or stimulated feeding respectively in Ay , which...

  18. Identification of Essential Cannabinoid-binding Domains: STRUCTURAL INSIGHTS INTO EARLY DYNAMIC EVENTS IN RECEPTOR ACTIVATION*

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Bertalovitz, Alexander C.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    The classical cannabinoid agonist HU210, a structural analog of (−)-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, binds to brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptors and activates signal transduction pathways. To date, an exact molecular description of the CB1 receptor is not yet available. Utilizing the minor binding pocket of the CB1 receptor as the primary ligand interaction site, we explored HU210 binding using lipid bilayer molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Among the potential ligand contact residues, we identifie...

  19. Distribution and function of TRP ion channels in primary sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsson, Helena HA

    2007-01-01

    It is frequently argued that cannabinoids exert part of their analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects via activation of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor located on TRPV1-expressing primary sensory nerve fibres in peripheral tissues. However, we find no evidence of CB1 receptor immunoreactivity on nerve fibres in rat or mouse hindpaw skin and mesenteric artery. The CB1 receptor agonists anandamide and HU210 also fail to inhibit TRPV1-mediated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from pri...

  20. Regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Linda A; Rock, Erin M; Limebeer, Cheryl L

    2011-01-01

    Considerable evidence demonstrates that manipulation of the endocannabinoid system regulates nausea and vomiting in humans and other animals. The anti-emetic effect of cannabinoids has been shown across a wide variety of animals that are capable of vomiting in response to a toxic challenge. CB1 agonism suppresses vomiting, which is reversed by CB1 antagonism, and CB1 inverse agonism promotes vomiting. Recently, evidence from animal experiments suggests that cannabinoids may be especially usef...

  1. Endocannabinoids and Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Potvin; Lahcen Ait Bentaleb; Emmanuel Stip; Joëlle Desfoss��s

    2010-01-01

    The endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachydonoylglycerol (2-AG) are lipids naturally derived from membrane precursors which bind cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2). This endocannabinoid system is disturbed in schizophrenia. Indeed, there seems to be an association between schizophrenia and polymorphisms of the CB1 receptor gene. Moreover, CB1 receptors are found in higher density in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and basal ganglia of patients with schizophrenia. Similarly, anandamide leve...

  2. Molecular-Interaction and Signaling Profiles of AM3677, a Novel Covalent Agonist Selective for the Cannabinoid 1 Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    David R Janero; Yaddanapudi, Suma; Zvonok, Nikolai; Subramanian, Kumar V.; Shukla, Vidyanand G.; Stahl, Edward; Zhou, Lei; Hurst, Dow; Wager-Miller, James; Bohn, Laura M.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Mackie, Ken; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) is one of the most abundant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the central nervous system. CB1R involvement in multiple physiological processes, especially neurotransmitter release and synaptic function, has made this GPCR a prime drug discovery target, and pharmacological CB1R activation has been demonstrated to be a tenable therapeutic modality. Accordingly, the design and profiling of novel, drug-like CB1R modulators to inform the receptor’s ligand-int...

  3. Enkephalin levels and the number of neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the hippocampus are decreased in female cannabinoid-receptor 1 knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Sophie A; Kempen, Tracey A Van; Pickel, Virginia M; Milner, Teresa A

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction requires learning and memory processes that are facilitated by activation of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) and opioid receptors in the hippocampus. This involves activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that is partially regulated by endogenous opioid (enkephalin and dynorphin) and non-opioid peptides, specifically cholecystokinin, parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y, the neuropeptides present in inhibitory interneurons that co-express CB1 or selective opioid receptors. We tested the hypothesis that CB1 receptor expression is a determinant of the availability of one or more of these peptide modulators in the hippocampus. This was achieved by quantitatively analyzing the immunoperoxidase labeling for each of these neuropeptide in the dorsal hippocampus of female wild-type (CB1+/+) and cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout (CB1-/-) C57/BL6 mice. The levels of Leu(5)-enkephalin-immunoreactivity were significantly reduced in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and in stratum lucidum of CA3 in CB1-/- mice. Moreover, the numbers of neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive interneurons in the dentate hilus were significantly lower in the CB1-/- compared to wild-type mice. However, CB1+/+ and CB1-/- mice did not significantly differ in expression levels of either dynorphin or cholecystokinin, and showed no differences in numbers of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid and opioid systems have a nuanced, regulatory relationship that could affect the balance of excitation and inhibition in the hippocampus and thus processes such as learning that rely on this balance. PMID:27012427

  4. An amino-terminal variant of the central cannabinoid receptor resulting from alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, D; Carillon, C; Kaghad, M; Calandra, B; Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Le Fur, G; Caput, D; Ferrara, P

    1995-02-24

    The cDNA sequences encoding the central cannabinoid receptor, CB1, are known for two species, rat and human. However, little information concerning the flanking, noncoding regions is presently available. We have isolated two overlapping clones from a human lung cDNA library with CB1 cDNA inserts. One of these, cann7, contains a short stretch of the CB1 coding region and 4 kilobase pairs (kb) of the 3'-untranslated region (UTR), including two polyadenylation signals. The other, cann6, is identical to cann7 upstream from the first polyadenylation signal, and in addition, it contains the whole coding region and extends for 1.8 kb into the 5'-UTR. Comparison of cann6 with the published sequence (Gérard, C. M., Mollereau, C., Vassart, G., and Parmentier, M. (1991) Biochem. J. 279, 129-134) shows the coding regions to be identical, but reveals important differences in the flanking regions. Notably, the cann6 sequence appears to be that of an immature transcript, containing 1.8 kb of an intronic sequence in the 5'-UTR. In addition, polymerase chain reaction amplification of the CB1 coding region in the IM-9 cell line cDNA resulted in two fragments, one containing the whole CB1 coding region and the second lacking a 167-base pair intron within the sequence encoding the amino-terminal tail of the receptor. This alternatively spliced form would translate to an NH2-terminal modified isoform (CB1A) of the receptor, shorter than CB1 by 61 amino acids. In addition, the first 28 amino acids of the putative truncated receptor are completely different from those of CB1, containing more hydrophobic residues. Rat CB1 mRNA is similarly alternatively spliced. A study of the distribution of the human CB1 and CB1A mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the presence of both CB1 and CB1A throughout the brain and in all the peripheral tissues examined, with CB1A being present in amounts of up to 20% of CB1. PMID:7876112

  5. The CB₁ cannabinoid receptor signals striatal neuroprotection via a PI3K/Akt/mTORC1/BDNF pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez, C; Chiarlone, A; Bellocchio, L; Resel, E; Pruunsild, P; García-Rincón, D; Sendtner, M; Timmusk, T; Lutz, B; Galve-Roperh, I; Guzmán, M

    2015-10-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor, the main molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is the most abundant G protein-coupled receptor in the mammalian brain. In particular, the CB1 receptor is highly expressed in the basal ganglia, mostly on terminals of medium-sized spiny neurons, where it plays a key neuromodulatory function. The CB1 receptor also confers neuroprotection in various experimental models of striatal damage. However, the assessment of the physiological relevance and therapeutic potential of the CB1 receptor in basal ganglia-related diseases is hampered, at least in part, by the lack of knowledge of the precise mechanism of CB1 receptor neuroprotective activity. Here, by using an array of pharmacological, genetic and pharmacogenetic (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug) approaches, we show that (1) CB1 receptor engagement protects striatal cells from excitotoxic death via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway, which, in turn, (2) induces brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression through the selective activation of BDNF gene promoter IV, an effect that is mediated by multiple transcription factors. To assess the possible functional impact of the CB1/BDNF axis in a neurodegenerative-disease context in vivo, we conducted experiments in the R6/2 mouse, a well-established model of Huntington's disease, in which the CB1 receptor and BDNF are known to be severely downregulated in the dorsolateral striatum. Adeno-associated viral vector-enforced re-expression of the CB1 receptor in the dorsolateral striatum of R6/2 mice allowed the re-expression of BDNF and the concerted rescue of the neuropathological deficits in these animals. Collectively, these findings unravel a molecular link between CB1 receptor activation and BDNF expression, and support the relevance of the CB1/BDNF axis in promoting striatal neuron survival. PMID:25698444

  6. Lack of association of genetic variants in genes of the endocannabinoid system with anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herpertz-Dahlmann Beate

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several lines of evidence indicate that the central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1 as well as the major endocannabinoid degrading enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH, N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL are implicated in mediating the orexigenic effects of cannabinoids. The aim of this study was to analyse whether nucleotide sequence variations in the CNR1, FAAH, NAAA and MGLL genes are associated with anorexia nervosa (AN. Methods We analysed the association of a previously described (AATn repeat in the 3' flanking region of CNR1 as well as a total of 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs representative of regions with restricted haplotype diversity in CNR1, FAAH, NAAA or MGLL in up to 91 German AN trios (patient with AN and both biological parents using the transmission-disequilibrium-test (TDT. One SNP was additionally analysed in an independent case-control study comprising 113 patients with AN and 178 normal weight controls. Genotyping was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, ARMS-PCR or using 3730xl capillary sequencers. Results The TDT revealed no evidence for association for any of the SNPs or the (AATn repeat with AN (all two-sided uncorrected p-values > 0.05. The lowest p-value of 0.11 was detected for the A-allele of the CNR1 SNP rs1049353 for which the transmission rate was 59% (95% confidence interval 47%...70%. Further genotyping of rs1049353 in 113 additional independent patients with AN and 178 normal weight controls could not substantiate the initial trend for association (p = 1.00. Conclusion As we found no evidence for an association of genetic variation in CNR1, FAAH, NAAA and MGLL with AN, we conclude that genetic variations in these genes do not play a major role in the etiology of AN in our study groups.

  7. Control of Inhibition by the Direct Action of Cannabinoids on GABAA Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golovko, Tatiana; Min, R.; Lozovaya, Natalia; Falconer, Caroline; Yatsenko, Natalia; Tsintsadze, Timur; Tsintsadze, Vera; Ledent, Catherine; Harvey, Robert J; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J; Rozov, Andrei; Burnashev, Nail

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are known to regulate inhibitory synaptic transmission via activation of presynaptic G protein-coupled cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs). Additionally, recent studies suggest that cannabinoids can also directly interact with recombinant GABAA receptors (GABAARs), potentiating currents a

  8. Constitutive cannabinoid 1 and mu opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area: occurrence, function and therapeutic relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meye, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) play a crucial role in regulating systems dedicated to processing rewards and emotions. It was known that in artificial systems, CB1Rs can exhibit activity that is independent of the typical agonist-driven form. However, it remained largely unclear whether this consti

  9. Identification of essential cannabinoid-binding domains: structural insights into early dynamic events in receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Bertalovitz, Alexander C; Kendall, Debra A

    2011-09-23

    The classical cannabinoid agonist HU210, a structural analog of (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, binds to brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptors and activates signal transduction pathways. To date, an exact molecular description of the CB1 receptor is not yet available. Utilizing the minor binding pocket of the CB1 receptor as the primary ligand interaction site, we explored HU210 binding using lipid bilayer molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Among the potential ligand contact residues, we identified residues Phe-174(2.61), Phe-177(2.64), Leu-193(3.29), and Met-363(6.55) as being critical for HU210 binding by mutational analysis. Using these residues to guide the simulations, we determined essential cannabinoid-binding domains in the CB1 receptor, including the highly sought after hydrophobic pocket important for the binding of the C3 alkyl chain of classical and nonclassical cannabinoids. Analyzing the simulations of the HU210-CB1 receptor complex, the CP55940-CB1 receptor complex, and the (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-CB1 receptor complex, we found that the positioning of the C3 alkyl chain and the aromatic stacking between Trp-356(6.48) and Trp-279(5.43) is crucial for the Trp-356(6.48) rotamer change toward receptor activation through the rigid-body movement of H6. The functional data for the mutant receptors demonstrated reductions in potency for G protein activation similar to the reductions seen in ligand binding affinity for HU210. PMID:21795705

  10. Fasting induces CART down-regulation in the zebrafish nervous system in a cannabinoid receptor 1-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Shin-Ichi; Gibert, Yann; Berekelya, Liubov; Bernard, Laure; Brunet, Frédéric; Guillot, Etienne; Le Bail, Jean-Christophe; Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Galzin, Anne Marie; Triqueneaux, Gerard; Laudet, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Central and peripheral mechanisms modulate food intake and energy balance in mammals and the precise role of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) in these processes is still being explored. Using the zebrafish, Danio rerio, we show that rimonabant, a CB1-specific antagonist with an EC(50) of 5.15 × 10(-8) m, decreases embryonic yolk sac reserve use. We reveal a developmental overlap between CART genes and CB1 expression in the hypothalamus and medulla oblongata, two brain structures that play crucial roles in appetite regulation in mammals. We show that morpholino knockdown of CB1 or fasting decreases cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript (CART)-3 expression. Strikingly, this down-regulation occurs only in regions coexpressing CB1 and CART3, reinforcing the link between CB1, CART, and appetite regulation. We show that rimonabant treatment impairs the fasting-induced down-regulation of CART expression in specific brain regions, whereas vehicle alone-treated embryos do not display this rescue of CART expression. Our data reveal that CB1 lies upstream of CART and signals the appetite through the down-regulation of CART expression. Thus, our results establish the zebrafish as a promising system to study appetite regulation. PMID:22700585

  11. A critical review of both the synthesis approach and the receptor profile of the 8-chloro-1-(2',4'-dichlorophenyl)-N-piperidin-1-yl-1,4,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[6,7]cyclohepta[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide and analogue derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Paolo; Distinto, Rita; Manca, Ilaria; Baillie, Gemma; Murineddu, Gabriele; Pira, Marilena; Falzoi, Matteo; Sani, Monica; Morales, Paula; Ross, Ruth; Zanda, Matteo; Jagerovic, Nadine; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2016-10-01

    8-Chloro-1-(2',4'-dichlorophenyl)-N-piperidin-1-yl-1,4,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[6,7]cyclohepta[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide 9a was discovered as potent and selective CB1 antagonist by part of our group few years ago. In particular it was reported to have an affinity towards the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), expressed as Ki, of 0.00035 nM. Nevertheless significantly divergent data were reported for the same compound from other laboratories. To unequivocally define the receptor profile of 9a, we have critically reviewed both its synthesis approach and binding data. Here we report that, in contrast to our previously reported data, 9a showed a Ki value for CB1R in the order of nanomolar rather than of fentomolar range. The new determined receptor profile of 9a was also ascertained for analogue derivatives 9b-i, as well as for 12. Moreover, the structural features of the synthesized compounds necessary for CB1R were investigated. Amongst the novel series, effects on CB1R intrinsic activity was highlighted due to the substituents at the position 3 of the pyrazole ring of the 1,4,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[6,7]cyclohepta[1,2-c]pyrazole scaffold. Although the cannabinoid receptor profile of 9a was reviewed in this work, the relevance of this compound in CB1R antagonist based drug discovery is confirmed. PMID:27240274

  12. Operant behavior to obtain palatable food modifies ERK activity in the brain reward circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guegan, Thomas; Cutando, Laura; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Santini, Emanuela; Fisone, Gilberto; Martinez, Albert; Valjent, Emmanuel; Maldonado, Rafael; Martin, Miquel

    2013-03-01

    Food palatability produces behavioral modifications that resemble those induced by drugs of abuse. Palatability-induced behavioral changes require both, the activation of the endogenous cannabinoid system, and changes in structural plasticity in neurons of the brain reward pathway. The ERK intracellular pathway is activated by CB1 receptors (CB1-R) and plays a crucial role in neuroplasticity. We investigated the activation of the ERK signaling cascade in the mesocorticolimbic system induced by operant training to obtain highly palatable isocaloric food and the involvement of the CB1-R in these responses. Using immunofluorescence techniques, we analyzed changes in ERK intracellular pathway activation in the mesocorticolimbic system of wild-type and CB1 knockout mice (CB1-/-) trained on an operant paradigm to obtain standard, highly caloric or highly palatable isocaloric food. Operant training for highly palatable isocaloric food, but not for standard or highly caloric food, produced a robust activation of the ERK signaling cascade in the same brain areas where this training modified structural plasticity. These changes induced by the operant training were absent in CB1-/-. We can conclude that the activation of the ERK pathway is associated to the neuroplasticity induced by operant training for highly palatable isocaloric food and might be involved in CB1-R mediated alterations in behavior and structural plasticity. PMID:22580057

  13. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPAR-δ)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p < 0.05). Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each p < 0.05). CB1 receptor expression and adipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-δ. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-δ. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-δ by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00 ± 0.06 (n = 3) to 1.91 ± 0.06 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and increased adipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-δ significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39 ± 0.03 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and reduced adipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-δ. Both CB1 and PPAR-δ are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor

  14. Small-animal PET imaging of the type 1 and type 2 cannabinoid receptors in a photothrombotic stroke model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent ex vivo and pharmacological evidence suggests involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of stroke, but conflicting roles for type 1 and 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CB1 and CB2 receptor binding over time in vivo in a rat photothrombotic stroke model using PET. CB1 and CB2 microPET imaging was performed at regular time-points up to 2 weeks after stroke using [18F]MK-9470 and [11C]NE40. Stroke size was measured using MRI at 9.4 T. Ex vivo validation was performed via immunostaining for CB1 and CB2. Immunofluorescent double stainings were also performed with markers for astrocytes (GFAP) and macrophages/microglia (CD68). [18F]MK-9470 PET showed a strong increase in CB1 binding 24 h and 72 h after stroke in the cortex surrounding the lesion, extending to the insular cortex 24 h after surgery. These alterations were consistently confirmed by CB1 immunohistochemical staining. [11C]NE40 did not show any significant differences between stroke and sham-operated animals, although staining for CB2 revealed minor immunoreactivity at 1 and 2 weeks after stroke in this model. Both CB1+ and CB2+ cells showed minor immunoreactivity for CD68. Time-dependent and regionally strongly increased CB1, but not CB2, binding are early consequences of photothrombotic stroke. Pharmacological interventions should primarily aim at CB1 signalling as the role of CB2 seems minor in the acute and subacute phases of stroke. (orig.)

  15. [18F]MK-9470, a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for in vivo human PET brain imaging of the cannabinoid-1 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, H. Donald; Van Laere, Koen; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Hamill, Terence G.; Bormans, Guy; Eng, Wai-si; Gibson, Ray; Ryan, Christine; Connolly, Brett; Patel, Shil; Krause, Stephen; Vanko, Amy; Van Hecken, Anne; DUPONT, Patrick; De Lepeleire, Inge

    2007-01-01

    [(18)F]MK-9470 is a selective, high-affinity, inverse agonist (human IC(50), 0.7 nM) for the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) that has been developed for use in human brain imaging. Autoradiographic studies in rhesus monkey brain showed that [(18)F]MK-9470 binding is aligned with the reported distribution of CB1 receptors with high specific binding in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, caudate/putamen, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and hippocampus. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging...

  16. Phase I hydroxylated metabolites of the K2 synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 retain in vitro and in vivo cannabinoid 1 receptor affinity and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K Brents

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: K2 products are synthetic cannabinoid-laced, marijuana-like drugs of abuse, use of which is often associated with clinical symptoms atypical of marijuana use, including hypertension, agitation, hallucinations, psychosis, seizures and panic attacks. JWH-018, a prevalent K2 synthetic cannabinoid, is structurally distinct from Δ(9-THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Since even subtle structural differences can lead to differential metabolism, formation of novel, biologically active metabolites may be responsible for the distinct effects associated with K2 use. The present study proposes that K2's high adverse effect occurrence is due, at least in part, to distinct JWH-018 metabolite activity at the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: JWH-018, five potential monohydroxylated metabolites (M1-M5, and one carboxy metabolite (M6 were examined in mouse brain homogenates containing CB1Rs, first for CB1R affinity using a competition binding assay employing the cannabinoid receptor radioligand [(3H]CP-55,940, and then for CB1R intrinsic efficacy using an [(35S]GTPγS binding assay. JWH-018 and M1-M5 bound CB1Rs with high affinity, exhibiting K(i values that were lower than or equivalent to Δ(9-THC. These molecules also stimulated G-proteins with equal or greater efficacy relative to Δ(9-THC, a CB1R partial agonist. Most importantly, JWH-018, M2, M3, and M5 produced full CB1R agonist levels of activation. CB1R-mediated activation was demonstrated by blockade with O-2050, a CB1R-selective neutral antagonist. Similar to Δ(9-THC, JWH-018 and M1 produced a marked depression of locomotor activity and core body temperature in mice that were both blocked by the CB1R-preferring antagonist/inverse agonist AM251. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Unlike metabolites of most drugs, the studied JWH-018 monohydroxylated compounds, but not the carboxy metabolite, retain in vitro and in vivo activity at CB1Rs. These observations

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-07-0067 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-05-0032 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-20-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-1883 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-14-0023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-18-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0074 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1734 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-1332 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-24-0009 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TNIG-10-0006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-04-0013 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-2200 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0845 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-05-0081 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-3023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0195 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-06-0074 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-1648 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OCUN-01-1522 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-1516 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-04-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-12-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-1020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-07-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l cannabinoid receptor emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal... cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid

  2. Rimonabant induced anorexia in rodents is not mediated by vagal or sympathetic gut afferents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Jelsing, Jacob; van de Wall, Esther H E M;

    2009-01-01

    The selective CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant is a novel weight control agent. Although CB1 receptors and binding sites are present in both the rodent central and peripheral nervous systems, including the afferent vagus nerve, the role of gut afferents in mediating anorexia following CB1R...... blockade is still debated. In the present study we examined rimonabant-induced anorexia in male C57BL/6J mice with subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (VGX) as well as in male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to either subdiaphragmatic vagal deafferentation (SDA) alone or in combination with a complete celiac...... system, are required for rimonabant to inhibit food intake leading to the hypothesis that centrally located CB1 receptors are the prime mediators of rimonabant-induced anorexia....

  3. Genetic deletion of monoacylglycerol lipase leads to impaired cannabinoid receptor CB₁R signaling and anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatore, Roberta; Morello, Giovanna; Luongo, Livio; Taschler, Ulrike; Romano, Rosaria; De Gregorio, Danilo; Belardo, Carmela; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Cristino, Luigia

    2015-11-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCB) are key regulators of excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission at cannabinoid-1-receptor (CB1 R)-expressing axon terminals. The most abundant eCB in the brain, that is 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), is hydrolyzed by the enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), whose chronic inhibition in the brain was reported to cause CB1 R desensitization. We employed the MAGL knock-out mouse (MAGL-/-), a genetic model of congenital and sustained elevation of 2-AG levels in the brain, to provide morphological and biochemical evidence for β-arrestin2-mediated CB1 R desensitization in brain regions involved in the control of emotional states, that is, the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala, hippocampus and cerebellar cortex. We found a widespread CB1 R/β-arrestin2 co-expression in the mPFC, amygdala and hippocampus accompanied by impairment of extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and elevation of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT1) at CB1 R-positive excitatory terminals in the mPFC, or vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) at CB1 R-positive inhibitory terminals in the amygdala and hippocampus. The impairment of CB1 R signaling in MAGL-/- mice was also accompanied by enhanced excitatory drive in the basolateral amygdala (BLA)-mPFC circuit, with subsequent elevation of glutamate release to the mPFC and anxiety-like and obsessive-compulsive behaviors, as assessed by the light/dark box and marble burying tests, respectively. Collectively, these data provide evidence for a β-arrestin2-mediated desensitization of CB1 R in MAGL-/- mice, with impact on the synaptic plasticity of brain circuits involved in emotional functions. In this study, the authors provide evidence that congenitally enhanced endocannabinoid levels in the neuronal circuits underlying anxiety-like behavioral states (mainly medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus) lead to CB1R desenistization and anxiety and depression. MAGL-/- mice, a model of congenital overactivity of the e

  4. Cannabinoid receptor 1 suppresses transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-induced inflammatory responses to corneal injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Y.; Yang, H.; Wang, Z; Varadaraj, K; Kumari, S.S.; Mergler, S; Okada, Y.; Saika, S.; Kingsley, P J; Marnett, L J; Reinach, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1)-induced suppression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) activation provides a therapeutic option to reduce inflammation and pain in different animal disease models through mechanisms involving dampening of TRPV1 activation and signaling events. As we found in both mouse corneal epithelium and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) that there is CB1 and TRPV1 expression colocalization based on overlap of coimmunostaining, we determined in m...

  5. Differential effects of TRPV1 receptor ligands against nicotine-induced depression-like behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background The contributions of brain cannabinoid (CB) receptors, typically CB1 (CB type 1) receptors, to the behavioral effects of nicotine (NC) have been reported to involve brain transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors, and the activation of candidate endogenous TRPV1 ligands is expected to be therapeutically effective. In the present study, the effects of TRPV1 ligands with or without affinity for CB1 receptors were examined on NC-induced depression-like behavioral alte...

  6. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be presc...

  7. Cannabinoid inhibition improves memory in food-storing birds, but with a cost.

    OpenAIRE

    Shiflett, Michael W.; Rankin, Alexander Z.; Tomaszycki, Michelle L.; DeVoogd, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    Food-storing birds demonstrate remarkable memory ability in recalling the locations of thousands of hidden food caches. Although this behaviour requires the hippocampus, its synaptic mechanisms are not understood. Here we show the effects of cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) blockade on spatial memory in food-storing black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapilla). Intra-hippocampal infusions of the CB1-R antagonist SR141716A enhanced long-term memory for the location of a hidden food reward, measur...

  8. Cannabinoid-Rezeptor1 und Essstörungen

    OpenAIRE

    Reichard, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    Hintergrund und Ziele Das Endocannabinoidsystem ist ein zentrales Element in der Regulation von Appetit, Nahrungsaufnahme und Energiehomöostase. Bei Patientinnen mit Anorexia nervosa (AN) wurden erhöhte Raten des Endocannabinoids Anandamid gemessen. Auch eine Assoziation zwischen dem restriktiven Typus der Anorexie und einem funktionellen Polymorphismus des Cannabinoid-Rezeptors1 (CB1) konnte aufgedeckt werden. Ein Ziel unserer Studie war, mögliche Unterschiede der CB1-mRNA-Ausprägung bei Fra...

  9. Molecular reconstruction of mGluR5a-mediated endocannabinoid signaling cascade in single rat sympathetic neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Yu-Jin; Puhl, Henry L.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCB) such as 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) are lipid metabolites that are synthesized in a postsynaptic neurons and act upon CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) in presynaptic nerve terminals. This retrograde transmission underlies several forms of short and long term synaptic plasticity within the central nervous system. Here, we constructed a model system based on isolated rat sympathetic neurons in which an eCB signaling cascade could be studied in a reduced, spatially compac...

  10. Inhibition of Recombinant Human T-type Calcium Channels by Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol*

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Hamish Redmond; Napier, Ian; Connor, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the most prevalent biologically active constituents of Cannabis sativa. THC is the prototypic cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist and is psychoactive and analgesic. CBD is also analgesic, but it is not a CB1 receptor agonist. Low voltage-activated T-type calcium channels, encoded by the CaV3 gene family, regulate the excitability of many cells, including neurons involved in nociceptive processing. We examined the eff...

  11. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen Cheng; Liu, Dao Yan; Zhang, Li Li; Shen, Chen Yi; Ma, Qun Li; Cao, Ting Bing; Wang, Li Juan; Nie, Hai; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin; Zhu, Zhi Ming

    2007-03-01

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each pAdipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each padipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-delta. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-delta. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-delta by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00+/-0.06 (n=3) to 1.91+/-0.06 (n=3; padipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-delta significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39+/-0.03 (n=3; padipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-delta. Both CB1 and PPAR-delta are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:17223076

  12. The evolution and comparative neurobiology of endocannabinoid signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Elphick, Maurice R.

    2012-01-01

    CB1- and CB2-type cannabinoid receptors mediate effects of the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide in mammals. In canonical endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic plasticity, 2-AG is generated postsynaptically by diacylglycerol lipase alpha and acts via presynaptic CB1-type cannabinoid receptors to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Electrophysiological studies on lampreys indicate that this retrograde signalling mechanism occurs throughout the vertebrates, whereas system-...

  13. A study of functional selectivity at the cannabinoid type 1 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Priestley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) which is important in the regulation of neuronal function, predominately via coupling to heterotrimeric Gi/o proteins. The receptor has also been shown to interact with a variety of other intracellular signalling mediators, including other G proteins, several members of the mitogen activated kinase (MAP) superfamily and β-arrestins. The CB1 receptor is recognised by an array of structurally distinct endogenous and exogenous l...

  14. Die Bedeutung von Endocannabinoiden im kardiogenen Schock und bei der Entwicklung der chronischen Herzinsuffizienz

    OpenAIRE

    Karcher, Jan Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass die in Monozyten und in Thrombozyten produzierten Cannabinoide Anandamid und 2-Arachidonylglycerol zur Blutdruckernierdrigung nach akutem Myokradinfarkt der Ratte beitragen. Durch CB1-Rezeptor-Blockade wurde der Abfall des arteriellen Mitteldruckes verhindert, aber die Mortaliät zwei Stunden nach MI erhöht. Dies geschieht möglicherweise durch Beeinträchtigung der endothelialen Funktion. Durch chronische CB1-Rezeptorstimulation konnte bei Ratten mit grossen Infar...

  15. Cannabinoids promote oligodendrocyte progenitor survival: Involvement of cannabinoid receptors and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Molina-Holgado, E; Vela, J.M. (José Miguel); Arévalo, Maria Ángeles; Almazán, G.; Molina-Holgado, F.; Borrell, Jose; Guaza, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert pleiotropic actions in the CNS, including the inhibition of inflammatory responses and the enhancement of neuronal survival after injury. Although cannabinoid receptors are distributed widely in brain, their presence has not been investigated previously in oligodendrocytes. This study examined the expression of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors in rat oligodendrocytes in vivo and in culture and explored their biological function. Expression of CB1 receptors by oligodendroc...

  16. Inhibition of the production of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor by cannabinoid receptor agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, I.; Schermer, B; Popp, R; Busse, R.

    1999-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid, anandamide, has been reported to induce an 'endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-like' relaxation in vitro. We therefore investigated the effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists; HU 210, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and anandamide, and a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist, SR 141716A, on nitric oxide (NO) and EDHF-mediated relaxation in precontracted rings of porcine coronary, rabbit carotid and mesenteric arteries.In rings of mesenteric artery HU...

  17. Pregnenolone Can Protect the Brain from Cannabis Intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Vallee, M; Vitiello, S.; Bellocchio, L.; Hebert-Chatelain, E.; Monlezun, S.; Martin-Garcia, E.; Kasanetz, F.; Baillie, G. L.; Panin, F.; Cathala, A.; Roullot-Lacarriere, V.; Fabre, S.; Hurst, D. P.; Lynch, D. L.; Shore, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnenolone is considered the inactive precursor of all steroid hormones and its potential functional effects have been largely neglected. The administration of the main active principle of Cannabis sativa (marijuana) Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) substantially increases the synthesis of pregnenolone in the brain via the activation of type-1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor. Pregnenolone then, acting as a signaling specific inhibitor of the CB1 receptor, reduces several effects of THC. This negati...

  18. Endocannabinoids in the rat basolateral amygdala enhance memory consolidation and enable glucocorticoid modulation of memory

    OpenAIRE

    Campolongo, Patrizia; Roozendaal, Benno; Trezza, Viviana; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.; Cuomo, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) modulates the consolidation of memories for emotionally arousing experiences, an effect that involves the activation of the glucocorticoid system. Because the BLA expresses high densities of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, the present experiments investigated whether the endocannabinoid system in the BLA influences memory consolidation and whether glucocorticoids interact with this system. The CB1 receptor agonist WIN5...

  19. Oleoylethanolamide: A Novel Potential Pharmacological Alternative to Cannabinoid Antagonists for the Control of Appetite

    OpenAIRE

    Adele Romano; Roberto Coccurello; Giacomo Giacovazzo; Gaurav Bedse; Anna Moles; Silvana Gaetani

    2014-01-01

    The initial pharmaceutical interest for the endocannabinoid system as a target for antiobesity therapies has been restricted by the severe adverse effects of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant. This study points at oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a monounsaturated analogue, and functional antagonist of anandamide, as a potential and safer antiobesity alternative to CB1 antagonism. Mice treated with equal doses (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) of OEA or rimonabant were analyzed for the progressive expression of spo...

  20. GPR55: a new member of the cannabinoid receptor clan?

    OpenAIRE

    Pertwee, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    In this issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology, Ryberg et al. present convincing in vitro evidence that the orphan GPCR, GPR55, is a cannabinoid receptor. GPR55 was activated by a range of plant, synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids and blocked by the non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol. Their experiments have revealed several differences between the pharmacology of GPR55 and the established cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. For example, the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, ...

  1. Hippocampal Cannabinoid Transmission Modulates Dopamine Neuron Activity: Impact on Rewarding Memory Formation and Social Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Loureiro, Michael; Renard, Justine; Zunder, Jordan; Laviolette, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances in cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) signaling have been linked to emotional and cognitive deficits characterizing neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Thus, there is growing interest in characterizing the relationship between cannabinoid transmission, emotional processing, and dopamine (DA)-dependent behavioral deficits. The CB1R is highly expressed in the mammalian nervous system, particularly in the hippocampus. Activation of the ventral hippocampal subregion ...

  2. SGIP1 alters internalization and modulates signaling of activated cannabinoid receptor 1 in a biased manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájková, Alena; Techlovská, Šárka; Dvořáková, Michaela; Chambers, Jayne Nicole; Kumpošt, Jiří; Hubálková, Pavla; Prezeau, Laurent; Blahos, Jaroslav

    2016-08-01

    Many diseases of the nervous system are accompanied by alterations in synaptic functions. Synaptic plasticity mediated by the endogenous cannabinoid system involves the activation of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R). The principles of CB1R signaling must be understood in detail for its therapeutic exploration. We detected the Src homology 3-domain growth factor receptor-bound 2-like (endophilin) interacting protein 1 (SGIP1) as a novel CB1R partner. SGIP1 is functionally linked to clathrin-mediated endocytosis and its overexpression in animals leads to an energy regulation imbalance resulting in obesity. We report that SGIP1 prevents the endocytosis of activated CB1R and that it alters signaling via the CB1R in a biased manner. CB1R mediated G-protein activation is selectively influenced by SGIP1, β-arrestin associated signaling is changed profoundly, most likely as a consequence of the prevention of the receptor's internalization elicited by SGIP1. PMID:26970018

  3. Therapeutic Potentials and uses of Cannabinoid Agonists in Health and Disease Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Ibegbu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis and its derivatives have great therapeutic potential and have been used for centuries for medicinal purposes. The side effects of cannabinoids include euphoric mood changes, acute psychotic episodes, initiation and exacerbation of schizophrenic psychosis in predisposed persons, impaired cognitive and psychomotor performance, tachycardia and hypotension. The production of complex behavioural effects by cannabinoids are mediated by cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2 and by interactions with other neurochemical systems. It has been shown that the therapeutic and physiological effects of cannabinoids are dependent upon whether the administration is acute or chronic and on the route of administration. The physiological effects of cannabis and its derivatives include: reduction in psychomotor coordination and performance, alterations in thermoregulation, endocrine and reproductive functions and gut motility. There is also evidence of agonist selectivity for CB1 receptors coupled to different subtypes of Gi proteins or to Gi versus Go proteins. Cannabinoid-activated receptors distinct from CB1 or CB2 exist in the central nervous system. Cannabinoids are known to inhibit GABA-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the hippocampus via a presynaptic action at CB1 receptors located on GABAergic terminals. CB1 receptors have also been implicated in the inhibition of glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents. The synthetic cannabinoid, Win 55,212-2, a mixed CB1-CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist, was found to attenuate hyperalgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain and suppress opioid-induced emesis in ferrets.

  4. Comparison of N uptake and internal use efficiency in two tobacco varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan; Teng; Wenqing; Li; Chunjian; Li

    2015-01-01

    To explain the observation in field experiments that tobacco variety CB-1 was more nitrogen(N)-efficient than K326, the influence of two N levels on growth, N uptake and N flow within plants of the two tobacco varieties was studied. Xylem sap from the upper and lower leaves of both tobacco varieties cultured in quartz sand was collected by application of pressure to the root system. CB-1 took up more N with smaller roots at both high(HN, 10 mmol L-1) and low(LN, 1 mmol L-1) N levels, and built up more new tissues in upper leaves especially at LN level,than K326. Both varieties showed luxury N uptake, and CB-1 accumulated significantly less NO-3in new tissues than K326, when grown at the HN level. At both N levels, the amount of xylem-transported N and phloem-cycled N from shoot to root in K326 was greater than those in CB-1, indicating higher N use efficiency in CB-1 shoots than in K326 shoots. The major nitrogenous compound in the xylem sap was NO-3irrespective of N level and variety. Low N supply did not cause more NO-3reduction in the root. The results indicated that the N-efficient tobacco variety CB-1 was more efficient in both N uptake by smaller roots and N utilization in shoots, especially when grown at the LN level.

  5. Enhancing Brain Pregnenolone May Protect Cannabis Intoxication but Should Not Be Considered as an Anti-addiction Therapeutic: Hypothesizing Dopaminergic Blockade and Promoting Anti- Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Blum

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many US states now embrace the medical and recreational use of Cannabis. Changes in the laws have heightened interest and encouraged research into both cannabinoid products and the potential harms of Cannabis use, addiction, and intoxication. Some research into those harms will be reviewed here and misgivings about the use of Pregnenolone, to treat cannabis addiction and intoxication explained. Pregnenolone considered the inactive precursor of all steroid hormones, has recently been shown to protect the brain from Cannabis intoxication. The major active ingredient of Cannabis sativa (marijuana, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC enhances Pregnenolone synthesis in the brain via stimulation of the type-1 cannabinoid (CB1 receptor. This steroid has been shown to inhibit the activity of the CB1 receptor thereby reducing many of the effects of THC. While this mechanism seems correct, in our opinion, Vallee et al., incorrectly suggest that blocking CB1 receptors could open unforeseen approaches to the treatment of cannabis intoxication and addiction. In this hypothesis, we caution the scientific community that, other CB1 receptor blockers, such as, Rimonabant (SR141718 have been pulled off the market in Europe. In addition, CB1 receptor blockers were rejected by the FDA due to mood changes including suicide ideation. Blocking CB1 receptors would result in reduced neuronal release of Dopamine by disinhibition of GABA signaling. Longterm blockade of cannabinoid receptors could occur with raising Pregnenolone brain levels, may induce a hypodopaminergic state, and lead to aberrant substance and nonsubstance (behavioral addictions.

  6. Endocannabinoid receptor 1 gene variations increase risk for obesity and modulate body mass index in European populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzinou, Michael; Chèvre, Jean-Claude; Ward, Kirsten J;

    2008-01-01

    (BMI) in the European population. With the input of CNR1 exons and 3' and 5' regions sequencing and HapMap database, we selected and genotyped 26 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1932 obese cases and 1173 non-obese controls of French European origin. Variants that showed significant...... associations (P < 0.05) with obesity after correction for multiple testing were further tested in two additional European cohorts including 2645 individuals. For the identification of the potential causal variant(s), we further genotyped SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the obesity......-associated variants. Of the 25 successfully genotyped CNR1 SNPs, 12 showed nominal evidence of association with childhood obesity, class I and II and/or class III adult obesity (1.16 < OR < 1.40, 0.00003 < P < 0.04). Intronic SNPs rs806381 and rs2023239, which resisted correction for multiple testing were further...

  7. Large joints in graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Bollobas, Bela

    2010-01-01

    We show that if G is a graph of sufficiently large order n containing as many r-cliques as the r-partite Turan graph of order n; then for some C>0 G has more than Cn^(r-1) (r+1)-cliques sharing a common edge unless G is isomorphic to the the r-partite Turan graph of order n. This structural result generalizes a previous result that has been useful in extremal graph theory.

  8. Replication of obesity and diabetes-related SNP associations in individuals from Yucatán, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Escalante, Victor M.; Nava-Gonzalez, Edna J.; Voruganti, V. Saroja; Kent, Jack W.; Haack, Karin; Laviada-Molina, Hugo A.; Molina-Segui, Fernanda; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther C.; Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Cole, Shelley A.; Mezzles, Marguerite J.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Bastarrachea, Raul A.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is rising rapidly and in Mexicans is ~19%. T2D is affected by both environmental and genetic factors. Although specific genes have been implicated in T2D risk few of these findings are confirmed in studies of Mexican subjects. Our aim was to replicate associations of 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 10 genes with T2D-related phenotypes in a community-based Mexican cohort. Unrelated individuals (n = 259) living in southeastern Mexico were enrolled in the study based at the University of Yucatan School of Medicine in Merida. Phenotypes measured included anthropometric measurements, circulating levels of adipose tissue endocrine factors (leptin, adiponectin, pro-inflammatory cytokines), and insulin, glucose, and blood pressure. Association analyses were conducted by measured genotype analysis implemented in SOLAR, adapted for unrelated individuals. SNP Minor allele frequencies ranged from 2.2 to 48.6%. Nominal associations were found for CNR1, SLC30A8, GCK, and PCSK1 SNPs with systolic blood pressure, insulin and glucose, and for CNR1, SLC30A8, KCNJ11, and PCSK1 SNPs with adiponectin and leptin (p < 0.05). P-values greater than 0.0014 were considered significant. Association of SNPs rs10485170 of CNR1 and rs5215 of KCNJ11 with adiponectin and leptin, respectively, reached near significance (p = 0.002). Significant association (p = 0.001) was observed between plasma leptin and rs5219 of KCNJ11. PMID:25477898

  9. Effect of synthetic cannabinoids on spontaneous neuronal activity: Evaluation using Ca(2+) spiking and multi-electrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauskela, Joseph S; Comas, Tanya; Hewitt, Melissa; Aylsworth, Amy; Zhao, Xigeng; Martina, Marzia; Costain, Willard J

    2016-09-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) inhibits synaptic transmission in hippocampal neurons. The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of benchmark and emerging synthetic cannabinoids to suppress neuronal activity in vitro using two complementary techniques, Ca(2+) spiking and multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). Neuron culture and fluorescence imaging conditions were extensively optimized to provide maximum sensitivity for detection of suppression of neural activity by cannabinoids. The neuronal Ca(2+) spiking frequency was significantly suppressed within 10min by the prototypic aminoalkylindole cannabinoid, WIN 55,212-2 (10µM). Suppression by WIN 55,212-2 was not improved by pharmacological intervention with signaling pathways known to interfere with CB1 signaling. The naphthoylindole CB1 agonist, JWH-018 suppressed Ca(2+) spiking at a lower concentration (2.5µM), and the CB1 antagonist rimonabant (5µM), reversed this suppression. In the MEA assay, the ability of synthetic CB1 agonists to suppress spontaneous electrical activity of hippocampal neurons was evaluated over 80min sessions. All benchmark (WIN 55,212-2, HU-210, CP 55,940 and JWH-018) and emerging synthetic cannabinoids (XLR-11, JWH-250, 5F-PB-22, AB-PINACA and MAM-2201) suppressed neural activity at a concentration of 10µM; furthermore, several of these compounds also significantly suppressed activity at 1µM concentrations. Rimonabant partially reversed spiking suppression of 5F-PB-22 and, to a lesser extent, of MAM-2201, supporting CB1-mediated involvement, although the inactive WIN 55,212-3 also partially suppressed activity. Taken together, synthetic cannabinoid CB1-mediated suppression of neuronal activity was detected using Ca(2+) spiking and MEAs. PMID:27262380

  10. THC Prevents MDMA Neurotoxicity in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Touriño

    Full Text Available The majority of MDMA (ecstasy recreational users also consume cannabis. Despite the rewarding effects that both drugs have, they induce several opposite pharmacological responses. MDMA causes hyperthermia, oxidative stress and neuronal damage, especially at warm ambient temperature. However, THC, the main psychoactive compound of cannabis, produces hypothermic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Therefore, THC may have a neuroprotective effect against MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. Mice receiving a neurotoxic regimen of MDMA (20 mg/kg x 4 were pretreated with THC (3 mg/kg x 4 at room (21 degrees C and at warm (26 degrees C temperature, and body temperature, striatal glial activation and DA terminal loss were assessed. To find out the mechanisms by which THC may prevent MDMA hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, the same procedure was carried out in animals pretreated with the CB(1 receptor antagonist AM251 and the CB(2 receptor antagonist AM630, as well as in CB(1, CB(2 and CB(1/CB(2 deficient mice. THC prevented MDMA-induced-hyperthermia and glial activation in animals housed at both room and warm temperature. Surprisingly, MDMA-induced DA terminal loss was only observed in animals housed at warm but not at room temperature, and this neurotoxic effect was reversed by THC administration. However, THC did not prevent MDMA-induced hyperthermia, glial activation, and DA terminal loss in animals treated with the CB(1 receptor antagonist AM251, neither in CB(1 and CB(1/CB(2 knockout mice. On the other hand, THC prevented MDMA-induced hyperthermia and DA terminal loss, but only partially suppressed glial activation in animals treated with the CB(2 cannabinoid antagonist and in CB(2 knockout animals. Our results indicate that THC protects against MDMA neurotoxicity, and suggest that these neuroprotective actions are primarily mediated by the reduction of hyperthermia through the activation of CB(1 receptor, although CB(2 receptors may also contribute to

  11. Type 1 cannabinoid receptor modulates water deprivation-induced homeostatic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruginsk, Silvia G; Vechiato, Fernanda M V; Uchoa, Ernane T; Elias, Lucila L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) as a potential candidate to mediate the homeostatic responses triggered by 24 h of water deprivation, which constitutes primarily a hydroelectrolytic challenge and also significantly impacts energy homeostasis. The present results demonstrated for the first time that CB1R mRNA expression is increased in the hypothalamus of water-deprived (WD) rats. Furthermore, the administration of ACEA, a CB1R selective agonist, potentiated WD-induced dipsogenic effect, whereas AM251, a CB1R antagonist, attenuated not only water but also salt intake in response to WD. In parallel with the modulation of thirst and salt appetite, we confirmed that CB1Rs are essential for the development of appropriated neuroendocrine responses. Although the administration of ACEA or AM251 did not produce any effects on WD-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, oxytocin (OXT) plasma concentrations were significantly decreased in WD rats treated with ACEA. At the genomic level, ACEA significantly decreased AVP and OXT mRNA expression in the hypothalamus of WD rats, whereas AM251 potentiated both basal and WD-induced stimulatory effects on the transcription of AVP and OXT genes. In addition, we showed that water deprivation alone upregulated proopiomelanocortin, Agouti-related peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone, and orexin A mRNA levels in the hypothalamus, and that CB1Rs regulate main central peptidergic pathways controlling food intake, being that most of these effects were also significantly influenced by the hydration status. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that CB1Rs participate in the homeostatic responses regulating fluid balance and energy homeostasis during water deprivation. PMID:26468265

  12. Behavioural and molecular consequences of chronic cannabinoid treatment in Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowie, M J; Howard, M L; Nicholson, L F B; Faull, R L M; Hannan, A J; Glass, M

    2010-09-29

    Early loss of CB1 receptors is a hallmark of human Huntington's disease. Data from rodent studies suggest that preservation and activation of CB1 receptors may be protective against disease progression. R6/1 transgenic mice are considered to be a model of early pathogenic changes in Huntington's disease. We have shown previously that levels of CB1 in R6/1 mice prior to the onset of motor symptoms (12 weeks of age) remain high enough to justify commencement of cannabinoid drug treatment. Eight weeks of daily treatment with the cannabinoid agonists HU210 (0.01 mg/kg) and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 10.00 mg/kg), or the inhibitor of endocannabinoid metabolism URB597 (0.30 mg/kg), did not alter the progressive deterioration of performance observed in motor behavioural testing. HU210-treated R6/1 mice experienced a significant increase in seizure events suggesting that this therapy may lower the seizure threshold and cautioning against highly efficacious agonists as potential therapy in this disease. Molecular characterisation of brains at the end of the study showed that there were no significant effects of HU210 or THC treatment on the ligand binding of cannabinoid CB1, dopamine D1, D2, serotonin 5HT2A or GABA(A) receptors, nor CB1 or fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) mRNA expression in R6/1 mice. Intriguingly, a significant increase in the number of ubiquitinated aggregates was observed in the striatum with HU210 treatment, indicating an influence of CB1 on the disease process. Chronic URB597 treatment preserved CB1 receptors in the R6/1 striatum, suggesting that the manipulation of endocannabinoid levels warrants further exploration. PMID:20600638

  13. Evaluation of the In Vivo and Ex Vivo Binding of Novel BC1 Cannabinoid Receptor Radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.; Gatley, J.; Gifford, A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary active ingredient of marijuana, 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, exerts its psychoactive effects by binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. These receptors are found throughout the brain with high concentrations in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The current study was conducted to evaluate the binding of a newly developed putative cannabinoid antagonist, AM630, and a classical cannabinoid 8-tetrahydrocannabinol as potential PET and/or SPECT imaging agents for brain CB1 receptors. For both of these ligands in vivo and ex vivo studies in mice were conducted. AM630 showed good overall brain uptake (as measure by %IA/g) and a moderately rapid clearance from the brain with a half-clearance time of approximately 30 minutes. However, AM630 did not show selective binding to CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Ex vivo autoradiography supported the lack of selective binding seen in the in vivo study. Similar to AM630, 8-tetrahydrocanibol also failed to show selective binding to CB1 receptor rich brain areas. The 8-tetrahydrocanibol showed moderate overall brain uptake and relatively slow brain clearance as compared to AM630. Further studies were done with AM2233, a cannabinoid ligand with a similar structure as AM630. These studies were done to develop an ex vivo binding assay to quantify the displacement of [131I]AM2233 binding by other ligands in Swiss-Webster and CB1 receptor knockout mice. By developing this assay we hoped to determine the identity of an unknown binding site for AM2233 present in the hippocampus of CB1 knockout mice. Using an approach based on incubation of brain slices prepared from mice given intravenous [131I]AM2233 in either the presence or absence of AM2233 (unlabelled) it was possible to demonstrate a significant AM2233-displacable binding in the Swiss-Webster mice. Future studies will determine if this assay is appropriate for identifying the unknown binding site for AM2233 in the CB1 knockout mice.

  14. Cannabinoids Regulate Bcl-2 and Cyclin D2 Expression in Pancreatic β Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Seok; Rho, Jun Gi; Shin, Jung Jae; Song, Woo Keun; Lee, Eun Kyung; Egan, Josephine M.; Kim, Wook

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed in pancreatic β cells, where they induce cell death and cell cycle arrest by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation. Here, we report that CB1Rs regulate the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell cycle regulator cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. Treatment of MIN6 and βTC6 cells with a synthetic CB1R agonist, WIN55,212–2, led to a decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2, in turn inducing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Additionally, genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1Rs after injury in mice led to increased levels of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 mediated by CB1Rs in the regulation of β-cell survival and growth, and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to enhance β-cell function and growth in diabetes. PMID:26967640

  15. Blockade of cannabinoid 1 receptor improves GLP-1R mediated insulin secretion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Kim, Wook; Rouse, Michael; Egan, Josephine M

    2016-03-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) is an important regulator of energy metabolism. Reports of in vivo and in vitro studies give conflicting results regarding its role in insulin secretion, possibly due to circulatory factors, such as incretins. We hypothesized that this receptor may be a regulator of the entero-insular axis. We found that despite lower food consumption and lower body weight postprandial GLP-1 plasma concentrations were increased in CB1(-/-) mice compared to CB1(+/+) mice administered a standard diet or high fat/sugar diet. Upon exogenous GLP-1 treatment, CB1(-/-) mice had increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In mouse insulinoma cells, cannabinoids reduced GLP-1R-mediated intracellular cAMP accumulation and subsequent insulin secretion. Importantly, such effects were also evident in human islets, and were prevented by pharmacologic blockade of CB1. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel mechanism in which endocannabinoids are negative modulators of incretin-mediated insulin secretion. PMID:26724516

  16. Cannabinoids Regulate Bcl-2 and Cyclin D2 Expression in Pancreatic β Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihye Kim

    Full Text Available Recent reports have shown that cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs are expressed in pancreatic β cells, where they induce cell death and cell cycle arrest by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation. Here, we report that CB1Rs regulate the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell cycle regulator cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. Treatment of MIN6 and βTC6 cells with a synthetic CB1R agonist, WIN55,212-2, led to a decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2, in turn inducing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Additionally, genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of CB1Rs after injury in mice led to increased levels of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 in pancreatic β cells. These findings provide evidence for the involvement of Bcl-2 and cyclin D2 mediated by CB1Rs in the regulation of β-cell survival and growth, and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to enhance β-cell function and growth in diabetes.

  17. Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fede, C; Albertin, G; Petrelli, L; Sfriso, M M; Biz, C; De Caro, R; Stecco, C

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  18. Feeding induced by cannabinoids is mediated independently of the melanocortin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspha Sinnayah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana, stimulate appetite, and cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1-R antagonists suppress appetite and promote weight loss. Little is known about how CB1-R antagonists affect the central neurocircuitry, specifically the melanocortin system that regulates energy balance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that peripherally administered CB1-R antagonist (AM251 or agonist equally suppressed or stimulated feeding respectively in A(y , which lack a functional melanocortin system, and wildtype mice, demonstrating that cannabinoid effects on feeding do not require melanocortin circuitry. CB1-R antagonist or agonist administered into the ventral tegmental area (VTA equally suppressed or stimulated feeding respectively, in both genotypes. In addition, peripheral and central cannabinoid administration similarly induced c-Fos activation in brain sites suggesting mediation via motivational dopaminergic circuitry. Amperometry-detected increases in evoked dopamine (DA release by the CB1-R antagonist in nucleus accumbens slices indicates that AM251 modulates DA release from VTA terminals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that the effects of cannabinoids on energy balance are independent of hypothalamic melanocortin circuitry and is primarily driven by the reward system.

  19. Cannabinoid modulation of drug reward and the implications of marijuana legalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Dan P; Wenzel, Jennifer M; Cheer, Joseph F

    2015-12-01

    Marijuana is the most popular illegal drug worldwide. Recent trends indicate that this may soon change; not due to decreased marijuana use, but to an amendment in marijuana's illegal status. The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor mediates marijuana's psychoactive and reinforcing properties. CB1 receptors are also part of the brain endocannabinoid (eCB) system and support numerous forms of learning and memory, including the conditioned reinforcing properties of cues predicting reward or punishment. This is accomplished via eCB-dependent alterations in mesolimbic dopamine function, which plays an obligatory role in reward learning and motivation. Presynaptic CB1 receptors control midbrain dopamine neuron activity and thereby shape phasic dopamine release in target regions, particularly the nucleus accumbens (NAc). By also regulating synaptic input to the NAc, CB1 receptors modulate NAc output onto downstream neurons of the basal ganglia motor circuit, and thereby support goal-directed behaviors. Abused drugs promote short- and long-term adaptations in eCB-regulation of mesolimbic dopamine function, and thereby hijack neural systems related to the pursuit of rewards to promote drug abuse. By pharmacologically targeting the CB1 receptors, marijuana has preferential access to this neuronal system and can potently alter eCB-dependent processing of reward-related stimuli. As marijuana legalization progresses, greater access to this drug should increase the utility of marijuana as a research tool to better understand the eCB system, which has the potential to advance cannabinoid-based treatments for drug addiction. PMID:25463025

  20. Role of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Parfieniuk; Robert Flisiak

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds acting primarily via CB1 and CB2 receptors. The expression of cannabinoid receptors in normal liver is low or absent. However, many reports have proven up-regulation of the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in hepatic myofibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells, as well as increased concentration of endocannabinoids in liver in the course of chronic progressive liver diseases. It has been shown that CB1 receptor signalling exerts profibrogenic and proinflammatory effects in liver tissue, primarily due to the stimulation of hepatic stellate cells, whereas the activation of CB2 receptors inhibits or even reverses liver fibrogenesis. Similarly, CB1 receptor stimulation contributes to progression of liver steatosis. In end-stage liver disease, the endocannabi-noid system has been shown to contribute to hepatic encephalopathy and vascular effects, such as portal hypertension, splanchnic vasodilatation, relative pe-ripheral hypotension and probably cirrhotic cardiomy-opathy. So far, available evidence is based on cellular cultures or animal models. Clinical data on the effects of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases are limited. However, recent studies have shown the contribution of cannabis smoking to the progression of liver fibrosis and steatosis. Moreover, controlling CB1 or CB2 signal-ling appears to be an attractive target in managing liver diseases.

  1. Cannabinoid Control of Learning and Memory through HCN Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroso, Mattia; Szabo, Gergely G; Kim, Hannah K; Alexander, Allyson; Bui, Anh D; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lutz, Beat; Soltesz, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of cannabinoids on cognitive processes are not understood. Here we show that cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs) control hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory through the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels that underlie the h-current (Ih), a key regulator of dendritic excitability. The CB1R-HCN pathway, involving c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNKs), nitric oxide synthase, and intracellular cGMP, exerts a tonic enhancement of Ih selectively in pyramidal cells located in the superficial portion of the CA1 pyramidal cell layer, whereas it is absent from deep-layer cells. Activation of the CB1R-HCN pathway impairs dendritic integration of excitatory inputs, long-term potentiation (LTP), and spatial memory formation. Strikingly, pharmacological inhibition of Ih or genetic deletion of HCN1 abolishes CB1R-induced deficits in LTP and memory. These results demonstrate that the CB1R-Ih pathway in the hippocampus is obligatory for the action of cannabinoids on LTP and spatial memory formation. PMID:26898775

  2. Effects of SR141716A on Cognitive and Depression-Related Behavior in an Animal Model of Premotor Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Tadaiesky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A previous study from our laboratory revealed that moderate nigral dopaminergic degeneration caused emotional and cognitive deficits in rats, paralleling early signs of Parkinson's disease. Recent evidence suggests that the blockade of cannabinoid CB1 receptors might be beneficial to alleviate motor inhibition typical of Parkinson's disease. Here, we investigated whether antagonism of CB1 receptors would improve emotional and cognitive deficits in a rat model of premotor Parkinson's disease. Depression-like behavior and cognition were assessed with the forced swim test and the social recognition test, respectively. Confirming our previous study, rats injected with 6-hydroxydopamine in striatum presented emotional and cognitive alterations which were improved by acute injection of SR141716A. HPLC analysis of monoamine levels demonstrated alterations in the striatum and prefrontal cortex after SR141716A injection. These findings suggest a role for CB1 receptors in the early symptoms caused by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the striatum, as observed in Parkinson's disease.

  3. Effects of SR141716A on Cognitive and Depression-Related Behavior in an Animal Model of Premotor Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadaiesky, M. T.; Dombrowski, P. A.; Da Cunha, C.; Takahashi, R. N.

    2010-01-01

    A previous study from our laboratory revealed that moderate nigral dopaminergic degeneration caused emotional and cognitive deficits in rats, paralleling early signs of Parkinson's disease. Recent evidence suggests that the blockade of cannabinoid CB1 receptors might be beneficial to alleviate motor inhibition typical of Parkinson's disease. Here, we investigated whether antagonism of CB1 receptors would improve emotional and cognitive deficits in a rat model of premotor Parkinson's disease. Depression-like behavior and cognition were assessed with the forced swim test and the social recognition test, respectively. Confirming our previous study, rats injected with 6-hydroxydopamine in striatum presented emotional and cognitive alterations which were improved by acute injection of SR141716A. HPLC analysis of monoamine levels demonstrated alterations in the striatum and prefrontal cortex after SR141716A injection. These findings suggest a role for CB1 receptors in the early symptoms caused by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the striatum, as observed in Parkinson's disease. PMID:20976080

  4. Endocannabinoids and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Potvin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachydonoylglycerol (2-AG are lipids naturally derived from membrane precursors which bind cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2. This endocannabinoid system is disturbed in schizophrenia. Indeed, there seems to be an association between schizophrenia and polymorphisms of the CB1 receptor gene. Moreover, CB1 receptors are found in higher density in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and basal ganglia of patients with schizophrenia. Similarly, anandamide levels are increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and in the serum of schizophrenia patients, including during the prodromal state, suggesting that they may play a protective role in psychosis homeostasis. Future studies are needed to further explore the role of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  5. A study of cannabinoid-1 receptors during the early phase of excitotoxic damage to rat spinal locomotor networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Priyadharishini; Dekanic, Ana; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Endocannabinoids acting on cannabinoid-1 receptors (CB1Rs) are proposed to protect brain and spinal neurons from excitotoxic damage. The ability to recover from spinal cord injury (SCI), in which excitotoxicity is a major player, is usually investigated at late times after modulation of CB1Rs whose role in the early phases of SCI remains unclear. Using the rat spinal cord in vitro as a model for studying SCI initial pathophysiology, we investigated if agonists or antagonists of CB1Rs might affect SCI induced by the excitotoxic agent kainate (KA) within 24h from a transient (1h) application of this glutamate agonist. The CB1 agonist anandamide (AEA or pharmacological block of its degradation) did not limit excitotoxic depolarization of spinal networks: cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) assay demonstrated that CB1Rs remained functional 24h later and similarly expressed among dead or survived cells. Locomotor-like network activity recorded from ventral roots could not recover with such treatments and was associated with persistent depression of synaptic transmission. Motoneurons, that are particularly vulnerable to KA, were not protected by AEA. Application of 2-arachidonoylglycerol also did not attenuate the electrophysiological and histological damage. The intensification of damage by the CB1 antagonist AM251 suggested that endocannabinoids were operative after excitotoxic stimulation, yet insufficient to contrast it efficiently. The present data indicate that the early phases of excitotoxic SCI could not be arrested by pharmacologically exploiting the endocannabinoid system, consistent with the notion that AEA and its derivatives are more useful to treat late SCI phases. PMID:27450568

  6. Impaired Ethanol-Induced Sensitization and Decreased Cannabinoid Receptor-1 in a Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchynski-Franks, Jessica J.; Susick, Laura L.; Schneider, Brandy L.; Perrine, Shane A.; Conti, Alana C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Impaired striatal neuroplasticity may underlie increased alcoholism documented in those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) is sensitive to the effects of ethanol (EtOH) and traumatic stress, and is a critical regulator of striatal plasticity. To investigate CB1 involvement in the PTSD-alcohol interaction, this study measured the effects of traumatic stress using a model of PTSD, mouse single-prolonged stress (mSPS), on EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization and striatal CB1 levels. Methods Mice were exposed to mSPS, which includes: 2-h restraint, 10-min group forced swim, 15-min exposure to rat bedding odor, and diethyl ether exposure until unconsciousness or control conditions. Seven days following mSPS exposure, the locomotor sensitizing effects of EtOH were assessed. CB1, post-synaptic density-95 (PSD95), and dopamine-2 receptor (D2) protein levels were then quantified in the dorsal striatum using standard immunoblotting techniques. Results Mice exposed to mSPS-EtOH demonstrated impaired EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization compared to Control-EtOH mice, which was accompanied by reduced striatal CB1 levels. EtOH increased striatal PSD95 in control and mSPS-exposed mice. Additionally, mSPS-Saline exposure increased striatal PSD95 and decreased D2 protein expression, with mSPS-EtOH exposure alleviating these changes. Conclusions These data indicate that the mSPS model of PTSD blunts the behavioral sensitizing effects of EtOH, a response that suggests impaired striatal neuroplasticity. Additionally, this study demonstrates that mice exposed to mSPS and repeated EtOH exposure decreases CB1 in the striatum, providing a mechanism of interest for understanding the effects of EtOH following severe, multimodal stress exposure. PMID:27186643

  7. Comparison of N uptake and internal use efficiency in two tobacco varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Department of Plant Nutrition, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To explain the observation in field experiments that tobacco variety CB-1 was more nitrogen (N-efficient than K326, the influence of two N levels on growth, N uptake and N flow within plants of the two tobacco varieties was studied. Xylem sap from the upper and lower leaves of both tobacco varieties cultured in quartz sand was collected by application of pressure to the root system. CB-1 took up more N with smaller roots at both high (HN, 10 mmol L− 1 and low (LN, 1 mmol L− 1 N levels, and built up more new tissues in upper leaves especially at LN level, than K326. Both varieties showed luxury N uptake, and CB-1 accumulated significantly less NO3− in new tissues than K326, when grown at the HN level. At both N levels, the amount of xylem-transported N and phloem-cycled N from shoot to root in K326 was greater than those in CB-1, indicating higher N use efficiency in CB-1 shoots than in K326 shoots. The major nitrogenous compound in the xylem sap was NO3− irrespective of N level and variety. Low N supply did not cause more NO3− reduction in the root. The results indicated that the N-efficient tobacco variety CB-1 was more efficient in both N uptake by smaller roots and N utilization in shoots, especially when grown at the LN level.

  8. Activation of cannabinoid receptor 2 reduces inflammation in acute experimental pancreatitis via intra-acinar activation of p38 and MK2-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michler, Thomas; Storr, Martin; Kramer, Johannes; Ochs, Stefanie; Malo, Antje; Reu, Simone; Göke, Burkhard; Schäfer, Claus

    2013-01-15

    The endocannabinoid system has been shown to mediate beneficial effects on gastrointestinal inflammation via cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB(1)) and 2 (CB(2)). These receptors have also been reported to activate the MAP kinases p38 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), which are involved in early acinar events leading to acute pancreatitis and induction of proinflammatory cytokines. Our aim was to examine the role of cannabinoid receptor activation in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis and the potential involvement of MAP kinases. Cerulein pancreatitis was induced in wild-type, CB(1)-/-, and MK2-/- mice pretreated with selective cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists. Severity of pancreatitis was determined by serum amylase and IL-6 levels, intracellular activation of pancreatic trypsinogen, lung myeloperoxidase activity, pancreatic edema, and histological examinations. Pancreatic lysates were investigated by Western blotting using phospho-specific antibodies against p38 and JNK. Quantitative PCR data, Western blotting experiments, and immunohistochemistry clearly show that CB(1) and CB(2) are expressed in mouse pancreatic acini. During acute pancreatitis, an upregulation especially of CB(2) on apoptotic cells occurred. The unselective CB(1)/CB(2) agonist HU210 ameliorated pancreatitis in wild-type and CB(1)-/- mice, indicating that this effect is mediated by CB(2). Furthermore, blockade of CB(2), not CB(1), with selective antagonists engraved pathology. Stimulation with a selective CB(2) agonist attenuated acute pancreatitis and an increased activation of p38 was observed in the acini. With use of MK2-/- mice, it could be demonstrated that this attenuation is dependent on MK2. Hence, using the MK2-/- mouse model we reveal a novel CB(2)-activated and MAP kinase-dependent pathway that modulates cytokine expression and reduces pancreatic injury and affiliated complications. PMID:23139224

  9. Cannabinoids reverse the effects of early stress on neurocognitive performance in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alteba, Shirley; Korem, Nachshon; Akirav, Irit

    2016-07-01

    Early life stress (ES) significantly increases predisposition to psychopathologies. Cannabinoids may cause cognitive deficits and exacerbate the effects of ES. Nevertheless, the endocannabinoid system has been suggested as a therapeutic target for the treatment of stress- and anxiety-related disorders. Here we examined whether cannabinoids administered during "late adolescence" (extensive cannabis use in humans at the ages 18-25) could reverse the long-term adverse effects of ES on neurocognitive function in adulthood. Male and female rats were exposed to ES during post-natal days (P) 7-14, injected with the cannabinoid CB1/2 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 1.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for 2 wk during late adolescence (P45-60) and tested in adulthood (P90) for working memory, anxiety, and alterations in CB1 receptors (CB1r), and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the stress circuit [hippocampus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and basolateral amygdala (BLA)]. ES males and females exhibited impaired performance in short-term memory in adulthood in the spatial location and social recognition tasks; males were also impaired in the novel object recognition task. WIN administered during late adolescence prevented these stress-induced impairments and reduced anxiety levels. WIN normalized the ES-induced up-regulation in PFC-GRs and CA1-CB1r in females. In males, WIN normalized the ES-induced up-regulation in PFC-GR and down-regulation in BLA-CB1r. There is a crucial role of the endocannabinoid system in the effects of early life stress on behavior at adulthood. Differences in recognition memory and in the expression of GRs and CB1r in the fear circuit suggest sex differences in the mechanism underlying coping with stress. PMID:27317195

  10. A novel control of human keratin expression: cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated signaling down-regulates the expression of keratins K6 and K16 in human keratinocytes in vitro and in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Ramot

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors (CB are expressed throughout human skin epithelium. CB1 activation inhibits human hair growth and decreases proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. Since psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative, inflammatory skin disease, it is conceivable that the therapeutic modulation of CB signaling, which can inhibit both proliferation and inflammation, could win a place in future psoriasis management. Given that psoriasis is characterized by up-regulation of keratins K6 and K16, we have investigated whether CB1 stimulation modulates their expression in human epidermis. Treatment of organ-cultured human skin with the CB1-specific agonist, arachidonoyl-chloro-ethanolamide (ACEA, decreased K6 and K16 staining intensity in situ. At the gene and protein levels, ACEA also decreased K6 expression of cultured HaCaT keratinocytes, which show some similarities to psoriatic keratinocytes. These effects were partly antagonized by the CB1-specific antagonist, AM251. While CB1-mediated signaling also significantly inhibited human epidermal keratinocyte proliferation in situ, as shown by K6/Ki-67-double immunofluorescence, the inhibitory effect of ACEA on K6 expression in situ was independent of its anti-proliferative effect. Given recent appreciation of the role of K6 as a functionally important protein that regulates epithelial wound healing in mice, it is conceivable that the novel CB1-mediated regulation of keratin 6/16 revealed here also is relevant to wound healing. Taken together, our results suggest that cannabinoids and their receptors constitute a novel, clinically relevant control element of human K6 and K16 expression.

  11. Cannabinoid 1 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors discretely modulate evoked glutamate separately from spontaneous glutamate transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawley, Jessica A; Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-06-11

    Action potentials trigger synaptic terminals to synchronously release vesicles, but some vesicles release spontaneously. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can modulate both of these processes. At cranial primary afferent terminals, the GPCR cannabinoid 1 (CB1) is often coexpressed with transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a nonselective cation channel present on most afferents. Here we tested whether CB1 activation modulates synchronous, action potential-evoked (eEPSCs) and/or spontaneous (sEPSCs) EPSCs at solitary tract nucleus neurons. In rat horizontal brainstem slices, activation of solitary tract (ST) primary afferents generated ST-eEPSCs that were rapidly and reversibly inhibited from most afferents by activation of CB1 with arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) or WIN 55,212-2 [R-(+)-(2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl)(1-naphthalenyl) methanone monomethanesulfonate]. The CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 [N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] blocked these responses. Despite profound depression of ST-eEPSCs during CB1 activation, sEPSCs in these same neurons were unaltered. Changes in temperature changed sEPSC frequency only from TRPV1(+) afferents (i.e., thermal sEPSC responses only occurred in TRPV1(+) afferents). CB1 activation failed to alter these thermal sEPSC responses. However, the endogenous arachidonate metabolite N-arachidonyldopamine (NADA) promiscuously activated both CB1 and TRPV1 receptors. NADA inhibited ST-eEPSCs while simultaneously increasing sEPSC frequency, and thermally triggered sEPSC increases in neurons with TRPV1(+) afferents. We found no evidence for CB1/TRPV1 interactions suggesting independent regulation of two separate vesicle pools. Together, these data demonstrate that action potential-evoked synchronous glutamate release is modulated separately from TRPV1-mediated glutamate release despite coexistence

  12. Constitutive cannabinoid 1 and mu opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area: occurrence, function and therapeutic relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Meye, F J

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) play a crucial role in regulating systems dedicated to processing rewards and emotions. It was known that in artificial systems, CB1Rs can exhibit activity that is independent of the typical agonist-driven form. However, it remained largely unclear whether this constitutive activity also occurred in native tissue (e.g. the brain), and if so, what role it plays in neurotransmission and behavior. In this thesis we have taken a multi-disciplinary approach to show ...

  13. Synthesis of Hemopressin Peptides by Classical Solution Phase Fragment Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anantha Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A fragment condensation solution phase assembly of the naturally occurring CB1 inverse agonist nonapeptides, Pro-Val-Asn-Phe-Lys-Phe/Leu-Leu-Ser-His-OH (hemopressins, and two other homologues: N-terminal 2-amino acid (dipeptide extended undecapeptide, Val-Asp-Pro-Val-Asn-Phe-Lys-Leu-Leu-Ser-His-OH, and three-amino acid (tripeptide extended dodecapeptide, Arg-Val-Asp-Pro-Val-Asn-Phe-Lys-Leu-Leu-Ser-His-OH, both CB1 agonists, is reported.

  14. Synaptic action of anandamide and related substances in mammalian brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Cheng Yong

    2007-01-01

    Anandamide and the synthetic cannabimimetic drugs AM 404 and WIN 55,212-2 were found to inhibit the binding of [3H]batrachotoxinin A 20--benzoate (BTX) to voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and also to depress VGSC-dependent release of GABA and L-glutamic acid. These effects occur independently of CB-1 receptor activation since they were not attenuated by AM251 at concentrations known to antagonize CB-1 receptors, although at higher concentrations AM251 inhibited VGSCs also. These ...

  15. Effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on neuronally-evoked contractions of urinary bladder tissues isolated from rat, mouse, pig, dog, monkey and human

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, R S; Luong, L A; Welsh, N. J.; Eglen, R. M.; Martin, G R; MacLennan, S J

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the cannabinoid receptor, known to inhibit neuronally-evoked contractions of the mouse isolated urinary bladder, in bladder sections isolated from mouse, rat, dog, pig non-human primate or human.The CB1-like pharmacology of the cannabinoid receptor in mouse isolated bladder observed previously was confirmed in this study by the rank order of agonist potencies: CP 55940⩾WIN 55212-2>HU 210>JWH 015>anandamide, the high affinity of the CB1 selective antagonist, SR 141716A ...

  16. Cannabinoids alter spontaneous firing, bursting and cell synchrony of hippocampal principal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goonawardena, Anushka V.; Riedel, Gernot; Hampson, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Both natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor (e.g. CB1) agonists such as Δ9-THC, WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2) and HU-210 disrupt spatial cognition presumably through the inhibition of synchrony of hippocampal ensemble firing to task-related events (Hampson and Deadwyler, J. of Neuroscience, 2000; 20:8932-8942; Robinson et al., Brit. J. Pharmacology, 2007; 151:688-700). And although the CB1 receptor agonist CP 55,940 also disrupts the synchronous firing of hippocampal neurons, it does not seem to a...

  17. Ligand Binding Sensitivity of the Extracellular Loop Two of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Bertalovitz, Alexander C.; Ahn, Kwang H.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor thought to bind ligands primarily within its helical bundle. Evidence suggests, however, that the extracellular domain may also play a role. We have previously shown that the C-terminus of the extracellular loop 2 of CB1 is important in binding some compounds; receptors with mutations in this region (F268W, P269A, H270A, and I271A) bound some agonists with severely reduced affinity relative to the wild-type receptor. I...

  18. Evaluation of Two New Models of Net Radiometers and Comparison to a Model to Predict Net Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonquist, J. M.; Tanner, B. D.; Bugbee, B.

    2007-12-01

    Net radiation is a key component to the surface energy balance, but it is difficult and expensive to measure accurately. Two new net radiometer models (Hukseflux NR01 and Kipp & Zonen CNR2) have been released in the past year. We evaluated and compared these models to two Kipp and Zonen model CNR1 net radiometers, and to two less expensive, older model net radiometers (Kipp & Zonen NR-Lite and REBS Q*7.1). Additionally, we predicted net radiation from solar radiation, air temperature, and absolute humidity measurements using a commonly used model that calculates net longwave radiation using a Brunt (1932; 1952) approach for predicting net emissivity. The model uses the ratio of measured solar radiation to predicted clear-sky solar radiation as a surrogate for cloud cover. Net shortwave radiation is determined by direct measurement of solar radiation and the albedo of the surface. Hourly averages and daily totals (over the course of the study; 33 days) from three replicate sensors of the two new net radiometers compared quite well to the CNR1 radiometers. The difference was generally less than +/- 5 %. Three replicates of the two older model net radiometers did not agree as well with the newer models, with differences generally less than +/- 15 %. Our data matched what others (Cobos and Baker, 2003; Brotzge and Duchon, 2000) have shown for these older radiometers. The net radiation model yielded hourly average and daily total values that were 10-15 % higher than the CNR1 radiometers. Our findings indicate that accuracy increases with increasing cost. Prediction of net radiation from the model yielded adequate results for some applications, such as evapotranspiration predictions and irrigation scheduling, but the model has considerable error at night due to some simplifying assumptions. Accurate net radiation measurements depend on proper placement of the sensor, proper leveling, and routine maintenance to keep the sensing surfaces clean.

  19. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB1 antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB1 receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB1 receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo

  20. Stress Response Recruits the Hippocampal Endocannabinoid System for the Modulation of Fear Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvares, Lucas de Oliveira; Engelke, Douglas Senna; Diehl, Felipe; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Haubrich, Josue; Cassini, Lindsey de Freitas; Molina, Victor Alejandro; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The modulation of memory processes is one of the several functions of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the brain, with CB1 receptors highly expressed in areas such as the dorsal hippocampus. Experimental evidence suggested an important role of the ECS in aversively motivated memories. Similarly, glucocorticoids released in response to stress…

  1. 78 FR 59039 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... demonstrated in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat model of type-2 diabetes that beta-cell loss is caused by... the endocannabinoid receptor CB1R. Development Stage: In vivo data available (animal). Inventors... agents. Development Stage Pre-clinical. In vitro data available. In vivo data available...

  2. Cannabinoid receptor type-1: breaking the dogmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets Garcia, Arnau; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is abundantly expressed in the brain. This system regulates a plethora of physiological functions and is composed of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of endocannabinoids. In this review, we highlight the new advances in cannabinoid signaling, focusing on a key component of the ECS, the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB 1). In recent years, the development of new imaging and molecular tools has demonstrated that this receptor can be distributed in many cell types (e.g., neuronal or glial cells) and intracellular compartments (e.g., mitochondria). Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects are differentially mediated by CB 1 receptors according to their specific localization (e.g., glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons). Moreover, this receptor is expressed in the periphery, where it can modulate periphery-brain connections. Finally, the better understanding of the CB 1 receptor structure led researchers to propose interesting and new allosteric modulators. Thus, the advances and the new directions of the CB 1 receptor field will provide new insights and better approaches to profit from its interesting therapeutic profile.

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-2565 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0982 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-1554 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-1297 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  7. Gene : CBRC-MMUS-04-0013 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mu...s musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAH70447.1| Cannab

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0117 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-1316 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-02-0334 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-1403 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-1112 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-1594 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-1494 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1368 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available usculus] emb|CAB42647.1| cannabinoid CB1 receptor [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91800.1| striatal cannabinoid recepto...r type 1 protein [Mus musculus] gb|AAS91801.1| striatal cannabinoid receptor type 1 protein [Mus musculus] g

  16. Synthesis of a sugar-based thiosemicarbazone series and structure-activity relationship versus the parasite cysteine proteases rhodesain, cruzain, and Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Nayara Cristina; da Cruz, Luana Faria; da Silva Villela, Filipe; do Nascimento Pereira, Glaécia Aparecida; de Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Kellar, Danielle; Suzuki, Brian M; Ray, Debalina; de Souza, Thiago Belarmino; Alves, Ricardo José; Sales Júnior, Policarpo Ademar; Romanha, Alvaro José; Murta, Silvane Maria Fonseca; McKerrow, James H; Caffrey, Conor R; de Oliveira, Renata Barbosa; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado

    2015-05-01

    The pressing need for better drugs against Chagas disease, African sleeping sickness, and schistosomiasis motivates the search for inhibitors of cruzain, rhodesain, and Schistosoma mansoni CB1 (SmCB1), the major cysteine proteases from Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and S. mansoni, respectively. Thiosemicarbazones and heterocyclic analogues have been shown to be both antitrypanocidal and inhibitory against parasite cysteine proteases. A series of compounds was synthesized and evaluated against cruzain, rhodesain, and SmCB1 through biochemical assays to determine their potency and structure-activity relationships (SAR). This approach led to the discovery of 6 rhodesain, 4 cruzain, and 5 SmCB1 inhibitors with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ≤ 10 μM. Among the compounds tested, the thiosemicarbazone derivative of peracetylated galactoside (compound 4i) was discovered to be a potent rhodesain inhibitor (IC50 = 1.2 ± 1.0 μM). The impact of a range of modifications was determined; removal of thiosemicarbazone or its replacement by semicarbazone resulted in virtually inactive compounds, and modifications in the sugar also diminished potency. Compounds were also evaluated in vitro against the parasites T. cruzi, T. brucei, and S. mansoni, revealing active compounds among this series. PMID:25712353

  17. What Can Rats Tell Us about Adolescent Cannabis Exposure? Insights from Preclinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Justine; Rushlow, Walter J; Laviolette, Steven R

    2016-06-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used drug of abuse among adolescents. Adolescence is a vulnerable period for brain development, during which time various neurotransmitter systems such as the glutamatergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and endocannabinoid systems undergo extensive reorganization to support the maturation of the central nervous system (CNS). ▵-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, acts as a partial agonist of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs). CB1Rs are abundant in the CNS and are central components of the neurodevelopmental changes that occur during adolescence. Thus, overactivation of CB1Rs by cannabinoid exposure during adolescence has the ability to dramatically alter brain maturation, leading to persistent and enduring changes in adult cerebral function. Increasing preclinical evidence lends support to clinical evidence suggesting that chronic adolescent marijuana exposure may be associated with a higher risk for neuropsychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia. In this review, we present a broad overview of current neurobiological evidence regarding the long-term consequences of adolescent cannabinoid exposure on adult neuropsychiatric-like disorders. PMID:27254841

  18. Effect of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, on the triggering of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations in dogs and humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Beaumont; J. Jensen; A. Carlsson; M. Ruth; A. Lehmann; G.E. Boeckxstaens

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are the main mechanism underlying gastro-oesophageal reflux and are a potential pharmacological treatment target. We evaluated the effect of the CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC

  19. Lipid rafts regulate 2-arachidonoylglycerol metabolism and physiological activity in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarrone, Mauro; De Chiara, Valentina; Gasperi, Valeria; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Rossi, Silvia; Oddi, Sergio; Molinari, Marco; Musella, Alessandra; Finazzi-Agrò, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2009-04-01

    Several G protein-associated receptors and synaptic proteins function within lipid rafts, which are subdomains of the plasma membranes that contain high concentrations of cholesterol. In this study we addressed the possible role of lipid rafts in the control of endocannabinoid system in striatal slices. Disruption of lipid rafts following cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodestrin (MCD) failed to affect synthesis and degradation of anandamide, while it caused a marked increase in the synthesis and concentration of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), as well as in the binding activity of cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Surprisingly, endogenous 2-AG-mediated control of GABA transmission was not potentiated by MCD treatment and, in contrast, neither basal nor 3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine-stimulated 2-AG altered GABA synapses in cholesterol-depleted slices. Synaptic response to the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist HU210 was however intact in MCD-treated slices, indicating that reduced sensitivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptors does not explain why endogenous 2-AG is ineffective in inhibiting striatal GABA transmission after cholesterol depletion. Confocal microscopy analysis suggested that disruption of raft integrity by MCD might uncouple metabotropic glutamate 5-CB1 receptor interaction by altering the correct localization of both receptors in striatal neuron elements. In conclusion, our data indicate that disruption of raft integrity causes a complex alteration of the endocannabinoid signalling in the striatum. PMID:19187444

  20. Endocannabinoids in the rat basolateral amygdala enhance memory consolidation and enable glucocorticoid modulation of memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campolongo, Patrizia; Roozendaal, Benno; Trezza, Viviana; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.; Cuomo, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) modulates the consolidation of memories for emotionally arousing experiences, an effect that involves the activation of the glucocorticoid system. Because the BLA expresses high densities of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, th

  1. (+)-Cannabidiol analogues which bind cannabinoid receptors but exert peripheral activity only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fride, Ester; Feigin, Cfir; Ponde, Datta E; Breuer, Aviva; Hanus, Lumír; Arshavsky, Nina; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2004-12-15

    Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and (-)-cannabidiol are major constituents of the Cannabis sativa plant with different pharmacological profiles: (-)-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, but not (-)-cannabidiol, activates cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and induces psychoactive and peripheral effects. We have tested a series of (+)-cannabidiol derivatives, namely, (+)-cannabidiol-DMH (DMH-1,1-dimethylheptyl-), (+)-7-OH-cannabidiol-DMH, (+)-7-OH- cannabidiol, (+)-7-COOH- cannabidiol and (+)-7-COOH-cannabidiol-DMH, for central and peripheral (intestinal, antiinflammatory and peripheral pain) effects in mice. Although all (+)-cannabidiols bind to cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, only (+)-7-OH-cannabidiol-DMH was centrally active, while all (+)-cannabidiol analogues completely arrested defecation. The effects of (+)-cannabidiol-DMH and (+)-7-OH-cannabidiol-DMH were partially antagonized by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist N-(piperidiny-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716), but not by the cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist N-[-(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethil bicyclo [2.2.1] heptan-2-yl-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528), and had no effect on CB1(-/-) receptor knockout mice. (+)-Cannabidiol-DMH inhibited the peripheral pain response and arachidonic-acid-induced inflammation of the ear. We conclude that centrally inactive (+)-cannabidiol analogues should be further developed as antidiarrheal, antiinflammatory and analgesic drugs for gastrointestinal and other peripheral conditions. PMID:15588739

  2. Approximation to Continuous Functions by a Kind of Interpolation Polynomials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Xue-gang; Wang De-hui

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an interpolation polynomial operator Fn (f; l, x ) is constructed based on the zeros of a kind of Jacobi polynomials as the interpolation nodes. For any continuous function f(x)∈ Cb[1,1] (0≤b≤l) Fn(f; l,x) converges to f(x) uniformly, where l is an odd number.

  3. Synthetic cannabinoids: In silico prediction of the cannabinoid receptor 1 affinity by a quantitative structure-activity relationship model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulke, Alexander; Proschak, Ewgenij; Sommer, Kai; Achenbach, Janosch; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-03-14

    The number of new synthetic psychoactive compounds increase steadily. Among the group of these psychoactive compounds, the synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) are most popular and serve as a substitute of herbal cannabis. More than 600 of these substances already exist. For some SCBs the in vitro cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) affinity is known, but for the majority it is unknown. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed, which allows the determination of the SCBs affinity to CB1 (expressed as binding constant (Ki)) without reference substances. The chemically advance template search descriptor was used for vector representation of the compound structures. The similarity between two molecules was calculated using the Feature-Pair Distribution Similarity. The Ki values were calculated using the Inverse Distance Weighting method. The prediction model was validated using a cross validation procedure. The predicted Ki values of some new SCBs were in a range between 20 (considerably higher affinity to CB1 than THC) to 468 (considerably lower affinity to CB1 than THC). The present QSAR model can serve as a simple, fast and cheap tool to get a first hint of the biological activity of new synthetic cannabinoids or of other new psychoactive compounds. PMID:26795018

  4. Dissecting the cannabinergic control of behavior: The where matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Desprez, Tifany; Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni; Soria-Gomez, Edgar

    2015-11-01

    The endocannabinoid system is the target of the main psychoactive component of the plant Cannabis sativa, the Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). This system is composed by the cannabinoid receptors, the endogenous ligands, and the enzymes involved in their metabolic processes, which works both centrally and peripherally to regulate a plethora of physiological functions. This review aims at explaining how the site-specific actions of the endocannabinoid system impact on memory and feeding behavior through the cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1 R). Centrally, CB1 R is widely distributed in many brain regions, different cell types (e.g. neuronal or glial cells) and intracellular compartments (e.g. mitochondria). Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects are differentially mediated by CB1 R according to their cell-type localization (e.g. glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons). Thus, understanding the cellular and subcellular function of CB1 R will provide new insights and aid the design of new compounds in cannabinoid-based medicine. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:26260530

  5. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis-González, Maria; Matute, Carlos; Maldonado, Rafael; Mato, Susana; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg) manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg) equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS. PMID:27589806

  6. Chronic administration of AM251 improves albuminuria and renal tubular structure in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkin, Kayte A; O'Keefe, Lannie; Simcocks, Anna C; Grinfeld, Esther; Mathai, Michael L; McAinch, Andrew J; Hryciw, Deanne H

    2015-05-01

    Modulation of the endocannabinoid system as an anti-obesity therapeutic is well established; however, the direct effects of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonism on renal function and structure in a model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) are unknown. The aim of this study was to characterise the renal effects of the CB1 antagonist AM251 in a model of DIO. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a low- or high-fat diet (HFD: 40% digestible energy from lipids) for 10 weeks to elicit DIO (n=9). In a different cohort, rats were fed a HFD for 15 weeks. After 9 weeks consuming a HFD, rats were injected daily for 6 weeks with 3 mg/kg AM251 (n=9) or saline via i.p. injection (n=9). After 10 weeks consuming a HFD, CB1 and megalin protein expression were significantly increased in the kidneys of obese rats. Antagonism of CB1 with AM251 significantly reduced weight gain, systolic blood pressure, plasma leptin, and reduced albuminuria and plasma creatinine levels in obese rats. Importantly, there was a significant reduction in tubular cross-section diameter in the obese rats treated with AM251. An improvement in albuminuria was likely due to the reduction in tubular size, reduced leptinaemia and maintenance of megalin expression levels. In obese rats, AM251 did not alter diastolic blood pressure, sodium excretion, creatinine clearance or expression of the fibrotic proteins VEGFA, TGFB1 and collagen IV in the kidney. This study demonstrates that treatment with CB1 antagonist AM251 improves renal outcomes in obese rats. PMID:25804605

  7. Type 1 cannabinoid receptor mapping with [18F]MK-9470 PET in the rat brain after quinolinic acid lesion: a comparison to dopamine receptors and glucose metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several lines of evidence imply early alterations in metabolic, dopaminergic and endocannabinoid neurotransmission in Huntington's disease (HD). Using [18F]MK-9470 and small animal PET, we investigated cerebral changes in type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor binding in the quinolinic acid (QA) rat model of HD in relation to glucose metabolism, dopamine D2 receptor availability and amphetamine-induced turning behaviour. Twenty-one Wistar rats (11 QA and 10 shams) were investigated. Small animal PET acquisitions were conducted on a Focus 220 with approximately 18 MBq of [18F]MK-9470, [18F]FDG and [11C]raclopride. Relative glucose metabolism and parametric CB1 receptor and D2 binding images were anatomically standardized to Paxinos space and analysed voxel-wise using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM2). In the QA model, [18F]MK-9470 uptake, glucose metabolism and D2 receptor binding were reduced in the ipsilateral caudate-putamen by 7, 35 and 77%, respectively (all p -5), while an increase for these markers was observed on the contralateral side (>5%, all p -4). [18F]MK-9470 binding was also increased in the cerebellum (p = 2.10-5), where it was inversely correlated to the number of ipsiversive turnings (p = 7.10-6), suggesting that CB1 receptor upregulation in the cerebellum is related to a better functional outcome. Additionally, glucose metabolism was relatively increased in the contralateral hippocampus, thalamus and sensorimotor cortex (p = 1.10-6). These data point to in vivo changes in endocannabinoid transmission, specifically for CB1 receptors in the QA model, with involvement of the caudate-putamen, but also distant regions of the motor circuitry, including the cerebellum. These data also indicate the occurrence of functional plasticity on metabolism, D2 and CB1 neurotransmission in the contralateral hemisphere. (orig.)

  8. Rimonabant precipitates anxiety in rats withdrawn from palatable food: role of the central amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasio, Angelo; Iemolo, Attilio; Sabino, Valentina; Petrosino, Stefania; Steardo, Luca; Rice, Kenner C; Orlando, Pierangelo; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Zorrilla, Eric P; Cottone, Pietro

    2013-11-01

    The anti-obesity medication rimonabant, an antagonist of cannabinoid type-1 (CB(1)) receptor, was withdrawn from the market because of adverse psychiatric side effects, including a negative affective state. We investigated whether rimonabant precipitates a negative emotional state in rats withdrawn from palatable food cycling. The effects of systemic administration of rimonabant on anxiety-like behavior, food intake, body weight, and adrenocortical activation were assessed in female rats during withdrawal from chronic palatable diet cycling. The levels of the endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the CB(1) receptor mRNA and the protein in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) were also investigated. Finally, the effects of microinfusion of rimonabant in the CeA on anxiety-like behavior, and food intake were assessed. Systemic administration of rimonabant precipitated anxiety-like behavior and anorexia of the regular chow diet in rats withdrawn from palatable diet cycling, independently from the degree of adrenocortical activation. These behavioral observations were accompanied by increased 2-AG, CB(1) receptor mRNA, and protein levels selectively in the CeA. Finally, rimonabant, microinfused directly into the CeA, precipitated anxiety-like behavior and anorexia. Our data show that (i) the 2-AG-CB(1) receptor system within the CeA is recruited during abstinence from palatable diet cycling as a compensatory mechanism to dampen anxiety, and (ii) rimonabant precipitates a negative emotional state by blocking the beneficial heightened 2-AG-CB(1) receptor signaling in this brain area. These findings help elucidate the link between compulsive eating and anxiety, and it will be valuable to develop better pharmacological treatments for eating disorders and obesity. PMID:23793355

  9. Influence of rimonabant treatment on peripheral blood mononuclear cells; flow cytometry analysis and gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Almestrand

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 antagonist rimonabant has been used as treatment for obesity. In addition, anti-proliferative effects on mitogen-activated leukocytes have been demonstrated in vitro. We have previously shown that rimonabant (SR141716A induces cell death in ex vivo isolated malignant lymphomas with high expression of CB1 receptors. Since CB1 targeting may be part of a future lymphoma therapy, it was of interest to investigate possible effects on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC in patients treated with rimonabant. We therefore evaluated leukocyte subsets by 6 color flow cytometry in eight patients before and at treatment with rimonabant for 4 weeks. Whole-transcript gene expression profiling in PBMC before and at 4 weeks of rimonabant treatment was done using Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Our data show no significant changes of monocytes, B cells, total T cells or T cell subsets in PBMC during treatment with rimonabant. There was a small but significant increase in CD3–, CD16+ and/or CD56+ cells after rimonabant therapy. Gene expression analysis detected significant changes in expression of genes associated with innate immunity, cell death and metabolism. The present study shows that normal monocytes and leukocyte subsets in blood remain rather constant during rimonabant treatment. This is in contrast to the induction of cell death previously observed in CB1 expressing lymphoma cells in response to treatment with rimonabant in vitro. These differential effects observed on normal and malignant lymphoid cells warrant investigation of CB1 targeting as a potential lymphoma treatment.

  10. Where's my entourage? The curious case of 2-oleoylglycerol, 2-linolenoylglycerol, and 2-palmitoylglycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murataeva, Natalia; Dhopeshwarkar, Amey; Yin, Danielle; Mitjavila, José; Bradshaw, Heather; Straiker, Alex; Mackie, Ken

    2016-08-01

    2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is the most abundant endogenous cannabinoid in the brain and an agonist at two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). The synthesis, degradation and signaling of 2-AG have been investigated in detail but its relationship to other endogenous monoacylglycerols has not been fully explored. Three congeners that have been isolated from the CNS are 2-linoleoylglycerol (2-LG), 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG), and 2-palmitoylglycerol (2-PG). These lipids do not orthosterically bind to cannabinoid receptors but are reported to potentiate the activity of 2-AG, possibly through inhibition of 2-AG degradation. This phenomenon has been dubbed the 'entourage effect' and has been proposed to regulate synaptic activity of 2-AG. To clarify the activity of these congeners of 2-AG we tested them in neuronal and cell-based signaling assays. The signaling profile for these compounds is inconsistent with an entourage effect. None of the compounds inhibited neurotransmission via CB1 in autaptic neurons. Interestingly, each failed to potentiate 2-AG-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE), behaving instead as antagonists. Examining other signaling pathways we found that 2-OG interferes with agonist-induced CB1 internalization while 2-PG modestly internalizes CB1 receptors. However in tests of pERK, cAMP and arrestin recruitment, none of the acylglycerols altered CB1 signaling. Our results suggest 1) that these compounds do not serve as entourage compounds under the conditions examined, and 2) that they may instead serve as functional antagonists. Our results suggest that the relationship between 2-AG and its congeners is more nuanced than previously appreciated. PMID:27117667

  11. Association between cerebral cannabinoid 1 receptor availability and body mass index in patients with food intake disorders and healthy subjects: a [(18)F]MK-9470 PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarini, J; Weltens, N; Ly, H G; Tack, J; Van Oudenhove, L; Van Laere, K

    2016-01-01

    Although of great public health relevance, the mechanisms underlying disordered eating behavior and body weight regulation remain insufficiently understood. Compelling preclinical evidence corroborates a critical role of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the central regulation of appetite and food intake. However, in vivo human evidence on ECS functioning in brain circuits involved in food intake regulation as well as its relationship with body weight is lacking, both in health and disease. Here, we measured cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) availability using positron emission tomography (PET) with [(18)F]MK-9470 in 54 patients with food intake disorders (FID) covering a wide body mass index (BMI) range (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, functional dyspepsia with weight loss and obesity; BMI range=12.5-40.6 kg/m(2)) and 26 age-, gender- and average BMI-matched healthy subjects (BMI range=18.5-26.6 kg/m(2)). The association between regional CB1R availability and BMI was assessed within predefined homeostatic and reward-related regions of interest using voxel-based linear regression analyses. CB1R availability was inversely associated with BMI in homeostatic brain regions such as the hypothalamus and brainstem areas in both patients with FID and healthy subjects. However, in FID patients, CB1R availability was also negatively correlated with BMI throughout the mesolimbic reward system (midbrain, striatum, insula, amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex), which constitutes the key circuit implicated in processing appetitive motivation and hedonic value of perceived food rewards. Our results indicate that the cerebral homeostatic CB1R system is inextricably linked to BMI, with additional involvement of reward areas under conditions of disordered body weight. PMID:27404285

  12. Activation of endocannabinoid system in the rat basolateral amygdala improved scopolamine-induced memory consolidation impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedaei, Seyed Ershad; Rezayof, Ameneh; Pourmotabbed, Ali; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-09-15

    The current study was designed to examine the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in scopolamine-induced memory impairment in adult male Wistar rats. The animals were bilaterally implanted with the cannulas in the BLA and submitted to a step-through type passive avoidance task to measure the memory formation. The results showed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of different doses of scopolamine (0.5-1.5mg/kg) immediately after the training phase (post-training) impaired memory consolidation. Bilateral microinjection of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, arachydonilcyclopropylamide (ACPA; 1-4ng/rat), into the BLA significantly improved scopolamine-induced memory consolidation impairment. On the other hand, co-administration of AM251, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist (0.25-1ng/rat, intra-BLA), with an ineffective dose of scopolamine (0.5mg/kg, i.p.), significantly impaired memory consolidation and mimicked the response of a higher dose of scopolamine. It is important to note that post-training intra-BLA microinjections of the same doses of ACPA or AM251 alone had no effect on memory consolidation. Moreover, the blockade of the BLA CB1 receptors by 0.3ng/rat of AM251 prevented ACPA-induced improvement of the scopolamine response. In view of the known actions of the drugs used, the present data pointed to the involvement of the BLA CB1 receptors in scopolamine-induced memory consolidation impairment. Furthermore, it seems that a functional interaction between the BLA endocannabinoid and cholinergic muscarinic systems may be critical for memory formation. PMID:27230394

  13. Activation of cannabinoid system in anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex modulates cost-benefit decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Abbas; Kermani, Mojtaba; Hesam, Soghra; Haghparast, Abbas; Argandoña, Enrike G; Rainer, Gregor

    2015-06-01

    Despite the evidence for altered decision making in cannabis abusers, the role of the cannabinoid system in decision-making circuits has not been studied. Here, we examined the effects of cannabinoid modulation during cost-benefit decision making in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), key brain areas involved in decision making. We trained different groups of rats in a delay-based and an effort-based form of cost-benefit T-maze decision-making task. During test days, the rats received local injections of either vehicle or ACEA, a cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) agonist in the ACC or OFC. We measured spontaneous locomotor activity following the same treatments and characterized CB1Rs localization on different neuronal populations within these regions using immunohistochemistry. We showed that CB1R activation in the ACC impaired decision making such that rats were less willing to invest physical effort to gain high reward. Similarly, CB1R activation in the OFC induced impulsive pattern of choice such that rats preferred small immediate rewards to large delayed rewards. Control tasks ensured that the effects were specific for differential cost-benefit tasks. Furthermore, we characterized widespread colocalizations of CB1Rs on GABAergic axonal ends but few colocalizations on glutamatergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic neuronal ends. These results provide first direct evidence that the cannabinoid system plays a critical role in regulating cost-benefit decision making in the ACC and OFC and implicate cannabinoid modulation of synaptic ends of predominantly interneurons and to a lesser degree other neuronal populations in these two frontal regions. PMID:25529106

  14. A high efficacy cannabinergic ligand (AM4054) used as a discriminative stimulus: Generalization to other adamantyl analogs and Δ(9)-THC in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järbe, Torbjörn U C; LeMay, Brian J; Thakur, Ganesh A; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2016-09-01

    In addition to endogenous lipids, the two main cloned receptors (CB1R and CB2R) of the endocannabinoid signaling system (ECS) can be activated (and blocked) by various exogenous ligands. A relatively novel template for CB1R activators contains an adamantyl moiety as a key structural subunit, the first being the cannabinergic AM411. Additional chemical optimization efforts using the classical tricyclic scaffold led to AM4054. Here we explored the in vivo consequences of novel adamantyl analogs in rats trained to recognize the effects of the potent adamantyl cannabinergic AM4054. Rats were trained to discriminate between AM4054 (0.1mg/kg) and vehicle. Three AM4054 analogs and Δ(9)-THC were tested for generalization (substitution) and antagonism was assessed with rimonabant. We found that all cannabinergics resulted in response generalization to the target stimulus AM4054. The order of potency was: AM4054≥AM4083≥AM4050>AM4089>Δ(9)-THC. The CB1R antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant blocked the discriminative stimulus effects of AM4054. Thus the examined structural modifications affected binding affinities but did not markedly change potencies with the exception of AM4089. In vitro (cAMP assay) functional data have suggested that AM4089 behaves as a partial rather than as a full agonist at CB1R which could explain its lower potency compared to AM4054 (Thakur et al., 2013). The 9β-formyl functionality at C-9 position was identified as an important pharmacophore yielding high in vivo potency. Antagonism by rimonabant suggested CB1R mediation. PMID:27264437

  15. Involvement of cannabinoid-1 and cannabinoid-2 receptors in septic ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y-Y; Li, Y-N; Ni, J-B; Chen, C-J; Lv, S; Chai, S-Y; Wu, R-H; Yüce, B; Storr, M

    2010-03-01

    BACKGROUND Cannabinoid (CB) receptors are involved in the regulation of gastrointestinal (GI) motility under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We aimed to characterize the possible influence of CB(1) and CB(2) receptors on motility impairment in a model of septic ileus. METHODS Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections were used to mimic pathophysiological features of septic ileus. Spontaneous jejunal myoelectrical activity was measured in rats in vivo, and upper GI transit was measured in vivo by gavaging of a charcoal marker into the stomach of mice, in absence or presence of LPS, and CB(1) and CB(2) receptor agonists and antagonists. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histology was performed with haematoxylin-eosin staining. KEY RESULTS Lipopolysaccharide treatment significantly reduced amplitude and frequency of myoelectric spiking activity and GI transit in vivo in a dose-dependent manner. TNF-alpha and IL-6 were increased in LPS-treated animals and histology showed oedema and cell infiltration. Both, the CB(1) agonist HU210 and the CB(2) agonist JWH133 reduced myoelectrical activity whereas the CB(1) antagonist AM251 caused an increase of myoelectrical activity. Pretreatment with AM251 or AM630 prevented against LPS-induced reduction of myoelectrical activity, and also against the delay of GI transit during septic ileus in vivo. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES The LPS model of septic ileus impairs jejunal myoelectrical activity and delays GI transit in vivo. Antagonists at the CB(1) receptor or the CB(2) receptor prevent the delay of GI transit and thus may be powerful tools in the future treatment of septic ileus. PMID:19840270

  16. Impaired Excitatory Neurotransmission in the Urinary Bladder from the Obese Zucker Rat: Role of Cannabinoid Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Igor; Recio, Paz; Martínez, María Pilar; López-Oliva, María Elvira; Ribeiro, Ana S. F.; Agis-Torres, Ángel; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Fernandes, Vítor S.; Hernández, Medardo

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a known risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms. This study investigates whether functional and expression changes of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors are involved in the bladder dysfunction in an obese rat model with insulin resistance. Bladder samples from obese Zucker rat (OZR) and their respective controls lean Zucker rat (LZR) were processed for immunohistochemistry and western blot for studying the cannabinoid receptors expression. Detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) strips from LZR and OZR were also mounted in myographs for isometric force recordings. Neuronal and smooth muscle CB1 and CB2 receptor expression and the nerve fiber density was diminished in the OZR bladder. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) and acetylcholine (ACh) induced frequency- and concentration-dependent contractions of LZR and OZR DSM. ACh contractile responses were similar in LZR and OZR. EFS-elicited contractions, however, were reduced in OZR bladder. Cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists failed to modify the DSM basal tension in LZR and OZR In LZR bladder, EFS responses were inhibited by ACEA and SER-601, CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists, respectively, these effects being reversed by ACEA plus the CB1 antagonist, AM-251 or SER-601 plus the CB2 antagonist, AM-630. In OZR bladder, the inhibitory action of ACEA on nerve-evoked contractions was diminished, whereas that SER-601 did not change EFS responses. These results suggest that a diminished function and expression of neuronal cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, as well as a lower nerve fiber density is involved in the impaired excitatory neurotransmission of the urinary bladder from the OZR. PMID:27285468

  17. Citoprotección y reparación mediadas por encefalinas en el ejercicio físico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Martínez-Rozo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes. Los efectos deletéreos de suprimir la oxigenación de los tejidos se pueden eliminar con protección celular, utilizando alimentos como el pescado, que contiene litio, ácidos grasos, omega 3, frutas y verduras para aportar antioxidantes. La regeneración celular y tisular se puede mediar por encefalinas. Su acción puede asociarse al ejercicio físico intenso y el trabajo excéntrico encargados de retirar los tejidos lesionados. Objetivo. Conocer algunas experiencias que utilizan la inmersión en piscina para suprimir el dolor y dar calidad de vida al paciente. Materiales y métodos. Se analiza la interacción de diez variables utilizadas como herramientas de trabajo en ocho pacientes escogidos al azar. Resultados. El trabajo excéntrico es la más importante de las herramientas. El daño muscular produce factor de crecimiento muscular y nervioso, lo cual, junto al empleo de insulinas, regenera en conjunto los tejidos. La herramienta de los endocanabinoides participa en la relajación, protección, alimentación y re-funcionalización de los tejidos, a la par que interactúa con las endorfinas para mediar la reparación en el sistema endotelial. Conclusiones. Las imágenes funcionales avanzadas (3 Teslas de resonancia serán de utilidad para observar y evaluar las interacciones de las herramientas.

  18. Contrasting effects of different cannabinoid receptor ligands on mouse ingestive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Jonathan; Terry, Phil; Higgs, Suzanne

    2012-09-01

    This study characterized the effects of seven diverse cannabinoid receptor agonists (and one antagonist) on ingestive behaviour in nondeprived adult, male CD1 mice. Microstructural analysis of licking for a range of concentrations of condensed milk (10, 15 and 20%) was carried out following administration of vehicle or: Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ⁹-THC) at 1, 3 or 6 mg/kg; CP55,940 at 10, 30 or 50 µg/kg; Win 55,212-2 at 0.5, 1 or 3 mg/kg; HU-210 at 0.01, 0.03 or 0.1 mg/kg; methanandamide at 1, 3 or 6 mg/kg; arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide at 1, 3 or 6 mg/kg and JWH133 at 1, 3 or 6 mg/kg. The cannabinoid receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant was also tested at 0.3, 1 or 3 mg/kg. Test sessions comprised three 30 s presentations of the milk concentrations separated by 10 s interpresentation intervals. The nonselective CB1 receptor agonists Δ⁹-THC, CP55,940 and Win 55,212-2 increased the number of licks for condensed milk, primarily by a significant increase in bout number. The potent and nonselective CB1 receptor agonist HU-210 and the selective CB1 receptor agonists methanandamide and arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide did not significantly affect licking behaviour but did significantly increase the latency to start licking. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant produced effects that were opposite in direction to those produced by Δ⁹-THC, CP55,940 and Win 55,212-2. Finally, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 had no significant effects on behaviour. These data add to reports that cannabinoid agonists can enhance the appetitive aspects of feeding, but they also demonstrate that not all CB1 receptor agonists do this, and therefore the relationship between action at CB1 receptors and appetitive feeding effects is not straightforward. PMID:22772336

  19. A runner’s high depends on cannabinoid receptors in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Johannes; Steinle, Jörg; Bindila, Laura; Auer, Matthias K.; Kirchherr, Hartmut; Lutz, Beat; Gass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is rewarding, and long-distance runners have described a runner’s high as a sudden pleasant feeling of euphoria, anxiolysis, sedation, and analgesia. A popular belief has been that endogenous endorphins mediate these beneficial effects. However, running exercise increases blood levels of both β-endorphin (an opioid) and anandamide (an endocannabinoid). Using a combination of pharmacologic, molecular genetic, and behavioral studies in mice, we demonstrate that cannabinoid receptors mediate acute anxiolysis and analgesia after running. We show that anxiolysis depends on intact cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptors on forebrain GABAergic neurons and pain reduction on activation of peripheral CB1 and CB2 receptors. We thus demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is crucial for two main aspects of a runner's high. Sedation, in contrast, was not influenced by cannabinoid or opioid receptor blockage, and euphoria cannot be studied in mouse models. PMID:26438875

  20. A runner's high depends on cannabinoid receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Johannes; Steinle, Jörg; Bindila, Laura; Auer, Matthias K; Kirchherr, Hartmut; Lutz, Beat; Gass, Peter

    2015-10-20

    Exercise is rewarding, and long-distance runners have described a runner's high as a sudden pleasant feeling of euphoria, anxiolysis, sedation, and analgesia. A popular belief has been that endogenous endorphins mediate these beneficial effects. However, running exercise increases blood levels of both β-endorphin (an opioid) and anandamide (an endocannabinoid). Using a combination of pharmacologic, molecular genetic, and behavioral studies in mice, we demonstrate that cannabinoid receptors mediate acute anxiolysis and analgesia after running. We show that anxiolysis depends on intact cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptors on forebrain GABAergic neurons and pain reduction on activation of peripheral CB1 and CB2 receptors. We thus demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is crucial for two main aspects of a runner's high. Sedation, in contrast, was not influenced by cannabinoid or opioid receptor blockage, and euphoria cannot be studied in mouse models. PMID:26438875

  1. Final evaluation of the CB3+burnup credit benchmark addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1966 a series of benchmarks focused on the application of burnup credit in WWER spent fuel management system was launched by L.Markova (1). The four phases of the proposed benchmark series corresponded to the phases of the Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark organised by the OECD/NEA.These phases referred as CB1, CB2, CB3 and CB4 benchmarks were designed to investigate the main features of burnup credit in WWER spent fuel management systems. In the CB1 step, the multiplication factor of an infinite array of spent fuel rods was calculated taking the burnup, cooling time and different group of nuclides as parameters. The fuel compositions was given in the benchmark specification (Authors)

  2. New insights on the role of the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta-Cherifi, B; Cota, D

    2016-02-01

    Within the past 15 years, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) has emerged as a lipid signaling system critically involved in the regulation of energy balance, as it exerts a regulatory control on every aspect related to the search, the intake, the metabolism and the storage of calories. An overactive endocannabinoid cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor signaling promotes the development of obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, representing a valuable pharmacotherapeutic target for obesity and metabolic disorders. However, because of the psychiatric side effects, the first generation of brain-penetrant CB1 receptor blockers developed as antiobesity treatment were removed from the European market in late 2008. Since then, recent studies have identified new mechanisms of action of the ECS in energy balance and metabolism, as well as novel ways of targeting the system that may be efficacious for the treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders. These aspects will be especially highlighted in this review. PMID:26374449

  3. Sexually-dimorphic effects of cannabinoid compounds on emotion and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana eRubino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the issue of sex differences in the response to cannabinoid compounds focusing mainly on behaviours belonging to the cognitive and emotional sphere. Sexual dimorphism exists in the different components of the endocannabinoid system.. Males seem to have higher CB1 receptor binding sites than females, but females seem to possess more efficient CB1 receptors. Differences between sexes have been also observed in the metabolic processing of THC, the main psychoactive ingredient of marijuana. The consistent dimorphism in the endocannabinoid system and THC metabolism may justify at least in part the different sensitivity observed between male and female animals in different behavioural paradigms concerning emotion and cognition after treatment with cannabinoid compounds.On the bases of these observations, we would like to emphasize the need of including females in basic research and to analyze results for sex differences in epidemiological studies.

  4. Inhibition of Monoacylglycerol Lipase Attenuates Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastric Hemorrhages in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kinsey, Steven G.; Daniel K Nomura; O'Neal, Scott T.; Long, Jonathan Z.; Mahadevan, Anu; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; John R Grider; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used analgesics, but can cause gastric and esophageal hemorrhages, erosion, and ulceration. The endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid; eCB) system possesses several potential targets to reduce gastric inflammatory states, including cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1), cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2), and enzymes that regulate the eCB ligands 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA). In the pres...

  5. Cannabinoid receptor 2 as a potential therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Shin; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Takayasu, Aiko; Yokoyama, Waka; Miyabe, Chie; Miyabe, Yoshishige; Harigai, Masayoshi; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Nanki, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Some of cannabinoids, which are chemical compounds contained in marijuana, are immunosuppressive. One of the receptors, CB receptor 1 (CB1), is expressed predominantly by the cells in the central nervous system, whereas CB receptor 2 (CB2) is expressed primarily by immune cells. Theoretically, selective CB2 agonists should be devoid of psychoactive effects. In this study, we investigated therapeutic effects of a selective CB2 agonist on arthritis. Methods The expression of CB2 was ...

  6. Cannabis in cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, DI; Guzman, M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tet...

  7. An amyloid β42-dependent deficit in anandamide mobilization is associated with cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Kwang-Mook; Astarita, Giuseppe; Yasar, Sevil; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Cribbs, David H.; Head, Elizabeth; Cotman, Carl W.; Piomelli, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    The endocannabinoids and their attending CB1 cannabinoid receptors have been implicated in the control of cognition, but their possible roles in dementias are still unclear. In the present study, we used liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to conduct an endocannabinoid-targeted lipidomic analysis of post mortem brain samples from 38 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients and 17 control subjects, matched for age and post mortem interval. The analysis revealed that midfrontal and temporal cortex...

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel compounds as potential modulators of cannabinoid signalling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    De Bank, Paul A

    2001-01-01

    Most of the biological effects of cannabis are due to the activation of specific cannabinoid receptors. To date, two such receptors have been discovered and are found predominantly in the central nervous system (the CB1 receptor) or the immune system (the CB2 receptor). Endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligands, the endocannabinoids, have also been isolated and the mechanisms of their synthesis and degradation postulated. By modulating the activation of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid...

  9. Application of medical cannabis in patients with the neurodegeneration disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lidia Kotuła; Paulina Sobstyl; Jan Sobstyl; Paulina Chwil; Karol Terlecki; Jolanta Karwat; Paulina Gil-Kulik; Alicja Niedojadło; Janusz Kocki

    2014-01-01

    Medical cannabis is the dried flowers of the female Cannabis sativa L. plant. Cannabis contains a number of active elements, including dronabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Dronabinol is usually the main ingredient. The body’s own cannabinoid system has been identified. The discovery of this system, which comprises endocannabinoids and receptors, confirmed that cannabis has a positive effect on certain illnesses and conditions. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified: CB1 an...

  10. Cannabis as a Possible Treatment for Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis / Kanabis Kao Moguci Tretman U Lecenju Spasticnosti Kod Multiple Skleroze

    OpenAIRE

    Vesic Katarina; Dejanovic Slavica Djukic; Borovcanin Milica; Samardzic Janko; Toncev Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of cannabis has been known for centuries. Cannabinoids express their effects through two types of receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2). Present studies indicate that cannabis-based drugs can make a positive impact in the treatment of different diseases. For many years, multiple sclerosis patients have self-medicated with illegal street cannabis to alleviate spasticity, a common and debilitating symptom that impairs quality of life.

  11. Characterisation of the cannabinoid receptor system in synovial tissue and fluid in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Denise; Pearson, Richard G; Kurian, Nisha; Latif, M. Liaque; Garle, Michael J; Barrett, David A; Kendall, David A; Scammell, Brigitte E; Reeve, Alison J; Chapman, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Cannabis-based medicines have a number of therapeutic indications, including anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. The endocannabinoid receptor system, including the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and receptor 2 (CB2) and the endocannabinoids, are implicated in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Pre-clinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that cannabis-based drugs have therapeutic potential in inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthr...

  12. Cannabis as a Possible Treatment for Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis / Kanabis Kao Moguci Tretman U Lecenju Spasticnosti Kod Multiple Skleroze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesic Katarina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic potential of cannabis has been known for centuries. Cannabinoids express their effects through two types of receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2. Present studies indicate that cannabis-based drugs can make a positive impact in the treatment of different diseases. For many years, multiple sclerosis patients have self-medicated with illegal street cannabis to alleviate spasticity, a common and debilitating symptom that impairs quality of life.

  13. Cannabinoid-induced apoptosis in immune cells as a pathway to immunosuppression

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Chauhan, Ashok; Singh, Ugra; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds present in Cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.). They mediate their physiological and behavioral effects by activating specific cannabinoid receptors. With the recent discovery of the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and the endocannabinoid system, research in this field has expanded exponentially. Cannabinoids have been shown to act as potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agents and have been shown to mediate beneficial effects in a wide rang...

  14. Cannabinoid receptor 2: Potential role in immunomodulation and neuroinflammation Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rom, Slava; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB1, CB2) play a significant role in physiologic and pathologic processes, including cognitive and immune functions. While the addictive properties of marijuana, an extract from the Cannabis plant, are well recognized, there is growing appreciation of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in multiple pathologic conditions involving chronic inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease, arthr...

  15. Differential Regulation of Behavioral Tolerance to WIN55,212-2 by GASP1

    OpenAIRE

    Martini, Lene; Thompson, Dawn; Kharazia, Viktor; Whistler, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid agonists have shown some promise clinically as analgesics, in particular for cancer pain, in which they have the additional benefit of decreasing nausea. However, as for most other drugs, the long-term use of cannabinoids is limited by the development of tolerance. Several molecular mechanisms have been proposed to explain drug tolerance, including receptor downregulation. The cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors can be downregulated in vitro through an interaction with the G-protein-cou...

  16. Cloning of the first sn1-DAG lipases points to the spatial and temporal regulation of endocannabinoid signaling in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Bisogno, Tiziana; Howell, Fiona; Williams, Gareth; Minassi, Alberto; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Ligresti, Alessia; Matias, Isabel; Schiano-Moriello, Aniello; Paul, Praveen; Williams, Emma-Jane; Gangadharan, Uma; Hobbs, Carl; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Doherty, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) lipase activity is required for axonal growth during development and for retrograde synaptic signaling at mature synapses. This enzyme synthesizes the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor is also required for the above responses. We now report on the cloning and enzymatic characterization of the first specific sn-1 DAG lipases. Two closely related genes have been identified and their expression in cells correlated with 2-AG bios...

  17. Hemopressins and other hemoglobin-derived peptides in mouse brain: Comparison between brain, blood, and heart peptidome and regulation in Cpefat/fat mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gelman, Julia S.; Sironi, Juan; Castro, Leandro M.; Ferro, Emer S.; Fricker, Lloyd D.

    2010-01-01

    Many hemoglobin-derived peptides are present in mouse brain, and several of these have bioactive properties including the hemopressins, a related series of peptides that bind to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Although hemoglobin is a major component of red blood cells, it is also present in neurons and glia. To examine whether the hemoglobin-derived peptides in brain are similar to those present in blood and heart, we used a peptidomics approach involving mass spectrometry. Many hemoglobin-derive...

  18. Effect of Cannabinoid Receptor Activation on Spreading Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi, Hadi; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s):The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of cannabinoid on cortical spreading depression (CSD) in rat brain. Cannabis has been used for centuries for both symptomatic and prophylactic treatment of different types of headaches including migraine. CSD is believed to be a putative neuronal mechanism underlying migraine aura and subsequent pain. Materials and Methods:The effects of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), as well as, cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists ...

  19. Intrathecal cannabinoid-1 receptor agonist prevents referred hyperalgesia in acute acrolein-induced cystitis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Marsha Ritter; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bjorling, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the capacity of intrathecal arachidonyl-2’-chloroethylamide (ACEA), a cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) agonist, to inhibit referred hyperalgesia and increased bladder contractility resulting from acute acrolein-induced cystitis in rats. 24 female rats were divided into 4 groups: 1) intrathecal vehicle/intravesical saline; 2) intrathecal vehicle/intravesical acrolein; 3) intrathecal ACEA/intravesical saline; and 4) intrathecal ACEA/intravesical acrolein. Bladder catheters were pla...

  20. Rimonabant is a dual inhibitor of acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferases 1 and 2

    OpenAIRE

    Netherland, Courtney; Thewke, Douglas P.

    2010-01-01

    Acyl-coenzymeA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes the intracellular synthesis of cholesteryl esters (CE). Both ACAT isoforms, ACAT1 and ACAT2, play key roles in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and ACAT inhibition retards atherosclerosis in animal models. Rimonabant, a type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonist, produces anti-atherosclerotic effects in humans and animals by mechanisms which are not completely understood. Rimonabant is structurally similar to two other cannab...

  1. Large Size Cells in the Visceral Adipose Depot Predict Insulin Resistance in the Canine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kabir, Morvarid; Stefanovski, Darko; Hsu, Isabel R.; Iyer, Malini; Woolcott, Orison O.; Zheng, Dan; Catalano, Karyn J.; Chiu, Jenny D.; Kim, Stella P.; Lisa N Harrison; Ionut, Viorica; Lottati, Maya; Richard N Bergman; Richey, Joyce M.

    2011-01-01

    Adipocyte size plays a key role in the development of insulin resistance. We examined longitudinal changes in adipocyte size and distribution in visceral (VIS) and subcutaneous (SQ) fat during obesity-induced insulin resistance and after treatment with CB-1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant (RIM) in canines. We also examined whether adipocyte size and/or distribution is predictive of insulin resistance. Adipocyte morphology was assessed by direct microscopy and analysis of digital images in pre...

  2. Antinociceptive Action of Isolated Mitragynine from Mitragyna Speciosa through Activation of Opioid Receptor System

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Aris Mohd Moklas; Palanisamy Arulselvan; Ithnin Hairuszah; Mohamad Taufik Hidayat; Sharida Fakurazi; Abdul Rahman Shamima

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids and opioids systems share numerous pharmacological properties and antinociception is one of them. Previous findings have shown that mitragynine (MG), a major indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa (MS) can exert its antinociceptive effects through the opioids system. In the present study, the action of MG was investigated as the antinociceptive agent acting on Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and effects on the opioids receptor. The latency time was recorded until the mice ...

  3. THE EFFECT OF ENDOCANNABINOID SYSTEM ON ENERGY METABOLISM AND OBESITY

    OpenAIRE

    Emel Tüfekçi Alphan; Nevin Yılmaz

    2007-01-01

    Recently, it has been defined that Marijuana and its major psychotropic component which Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, CB1 cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoids which include endogenous ligands stimulate appetite and increase body weight by controlling energy balance.It has been shown on the animal experiments and human clinical studies that the endocannabinoid system controls food intake by central and peripheral mechanism and stimulate lipogenesis and fat accumulation.The formation of endoca...

  4. Aspectos terapêuticos de compostos da planta Cannabis sativa Therapeutical aspects of compounds of the plant Cannabis sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Káthia Maria Honório; Agnaldo Arroio; Albérico Borges Ferreira da Silva

    2006-01-01

    Several cannabinoid compounds present therapeutic properties, but also have psychotropic effects, limiting their use as medicine. Nowadays, many important discoveries on the compounds extracted from the plant Cannabis sativa (cannabinoids) have contributed to understand the therapeutic properties of these compounds. The main discoveries in the last years on the cannabinoid compounds were: the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, the endogenous cannabinoids and the possible mechanisms of action ...

  5. Cannabinoid agonists rearrange synaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses and depress motoneuron activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Impairment of motor skills is one of the most common acute adverse effects of cannabis. Related studies have focused mainly on psychomotor alterations, and little is known about the direct impact of cannabinoids (CBs) on motoneuron physiology. As key modulators of synaptic function, CBs regulate multiple neuronal functions and behaviors. Presynaptic CB1 mediates synaptic strength depression by inhibiting neurotransmitter release, via a poorly understood mechanism. The present study examined the effect of CB agonists on excitatory synaptic inputs incoming to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) in vitro and in vivo. The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and the synthetic CB agonist WIN 55,212-2 rapidly and reversibly induced short-term depression (STD) of glutamatergic synapses on motoneurons by a presynaptic mechanism. Presynaptic effects were fully reversed by the CB1-selective antagonist AM281. Electrophysiological and electron microscopy analysis showed that WIN 55,212-2 reduced the number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. Given that AM281 fully abolished depolarization-induced depression of excitation, motoneurons can be feasible sources of CBs, which in turn act as retrograde messengers regulating synaptic function. Finally, microiontophoretic application of the CB agonist O-2545 reversibly depressed, presumably via CB1, glutamatergic inspiratory-related activity of HMNs in vivo. Therefore, evidence support that CBs, via presynaptic CB1, induce excitatory STD by reducing the readily releasable pool of SVs at excitatory synapses, then attenuating motoneuron activity. These outcomes contribute a possible mechanistic basis for cannabis-associated motor performance disturbances such as ataxia, dysarthria and dyscoordination. PMID:25595101

  6. Activation of Cannabinoid CB2 receptors Reduces Hyperalgesia in an Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Weisi; Taylor, Bradley K.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials investigating the analgesic efficacy of cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis have yielded mixed results, possibly due to psychotropic side effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. We hypothesized that a CB2-specific agonist (JWH-133) would decrease hyperalgesia in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of multiple sclerosis. 4 weeks after induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we found that intrathecal administration of JWH-133 (10–100 μg...

  7. Inhibition of G Protein-Activated Inwardly Rectifying K+ Channels by Phencyclidine

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Toru; Nishizawa, Daisuke; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    Addictive drugs, such as opioids, ethanol, cocaine, amphetamine, and phencyclidine (PCP), affect many functions of the nervous system and peripheral organs, resulting in severe health problems. G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK, Kir3) channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability through activation of various Gi/o protein-coupled receptors including opioid and CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Furthermore, the channels are directly activated by ethanol and inhibi...

  8. Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors Transiently Silence Glutamatergic Nerve Terminals of Cultured Cerebellar Granule Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez-Franco, Jorge; Bartolomé-Martín, David; Alonso, Beatris; Torres, Magdalena; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors are the most abundant G protein-coupled receptors in the brain and they mediate retrograde short-term inhibition of neurotransmitter release, as well as long-term depression of synaptic transmission at many excitatory synapses. The induction of presynaptically silent synapses is a means of modulating synaptic strength, which is important for synaptic plasticity. Persistent activation of cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) mutes GABAergic terminals, although it is unclea...

  9. The endogenous cannabinoid system protects against colonic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Massa, Federico; MARSICANO, Giovanni; Hermann, Heike; Cannich, Astrid; Monory, Krisztina; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Sibaev, Andrei; Storr, Martin; Lutz, Beat

    2004-01-01

    Excessive inflammatory responses can emerge as a potential danger for organisms’ health. Physiological balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory processes constitutes an important feature of responses against harmful events. Here, we show that cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) mediate intrinsic protective signals that counteract proinflammatory responses. Both intrarectal infusion of 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) and oral administration of dextrane sulfate sodium induced stronger ...

  10. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 protects nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons against MPTP neurotoxicity by inhibiting microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Young C; Bok, Eugene; Huh, Sue H; Park, Ju-Young; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Kim, Sang R; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Maeng, Sungho; Park, Sung Hyun; Jin, Byung K

    2011-12-15

    This study examined whether the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1)) receptor contributes to the survival of nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. MPTP induced significant loss of nigrostriatal DA neurons and microglial activation in the substantia nigra (SN), visualized with tyrosine hydroxylase or macrophage Ag complex-1 immunohistochemistry. Real-time PCR, ELISA, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry disclosed upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, activation of microglial NADPH oxidase, and subsequent reactive oxygen species production and oxidative damage of DNA and proteins in MPTP-treated SN, resulting in degeneration of DA neurons. Conversely, treatment with nonselective cannabinoid receptor agonists (WIN55,212-2 and HU210) led to increased survival of DA neurons in the SN, their fibers and dopamine levels in the striatum, and improved motor function. This neuroprotection by cannabinoids was accompanied by suppression of NADPH oxidase reactive oxygen species production and reduced expression of proinflammatory cytokines from activated microglia. Interestingly, cannabinoids protected DA neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium neurotoxicity in cocultures of mesencephalic neurons and microglia, but not in neuron-enriched mesencephalic cultures devoid of microglia. The observed neuroprotection and inhibition of microglial activation were reversed upon treatment with CB(1) receptor selective antagonists AM251 and/or SR14,716A, confirming the involvement of the CB(1) receptor. The present in vivo and in vitro findings clearly indicate that the CB(1) receptor possesses anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits microglia-mediated oxidative stress. Our results collectively suggest that the cannabinoid system is beneficial for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and other disorders associated with neuroinflammation and microglia-derived oxidative damage

  11. Cannabinoid inhibition of the capsaicin-induced calcium response in rat dorsal root ganglion neurones

    OpenAIRE

    Millns, Paul J; Chapman, Victoria; Kendall, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Cannabinoids have marked inhibitory effects on somatosensory processing, which may arise from actions at both peripheral and central cannabinoid receptors. Here, the effect of a synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU210 on capsaicin-evoked responses in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones was studied. The vanilloid capsaicin produced a concentration-related increase in intracellular calcium in DRG neurones, which was significantly inhibited by HU210 (1 μM). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor ant...

  12. Cannabinoids go nuclear: evidence for activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, S E

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids act at two classical cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), a 7TM orphan receptor and the transmitter-gated channel transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 receptor. Recent evidence also points to cannabinoids acting at members of the nuclear receptor family, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, with three subtypes α, β (δ) and γ), which regulate cell differentiation and lipid metabolism. Much evidence now suggests that endocannabinoids are natural activators o...

  13. Hämodynamische Auswirkungen synthetischer, pflanzlicher und endogener Cannabinoide im Modell der isolierten Kaninchenlunge

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Cannabinoide zeigen komplexe kardiovaskuläre Effekte. Das endogene Cannabinoid Anandamid (Arachidonylethanolamid) induziert in verschiedenen Organsystemen eine hauptsächlich über periphere CB1-Rezeptoren vermittelte Vasodilatation. Der Einfluss von Cannabinoiden auf die pulmonale Strombahn ist jedoch unklar. Am Modell einer isolierten, perfundierten und ventilierten Kaninchenlunge konnte gezeigt werden, dass die endogenen Cannabinoide Anandamid und 2-Arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) dosisabhängig d...

  14. Cannabinoids as modulators of cancer cell viability, neuronal differentiation, and embryonal development

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids (CBs) are compounds that activate the CB1 and CB2 receptors. CB receptors mediate many different physiological functions, and cannabinoids have been reported to decrease tumor cell viability, proliferation, migration, as well as to modulate metastasis. In this thesis, the effects of cannabinoids on human colorectal carcinoma Caco-2 cells (Paper I) and mouse P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells (Paper III) were studied.  In both cell lines, the compounds examined produced a concentr...

  15. Actions of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 in neuropathic and inflammatory chronic pain models

    OpenAIRE

    Jayamanne, Angelo; Greenwood, Ruth; Mitchell, Vanessa A; Aslan, Sevda; Piomelli, Daniele; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2005-01-01

    While cannabinoid receptor agonists have analgesic activity in chronic pain states, they produce a spectrum of central CB1 receptor-mediated motor and psychotropic side effects. The actions of endocannabinoids, such as anandamide are terminated by removal from the extracellular space, then subsequent enzymatic degradation by fatty-acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In the present study, we compared the effect of a selective FAAH inhibitor, URB597, to that of a pan-cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210...

  16. Cannabinoid receptor activation in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata evokes cardiorespiratory effects in anaesthetised rats

    OpenAIRE

    Padley, James R; Li, Qun; Pilowsky, Paul M.; Goodchild, Ann K

    2003-01-01

    The nature of the cardiorespiratory effects mediated by cannabinoids in the hindbrain is poorly understood. In the present study we investigated whether cannabinoid receptor activation in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata (RVLM) affects cardiovascular and/or respiratory function.Initially, we looked for evidence of CB1 receptor gene expression in rostral and caudal sections of the rat ventrolateral medulla (VLM) using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Second, the pote...

  17. The Endocannabinoid System as Pharmacological Target Derived from Its CNS Role in Energy Homeostasis and Reward. Applications in Eating Disorders and Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco-Javier Bermúdez-Silva; Maria-Paz Viveros; Ana-Belén Lopez-Rodriguez; Wagner, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) has been implicated in many physiological functions, including the regulation of appetite, food intake and energy balance, a crucial involvement in brain reward systems and a role in psychophysiological homeostasis (anxiety and stress responses). We first introduce this important regulatory system and chronicle what is known concerning the signal transduction pathways activated upon the binding of endogenous cannabinoid ligands to the Gi/0-coupled CB1 cannabin...

  18. Rimonabant Precipitates Anxiety in Rats Withdrawn from Palatable Food: Role of the Central Amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Blasio, Angelo; Iemolo, Attilio; Sabino, Valentina; Petrosino, Stefania; Steardo, Luca; Rice, Kenner C.; Orlando, Pierangelo; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Zorrilla, Eric P.; Cottone, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    The anti-obesity medication rimonabant, an antagonist of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor, was withdrawn from the market because of adverse psychiatric side effects, including a negative affective state. We investigated whether rimonabant precipitates a negative emotional state in rats withdrawn from palatable food cycling. The effects of systemic administration of rimonabant on anxiety-like behavior, food intake, body weight, and adrenocortical activation were assessed in female rats during...

  19. More surprises lying ahead: The endocannabinoids keep us guessing

    OpenAIRE

    Piomelli, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to point out some important facts that we don’t know about endogenous cannabinoids — lipid-derived signaling molecules that activate CB1 cannabinoid receptors and play key roles in motivation, emotion and energy balance. The first endocannabinoid substance to be discovered, anandamide, was isolated from brain tissue in 1992. Research has shown that this molecule is a bona fide brain neurotransmitter involved in the regulation of stress responses and pain, but t...

  20. Il sistema degli endocannabinoidi nella cirrosi epatica complicata da infezione batterica: studio nell’uomo ed in un modello sperimentale animale

    OpenAIRE

    Baldassarre, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Gli endocannabinoidi (EC) sono una classe di composti che mimano gli effetti del Δ9-tetraidrocannabinolo. Essi comprendono l’anandamide (AEA) ed il 2-arachidonoilglicerolo (2-AG), molecole che interagiscono preferenzialmente con due specifici recettori, il CB1 ed il CB2. Più recente è la scoperta di due molecole EC simili, il palmitoiletanolamide (PEA) e l’oleiletanolamide (OEA), che tuttavia agiscono legando recettori diversi tra cui il PPARα ed il TRVP1. Studi sperimentali dimostrano che...

  1. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Zhen Cheng; Liu, Dao Yan; Zhang, Li Li;

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow...... or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p...

  2. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB1 receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis attenuates

  3. Interactions Between Endocannabinoids and Stress-Induced Decreased Sensitivity to Natural Reward

    OpenAIRE

    Rademacher, David J.; Hillard, Cecilia J.

    2006-01-01

    Since endocannabinoids modulate reward processing and the stress response, we tested the hypothesis that endocannabinoids regulate stress-induced decreased sensitivity to natural reward. Restraint was used to produce stress-induced reductions in sucrose consumption and preference in male mice. Central cannabinoid receptor (CB1) signaling was modulated pharmacologically prior to the application of stress. The preference for sucrose over water was significantly decreased in mice exposed to rest...

  4. The monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor JZL184 suppresses inflammatory pain in the mouse carrageenan model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Wise, Laura E.; Chen, Yugang; Gujjar, Ramesh; Mahadevan, Anu; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim The present study tested whether the selective monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor JZL184 would reduce allodynia and paw edema in the carrageenan test. Main methods The anti-edematous and anti-allodynic effects of JZL184 were compared to those of PF-3845, an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and diclofenac, a non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Cannabinoid receptor involvement in the anti-edematous and anti-allodynic effects of JZL184 was evaluated by administration of the respective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists rimonabant and SR144528 as well as with CB1(−/−) and CB2(−/−) mice. JZL184 (1.6, 4, 16, or 40 mg/kg) was administered for six days to assess tolerance. Key findings JZL184 administered before or after carrageenan significantly attenuated carrageenan-induced paw edema and mechanical allodynia. Complementary genetic and pharmacological approaches revealed that the anti-allodynic effects of JZL184 required both CB1 and CB2 receptors, but only CB2 receptors mediated its anti-edematous actions. Importantly, both the anti-edematous and anti-allodynic effects underwent tolerance following repeated injections of high dose JZL184 (16 or 40 mg/kg), but repeated administration of low dose JZL184 (4 mg/kg) retained efficacy. Significance These results suggest that the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 reduces inflammatory nociception through the activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors, with no evidence of tolerance following repeated administration of low doses. PMID:22749865

  5. NESS06SM reduces body weight with an improved profile relative to SR141716A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastinu, Andrea; Pira, Marilena; Pinna, Gérard Aimè; Pisu, Carla; Casu, Maria Antonietta; Reali, Roberta; Marcello, Stefania; Murineddu, Gabriele; Lazzari, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    We have recently synthesized a new series of 4,5-dihydrobenzo-oxa-cycloheptapyrazole derivatives with the aim to discover novel CB1 antagonist agents characterized by anti-obesity activity comparable to that of SR141716A but with reduced adverse effects such as anxiety and depression. Within the novel class, the CB1 antagonist 8-chloro-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-piperidin-1-yl-4,5-dihydrobenzo-1H-6-oxa-cyclohepta(1,2-c)pyrazole-3-carboxamide (NESS06SM) has been selected as lead compound. We found that NESS06SM is a CB1 neutral antagonist, characterized by poor blood-brain barrier permeability. Moreover, NESS06SM chronic treatment determined both anti-obesity effect and cardiovascular risk factor improvement in C57BL/6N Diet Induced Obesity (DIO) mice fed with fat diet (FD mice). In fact, the mRNA gene expression in Central Nervous System (CNS) and peripheral tissues by real time PCR, showed a significant increase of orexigenic peptides and a decrease of anorexigenic peptides elicited by NESS06SM treatment, compared to control mice fed with the same diet. Moreover, in contrast to SR141716A treatment, the chronic administration of NESS06SM did not change mRNA expression of both monoaminergic transporters and neurotrophins highly related with anxiety and mood disorders. Our results suggest that NESS06SM reduces body weight and it can restore the disrupted expression profile of genes linked to the hunger-satiety circuit without altering monoaminergic transmission probably avoiding SR141716A side effects. Therefore the novel CB1 neutral antagonist could represent a useful candidate agent for the treatment of obesity and its metabolic complications. PMID:23756200

  6. Inhibition and enhancement of contextual fear memory destabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jonathan L. C.; Charlotte eFlavell

    2014-01-01

    The reactivation of a memory can result in its destabilization, necessitating a process of memory reconsolidation to maintain its persistence. Here we show that the destabilization of a contextual fear memory is potentiated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist ACEA. Co-infusion of ACEA and the IKK inhibitor sulfasalazine into the dorsal hippocampus impaired contextual fear memory reconsolidation. This observation was achieved under behavioural conditions that, by themselves, did not result...

  7. Synaptic organization of perisomatic GABAergic inputs onto the principal cells of the mouse basolateral amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria eVereczki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Spike generation is most effectively controlled by inhibitory inputs that target the perisomatic region of neurons. Despite the critical importance of this functional domain, very little is known about the organization of the GABAergic inputs contacting the perisomatic region of principal cells (PCs in the basolateral amygdala. Using immunocytochemistry combined with in vitro single-cell labeling we determined in mice the number and sources of GABAergic inputs of PCs at light and electron microscopic levels. We found that the soma and proximal dendrites of PCs were innervated primarily by two neurochemically distinct basket cell types expressing parvalbumin (PVBC or cholecystokinin and CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CCK/CB1BC. The innervation of the initial segment of PC axons was found to be parceled out by PVBCs and axo-axonic cells (AAC, as the majority of GABAergic inputs onto the region nearest to the soma (between 0-10 µm originated from PVBCs, while the largest portion of the axon initial segment was innervated by AACs. Detailed morphological investigations revealed that the three perisomatic region-targeting interneuron types significantly differed in dendritic and axonal arborization properties. We found that, although individual PVBCs targeted PCs via more terminals than CCK/CB1BCs, similar numbers (15-17 of the two BC types converge onto single PCs, whereas fewer (6-7 AACs innervate the axon initial segment of single PCs. Furthermore, we estimated that a PVBC and a CCK/CB1BC may target 800-900 and 700-800 PCs, respectively, while an AAC can innervate 600-650 PCs. Thus, BCs and AACs innervate approximately 10 % and 20 % of PC population, respectively, within their axonal cloud. Our results collectively suggest that these interneuron types may be differently affiliated within the local amygdalar microcircuits in order to fulfill specific functions in network operation during various brain states.

  8. Synaptic Organization of Perisomatic GABAergic Inputs onto the Principal Cells of the Mouse Basolateral Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereczki, Viktória K; Veres, Judit M; Müller, Kinga; Nagy, Gergö A; Rácz, Bence; Barsy, Boglárka; Hájos, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Spike generation is most effectively controlled by inhibitory inputs that target the perisomatic region of neurons. Despite the critical importance of this functional domain, very little is known about the organization of the GABAergic inputs contacting the perisomatic region of principal cells (PCs) in the basolateral amygdala. Using immunocytochemistry combined with in vitro single-cell labeling we determined the number and sources of GABAergic inputs of PCs at light and electron microscopic levels in mice. We found that the soma and proximal dendrites of PCs were innervated primarily by two neurochemically distinct basket cell types expressing parvalbumin (PVBC) or cholecystokinin and CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CCK/CB1BC). The innervation of the initial segment of PC axons was found to be parceled out by PVBCs and axo-axonic cells (AAC), as the majority of GABAergic inputs onto the region nearest to the soma (between 0 and 10 μm) originated from PVBCs, while the largest portion of the axon initial segment was innervated by AACs. Detailed morphological investigations revealed that the three perisomatic region-targeting interneuron types significantly differed in dendritic and axonal arborization properties. We found that, although individual PVBCs targeted PCs via more terminals than CCK/CB1BCs, similar numbers (15-17) of the two BC types converge onto single PCs, whereas fewer (6-7) AACs innervate the axon initial segment of single PCs. Furthermore, we estimated that a PVBC and a CCK/CB1BC may target 800-900 and 700-800 PCs, respectively, while an AAC can innervate 600-650 PCs. Thus, BCs and AACs innervate ~10 and 20% of PC population, respectively, within their axonal cloud. Our results collectively suggest, that these interneuron types may be differently affiliated within the local amygdalar microcircuits in order to fulfill specific functions in network operation during various brain states. PMID:27013983

  9. Genetic, physiological and biochemical characterization of multiple methanol methyltransferase isozymes in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Matthew A; Metcalf, William W

    2005-06-01

    Biochemical evidence suggests that methanol catabolism in Methanosarcina species requires the concerted effort of methanol:5-hydroxybenzimidazolylcobamide methyltransferase (MtaB), a corrinoid-containing methyl-accepting protein (MtaC) and Co-methyl-5-hydroxybenzimidazolylcobamide:2-mercapto-ethanesulphonic acid methyltransferase (MtaA). Here we show that Methanosarcina acetivorans possesses three operons encoding putative methanol-specific MtaB and corrinoid proteins: mtaCB1, mtaCB2 and mtaCB3. Deletion mutants lacking the three operons, in all possible combinations, were constructed and characterized. Strains deleted for any two of the operons grew on methanol, whereas strains lacking all three did not. Therefore, each operon encodes a bona fide methanol-utilizing MtaB/corrinoid protein pair. Most of the mutants were similar to the wild-type strain, with the exception of the DeltamtaCB1 DeltamtaCB2 double mutant, which grew more slowly and had reduced cell yields on methanol medium. However, all mutants displayed significantly longer lag times when switching from growth on trimethylamine to growth on methanol. This indicates that all three operons are required for wild-type growth on methanol and suggests that each operon has a distinct role in the metabolism of this substrate. The combined methanol:CoM methyltransferase activity of strains carrying only mtaCB1 was twofold higher than strains carrying only mtaCB2 and fourfold higher than strains carrying only mtaCB3. Interestingly, the presence of the mtaCB2 and mtaCB3 operons, in addition to the mtaCB1 operon, did not increase the overall methyltransferase activity, suggesting that these strains may be limited by MtaA availability. All deletion mutants were unaffected with respect to growth on trimethylamine and acetate corroborating biochemical evidence indicating that each methanogenic substrate has specific methyltransfer enzymes. PMID:15882413

  10. Care and Feeding of the Endocannabinoid System: A Systematic Review of Potential Clinical Interventions that Upregulate the Endocannabinoid System

    OpenAIRE

    McPartland, John M.; Guy, Geoffrey W.; Vincenzo Di Marzo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The "classic" endocannabinoid (eCB) system includes the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, the eCB ligands anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and their metabolic enzymes. An emerging literature documents the "eCB deficiency syndrome" as an etiology in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, psychological disorders, and other conditions. We performed a systematic review of clinical interventions that enhance the eCB system--ways to upregulate cannabinoid ...

  11. Mastering tricyclic ring systems for desirable functional cannabinoid activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Ravil R.; Knight, Lindsay; Chen, Shao-Rui; Wager-Miller, Jim; McDaniel, Steven W.; Diaz, Fanny; Barth, Francis; Pan, Hui-Lin; Mackie, Ken; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Diaz, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in using cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain and other indications. In continuation of our ongoing program aiming for the development of new small molecule cannabinoid ligands, we have synthesized a novel series of carbazole and γ-carboline derivatives. The affinities of the newly synthesized compounds were determined by a competitive radioligand displacement assay for human CB2 cannabinoid receptor and rat CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Functional activity and selectivity at human CB1 and CB2 receptors were characterized using receptor internalization and [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies of the carbazole series have led to the discovery of a non-selective CB1 and CB2 agonist, compound 4. Our subsequent research efforts to increase CB2 selectivity of this lead compound have led to the discovery of CB2 selective compound 64, which robustly internalized CB2 receptors. Compound 64 had potent inhibitory effects on pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Other potent and CB2 receptor–selective compounds, including compounds 63 and 68, and a selective CB1 agonist, compound 74 were also discovered. In addition, we identified the CB2 ligand 35 which failed to promote CB2 receptor internalization and inhibited compound CP55,940-induced CB2 internalization despite a high CB2 receptor affinity. The present study provides novel tricyclic series as a starting point for further investigations of CB2 pharmacology and pain treatment. PMID:24125850

  12. FAAH deficiency promotes energy storage and enhances the motivation for food

    OpenAIRE

    Touriño, Clara; Oveisi, Fariba; Lockney, Jennifer; Piomelli, Daniele; Maldonado, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    FAAH is the main degrading enzyme of the fatty acid ethanolamides anandamide (AEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), which have opposite effects on food intake and energy balance. AEA, an endogenous ligand of CB1 cannabinoid receptors, enhances food intake and energy storage, whereas OEA binds to PPAR-α receptors to reduce food intake and promoting lipolysis. To elucidate the role of FAAH in food intake and energy balance, we have evaluated different metabolic and behavioral responses related to ...

  13. Novel cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, A J

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids have numerous physiological effects. In the years since the molecular identification of the G protein-coupled receptors CB1 and CB2, the ion channel TRPV1, and their corresponding endogenous ligand systems, many cannabinoid-evoked actions have been shown conclusively to be mediated by one of these specific receptor targets. However, there remain several examples where these classical cannabinoid receptors do not explain observed pharmacology. Studies using mice genetically delete...

  14. The role of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition in nicotine reward and dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Muldoon, Pretal P.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Parsons, Loren H.; Damaj, M Imad

    2012-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (AEA) exerts the majority of its effects at CB1 and CB2 receptors and is degraded by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). FAAH KO mice and animals treated with FAAH inhibitors are impaired in their ability to hydrolyze AEA and other non-cannabinoid lipid signaling molecules, such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA). AEA and these other substrates activate non- cannabinoid receptor systems, including TRPV1 and PPAR-α receptors. In thi...

  15. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibition enhances memory acquisition through activation of PPAR-α nuclear receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB1-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for α-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-α) when and where they are naturally released in the brain. Using a passive-avoidance task in rats, we found that memory acquisition was enhanced by the FAAH inhibitor URB597 or by the PPAR-α agonist WY14643, and these enhancements ...

  16. The Volitional Nature of Nicotine Exposure Alters Anandamide and Oleoylethanolamide Levels in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    OpenAIRE

    Buczynski, Matthew W.; Polis, Ilham Y; Parsons, Loren H.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid-1 receptors (CB1) have an important role in nicotine reward and their function is disrupted by chronic nicotine exposure, suggesting nicotine-induced alterations in endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling. However, the effects of nicotine on brain eCB levels have not been rigorously evaluated. Volitional intake of nicotine produces physiological and behavioral effects distinct from forced drug administration, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not known. This study compa...

  17. Full Inhibition of Spinal FAAH Leads to TRPV1-Mediated Analgesic Effects in Neuropathic Rats and Possible Lipoxygenase-Mediated Remodeling of Anandamide Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Starowicz, Katarzyna; Makuch, Wioletta; Korostynski, Michal; Malek, Natalia; Slezak, Michal; Zychowska, Magdalena; Petrosino, Stefania; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Cristino, Luigia; Przewlocka, Barbara; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain elevates spinal anandamide (AEA) levels in a way further increased when URB597, an inhibitor of AEA hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), is injected intrathecally. Spinal AEA reduces neuropathic pain by acting at both cannabinoid CB1 receptors and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channels. Yet, intrathecal URB597 is only partially effective at counteracting neuropathic pain. We investigated the effect of high doses of intrathecal URB597 on allodyni...

  18. Differential alterations of the concentrations of endocannabinoids and related lipids in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Verde Roberta; Riccardi Gabriele; Bozzetto Lutgarda; Costabile Giuseppina; Giacco Rosalba; Patti Lidia; Di Marino Lucrezia; Piscitelli Fabiana; Annuzzi Giovanni; Petrosino Stefania; Rivellese Angela A; Di Marzo Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-AG, are produced by adipocytes, where they stimulate lipogenesis via cannabinoid CB1 receptors and are under the negative control of leptin and insulin. Endocannabinoid levels are elevated in the blood of obese individuals and nonobese type 2 diabetes patients. To date, no study has evaluated endocannabinoid levels in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of subjects with both obesity and type 2 diabetes (OBT2D), characterised by similar ...

  19. Opposite control of frontocortical 2-arachidonoylglycerol turnover rate by cannabinoid type-1 receptors located on glutamatergic neurons and on astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belluomo, Ilaria; Matias, Isabelle; Pernègre, Camille; Marsicano, Giovanni; Chaouloff, Francis

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the respective influences of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors expressed either in forebrain GABAergic neurons, in cortical glutamatergic neurons, or in astrocytes on the turnover rates of the endocannabinoids N-arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the non-cannabinoid N-acylethanolamides, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), in mouse forebrain regions. To this end, conditional mutant mice lacking CB1 receptors from either of these cell types were pre-treated systemically with JZL195, a dual inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase, the enzyme degrading AEA, PEA, and OEA, and of monoacylglycerol lipase, the main 2-AG-degrading enzyme. The analyses of frontocortical, hippocampal, and striatal AEA, 2-AG, PEA, and OEA concentrations revealed that their respective baseline concentrations were not influenced by the mouse genotype. On the other hand, the accumulation of frontocortical and/or hippocampal 2-AG levels in JZL195-pre-treated mice was dependent on the mouse genotype. Thus, JZL195-induced 2-AG accumulation rates were diminished in the frontal cortex of mice lacking CB1 receptors in glutamatergic neurons while their respective values were increased in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of mice lacking these receptors in astrocytes. These genotypic differences occurred with parallel and proportionate changes in the fractional rate constants for degradation of 2-AG, thus providing a mechanism whereby the baseline levels of 2-AG remained constant between genotypes. Besides suggesting a cell-type-specific control of frontocortical and/or hippocampal 2-AG synthesis and degradation rates by CB1 receptors, this study highlights the interest of assessing endocannabinoid turnover rates when questioning the status of the endocannabinoid system. PMID:25626460

  20. Dronabinol has preferential antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia with lymphoid differentiation patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Kampa-Schittenhelm, Kerstin Maria; Salitzky, Olaf; Akmut, Figen; Illing, Barbara; Kanz, Lothar; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Schittenhelm, Marcus Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been previously demonstrated in several cancer models, that Dronabinol (THC) may have anti-tumor activity – however, controversial data exists for acute leukemia. We have anecdotal evidence that THC may have contributed to disease control in a patient with acute undifferentiated leukemia. Methods To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the antileukemic efficacy of THC in several leukemia cell lines and native leukemia blasts cultured ex vivo. Expression analysis for the CB1/2 ...

  1. A Review of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Studies in Marijuana using Adolescents and Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Sneider, Jennifer T; Mashhoon, Yasmin; Silveri, Marisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Marijuana (MJ) remains the most widely used illicit drug of abuse, and accordingly, is associated with adverse effects on mental and physical health, and neurocognitive decline. Studies investigating the neurobiology of underlying MJ effects have demonstrated structural and functional alterations in brain areas that contain moderate to high concentrations of cannabinoid (CB1) receptors and that are implicated in MJ-related cognitive decrements. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS),...

  2. Subjective, cognitive, and cardiovascular dose-effect profile of nabilone and dronabinol in marijuana smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Bedi, Gillinder; Cooper, Ziva D; Haney, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana dependence is a substantial public health problem, with existing treatments showing limited efficacy. In laboratory and clinical studies, the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist oral Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; dronabinol) has been shown to decrease marijuana withdrawal, but not relapse. Dronabinol has poor bioavailability, potentially contributing to its failure to decrease relapse. The synthetic THC analogue, nabilone, has better bioavailability than dronabinol. We therefore aim...

  3. Aspectos terapêuticos de compostos da planta Cannabis sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Honório Káthia Maria; Arroio Agnaldo; Silva Albérico Borges Ferreira da

    2006-01-01

    Several cannabinoid compounds present therapeutic properties, but also have psychotropic effects, limiting their use as medicine. Nowadays, many important discoveries on the compounds extracted from the plant Cannabis sativa (cannabinoids) have contributed to understand the therapeutic properties of these compounds. The main discoveries in the last years on the cannabinoid compounds were: the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, the endogenous cannabinoids and the possible mechanisms of action ...

  4. Inhibition of platelet aggregation by vanilloid-like agents is not mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 channels or cannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaghrabi, Safa; Geraghty, Dominic; Ahuja, Kiran; Adams, Murray

    2016-06-01

    Vanilloid-like agents, including capsaicin, N-arachidonoyl-dopamine and N-oleoyldopamine inhibit platelet aggregation, however little is known about the precise mechanism(s) of action. The authors have previously shown that blocking of the capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1), does not interfere with capsaicin action during adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation. This research is extended to investigate the effect of these vanilloid-like-agents on platelet count, and to test whether the effect of these agents is mediated through TRPV1 and/or cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) receptors in the presence of other agonists, including collagen and arachidonic acid. Incubation of platelets with each of the individual vanilloids, or with receptor antagonists of TRPV1 (SB452533), CB1 (AM251) and CB2 (AM630), for up to 2 h did not significantly affect the platelet count. Similarly, the effect of individual vanilloids on the inhibition of platelet aggregation was not significantly different in the presence of receptor agonists compared to control, irrespective of the agonist used, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of vanilloids on platelet aggregation is independent of TRPV1, CB1 and CB2 receptors. Further research on the antiplatelet activity of vanilloids should focus on mechanisms other than those associated with vanilloid receptors. PMID:26991025

  5. Fine-tuning of defensive behaviors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray by atypical neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Fogaça

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an up-to-date review of the evidence indicating that atypical neurotransmitters such as nitric oxide (NO and endocannabinoids (eCBs play an important role in the regulation of aversive responses in the periaqueductal gray (PAG. Among the results supporting this role, several studies have shown that inhibitors of neuronal NO synthase or cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor agonists cause clear anxiolytic responses when injected into this region. The nitrergic and eCB systems can regulate the activity of classical neurotransmitters such as glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA that control PAG activity. We propose that they exert a ‘fine-tuning’ regulatory control of defensive responses in this area. This control, however, is probably complex, which may explain the usually bell-shaped dose-response curves observed with drugs that act on NO- or CB1-mediated neurotransmission. Even if the mechanisms responsible for this complex interaction are still poorly understood, they are beginning to be recognized. For example, activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel (TRPV1 receptors by anandamide seems to counteract the anxiolytic effects induced by CB1 receptor activation caused by this compound. Further studies, however, are needed to identify other mechanisms responsible for this fine-tuning effect.

  6. LiCABEDS II. Modeling of ligand selectivity for G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Wang, Lirong; Yang, Peng; Myint, Kyaw Z; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2013-01-28

    The cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2) is a promising therapeutic target for blood cancer, pain relief, osteoporosis, and immune system disease. The recent withdrawal of Rimonabant, which targets another closely related cannabinoid receptor (CB1), accentuates the importance of selectivity for the development of CB2 ligands in order to minimize their effects on the CB1 receptor. In our previous study, LiCABEDS (Ligand Classifier of Adaptively Boosting Ensemble Decision Stumps) was reported as a generic ligand classification algorithm for the prediction of categorical molecular properties. Here, we report extension of the application of LiCABEDS to the modeling of cannabinoid ligand selectivity with molecular fingerprints as descriptors. The performance of LiCABEDS was systematically compared with another popular classification algorithm, support vector machine (SVM), according to prediction precision and recall rate. In addition, the examination of LiCABEDS models revealed the difference in structure diversity of CB1 and CB2 selective ligands. The structure determination from data mining could be useful for the design of novel cannabinoid lead compounds. More importantly, the potential of LiCABEDS was demonstrated through successful identification of newly synthesized CB2 selective compounds. PMID:23278450

  7. Ethanol modulates facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells in vivo in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Cheng; Bing, Yan-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Acute ethanol overdose can induce dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation and cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory synaptic responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in urethane-anesthetized mice, using in vivo patch-clamp recordings. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol (300 mM) decreased the amplitude, half-width, rise time and decay time of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in PCs. The ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was dose-dependent, with an IC50 of 148.5 mM. Notably, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents were significantly abrogated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists, AM251 and O-2050, as well as by the CB1 agonist WIN55212-2. Moreover, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was prevented by cerebellar surface perfusion of the PKA inhibitors H-89 and Rp-cAMP, but not by intracellular administration of the PKA inhibitor PKI. Our present results indicate that ethanol inhibits the facial stimulation-evoked outward currents by activating presynaptic CB1 receptors via the PKA signaling pathway. These findings suggest that ethanol overdose impairs sensory information processing, at least in part, by inhibiting GABA release from molecular layer interneurons onto PCs. PMID:27489024

  8. Endocannabinoids signaling: Molecular mechanisms of liver regulation and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mi; Meng, Nan; Chang, Ying; Tang, Wangxian

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) includes endocannabinoids (eCBs), cannabinoid (CB) receptors and the enzymes that are responsible for endocannabinoid production and metabolism. The ECS has been reported to be present in both brain and peripheral tissues. Recent studies have indicated that eCBs and their receptors are involved in the development of various liver diseases. They were found to be altered in response to many danger factors. It is generally accepted that eCB may exert a protective action via CB2 receptors in different liver diseases. However, eCBs have also been demonstrated to have pathogenic role via their CB1 receptors. Although the therapeutic potential of CB1 receptor blockade in liver diseases is limited by its neuropsychiatric side effects, many studies have been conducted to search for novel, peripherally restricted CB1 antagonists or CB2 agonists, which may minimize their neuropsychiatric side effects in clinical use. This review summarizes the current understanding of the ECS in liver diseases and provides evidence for the potential to develop new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of these liver diseases. PMID:27100518

  9. Role of the endocannabinoid system in the mechanisms involved in the LPS-induced preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariani, María Victoria; Domínguez Rubio, Ana Paula; Cella, Maximiliano; Burdet, Juliana; Franchi, Ana María; Aisemberg, Julieta

    2015-12-01

    Prematurity is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a strong causal relationship between infection and preterm births. Intrauterine infection elicits an immune response involving the release of inflammatory mediators like cytokines and prostaglandins (PG) that trigger uterine contractions and parturition events. Anandamide (AEA) is an endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Similarly to PG, endocannabinoids are implicated in different aspects of reproduction, such as maintenance of pregnancy and parturition. Little is known about the involvement of endocannabinoids on the onset of labor in an infectious milieu. Here, using a mouse model of preterm labor induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we explored changes on the expression of components of endocannabinoid system (ECS). We have also determined whether AEA and CB antagonists alter PG production that induces labor. We observed an increase in uterine N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D expression (NAPE-PLD, the enzyme that synthesizes AEA) upon LPS treatment. Activity of catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) did not change significantly. In addition, we also found that LPS modulated uterine cannabinoid receptors expression by downregulating Cb2 mRNA levels and upregulating CB1 protein expression. Furthermore, LPS and AEA induced PGF2a augmentation, and this was reversed by antagonizing CB1 receptor. Collectively, our results suggest that ECS may be involved in the mechanism by which infection causes preterm birth. PMID:26347521

  10. Fasting stimulates 2-AG biosynthesis in the small intestine: role of cholinergic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Igarashi, Miki; Narayanaswami, Vidya; Murray, Conor; Gancayco, Joseph; Russell, Amy; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-10-15

    The endocannabinoids are lipid-derived signaling molecules that control feeding and energy balance by activating CB1-type cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Previous studies have shown that oral exposure to dietary fat stimulates endocannabinoid signaling in the rat small intestine, which provides positive feedback that drives further food intake and preference for fat-rich foods. We now describe an unexpectedly broader role for cholinergic signaling of the vagus nerve in the production of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), in the small intestine. We show that food deprivation increases levels of 2-AG and its lipid precursor, 1,2-diacylglycerol, in rat jejunum mucosa in a time-dependent manner. This response is abrogated by surgical resection of the vagus nerve or pharmacological blockade of small intestinal subtype-3 muscarinic acetylcholine (m3 mAch) receptors, but not inhibition of subtype-1 muscarinic acetylcholine (m1 mAch). We further show that blockade of peripheral CB1 receptors or intestinal m3 mAch receptors inhibits refeeding in fasted rats. The results suggest that food deprivation stimulates 2-AG-dependent CB1 receptor activation through a mechanism that requires efferent vagal activation of m3 mAch receptors in the jejunum, which, in turn, may promote feeding after a fast. PMID:26290104

  11. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in periodontal healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozono, Sayaka [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Matsuyama, Takashi, E-mail: takashi@dent.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Biwasa, Kamal Krishna [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Kawahara, Ko-ichi [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Nakajima, Yumiko; Yoshimoto, Takehiko; Yonamine, Yutaka; Kadomatsu, Hideshi [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Tancharoen, Salunya [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Hashiguchi, Teruto [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Noguchi, Kazuyuki [Department of Periodontology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan); Maruyama, Ikuro [Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8520 (Japan)

    2010-04-16

    Endocannabinoids including anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are important lipid mediators for immunosuppressive effects and for appropriate homeostasis via their G-protein-coupled cannabinoid (CB) receptors in mammalian organs and tissues, and may be involved in wound healing in some organs. The physiological roles of endocannabinoids in periodontal healing remain unknown. We observed upregulation of the expression of CB1/CB2 receptors localized on fibroblasts and macrophage-like cells in granulation tissue during wound healing in a wound-healing model in rats, as well as an increase in AEA levels in gingival crevicular fluid after periodontal surgery in human patients with periodontitis. In-vitro, the proliferation of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) by AEA was significantly attenuated by AM251 and AM630, which are selective antagonists of CB1 and CB2, respectively. CP55940 (CB1/CB2 agonist) induced phosphorylation of the extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and Akt in HGFs. Wound closure by CP55940 in an in-vitro scratch assay was significantly suppressed by inhibitors of MAP kinase kinase (MEK), p38MAPK, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K). These findings suggest that endocannabinoid system may have an important role in periodontal healing.

  12. Correlations between the Memory-Related Behavior and the Level of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in the Mice Brain, Provoked by an Acute Administration of CB Receptor Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Slomka, Tomasz; Budzynska, Barbara; Biala, Grazyna

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB) receptors, is involved in memory-related responses, as well as in processes that may affect cognition, like oxidative stress processes. The purpose of the experiments was to investigate the impact of CB1 and CB2 receptor ligands on the long-term memory stages in male Swiss mice, using the passive avoidance (PA) test, as well as the influence of these compounds on the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in the mice brain. A single injection of a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM 251, improved long-term memory acquisition and consolidation in the PA test in mice, while a mixed CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 impaired both stages of cognition. Additionally, JWH 133, a selective CB2 receptor agonist, and AM 630, a competitive CB2 receptor antagonist, significantly improved memory. Additionally, an acute administration of the highest used doses of JWH 133, WIN 55,212-2, and AM 630, but not AM 251, increased total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the brain. In turn, the processes of lipids peroxidation, expressed as the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), were more advanced in case of AM 251. Thus, some changes in the PA performance may be connected with the level of oxidative stress in the brain. PMID:26839719

  13. Correlations between the Memory-Related Behavior and the Level of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in the Mice Brain, Provoked by an Acute Administration of CB Receptor Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kruk-Slomka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB receptors, is involved in memory-related responses, as well as in processes that may affect cognition, like oxidative stress processes. The purpose of the experiments was to investigate the impact of CB1 and CB2 receptor ligands on the long-term memory stages in male Swiss mice, using the passive avoidance (PA test, as well as the influence of these compounds on the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in the mice brain. A single injection of a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM 251, improved long-term memory acquisition and consolidation in the PA test in mice, while a mixed CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 impaired both stages of cognition. Additionally, JWH 133, a selective CB2 receptor agonist, and AM 630, a competitive CB2 receptor antagonist, significantly improved memory. Additionally, an acute administration of the highest used doses of JWH 133, WIN 55,212-2, and AM 630, but not AM 251, increased total antioxidant capacity (TAC in the brain. In turn, the processes of lipids peroxidation, expressed as the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA, were more advanced in case of AM 251. Thus, some changes in the PA performance may be connected with the level of oxidative stress in the brain.

  14. Social defeat leads to changes in the endocannabinoid system: An overexpression of calreticulin and motor impairment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas-Roig, J; Piscitelli, F; Gil, V; Del Río, J A; Moore, T P; Agbemenyah, H; Salinas-Riester, G; Pommerenke, C; Lorenzen, S; Beißbarth, T; Hoyer-Fender, S; Di Marzo, V; Havemann-Reinecke, U

    2016-04-15

    Prolonged and sustained stimulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis have adverse effects on numerous brain regions, including the cerebellum. Motor coordination and motor learning are essential for animal and require the regulation of cerebellar neurons. The G-protein-coupled cannabinoid CB1 receptor coordinates synaptic transmission throughout the CNS and is of highest abundance in the cerebellum. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to investigate the long-lasting effects of chronic psychosocial stress on motor coordination and motor learning, CB1 receptor expression, endogenous cannabinoid ligands and gene expression in the cerebellum. After chronic psychosocial stress, motor coordination and motor learning were impaired as indicated the righting reflex and the rota-rod. The amount of the endocannabinoid 2-AG increased while CB1 mRNA and protein expression were downregulated after chronic stress. Transcriptome analysis revealed 319 genes differentially expressed by chronic psychosocial stress in the cerebellum; mainly involved in synaptic transmission, transmission of nerve impulse, and cell-cell signaling. Calreticulin was validated as a stress candidate gene. The present study provides evidence that chronic stress activates calreticulin and might be one of the pathological mechanisms underlying the motor coordination and motor learning dysfunctions seen in social defeat mice. PMID:26815100

  15. [Neurobiology of endocannabinoids and central effects of tetrahydrocannabinol contained in indian hemp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychotropic component of Cannabis indica, is an addictive drug with multiple effects including both peripheral and central damages. All these effects are due to interference with endocannabinoidergic transmission. This endocannabinoid system subtly regulates many physiologicalfunctions. This regulation involves various ligands derived from arachidonic acid (anandamide, di-arachidonoylglycerol, virodhamin, noladin ether, N arachidonoyl dopamine, etc.) which stimulate two main types of receptor CB1 in the central nervous system and CB2 in the periphery. CB1 receptors are very numerous and ubiquitous in the brain. They influence various important functions (awakening, attention, delirium, hallucinations, memory, cognition, anxiety, humor stability, motor coordination, brain maturation, etc.). Far from mimicking endocannabinoids, THC caricatures their effects. It affects all brain structures, simultaneously, intensely and durably, inducing down-regulation of CB1 receptors and thereby reducing the effects of their physiological ligands. On account of its exceptional lipophilia, THC accumulates for days and even weeks in the brain. It is not a soft drug but rather a slow drug: its abuse induces long-lasting modifications and deterioration of brain function, potentially leading to various mental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:26427295

  16. Neuron to astrocyte communication via cannabinoid receptors is necessary for sustained epileptiform activity in rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyllaume Coiret

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are integral functional components of synapses, regulating transmission and plasticity. They have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, although their precise roles have not been comprehensively characterized. Astrocytes integrate activity from neighboring synapses by responding to neuronally released neurotransmitters such as glutamate and ATP. Strong activation of astrocytes mediated by these neurotransmitters can promote seizure-like activity by initiating a positive feedback loop that induces excessive neuronal discharge. Recent work has demonstrated that astrocytes express cannabinoid 1 (CB1 receptors, which are sensitive to endocannabinoids released by nearby pyramidal cells. In this study, we tested whether this mechanism also contributes to epileptiform activity. In a model of 4-aminopyridine induced epileptic-like activity in hippocampal slice cultures, we show that pharmacological blockade of astrocyte CB1 receptors did not modify the initiation, but significantly reduced the maintenance of epileptiform discharge. When communication in astrocytic networks was disrupted by chelating astrocytic calcium, this CB1 receptor-mediated modulation of epileptiform activity was no longer observed. Thus, endocannabinoid signaling from neurons to astrocytes represents an additional significant factor in the maintenance of epileptiform activity in the hippocampus.

  17. Non-psychotropic plant cannabinoids: new therapeutic opportunities from an ancient herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Angelo A; Borrelli, Francesca; Capasso, Raffaele; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2009-10-01

    Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol binds cannabinoid (CB(1) and CB(2)) receptors, which are activated by endogenous compounds (endocannabinoids) and are involved in a wide range of physiopathological processes (e.g. modulation of neurotransmitter release, regulation of pain perception, and of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and liver functions). The well-known psychotropic effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which are mediated by activation of brain CB(1) receptors, have greatly limited its clinical use. However, the plant Cannabis contains many cannabinoids with weak or no psychoactivity that, therapeutically, might be more promising than Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. Here, we provide an overview of the recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms of action, and potential therapeutic applications of such non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoids. Special emphasis is given to cannabidiol, the possible applications of which have recently emerged in inflammation, diabetes, cancer, affective and neurodegenerative diseases, and to Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin, a novel CB(1) antagonist which exerts potentially useful actions in the treatment of epilepsy and obesity. PMID:19729208

  18. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in periodontal healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocannabinoids including anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are important lipid mediators for immunosuppressive effects and for appropriate homeostasis via their G-protein-coupled cannabinoid (CB) receptors in mammalian organs and tissues, and may be involved in wound healing in some organs. The physiological roles of endocannabinoids in periodontal healing remain unknown. We observed upregulation of the expression of CB1/CB2 receptors localized on fibroblasts and macrophage-like cells in granulation tissue during wound healing in a wound-healing model in rats, as well as an increase in AEA levels in gingival crevicular fluid after periodontal surgery in human patients with periodontitis. In-vitro, the proliferation of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) by AEA was significantly attenuated by AM251 and AM630, which are selective antagonists of CB1 and CB2, respectively. CP55940 (CB1/CB2 agonist) induced phosphorylation of the extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and Akt in HGFs. Wound closure by CP55940 in an in-vitro scratch assay was significantly suppressed by inhibitors of MAP kinase kinase (MEK), p38MAPK, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K). These findings suggest that endocannabinoid system may have an important role in periodontal healing.

  19. Modulation of breast cancer cell viability by a cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist, JWH-015, is calcium dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Katherine E; Lozano-Ondoua, Alysia N; Umaretiya, Puja J; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M; Chandramouli, Anupama; Moy, Jamie K; Kwass, William K; Mantyh, Patrick W; Nelson, Mark A; Vanderah, Todd W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cannabinoid compounds, both nonspecific as well as agonists selective for either cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), have been shown to modulate the tumor microenvironment by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells in several model systems. The mechanism of this modulation remains only partially delineated, and activity induced via the CB1 and CB2 receptors may be distinct despite significant sequence homology and structural similarity of ligands. Methods The CB2-selective agonist JWH-015 was used to investigate mechanisms downstream of CB2 activation in mouse and human breast cancer cell lines in vitro and in a murine mammary tumor model. Results JWH-015 treatment significantly reduced primary tumor burden and metastasis of luciferase-tagged murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells in immunocompetent mice in vivo. Furthermore, JWH-015 reduced the viability of murine 4T1 and human MCF7 mammary carcinoma cells in vitro by inducing apoptosis. JWH-015-mediated reduction of breast cancer cell viability was not dependent on Gαi signaling in vitro or modified by classical pharmacological blockade of CB1, GPR55, TRPV1, or TRPA1 receptors. JWH-015 effects were calcium dependent and induced changes in MAPK/ERK signaling. Conclusion The results of this work characterize the actions of a CB2-selective agonist on breast cancer cells in a syngeneic murine model representing how a clinical presentation of cancer progression and metastasis may be significantly modulated by a G-protein-coupled receptor. PMID:27186076

  20. Orexins contribute to restraint stress-induced cocaine relapse by endocannabinoid-mediated disinhibition of dopaminergic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Li-Wei; Lu, Guan-Ling; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Yu, Lung; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Leishman, Emma; Bradshaw, Heather; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Hung, Ming-Shiu; Mackie, Ken; Zimmer, Andreas; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Orexins are associated with drug relapse in rodents. Here, we show that acute restraint stress in mice activates lateral hypothalamic (LH) orexin neurons, increases levels of orexin A and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and reinstates extinguished cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). This stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine CPP depends on type 1 orexin receptors (OX1Rs), type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) and diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) in the VTA. In dopaminergic neurons of VTA slices, orexin A presynaptically inhibits GABAergic transmission. This effect is prevented by internal GDP-β-S or inhibiting OX1Rs, CB1Rs, phospholipase C or DAGL, and potentiated by inhibiting 2-AG degradation. These results suggest that restraint stress activates LH orexin neurons, releasing orexins into the VTA to activate postsynaptic OX1Rs of dopaminergic neurons and generate 2-AG through a Gq-protein-phospholipase C-DAGL cascade. 2-AG retrogradely inhibits GABA release through presynaptic CB1Rs, leading to VTA dopaminergic disinhibition and reinstatement of cocaine CPP. PMID:27448020

  1. Orexins contribute to restraint stress-induced cocaine relapse by endocannabinoid-mediated disinhibition of dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Li-Wei; Lu, Guan-Ling; Lee, Yen-Hsien; Yu, Lung; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Leishman, Emma; Bradshaw, Heather; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Hung, Ming-Shiu; Mackie, Ken; Zimmer, Andreas; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Orexins are associated with drug relapse in rodents. Here, we show that acute restraint stress in mice activates lateral hypothalamic (LH) orexin neurons, increases levels of orexin A and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and reinstates extinguished cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). This stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine CPP depends on type 1 orexin receptors (OX1Rs), type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) and diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) in the VTA. In dopaminergic neurons of VTA slices, orexin A presynaptically inhibits GABAergic transmission. This effect is prevented by internal GDP-β-S or inhibiting OX1Rs, CB1Rs, phospholipase C or DAGL, and potentiated by inhibiting 2-AG degradation. These results suggest that restraint stress activates LH orexin neurons, releasing orexins into the VTA to activate postsynaptic OX1Rs of dopaminergic neurons and generate 2-AG through a Gq-protein-phospholipase C-DAGL cascade. 2-AG retrogradely inhibits GABA release through presynaptic CB1Rs, leading to VTA dopaminergic disinhibition and reinstatement of cocaine CPP. PMID:27448020

  2. The discovery of taranabant, a selective cannabinoid-1 receptor inverse agonist for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, William K

    2008-07-01

    The cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) has emerged as one of the most important targets for the treatment of obesity. Pioneering studies with rimonabant helped to validate animal models of food intake reduction and weight loss and made the connection to weight loss in the clinic. A novel, acyclic amide was identified from a high throughput screen (HTS) of the Merck sample collection and found to be a potent and selective CB1R inhibitor. Further optimization led to more potent compounds that were orally active in reducing food intake and weight loss in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. However, many of these analogues exhibited a high potential for bioactivation and the formation of reactive intermediates and covalent protein binding. Identification of the products of oxidative metabolism guided medicinal chemistry efforts to minimize the formation of these unwanted products. These efforts resulted in the identification of the CB1R inverse agonist, taranabant, which is currently in Phase-III clinical studies for the treatment of obesity. This mini-review will describe some of the medicinal chemistry strategies that were followed from the original high throughput screen hit to the discovery of taranabant. PMID:18574849

  3. [INCREMENT]9-Tetrahydrocannabinol discriminative stimulus effects of AM2201 and related aminoalkylindole analogs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järbe, Torbjörn U C; Gifford, Roger S; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2016-04-01

    The recent recreational use of synthetic cannabinoid ligands, collectively referred to as 'Spice', has raised concerns about their safety and possible differences in their biological effect(s) from marijuana/Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). AM2201, a highly efficacious, potent cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) agonist, is a recently detected compound in 'Spice' preparations. Furthermore, structural analogs of AM2201 are now being found in 'Spice'. The present studies were conducted to investigate their Δ-THC-like effects using drug (Δ-THC) discrimination in rats. Results show that the tested compounds were potent cannabinergics that generalized to the response to Δ-THC, with AM2201 being most potent, exhibiting a 14-fold potency difference over Δ-THC. The other analogs were between 2.5-fold and 4-fold more potent than THC. Surmountable antagonism of AM2201 with the selective CB1R antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant also established that the discrimination is CB1R dependent. Time-course data reveal that AM2201 likely peaks rapidly with an in-vivo functional half-life of only 60 min. The present data confirm and extend previous observations regarding Δ-THC-like effects of 'Spice' components. PMID:26397760

  4. Endocannabinoids and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

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    Helmy Ahmed

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH has gained a lot of attention recently due to the increased prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and hyperlipedemia. The endogenous compounds, endocannabinoids (ECBs, bind to the same receptors as tetrahydrocannabinol, the active component in marijuana and hashish. Recently, two G-proteins coupled, and specific receptors, to cannabinoids, CB1 &CB2, which act via adenylate cyclase and calcium channels, were described. In this brief review, we shed light on the possible relation between NASH and these proteins. It has been hypothesized that ECBs regulate peripheral lipogenesis. Some studies suggest that in CB1-deficient mice there is complete resistance to the development of dietinduced hepatic steatosis, while wild-type mice showed remarkable hepatic steatosis after 3 and 14 weeks of high-fat diet. Based on these results and others, the hepatic ECB system may be a target for the treatment of NASH. The CB1 antagonist, Rimonabant, will shortly be approved for the treatment of obesity and may thus reduce the necessity for bariatric surgery.

  5. Ethanol modulates facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in cerebellar Purkinje cells in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Cheng; Bing, Yan-Hua; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Acute ethanol overdose can induce dysfunction of cerebellar motor regulation and cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory synaptic responses in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) in urethane-anesthetized mice, using in vivo patch-clamp recordings. Under voltage-clamp conditions, ethanol (300 mM) decreased the amplitude, half-width, rise time and decay time of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents in PCs. The ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was dose-dependent, with an IC50 of 148.5 mM. Notably, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents were significantly abrogated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists, AM251 and O-2050, as well as by the CB1 agonist WIN55212-2. Moreover, the ethanol-induced inhibition of facial stimulation-evoked outward currents was prevented by cerebellar surface perfusion of the PKA inhibitors H-89 and Rp-cAMP, but not by intracellular administration of the PKA inhibitor PKI. Our present results indicate that ethanol inhibits the facial stimulation-evoked outward currents by activating presynaptic CB1 receptors via the PKA signaling pathway. These findings suggest that ethanol overdose impairs sensory information processing, at least in part, by inhibiting GABA release from molecular layer interneurons onto PCs. PMID:27489024

  6. The Antitumor Activity of Plant-Derived Non-Psychoactive Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Sean D; Soroceanu, Liliana; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2015-06-01

    As a therapeutic agent, most people are familiar with the palliative effects of the primary psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa (CS), Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a molecule active at both the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor subtypes. Through the activation primarily of CB1 receptors in the central nervous system, THC can reduce nausea, emesis and pain in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. During the last decade, however, several studies have now shown that CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists can act as direct antitumor agents in a variety of aggressive cancers. In addition to THC, there are many other cannabinoids found in CS, and a majority produces little to no psychoactivity due to the inability to activate cannabinoid receptors. For example, the second most abundant cannabinoid in CS is the non-psychoactive cannabidiol (CBD). Using animal models, CBD has been shown to inhibit the progression of many types of cancer including glioblastoma (GBM), breast, lung, prostate and colon cancer. This review will center on mechanisms by which CBD, and other plant-derived cannabinoids inefficient at activating cannabinoid receptors, inhibit tumor cell viability, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and the stem-like potential of cancer cells. We will also discuss the ability of non-psychoactive cannabinoids to induce autophagy and apoptotic-mediated cancer cell death, and enhance the activity of first-line agents commonly used in cancer treatment. PMID:25916739

  7. Cannabinoid receptor activation prevents the effects of chronic mild stress on emotional learning and LTP in a rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Amir; Rubin, Adva S; Abush, Hila; Richter-Levin, Gal; Akirav, Irit

    2014-03-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are characterized by emotional memory or learning disturbances. Chronic mild stress (CMS) is a common animal model for stress-induced depression. Here we examined whether 3 days of treatment using the CB1/2 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 could ameliorate the effects of CMS on emotional learning (ie, conditioned avoidance and extinction), long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal-accumbens pathway, and depression-like symptoms (ie, coping with stress behavior, anhedonia, and weight changes). We also examined whether the ameliorating effects of WIN55,212-2 on behavior and physiology after CMS are mediated by CB1 and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Rats were exposed to CMS or handled on days 1-21. The agonist WIN55,212-2 or vehicle were administered on days 19-21 (IP; 0.5 mg/kg) and behavioral and electrophysiological measures were taken on days 23 and 28. The CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (IP; 0.3 mg/kg) or the GR antagonist RU-38486 (IP; 10 mg/kg) were co-administered with WIN55,212-2. Our results show that CMS significantly modified physiological and behavioral reactions, as observed by the impairment in avoidance extinction and LTP in the hippocampal-accumbens pathway, and the alterations in depression-like symptoms, such as coping with stress behavior, weight gain, and sucrose consumption. The most significant effect observed in this study was that 3 days of WIN55,212-2 administration prevented the CMS-induced alterations in emotional memory (ie, extinction) and plasticity. This effect was mediated by CB1 receptors as the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 prevented the ameliorating effects of WIN55,212-2 on extinction and LTP. The GR antagonist RU-38486 also prevented the CMS-induced alterations in extinction and plasticity, and when co-administered with WIN55,212-2, the preventive effects after CMS were maintained. The findings suggest that enhancing cannabinoid signaling could represent a novel approach to the treatment of cognitive

  8. Endocannabinoids differentially modulate synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Jian-Yi Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons receive two excitatory glutamatergic synaptic inputs: their most distal dendritic regions in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SLM are innervated by the perforant path (PP, originating from layer III of the entorhinal cortex, while their more proximal regions of the apical dendrites in the stratum radiatum (SR are innervated by the Schaffer-collaterals (SC, originating from hippocampal CA3 neurons. Endocannabinoids (eCBs are naturally occurring mediators capable of modulating both GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity via the CB1 receptor. Previous work on eCB modulation of excitatory synapses in the CA1 region largely focuses on the SC pathway. However, little information is available on whether and how eCBs modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity at PP synapses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By employing somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, Ca(2+ uncaging, and immunostaining, we demonstrate that there are significant differences in low-frequency stimulation (LFS- or DHPG-, an agonist of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs, induced long-term depression (LTD of excitatory synaptic transmission between SC and PP synapses in the same pyramidal neurons. These differences are eliminated by pharmacological inhibition with selective CB1 receptor antagonists or genetic deletion of the CB1 receptor, indicating that these differences likely result from differential modulation via a CB1 receptor-dependent mechanism. We also revealed that depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE, a form of short-term synaptic plasticity, and photolysis of caged Ca(2+-induced suppression of Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs were less at the PP than that at the SC. In addition, application of WIN55212 (WIN induced a more pronounced inhibition of EPSCs at the SC when compared to that at the PP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest

  9. DNA methyltransferase expressions in Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis is developmentally regulated and modulated by ethanol and 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmahapatra, Asok K; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the impact of the epigenome in inducting fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) phenotypes in Japanese rice fish embryogenesis. One of the significant events in epigenome is DNA methylation which is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) enzymes. We analyzed DNMT enzyme mRNA expressions in Japanese rice fish development starting from fertilized eggs to hatching and also in embryos exposed for first 48h of development either to ethanol (300mM) or to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC; 2mM), an inhibitor of DNMT enzyme activity. As observed in FASD phenotypes, 5-azaC exposure was able to induce microcephaly and craniofacial cartilage deformities in Japanese rice fish. Moreover, we have observed that expression of DNMTs (dnmt1, dnmt3aa, and dnmt3bb.1) are developmentally regulated; high mRNA copies were found in early stages (1-2day-post-fertilization, dpf), followed by gradual reduction until hatched. In ethanol-treated embryos, compared to controls, dnmt1 mRNA is in reduced level in 2dpf and in enhanced level in 6dpf embryos. While dnmt3aa and 3bb.1 remained unaltered. In contrast, embryos exposed to 5-azaC have an enhanced level of dnmt1 and dnmt3bb.1 mRNAs both in 2 and 6dpf embryos while dnmt3aa is enhanced only in 6dpf embryos. Moreover, endocannabinoid receptor 1a (cnr1a) mRNA which was found to be reduced by ethanol remained unaltered and cnr1b and cnr2 mRNAs, which were remained unaltered by ethanol, were increased significantly by 5-azaC in 6dpf embryos. This study indicates that the craniofacial defects observed in FASD phenotypes are the results of dysregulations in DNMT expressions. PMID:26183885

  10. Psychopathology and Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    João Gama Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Hippocrates that neuropsychiatric illness secondary to liver disease fascinates physicians, but only in the XIX century Marcel Nencki and Ivan Pavlov suggested the relation between high concentrations of ammonia and Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE. The reaction of ammonia and glutamate (origins glutamine, “the Trojan Horse of neurotoxicity of ammonia continues to be the main responsible for the neurologic lesions, recently confirmed by neurochemistry and neuroimagiology studies. Glutamine starts the inflammatory reaction at the central nervous sys- tem but other important actors seem to be manganese and the neurotransmitters systems of GABA and endocanabinoids. Nowadays there are three different etiologic big groups for HE: type A associated with acute liver failure; type B associated with portosystemic bypass; and type C associated with cirrhosis of the liver. The staging of HE is still based on classic West Haven system, but a latent Grade 0 was introduced (the so called minimal HE; remaining the aggra- vating HE from Grade 1 (subtle changes at clinical examination to Grade 4 (coma. In this work a bibliographic review was made on 30 of the most pertinent and recent papers, focusing in psychopathology, physiopathology, etiology and staging of this clinical entity transversal to Psychiatry and Gastroenterology. Alterations are described in vigility and conscience like temporal, spatial and personal disorientation. Attention, concentration and memory are impaired very early, on latent phase and can be accessed through neuropsychological tests. Mood oscillates between euphoric and depressive. Personality changes begin obviously and abruptly or in a subtle and insidious way. There can be changes in perception like visual hallucinations or even of acoustic-verbal. The thought disorders can be of delusional type, paranoid, systematized or not, but also monothematic ala Capgras Syndrome. Speech can be accelerated, slowed down or completely in

  11. Role of cannabinoidergic system on food intake in neonatal layer-type chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Abbas; Zendehdel, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab; Charkhkar, Saeed; Hassanpour, Shahin

    2015-06-01

    Central regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitters of food intake vary among animals. Endocannabinoids have crucial role on central food intake regulation in mammals but its role has not been studied in layer-type chicken. Thus, in this study 6 experiments designed to evaluate effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of 2-AG (2-Arachidonoylglycerol, selective CB1 receptors agonist), SR141716A (selective CB1 receptors antagonist), JWH015 (selective CB2 receptors agonist), AM630 (selective CB2 receptors antagonist) on feeding behavior in 3 h food deprived neonatal layer-type chickens. In experiment 1, birds ICV injected with control solution and 2-AG (0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg). In experiment 2: control solution, SR141716A (6.25, 12.5 and 25 μg) were ICV injected to birds. In experiment 3 animals received: control solution, SR141716A (6.25 μg), 2-AG (1 μg) and co-injection of SR141716A+2-AG. In experiment 4, chickens received control solution and JWH015 (6.25, 12.5 and 25 μg). In experiment 5, control solution and AM630 (1.25, 2.5 and 5 μg) were injected. In experiment 6, the birds received control solution, AM630 (1.25 μg), JWH015 (25 μg) and co-administration of AM630+JWH015. Then, cumulative food intake was recorded until 120 min after injection. According to the results, 2-AG dose dependently increased cumulative food intake while SR141716A reduced appetite compared to control group (P co-injection of JWH015+AM630 decreased JWH015-induced food intake (P < 0.05). These results suggest CB1 and CB2 receptors have an important role on ingestive behavior in FD3 neonatal layer-type chicken. PMID:25902906

  12. Endocannabinoid release modulates electrical coupling between CCK cells connected via chemical and electrical synapses in CA1

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    Jonathan eIball

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrical coupling between some subclasses of interneurons is thought to promote coordinated firing that generates rhythmic synchronous activity in cortical regions. Synaptic activity of cholesystokinin (CCK interneurons which co-express cannbinoid type-1 (CB1 receptors are powerful modulators of network activity via the actions of endocannabinoids. We investigated the modulatory actions of endocannabinoids between chemically and electrically connected synapses of CCK cells using paired whole-cell recordings combined with biocytin and double immunofluorescence labelling in acute slices of rat hippocampus at P18-20 days. CA1 stratum radiatum CCK Schaffer collateral associated (SCA cells were coupled electrically with each other as well as CCK basket cells and CCK cells with axonal projections expanding to dentate gyrus. Approximately 50% of electrically coupled cells received facilitating, asynchronously released IPSPs that curtailed the steady-state coupling coefficient by 57%. Tonic CB1 receptor activity which reduces inhibition enhanced electrical coupling between cells that were connected via chemical and electrical synapses. Blocking CB1 receptors with antagonist, AM-251 (5M resulted in the synchronized release of larger IPSPs and this enhanced inhibition further reduced the steady-state coupling coefficient by 85%. Depolarization induced suppression of inhibition (DSI, maintained the asynchronicity of IPSP latency, but reduced IPSP amplitudes by 95% and enhanced the steady-state coupling coefficient by 104% and IPSP duration by 200%. However, DSI did not did not enhance electrical coupling at purely electrical synapses. These data suggest that different morphological subclasses of CCK interneurons are interconnected via gap junctions. The synergy between the chemical and electrical coupling between CCK cells probably plays a role in activity-dependent endocannabinoid modulation of rhythmic synchronization.

  13. Pharmacological blockade of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH alters neural proliferation, apoptosis and gliosis in the rat hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum in a negative energy context

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    Patricia eRivera

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids participate in the control of neurogenesis, neural cell death and gliosis. The pharmacological effect of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH inhibitor URB597, which limits the endocannabinoid degradation, was investigated in the present study. Cell proliferation (phospho-H3+ or BrdU+ cells of the main adult neurogenic zones as well as apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3+, astroglia (GFAP+, and microglia (Iba1+ cells were analyzed in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum of rats intraperitoneally treated with URB597 (0.3 mg/kg/day at one dose/4-days resting or 5 doses (1 dose/day. Repeated URB597 treatment increased the plasma levels of the endocannabinoids oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide and arachidonoylethanolamine, reduced the plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, and induced a transitory body weight decrease. The hippocampi of repeated URB597-treated rats showed a reduced number of phospho-H3+ and BrdU+ subgranular cells as well as GFAP+, Iba1+ and cleaved caspase-3+ cells, which was accompanied with decreased hippocampal expressions of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and FAAH. In the hypothalami of these rats, the number of phospho-H3+, GFAP+ and 3-weeks-old BrdU+ cells was specifically decreased. The reduced striatal expression of CB1 receptor in repeated URB597-treated rats was only associated with a reduced apoptosis. In contrast, the striatum of acute URB597-treated rats showed an increased number of subventricular proliferative, astroglial and apoptotic cells, which was accompanied with increased Faah expression. Main results indicated that FAAH inhibitor URB597 decreased neural proliferation, glia and apoptosis in a brain region-dependent manner, which were coupled to local changes in FAAH and/or CB1 receptor expressions and a negative energy context.

  14. Elevated Systemic Levels of Endocannabinoids and Related Mediators Across the Menstrual Cycle in Women With Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ana Maria; Cioffi, Raffaella; Viganò, Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Verde, Roberta; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Garavaglia, Elisabetta; Panina-Bordignon, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoids and modulators of the endocannabinoid system affect specific mechanisms that are critical to the establishment and development of endometriosis. The aim of this study was to measure the systemic levels of endocannabinoids and related mediators in women with and without endometriosis and to investigate whether such levels correlated with endometriosis-associated pain. Plasma and endometrial biopsies were obtained from women with a laparoscopic diagnosis of endometriosis (n = 27) and no endometrial pathology (n = 29). Plasma levels of endocannabinoids (N-arachidonoylethanolamine [AEA] and 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and related mediators (N-oleoylethanolamine [OEA] and N-palmitoylethanolamine [PEA]), messenger RNA expression of some of their receptors (cannabinoid receptor type 1 [CB1], CB2, transient receptor potential vanilloid type [TRPV1]), and the enzymes involved in the synthesis (N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D [NAPE-PLD]) and degradation (fatty acid amide hydrolase 1 [FAAH]) of AEA, OEA, and PEA were evaluated in endometrial stromal cells. The systemic levels of AEA, 2-AG, and OEA were elevated in endometriosis in the secretory phase compared to controls. The expression of CB1 was higher in secretory phase endometrial stromal cells of controls versus endometriosis. Similar expression levels of CB2, TRPV1, NAPE-PLD, and FAAH were detected in controls and endometriosis. Patients with moderate-to-severe dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia showed higher AEA and PEA levels than those with low-to-moderate pain symptoms, respectively. The association of increased circulating AEA and 2-AG with decreased local CB1 expression in endometriosis suggests a negative feedback loop regulation, which may impair the capability of these mediators to control pain. These preliminary data suggest that the pharmacological manipulation of the action or levels of these mediators may offer an alternative option for the management of endometriosis

  15. Cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization decreases the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse hippocampus.

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    Blanco, Eduardo; Galeano, Pablo; Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco J; Rivera, Patricia; Serrano, Antonia; Alen, Francisco; Rubio, Leticia; Vargas, Antonio; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Decara, Juan; Bilbao, Ainhoa; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Suárez, Juan

    2016-03-01

    In the reward mesocorticolimbic circuits, the glutamatergic and endocannabinoid systems are implicated in neurobiological mechanisms underlying cocaine addiction. However, the involvement of both systems in the hippocampus, a critical region to process relational information relevant for encoding drug-associated memories, in cocaine-related behaviors remains unknown. In the present work, we studied whether the hippocampal gene/protein expression of relevant glutamate signaling components, including glutamate-synthesizing enzymes and metabotropic and ionotropic receptors, and the hippocampal gene/protein expression of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes were altered following acute and/or repeated cocaine administration resulting in conditioned locomotion and locomotor sensitization. Results showed that acute cocaine administration induced an overall down-regulation of glutamate-related gene expression and, specifically, a low phosphorylation level of GluA1. In contrast, locomotor sensitization to cocaine produced an up-regulation of several glutamate receptor-related genes and, specifically, an increased protein expression of the GluN1 receptor subunit. Regarding the endocannabinoid system, acute and repeated cocaine administration were associated with an increased gene/protein expression of CB1 receptors and a decreased gene/protein expression of the endocannabinoid-synthesis enzymes N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine D (NAPE-PLD) and diacylglycerol lipase alpha (DAGLα). These changes resulted in an overall decrease in endocannabinoid synthesis/degradation ratios, especially NAPE-PLD/fatty acid amide hydrolase and DAGLα/monoacylglycerol lipase, suggesting a reduced endocannabinoid production associated with a compensatory up-regulation of CB1 receptor. Overall, these findings suggest that repeated cocaine administration resulting in locomotor sensitization induces a down-regulation of the endocannabinoid signaling that could

  16. Hormonal status and age differentially affect tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC on learning in female rats

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    Peter J Winsauer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hormone status and age on the development of tolerance to D9-THC were assessed in sham-operated (intact or ovariectomized (OVX female rats that received either intraperitoneal saline or 5.6 mg/kg of D9-THC daily from postnatal day (PD 75 to 180 (early adulthood onward or PD 35 to 140 (adolescence onward. During this time, the 4 groups for each age (i.e., intact/saline, intact/THC, OVX/saline, and OVX/THC were trained in a learning and performance procedure and dose-effect curves were established for D9-THC (0.56-56 mg/kg and the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R antagonist rimonabant (0.32-10 mg/kg. Despite the persistence of small rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in intact and OVX females from both ages during chronic D9-THC, all of the D9-THC groups developed tolerance. However, the magnitude of tolerance, as well as the effect of hormone status, varied with the age at which chronic D9-THC was initiated. There was no evidence of dependence in any of the groups. Hippocampal protein expression of CB1R, AHA1 (a co-chaperone of CB1R and HSP90β (a molecular chaperone modulated by AHA-1 was affected more by OVX than chronic D9-THC; striatal protein expression was not consistently affected by either manipulation. Hippocampal BDNF expression varied with age, hormone status, and chronic treatment. Thus, hormonal status differentially affects the development of tolerance to the disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (D9-THC on learning and performance behavior in adolescent, but not adult, female rats. These factors and their interactions also differentially affect cannabinoid signaling proteins in the hippocampus and striatum, and ultimately, neural plasticity.

  17. Synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and its halogenated derivatives JWH-018-Cl and JWH-018-Br impair Novel Object Recognition in mice: Behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, M; Ossato, A; Canazza, I; Trapella, C; Borelli, A C; Beggiato, S; Rimondo, C; Serpelloni, G; Ferraro, L; Marti, M

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that an impairment of learning and memory function is one of the major physiological effects caused by natural or synthetic cannabinoid consumption in rodents, nonhuman primates and in humans. JWH-018 and its halogenated derivatives (JWH-018-Cl and JWH-018-Br) are synthetic CB1/CB2 cannabinoid agonists, illegally marketed as "Spice" and "herbal blend" for their Cannabis-like psychoactive effects. In the present study the effects of acute exposure to JWH-018, JWH-018-Cl, JWH-018-Br (JWH-018-R compounds) and Δ(9)-THC (for comparison) on Novel Object Recognition test (NOR) has been investigated in mice. Moreover, to better characterize the effects of JWH-018-R compounds on memory function, in vitro electrophysiological and neurochemical studies in hippocampal preparations have been performed. JWH-018, JWH-018-Cl and JWH-018-Br dose-dependently impaired both short- and long-memory retention in mice (respectively 2 and 24 h after training session). Their effects resulted more potent respect to that evoked by Δ(9)-THC. Moreover, in vitro studies showed as JWH-018-R compounds negatively affected electrically evoked synaptic transmission, LTP and aminoacid (glutamate and GABA) release in hippocampal slices. Behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical effects were fully prevented by CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 pretreatment, suggesting a CB1 receptor involvement. These data support the hypothesis that synthetic JWH-018-R compounds, as Δ(9)-THC, impair cognitive function in mice by interfering with hippocampal synaptic transmission and memory mechanisms. This data outline the danger that the use and/or abuse of these synthetic cannabinoids may represent for the cognitive process in human consumer. PMID:27346209

  18. Molecular mechanisms for the destabilization and restabilization of reactivated spatial memory in the Morris water maze

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    Kim Ryang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Memory retrieval is not a passive process. Recent studies have shown that reactivated memory is destabilized and then restabilized through gene expression-dependent reconsolidation. Molecular studies on the regulation of memory stability after retrieval have focused almost exclusively on fear memory, especially on the restabilization process of the reactivated fear memory. We previously showed that, similarly with fear memories, reactivated spatial memory undergoes reconsolidation in the Morris water maze. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which reactivated spatial memory is destabilized and restabilized remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism that regulates the stability of the reactivated spatial memory. Results We first showed that pharmacological inactivation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR in the hippocampus or genetic inhibition of cAMP-responsible element binding protein (CREB-mediated transcription disrupted reactivated spatial memory. Finally, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and L-type voltage gated calcium channels (LVGCCs in the hippocampus blocked the disruption of the reactivated spatial memory by the inhibition of protein synthesis. Conclusions Our findings indicated that the reactivated spatial memory is destabilized through the activation of CB1 and LVGCCs and then restabilized through the activation of NMDAR- and CREB-mediated transcription. We also suggest that the reactivated spatial memory undergoes destabilization and restabilization in the hippocampus, through similar molecular processes as those for reactivated contextual fear memories, which require CB1 and LVGCCs for destabilization and NMDAR and CREB for restabilization.

  19. Acetaldehyde as a drug of abuse: insight into AM281 administration on operant-conflict paradigm in rats.

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    Fulvio ePlescia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence focuses on acetaldehyde (ACD as the mediator of the rewarding and motivational properties of ethanol. Indeed, ACD stimulates dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and it is self-administered under different conditions. Besides the dopaminergic transmission, the endocannabinoid system has been reported to play an important role in ethanol central effects, modulating primary alcohol rewarding effect, drug-seeking and relapse behaviour. Drug motivational properties are highlighted in operant paradigms which include response-contingent punishment, a behavioural equivalent of compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences.The aim of this study was thus to characterize ACD motivational and rewarding properties employing an operant-conflict paradigm in which rats, trained to lever press in order to get ACD solution (0.9%, undergo extinction, reinstatement and conflict sessions, according to a modified Geller-Seifter procedur. Furthermore the role played by CB1 receptor system in modulating ACD-induced effects were investigated through the administration of CB1 receptor antagonist, AM281 (1 mg/kg, i.p. during the extinction-, relapse- and conflict experiments.Our results indicate that ACD is able to induce and maintain an operant behaviour, a high number of responses during extinction, an increase in the lever presses during the reinstatement phase, and a higher emission of punished responses during the conflict experiments, when compared to controls.The administration of AM281 is able to decrease ACD-seeking behaviour during extinction, the number of lever presses during reinstatement and to strongly decrease the punished responses for ACD. Our data strengthen the idea that ACD may be responsible for the central effects of ethanol, and pinpoint at the CB1 system as one of the neural substrates underlying its addictive properties.

  20. Molecular components and functions of the endocannabinoid system in mouse prefrontal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Lafourcade

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cannabinoids have deleterious effects on prefrontal cortex (PFC-mediated functions and multiple evidences link the endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid system, cannabis use and schizophrenia, a disease in which PFC functions are altered. Nonetheless, the molecular composition and the physiological functions of the endocannabinoid system in the PFC are unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, using electron microscopy we found that key proteins involved in endocannabinoid signaling are expressed in layers v/vi of the mouse prelimbic area of the PFC: presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R faced postsynaptic mGluR5 while diacylglycerol lipase alpha (DGL-alpha, the enzyme generating the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG was expressed in the same dendritic processes as mGluR5. Activation of presynaptic CB1R strongly inhibited evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents. Prolonged synaptic stimulation at 10Hz induced a profound long-term depression (LTD of layers V/VI excitatory inputs. The endocannabinoid -LTD was presynaptically expressed and depended on the activation of postsynaptic mGluR5, phospholipase C and a rise in postsynaptic Ca(2+ as predicted from the localization of the different components of the endocannabinoid system. Blocking the degradation of 2-AG (with URB 602 but not of anandamide (with URB 597 converted subthreshold tetanus to LTD-inducing ones. Moreover, inhibiting the synthesis of 2-AG with Tetrahydrolipstatin, blocked endocannabinoid-mediated LTD. All together, our data show that 2-AG mediates LTD at these synapses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the endocannabinoid -retrograde signaling plays a prominent role in long-term synaptic plasticity at the excitatory synapses of the PFC. Alterations of endocannabinoid -mediated synaptic plasticity may participate to the etiology of PFC-related pathologies.

  1. The effects of cannabinoid drugs on abnormal involuntary movements in dyskinetic and non-dyskinetic 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sinéad; Gorman, Adrienne M; Finn, David P; Dowd, Eilís

    2010-12-01

    The long-term use of levodopa as a pharmacotherapy for Parkinson's disease is limited by the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. However, recent studies have suggested that pharmacological targeting of the endocannabinoid system may provide a viable adjunct to suppress these motor side effects. Thus, this study sought to determine the effect of pharmacologically activating or blocking endocannabinoid signalling on levodopa-induced dyskinesias in a rat model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesions were made dyskinetic by 6 weeks of daily levodopa injections (10mg/kg s.c.). Rats that developed stable abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) received acute injections of the cannabinoid receptor agonist, HU210 (0.0, 0.5, 5.0, and 50.0 μg/kg i.p.), or the CB(1) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, AM251 (0.0 and 3.0mg/kg i.p.), whereas rats that did not develop stable AIMs received injections of the CB(1) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant (0.0 and 3.0mg/kg i.p.), for 18 days. In the dyskinetic rats, the highest dose of HU210 significantly reduced certain subtypes of AIMs but it also impaired normal motor functioning, while AM251 had no effect on AIMs. In the non-dyskinetic rats, rimonabant precipitated certain subtypes of AIMs. Overall, this study demonstrates that the anti-dyskinetic effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists may not be dissociable from their motor suppressant effects thereby limiting their potential usefulness for treating established dyskinesias in parkinsonism. However, it is intriguing that blockade of endocannabinoid-CB(1) signalling can unmask levodopa-induced AIMs, and this finding suggests that endocannabinoid tone may confer protection against the development of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. PMID:20888328

  2. Acetaldehyde as a drug of abuse: insight into AM281 administration on operant-conflict paradigm in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plescia, Fulvio; Brancato, Anna; Marino, Rosa A M; Cannizzaro, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence focuses on acetaldehyde (ACD) as the mediator of the rewarding and motivational properties of ethanol. Indeed, ACD stimulates dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and it is self-administered under different conditions. Besides the dopaminergic transmission, the endocannabinoid system has been reported to play an important role in ethanol central effects, modulating primary alcohol rewarding effect, drug-seeking, and relapse behavior. Drug motivational properties are highlighted in operant paradigms which include response-contingent punishment, a behavioral equivalent of compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences. The aim of this study was thus to characterize ACD motivational and rewarding properties employing an operant-conflict paradigm in which rats, trained to lever press in order to get ACD solution (0.9%), undergo extinction, reinstatement and conflict sessions, according to a modified Geller-Seifter procedure. Furthermore, the role played by CB1 receptor system in modulating ACD-induced effects were investigated through the administration of CB1 receptor antagonist, AM281 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) during the extinction-, relapse-, and conflict-experiments. Our results indicate that ACD is able to induce and maintain an operant behavior, a high number of responses during extinction, an increase in the lever presses during the reinstatement phase, and a higher emission of punished responses during the conflict experiments, when compared to controls. The administration of AM281 is able to decrease ACD-seeking behavior during extinction, the number of lever presses during reinstatement and to strongly decrease the punished responses for ACD. Our data strengthen the idea that ACD may be responsible for the central effects of ethanol, and pinpoint at the CB1 system as one of the neural substrates underlying its addictive properties. PMID:23781180

  3. [The endocannabinoid system role in the pathogenesis of obesity and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, Anna; Kaźmierczak, Wieńczysław; Wierzbiński, Piotr

    2015-07-01

    Excessive consumption and obesity do not always have to be strictly pathological. The adjustment of food intake as well as the pleasure of eating are the results of the circulation of neurotransmitters, hormones and glucocorticoids which have an ability to regulate the activity of many receptors connected with G protein, including endocannabinoid receptors. The key role of endocannabinoids in pathogenesis of obesity is their overproduction by adipose cells. Endocannabinoids (eCBs) affect CB1 receptors and increase hunger, willingness to intake food, decrease peristalsis and delay stomach emptying. In obese people increased levels of both central and peripheral endocannabinoids are observed. It may be connected with higher availability of endocannabinoid precursors to synthesis from adipose tissue and lipids. Raised concentration of eCBs in the body may be the consequence of their catabolism dysfunction. There is a positive correlation between amount the number of receptors in the peripheral tissues and obesity increase. It is thought that expression of CB1 receptors in mesolimbic system is connected with motivation to consume food in response to rewarding factor. The appetite increase after cannabinoids use is probably caused by rewarding action of the consumed food and it results from excessive dopaminergic transmission in award system. The pharmacological inhibition of endocannabinoids activity leads to weight loss, but may also have negative consequences such as decreased mood, reduced tolerance of pain, intensified anxiety, anhedonia, depressive symptoms, even suicidal thoughts. In post mortem examinations a decrease in CB1 receptor density in grey matter of glial cells in patients with major depression was identified. The pleiotropic and extensive activity of endocannabinoid system can influence a range of neurotransmitters thereby modulating the psychiatric life phenomena, simultaneously being involved in metabolism control and energetic system of human body

  4. Effect of cannabidiol on sepsis-induced motility disturbances in mice: involvement of CB receptors and fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Filippis, D; Iuvone, T; d'amico, A; Esposito, G; Steardo, L; Herman, A G; Pelckmans, P A; de Winter, B Y; de Man, J G

    2008-08-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory condition that is associated with reduced propulsive gastrointestinal motility (ileus). A therapeutic option to treat sepsis is to promote intestinal propulsion preventing bacterial stasis, overgrowth and translocation. Recent evidence suggests that anti-oxidants improve sepsis-induced ileus. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa, exerts strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects without binding to cannabinoid CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. Cannabidiol also regulates the activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which is the main enzyme involved in endocannabinoid breakdown and which modulates gastrointestinal motility. Because of the therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in several pathologies, we investigated its effect on sepsis-induced ileus and on cannabinoid receptor and FAAH expression in the mouse intestine. Sepsis was induced by treating mice with lipopolysaccharides for 18 h. Sepsis led to a decrease in gastric emptying and intestinal transit. Cannabidiol further reduced gastrointestinal motility in septic mice but did not affect gastrointestinal motility in control mice. A low concentration of the CB(1) antagonist AM251 did not affect gastrointestinal motility in control mice but reversed the effect of cannabidiol in septic mice. Sepsis was associated with a selective upregulation of intestinal CB(1) receptors without affecting CB(2) receptor expression and with increased FAAH expression. The increase in FAAH expression was completely reversed by cannabidiol but not affected by AM251. Our results show that sepsis leads to an imbalance of the endocannabinoid system in the mouse intestine. Despite its proven anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, cannabidiol may be of limited use for the treatment of sepsis-induced ileus. PMID:18373655

  5. Normal aging in rats and pathological aging in human Alzheimer's disease decrease FAAH activity: modulation by cannabinoid agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, A C; Martín-Moreno, A M; Giusto, N M; de Ceballos, M L; Pasquaré, S J

    2014-12-01

    Anandamide is an endocannabinoid involved in several physiological functions including neuroprotection. Anandamide is synthesized on demand and its endogenous level is regulated through its degradation, where fatty acid amide hydrolase plays a major role. The aim of this study was to characterize anandamide breakdown in physiological and pathological aging and its regulation by CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists. Fatty acid amide hydrolase activity was analyzed in an independent cohort of human cortical membrane samples from control and Alzheimer's disease patients, and in membrane and synaptosomes from adult and aged rat cerebral cortex. Our results demonstrate that fatty acid amide hydrolase activity decreases in the frontal cortex from human patients with Alzheimer's disease and this effect is mimicked by Aβ(1-40) peptide. This activity increases and decreases in aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes, respectively. Also, while the presence of JWH-133, a CB2 selective agonist, slightly increases anandamide hydrolysis in human controls, it decreases this activity in adults and aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes. In the presence of WIN55,212-2, a mixed CB1/CB2 agonist, anandamide hydrolysis increases in Alzheimer's disease patients but decreases in human controls as well as in adult and aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes. Although a similar profile is observed in fatty acid amide hydrolase activity between aged rat synaptic endings and human Alzheimer's disease brains, it is differently modulated by CB1/CB2 agonists. This modulation leads to a reduced availability of anandamide in Alzheimer's disease and to an increased availability of this endocannabinoid in aging. PMID:25456842

  6. Endocannabinoid system in cardiovascular disorders - new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Cunha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The long history of Cannabis sativa had its development stimulated and oriented for medicine after the discovery and chemical characterization of its main active ingredient, the 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (9-THC. Consequently, a binding site for 9-THC was identified in rat brains and the first cannabinoid receptor (CB1 was cloned, followed by the CB2 and by the discover of two endogenous agonists: anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol. Cannabinoid receptors, endocannabinoids and the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and degradation constitute the endocannabinoid system (ECS, which plays an important role in the cardiovascular system. In vivo experiments with rats have demonstrated the action of anandamide and 2-AG on the development of atherosclerotic plaque, as well as an effect on heart rate, blood pressure, vasoactivity and energy metabolism (action in dyslipidemia and obesity. Recent studies with an antagonist of CB1 receptors showed that the modulation of ECS can play an important role in reducing cardiovascular risk in obese and dyslipidemic patients. Similarly, studies in rats have demonstrated the action of CB2 receptors in adhesion, migration, proliferation and function of immune cells involved in the atherosclerotic plaque formation process. The evidence so far gathered shows that the modulation of ECS (as agonism or antagonism of its receptors is an enormous potential field for research and intervention in multiple areas of human pathophysiology. The development of selective drugs for the CB1 and CB2 receptors may open a door to new therapeutic regimens.This review article aims to address the key findings and evidences on the modulation of ECS, in order to prospect future forms of therapeutic intervention at the cardiovascular level. A recent, emerging, controversial and of undoubted scientific interest subject, which states as a potential therapeutic target to reach in the 21 st century.

  7. Endocannabinoid 2-AG and intracellular cannabinoid receptors modulate a low-threshold calcium spike-induced slow depolarizing afterpotential in rat thalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Kolaj, M; Renaud, L P

    2016-05-13

    In rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) neurons, activation of low-threshold calcium (Ca(2+)) channels triggers a low-threshold spike (LTS) which may be followed by slow afterpotentials that can dramatically influence action potential patterning. Using gluconate-based internal recording solutions, we investigated the properties of a LTS-induced slow afterdepolarization (sADP) observed in a subpopulation of PVT neurons recorded in brain slice preparations. This LTS-induced sADP required T-type Ca(2+) channel opening, exhibited variable magnitudes between neurons and a voltage dependency with a maximum near -50mV. The area under the sADP remained stable during control monitoring, but displayed gradual suppression in media where strontium replaced Ca(2+). The sADP was suppressed following bath application of 2-APB or ML204, suggesting engagement of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC)-like channels. Further investigation revealed a reversible suppression during bath applications of membrane permeable cannabinoid receptor (CBR) blockers rimonabant, AM630 or SR144528 suggesting the presence of both CB1Rs and CB2Rs. Similar results were achieved by intracellular, but not bath application of the membrane impermeant CB1R blocker hemopressin, suggesting an intracellular localization of CB1Rs. Data from pharmacologic manipulation of endocannabinoid biosynthetic pathways suggested 2-arachidonlyglycerol (2-AG) as the endogenous cannabinoid ligand, derived via hydrolysis of diacylglycerol (DAG), with the latter formed from the pathway involving phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D and phosphatic acid phosphohydrolase. The sADP suppression observed during recordings with pipettes containing LY294002, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, suggested a role for PI3kinase in the translocation of these TRPC-like channels to the plasma membrane. Drug-induced attenuation of the availability of 2-AG influences the number of action potentials that surmount the LTS evoked in PVT

  8. Cannabinoids and Glucocorticoids in the Basolateral Amygdala Modulate Hippocampal-Accumbens Plasticity After Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2016-03-01

    Acute stress results in release of glucocorticoids, which are potent modulators of learning and plasticity. This process is presumably mediated by the basolateral amygdala (BLA) where cannabinoids CB1 receptors have a key role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Growing attention has been focused on nucleus accumbens (NAc) plasticity, which regulates mood and motivation. The NAc integrates affective and context-dependent input from the BLA and ventral subiculum (vSub), respectively. As our previous data suggest that the CB1/2 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU-38486 (RU) can prevent the effects of stress on emotional memory, we examined whether intra-BLA WIN and RU can reverse the effects of acute stress on NAc plasticity. Bilateral, ipsilateral, and contralateral BLA administration of RU or WIN reversed the stress-induced impairment in vSub-NAc long-term potentiation (LTP) and the decrease in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activity in the NAc. BLA CB1 receptors were found to mediate the preventing effects of WIN on plasticity, but not the preventing effects of RU, after stress. Inactivating the ipsilateral BLA, but not the contralateral BLA, impaired LTP. The possible mechanisms underlying the effects of BLA on NAc plasticity are discussed; the data suggest that BLA-induced changes in the NAc may be mediated through neural pathways in the brain's stress circuit rather than peripheral pathways. The results suggest that glucocorticoid and cannabinoid systems in the BLA can restore normal function of the NAc and hence may have a central role in the treatment of a variety of stress-related disorders. PMID:26289146

  9. The structure, rearrangement, and ontogenic expression of DB and JB gene segments of the Mexican axolotl T-cell antigen receptor beta chain (TCRB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfourn, F; Charlemagne, J; Fellah, J S

    1996-01-01

    We sequenced a total of 189 independent rearrangements in which the VB7.1 element is associated with CB1 (99 clones) or CB2 (90 clones) isotypes of the T-cell receptor (TCR) beta chain in the Mexican axolotl. Three stages of development were analyzed: 2.5 months, 10 months, and 25 months. Three JB1 segments were associated with the VB-CB1 rearrangements and six JB2 segments with VB-CB2. As in other vertebrates, some amino acid positions were conserved in all Jbetas (e. g., Phe-108, Gly-109, Gly-111, Thr-112, and Val-116). Two 11 nucleotides DB-like sequences, differed by one (A or T) central residue and could be productively read in the three putative reading frames. Most of the DB1 and JB1 segments were in the VB-CB1 clones, and most of the DB2 and JB2 segments were in the VB-CB2 clones, suggesting that the TCRB locus is organized into independent DB-JB-CB clusters that used the same collection of VB segments. About 40% of the beta-chain VDJ junctions in 2.5-month-old larvae had N nucleotides, compared with about 73% in 10 - 25-month old animals. The beta-chain VDJ junctions had about 30% of defective rearrangements at all stages of development, which could be due to the slow rate of cell division in the axolotl lymphoid organs, and the large genome in this urodele. Many of the axolotl CDRbeta3 sequences deduced for in frame VDJ rearrangements are the same in animals of different origins. Such redundancy could be a statistical effect due to the small number of thymocytes in the developing axolotl, rather than to some bias due to junctional preferences. PMID:8753858

  10. Emerging drugs of abuse: current perspectives on synthetic cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debruyne D

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Danièle Debruyne,1,2 Reynald Le Boisselier1 1Centre for Evaluation and Information on Pharmacodependence - Addictovigilance (CEIP-A, 2Toxicology and Pharmacology Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, University Hospital Centre Côte de Nacre, Caen, France Abstract: New psychoactive drugs that have appeared over the last decade are typically dominated by cathinones and synthetic cannabinoids (SCs. SCs have been emerging as recreational drugs because they mimic the euphoria effect of cannabis while still being legal. Sprayed on natural herb mixtures, SCs have been primarily sold as “herbal smoking blends” or “herbal incense” under brand names like “Spice” or “K2”. Currently, SCs pure compounds are available from websites for the combination with herbal materials or for the use in e-cigarettes. For the past 5 years, an ever increasing number of compounds, representative of different chemical classes, have been promoted and now represent a large assortment of new popular drugs of abuse, which are difficult to properly identify. Their legal status varies by country with many government institutions currently pushing for their control. The in vitro binding to CB1/CB2 receptors is usually well-known and considerable differences have been found in the CB1 versus CB2 selectivity and potency within the different SCs, with several structure-activity relations being evident. Desired effects by CB1 agonist users are relaxation/recreative, however, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or psychiatric/neurological side effects are commonly reported. At present there is no specific antidote existing if an overdose of designer drugs was to occur, and no curative treatment has been approved by health authorities. Management of acute toxic effects is mainly symptomatic and extrapolated from experience with cannabis. Keywords: synthetic cannabinoids, chemistry, analysis, pharmacology, toxicology, dependence, medical care

  11. The endocannabinoid anandamide impairs in vitro decidualization of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, M; Amaral, C; Diniz-da-Costa, M; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N A; Fonseca, B M

    2016-10-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are endogenous mediators that along with the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), a membrane transporter and metabolic enzymes form the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Several eCBs have been discovered with emphasis on anandamide (AEA). They are involved in several biological processes such as energy balance, immune response and reproduction. Decidualization occurs during the secretory phase of human menstrual cycle, which involves proliferation and differentiation of endometrial stromal cells into decidual cells and is crucial for the establishment and progression of pregnancy. In this study, a telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cell line (St-T1b) and non-differentiated primary cultures of human decidual fibroblasts from term placenta were used to characterize the ECS using immunoblotting and qRT-PCR techniques. It was shown that St-T1b cells express CB1, but not CB2, and that both receptors are expressed in HdF cells. Furthermore, the expression of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main degrading enzyme of AEA, increased during stromal cell differentiation. AEA inhibited cell proliferation, through deregulation of cell cycle progression and induced polyploidy. Moreover, through CB1 binding receptor, AEA also impaired cell differentiation. Therefore, AEA is proposed as a modulator of human decidualization. Our findings may provide wider implications, as deregulated levels of AEA, due to Cannabis sativa consumption or altered expression of the metabolic enzymes, may negatively regulate human endometrial stromal cell decidualization with an impact on human (in)fertility.Free Portuguese abstract: A Portuguese translation of this abstract is freely available at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/152/4/351/suppl/DC1. PMID:27568210

  12. Calculations of criticality, nuclide compositions, decay heat and sources for WWER-440 fuel by new version of the SCALE 5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article are compared theoretical results by new version of the SCALE5 code with experiments or other theoretical calculation for: 1. criticality: -measurement on ZR-6 and LR-0; - numerical benchmark No. 1.3 and 4 (CB1, CB3, CB4); 2. nuclide compositions: - measurement in Kurchatov institute for 3,6 %; - measurement in JAERI(PWR 17x17); - numerical benchmark No. 2-Source (CB2); 3. sources and decay heat:- numerical benchmark No.2-Source (CB2-S); The focus is on modules KENO, TRITON and ORIGEN-S (Authors)

  13. Correlations between the Memory-Related Behavior and the Level of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in the Mice Brain, Provoked by an Acute Administration of CB Receptor Ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Kruk-Slomka; Anna Boguszewska-Czubara; Tomasz Slomka; Barbara Budzynska; Grazyna Biala

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB) receptors, is involved in memory-related responses, as well as in processes that may affect cognition, like oxidative stress processes. The purpose of the experiments was to investigate the impact of CB1 and CB2 receptor ligands on the long-term memory stages in male Swiss mice, using the passive avoidance (PA) test, as well as the influence of these compounds on the level of oxidative stress biomarkers in the mice brain. A single injection...

  14. Acute Immobilization Stress Modulate GABA Release from Rat Olfactory Bulb: Involvement of Endocannabinoids—Cannabinoids and Acute Stress Modulate GABA Release

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandra Delgado; Erica H. Jaffé

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effects of cannabinoids and acute immobilization stress on the regulation of GABA release in the olfactory bulb. Glutamate-stimulated 3H-GABA release was measured in superfused slices. We report that cannabinoids as WIN55, 212-2, methanandamide, and 2-arachidonoylglycerol were able to inhibit glutamate- and KCl-stimulated 3H-GABA release. This effect was blocked by the CB1 antagonist AM281. On the other hand, acute stress was able per se to increase endocannabinoid activity. Th...

  15. Genetic Background Can Result in a Marked or Minimal Effect of Gene Knockout (GPR55 and CB2 Receptor) in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Models of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sisay, S.; Pryce, G.; Jackson, S. J.; Tanner, C.; Ross, R A; Michael, G. J.; Selwood, D. L.; Giovannoni, G; Baker, D.

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and some phytocannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid one (TRPV1) receptor and the orphan G protein receptor fifty-five (GPR55). Studies using C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 (Cnr2 (tm1Zim)) CB2 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice have demonstrated an immune-augmenting effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of multiple sclerosis. However, other EAE studies in Biozzi ABH mice often failed to show any treatmen...

  16. [Progress in study on endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors in the treatment for neuropathic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Shaobo; Zhang, Yibao; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors are expressed in various central pain modulation regions. They maintain in dynamic changes in the expression level and distribution under different pathological and physiological conditions. These changes possess advantage as well as disadvantage. Exogenous administration of endocannabinoids exerts analgesic effect in different pain models, which is mainly mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. Inhibition of enzymes for degrading endocannabinoids in different pain models also shows analgesic effect due to the increased local levels of endocannabinoids. PMID:27600019

  17. Müller cells express the cannabinoid CB2 receptor in the vervet monkey retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    presence of CB2R in the neural component of the retina. We therefore thoroughly examined the cellular localization of CB2R in the vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabeus) retina, using confocal microscopy. Our results demonstrate that CB2R, like CB1R, is present throughout the retinal layers, but with striking...... dissimilarities. Double labeling of CB2R and glutamine synthetase shows that CB2R is restricted to Müller cell processes, extending from the internal limiting membrane, with very low staining, to the external limiting membrane, with heavy labeling. We conclude that CB2R is indeed present in the retina but...

  18. Perspectives of power increasing of arc cesium-oxygen thermoemission converters with tungsten electrodes at increased emitter temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of experimental thermoemission converters with emitters made of oxygen-containing monocrystal tungsten produced by chloride gas-phase technology were studied. The emitters, besides their main function in the operating converters, played the role of inner source of oxygen. An attempt was made to expand the range of the emitter temperatures towards increase for attaining the maximum output power of the converter using the new emitter material. Efficiency of using the monocrystal oxygen-free tungsten collector compared to collectors made of polycrystal tungsten and niobium alloy Cb-1 was studied

  19. Psychotropic and Nonpsychotropic Cannabis Derivatives Inhibit Human 5-HT3A receptors through a Receptor Desensitization-Dependent Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Wei; Koo, Bon-Nyeo; Morton, Russell; Zhang, Li

    2011-01-01

    Δ9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the principal psychoactive and non-psychoactive components of cannabis. While most THC-induced behavioral effects are thought to depend on endogenous cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors, the molecular targets for CBD remain unclear. Here, we report that CBD and THC inhibited the function of human 5-HT3A receptors (h5-HT3ARs) expressed in HEK 293 cells. The magnitude of THC and CBD inhibition was maximal 5 min after a continuous incubation with...

  20. Haloperidol, but not clozapine, produces dramatic catalepsy in Δ9-THC-treated rats: possible clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Marchese, Giorgio; Casti, Paola; Ruiu, Stefania; Saba, Pierluigi; Sanna, Angela; Casu,Gianluca; Pani, Luca

    2003-01-01

    The effect on rat catalepsy induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) in association with haloperidol (HP) or clozapine (CLOZ) administration was investigated.Δ9-THC dose-dependently increased HP (0.05–1 mg kg−1, s.c.)-induced rat catalepsy, while no catalepsy was observed after CLOZ (1–20 mg kg−1, s.c.) or Δ9-THC+CLOZ administration.The CB1 antagonist SR141716A (0.5–5 mg kg−1, i.p.) reversed the increase mediated by Δ9-THC on HP-induced catalepsy.The D2 agonist quinpirole completely revers...

  1. Novel endogenous peptide agonists of cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Ivone; Grushko, Julia S.; Golebiewska, Urszula; Hoogendoorn, Sascha; Gupta, Achla; Heimann, Andrea S.; Ferro, Emer S.; Scarlata, Suzanne; Fricker, Lloyd D.; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2009-01-01

    Hemopressin (Hp), a 9-residue α-hemoglobin-derived peptide, was previously reported to function as a CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist (1). In this study, we report that mass spectrometry (MS) data from peptidomics analyses of mouse brain extracts identified N-terminally extended forms of Hp containing either three (RVD-Hpα) or two (VD-Hpα) additional amino acids, as well as a β-hemoglobin-derived peptide with sequence similarity to that of hemopressin (VD-Hpβ). Characterization of the α-he...

  2. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Melck, Dominique; Palmisano, Antonella; Bisogno, Tiziana; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 ...

  3. Single photon emission computer tomography of dopamine transporters in monkeys and humans with 99mTc-TRODAT-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡平; 陈玲; 张海琴; 黎锦如; 梁宏

    2004-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is presently based on non-specific symptoms. However, radionuclide dopamine transporters imaging can provide specific diagnostic tool for Parkinson's disease. This study was designed to investigate the effects of imaging of dopamine transporters with 99mTc-TRODAT-1 in early diagnosis or differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.Methods Nine normal monkeys were used to establish N-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetra-hydropyridine (MPTP) hemi-Parkinsonian animal models, and they were subjected to imaging. Twenty-nine patients with Parkinson's disease, 12 age-matched healthy volunteers, and 18 age-matched patients with Parkinson's syndrome were investigated. Single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) was performed 3 hours after intravenous injection of 740 MBq 99mTc-TRODAT-1. Striatum specific uptake of 99mTc-TRODAT-1 was calculated according to the ratio of striatum (ST) to cerebellum (CB)in dopamine transporters uptake.Results In normal monkeys, bilateral ratio of ST/CB was 2.34±0.41. After the injection of MPTP, uptake rate of 99mTc-TRODAT-1 at damaged region was much lower than that at the contralateral region, resulting in a significant difference in the ratio of ST/CB (right: ST/CB=1.73±0.35; left: ST/CB=1.90±0.30), especially in hemi-Parkinsonian model monkeys (right: ST/CB=1.29±0.17; left: ST/CB=1.80±0.33). The ratios of ST/CB were 1.57±0.17 and 1.61±0.14 for the right and left respectively in the healthy volunteers, 1.04±0.29 and 1.06±0.30 in the age-matched patients with Parkinson's disease, and 1.56±0.17 and 1.59±0.18 in the age-matched patients with Parkinson's disease syndrome. A significant difference was noted between group of Parkinson's disease, normal controls and Parkinson's disease syndrome. Conclusion The results suggest that 99mTc-TRODAT-1 dopamine transporters SPECT has clinical application value in early diagnosis or differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

  4. New potent and selective inhibitors of anandamide reuptake with antispastic activity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ligresti, Alessia; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Pryce, Gareth; Kulasegram, Sanjitha; Beletskaya, Irina; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Saha, Bijali; Mahadevan, Anu; Visintin, Cristina; Wiley, Jenny L.; Baker, David; Martin, Billy R.; Razdan, Raj K.; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that the compound O-2093 is a selective inhibitor of the reuptake of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA). We have now re-examined the activity of O-2093 in vivo and synthesized four structural analogs (O-2247, O-2248, O-3246, and O-3262), whose activity was assessed in: (a) binding assays carried out with membranes from cells overexpressing the human CB1 and CB2 receptors; (b) assays of transient receptor potential of the vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel functional act...

  5. Heterómeros de receptores de dopamina como dianas terapéuticas en la enfermedad de Parkinson y en discinesias inducidas por el tratamiento con L-DOPA

    OpenAIRE

    Farré Pérez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    La desregulación de la transmisión dopaminérgica da lugar a la enfermedad de Parkinson. Los receptores de dopamina interaccionan con receptores tanto de la misma familia como con otros tipos de receptores, para formar complejos heteroméricos organizados. Fruto de nuestro trabajo, hemos descubierto que los receptores de adenosina A2A, de cannabinoides CB1 y de dopamina D2 forman heterómeros en el núcleo caudado de Macaca fascicularis no lesionados o lesionados con MPTP pero no en el putamen. H...

  6. Leucettamols, Bifunctionalized Marine Sphingoids, Act as Modulators of TRPA1 and TRPM8 Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Taglialatela-Scafati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Leucettamols, bifunctionalized sphingoid-like compounds obtained from a marine sponge Leucetta sp., act as non-electrophilic activators of the TRPA1 channel and potent inhibitors of the icilin-mediated activation of the TRPM8 channel, while they are inactive on CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptors. Leucettamols represent the first compounds of marine origin to target TRPA1 and the first class of natural products to inhibit TRPM8 channels. The preparation of a small series of semi-synthetic derivatives revealed interesting details on the structure-activity relationships within this new chemotype of simple acyclic TRP modulators.

  7. Leucettamols, Bifunctionalized Marine Sphingoids, Act as Modulators of TRPA1 and TRPM8 Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Orazio Taglialatela-Scafati; Vincenzo Di Marzo; Aniello Schiano Moriello; Luciano De Petrocellis; Giorgio Bavestrello; Barbara Calcinai; Masteria Yunovilsa Putra; Ernesto Fattorusso; Giuseppina Chianese

    2012-01-01

    Leucettamols, bifunctionalized sphingoid-like compounds obtained from a marine sponge Leucetta sp., act as non-electrophilic activators of the TRPA1 channel and potent inhibitors of the icilin-mediated activation of the TRPM8 channel, while they are inactive on CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptors. Leucettamols represent the first compounds of marine origin to target TRPA1 and the first class of natural products to inhibit TRPM8 channels. The preparation of a small series of semi-synthetic derivative...

  8. Leucettamols, Bifunctionalized Marine Sphingoids, Act as Modulators of TRPA1 and TRPM8 Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chianese, Giuseppina; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Putra, Masteria Yunovilsa; Calcinai, Barbara; Bavestrello, Giorgio; Moriello, Aniello Schiano; Petrocellis, Luciano De; Marzo, Vincenzo Di; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2012-01-01

    Leucettamols, bifunctionalized sphingoid-like compounds obtained from a marine sponge Leucetta sp., act as non-electrophilic activators of the TRPA1 channel and potent inhibitors of the icilin-mediated activation of the TRPM8 channel, while they are inactive on CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptors. Leucettamols represent the first compounds of marine origin to target TRPA1 and the first class of natural products to inhibit TRPM8 channels. The preparation of a small series of semi-synthetic derivatives revealed interesting details on the structure-activity relationships within this new chemotype of simple acyclic TRP modulators. PMID:23203269

  9. Physiology and Posttranscriptional Regulation of Methanol:Coenzyme M Methyltransferase Isozymes in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A ▿ §

    OpenAIRE

    Opulencia, Rina B.; Bose, Arpita; Metcalf, William W.

    2009-01-01

    Methanosarcina species possess three operons (mtaCB1, mtaCB2, and mtaCB3) encoding methanol-specific methyltransferase 1 (MT1) isozymes and two genes (mtaA1 and mtaA2) with the potential to encode a methanol-specific methyltransferase 2 (MT2). Previous genetic studies showed that these genes are differentially regulated and encode enzymes with distinct levels of methyltransferase activity. Here, the effects of promoter strength on growth and on the rate of methane production were examined by ...

  10. Evaluación del efecto de un biopreparado de origen bacteriano en el cultivo in vitro del cafeto (Coffea canephora P.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Vega María Esther

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio se realizó en el Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Agrícolas de Cuba, con el objetivo de evaluar el efecto de diferentes concentraciones del compuesto bacteriano CB-1 sobre el crecimiento y desarrollo in vitro de tres clones seleccionados de cafeto, var. Robusta, así como valorar la posible sustitución de la auxina AIA en el medio de cultivo establecido para la multiplicación del cafeto, donde se realizaron ensayos durante la fase de aclimatización de las vitroplantas. Se estudiaron diferentes tratamientos. Como testigo se empleó el medio de multiplicación establecido convencionalmente, mientras que los otros tres tratamientos consistieron en sustituir el AIÁ del medio por el CB-1 a diferentes concentraciones (0.5; 1.0 y 2.0 mg.L-1. Durante la aclimatización, se estudió el efecto del biopreparado (sólido y líquido, a través de la exposición del sistema radical de las plántulas a una concentración de 20 mg/L del compuesto por 30 minutos. Se evaluaron las variables: número de explantes vivos, altura de la vitroplanta (cm, número de brotes, número de pares de hojas, porcentaje de plantas enraizadas y contenido de proteínas totales y fenoles (mg/g tejido. Como resultado se detectaron variaciones en la respuesta de los clones estudiados, así como en los indicadores evaluados, obteniéndose mayor capacidad de respuesta en el clon M-229 y con concentraciones de 0.5 y 1.0 mg.L-1 de CB-1. Se obtuvo mayor efectividad con el CB-1 en estado líquido durante la aclimatización de las vitroplantas. Se demostró la factibilidad del empleo del nuevo biopreparado en la estimulación del crecimiento vegetal. 

  11. Potential modulation of plasma ghrelin and glucagon-like peptide-1 by anorexigenic cannabinoid compounds, SR141716A (rimonabant) and oleoylethanolamide

    OpenAIRE

    Cani, Patrice D.; Montoya, Maite Lasa; Neyrinck, Audrey M; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Lambert, Didier

    2004-01-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, N-piperidino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methylpyrazole-3-carboxamide (rimonabant; SR141716A), and oleoylethanolamide (OEA) are known to reduce food consumption, by, at least partially, a peripheral regulation of feeding. The effects of systemic SR141716A or OEA (5 mg/kg) administrations on food consumption in 24 h food-deprived and fed rats were investigated. In fasted rats, SR141716A and OEA produced an inhibition in food intake measu...

  12. Proapoptotic effect of endocannabinoids in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana-Serradell, O; Poblete, C E; Sanchez, C; Castellón, E A; Gallegos, I; Huidobro, C; Llanos, M N; Contreras, H R

    2015-04-01

    In the early stages, prostate cancer is androgen‑ dependent; therefore, medical castration has shown significant results during the initial stages of this pathology. Despite this early effect, advanced prostate cancer is resilient to such treatment. Recent evidence shows that derivatives of Cannabis sativa and its analogs may exert a protective effect against different types of oncologic pathologies. The purpose of the present study was to detect the presence of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) on cancer cells with a prostatic origin and to evaluate the effect of the in vitro use of synthetic analogs. In order to do this, we used a commercial cell line and primary cultures derived from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The presence of the CB1 and CB2 receptors was determined by immunohistochemistry where we showed a higher expression of these receptors in later stages of the disease (samples with a high Gleason score). Later, treatments were conducted using anandamide, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and a synthetic analog of anandamide, methanandamide. Using the MTT assay, we proved that the treatments produced a cell growth inhibitory effect on all the different prostate cancer cultures. This effect was demonstrated to be dose-dependent. The use of a specific CB1 receptor blocker (SR141716) confirmed that this effect was produced primarily from the activation of the CB1 receptor. In order to understand the MTT assay results, we determined cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry, which showed no variation at the different cell cycle stages in all the cultures after treatment. Treatment with endocannabinoids resulted in an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells as determined by Annexin V assays and caused an increase in the levels of activated caspase-3 and a reduction in the levels of Bcl-2 confirming that the reduction in cell viability noted in the MTT assay was caused by the activation of the apoptotic pathway. Finally, we observed

  13. Aspectos terapêuticos de compostos da planta Cannabis sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honório Káthia Maria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several cannabinoid compounds present therapeutic properties, but also have psychotropic effects, limiting their use as medicine. Nowadays, many important discoveries on the compounds extracted from the plant Cannabis sativa (cannabinoids have contributed to understand the therapeutic properties of these compounds. The main discoveries in the last years on the cannabinoid compounds were: the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, the endogenous cannabinoids and the possible mechanisms of action involved in the interaction between cannabinoid compounds and the biological receptors. So, from the therapeutical aspects presented in this work, we intended to show the evolution of the Cannabis sativa research and the possible medicinal use of cannabinoid compounds.

  14. Determinação do albedo da superfície a partir de dados AVHRR/NOAA e T/LANDSAT-5 Determination of surface albedo from AVHRR/NOAA and TM/LANDSAT-5 data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Regina da Cunha Dantas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo estimar uma distribuição espacial do albedo da superfície para obter uma relação funcional entre o albedo dos sensores AVHRR/NOAA e TM/LANDSAT-5, sobre diferentes alvos nas proximidades de Quixeré-CE, nos anos de 2005 e 2006. As imagens foram processadas pelo software Erdas Image 8.7 utilizando o SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land. Os resultados mostraram diferenças na variabilidade espacial e temporal do albedo nos dois anos estudados, pois 2005 foi predominantemente seco enquanto que 2006 foi um ano chuvoso. A relação funcional entre os dados AVHRR e TM apresentou coeficiente de correlação (r igual a 0,75 com erro padrão de 1,67%. Valores de albedo da superfície estimados pelo AVHRR e TM apresentaram respectivamente erros padrões de 2,44 e 3,45%, quando comparados com as observações do radiômetro CNR1.This work aims to estimate a spatial distribution of surface albedo and to derive a functional relationship between the albedo from AVHRR/NOAA and TM/LANDSAT-5 sensors over different targets in the proximities of Quixeré - CE during the years of 2005 and 2006. The images were processed by the software Erdas Image 8.7 using the SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land. The results showed differences in the spatial and temporal variability of the albedo in the two studied years, because 2005 was predominantly dry while 2006 was a rainy year. The functional relationship between AVHRR and TM data presented correlation coefficient (r value equal to 0.75 with a standard error of 1.67%. Surface albedo values estimated by AVHRR and TM showed standard errors of 2.44 and 3.45% respectively when compared to the CNR1 radiometer observations.

  15. Bis-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes bearing ancillary guanidinate ligands. Synthesis, structure, and highly efficient electroluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Virendra Kumar; Nishiura, Masayoshi; Takimoto, Masanori; Zhao, Shanshan; Liu, Yu; Hou, Zhaomin

    2012-01-16

    We report the synthesis, structure, and photophysical and electroluminescent (EL) properties of a series of heteroleptic bis(pyridylphenyl)iridium(III) complexes with various ancillary guanidinate ligands. The reaction of the bis(pyridylphenyl)iridium(III) chloride [(ppy)(2)Ir(μ-Cl)](2) with the lithium salt of various guanidine ligands Li{(N(i)Pr)(2)C(NR(1)R(2))} at 80 °C gave in 60-80% yield the corresponding heteroleptic bis(pyridylphenyl)/guanidinate iridium(III) complexes having a general formula of [(ppy)(2)Ir{(N(i)Pr)(2)C(NR(1)R(2))}], where NR(1)R(2) = NPh(2) (1), N(C(6)H(4)(t)Bu-4)(2) (2), carbazolyl (3), 3,6-bis(tert-butyl)carbazolyl (4), N(C(6)H(4))(2)S (5), N(C(6)H(4))(2)O (6), indolyl (7), NEt(2) (8), N(i)Pr(2) (9), N(i)Bu(2) (10), and N(SiMe(3))(2) (11). These heteroleptic cyclometalated (C^N) iridium(III) complexes showed intense absorption bands in the UV region assignable to π-π* transitions and weaker metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions extending to the visible region. These complexes also showed intense emissions at room temperature. Their photoluminescence spectra were influenced to some extent by the ancillary guanidinate ligands, giving λ(max) values in the range of 528-560 nm with quantum yields (Φ) of 0.16-0.37 and lifetimes of 0.61-1.43 μs. Organic light-emitting diodes were fabricated by the use of these complexes as dopants in various concentrations (5-100%) in a N,N'-dicarbazolylbiphenyl host. High current efficiency (η(c); up to 137.4 cd/A) and power efficiency (η(p); up to 45.7 lm/W) were observed under appropriate conditions. Their high EL efficiency may result from efficient trapping and radiative relaxation of the excitons formed in the EL process. Because of the steric hindrance of the guanidinate ligands, no significant intermolecular interaction was observed in these complexes, thus leading to the reduction of self-quenching and triplet-triplet annihilation at high currents. The EL emission color could be changed in the range of green to yellow by choosing appropriate guanidinate ligands. PMID:22220716

  16. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ethan B

    2008-02-01

    This article reviews recent research on cannabinoid analgesia via the endocannabinoid system and non-receptor mechanisms, as well as randomized clinical trials employing cannabinoids in pain treatment. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Marinol((R))) and nabilone (Cesamet((R))) are currently approved in the United States and other countries, but not for pain indications. Other synthetic cannabinoids, such as ajulemic acid, are in development. Crude herbal cannabis remains illegal in most jurisdictions but is also under investigation. Sativex((R)), a cannabis derived oromucosal spray containing equal proportions of THC (partial CB(1) receptor agonist ) and cannabidiol (CBD, a non-euphoriant, anti-inflammatory analgesic with CB(1) receptor antagonist and endocannabinoid modulating effects) was approved in Canada in 2005 for treatment of central neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and in 2007 for intractable cancer pain. Numerous randomized clinical trials have demonstrated safety and efficacy for Sativex in central and peripheral neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer pain. An Investigational New Drug application to conduct advanced clinical trials for cancer pain was approved by the US FDA in January 2006. Cannabinoid analgesics have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials with acceptable adverse event profiles. Their adjunctive addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for treatment of pain shows great promise. PMID:18728714

  17. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'. PMID:23108552

  18. Endocannabinoids and Human Sperm Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Zolese

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available N-acylethanolamides (NAEs are naturally occurring signaling lipids consisting of amides and esters of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. Usually they are present in a very small amounts in many mammalian tissues and cells, including human reproductive tracts and fluids. Recently, the presence of N-arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide, AEA, the most characterised member of endocannabinoids, and its congeners palmitoylethanolamide (PEA and oleylethanolamide (OEA in seminal plasma, oviductal fluid, and follicular fluids was demonstrated. AEA has been shown to bind not only type-1 (CB1 and type-2 (CB2 cannabinoid receptors, but also type-1 vanilloid receptor (TRPV1, while PEA and OEA are inactive with respect to classical cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 but activate TRPV1 or peroxisome proliferator activate receptors (PPARs. This review concerns the most recent experimental data on PEA and OEA, endocannabinoid-like molecules which appear to exert their action exclusively on sperm cells with altered features, such as membrane characteristics and kinematic parameters. Their beneficial effects on these cells could suggest a possible pharmacological use of PEA and OEA on patients affected by some forms of idiopathic infertility.

  19. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P.; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca2+ signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca2+ overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  20. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca(2+) signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca(2+) overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca(2+) signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  1. Efficacy of freezing, frozen storage and edible antimicrobial coatings used in combination for control of Listeria monocytogenes on roasted turkey stored at chiller temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zheng; Neetoo, Hudaa; Chen, Haiqiang

    2011-10-01

    The presence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey is an important food safety issue. The antilisterial efficacy of four polysaccharide-based edible coatings (starch, chitosan, alginate and pectin) incorporating sodium lactate (SL) and sodium diacetate (SD) as well as commercial preparations Opti.Form PD4, NovaGARD™ CB1, Protect-M and Guardian™ NR100 were compared against L. monocytogenes on roasted turkey. Pectin coating treatments incorporating SL/SD, Opti.Form PD4 with or without Protect-M, and NovaGARD™ CB1 displayed higher antimicrobial efficacy against. L. monocytogenes than the other antimicrobials and coating materials. In the second phase of the study, it was investigated whether frozen storage could enhance the antilisterial effectiveness of pectin coating treatments on chilled roasted turkey. Inoculated roasted turkey samples coated with pectin-based treatments were frozen for up to 4 weeks and subsequently stored at 4 °C for 8 weeks. Frozen storage significantly enhanced the antilisterial activity of various coating treatments; with selected treatments reducing the L. monocytogenes populations by as much as 1.1 log CFU/cm(2) during the subsequent 8-week chilled storage. This study demonstrates that pectin-based antimicrobial edible coatings hold promise in enhancing the safety of RTE poultry products and frozen storage has the potential to enhance their effectiveness. PMID:21839391

  2. Recent advances in the synthesis of endocannabinoid related ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razdan, R K; Mahadevan, A

    2002-12-31

    The chemical strategies used for the synthesis of various ligands related to the endocannabinoid system namely anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-Ara-Gl), CB1/(vanilloid receptors) VR1, anandamide membrane transporter (AMT) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are described in this review. In general, the chemical synthesis of analogs with changes in the head group of AEA was quite straightforward involving the conversion of an acid to an amide or an ester. Analogs which had modifications in the end pentyl chain were more difficult to synthesize and required multistep synthetic sequences to prepare the target compounds. A facile total synthesis of 2-Ara-Gl was reported and an HPLC procedure for its identification and quantification was developed, but because of the instability of 2-Ara-Gl another synthesis was developed so that it can be stored as the more stable phenylboronate ester. Similarly the chemical synthesis of various ligands in the remaining areas of CB1/VR1, AMT and FAAH are described. A summary of the present state of knowledge about the SAR in each area is presented to help in the design and synthesis of novel ligands for the future. PMID:12505687

  3. Mechanism of endocannabinoids system in glucose metabolism of rats with chronic intermittent hypoxia%内源性大麻素系统对慢性间歇低氧大鼠糖代谢的影响机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖玲; 陈彦; 张晋源; 王蓓

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨内源性大麻素系统(ECS)对慢性间歇低氧(CIH)大鼠糖代谢的影响机制.方法 将48只Wistar大鼠采用随机排列表法及实验结束时间分为4、6周正常对照组(充入压缩空气氧浓度为21%),4、6周CIH组(每日CIH暴露8h)及4、6周CIH+利莫那班组[CIH暴露前给予肝脏CB1受体拮抗剂利莫那班腹腔注射(1 mg·kg-1·d-1)]各8只.第4周及第6周结束实验,检测各组大鼠空腹血糖、血清胰岛素、血清C肽水平及肝脏CB1受体表达的变化,评价CIH对糖代谢指标的影响.结果 4、6周CIH组下列指标均显著高于4、6周正常对照组:空腹血糖(8.91±0.40)、(10.61 ±0.36)比(6.48±0.23)、(6.51 ±0.25) mmol/L,血清胰岛素(16.72 ±3.76)、(20.25 ±3.64)比(9.02±2.05)、(9.19 ±2.35) U/L,血清C肽水平(3.53±0.26)、(5.23±0.29)比(1.37±0.26)、(1.41 ±0.41) μg/L,肝脏CB1受体表达(0.290±0.026)、(0.342±0.030)比(0.214±0.023)、(0.221 ±0.026)(均P<0.05);且6周CIH组均显著高于4周CIH组(均P<0.05);而4、6周CIH+利莫那班组上述指标明显降低(均P<0.05).CB1水平与空腹血糖、血清胰岛素、血清C肽水平呈正相关(r=0.856、0.758、0.827,均P<0.05).结论 ECS在CIH引发的糖代谢异常中发挥一定的促进作用.%Objective To explore the mechanism of endocannabinoids system (ECS) in glucose metabolism of rats with chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH).Methods According to random permutation table and experiment time,a total of 48 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 4/6-week control (filling with compressed air with 21% oxygen),4/6-week CIH (CIH exposure for 8 hours per day) and 4/ 6-week CIH plus rimonabant group [an intraperitoneal injection of CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant into liver (1 mg · kg-1 · d-1) before CIH exposure] (n =8 each).The levels of fasting plasma glucose,serum insulin,serum C-peptide and the expression of CB1 receptor in liver were detected after 4/6 weeks to evaluate the

  4. Involvement of PPAR receptors in the anticonvulsant effects of a cannabinoid agonist, WIN 55,212-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payandemehr, Borna; Ebrahimi, Ali; Gholizadeh, Ramtin; Rahimian, Reza; Varastehmoradi, Bardia; Gooshe, Maziar; Aghaei, Hossein Nayeb; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-03-01

    Cannabinoid and PPAR receptors show well established interactions in a set of physiological effects. Regarding the seizure-modulating properties of both classes of receptors, the present study aimed to evaluate the roles of the PPAR-gamma, PPAR-alpha and CB1 receptors on the anticonvulsant effects of WIN 55,212-2 (WIN, a non selective cannabinoid agonist). The clonic seizure thresholds after intravenous administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) were assessed in mice weighing 23-30 g. WIN increased the seizure threshold dose dependently. Pretreatment with pioglitazone, as a PPARγ agonist, potentiated the anticonvulsant effects of WIN, while PPARγ antagonist inhibited these anticonvulsant effects partially. On the other hand PPARα antagonist reduced the anticonvulsant effects of WIN significantly. Finally the combination of CB1 antagonist and PPARα antagonist could completely block the anticonvulsant properties of WIN. Taken together, these results show for the first time that a functional interaction exists between cannabinoid and PPAR receptors in the modulation of seizure susceptibility. PMID:25448777

  5. Dynamics of Hadronic Molecule in One-Boson Exchange Approach and Possible Heavy Flavor Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Gui-Jun; Yan, Mu-Lin

    2009-01-01

    We extend the one pion exchange model at quark level to include the short distance contributions coming from $\\eta$, $\\sigma$, $\\rho$ and $\\omega$ exchange. This formalism is applied to discuss the possible molecular states of $D\\bar{D}^{*}/\\bar{D}D^{*}$, $B\\bar{B}^{*}/\\bar{B}B^{*}$, $DD^{*}$, $BB^{*}$, the pseudoscalar-vector systems with $C=B=1$ and $C=-B=1$ respectively. The "$\\delta$ function" term contribution and the S-D mixing effects have been taken into account. We find the conclusions reached after including the heavier mesons exchange are qualitatively the same as those in the one pion exchange model. The previous suggestion that $1^{++}$ $B\\bar{B}^{*}/\\bar{B}B^{*}$ molecule should exist, is confirmed in the one boson exchange model, whereas $DD^{*}$ bound state should not exist. The $D\\bar{D}^{*}/\\bar{D}D^{*}$ system can accomodate a $1^{++}$ molecule close to the threshold, the mixing between the molecule and the conventional charmonium has to be considered to identify this state with X(3872). Fo...

  6. Anandamide mediates cognitive judgement bias in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregiel, J; Malek, N; Popik, P; Starowicz, K; Rygula, R

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of acute pharmacological manipulation of the endocannabinoid (EC) system on the valence of cognitive judgement bias of rats in the ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) paradigm. To accomplish this goal, after initial behavioural training, different groups of rats received single, systemic injections of the irreversible anandamide (AEA) hydrolysis inhibitor URB597, the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) inverse agonist AM251, the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) inverse agonist AM630, the combination of URB597 and AM251, and a combination of URB597 and AM630 and were subsequently tested with the ACI paradigm. We report that URB597 at a dose of 1 mg/kg significantly biased animals towards positive interpretation of the ambiguous cue and that this effect was abolished by pre-treatment with AM251 (1 mg/kg) or AM630 (1 mg/kg). The CB1 and CB2 inverse agonists administered alone (1 mg/kg) had no statistically significant effects on the interpretation of the ambiguous cue by rats. Our findings suggest involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the mediation of optimistic judgement bias. PMID:26363193

  7. Effects of various cannabinoid ligands on choice behaviour in a rat model of gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Aliou B; Trigo, Jose M; Vemuri, Kiran V; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Le Foll, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    It is estimated that 0.6-1% of the population in the USA and Canada fulfil the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed. (DSM-5) criteria for gambling disorders (GD). To date, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for GD. The rat gambling task (rGT) is a recently developed rodent analogue of the Iowa gambling task in which rats are trained to associate four response holes with different magnitudes and probabilities of food pellet rewards and punishing time-out periods. Similar to healthy human volunteers, most rats adopt the optimal strategies (optimal group). However, a subset of animals show preference for the disadvantageous options (suboptimal group), mimicking the choice pattern of patients with GD. Here, we explored for the first time the effects of various cannabinoid ligands (WIN 55,212-2, AM 4113, AM 630 and URB 597) on the rGT. Administration of the cannabinoid agonist CB1/CB2 WIN 55,212-2 improved choice strategy and increased choice latency in the suboptimal group, but only increased perseverative behaviour, when punished, in the optimal group. Blockade of CB1 or CB2 receptors or inhibition of fatty-acid amide hydrolase did not affect rGT performance. These results suggest that stimulation of cannabinoid receptors could affect gambling choice behaviours differentially in some subgroups of subjects. PMID:26905189

  8. Role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol in aversive responses mediated by the dorsolateral periaqueductal grey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobira, P H; Almeida-Santos, A F; Guimaraes, F S; Moreira, F A; Aguiar, D C

    2016-01-01

    2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is an endogenous ligand of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor. This endocannabinoid and its hydrolyzing enzyme, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), are present in encephalic regions related to psychiatric disorders, including the midbrain dorsolateral periaqueductal grey (dlPAG). The dlPAG is implicated in panic disorder and its stimulation results in defensive responses proposed as a model of panic attacks. The present work verified if facilitation of 2-AG signalling in the dlPAG counteracts panic-like responses induced by local chemical stimulation. Intra-dlPAG injection of 2-AG prevented panic-like response induced by the excitatory amino acid N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). This effect was mimicked by the 2-AG hydrolysis inhibitor (MAGL preferring inhibitor) URB602. The anti-aversive effect of URB602 was reversed by the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251. Additionally, a combination of sub-effective doses of 2-AG and URB602 also prevented NMDA-induced panic-like response. Finally, immunofluorescence assay showed a significant increase in c-Fos positive cells in the dlPAG after local administration of NMDA. This response was also prevented by URB602. These data support the hypothesis that 2-AG participates in anti-aversive mechanisms in the dlPAG and reinforce the proposal that facilitation of endocannabinoid signalling could be a putative target for developing additional treatments against panic and other anxiety-related disorders. PMID:26628106

  9. Endocannabinoid System and Synaptic Plasticity: Implications for Emotional Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Paz Viveros

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has been involved in the regulation of anxiety, and proposed as an inhibitory modulator of neuronal, behavioral and adrenocortical responses to stressful stimuli. Brain regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus and cortex, which are directly involved in the regulation of emotional behavior, contain high densities of cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Mutant mice lacking CB1 receptors show anxiogenic and depressive-like behaviors as well as an altered hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis activity, whereas enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling produces anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects. Genetic and pharmacological approaches also support an involvement of endocannabinoids in extinction of aversive memories. Thus, the endocannabinoid system appears to play a pivotal role in the regulation of emotional states. Endocannabinoids have emerged as mediators of short- and long- term synaptic plasticity in diverse brain structures. Despite the fact that most of the studies on this field have been performed using in vitro models, endocannabinoid-mediated plasticity might be considered as a plausible candidate underlying some of the diverse physiological functions of the endogenous cannabinoid system, including developmental, affective and cognitive processes. In this paper, we will focus on the functional relevance of endocannabinoid-mediated plasticity within the framework of emotional responses. Alterations of the endocannabinoid system may constitute an important factor in the aetiology of certain neuropsychiatric disorders, and, in turn, enhancers of endocannabinoid signaling could represent a potential therapeutical tool in the treatment of both anxiety and depressive symptoms.

  10. Long-term consequences of adolescent cannabinoid exposure in adult psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine eRenard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug among adolescents and young adults. Unique cognitive, emotional, and social changes occur during this critical period of development from childhood into adulthood. The adolescent brain is in a state of transition and differs from the adult brain with respect to both anatomy (e.g., neuronal connections and morphology and neurochemistry (e.g., dopamine, GABA, and glutamate. These changes are thought to support the emergence of adult cerebral processes and behaviors. The endocannabinoid system plays an important role in development by acting on synaptic plasticity, neuronal cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Delta-9-tetrahydrocanabinol (THC, the principal psychoactive component in marijuana, acts as an agonist of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R. Thus, over-activation of the endocannabinoid system by chronic exposure to CB1R agonists (e.g. THC, CP-55,940, and WIN55,212-2 during adolescence can dramatically alter brain maturation and cause long-lasting neurobiological changes that ultimately affect the function and behavior of the adult brain. Indeed, emerging evidence from both human and animal studies demonstrates that early-onset marijuana use has long-lasting consequences on cognition; moreover, in humans, this use is associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of developing a psychotic disorder. Here, we review the relationship between cannabinoid exposure during adolescence and the increased risk of neuropsychiatric disorders, focusing on both clinical and animal studies.

  11. Application of medical cannabis in patients with the neurodegeneration disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Kotuła

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical cannabis is the dried flowers of the female Cannabis sativa L. plant. Cannabis contains a number of active elements, including dronabinol (THC and cannabidiol (CBD. Dronabinol is usually the main ingredient. The body’s own cannabinoid system has been identified. The discovery of this system, which comprises endocannabinoids and receptors, confirmed that cannabis has a positive effect on certain illnesses and conditions. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified: CB1 and CB2 receptors. The first type CB1 is mostly found in the central nervous system, modulate pain. It also has an anti-emetic effect, and has influence on the memory and the motor system. The second type of receptors CB2 is peripheral, and it is primarily found in immune system cells and it is responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of cannabinoids. Medical cannabis can help in cases of the neurodegeneration disorders, for example Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Patients generally tolerate medical cannabis well.

  12. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Charu; Sadek, Bassem; Goyal, Sameer N; Sinha, Satyesh; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics. PMID:26664449

  13. Development and chemical and sensory characterization of pumpkin seed flour-based cereal bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovane Santana Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima, popularly known as squash, is a widely grown vegetable in Brazil. In this study, pumpkin seed flours (PSF with different granulometries were used: PSF 1 (medium granulometry and PSF 2 (coarse granulometry in the preparation of cereal bars (CB with different combinations with brown oats. Five formulations were prepared: CB-1 (control - 25% brown oats and 0% PSF; CB-2 (12.5% PSF 1 and 12.5% brown oats; CB-3 (25% PSF 1 and 0% brown oats; CB-4 (12.5% PSF 2 and 12.5% brown oats; and CB-5 (25% PSF 2 and 0% brown oats. The acceptance test results were analyzed in a conventional preference mapping which indicated that the bars CB-2 and CB-5 received mostly the maximum hedonistic score. With the objective of developing a cereal bar replacing oats with PSF, the bars CB-2 and CB-5 were compared to the conventional bar CB-1. The cereal bars CB-2 and CB-5 showed an increase in crude protein (87.5% and 62.5% and in dietary fiber (77% and 44%, respectively. These results allowed the classification of CB-2 and CB-5 as fiber sources; they can, therefore, be classified as light products according to the Brazilian legislation.

  14. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus. PMID:23301200

  15. Endocannabinoid regulation of nausea is mediated by 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the rat visceral insular cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticht, Martin A; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Rafla, Benjamin R; Abdullah, Rehab A; Poklis, Justin L; Ho, Winnie; Niphakis, Micah J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Sharkey, Keith A; Lichtman, Aron H; Parker, Linda A

    2016-03-01

    Cannabinoid (CB) agonists suppress nausea in humans and animal models; yet, their underlying neural substrates remain largely unknown. Evidence suggests that the visceral insular cortex (VIC) plays a critical role in nausea. Given the expression of CB1 receptors and the presence of endocannabinoids in this brain region, we hypothesized that the VIC endocannabinoid system regulates nausea. In the present study, we assessed whether inhibiting the primary endocannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes in the VIC reduces acute lithium chloride (LiCl)-induced conditioned gaping, a rat model of nausea. We also quantified endocannabinoid levels during an episode of nausea, and assessed VIC neuronal activation using the marker, c-Fos. Local inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the main hydrolytic enzyme of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), reduced acute nausea through a CB1 receptor mechanism, whereas inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the primary catabolic enzyme of anandamide (AEA), was without effect. Levels of 2-AG were also selectively elevated in the VIC during an episode of nausea. Inhibition of MAGL robustly increased 2-AG in the VIC, while FAAH inhibition had no effect on AEA. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of MAGL reduced VIC Fos immunoreactivity in response to LiCl treatment. Taken together, these findings provide compelling evidence that acute nausea selectively increases 2-AG in the VIC, and suggests that 2-AG signaling within the VIC regulates nausea by reducing neuronal activity in this forebrain region. PMID:26541329

  16. Interdiffusion behavior of tungsten or rhenium and group 5 and 6 elements and alloys of the periodic table, part 1. [at dissimilar metal joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcella, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    Arc cast W, CVD W, CVD Re, and powder metallurgy Re materials were hot isostatically pressure welded to ten different refractory metals and alloys (Cb, Cb-1Zr, Ta, Ta-10W, T-111, ASTAR-811C, W-25Re, Mo-50Re, W-30Re-20Mo, ect.) and thermally aged at 10 to the minus 8th power torr at 1200, 1500, 1630, 1800, and 2000 C for 100 to 2000 hours. Electron beam microprobe analysis was used to characterize the interdiffusion zone width of each couple system as a function of age time and temperature. Extrapolations of interdiffusion zone thickness to 10,000 hours were made. Classic interdiffusion analysis was performed for several of the systems by Boltzmann-Matano analysis. A method of inhibiting Kirkendall voids from forming during thermal ageing of dissimilar metal junctions was devised and experimentally demonstrated. An electron beam weld study of Cb-1Zr to Re and W-25Re demonstrated the limited acceptability of these welds.

  17. Cannabinoid receptor 1 is a potential drug target for treatment of translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesch, Susanne; Walter, Dagmar; Wachtel, Marco; Pretre, Kathya; Salazar, Maria; Guzmán, Manuel; Velasco, Guillermo; Schäfer, Beat W

    2009-07-01

    Gene expression profiling has revealed that the gene coding for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is highly up-regulated in rhabdomyosarcoma biopsies bearing the typical chromosomal translocations PAX3/FKHR or PAX7/FKHR. Because cannabinoid receptor agonists are capable of reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in diverse cancer cells such as glioma, breast cancer, and melanoma, we evaluated whether CB1 is a potential drug target in rhabdomyosarcoma. Our study shows that treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonists HU210 and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol lowers the viability of translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma cells through the induction of apoptosis. This effect relies on inhibition of AKT signaling and induction of the stress-associated transcription factor p8 because small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of p8 rescued cell viability upon cannabinoid treatment. Finally, treatment of xenografts with HU210 led to a significant suppression of tumor growth in vivo. These results support the notion that cannabinoid receptor agonists could represent a novel targeted approach for treatment of translocation-positive rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:19509271

  18. Effects of various cannabinoid ligands on choice behaviour in a rat model of gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Aliou B.; Trigo, Jose M.; Vemuri, Kiran V.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that 0.6–1% of the population in the USA and Canada fulfil the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed. (DSM-5) criteria for gambling disorders (GD). To date, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for GD. The rat gambling task (rGT) is a recently developed rodent analogue of the Iowa gambling task in which rats are trained to associate four response holes with different magnitudes and probabilities of food pellet rewards and punishing time-out periods. Similar to healthy human volunteers, most rats adopt the optimal strategies (optimal group). However, a subset of animals show preference for the disadvantageous options (suboptimal group), mimicking the choice pattern of patients with GD. Here, we explored for the first time the effects of various cannabinoid ligands (WIN 55,212-2, AM 4113, AM 630 and URB 597) on the rGT. Administration of the cannabinoid agonist CB1/CB2 WIN 55,212-2 improved choice strategy and increased choice latency in the suboptimal group, but only increased perseverative behaviour, when punished, in the optimal group. Blockade of CB1 or CB2 receptors or inhibition of fatty-acid amide hydrolase did not affect rGT performance. These results suggest that stimulation of cannabinoid receptors could affect gambling choice behaviours differentially in some subgroups of subjects. PMID:26905189

  19. The effect of cannabinoids on dinitrofluorobenzene-induced experimental asthma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Turgut Emrah; Kaya, Yesim; Durlu-Kandilci, Nezahat Tugba; Onder, Sevgen; Sahin-Erdemli, Inci

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoids have anti-inflammatory effects and can produce bronchodilation in the airways. We have investigated the effects of cannabinoids on tracheal hyperreactivity and airway inflammation in dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-induced experimental non-atopic asthma in mice. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced contraction response was enhanced while carbachol- and electrical field stimulation-induced contractions, and isoprenaline-induced relaxation responses were remained unchanged in DNFB group. The increased 5-HT-induced contractions were inhibited by incubation with either atropine or tetrodotoxin. DNFB application resulted in increased macrophage number in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). In vivo ACEA (CB1 agonist) treatment prevented the increase in 5-HT contractions, while JWH133 (CB2 agonist) had no effect. However, neither ACEA nor JWH133 prevented the increase in macrophage number in BALF. In vitro ACEA incubation also inhibited the increase in 5-HT contraction in DNFB group. These results show that cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist can prevent tracheal hyperreactivity to 5-HT in DNFB-induced non-atopic asthma in mice. PMID:27216000

  20. The effects of cannabidiolic acid and cannabidiol on contractility of the gastrointestinal tract of Suncus murinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluny, Nina L; Naylor, Robert J; Whittle, Brian A; Javid, Farideh A

    2011-09-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI) transit in pathophysiologic in vivo models, while having no effect in physiologic controls. The actions of the precursor of CBD, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), have not been investigated in the GI tract. The actions of these phytocannabinoids on the contractility of the GI tract of Suncus murinus were investigated in the current study. The effects of CBDA and CBD in resting state and pre-contracted isolated intestinal segments, and on the contractile effects of carbachol and electrical field stimulation (EFS) on the intestines of S. murinus were examined. CBDA and CBD induced a reduction in resting tissue tension of isolated intestinal segments which was not blocked by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, the CB(2) receptor antagonist AM630, or tetrodotoxin. CBDA and CBD reduced the magnitude of contractions induced by carbachol and the tension of intestinal segments that were pre-contracted with potassium chloride. In tissues stimulated by EFS, CBDA inhibited contractions induced by lower frequencies (0.1-4.0 Hz) of EFS, while CBD inhibited contractions induced by higher frequencies (4.0-20.0 Hz) of EFS. The data suggest that CBDA and CBD have inhibitory actions on the intestines of S. murinus that are not neuronallymediated or mediated via CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. PMID:21975813