WorldWideScience

Sample records for cazro3 hydrogen sensor

  1. Ceramic powders of CaZrO3. Preparation and sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium zirconate (CaZrO3 ) is a compound belonging to the perovskite family of the A2+B4+O36- type with orthorhombic crystalline structure (distorted perovskite).CaZrO3 is used in the manufacture of sensors of oxygen, humidity, hydrogen and hydrocarbides.Additionally, it is also being studied for the manufacture of thermistors.The calcium zirconate preparation by solid state reaction from stoichiometric mixtures of CaCO3 and ZrO2 is studied.The formation reaction was followed by thermal analysis techniques (DTA-TG-DTG) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The different behaviour of the mixtures was studied according to the milling type employed.It could be observed a shift of some peaks, mainly of TG (gravimetry) with a tendency to a temperature decrease.These changes are mainly influenced by the amorphization effects on the carbonate and by the mixing caused by the milling type used.The powder (CaZrO3) was isostatically pressed obtaining then green densities of 50% of the theoretical one.Sintering was made in air between 1300 and 1600degC at times between 0 and 240.Densities reached were between 90 and 95% increasing with the temperature and the sintering time

  2. Usefulness of gel-casting method in the fabrication of nonstoichiometric CaZrO3-based electrolytes for high temperature application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogels obtained from lower toxicity monomers of N-(hydroxymethyl)acrylamide and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide were applied to form nonstoichiometric CaZrO3-based electrolytes. A coprecipitation-calcination method with ((NH4)2C2O4) in concentrated NH3 aqueous solution was used to synthesise CaZrO3 involving 51 mol.% CaO (CZ-51) powder. The gas-tight CaZrO3-based rods were prepared by the gel-casting method with 45 vol.% suspension and then sintered at 1500 deg. C-2 h. It was found that in low oxygen partial pressure, the nonstoichiometric CaZrO3 obtained by gel-casting method were pure oxide ion conductors. These samples exhibited comparable electrical conductivity values to isostatically compressed pellets starting from the same powder. The results of experiments on thermochemical stability of CZ-51 gel-cast shapes at high temperatures in air or gas mixtures involving 2-50 vol.% H2, as well as the corrosion resistance in exhaust gases from a self-ignition engine were also presented and discussed. The thermal resistance of CaZrO3 obtained rods against molten nickel or iron was also examined. Based upon these investigations, it is evident that only in hydrogen-rich gas atmospheres can the stability of CaZrO3 shapes be limited due to the presence of CaO precipitation as a second phase. The nonstoichiometric CaZrO3 (CZ-51) gel-cast materials were also tested in solid galvanic cells, designed to study thermodynamic properties of oxide materials, important for SOFC and energy technology devices. In this way, the Gibbs energy of NiM2O4, M = Cr, Fe, at 650-1000 deg. C was determined. The CaZrO3 involving 51 mol.% CaO gel-cast sintered shapes seems to be promising solid electrolytes for electrochemical oxygen probes in control of metal processing and thermodynamic studies of materials important for the development of the energy industry.

  3. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  4. Facile combustion synthesis of novel CaZrO3:Eu3+, Gd3+ red phosphor and remarkably enhanced photoluminescence by Gd3+ doping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qingqing Du; Guangjun Zhou; Shuo Zhang; Xiao Jia; Haifeng Zhou; Zhongsen Yang

    2015-02-01

    A facile sol–gel combustion route was reported for the direct preparation of CaZrO3:Eu3+ and CaZrO3:Eu3+, Gd3+. The obtained deposits were characterized by XRD, TGA-DSC, SEM, EDS, PL measurements and microscope fluorescence. When the Gd3+ ions were introduced in this compound, the emissions of CaZrO3:Eu3+ were remarkably enhanced. The emission spectrum of CaZrO3:Eu3+, Gd3+ nanocrystals exhibited a red shift compared with CaZrO3:Eu3+ samples. A new mechanism of the improved photoluminescent properties of Eu3+ by Gd3+ was investigated. The optimized phosphor CaZrO3:5%Eu3+, 2%Gd3+ could be considered an efficient red-emitting component for white lighting devices excited in the near-ultraviolet region.

  5. Low temperature synthesis of CaZrO3 nanoceramics from CaCl2–NaCl molten eutectic salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Fazli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available CaZrO3 nanoceramics were successfully synthesized at 700 C using the molten salt method, and the effects of processing parameters, such as temperature, holding time, and amount of salt on the crystallization of CaZrO3 were investigated. CaCl2, Na2CO3, and nano-ZrO2 were used as starting materials. On heating, CaCl2–NaCl molten eutectic salt provided a liquid medium for the reaction of CaCO3 and ZrO2 to form CaZrO3. The results demonstrated that CaZrO3 started to form at about 600C and that, after the temperature was increased to 1,000C, the amounts of CaZrO3 in the resultant powders increased with a concomitant decrease in CaCO3and ZrO2 contents. After washing with hot distilled water, the samples heated for 3 h at 700C were single-phase CaZrO3 with 90–95 nm particle size. Furthermore, the synthesized CaZrO3 particles retained the size and morphology of the ZrO2 powders which indicated that a template mechanism dominated the formation of CaZrO3 by molten-salt method.

  6. Influence of CaZrO3 on dielectric properties and microstructures of BaTiO3-based X8R ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The influences of CaZrO3 on the dielectric properties and microstructures of BaTiO3 (BT)-based ceramics have been investigated. The experiment results showed that the dielectric constant at room temperature increased with the addition of CaZrO3 in the range of 0―3.0 mol%, which could be explained by the growth of BT grains. XRD analysis revealed that the tetragonality declined as CaZrO3 concentration in-creased. XRD patterns of BT ceramics with different amounts of CaZrO3 doping were analyzed by a recently developed procedure-materials analysis using diffrac-tion (MAUD), which was based on the Rietveld method combined with Fourier analysis. The results depicted that the high temperature peak of tempera-ture-capacitance characteristics (TCC) was largely dependent on the micro-strain of samples. Furthermore, more CaZrO3 doping resulted in lower porosity and higher density. It was revealed that proper usage of CaZrO3 could improve the di-electric properties significantly, which was benefit to develop X8R multi-layer ce-ramic capacitors.

  7. Influence of CaZrO3 on dielectric properties and microstructures of BaTiO3-based X8R ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Bin; ZHANG ShuRen; YUAN Ying; ZHOU XiaoHua; LIANG YiShuai

    2008-01-01

    The influences of CaZrO3 on the dielectric properties and microstructures of BaTiO3 (BT)-based ceramics have been investigated. The experiment results showed that the dielectric constant at room temperature increased with the addition of CaZrO3 in the range of 0-3.0 mol%, which could be explained by the growth of BT grains. XRD analysis revealed that the tetragonality declined as CaZrO3 concentration in- creased. XRD patterns of BT ceramics with different amounts of CaZrO3 doping were analyzed by a recently developed procedure-materials analysis using diffrac- tion (MAUD), which was based on the Rietveld method combined with Fourier analysis. The results depicted that the high temperature peak of tempera- ture-capacitance characteristics (TCC) was largely dependent on the micro-strain of samples. Furthermore, more CaZrO3 doping resulted in lower porosity and higher density. It was revealed that proper usage of CaZrO3 could improve the di- electric properties significantly, which was benefit to develop X8R multi-layer ce- ramic capacitors.

  8. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chuck C.; Saaski, Elric W.; McCrae, David A.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a novel fiber optic-based hydrogen sensor. The sensor consists of a thin-film etalon, constructed on the distal end of a fiber optic. The exterior mirror of the etalon is palladium or a palladium-alloy, which undergoes an optical change upon exposure to hydrogen. Data is presented on fiber optic sensors constructed with palladium and several alloys of palladium. The linearity of the optical response of these sensors to hydrogen is examined. Etalons made with pure palladium are found to be desirable for sensing low concentrations of hydrogen, or for one-time exposure to high concentrations of hydrogen. Etalons made from palladium alloys are found to be more desirable in applications were repeated cycling in high concentrations of hydrogen occurs.

  9. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  10. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  11. Synthesis of Red Phosphor CaZrO3:Eu3+ for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xu; GUAN Li; AN Jia-Yi; JIN Li-Tao; YANG Zhi-Ping; YANG Yan-Min; LI Pan-Lai; FU Guang-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    @@ A red-emitting CaZrOa :Eu3+ phosphor has been prepared by solid state reaction and its luminescent properties are studied.The crystal structure is investigated by the x-ray diffraction.Through energy transitions of5 Do →7Fj (J = 0,1,2,3) in Eu3+ ions, the emission spectrum of the phosphor shows a series of narrow bands under near-ultraviolet light and the strongest peak locates at 613nm.The emission intensity of Cai-xZrO3:xEu3+ phosphor will reach the maximum as the molar concentration of Eu3+ is 5mol%.%A red-emitting CaZrO3 :Eu3+ phosphor has been prepared by solid state reaction and its luminescent properties are studied.The crystal structure is investigated by the x-ray diffraction.Through energy transitions of 5D0 → 7FJ (J = 0, 1, 2, 3) in Eu3+ ions, the emission spectrum of the phosphor shows a series of narrow bands under nearultraviolet light and the strongest peak locates at 613 nm.The emission intensity of Ca1-xZrO3:xEu3+ phosphor will reach the maximum as the molar concentration of Eu3+ is 5mol%.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of Eu3+-doped CaZrO3-based perovskite-type phosphors. Part I: Determination of the Eu3+ occupied site using the ALCHEMI technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Eu3+-doped CaZrO3-based compounds were synthesized by the solid state reaction. • PL emission intensity at 614 nm was changed by the second dopant cations. • The site substituted by Eu3+ cations was investigated by using XRD and ALCHEMI technique. • The dominant Eu3+ substitution site was found as the B site (Zr4+) in the CaZrO3. • The dominant Eu3+ substitution site could be strongly influenced by the co-dopants. - Abstract: Eu3+-doped CaZrO3, SrZrO3, and Mg2+- or Sr2+-co-doped CaZrO3 were synthesized by conventional solid state reaction and their photoluminescence (PL) properties were characterized. The Eu3+-doped CaZrO3-based compounds exhibited characteristic emissions of Eu3+ (f–f transition). The intensity of the main PL emission peak at 614 nm increased with Mg2+ co-doping, while it decreased with the amount of co-doped Sr2+. The site substituted by Eu3+ cations in the CaZrO3-based compounds was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis based on the electron channeling effects in transmission electron microscopy. The Eu3+ cations were determined to occupy mainly the B site (Zr4+) in CaZrO3. The dominant Eu3+ substitution site was also strongly influenced by the co-dopant, and the ionic radius of the co-dopant was identified as an important factor that determines the dominant Eu3+ substitution site

  13. Large pressure range hydrogen sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelsma, C.; Dam, B.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin-film sensor, to a method for producing a thin-film device, to an alloy for use in an optical sensing layer, to use of an alloy for sensing a chemical species such as hydrogen, to a sensor, to an apparatus for detecting hydrogen, to an electro-magnetic transfor

  14. Polymer based amperometric hydrogen sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A polymer based amperometric hydrogen sensor has been developed for measuring hydrogen in argon. Polyvinyl alcohol-phosphoric acid serves as the solid electrolyte for proton conduction. The electrolyte is sandwiched between two palladium films. Short circuit current between the film at room temperature is measured and is found to be linearly dependant on hydrogen concentration in argon to which one side of the film is exposed. The other side is exposed to air. The response time of the sensor is found to be improved on application of a D.C. potential of 200 mV in series. The sensitivity of the sensor is in ppm range. This may be sufficient for monitoring cover gas hydrogen in FBTR. Work is underway to improve the long-term stability of the sensor. (author)

  15. Effect of Gun Current on Deposition of CaZrO3 Coatings on SS316L by Air Plasma Spraying for Biomedical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CaZrO3 is high melting point ceramic material that is generally studied as coating for high temperature applications in aircrafts and land based power turbines. In this study 30 mol% calcia stabilized zirconia (CaZrO3) was deposited on SS316L substrate by atmospheric plasma spray (APS) technique as possible candidate for biomedical applications in orthopaedics and dentistry for medical implants. The coatings were deposited at three gun currents of 400A, 500A and 600A keeping gun to substrate distance fixed. Coatings were characterized by surface profilometery, SEM, XRD and wear tesing. Results indicate that coating deposited at 600A has highest coating thickness and highest roughness (Ra) values. Dipping the prepared coatings in simulated body fluid (SBF) exhibited precipitation of apatite as revealed by SEM and EDX analysis. The deposited coating will act as a barrier to diffusion of deleterious Ni ions from substrate to surrounding tissues and may enhance the bone in growth when implanted. (author)

  16. Hydrogen Leak Detection Sensor Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Barton D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the characteristics of the Hydrogen Sensor database. The database is the result of NASA's continuing interest in and improvement of its ability to detect and assess gas leaks in space applications. The database specifics and a snapshot of an entry in the database are reviewed. Attempts were made to determine the applicability of each of the 65 sensors for ground and/or vehicle use.

  17. Overview of North American Hydrogen Sensor Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Malley, Kathleen [SRA International, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Lopez, Hugo [UL LLC, Chicago, IL (United States); Cairns, Julie [CSA Group, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wichert, Richard [Professional Engineering, Inc.. Citrus Heights, CA (United States); Rivkin, Carl [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, Robert [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, William [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-11

    An overview of the main North American codes and standards associated with hydrogen safety sensors is provided. The distinction between a code and a standard is defined, and the relationship between standards and codes is clarified, especially for those circumstances where a standard or a certification requirement is explicitly referenced within a code. The report identifies three main types of standards commonly applied to hydrogen sensors (interface and controls standards, shock and hazard standards, and performance-based standards). The certification process and a list and description of the main standards and model codes associated with the use of hydrogen safety sensors in hydrogen infrastructure are presented.

  18. MIS-based sensors with hydrogen selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li; ,Dongmei; Medlin, J. William; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Bastasz, Robert J.

    2008-03-11

    The invention provides hydrogen selective metal-insulator-semiconductor sensors which include a layer of hydrogen selective material. The hydrogen selective material can be polyimide layer having a thickness between 200 and 800 nm. Suitable polyimide materials include reaction products of benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride 4,4-oxydianiline m-phenylene diamine and other structurally similar materials.

  19. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  20. Double electrolyte sensor for monitoring hydrogen permeation rate in steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Y.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihua College, Huaihua 418008 (China); Yu, G., E-mail: yuganghnu@163.co [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Ou, A.L.; Hu, L.; Xu, W.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Designed an amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes. {yields} Explained the principle of determining hydrogen permeation rate. {yields} Verified good stability, reproducibility and correctness of the developed sensor. {yields} Field on-line monitoring the susceptivity of hydrogen induced cracks. - Abstract: An amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes composed of a gelatiniform electrolyte and KOH solution has been developed to determine the permeation rate of hydrogen atoms in steel equipment owing to hydrogen corrosion. The gelatiniform electrolyte was made of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS), carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) and 0.2 mol dm{sup -3} KOH solution. The results show that the gelatiniform electrolyte containing 50 wt.% polymers has suitable viscosity and high electrical conductivity. The consistent permeation curves were detected by the sensor of the double electrolyte and single liquid KOH electrolyte, respectively. The developed sensor has good stability and reproducibility at room temperature.

  1. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  2. POF hydrogen detection sensor systems for launch vehicles applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Larson, David B.; Wuestling, Mark D.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the first successful Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) cable and glass fiber hydrogen detection sensor systems developed for Delta IV Launch Vehicle. Hydrogen detection in space application is very challenging; the hydrogen detection is priority for rocket industry and every transport device or any application where hydrogen is involved. H2 sensors are necessary to monitor the detection possible leak to avoid explosion, which can be highly dangerous. The hydrogen sensors had to perform in temperatures between -18° C to 60° C (0° F to 140° F). The response of the sensor in this temperature regime was characterized to ensure proper response of the sensors to fugitive hydrogen leakage during vehicle ground operations. We developed the first 75 m combination of POF and glass fiber H2 sensors. Performed detail investigation of POF-glass cables for attenuation loss, thermal, humidity, temperature, shock, accelerate testing for life expectancy. Also evaluated absorption, operating and high/low temperatures, and harsh environmental for glass-POF cables connectors. The same test procedures were performed for glass multi mode fiber part of the H2 and O2 sensors. A new optical waveguides was designed and developed to decrease the impact of both noise and long term drift of sensor. A field testing of sensors was performed at NASA Stennis on the Aerospike X-33 to quantify the element of the sensor package that was responsible for hydrogen detection and temperature.

  3. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  4. Palladium coated fibre Bragg grating based hydrogen sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of steam generator leaks in fast nuclear reactors is carried out by monitoring hydrogen in argon cover-gas. Hydrogen released during sodium cleaning of fast reactor components is required to be monitored. Hydrogen sensors with good sensitivity, stability and response time are required for all the above applications. We report a new type of hydrogen sensor with a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) coated with palladium thin film which is used to detect the leak of hydrogen gas in the Steam Generator (SG) module of the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). If water leaks into sodium, it results in sodium-water reaction. In this reaction hydrogen and sodium hydroxide are formed. Due to the explosive risk of hydrogen system, hydrogen sensors are of great interest in this case. It is known that hydrogen forms an explosive mixture with air once its concentration exceeds beyond the explosion limit of four percent. The advantages of FBG based hydrogen sensor over the other hydrogen sensors are its inherent property of safety from sparking, immunity to ambient electromagnetic interference. The sensing mechanism in this device is based on mechanical strain that is induced in the palladium coating when it absorbs hydrogen. This process physically stretches the grating and causes the grating period and grating's refractive index, to change. The Bragg wavelength shift is directly proportional to the strain induced and can be directly related to the percentage of hydrogen exposure. The online monitoring of palladium thin film coating on FBG is carried out and recorded the wavelength change and strain induced on the FBG. A hydrogen sensor set up have been fabricated which consists of SS vessel of capacity 10 litres, provided with pressure gauge, Argon filling line with a valve, Hydrogen injection line with flange, a vent line with valve and Hydrogen sensor fixing point. The Palladium coated FBG based Hydrogen sensor is tested in this experimental facility in the exposure of hydrogen in

  5. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development for Hydrogen Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosha, Eric L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop a low cost, low power, durable, and reliable hydrogen safety sensor for a wide range of vehicle and infrastructure applications; (2) Continually advance test prototypes guided by materials selection, sensor design, electrochemical R&D investigation, fabrication, and rigorous life testing; (3) Disseminate packaged sensor prototypes and control systems to DOE Laboratories and commercial parties interested in testing and fielding advanced prototypes for cross-validation; (4) Evaluate manufacturing approaches for commercialization; and (5) Engage an industrial partner and execute technology transfer. Recent developments in the search for sustainable and renewable energy coupled with the advancements in fuel cell powered vehicles (FCVs) have augmented the demand for hydrogen safety sensors. There are several sensor technologies that have been developed to detect hydrogen, including deployed systems to detect leaks in manned space systems and hydrogen safety sensors for laboratory and industrial usage. Among the several sensing methods electrochemical devices that utilize high temperature-based ceramic electrolytes are largely unaffected by changes in humidity and are more resilient to electrode or electrolyte poisoning. The desired sensing technique should meet a detection threshold of 1% (10,000 ppm) H{sub 2} and response time of {approx_equal}1 min, which is a target for infrastructure and vehicular uses. Further, a review of electrochemical hydrogen sensors by Korotcenkov et.al and the report by Glass et.al suggest the need for inexpensive, low power, and compact sensors with long-term stability, minimal cross-sensitivity, and fast response. This view has been largely validated and supported by the fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure industries by the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held on June 8, 2011. Many of the issues preventing widespread adoption of best-available hydrogen sensing technologies available today

  6. A novel three-electrode solid electrolyte hydrogen gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Min; Yang, Chunling; Zhang, Yan [Harbin Insitute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Computer Science and Technology; Jia, Zheng [Harbin Insitute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2013-07-01

    A three-electrode solid electrolyte hydrogen gas sensor is explored in this paper. The sensor utilized phosphotungstic acid as the electrolyte material and adopted platinum, nickel and tungsten as the three-electrode materials respectively. In real applications, platinum was used as the measuring electrode, nickel was used as the adjusting electrode and tungsten was used as the reference electrode. In order to compare the performance of the new sensor with that of the traditional two-electrode sensor, the hydrogen concentrations were adjusted so as to detect the output of the two-electrode sensor and the three-electrode sensor. The dynamic range between the measuring electrode and the reference electrode is about 0.65V and the highest detectable limit is 12% for the three-electrode solid hydrogen gas sensor. While the dynamic range is about 0.25V and and the highest detectable limit is 1% for the two-electrode solid electrolyte gas sensor. The results demonstrate that the three-electrode solid hydrogen gas sensor has a higher resolution and detectable limit than the two-electrode sensor. abstract environment.

  7. Early forest fire detection using low-energy hydrogen sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nörthemann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Most huge forest fires start in partial combustion. In the beginning of a smouldering fire, emission of hydrogen in low concentration occurs. Therefore, hydrogen can be used to detect forest fires before open flames are visible and high temperatures are generated. We have developed a hydrogen sensor comprising of a metal/solid electrolyte/insulator/semiconductor (MEIS structure which allows an economical production. Due to the low energy consumption, an autarkic working unit in the forest was established. In this contribution, first experiments are shown demonstrating the possibility to detect forest fires at a very early stage using the hydrogen sensor.

  8. Development of a hydrogen permeation sensor for future tritium applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llivina, L.; Colominas, S.; Abellà, J., E-mail: sergi.colominas@iqs.es

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Designing and testing of a hydrogen permeation sensor. • Palladium and α-iron have been used as a hydrogen permeation materials in the sensor. • The experiments performed using both membranes showed that the operation of the sensors in the equilibrium mode required at least several hours to reach the hydrogen equilibrium pressure. - Abstract: Tritium monitoring in lithium–lead eutectic is of great importance for the performance of liquid blankets in fusion reactors. In addition, tritium measurements will be required in order to proof tritium self-sufficiency in liquid metal breeding systems. On-line hydrogen (isotopes) sensors must be design and tested in order to accomplish these goals. In this work, an experimental set up was designed in order to test the permeation hydrogen sensors at 500 °C. This experimental set-up allowed working with controlled environments (different hydrogen partial pressures) and the temperature was measured using a thermocouple connected to a temperature controller that regulated an electrical heater. In a first set of experiments, a hydrogen sensor was constructed using an α-iron capsule as an active hydrogen area. The sensor was mounted and tested in the experimental set up. In a second set of experiments the α-iron capsule was replaced by a welded thin palladium disk in order to minimize the death volume. The experiments performed using both membranes (α-iron and palladium) showed that the operation of the sensors in the equilibrium mode required at least several hours to reach the hydrogen equilibrium pressure.

  9. Rapid Hydrogen and Methane Sensors for Wireless Leak Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under NASA STTR NNK07EA39C, ASR&D developed passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors that utilize Pd nanocluster films on self-assembled...

  10. In-Space Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Leak Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Broadband Photonics Inc. proposes development of a patent-pending distributed fiber optic sensor for in-space hydrogen leak detection. Reliable and fast detection...

  11. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Hu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors.

  12. ZnO-B2O3-SiO2掺杂对锆酸钙基陶瓷性能的影响%Effect of ZnO-B2O3-SiO2 glass doping on properties of CaZrO3 microwave dielectric ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李栋; 李谦; 黄金亮; 顾永军

    2013-01-01

    With ZnO-B2O3-SiO2(ZBS) glass as a liquid phase sintering assistant,the effects of ZBS doping on the sintering performance,phase composition,microstructure morphology and dielectric properties of CaZrO3 ceramics were investigated.The results indicate that ZBS glass can be used as sintering assistant to reduce the sintering temperature of CaZrO3 ceramics from 1 550 ℃ to 1 000 ℃ without second phase formation.When the mass fraction of ZBS glass is 15%,a high relative density of 97.8% and good dielectric properties ofεr=25,Q ·f=8 584 GHz,τf=-45 × 10-6/℃ are obtained for the CaZrO3 ceramics sintered at 1 000 ℃ for 3 h.%研究了ZnO-B2O3-SiO2(ZBS)玻璃掺杂量对CaZrO3陶瓷烧结性能、物相组成、微观组织形貌和介电性能的影响.结果表明:通过掺杂ZBS,可使CaZrO3陶瓷的烧结温度由1550℃降至1 000℃,且无第二相生成,相对密度达97.8%.当ZBS添加量为质量分数15%时,CaZrO3陶瓷在1 000℃烧结3h获得良好的介电性能:εr=25,Q·f=8 584 GHz,τf=-45×10-6/℃.

  13. Demonstration of a prototype hydrogen sensor and electronics package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Amanda S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brosha, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-03

    This is a progress report for the demonstration of a prototype hydrogen sensor and electronics package. There are five tasks associated with this, and four have been completed as of August 2016: Station Demonstration and Site Recommendation, Order Sensor Equipment, Build Sensors, and Install Sensors. The final task to be completed is Sensor Demonstration and Data Analysis, and expected completion date is January 26, 2017. This progress report details each of the tasks and goes into detail about what is currently being worked on, along with the budget and planned work for July 27, 2016 to January 26, 2017.

  14. Thermochemical hydrogen sensor based on chalcogenide nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrogen gas-sensing properties have been investigated of two types of thermochemical hydrogen (TCH) sensors composed of thermoelectric layers based on chalcogenide nanowire arrays and anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. The monomorphic-type TCH sensor, which had only Bi2Te3 nanowire arrays, showed an output signal of 23.7 μV in response to 5 vol% hydrogen gas at room temperature, whereas an output signal of 215 μV was obtained from an n–p junction-type TCH sensor made of connected Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 nanowire arrays in an AAO template. Despite its small deposition area, the output signal of the n–p sensor was more than nine times that of the monomorphic sensor. This observation can be explained by the difference in electrical connections (parallel and serial conversions) in the TCH sensor between each type of nanowire array. Also, our n–p sensor had a wide detection range for hydrogen gas (from 400 ppm to 45 vol%) and a fast response time of 1.3 s at room temperature without requiring external power. (paper)

  15. The Development of Silicon Carbide Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a high temperature electronic material. Its potential for development of chemical sensors in a high temperature environment has not been explored. The objective of this study is to use silicon carbide as the substrate material for the construction of chemical sensors for high temperature applications. Sensors for the detection of hydrogen and hydrocarbon are developed in this program under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, NASA. Metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structures are used in this development. Specifically, using palladium-silicon carbide Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range of 100 to 400 C are designed, fabricated and assessed. The effect of heat treatment on the Pd-SiC Schottky diode is examined. Operation of the sensors at 400 C demonstrate sensitivity of the sensor to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. Substantial progress has been made in this study and we believe that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures. However, the long term stability and operational life of the sensor need to be assessed. This aspect is an important part of our future continuing investigation.

  16. Optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on photothermal reflectance detection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarai, A; Nakanishi, T, E-mail: yarai@osaka-sandai.ac.j [Department of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1 Nakagaito, Daito, Osaka 574-8530 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    This article proposes an optical fiber hydrogen (H{sub 2}) sensor based on photothermal reflectance [hereinafter modulated optical reflectance (MOR)] technique. Our H{sub 2} sensor is based on a technique that detects the changes of MOR signals in palladium film, which is widely known to absorb H{sub 2} gas. The sensor element is a palladium film deposited on a 2.5-mm-diameter FC-ferrule made from zirconium to realize the optical fiber sensor. Our recently developed 'laptop' MOR instrument assembled with optical fiber components is applied to this technique. Thus, an extremely compact photothermal H{sub 2} gas sensor system can be constructed. We certified that our technique has hypersensitive less than 1% with a concentration of H{sub 2} gas and also demonstrated that the response time is approximately 5 seconds when the sensor head is filled with H{sub 2} gas.

  17. Fault Detection and Recovery for Full Range of Hydrogen Sensor Based on Relevance Vector Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Song; Bing Wang; Ming Diao; Hongquan Zhang; Zhenyu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the reliability of hydrogen sensor, a novel strategy for full range of hydrogen sensor fault detection and recovery is proposed in this paper. Three kinds of sensors are integrated to realize the measurement for full range of hydrogen concentration based on relevance vector machine ( RVM ) . Failure detection of hydrogen sensor is carried out by using the variance detection method. When a sensor fault is detected, the other fault⁃free sensors can recover the fault data in real⁃time by using RVM predictor accounting for the relevance of sensor data. Analysis, together with both simulated and experimental results, a full⁃range hydrogen detection and hydrogen sensor self⁃validating experiment is presented to demonstrate that the proposed strategy is superior at accuracy and runtime compared with the conventional methods. Results show that the proposed methodology provides a better solution to the full range of hydrogen detection and the reliability improvement of hydrogen sensor.

  18. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Sensors and Systems. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Sensor systems research was focused on hydrogen leak detection and smart sensors with adaptive feedback control for fuel cells. The goal was to integrate multifunction smart sensors, low-power high-efficiency wireless circuits, energy harvesting devices, and power management circuits in one module. Activities were focused on testing and demonstrating sensors in a realistic environment while also bringing them closer to production and commercial viability for eventual use in the actual operating environment.

  19. FGI spool piece hydrogen sensor response test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of testing of three flammable gas sensors used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System (RMCSS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI). These sensors, a Detector Electronics Inc. (Detronics), a Sierra Montiro Corp. (SMC), and a Whittaker Electronics Corp. (WEC) can detect flammable gases and terminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined gas concentration. Testing showed that each of the units can adequately detect a hydrogen gas mixture within a specified time frame and be accurate within manufacturers specifications

  20. Porous palladium coated conducting polymer nanoparticles for ultrasensitive hydrogen sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Seop; Kim, Sung Gun; Cho, Sunghun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen leak detection and surveillance sensor systems are needed; additionally, the ability to maintain uniformity through repetitive hydrogen sensing is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we detail the fabrication of porous palladium coated conducting polymer (3-carboxylate polypyrrole) nanoparticles (Pd@CPPys) to detect hydrogen gas. The Pd@CPPys are produced by means of facile alkyl functionalization and chemical reduction of a pristine 3-carboxylate polypyrrole nanoparticle-contained palladium precursor (PdCl2) solution. The resulting Pd@CPPy-based sensor electrode exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity (0.1 ppm) and stability toward hydrogen gas at room temperature due to the palladium sensing layer.Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen leak detection and surveillance sensor systems are needed; additionally, the ability to maintain uniformity through repetitive hydrogen sensing is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we detail the fabrication of porous palladium coated conducting polymer (3-carboxylate polypyrrole) nanoparticles (Pd@CPPys) to detect hydrogen gas. The Pd@CPPys are produced by means of facile alkyl functionalization and chemical reduction of a pristine 3-carboxylate polypyrrole nanoparticle-contained palladium precursor (PdCl2) solution. The resulting Pd@CPPy-based sensor electrode exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity (0.1 ppm

  1. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA application to distributed wireless hydrogen leak...

  2. Integrated Micro-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensor. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank DiMeo, Jr.

    2000-10-02

    This report details our recent progress in developing novel MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) based hydrogen gas sensors. These sensors couple novel thin films as the active layer on a device structure known as a Micro-HotPlate. This coupling has resulted in a gas sensor that has several unique advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, stability and amenability to large scale manufacture. This Phase-I research effort was focused on achieving the following three objectives: (1) Investigation of sensor fabrication parameters and their effects on sensor performance. (2) Hydrogen response testing of these sensors in wet/dry and oxygen-containing/oxygen-deficient atmospheres. (3) Investigation of the long-term stability of these thin film materials and identification of limiting factors. We have made substantial progress toward achieving each of these objectives, and highlights of our phase I results include the demonstration of signal responses with and without oxygen present, as well as in air with a high level of humidity. We have measured response times of <0.5 s to 1% H{sub 2} in air, and shown the ability to detect concentrations of <200 ppm. These results are extremely encouraging and suggest that this technology has substantial potential for meeting the needs of a hydrogen based economy. These achievements demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-hotplates structures in conjunction with palladium+coated metal-hydride films for sensing hydrogen in many of the environments required by a hydrogen based energy economy. Based on these findings, they propose to continue and expand the development of this technology in Phase II.

  3. Optimization of Pd Surface Plasmon Resonance sensors for hydrogen detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrotton, C.; Javahiraly, N.; Slaman, M.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.; Meyrueis, P.

    2011-01-01

    A design to optimize a fiber optic Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensor using Palladium as a sensitive layer for hydrogen detection is presented. In this approach, the sensitive layer is deposited on the core of a multimode fiber, after removing the optical cladding. The light is injected in the f

  4. An optical fiber hydrogen sensor with Pd/Ag film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Lu-jun; CHEN You-ping; ZHANG Gang

    2009-01-01

    A 20 nanometer palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) ultra-thin film was used for hydrogen gas sensing. The atomic ratio of Pd: Ag was 3:1, the thin film was evaporated on the optical glass, the Pd/Ag alloy could increase the life and provide the stability of the sensing film. The artificial neutral network was used for processing the data collected from the optical fiber bundle hydro-gen sensor, which could enhance the measuring accuracy, at the same time, the intrinsic and extrinsic influences were eliminated mainly. Experimental results and numerical simulation show the training method available, a linear precision of 0.1% for the optical hydrogen sensor is achieved.

  5. Design and development of an optical fiber sensor for hydrogen detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen detection is an environmental priority. Numerous hydrogen sensors have been developed, but none of them meet the industry requirements. Optical fiber sensors, electrically isolated, are excellent candidates for operating in explosive environments. Our goal is to develop an intrinsic optical fiber sensor based on Surface Plasmon Resonance. In this thesis, we study two optical fiber hydrogen sensors. The first sensor, based on amplitude modulation, consists of a thin Pd layer deposited on the multimode fiber core, after removing the optical cladding. The second design, based on wavelength modulation, consists of replacing the single Pd layer by a Au/SiO2/Pd multilayer stack. We demonstrate in this thesis that plasmonic sensors may be a solution to develop fast and reliable fiber hydrogen sensors. Finally, we study Mg alloys as hydrogen sensitive material in order to improve the detection range of hydrogen sensors. (author)

  6. Summary and Findings from the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop (June 8, 2011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.; Post, M.; Rivkin, C.

    2012-07-01

    On June 8, 2011, DOE/NREL hosted a hydrogen sensor workshop attended by nearly forty participants from private organizations, government facilities, and academic institutions . The workshop participants represented a cross section of stakeholders in the hydrogen community, including sensor developers, end users, site safety officials, and code and standards developers. The goals of the workshop were to identify critical applications for the emerging hydrogen infrastructure that require or would benefit from hydrogen sensors, to assign performance specifications for sensor deployed in each application, and to identify shortcomings or deficiencies (i.e., technical gaps) in the ability of current sensor technology to meet the assigned performance requirements.

  7. A reliable, sensitive and fast optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on surface plasmon resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrotton, C.; Westerwaal, R.J.; Javahiraly, N.; Slaman, M.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.; Meyrueis, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time on the experimental response of a Surface Plasmon Resonance fiber optic sensor based on wavelength modulation for hydrogen sensing. This approach of measuring the hydrogen concentration makes the sensor insensitive to intensity fluctuations. The intrinsic fiber sensor de

  8. Proton conducting ceramics for potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, H.; Llivina, L.; Colominas, S.; Abellà, J., E-mail: jordi.abella@iqs.edu

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis and chemical characterization of proton conductor ceramics. • Qualification of ceramics for hydrogen sensors in molten lithium–lead. • Ceramics have well-defined grains with a wide distribution of sizes. • Good agreement with predictions obtained with BaZrY, BaCeZrY and SrFeCo ceramics. -- Abstract: Tritium monitoring in lithium–lead eutectic (Pb–15.7Li) is of great importance for the performance of liquid blankets in fusion reactors. Also, tritium measurements will be required in order to proof tritium self-sufficiency in liquid metal breeding systems. On-line hydrogen (isotopes) sensors must be design and tested in order to accomplish these goals. Potentiometric hydrogen sensors for molten lithium–lead eutectic have been designed at the Electrochemical Methods Lab at Institut Quimic de Sarria (IQS) at Barcelona and are under development and qualification. The probes are based on the use of solid state electrolytes and works as proton exchange membranes (PEM). In this work the following compounds: BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α}, Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}-Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−α} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been synthesized in order to be tested as PEM H-probes. Potentiometric measurements of the synthesized ceramic elements at 500 °C have been performed at a fixed hydrogen concentration. The sensors constructed using the proton conductor elements BaZr{sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}, BaCe{sub 0.6}Zr{sub 0.3}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} and Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 1.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 7−δ} exhibited stable output potential and its value was close to the theoretical value calculated with the Nernst equation (deviation around 60 mV). In contrast, the sensor constructed using the proton conductor element Sr(Ce{sub 0.6}–Zr{sub 0.4}){sub 0.9}Y{sub 0.1}O{sub 3−δ} showed a deviation higher than 100 mV between experimental an theoretical data.

  9. Selective hydrogen gas sensor using CuFe2O4 nanoparticle based thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haija, Mohammad Abu; Ayesh, Ahmad I.; Ahmed, Sadiqa; Katsiotis, Marios S.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen gas sensors based on CuFe2O4 nanoparticle thin films are presented in this work. Each gas sensor was prepared by depositing CuFe2O4 thin film on a glass substrate by dc sputtering inside a high vacuum chamber. Argon inert gas was used to sputter the material from a composite sputtering target. Interdigitated metal electrodes were deposited on top of the thin films by thermal evaporation and shadow masking. The produced sensors were tested against hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and ethylene gases where they were found to be selective for hydrogen. The sensitivity of the produced sensors was maximum for hydrogen gas at 50 °C. In addition, the produced sensors exhibit linear response signal for hydrogen gas with concentrations up to 5%. Those sensors have potential to be used for industrial applications because of their low power requirement, functionality at low temperatures, and low production cost.

  10. Fabrication of Pd Doped WO3 Nanofiber as Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Nikfarjam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pd doped WO3 fibers were synthesized by electro-spinning. The sol gel method was employed to prepare peroxopolytungstic acid (P-PTA. Palladium chloride and Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP was dissolved in the sol Pd:WO3 = 10% molar ratio. The prepared sol was loaded into a syringe connected to a high voltage of 18.3 kV and electrospun fibers were collected on the alumina substrates. Scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS techniques were used to analyze the crystal structure and chemical composition of the fibers after heat treatment at 500 °C. Resistance-sensing measurements exhibited a sensitivity of about 30 at 500 ppm hydrogen in air, and the response and recovery times were about 20 and 30 s, respectively, at 300 °C. Hydrogen gas sensing mechanism of the sensor was also studied.

  11. Development of a reliable, miniaturized hydrogen safety sensor prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekhar, Praveen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rangachary, Mukundan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williamson, Todd L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the development and long-term testing of a hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle and infrastructure applications is presented. The working device is demonstrated through application of commercial and reproducible manufacturing methods and rigorous life testing results guided by materials selection, and sensor design. Fabricated using Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) as the sensing electrode, Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen ion conducting solid electrolyte and Platinum (Pt) as a pseudo-counter electrode, the device was subjected to interference studies, temperature cycling, and long-testing routine. The sensor responded in real time to varying concentrations of H{sub 2} (1000 to 20,000 ppm) monitored under a humidified condition. Among the interference gases tested such as nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), carbon monoxide (CO), and propylene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}), the sensor showed cross-sensitivity to C{sub 3}H{sub 6}. Analyzing the overall device performance over 4000 hrs of testing for 5000 ppm of H{sub 2}, (a) the sensitivity varied {+-}21% compared to response recorded at 0 hrs, and (c) the response rise time fluctuated between 3 to 46 s. The salient features of the H{sub 2} sensor prototype designed and co-developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are (a) stable three phase interface (electrode/electrolyte/gas) leading to reliable sensor operation, (b) low power consumption, (b) compactness to fit into critical areas of application, (c) simple operation, (d) fast response, (e) a direct voltage read-out circumventing the need for any additional conditioning circuitry, and (f) conducive to commercialization.

  12. Fiber Optic Sensors for Leak Detection and Condition Monitoring in Hydrogen Fuel Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal addresses the need for explosion proof, sensitive and reliable hydrogen sensors for NASA and commercial hydrogen fuel systems. It also...

  13. Evaluation of Hydrogen Sensors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-547

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In preparation for the projected 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, KPA has been contracted by Toyota Motors to develop a hydrogen safety system for vehicle repair facilities. Repair facility safety designs will include hydrogen sensors. KPA will identify critical sensor specifications for vehicle repair facilities. In collaboration with NREL, KPA will select and purchase commercial hydrogen sensors that meet or nearly meet requirements for deployment in vehicle repair facility. A two-phase field deployment plan to verify sensor performance has been developed.

  14. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA...

  15. Research Surveys of Electrochemical Sensors for in-situ Determining Hydrogen in Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The principle, construction and application of two types of electrochemical sensors-amperometric and potentiometric are surveyed. Both types of sensors are very sensitive to changes in temperature. The accuracy of hydrogen measurement depends on both the precision of sensors developed and the reliable technique of installation and security of sensors. The two types of sensors have been used for in-situ determining hydrogen permeated in steels owing to a corrosive reaction,a hydrogen gas circumstance at elevated temperatures and high pressure or also a pretreatment process such as pickling and plating process, etc.

  16. Hydrogen transport in molten salt Flinak measured by solid electrolyte sensors with Pd electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of hydrogen (H2) in Flinak was investigated using hydrogen sensor made of proton conductive solid electrolyte. The test in Flinak was performed after the validity of the sensor was checked in the test in Ar-H2 gas mixture with known hydrogen partial pressure. The sensor showed stable output in the Flinak at homogeneous temperature condition. The electromotive force (EMF) of the sensor agreed with theoretically estimated EMF. The sensor however showed the EMF much different from the theoretically estimated EMF when there was temperature difference between the free surface and the immersed sensor position. The temperature dependence of the Henry's law which controlled the hydrogen transport in Flinak was investigated from the sensor EMF. It was indicated that the Henry's constant for H2 in Flinak had the negative temperature dependence, which agrees with the previous study.

  17. Current Design of the Flange Type Hydrogen Permeation Sensor in Liquid Breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. H.; Jin, H. G.; Yoon, J. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, D. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In 2004, A. Ciampichetti et al. proposed a hollow capsule shape permeation sensor and they theoretically and experimentally evaluated the performance of the sensor made of Nb membrane at test condition of 500 .deg. C. However, the evaluation result showed the measured hydrogen permeation flux in the sensor much lower than the predicted one and they concluded that, the result is due to the formation of an oxide layer on the sensor membrane surface. Three years later, A. Ciampichetti et al. observed that a hollow capsule shape permeation sensor has too long response time to measure hydrogen concentration in liquid breeder. However, they suggested optimizing the sensor geometry with the reduction of the ratio 'total sensor volume/permeation surface' to overcome the low hydrogen permeating flux. For development of the liquid breeding technologies in nuclear fusion, the permeation sensor to measure tritium concentration in liquid metal breeder has been developed. Lee et al. proposed a flange type permeation sensor to dramatically reduce the ratio sensor 'inside volume/permeation surface' and to remove membrane welding during sensor manufacture process. However, the flange type sensor has problem with sealing. In present study, the modified flange sensor design with a metallic C-ring spring gasket is introduced. The modified sensor will be verified and evaluated under high temperature conditions by end of 2015.

  18. Hydrogen generation monitoring and mass gain analysis during the steam oxidation for Zircaloy using hydrogen and oxygen sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation behavior of Zircaloy-4 at high temperatures in a flowing Ar-H2O (saturated at 323 K) mixed gas was investigated using hydrogen and oxygen sensors installed at a gas outlet, and the utility of the gas sensing methods by using both sensors was examined. The generated amount of hydrogen was determined from the hydrogen partial pressure continuously measured by the hydrogen sensor, and the resultant calculated oxygen amount that reacted with the specimen was in close agreement with the mass gain gravimetrically measured after the experiment. This result demonstrated that the hydrogen partial pressure measurement using a hydrogen sensor is an effective method for examining the steam oxidation of this metal as well as monitoring the hydrogen evolution. The advantage of this method is that the oxidation rate of the metal at any time as a differential quantity is able to be obtained, compared to the oxygen amount gravimetrically measured as an integral quantity. When the temperature was periodically changed in the range of 1173 K to 1523 K, highly accurate measurements could be carried out using this gas monitoring method, although reasonable measurements were not gravimetrically performed due to the fluctuating thermo-buoyancy during the experiment. A change of the oxidation rate was clearly detected at a monoclinic tetragonal transition temperature of ZrO2. From the calculation of the water vapor partial pressure during the thermal equilibrium condition using the hydrogen and oxygen partial pressures, it became clear that a thermal equilibrium state is maintained when the isothermal condition is maintained, but is not when the temperature increases or decreases with time. Based on these results, it was demonstrated that the gas monitoring system using hydrogen and oxygen sensors is very useful for investigating the oxidation process of the Zircaloy in steam. (author)

  19. Artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy inference systems as virtual sensors for hydrogen safety prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karri, Vishy; Ho, Tien [School of Engineering, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252-65, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Madsen, Ole [Department of Production, Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 16, DK-9220 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2008-06-15

    Hydrogen is increasingly investigated as an alternative fuel to petroleum products in running internal combustion engines and as powering remote area power systems using generators. The safety issues related to hydrogen gas are further exasperated by expensive instrumentation required to measure the percentage of explosive limits, flow rates and production pressure. This paper investigates the use of model based virtual sensors (rather than expensive physical sensors) in connection with hydrogen production with a Hogen 20 electrolyzer system. The virtual sensors are used to predict relevant hydrogen safety parameters, such as the percentage of lower explosive limit, hydrogen pressure and hydrogen flow rate as a function of different input conditions of power supplied (voltage and current), the feed of de-ionized water and Hogen 20 electrolyzer system parameters. The virtual sensors are developed by means of the application of various Artificial Intelligent techniques. To train and appraise the neural network models as virtual sensors, the Hogen 20 electrolyzer is instrumented with necessary sensors to gather experimental data which together with MATLAB neural networks toolbox and tailor made adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) were used as predictive tools to estimate hydrogen safety parameters. It was shown that using the neural networks hydrogen safety parameters were predicted to less than 3% of percentage average root mean square error. The most accurate prediction was achieved by using ANFIS. (author)

  20. Development of a fiber-optic sensor for hydrogen leak detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The real and perceived risks of hydrogen fuel use, particularly in passenger vehicles, will require extensive safety precautions including hydrogen leak detection. Conventional hydrogen gas sensors require electrical wiring and may be too expensive for deployment in multiple locations within a vehicle. In this recently initiated project, we are attempting to develop a reversible, thin-film, chemochromic sensor that can be applied to the end of a polymer optical fiber. The presence of hydrogen gas causes the film to become darker. A light beam transmitted from a central instrument in the vehicle along the sensor fibers will be reflected from the ends of the fiber back to individual light detectors. A decrease in the reflected light signal will indicate the presence and concentration of hydrogen in the vicinity of the fiber sensor. The typical thin film sensor consists of a layer of transparent, amorphous tungsten oxide covered by a very thin reflective layer of palladium. When the sensor is exposed to hydrogen, a portion of the hydrogen is dissociated, diffuses through the palladium and reacts with the tungsten oxide to form a blue insertion compound, H{sub X}WO{sub 3}- When the hydrogen gas is no longer present, the hydrogen will diffuse out of the H{sub X}WO{sub 3} and oxidize at the palladium/air interface, restoring the tungsten oxide film and the light signal to normal. The principle of this detection scheme has already been demonstrated by scientists in Japan. However, the design of the sensor has not been optimized for speed of response nor tested for its hydrogen selectivity in the presence of hydrocarbon gases. The challenge of this project is to modify the basic sensor design to achieve the required rapid response and assure sufficient selectivity to avoid false readings.

  1. Development of a rechargeable optical hydrogen peroxide sensor - sensor design and biological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Klaus; Jensen, Peter Ø; Kühl, Michael

    2016-07-21

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important member of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) family. Among ROS, H2O2 is considered the most long-lived and can accumulate inside and outside of cells, where it is involved in both vital (signaling) and deadly (toxic) reactions depending on its concentration. Quantifying H2O2 within biological samples is challenging and often not possible. Here we present a quasi-reversible fiber-optic sensor capable of measuring H2O2 concentrations ranging from 1-100 μM within different biological samples. Based on a Prussian blue/white redox cycle and a simple sensor recharging and readout strategy, H2O2 can be measured with high spatial (∼500 μm) and temporal (∼30 s) resolution. The sensor has a broad applicability both in complex environmental and biomedical systems, as demonstrated by (i) H2O2 concentration profile measurements in natural photosynthetic biofilms under light stress reaching H2O2 concentrations as high as 15 μM, and (ii) the quantification of the transient increase of the extracellular concentration of H2O2 during stimulation of neutrophils. PMID:27183881

  2. A Finite Element Model of a MEMS-based Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walied A. Moussa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced.

  3. Optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on light reflection and a palladium-sliver thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Lu-jun; SHANG Hui-chao; ZHANG Gang; ZHAO Ze-xiang; ZHOU Jun

    2011-01-01

    Thin alloy films of palladium (Pd) and silver (Ag) are deposited onto glass substrates via the direct current (DC) magnetron technique. The hydrogen sensor probe consists of optical fiber bundle and Pd/Ag optical thin film. When the sensor is exposed to hydrogen, the refractive index of Pd/Ag optical thin layer will diminish and cause attenuation changes of the reflective light. It is observed that the thickness of Pd/Ag alloy layer can affect the hydrogen sensor signal. Under different substrate temperatures, several Pd/Ag samples are coated with different thicknesses of Pd/Ag alloy, and the results of a hydrogen sensor based on reflective light from the Pd/Ag alloy thin film are discussed.

  4. Optical Sensors for Hydrogen and Oxygen for Unambiguous Detection in Their Mutual Presence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase I SBIR project is to develop sensors that can discriminate the presence of combustible gases like oxygen (O2) in hydrogen (H2) or H2 in...

  5. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures. PMID:24113685

  6. Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

    2010-01-06

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

  7. Wireless Hydrogen Smart Sensor Based on Pt/Graphene-Immobilized Radio-Frequency Identification Tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Seop; Oh, Jungkyun; Jun, Jaemoon; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-08-25

    Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus, appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen-gas leak detection and surveillance systems are needed; additionally, the ability to monitor large areas (e.g., cities) via wireless networks is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we introduce a radio frequency identification (RFID)-based wireless smart-sensor system, composed of a Pt-decorated reduced graphene oxide (Pt_rGO)-immobilized RFID sensor tag and an RFID-reader antenna-connected network analyzer to detect hydrogen gas. The Pt_rGOs, produced using a simple chemical reduction process, were immobilized on an antenna pattern in the sensor tag through spin coating. The resulting Pt_rGO-based RFID sensor tag exhibited a high sensitivity to hydrogen gas at unprecedentedly low concentrations (1 ppm), with wireless communication between the sensor tag and RFID-reader antenna. The wireless sensor tag demonstrated flexibility and a long lifetime due to the strong immobilization of Pt_rGOs on the substrate and battery-independent operation during hydrogen sensing, respectively. PMID:26060881

  8. Microcontroller based instrumentation for heater control circuit of tin oxide based hydrogen sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thin film sensor based on tin oxide developed in IGCAR is used to monitor very low levels of hydrogen (concentration ranging from 2 ppm to 80 ppm). The heater and the sensor patterns are integrated on a miniature alumina substrate and necessary electrical leads are taken out. For proper functioning of the sensor, the heater has to be maintained at a constant temperature of 350°C. The sensor output (voltage signal) varies with H2 concentration. In fast breeder reactors, liquid sodium is used as coolant. The sensor is used to detect water/steam leak in secondary sodium circuit. During the start up of the reactor, steam leak into sodium circuit generates hydrogen gas as a product that doesn't dissolve in sodium, but escapes to the surge tank containing argon i.e. in cover gas plenum of sodium circuit. On-line monitoring of hydrogen in cover gas is done to detect an event of water/steam leakage. The focus of this project is on the instrumentation pertaining to the temperature control for the sensor heater. The tin oxide based hydrogen sensor is embedded in a substrate which consists of a platinum heater, essentially a resistor. There is no provision of embedding a temperature sensor on the heater surface due to the physical constraints, without which maintaining a constant heater temperature is a complex task

  9. Hysteresis-free nanoplasmonic pd-au alloy hydrogen sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadell, Carl; Nugroho, Ferry Anggoro Ardy; Lidström, Emil;

    2015-01-01

    The recent market introduction of hydrogen fuel cell cars and the prospect of a hydrogen economy have drastically accelerated the need for safe and accurate detection of hydrogen. In this Letter, we investigate the use of arrays of nanofabricated Pd-Au alloy nanoparticles as plasmonic optical...

  10. Rice-straw-like structure of silicon nanowire arrays for a hydrogen gas sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rice-straw-like silicon nanowire (SiNW) array was developed for hydrogen gas sensing applications. The straight-aligned SiNW array sensor was first fabricated by the metal-assisted electroless etching (MAEE) technique. Rice-straw-like SiNW arrays were formed using a repeated MAEE technique. Hydrogen sensing characteristics were measured for gas concentrations from 20 to 1000 ppm at room temperature. The rice-straw-like SiNW-array-based hydrogen gas sensor performed with low noise and a high response (232.5%) for 1000 ppm hydrogen gas. It was found that the rice-straw-like SiNW-array hydrogen gas sensor had a much better response (approximately 2.5 times) than the straight-aligned SiNW-array sensor. The rice-straw-like SiNW-array structure effectively increased the surface area and the concentration of silicon oxide, which provided additional binding sites for gas molecules. Thus, the rice-straw-like SiNW-array-based hydrogen gas sensor possessed good sensing properties and has the potential for mass production of sensing devices. (paper)

  11. High-performance flexible hydrogen sensor made of WS₂ nanosheet-Pd nanoparticle composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Cihan; Choi, Duyoung; Kargar, Alireza; Liu, Chin Hung; Yavuz, Serdar; Choi, Chulmin; Jin, Sungho; Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2016-05-13

    We report a flexible hydrogen sensor, composed of WS2 nanosheet-Pd nanoparticle composite film, fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate. The sensor offers the advantages of light-weight, mechanical durability, room temperature operation, and high sensitivity. The WS2-Pd composite film exhibits sensitivity (R 1/R 2, the ratio of the initial resistance to final resistance of the sensor) of 7.8 to 50,000 ppm hydrogen. Moreover, the WS2-Pd composite film distinctly outperforms the graphene-Pd composite, whose sensitivity is only 1.14. Furthermore, the ease of fabrication holds great potential for scalable and low-cost manufacturing of hydrogen sensors. PMID:27040653

  12. High-performance flexible hydrogen sensor made of WS2 nanosheet–Pd nanoparticle composite film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Cihan; Choi, Duyoung; Kargar, Alireza; Liu, Chin Hung; Yavuz, Serdar; Choi, Chulmin; Jin, Sungho; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2016-05-01

    We report a flexible hydrogen sensor, composed of WS2 nanosheet–Pd nanoparticle composite film, fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate. The sensor offers the advantages of light-weight, mechanical durability, room temperature operation, and high sensitivity. The WS2–Pd composite film exhibits sensitivity (R 1/R 2, the ratio of the initial resistance to final resistance of the sensor) of 7.8 to 50 000 ppm hydrogen. Moreover, the WS2–Pd composite film distinctly outperforms the graphene–Pd composite, whose sensitivity is only 1.14. Furthermore, the ease of fabrication holds great potential for scalable and low-cost manufacturing of hydrogen sensors.

  13. Development of sensors and sensing technology for hydrogen fuel cell vehicle applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sekhar, Praveen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangchary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williamson, Todd L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barzon, Fernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Woo, Leta Y [LLNL; Glass, Robert S [LLNL

    2010-01-01

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features.

  14. Fiber Optic Hydrogen Sensor Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-05-00158

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringer, M.

    2010-07-01

    NREL and Nuclear Filter Technology collaborated to develop a prototype product for a hydrogen threshold sensor that was used to monitor hydrogen production in the transport of nuclear waste transport containers.

  15. Development of High Temperature SiC Based Hydrogen/Hydrocarbon Sensors with Bond Pads for Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liangyu; Biagi-Labiosa, Azlin M.; Ward, Benjamin J.; Lukco, Dorothy; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Lampard, Peter S.; Artale, Michael A.; Hampton, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes efforts towards the transition of existing high temperature hydrogen and hydrocarbon Schottky diode sensor elements to packaged sensor structures that can be integrated into a testing system. Sensor modifications and the technical challenges involved are discussed. Testing of the sensors at 500 C or above is also presented along with plans for future development.

  16. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam Thi Van; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.

    2005-01-01

    An increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to the lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase toge

  17. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam T.V.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.; Berg, van den A.

    2004-01-01

    An increase in produced hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  18. Highly Sensitive Rayleigh Wave Hydrogen Sensors with WO3 Sensing Layers at Room Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng; FAN Li; ZHANG Shu-Yi; YANG Yue-Tao; ZHOU Ding-Mao; SHUI Xiu-Ji

    2011-01-01

    Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied.The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity.It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method,keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer.Under the optimized preparation conditions,the high sensitivity of the hydrogen sensors at room temperature is obtained,in which 1% hydrogen in natural air induces the frequency shift of 72 kHz at the operating frequency of 124.2 MHz.Surface acoustic wave (SAW) hydrogen sensors have attracted a great deal of attention so far,in which the sensors have achieved high sensitivity as the sensors were often operated at high temperature,such as higher than 100℃.[1-4] However,in these experiments,a heater and a thermostat were required,which induced the sensors to be more complicated and unfavorable for miniaturization,and limited their application at room temperature.Furthermore,the heater can induce extra power loss and risks of fire and explosion.%Rayleigh wave hydrogen sensors based on 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrates with WO3 sensing layers operating at room temperature are studied. The experimental results indicate that the WO3 layers obtained by a sol-gel method have much higher sensitivities because the sensing layers produced by the sol-gel method have small grains and high roughness and porosity. It is also confirmed that in the sol-gel method, keeping WO3 solutions at low temperature and/or decreasing the viscosity of the solutions can decrease the grain sizes and increase the hydrogen-absorbability of the sensing layer. Under the optimized preparation conditions, the high sensitivity of the

  19. Hydrogen gas sensors using a thin Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} dielectric film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seongjeen [Kyungnam University, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    A capacitive-type hydrogen gas sensor with a MIS (metal-insulator-semiconductor) structure was investigated for high-temperature applications. In this work, a tantalum oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) layer of tens of nanometers in thickness formed by oxidizing tantalum film in rapid thermal processing (RTP) was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement. Silicon carbide (SiC), which is good even at high temperatures over 500 .deg. C, was used as the substrate. We fabricated sensors composed of Pd/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiC, and the dependences of the capacitance response properties and the I-V characteristics on the hydrogen concentration were analyzed from the temperature range of room temperature to 500 .deg C. As a result, our hydrogen sensor showed promising performance with respect to the sensitivity and the adaptability at high temperature.

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide Micro-Sensor for Biomass Fouling Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S)is the leading chemical agent causing human fatalities following inhalation exposures. The overall aim of this project is to develop and...

  1. Assembly of thermally reduced graphene oxide nanostructures by alternating current dielectrophoresis as hydrogen-gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwei; Singh, Budhi; Maeng, Sunglyul; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2013-08-01

    Chemo-resistive hydrogen-gas sensors based on thermally reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been fabricated on a micro-hotplate by positive ac dielectrophoresis (DEP). The optimized DEP parameters for manipulating rGO nanostructures into Au electrodes for hydrogen sensing are: applied frequency = 1 MHz, peak-to-peak voltage = 5 V, and DEP time = 30 s. The device exhibits good sensitivity (˜6%) with fast response time (˜11 s) and recovery time (˜36 s) for 200 ppm hydrogen gas at room temperature. This result indicates that the DEP process has great potential for assembling rGO for hydrogen-gas sensor in many industrial and scientific applications.

  2. Electrochemical behavior of hydrogen peroxide sensor based on new methylene blue as mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jie; WU Hai; ZHU Yaqi

    2007-01-01

    A novel amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor was proposed by co-immobilizing new methylene blue (NMB) and Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on glassy carbon electrode through covalent binding.The electrochemical behavior of the sensor was studied extensively in 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffering solution (pH = 7.0).The experiments showed NMB could effectively transfer electrons between hydrogen peroxide and glassy carbon electrode.The electron transfer coefficient and apparent reaction rate constant were determined to be 0.861 and 1.27 s-1.The kinetic characteristics and responses of sensor on HzO2 were investigated.The Michaelis constant is 8.27 mol/L and the linear dependence of current on H2O2 is in the range of 2.5-100 μmol/L.At the same time,the effects of solution pH,buffer capacity,and temperature on the sensor were examined.

  3. Performance of a CVD grown graphene-based planar device for a hydrogen gas sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multilayer graphene (MLG) film was grown on thermally oxidized silicon (SiO2/Si) substrate by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). The formation of the MLG and the presence of the oxide on the graphene surface were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. An energy gap of 0.234 eV was determined by the optical transmission method. The surface morphology of the graphene film was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A planar device with lateral Pd metal contacts was used for the hydrogen sensor studies. The sensor performance in the temperature range (110 °C–150 °C) revealed a relatively fast response (∼12 s) and recovery (∼24 s) for hydrogen sensing. The reproducibility, the selectivity, and the stability of the device were also studied. The sensor was found to be selective for hydrogen relative to methane in the temperature range studied. The gas sensing mechanism has been suggested on the basis of the interaction of palladium with hydrogen, the change in the interface barrier, and the adsorption–desorption processes related to the change in the hydrogen partial pressure and temperature. The AFM study indicates the reorientation of the graphene surface after the sensing operation, most probably due to hydrogen passivation. (paper)

  4. Performance of a CVD grown graphene-based planar device for a hydrogen gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, D.; Hazra, A.; Hazra, S. K.; Das, J.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Sarkar, C. K.; Basu, S.

    2015-11-01

    A multilayer graphene (MLG) film was grown on thermally oxidized silicon (SiO2/Si) substrate by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). The formation of the MLG and the presence of the oxide on the graphene surface were confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. An energy gap of 0.234 eV was determined by the optical transmission method. The surface morphology of the graphene film was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A planar device with lateral Pd metal contacts was used for the hydrogen sensor studies. The sensor performance in the temperature range (110 °C-150 °C) revealed a relatively fast response (~12 s) and recovery (~24 s) for hydrogen sensing. The reproducibility, the selectivity, and the stability of the device were also studied. The sensor was found to be selective for hydrogen relative to methane in the temperature range studied. The gas sensing mechanism has been suggested on the basis of the interaction of palladium with hydrogen, the change in the interface barrier, and the adsorption-desorption processes related to the change in the hydrogen partial pressure and temperature. The AFM study indicates the reorientation of the graphene surface after the sensing operation, most probably due to hydrogen passivation.

  5. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Fabricated on Atomically Flat 4H-SiC Webbed Cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Evans, Laura J.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Androjna, Drago

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on initial results from the first device tested of a "second generation" Pt-SiC Schottky diode hydrogen gas sensor that: 1) resides on the top of atomically flat 4H-SiC webbed cantilevers, 2) has integrated heater resistor, and 3) is bonded and packaged. With proper selection of heater resistor and sensor diode biases, rapid detection of H2 down to concentrations of 20 ppm was achieved. A stable sensor current gain of 125 +/- 11 standard deviation was demonstrated during 250 hours of cyclic test exposures to 0.5% H2 and N2/air.

  6. Fiber optic sensors using novel substrates for hydrogen sulfide determination by solid surface fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Eroğlu, Ahmet E.; Volkan, Mürvet; Ataman, O. Yavuz

    2000-01-01

    Two different fiber optic sensors were developed for the determination of hydrogen sulfide at ppb concentration levels; a probe-type fiber optic sensor coated with polyethylene oxide containing 0.5 M CdCl2 and a fiber optic sensor utilizing 0.5 M CdCl2-pretreated filter paper as solid substrate. In the first type, CdCl2–polyethyleneoxide (PEO) mixture was coated onto the tip of a fiber optic probe and the probe was exposed to H2S. The methodology is based on the measurement of CdS fluorescenc...

  7. Gas Phase Fabrication of Pd-Ni Nanoparticle Arrays for Hydrogen Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pd-Ni nanoparticles have been fabricated by gas aggregation process. The formation of Pd-Ni nano-alloys was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. By depositing Pd-Ni nanoparticles on the interdigital electrodes, quantum conductance-based hydrogen sensors were fabricated. The Ni content in the nanoparticle showed an obvious effect on the hydrogen response behavior corresponding to the conductance change of the nanoparticle film. Three typical response regions with different conductance-hydrogen pressure correlations were observed. It was found that the α-β phase transition region of palladium hydride moves to significant higher hydrogen pressure with the addition of nickel element, which greatly enhance the hydrogen sensing performance of the nanoparticle film.

  8. Role of oxygen in high temperature hydrogen sulfide detection using MISiC sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the sensitivity of a MISiC capacitor sensor with a catalytic top contact to gas mixtures, including hydrogen sulfide, at temperatures in excess of 300 °C. The gas concentration may be extracted from the change in leakage current through the capacitor and exposure to H2S gives a response similar to that observed in hydrogen. This indicates that the decomposition of the H2S on the catalytic contact is forming atomic hydrogen, which forms a dipole layer at the dielectric/SiO2 interface. Exposure to oxygen and H2S simultaneously gives a larger hydrogen-like response, which is contrary to that observed when hydrogen and oxygen are mixed. We suggest that this response is related to the influence of the choice of dielectric used to fabricate the capacitor structure, offering the opportunity to develop array technology for unique identification of gas species in a mixture

  9. A distributed optical fiber sensor for hydrogen detection based on Pd, and Mg alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrotton, C.; Slaman, M.; Javahiraly, N.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.; Meyrueis, P.

    2010-01-01

    An optical fiber containing structured hydrogen sensing points, consisting of Palladium and/or Magnesium alloys is proposed and characterized. The sensitive layer is deposited on the outside of a multimode fiber, after removing the optical cladding. The sensor is based on a measurement technique whi

  10. Fiber optic Surface Plasmon Resonance sensor based on wavelength modulation for hydrogen sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrotton, C.; Javahiraly, N.; Slaman, M.J.; Dam, B.; Meyrueis, P.

    2011-01-01

    A new design of a fiber optic Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensor using Palladium as a sensitive layer for hydrogen detection is presented. In this approach, a transducer layer is deposited on the outside of a multimode fiber, after removing the optical cladding. The transducer layer is a multila

  11. Demonstration of a Prototype Hydrogen Sensor and Electronics Package - Progress Report 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Amanda S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brosha, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-14

    This is the second progress report on the demonstration of a prototype hydrogen sensor and electronics package. It goes into detail about the five tasks, four of which are already completed as of August 2016, with the final to be completed by January 26, 2017. Then the budget is detailed along with the planned work for May 27, 2016 to July 27, 2016.

  12. Determination of hydrogen permeation using metallic sensors of construction similar to bimetallic thermocouples; Determinacao de permeacao de hidrogenio utilizando sensores metalicos de construcao similar a termopares bimetalicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maul, Alexandre M. [Ministerio de Ciencia e Tecnologia (MCT), Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia e Processos (PIPE- PRH-24/ANP); Ponte, Haroldo A. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Correa, Luiz A. [Metaldata Tecnologia de Materiais, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)] (in Memoriam)

    2004-07-01

    Crude oils range in consistency from water to tar-like solids, and in color from clear to black. An average crude oil contains about 84 percent carbon, 14 percent hydrogen, 1 to 3 percent sulfur, and less than 1 percent each of nitrogen, oxygen, metals, and salts. Crude oils are generally classified as paraffinic, naphthenic, or aromatic based on the predominant proportion of similar hydrocarbon molecules. Refinery crude base stocks usually consist of mixtures of two or more different crude oils. Many corrosive processes found in machines, equipment and pipes used in the petroleum industry are directly influenced by hydrogen. The structural damages are caused by hydrogen inclusion in metallic structures, generated by acid media that contain free protons (H{sup +}), by chemical processes that lead to the protons formation, by formation of atomic hydrogen (H0) or even by adsorbed gas hydrogen (H2). The structural damages are varied: hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), blistering, stress corrosion cracking (SSC), stress oriented hydrogen induced cracking (SOHIC). The main problem found in practice is how to detect, in a safe, fast and economically viable way, the formation of hydrogen close to a surface subjected to hydrogen permeation. Within this work, we built a cell for hydrogen generation/permeation to study and evaluate a new hydrogen sensor. This new sensor is composed of two parts, each one build with a couple of dissimilar materials, being a sensor couple, for hydrogen flux measurement, and a reference couple, for temperature corrections. In this sensor, the changes in some physical properties are related with the flow of permeated hydrogen. The results using a prototype model showed good agreement with a traditional Devanathan-Stachurski sensor. (author)

  13. Comparison of optical fiber Bragg grating hydrogen sensors with Pd-based thin films and sol–gel WO3 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pd-based thin films and sol–gel WO3 coatings are two kinds of hydrogen sensitive elements used in hydrogen concentration sensing and detection. Optical fiber hydrogen sensors are very promising solutions for flammable hydrogen detection, when the sensitive materials are integrated with optical fiber sensors. This paper reviews the sensing performance of optical fiber hydrogen sensors with these two sensitive materials, which are developed at the National Engineering Laboratory for Optical Fiber Sensing Technologies in Wuhan University of Technology. (paper)

  14. Amperometric mediatorless hydrogen peroxide sensor with horseradish peroxidase encapsulated in peptide nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Feyzizarnagh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A mediatorless sensor with horseradish peroxidase (HRP enzymes encapsulated inside peptide nanotubes (PNTs has been proposed for amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide. PNTs not only encapsulate the enzymes to retain their activity and stability, but also can provide direct electron transfer between an electrode and the electroactive sites of HRP without mediators. Experimental results were compared with hydroquinone (HQ-mediated electron transfer results. The PNT/HRP sensor produced a current signal comparable to the HQ/HRP sensor in the entire range of hydrogen peroxide concentrations (0–60 mM. The amperometric signal was the greatest when PNT and HQ were used together. The current signal of the PNT/HQ/HRP system increased rapidly with the hydrogen peroxide concentration while the PNT/HRP and HQ/HRP systems showed a similar increase in the rate of current with hydrogen peroxide. The current-H2O2 concentration relations of the tested systems were analyzed using the Michaelis–Menten type equation. Using PNTs as immobilizing agents for enzymes may circumvent the drawbacks of chemical mediators such as HQ that may interfere with the redox reactions and may cause toxicity problems to enzymes.

  15. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes with Gold Nanoparticles to Fabricate a Sensor for Hydrogen Peroxide Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halimeh Rajabzade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive electrode was prepared based on gold nanoparticles/nanotubes/ionic liquid for measurement of Hydrogen peroxide. Gold nanoparticles of 20–25 nm were synthesized on a nanotube carbon paste electrode by cyclic voltammetry technique while the coverage was controlled by applied potential and time. The gold nanoparticles were modified to form a monolayer on CNT, followed by decoration with ionic liquid for determination of hydrogen peroxide. The experimental conditions, applied potential and pH, for hydrogen peroxide monitoring were optimized, and hydrogen peroxide was determined amperometrically at 0.3 V vs. SCE at pH 7.0. Electrocatalytic effects of gold deposited CNT were observed with respect to unmodified one. The sensitivity obtained was 5 times higher for modified one. The presence of Au particles in the matrix of CNTs provides an environment for the enhanced electrocatalytic activities. The sensor has a high sensitivity, quickly response to H2O2 and good stability. The synergistic influence of MWNT, Au particles and IL contributes to the excellent performance for the sensor. The sensor responds to H2O2 in the linear range from 0.02 µM to 0.3 mM. The detection limit was down to 0.4 µM when the signal to noise ratio is 3.

  16. Study on In-Situ Diffusible Hydrogen Sensor for Welded Hsla Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeong-Do; Kim, Yang-Do; Kim, Young-Seok; Olson, David L.

    2008-02-01

    Diffusible hydrogen contents of welds need to be measured to avoid hydrogen cracking in weldment of high strength steels. Unlike other elements in weld metal, hydrogen diffuses very quickly at normal room temperature, and hence, difficulties occur in accurate measurement. Several methods are currently being used, which are the Japanese method (JIS Z 313-1975), the International Institute of Welding (IIW) method (ISO 3690-1977), and the AWS standard (ANSI/AWS A4.3-93). However, these methods do not give identical results when applied to identical conditions. Therefore, this investigation was attempting to correlate the measured TEP (Thermo Electric Power) coefficient values with diffusible hydrogen content measured by AWS standard method. TEP measurement was studied for application as in-situ diffusible hydrogen sensor for welded HSLA (High Strength Low alloy) steel. The results of TEP measurement are shown to be sensitive to the weld diffusible hydrogen content in low temperature (-80 °C) measurement and almost thirty times faster than standard diffusible hydrogen test.

  17. New Nanomaterials and Luminescent Optical Sensors for Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Burmistrova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate methods that can continuously detect low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 have a huge application potential in biological, pharmaceutical, clinical and environmental analysis. Luminescent probes and nanomaterials are used for fabrication of sensors for H2O2 that can be applied for these purposes. In contrast to previous reviews focusing on the chemical design of molecular probes for H2O2, this mini-review highlights the latest luminescent nanoparticular materials and new luminescent optical sensors for H2O2 in terms of the nanomaterial composition and luminescent receptor used in the sensors. The nanomaterial section is subdivided into schemes based on gold nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles with embedded enzymes, probes showing aggregation-induced emission enhancement, quantum dots, lanthanide-based nanoparticles and carbon based nanomaterials, respectively. Moreover, the sensors are ordered according to the type of luminescent receptor used within the sensor membranes. Among them are lanthanide complexes, metal-ligand complexes, oxidic nanoparticles and organic dyes. Further, the optical sensors are confined to those that are capable to monitor the concentration of H2O2 in a sample over time or are reusable. Optical sensors responding to gaseous H2O2 are not covered. All nanomaterials and sensors are characterized with respect to the analytical reaction towards H2O2, limit of detection (LOD, analytical range, electrolyte, pH and response time/incubation time. Applications to real samples are given. Finally, we assess the suitability of the nanomaterials to be used in membrane-based sensors and discuss future trends and perspectives of these sensors in biomedical research.

  18. Note: Durability analysis of optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on Pd-Y alloy film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng-cheng; Chen, You-ping; Zhang, Gang; Song, Han; Liu, Yi

    2016-02-01

    The Pd-Y alloy sensing film has an excellent property for hydrogen detection, but just for one month, the sensing film's property decreases seriously. To study the failure of the sensing film, the XPS spectra analysis was used to explore the chemical content of the Pd-Y alloy film, and analysis results demonstrate that the yttrium was oxidized. The paper presented that such an oxidized process was the potential reason of the failure of the sensing film. By understanding the reason of the failure of the sensing film better, we could improve the manufacturing process to enhance the property of hydrogen sensor. PMID:26931903

  19. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Sensor Deposited on Integrated Circuit for Radiation Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Despeisse, M; Anelli, G.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J; Moraes, D.; A. Nardulli(Institute for Particle Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland); Powolny, F; Wyrsch, N

    2008-01-01

    Radiation detectors based on the deposition of a 10 to 30 μm thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) sensor directly on top of integrated circuits have been developed. The performance of this detector technology has been assessed for the first time in the context of particle detectors. Three different circuits were designed in a quarter micron CMOS technology for these studies. The so-called TFA (Thin-Film on ASIC) detectors obtained after deposition of a-Si:H sensors on the developed c...

  20. Hydrogen gas sensor based on metal oxide nanoparticles decorated graphene transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhangyuan; Zou, Xuming; Xu, Lei; Liao, Lei; Liu, Wei; Ho, Johnny; Xiao, Xiangheng; Jiang, Changzhong; Li, Jinchai

    2015-05-01

    In this work, in order to enhance the performance of graphene gas sensors, graphene and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are combined to be utilized for high selectivity and fast response gas detection. Whether at the relatively optimal temperature or even room temperature, our gas sensors based on graphene transistors, decorated with SnO2 NPs, exhibit fast response and short recovery times (~1 seconds) at 50 °C when the hydrogen concentration is 100 ppm. Specifically, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy are employed to explore the interface properties between graphene and SnO2 NPs. Through the complimentary characterization, a mechanism based on charge transfer and band alignment is elucidated to explain the physical originality of these graphene gas sensors: high carrier mobility of graphene and small energy barrier between graphene and SnO2 NPs have ensured a fast response and a high sensitivity and selectivity of the devices. Generally, these gas sensors will facilitate the rapid development of next-generation hydrogen gas detection.In this work, in order to enhance the performance of graphene gas sensors, graphene and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are combined to be utilized for high selectivity and fast response gas detection. Whether at the relatively optimal temperature or even room temperature, our gas sensors based on graphene transistors, decorated with SnO2 NPs, exhibit fast response and short recovery times (~1 seconds) at 50 °C when the hydrogen concentration is 100 ppm. Specifically, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy are employed to explore the interface properties between graphene and SnO2 NPs. Through the complimentary characterization, a mechanism based on charge transfer and band alignment is elucidated to explain the physical originality of these graphene gas sensors: high carrier mobility of graphene and small energy barrier between graphene and SnO2 NPs have ensured a

  1. Temperature response and durability characterization of an optical fiber sensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen peroxide is a precursor to damage mechanisms in numerous applications; its monitoring is important and challenging. The effect of temperature on the performance and durability of a recently developed optical fiber sensors sensitive to the presence of hydrogen peroxide in low concentrations is investigated. The sensors are fabricated by immobilizing Prussian blue within a multilayer of electrostatically self-assembled polyelectrolytes. The sensing principle of this optical electrode relies on the change in the intensity of the reflected light when Prussian white is oxidized back to the blue state due to the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The amplitude of the intensity of the reflected light is found to vary with temperature in a quadratic fashion, but the characteristic response time which correlates with concentration remains constant. Thus the sensing device retains its abilities to determine and quantify the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in a liquid solution. Additionally, the degradation of these fiber sensors when subjected to high temperature is examined. Four optical fiber sensing devices were subjected to different testing conditions and a characterization protocol that included: measurement of the intensity of the cyanide stretch (2150 cm−1) via Raman micro spectroscopy; imaging with scanning electron microscopy; and measurement of the presence of iron ions using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show a gradual degradation of the sensing device as a result of progressive desorption of the polyelectrolyte multilayer structure that leads to leaching of the Prussian reagent. This degradation mechanism does not compromise the functionality of the device which is found sufficiently robust for multiple tests at high temperature. The simplicity of this sensing system combined with its relative robustness and reusability make it a good a good candidate for minimally intrusive and localized monitoring of hydrogen peroxide formation in

  2. A Hydrogen Ion-Selective Sensor Based on Non-Plasticised Methacrylic-acrylic Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Ahmad

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A methacrylic-acrylic polymer was synthesised for use as a non-plasticised membrane for hydrogen ion-selective sensor incorporating tridodecylamine as an ionophore. The copolymer consisted of methyl methacrylate and n-butyl acrylate monomers in a ratio of 2:8. Characterisation of the copolymer using FTNMR demonstrated that the amount of each monomer incorporated during solution polymerisation was found to be similar to the amount used in the feed before polymerisation. The glass transition temperature of the copolymer determined by differential scanning calorimetry was -30.9 ºC. Potentiometric measurements conducted showed a linear pH response range of 4.3 – 9.6 with the response slope of 56.7 mV/decade. The selectivity of the sensors towards hydrogen ions was similar to other plasticiser based membrane electrodes and the logarithmic selectivity coefficients for discrimination against interference cations is close to –9.7. However, the incorporation of a lipophilic anion as membrane additive is essential in ensuring optimum performance of the hydrogen ion sensor.

  3. Hydrogen gas sensor based on metal oxide nanoparticles decorated graphene transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhangyuan; Zou, Xuming; Xu, Lei; Liao, Lei; Liu, Wei; Ho, Johnny; Xiao, Xiangheng; Jiang, Changzhong; Li, Jinchai

    2015-06-14

    In this work, in order to enhance the performance of graphene gas sensors, graphene and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are combined to be utilized for high selectivity and fast response gas detection. Whether at the relatively optimal temperature or even room temperature, our gas sensors based on graphene transistors, decorated with SnO2 NPs, exhibit fast response and short recovery times (∼1 seconds) at 50 °C when the hydrogen concentration is 100 ppm. Specifically, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy are employed to explore the interface properties between graphene and SnO2 NPs. Through the complimentary characterization, a mechanism based on charge transfer and band alignment is elucidated to explain the physical originality of these graphene gas sensors: high carrier mobility of graphene and small energy barrier between graphene and SnO2 NPs have ensured a fast response and a high sensitivity and selectivity of the devices. Generally, these gas sensors will facilitate the rapid development of next-generation hydrogen gas detection.

  4. Miniaturized metal (metal alloy)/ PdO.sub.x/SiC hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO.sub.x ). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600.degree. C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sized sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  5. Miniaturized Metal (Metal Alloy)/PdO(x)/SiC Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO(x)). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600 C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sided sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  6. An ultra-sensitive hydrogen gas sensor using reduced graphene oxide-loaded ZnO nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Abideen, Zain; Kim, Hyoun Woo; Kim, Sang Sub

    2015-10-28

    We developed a hydrogen sensor of reduced graphene oxide-loaded ZnO nanofibers. An extremely high response of about 866 at a low concentration of 100 ppb was obtained. The combined effect of the presence of rGO nanosheets and hydrogen-induced metallization of ZnO played a crucial role in enhancing the detection behavior. PMID:26344787

  7. Temperature dependent dual hydrogen sensor response of Pd nanoparticle decorated Al doped ZnO surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, D.; Barman, P. B.; Hazra, S. K., E-mail: surajithazra@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Jaypee University of Information Technology, Waknaghat, Solan, Himachal Pradesh-173234 (India); Dutta, D. [IC Design and Fabrication Centre, Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032 (India); Kumar, M.; Som, T. [SUNAG Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)

    2015-10-28

    Sputter deposited Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films exhibit a dual hydrogen sensing response in the temperature range 40 °C–150 °C after surface modifications with palladium nanoparticles. The unmodified AZO films showed no response in hydrogen in the temperature range 40 °C–150 °C. The operational temperature windows on the low and high temperature sides have been estimated by isolating the semiconductor-to-metal transition temperature zone of the sensor device. The gas response pattern was modeled by considering various adsorption isotherms, which revealed the dominance of heterogeneous adsorption characteristics. The Arrhenius adsorption barrier showed dual variation with change in hydrogen gas concentration on either side of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen gas response pattern by considering the changes in nano palladium due to hydrogen adsorption, and semiconductor-to-metal transition of nanocrystalline Al doped ZnO layer due to temperature, along with material characterization studies by glancing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, are presented.

  8. Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) gas sensors from viral-templated nanocrystalline gold nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chung Hee; Zhang, Miluo; Myung, Nosang V.; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-01

    A facile, site-specific viral-templated assembly method was used to fabricate sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors at room temperature. A gold-binding M13 bacteriophage served to organize gold nanoparticles into linear arrays which were used as seeds for subsequent nanowire formation through electroless deposition. Nanowire widths and densities within the sensors were modified by electroless deposition time and phage concentration, respectively, to tune device resistance. Chemiresistive H2S gas sensors with superior room temperature sensing performance were produced with sensitivity of 654%/ppmv, theoretical lowest detection limit of 2 ppbv, and 70% recovery within 9 min for 0.025 ppmv. The role of the viral template and associated gold-binding peptide was elucidated by removing organics using a short O2 plasma treatment followed by an ethanol dip. The template and gold-binding peptide were crucial to electrical and sensor performance. Without surface organics, the resistance fell by several orders of magnitude, the sensitivity dropped by more than a factor of 100 to 6%/ppmv, the lower limit of detection increased, and no recovery was detected with dry air flow. Viral templates provide a novel, alternative fabrication route for highly sensitive, nanostructured H2S gas sensors.

  9. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Sensor Deposited on Integrated Circuit for Radiation Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Despeisse, M; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; Moraes, D; Nardulli, A; Powolny, F; Wyrsch, N

    2008-01-01

    Radiation detectors based on the deposition of a 10 to 30 mum thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) sensor directly on top of integrated circuits have been developed. The performance of this detector technology has been assessed for the first time in the context of particle detectors. Three different circuits were designed in a quarter micron CMOS technology for these studies. The so-called TFA (Thin-Film on ASIC) detectors obtained after deposition of a-Si:H sensors on the developed circuits are presented. High internal electric fields (104 to 105 V/cm) can be built in the a-Si:H sensor and overcome the low mobility of electrons and holes in this amorphous material. However, the deposited sensor's leakage current at such fields turns out to be an important parameter which limits the performance of a TFA detector. Its detailed study is presented as well as the detector's pixel segmentation. Signal induction by generated free carrier motion in the a-Si:H sensor has been characterized using a 660 nm pul...

  10. Pt–Ti–O gate silicon–metal–insulator–semiconductor field-effect transistor hydrogen gas sensors in harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usagawa, Toshiyuki; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Nambu, Akira; Yoneyama, Akio; Kikuchi, Yota; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    The influence of radiation damages to developed hydrogen gas sensor chips from γ-rays (60Co) and/or X-rays (synchrotron radiation) is manageably avoided for sensor operations even at extremely high integral doses such as 1.8 and/or 18 MGy. Platinum–titanium–oxygen (Pt–Ti–O) gate silicon–metal–insulator–semiconductor field-effect transistor (Si-MISFET) hydrogen gas sensors can work stably as hydrogen sensors up to about 270 °C and also show environmental hardness as follows: When nitrogen-diluted 10-ppm hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) was exposed to the sensor FETs for 40 min at a working temperature of 115 °C, large sensing amplitude (ΔV g) changed little within repetition errors before and after HMDS exposures. The variations of ΔV g among relative humidity of 20 and 80% are very small within ±4.4% around 50% under 40 °C atmosphere. The Pt–Ti–O sensors have been found to show large ΔV g of 624.4 mV with σΔV g of 7.27 mV for nine times repeated measurements under nitrogen-diluted 1.0%-hydrogen gas, which are nearly the same values of 654.5 mV with σΔV g of 3.77 mV under air-diluted 1.0%-hydrogen gas.

  11. Development of a handheld sensor system system for the online measurement of hydrogen peroxide in aseptic filling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisert, Steffen; Schoening, Michael J. [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Juelich (Germany); Henkel, Hartmut; Schneider, Andreas; Schaefer, Daniel [von Hoerner and Sulger GmbH, Schwetzingen (Germany); Friedrich, Peter [Aseptiksysteme and Foodtechnologie, Linnich (Germany); Berger, Joerg [Filldesign GmbH, Moenchengladbach (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    A handheld sensor system for the online measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in aseptic sterilisation processes has been developed. It is based on a calorimetric-type gas sensor that consists of a differential set-up of two temperature sensors, of which one is catalytically activated and the second one is passivated and used as reference. The sensor principle relies in detecting a rise in temperature on the active sensor due to the exothermic reaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on the catalytic surface. To characterise the sensor system towards H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensitivity and other influencing factors, measurements have been carried out both at an experimental set-up and a manufacturer's sterilisation machine. Physical sensor characterisation was done by means of the optical microscopy. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. The role of W doping in response of hydrogen sensors based on MAO titania films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anatase TiO2 and W doped TiO2 films were fabricated by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) on titanium substrates and their hydrogen sensing properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the oxide films and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was applied to investigate the gas sensing mechanism. It is found that the conductivity of TiO2 films varies with the introduction of W dopant. EIS analysis reveals that the grains and especially the grain boundaries are mainly contributed to the hydrogen response and their equivalent circuits could be represented electrochemically by parallel resistor and constant phase element (CPE). The enhanced sensor signal at higher measuring temperature (300 deg. C) is observed with an optimal doping concentration of W ions (1.81 at.%).

  13. Alternating Current Dielectrophoresis Optimization of Pt-Decorated Graphene Oxide Nanostructures for Proficient Hydrogen Gas Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwei; Rathi, Servin; Singh, Budhi; Lee, Inyeal; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2015-07-01

    Alternating current dielectrophoresis (DEP) is an excellent technique to assemble nanoscale materials. For efficient DEP, the optimization of the key parameters like peak-to-peak voltage, applied frequency, and processing time is required for good device. In this work, we have assembled graphene oxide (GO) nanostructures mixed with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles between the micro gap electrodes for a proficient hydrogen gas sensors. The Pt-decorated GO nanostructures were well located between a pair of prepatterned Ti/Au electrodes by controlling the DEP technique with the optimized parameters and subsequently thermally reduced before sensing. The device fabricated using the DEP technique with the optimized parameters showed relatively high sensitivity (∼10%) to 200 ppm hydrogen gas at room temperature. The results indicates that the device could be used in several industry applications, such as gas storage and leak detection. PMID:26042360

  14. Development of hydrogen sensors based on polymeric and ceramic proton conductors

    OpenAIRE

    Sakthivel, Mariappan

    2006-01-01

    An all-solid-state hydrogen sensor working under short circuit amperometric conditions at low temperature with minor water maintenance has been developed. A simple and upscaleable method for the preparation of platinum metal nanoparticles were deposited onto the surface of a perfluorinated ion-exchange membrane without a binder by impregnation-reduction (I-R) of a cationic precursor salt. The I-R method, utilizes reactions of a tetraammine platinum(II) chloride hydrate [Pt(NH3)4]Cl2 solution ...

  15. New optical paper sensor for in situ measurement of hydrogen sulphide in waters and atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla-Tolós, J; Moliner-Martínez, Y; Verdú-Andrés, J; Casanova-Chafer, J; Molins-Legua, C; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2016-08-15

    A novel and low-cost colorimetric sensor for the determination of hydrogen sulphide in environmental samples has been developed. This sensor is based on the immobilization of the reagent N,N-Dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine and FeCl3 in paper support, in which the H2S is adsorbed in order to give rise to the formation of methylene blue as reaction product. The sensor has been applied to determine H2S in water and air samples. Two different sampling systems for H2S caption from the air have been assayed: active and passive sampling. The analytical properties of the different systems have been obtained and compared. The analytical signals, corresponding to the methylene blue, have been obtained measuring the absorbance by conventional reflectance diffuse or using different algorithms for quantifying color intensity. The results obtained with both measurement procedures were comparable, with a detection limit of 1.11 and 1.12mLm(-3) for air samples (active and passive), and 0.5mgL(-1) for water samples. The developed sensor provides good accuracy and precision (RSD<12%) and simplifies significantly the analytical measurements because it avoids the need of preparing derivatization reagents, sample handling and allows in situ measurements. The reaction product obtained is highly stable in this support and no provide any blank signal. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method exhibit excellent visual sensitivity for the naked eye procedure, making the detection of H2S possible. PMID:27260438

  16. Printed hydrogen sulfide gas sensor on paper substrate based on polyaniline composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication of a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) sensor based on polyaniline (PANI)-metal salt (CuCl2) composite is demonstrated. The sensing film was produced by screen printing and spray coating of the sensing material on interdigitated silver electrodes inkjet-printed on a paper substrate. The H2S sensing functionality with respect to pH and metal salt concentration was optimized. In addition, the long term stability and humidity effects on the sensor performance were investigated. The printed chemiresistors showed more than five orders of magnitude change in resistance within 20 min of exposure of 15 ppm H2S at room temperature. The relatively fast kinetics and large response of the sensor can be explained by the formation of Cu2S and subsequent protonation of PANI. In addition, the relatively large roughness and porosity of the paper substrate offers an increased surface sensing area. - Highlights: • pH, salt concentration, film thickness, cross sensitivity • Printed sensor on paper substrate • Commercial polyaniline against special morphologies

  17. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensors based on thin film on ASIC technology

    CERN Document Server

    Despeisse, M; Anelli, G; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; Rusack, R; Saramad, S; Wyrsch, N

    2006-01-01

    The performance and limitations of a novel detector technology based on the deposition of a thin-film sensor on top of processed integrated circuits have been studied. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films have been deposited on top of CMOS circuits developed for these studies and the resulting "thin-film on ASIC" (TFA) detectors are presented. The leakage current of the a-Si:H sensor at high reverse biases turns out to be an important parameter limiting the performance of a TFA detector. Its detailed study and the pixel segmentation of the detector are presented. High internal electric fields (in the order of 10/sup 4/-10/sup 5/ V/cm) can be built in the a-Si:H sensor and overcome the low mobility of electrons and holes in a-Si:H. Signal induction by generated carrier motion and speed in the a-Si:H sensor have been studied with a 660 nm pulsed laser on a TFA detector based on an ASIC integrating 5 ns peaking time pre- amplifiers. The measurement set-up also permits to study the depletion of the senso...

  18. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for detection of hydrogen chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Hagen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A laser-based cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS sensor for measurement of hydrogen chloride (HCl has been developed and characterized. The instrument uses light from a distributed-feedback diode laser at 1742 nm coupled to a high finesse optical cavity to make sensitive and quantifiable concentration measurements of HCl based on optical absorption. The instrument has a (1σ limit of detection of < 20 pptv in 1 min and has high specificity to HCl. The measurement response time to changes in input HCl concentration is < 15 s. Validation studies with a previously calibrated permeation tube setup show an accuracy of better than 10%. The CRDS sensor was preliminarily tested in the field with two other HCl instruments (mist chamber and chemical ionization mass spectrometry, all of which were in broad agreement. The mist chamber and CRDS sensors both showed a 400 pptv plume within 50 pptv agreement. The sensor also allows simultaneous sensitive measurements of water and methane, and minimal hardware modification would allow detection of other near-infrared absorbers.

  19. Non-Intrusive, Real-Time, On-Line Temperature Sensor for Superheated Hydrogen at High Pressure and High Flow Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SSC needs a hydrogen temperature sensor that can provide high accuracy, fast response and can be operated on a superheated hydrogen (SHH2) environment. This...

  20. A hydrogen gas sensor using a Pt-sputtered MWCNTs/ZnO nanostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, a hydrogen gas sensor of moderate sensitivity utilizing multiwalled carbon nanotubes partially decorated with zinc oxide nanoparticles (MWCNTs/ZnO) has been fabricated. To further enhance its sensitivity, nanoparticles of platinum (Pt) metal have been deposited via a sputtering technique on the MWCNTs/ZnO layer. The sensing materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The MWCNTs/ZnO/Pt sensor shows a low recovery time of ∼78 s and good repeatability when exposed to a 0.05% concentration of H2 gas at room temperature. Moreover, the sensitivity achieved for the MWCNTs/ZnO/Pt sensor is 4.2% as compared to 1.6% for MWCNTs/ZnO for 1% concentration of H2 gas. To the best of our knowledge, such a low concentration of H2 gas detection is reported for the first time using a MWCNTs/ZnO/Pt hybrid nanostructure at room temperature. (paper)

  1. Study and characterization of an integrated circuit-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensor for the detection of particles and radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Next generation experiments at the European laboratory of particle physics (CERN) require particle detector alternatives to actual silicon detectors. This thesis presents a novel detector technology, which is based on the deposition of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensor on top of an integrated circuit. Performance and limitations of this technology have been assessed for the first time in this thesis in the context of particle detectors. Specific integrated circuits have been designed and the detector segmentation, the interface sensor-chip and the sensor leakage current have been studied in details. The signal induced by the track of an ionizing particle in the sensor has been characterized and results on the signal speed, amplitude and on the sensor resistance to radiation are presented. The results are promising regarding the use of this novel technology for radiation detection, though limitations have been shown for particle physics application. (author)

  2. Green synthesis of nanosilver as a sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vineet K; Yadav, Raghvendra S; Yadav, Poonam; Pandey, Avinash C

    2012-04-30

    Present "green" synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach for nanosilver formation, which offers numerous benefits over physiochemical approaches. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern suggests the formation and crystallinity of nanosilver. The average particle size of silver nanoparticles was 8.25±1.37 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows a characteristic absorption peak of silver nanoparticles at 410 nm. FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation. In addition, the nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The produced nanosilver is stable and comparable in size. These silver nanoparticles show potential applications in the field of sensors, catalysis, fuel cells and nanodevices.

  3. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor based on an etched Bragg grating coated with palladium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, L; de Almeida, J M M M; Santos, J L; Viegas, D

    2015-12-10

    A study of a sensor for hydrogen (H2) detection based on fiber Bragg gratings coated with palladium (Pd) with self-temperature compensation is presented. The cladding around the gratings was reduced down to 50 μm diameter by a chemical etching process. One of the gratings was left uncoated, and the other was coated with 150 nm of Pd. It was observed that palladium hydride has unstable behavior in environments with high humidity level. A simple solution to overcome this problem based on a Teflon tape is presented. The sensing device studied was able to respond to H2 concentrations in the range 0%-1% v/v at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, achieving sensitivities larger than 20 pm/% v/v. Considering H2 concentrations in nitrogen up to 1%, the performance of the sensing head was characterized for different thicknesses of Pd coating ranging from 50 to 200 nm. PMID:26836856

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on Schottky-contacted vertically aligned ZnO nanorod-based hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranwa, Sapana; Singh Barala, Surendra; Fanetti, Mattia; Kumar, Mahesh

    2016-08-01

    We report the impact of gamma irradiation on the performance of a gold Schottky-contacted ZnO nanorod-based hydrogen sensor. RF-sputtered vertically aligned highly c-axis-oriented ZnO NRs were grown on Si(100) substrate. X-ray diffraction shows no significant change in crystal structure at low gamma doses from 1 to 5 kGy. As gamma irradiation doses increase to 10 kGy, the single crystalline ZnO structure converts to polycrystalline. The photoluminescence spectra also shows suppression of the near-band emission peak and the huge wide-band spectrum indicates the generation of structural defects at high gamma doses. At 1 kGy, the hydrogen sensor response was enhanced from 67% to 77% for 1% hydrogen in pure argon at a 150 °C operating temperature. However, at 10 kGy, the relative response decreases to 33.5%. High gamma irradiation causes displacement damage and defects in ZnO NRs, and as a result, degrades the sensor’s performance as a result. Low gamma irradiation doses activate the ZnO NR surface through ionization, which enhances the sensor performance. The relative response of the hydrogen sensor was enhanced by ∼14.9% with respect to pristine ZnO using 1 kGy gamma ray treatment.

  5. Green synthesis of nanosilver as a sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Vineet K., E-mail: vineet2shukla@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Application Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Yadav, Raghvendra S. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Yadav, Poonam [National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Pandey, Avinash C. [Nanotechnology Application Centre, Faculty of Science, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Present 'green' synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TEM shows average particle size of 8.25 {+-} 1.37 nm of synthesized nanosilver, giving UV-vis absorption at 410 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation (stability up to three months). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recovery percentage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in water is 92-105%, which is applicable for sensors and water/waste water plants. - Abstract: Present 'green' synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach for nanosilver formation, which offers numerous benefits over physiochemical approaches. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern suggests the formation and crystallinity of nanosilver. The average particle size of silver nanoparticles was 8.25 {+-} 1.37 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows a characteristic absorption peak of silver nanoparticles at 410 nm. FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation. In addition, the nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The produced nanosilver is stable and comparable in size. These silver nanoparticles show potential applications in the field of sensors, catalysis, fuel cells and nanodevices.

  6. Fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor utilizing surface plasmon resonance and native defects of zinc oxide by palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an experimental study on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor employing a palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposite (ZnO(1−x)Pdx, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.85) layer over the silver coated unclad core of the fiber. Palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposites (ZnO(1−x)Pdx)  are prepared by a chemical route for different composition ratios and their structural, morphological and hydrogen sensing properties are investigated experimentally. The sensing principle involves the absorption of hydrogen gas by ZnO(1−x)Pdx, altering its dielectric function. The change in the dielectric constant is analyzed in terms of the red shift of the resonance wavelength in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. To check the sensing capability of sensing probes fabricated with varying composition ratio (x) of nanocomposite, the SPR curves are recorded typically for 0% H2 and 4% H2 in N2 atmosphere for each fabricated probe. On changing the concentration of hydrogen gas from 0% to 4%, the red shift in the SPR spectrum confirms the change in dielectric constant of ZnO(1−x)Pdx on exposure to hydrogen gas. It is noted that the shift in the SPR spectrum increases monotonically up to a certain fraction of Pd in zinc oxide, beyond which it starts decreasing. SEM images and the photoluminescence (PL) spectra reveal that Pd dopant atoms substitutionally incorporated into the ZnO lattice profoundly affect its defect levels; this is responsible for the optimal composition of ZnO(1−x)Pdx to sense the hydrogen gas. The sensor is highly selective to hydrogen gas and possesses high sensitivity. Since optical fiber sensing technology is employed along with the SPR technique, the present sensor is capable of remote sensing and online monitoring of hydrogen gas. (paper)

  7. High surface area polyaniline nanofiber synthesized in compressed CO{sub 2} and its application to a hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Quoc Minh; Kim, Sunwook [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    High surface area polyaniline (HSA PANI) nanofibers were synthesized through oxidative polymerization of aniline in compressed CO{sub 2} using cobalt chloride as an additive. SEM and TEM analyses showed that the HSA PANI nanofibers had a coarse surface of very thin nanofibers. The HSA PANI nanofibers had a fairly uniform diameter range of 70-90 nm with a length of 0.5-1 μm, and showed an electrical conductivity (EC) of 3.46 S/cm. TGA analysis revealed that the HSA PANI nanofibers had more doping substances than did ordinary PANI nanofibers. In the case of the HSA PANI nanofibers, direct measurement of the surface area using gas adsorption method showed high value of 68.4m{sup 2}/g, which was nearly twice that of ordinary PANI nanofibers. The HSA PANI nanofibers were used to fabricate the hydrogen sensor, exhibiting a large increase in resistance upon exposure to hydrogen gas. The hydrogen sensor in this work showed excellent characteristics, such as high sensitivity and short response time. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the hydrogen sensor were very low to show 40 ppm and 133 ppm of hydrogen, respectively.

  8. Effect of the Pd-Au thin film thickness uniformity on the performance of an optical fiber hydrogen sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna-Moreno, Donato [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica A. C., Loma del Bosque 115, Leon GTO, 37150 (Mexico)]. E-mail: dluna@cio.mx; Monzon-Hernandez, David [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica A. C., Loma del Bosque 115, Leon GTO, 37150 (Mexico)

    2007-08-31

    Thin alloy film of Pd and Au, formed by simultaneous electron-beam and thermal evaporation techniques, respectively, is used in the design of an optical fiber hydrogen sensor. The sensor consists of a multimode fiber (MMF) in which a short section of single mode fiber (SMF), coated with the Pd-Au thin film, is inserted. Due to core diameter mismatch, the SMF cladding guides light, allowing the interaction between the sensing layer and the guided light. When the sensor is exposed to hydrogen, the Pd-Au layer refractive index diminishes and causes attenuation changes on the transmitted light. Several samples with different layer thickness uniformity were fabricated and tested in a very simple experimental set-up. We have observed that the sensor signal change is dependant on layer thickness uniformity, since the effective interaction length between the evanescent field and the sensing layer is increased. By contrast, such uniformity practically has no influence on the time response of the sensor. The resulting Pd-Au film can detect 4% hydrogen with a response time of 15 s.

  9. Micro-reactor for heterogeneous catalysis. Applications: hydrogen storage in hydrocarbons and filter for gas sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manuscript presents the design and the use of silicon micro-structured reactor for heterogeneous catalysis and especially for the dehydrogenation of methyl-cyclohexane reaction. This reaction enables on one hand to store hydrogen and on the other hand to realize technological developments since it is endothermic and difficult to carry out. By consequence, a new micro-reactor obtained by DRIE was designed and capped with a Pyrex wafer. It bundles micro-heaters deposited by screen-printing and a high temperature metallic connection. It comprises either a catalyst coming from micro-technology, Pt film deposited by sputtering or a classic catalyst, platinum supported on alumina. For this last catalyst, the micro-reactor previously pre-oxidized is pretreated by oxygen plasma or liquid way so that the deposit to walls. The wash coat could be done in open micro-reactor by dip coating in the suspension or in closed micro-reactor under vacuum or by liquid circulation. After catalytic tests realised in a macro-reactor, the Pt/Al2O3 catalyst was chosen to be inserted in the micro-reactor. The catalytic tests realised in a micro-reactor coupled with a mass spectrometer let to show the presence of hydrogen. In parallel, the micro-reactor was used as filter to improve gas sensor selectivity. (author)

  10. Amperometric Non-Enzymatic Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Aligned Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hardan, Naif H.; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Kar Keng, Lim

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) have been synthesized via the hydrothermal process. The NRs were grown over a conductive glass substrate. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), based on the prepared ZnO NRs, was examined through the use of current-voltage measurements. The measured currents, as a function of H2O2 concentrations ranging from 10 μM to 700 μM, revealed two distinct behaviours and good performance, with a lower detection limit (LOD) of 42 μM for the low range of H2O2 concentrations (first region), and a LOD of 143.5 μM for the higher range of H2O2 concentrations (second region). The prepared ZnO NRs show excellent electrocatalytic activity. This enables a measurable and stable output current. The results were correlated with the oxidation process of the H2O2 and revealed a good performance for the ZnO NR non-enzymatic H2O2 sensor. PMID:27367693

  11. Fabrication of a novel electrochemical sensor for determination of hydrogen peroxide in different fruit juice samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nasirizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 sensor is fabricated based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNT-GCE and reactive blue 19 (RB. The charge transfer coefficient, α, and the charge transfer rate constant, ks, of RB adsorbed on MWCNT-GCE were calculated and found to be 0.44 ± 0.01 Hz and 1.9 ± 0.05 Hz, respectively. The catalysis of the electroreduction of H2O2 by RB-MWCNT-GCE is described. The RB-MWCNT-GCE shows a dramatic increase in the peak current and a decrease in the overvoltage of H2O2 electroreduction in comparison with that seen at an RB modified GCE, MWCNT modified GCE, and activated GCE. The kinetic parameters such as α and the heterogeneous rate constant, k', for the reduction of H2O2 at RB-MWCNT-GCE surface were determined using cyclic voltammetry. The detection limit of 0.27μM and three linear calibration ranges were obtained for H2O2 determination at the RB-MWCNT-GCE surface using an amperometry method. In addition, using the newly developed sensor, H2O2 was determined in real samples with satisfactory results.

  12. Amperometric Non-Enzymatic Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Aligned Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naif H. Al-Hardan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods (NRs have been synthesized via the hydrothermal process. The NRs were grown over a conductive glass substrate. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, based on the prepared ZnO NRs, was examined through the use of current-voltage measurements. The measured currents, as a function of H2O2 concentrations ranging from 10 μM to 700 μM, revealed two distinct behaviours and good performance, with a lower detection limit (LOD of 42 μM for the low range of H2O2 concentrations (first region, and a LOD of 143.5 μM for the higher range of H2O2 concentrations (second region. The prepared ZnO NRs show excellent electrocatalytic activity. This enables a measurable and stable output current. The results were correlated with the oxidation process of the H2O2 and revealed a good performance for the ZnO NR non-enzymatic H2O2 sensor.

  13. Calorimetric Thermoelectric Gas Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen, Methane and Mixed Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Hee Park

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel miniaturized calorimeter-type sensor device with a dual-catalyst structure was fabricated by integrating different catalysts on the hot (Pd/θ-Al2O3 and cold (Pt/α-Al2O3 ends of the device. The device comprises a calorimeter with a thermoelectric gas sensor (calorimetric-TGS, combining catalytic combustion and thermoelectric technologies. Its response for a model fuel gas of hydrogen and methane was investigated with various combustor catalyst compositions. The calorimetric-TGS devices detected H2, CH4, and a mixture of the two with concentrations ranging between 200 and 2000 ppm at temperatures of 100–400 °C, in terms of the calorie content of the gases. It was necessary to reduce the much higher response voltage of the TGS to H2 compared to CH4. We enhanced the H2 combustion on the cold side so that the temperature differences and response voltages to H2 were reduced. The device response to H2 combustion was reduced by 50% by controlling the Pt concentration in the Pt/α-Al2O3 catalyst on the cold side to 3 wt%.

  14. Field evaluation of dual-ended, high temperature, hydrogen tolerant fiber optic DTS sensor with compact fiber loop assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, P.E.; MacDougall, T.W.; Birritta, F. [QOREX LLC (Canada); Melnychuk, M. R.; Molzan, K. M.; Chalifoux, G. V. [Petrospec Engineering Ltd. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, monitoring temperature through the use of temperature sensors is of critical importance in optimizing well performance under thermal recovery methods. Raman type optical distributed temperature sensors (DTS) are usually used but an accuracy problem occurs due to hydrogen and measures to prevent it are not efficient at temperatures common to thermal recovery methods. The aim of this study is to present a high temperature, hydrogen tolerant DTS system incorporating a new hydrogen tolerant dual fiber downhole sensing cable. Field tests were carried out in operating SAGD wells, the DTS system was installed permanently or for run in surveys. Observations showed low cable aging and a good correlation between the system's results and downhole thermocouple references. The high temperature DTS system presented herein was proved efficient in monitoring temperature in SAGD applications and had good resistance with an expected lifetime over 10 years.

  15. Development of a Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with Inkjet-Printed Prussian Blue Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cinti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A sensor for the simple and sensitive measurement of hydrogen peroxide has been developed which is based on screen printed electrodes (SPEs modified with Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs deposited using piezoelectric inkjet printing. PBNP-modified SPEs were characterized using physical and electrochemical techniques to optimize the PBNP layer thickness and electroanalytical conditions for optimum measurement of hydrogen peroxide. Sensor optimization resulted in a limit of detection of 2 × 10−7 M, a linear range from 0 to 4.5 mM and a sensitivity of 762 μA∙mM–1∙cm–2 which was achieved using 20 layers of printed PBNPs. Sensors also demonstrated excellent reproducibility (<5% rsd.

  16. Response kinetics of a fiber-optic gas sensor using Pt/WO{sub 3} thin film to hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Okazaki, S., E-mail: sokazaki@ynu.ac.j [Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Nakagawa, H. [Research center for advanced science and technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Sone, H.; Fukuda, K. [Research and Development Division, The Institute of Applied Energy, Shinbashi SY Bldg., 1-14-2 Nishi-shinbashi 1-Choume, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0003 (Japan)

    2009-06-30

    Response kinetics of a fiber-optic hydrogen gas sensor in air- and inert-atmosphere were characterized. The sensor is mainly based on the evanescent field interaction in hydrogen sensitive cladding which is used Platinum-supported tungsten trioxide (Pt/WO{sub 3}). When the sensor was exposed to 1 vol.% H{sub 2}/air and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} gas, the changes in optical power propagating through the fiber were about 30% and 50%, respectively. The detection limit was about 0.1 vol.% in air-atmosphere. The humidity dependence of the response kinetics was also evaluated. While the response speed in N{sub 2}-atmosphere was accelerated, the speed in air-atmosphere was suppressed by the humidity.

  17. The role of boron nitride nanotube as a new chemical sensor and potential reservoir for hydrogen halides environmental pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi; Etminan, Nazanin; Moghani, Maryam Zeraati; Mirzaei, Samaneh; Abbasi, Shima

    2016-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) studies on the interaction of hydrogen halides (HX) environmental pollutants and the boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have been reported. To exploit the possibility of BNNTs as gas sensors, the adsorption of hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen bromide (HBr) on the side wall of armchair (5,5) boron nitride nanotubes have been investigated. B3LYP/6-31G (d) level were used to analyze the structural and electronic properties of investigate sensor. The adsorption process were interpreted by highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis. Topological parameters of bond critical points have been used to calculate as measure of hydrogen bond (HB) strength. Stronger binding energy, larger charge transfer and charge density illustrate that HF gas possesses chemisorbed adsorption process. The obtained results also show the strongest HB in HF/BNNT complex. We expect that results could provide helpful information for the design of new BNNTs based sensing devices.

  18. A Dual Sensor for pH and Hydrogen Peroxide Using Polymer-Coated Optical Fibre Tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm S. Purdey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the first single optical fibre tip probe for concurrent detection of both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentration and pH of a solution. The sensor is constructed by embedding two fluorophores: carboxyperoxyfluor-1 (CPF1 and seminaphtharhodafluor-2 (SNARF2 within a polymer matrix located on the tip of the optical fibre. The functionalised fibre probe reproducibly measures pH, and is able to accurately detect H2O2 over a biologically relevant concentration range. This sensor offers potential for non-invasive detection of pH and H2O2 in biological environments using a single optical fibre.

  19. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yang; Qiang Han; Shuya Cao; Feng Huang; Molin Qin; Chenghai Guo; Mingyu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical an...

  20. Sagnac interferometer hydrogen sensor based on panda fiber with Pt-loaded WO3/SiO2 coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben; Zhao, C L; Yang, Fan; Gong, Huaping; Wang, D N; Dai, JiXiang; Yang, Minghong

    2016-04-01

    A highly sensitive optical fiber Sagnac interferometer hydrogen sensor is proposed and demonstrated. The device is fabricated by inserting a segment of panda fiber coated with Pt-loaded WO3/SiO2 into a Sagnac interferometer loop. When Pt/WO3 film is exposed to hydrogen, the exothermic reaction raises the temperature of the panda fiber, resulting in the resonant wavelength shift of the interferometer, and the resonant dip obtained has a large extinction ratio of ∼25  dB and a narrow linewidth of 2.5 nm. Such a device responds fast to hydrogen, exhibits a high sensitivity of -7.877  nm/% (vol. %) within the range of 0%-1.0% and is robust, low cost, and easy to fabricate. PMID:27192295

  1. Hydrogen Detection With a Gas Sensor Array – Processing and Recognition of Dynamic Responses Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwiżdż Patryk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An array consisting of four commercial gas sensors with target specifications for hydrocarbons, ammonia, alcohol, explosive gases has been constructed and tested. The sensors in the array operate in the dynamic mode upon the temperature modulation from 350°C to 500°C. Changes in the sensor operating temperature lead to distinct resistance responses affected by the gas type, its concentration and the humidity level. The measurements are performed upon various hydrogen (17-3000 ppm, methane (167-3000 ppm and propane (167-3000 ppm concentrations at relative humidity levels of 0-75%RH. The measured dynamic response signals are further processed with the Discrete Fourier Transform. Absolute values of the dc component and the first five harmonics of each sensor are analysed by a feed-forward back-propagation neural network. The ultimate aim of this research is to achieve a reliable hydrogen detection despite an interference of the humidity and residual gases.

  2. Advances in Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Technology Using GaN and ZnO-Based Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Travis; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Kang, Byoung Sam; Wang, Hung-Ta; Chang, Chih-Yang; Lin, Jenshan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we review our recent results in developing gas sensors for hydrogen using various device structures, including ZnO nanowires and GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). ZnO nanowires are particularly interesting because they have a large surface area to volume ratio, which will improve sensitivity, and because they operate at low current levels, will have low power requirements in a sensor module. GaN-based devices offer the advantage of the HEMT structure, high temperature operation, and simple integration with existing fabrication technology and sensing systems. Improvements in sensitivity, recoverability, and reliability are presented. Also reported are demonstrations of detection of other gases, including CO(2) and C(2)H(4) using functionalized GaN HEMTs. This is critical for the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems and can provide a significant advance towards a market-ready sensor application.

  3. Advances in Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Technology Using GaN and ZnO-Based Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenshan Lin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review our recent results in developing gas sensors for hydrogen using various device structures, including ZnO nanowires and GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs. ZnO nanowires are particularly interesting because they have a large surface area to volume ratio, which will improve sensitivity, and because they operate at low current levels, will have low power requirements in a sensor module. GaN-based devices offer the advantage of the HEMT structure, high temperature operation, and simple integration with existing fabrication technology and sensing systems. Improvements in sensitivity, recoverability, and reliability are presented. Also reported are demonstrations of detection of other gases, including CO2 and C2H4 using functionalized GaN HEMTs. This is critical for the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems and can provide a significant advance towards a market-ready sensor application.

  4. Selective detection of hydrogen sulfide using copper oxide-doped tin oxide based thick film sensor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, copper oxide-doped (1, 3 and 5 wt%) tin oxide powders have been synthesised by sol–gel method and thick film sensor array has been developed by screen printing technique for the detection of H2S gas. Powder X-ray diffraction pattern shows that the tin oxide (SnO2) doped with 3 wt% copper oxide (CuO) has smaller crystallite size in comparison to 0, 1 and 5 wt% CuO-doped SnO2. Furthermore, field emission scanning electron microscopy manifests the formation of porous film consisting of loosely interconnected small crystallites. The effect of various amounts of CuO dopant has been studied on the sensing properties of sensor array with respect to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas. It is found that the SnO2 doped with 3 wt% CuO is extremely sensitive (82%) to H2S gas at 150 °C, while it is almost insensitive to many other gases, i.e., hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Moreover, at low concentration of gas, it shows fast recovery as compared to response time. Such high performance of 3 wt% CuO-doped SnO2 thick film sensor is probably due to the diminishing of the p–n junction and the smallest crystallite size (11 nm) along with porous structure. - Highlights: • Thick film sensor array has been developed by screen printing technique. • SnO2 doped with 3 wt% CuO is extremely sensitive (82%) to H2S gas at 150 °C. • Above sensor shows high performance due to diminishing of the p–n junction. • All sensors have switching like characteristics at low concentration of H2S

  5. Enzyme-free hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yancai, E-mail: liyancai@mnnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zhang, Yayun; Zhong, Yanmei [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Li, Shunxing [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A facile method was designed to synthesize Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites. • Carbon nanomaterials at the outermost layer could protect Au and Ag nanoparticles from oxidation and aggregation. • The Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites showed high sensitivity and selectivity to electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide. • The hydrogen peroxide sensor has a wide linear range of 5.0 μM to 4.75 mM and a limit of detection as low as 0.14 μM. - Abstract: The well-designed Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites were synthesized via a facile method, and were used to fabricate an enzyme-free amperometric hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) sensor. The size, shape, elementary composition and structure of the nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy-dispersed spectrum (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The outermost layer of the nanocomposites was amorphous carbon, the second layer was Ag and the core was Au. The Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites exhibit attractive activity for electrocatalytic reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} according to the electrochemical experiments. It also demonstrates the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor possess well performance with a wide linear range of 5.0 μM to 4.75 mM and a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.14 μM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the interference from the common interfering species, such as glucose, ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid can be effectively avoided. In a word, the Au@Ag@C nanocomposites are promising candidates for enzyme-free H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor.

  6. Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) gas sensors from viral-templated nanocrystalline gold nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facile, site-specific viral-templated assembly method was used to fabricate sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors at room temperature. A gold-binding M13 bacteriophage served to organize gold nanoparticles into linear arrays which were used as seeds for subsequent nanowire formation through electroless deposition. Nanowire widths and densities within the sensors were modified by electroless deposition time and phage concentration, respectively, to tune device resistance. Chemiresistive H2S gas sensors with superior room temperature sensing performance were produced with sensitivity of 654%/ppmv, theoretical lowest detection limit of 2 ppbv, and 70% recovery within 9 min for 0.025 ppmv. The role of the viral template and associated gold-binding peptide was elucidated by removing organics using a short O2 plasma treatment followed by an ethanol dip. The template and gold-binding peptide were crucial to electrical and sensor performance. Without surface organics, the resistance fell by several orders of magnitude, the sensitivity dropped by more than a factor of 100 to 6%/ppmv, the lower limit of detection increased, and no recovery was detected with dry air flow. Viral templates provide a novel, alternative fabrication route for highly sensitive, nanostructured H2S gas sensors. (paper)

  7. Ultrafast and ultrasensitive hydrogen sensors based on self-assembly monolayer promoted 2-dimensional palladium nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Zach, Michael P.; Xiao, Zhili

    2007-02-06

    A device and method of making same. The device or hydrogen detector has a non-conducting substrate with a metal film capable of absorbing hydrogen to form a stable metal hydride. The metal film is being on the threshold of percolation and is connected to mechanism for sensing a change in electrical resistance in response to the presence of hydrogen in contact with the metal film which causes an increase in conductivity.

  8. Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

    2008-06-05

    A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

  9. Coulometric determination of dissolved hydrogen with a multielectrolytic modified carbon felt electrode-based sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki Matsuura; Yosuke Yamawaki; Kosuke Sasaki; Shunichi Uchiyama

    2013-01-01

    A multielectrolytic modified carbon electrode (MEMCE) was fabricated by the electrolytic-oxidation/reduction processes.First,the functional groups containing nitrogen atoms such as amino group were introduced by the electrode oxidation of carbon felt electrode in an ammonium carbamate aqueous solution,and next,this electrode was electroreduced in sulfuric acid.The redox waves between hydrogen ion and hydrogen molecule at highly positive potential range appeared in the cyclic voltammogram obtained by MEMCE.A coulometric cell using MEMCE with a catalytic activity of electrooxidation of hydrogen molecule was constructed and was used for the measurement of dissolved hydrogen.The typical current vs.time curve was obtained by the repetitive measurement of the dissolved hydrogen.These curves indicated that the measurement of dissolved hydrogen was finished completely in a very short time (ca.10sec).A linear relationship was obtained between the electrical charge needed for the electrooxidation process of hydrogen molecule and dissolved hydrogen concentration.This indicates that the developed coulometfic method can be used for the determination of the dissolved hydrogen concentration.

  10. Titanium Dioxide-Based 64∘ YX LiNbO3 Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Z. Sadek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous titanium dioxide (TiO2 and gold (Au doped TiO2-based surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors have been investigated as hydrogen gas detectors. The nanocrystal-doped TiO2 films were synthesized through a sol-gel route, mixing a Ti-butoxide-based solution with diluted colloidal gold nanoparticles. The films were deposited via spin coating onto 64∘ YX LiNbO3 SAW transducers in a helium atmosphere. The SAW gas sensors were operated at various temperatures between 150 and 310∘C. It was found that gold doping on TiO2 increased the device sensitivity and reduced the optimum operating temperature.

  11. A Room-temperature Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using Palladium-decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Si Heterojunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Gang DU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a room-temperature (RT hydrogen gas (H2 sensor based on palladium-decorated single-walled carbon nanotube/Si (Pd-SWNTs/Si heterojunction. The current-voltage (I-V curves of the Pd-SWNTs/Si heterojunction in different concentrations of H2 were measured. The experimental results reveal that the Pd-SWNTs/Si heterojunction exhibits high H2 response. After exposure to 0.02 %, 0.05 %, and 0.1 % H2 for 10 min, the resistance of the heterojunction increases dramatically. The response is 122 %, 269 % and 457 %, respectively. A simple interfacial theory is used to understand the gas sensitivity results. This approach is a step toward future CNTs-based gas sensors for practical application.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12925

  12. A sensitive nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Fe3O4–Fe2O3 nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guang Sheng Cao; Peilong Wang; Xin Li; Yue Wang; Guilong Wang; Junping Li

    2015-02-01

    The Fe3O4–Fe2O3 nanocomposites were prepared by the co-precipitation method and followed by calcination process. The products were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The obtained Fe3O4–Fe2O3 nanocomposites were then applied to study the electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in 0.01 M pH 7.0 phosphate buffer medium. Then the Fe3O4–Fe2O3 nanocomposites were used as active electrode material of electrochemical sensors for H2O2 detection The detection sensitivity of the sensor was 20.325 A mM-1, and the detection limit was estimated to be about 0.2 mM.

  13. A Room-temperature Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using Palladium-decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Si Heterojunction

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Gang DU; Hai Xia ZHENG; Hao NI

    2016-01-01

    We report a room-temperature (RT) hydrogen gas (H2) sensor based on palladium-decorated single-walled carbon nanotube/Si (Pd-SWNTs/Si) heterojunction. The current-voltage (I-V) curves of the Pd-SWNTs/Si heterojunction in different concentrations of H2 were measured. The experimental results reveal that the Pd-SWNTs/Si heterojunction exhibits high H2 response. After exposure to 0.02 %, 0.05 %, and 0.1 % H2 for 10 min, the resistance of the heterojunction increases dramatically. The response is...

  14. Photoluminescence of MoS2 quantum dots quenched by hydrogen peroxide: A fluorescent sensor for hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhixing; Gui, Qingfeng; Shan, Yun; Pan, Pengfei; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Lifa

    2016-09-01

    By cutting MoS2 microcrystals to quantum dots (QDs) of sizes below 10 nm, the photoluminescence (PL) at ca. 450 nm can be detected easily due to the quantum confinement effects across the 2D planes. The PL is stable under continuous irradiation of UV light but gradually quenches when treated with an increasing concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Time-resolved PL and Raman spectra imply that H2O2 causes the partial oxidation of MoS2 QDs. First-principles calculations reveal that the MoS2 QDs with oxygen impurity are of indirect bandgap structures showing no notable PL. And absorption spectra verify that the PL of MoS2 QDs quenched by H2O2 is attributed to the oxidation. The integrated PL intensity and H2O2 concentration show an exponential relationship in the range of 2-20 μM, suggesting that MoS2 QDs are potential fluorescent probes for hydrogen peroxide sensing in a physiological environment.

  15. Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the...

  16. Eye readable metal hydride based hydrogen tape sensor for health applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngene, P.; Radeva, T.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    Using the change in the intrinsic optical properties of YMg-based thin films upon exposure to hydrogen, we observe the presence of hydrogen at concentrations as low as 20 ppm just by a change in color. The eye-visible color change circumvents the use of any electronics in this device, thereby making

  17. Structural effects of naphthalimide-based fluorescent sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in live zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seon-Ae; Park, Chul Soon; Kwon, Oh Seok; Giong, Hoi-Khoanh; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Ha, Tai Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological messenger, but few biologically-compatible methods are available for its detection in aqueous solution. Herein, we report a highly water-soluble naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe (L1), which is a highly versatile building unit that absorbs and emits at long wavelengths and is selective for hydrogen sulfide over cysteine, glutathione, and other reactive sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen species in aqueous solution. We describe turn-on fluorescent probes based on azide group reduction on the fluorogenic ‘naphthalene’ moiety to fluorescent amines and intracellular hydrogen sulfide detection without the use of an organic solvent. L1 and L2 were synthetically modified to functional groups with comparable solubility on the N-imide site, showing a marked change in turn-on fluorescent intensity in response to hydrogen sulfide in both PBS buffer and living cells. The probes were readily employed to assess intracellular hydrogen sulfide level changes by imaging endogenous hydrogen sulfide signal in RAW264.7 cells incubated with L1 and L2. Expanding the use of L1 to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we successfully visualized hydrogen sulfide detection in the yolk, brain and spinal cord of living zebrafish embryos, thereby providing a powerful approach for live imaging for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  18. Ultrasensitive hydrogen sensor based on Pt-decorated WO₃ nanorods prepared by glancing-angle dc magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horprathum, M; Srichaiyaperk, T; Samransuksamer, B; Wisitsoraat, A; Eiamchai, P; Limwichean, S; Chananonnawathorn, C; Aiempanakit, K; Nuntawong, N; Patthanasettakul, V; Oros, C; Porntheeraphat, S; Songsiriritthigul, P; Nakajima, H; Tuantranont, A; Chindaudom, P

    2014-12-24

    In this work, we report an ultrasensitive hydrogen (H2) sensor based on tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanorods decorated with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. WO3 nanorods were fabricated by dc magnetron sputtering with a glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique, and decorations of Pt nanoparticles were performed by normal dc sputtering on WO3 nanorods with varying deposition time from 2.5 to 15 s. Crystal structures, morphologies, and chemical information on Pt-decorated WO3 nanorods were characterized by grazing-incident X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effect of the Pt nanoparticles on the H2-sensing performance of WO3 nanorods was investigated over a low concentration range of 150-3000 ppm of H2 at 150-350 °C working temperatures. The results showed that the H2 response greatly increased with increasing Pt-deposition time up to 10 s but then substantially deteriorated as the deposition time increased further. The optimally decorated Pt-WO3 nanorod sensor exhibited an ultrahigh H2 response from 1530 and 214,000 to 150 and 3000 ppm of H2, respectively, at 200 °C. The outstanding gas-sensing properties may be attributed to the excellent dispersion of fine Pt nanoparticles on WO3 nanorods having a very large effective surface area, leading to highly effective spillover of molecular hydrogen through Pt nanoparticles onto the WO3 nanorod surface.

  19. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  20. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  1. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  2. Studies on Metal-Oxide Semiconductor ZnO as a Hydrogen Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Prajapati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-oxide semiconductor ZnO thin films were prepared on glass slides by spray pyrolysis technique at substrate temperature (410 ± 10 °C. Zn(NO326H2O was used as the precursor solution. The films thus prepared are undergone for structural and morphological studies using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy The films are found to be polycrystalline zinc oxide in nature, possessing hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure and nanocrystalline in grain size ~ 30-35 nm. The hydrogen sensing performance of the films has been investigated for various concentration of hydrogen in air at different operating temperatures in the range 200-400 °C. It is observed that the response is maximum (44.3 % at the operating of temperature of 250 °C for 0.8 vol % concentration of hydrogen in air. A possible sensing mechanism for hydrogen has been proposed.

  3. Henry's Law Constant for Hydrogen in Li/H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} solution using a Pd-Ag Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Lee, Deok-Hyun; Hur, Do-Haeng [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The dissolved hydrogen concentration in PWRs has been controlled within the range of 25 - 50cc (STP)/kg-H{sub 2}O. It is well known that the dissolved hydrogen leads to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), general corrosion of the primary structural materials, higher radiation fields, and deposit build up on the fuel rods in PWRs. Therefore, the optimization of the hydrogen concentration in the RCS is regarded as one of several effective approaches to manage the material integrity and reduction of the radiation sources in the primary circuit. During PWR operation, the hydrogen concentrations are controlled by varying hydrogen over pressures of a volume control tank (VCT). However, as the primary water flows from the VCT into the RCS, the temperature, system pressure, and solution chemistry in the RCS can affect the hydrogen concentration. In order to predict the content of the hydrogen partial pressure which affects the structural materials, it is needed to measure and monitor the hydrogen partial pressure accurately. In this paper, we fabricated a Pd-25wt.%Ag alloy hydrogen sensor to measure hydrogen partial pressures directly at high temperatures and high pressures. From the measured data, we determined the Henry's constants for various fields' applications. The hydrogen partial pressures were measured using a Pd-Ag hydrogen sensor in the 2 ppm Li and 1200 ppm B solution within the temperature and pressure ranges of 290 - 330 .deg. C and 2000 - 2900 psia, respectively. The Henry's constants were determined from the measured data.

  4. Henry's Law Constant for Hydrogen in Li/H3BO3 solution using a Pd-Ag Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolved hydrogen concentration in PWRs has been controlled within the range of 25 - 50cc (STP)/kg-H2O. It is well known that the dissolved hydrogen leads to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), general corrosion of the primary structural materials, higher radiation fields, and deposit build up on the fuel rods in PWRs. Therefore, the optimization of the hydrogen concentration in the RCS is regarded as one of several effective approaches to manage the material integrity and reduction of the radiation sources in the primary circuit. During PWR operation, the hydrogen concentrations are controlled by varying hydrogen over pressures of a volume control tank (VCT). However, as the primary water flows from the VCT into the RCS, the temperature, system pressure, and solution chemistry in the RCS can affect the hydrogen concentration. In order to predict the content of the hydrogen partial pressure which affects the structural materials, it is needed to measure and monitor the hydrogen partial pressure accurately. In this paper, we fabricated a Pd-25wt.%Ag alloy hydrogen sensor to measure hydrogen partial pressures directly at high temperatures and high pressures. From the measured data, we determined the Henry's constants for various fields' applications. The hydrogen partial pressures were measured using a Pd-Ag hydrogen sensor in the 2 ppm Li and 1200 ppm B solution within the temperature and pressure ranges of 290 - 330 .deg. C and 2000 - 2900 psia, respectively. The Henry's constants were determined from the measured data

  5. Hydrogen peroxide sensor based on modified vitreous carbon with multiwall carbon nanotubes and composites of Pt nanoparticles-dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, C.; Orozco, G. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S.C., P.O. Box 064, C.P. 76700, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Verde, Y. [Instituto Tecnologico de Cancun, Av. Kabah Km. 3, C.P. 77500, Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico); Jimenez, S. [Unidad Queretaro Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., Juriquilla, Santiago de Queretaro (Mexico); Godinez, Luis A. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S.C., P.O. Box 064, C.P. 76700, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Juaristi, E. [Chemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., P.O. Box 14-740, C.P. 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bustos, E. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S.C., P.O. Box 064, C.P. 76700, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico); Chemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., P.O. Box 14-740, C.P. 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: ebustos@cideteq.mx

    2009-02-15

    Sensors using nanostructured materials have been under development in the last decade due to their selectivity for the detection and quantification of different compounds. The physical and chemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes provide significant advantages when used as electrodes for electronic devices, fuel cells and electrochemical sensors. This paper presents preliminary results on the modification of vitreous carbon electrodes with Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) and composites of Pt nanoparticles-dopamine (DA) as electro-catalytic materials for the hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) reaction. Chemical pre-treatment and consequent functionalization of MWCNTs with carboxylic groups was necessary to increase the distribution of the composites. In addition, the presence of DA was important to protect the active sites and eliminate the pasivation of the surface after the electro-oxidation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} takes place. The proposed H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor exhibited a linear response in the 0-5 mM range, with detection and quantification limits of 0.3441 mM and 1.1472 mM, respectively.

  6. Non-enzymatic amperometric sensor for hydrogen peroxide based on a biocomposite made from chitosan, hemoglobin, and silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a novel non-enzymatic sensor for hydrogen peroxide (HP) that is based on a biocomposite made up from chitosan (CS), hemoglobin (Hb), and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were prepared in the presence of CS and glucose in an ultrasonic bath, and CS is found to act as a stabilizing agent. They were then combined with Hb and CS to construct a carbon paste biosensor. The resulting electrode gave a well-defined redox couple for Hb, with a formal potential of about -0.17 V (vs. SCE) at pH 6. 86 and exhibited a remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of HP. The sensor was used to detect HP by flow injection analysis, and a linear response is obtained in the 0. 08 to 250 μM concentration range. The detection limit is 0.05 μM (at S/N = 3). These characteristics, along with its long-term stability make the sensor highly promising for the amperometric determination of HP. (author)

  7. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  8. A novel non-enzyme hydrogen peroxide sensor based on an electrode modified with carbon nanotube-wired CuO nanoflowers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have prepared a novel sensor for hydrogen peroxide that is based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with a film containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes wired to CuO nanoflowers. The nanoflowers were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, and the electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning electron microscopy. The response of the modified electrode towards hydrogen peroxide was investigated by CV and chronoamperometry and showed it to exhibit high electrocatalytic activity, with a linear range from 0. 5 μM to 82 μM and a detection limit of 0. 16 μM. The sensor also displays excellent selectivity and stability. (author)

  9. Soil water content determination with cosmic-ray neutron sensor: Correcting aboveground hydrogen effects with thermal/fast neutron ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhengchao; Li, Zizhong; Liu, Gang; Li, Baoguo; Ren, Tusheng

    2016-09-01

    The cosmic-ray neutron sensor (CRNS), which estimates field scale soil water content, bridges the gap between point measurement and remote sensing. The accuracy of CRNS measurements, however, is affected by additional hydrogen pools (e.g., vegetation, snow, and rainfall interception). The objectives of this study are to: (i) evaluate the accuracy of CRNS estimates in a farmland system using depth and horizontal weighted point measurements, (ii) introduce a novel method for estimating the amounts of hydrogen from biomass and snow cover in CRNS data, and (iii) propose a simple approach for correcting the influences of aboveground hydrogen pool (expressed as aboveground water equivalent, AWE) on CRNS measurements. A field experiment was conducted in northeast China to compare soil water content results from CRNS to in-situ data with time domain reflectometry (TDR) and neutron probe (NP) in the 0-40 cm soil layers. The biomass water equivalent (BWE) and snow water equivalent (SWE) were observed to have separate linear relationships with the thermal/fast neutron ratio, and the dynamics of BWE and SWE were estimated correctly in the crop seasons and snow-covered seasons, respectively. A simple approach, which considered the AWE, AWE at calibration, and the effective measurement depth of CRNS, was introduced to correct the errors caused by BWE and SWE. After correction, the correlation coefficients between soil water contents determined by CRNS and TDR were 0.79 and 0.77 during the 2014 and 2015 crop seasons, respectively, and CRNS measurements had RMSEs of 0.028, 0.030, and 0.039 m3 m-3 in the 2014 and 2015 crop seasons and the snow-covered seasons, respectively. The experimental results also indicated that the accuracies of CRNS estimated BWE and SWE were affected by the distributions of aboveground hydrogen pools, which were related to the height of the CRNS device above ground surface.

  10. Wavelength response of a surface plasmon resonance palladium-coated optical fiber sensor for hydrogen detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perrotton, C.; Slaman, M.; Javahiraly, N.; Schreuders, H.; Dam. B.; Meyrueis, P.

    2011-01-01

    An optical fiber using palladium as sensitive layer is characterized in the range of 450 to 900 nm. The sensitive layer is deposited on the outside of a multimode fiber, after removing the optical cladding. The sensor is based on a measurement technique that uses the surface plasmon resonance effect

  11. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Long

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA linear functionalized polymer (PLF, was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP, mustard gas (HD, chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES, 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can’t be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed.

  12. Highly sensitive hydrogen peroxide sensor based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with platinum nanoparticles on carbon nanofiber heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are presenting a sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that is based on the use of a heterostructure composed of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs). High-density Pt NPs were homogeneously loaded onto a three-dimensional nanostructured CNF matrix and then deposited in a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The resulting sensor synergizes the advantages of the conducting CNFs and the nanoparticle catalyst. The porous structure of the CNFs also favor the high-density immobilization of the NPs and the diffusion of water-soluble molecules, and thus assists the rapid catalytic oxidation of H2O2. If operated at a working voltage of −0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), the modified GCE exhibits a linear response to H2O2 in the 5 μM to 15 mM concentration range (total analytical range: 5 μM to 100 mM), with a detection limit of 1.7 μM (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The modified GCE is not interfered by species such as uric acid and glucose. Its good stability, high selectivity and good reproducibility make this electrode a valuable tool for inexpensive amperometric sensing of H2O2. (author)

  13. Non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Co3O4 nanocubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guang Sheng Cao; Lei Wang; Pengfei Yuan; Chao Gao; Xiaojuan Liu; Tong Li; Tianmin Li

    2014-10-01

    The Co3O4 nanocubes were prepared by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidant, Co(NO3)2. 6H2O as a cobalt source. The products were characterized in detail by multiform techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The prepared Co3O4 nanocubes were applied to study the electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in 0.01 M pH 7.0 phosphate buffer medium. The Co3O4 nanocubes exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic activity for H2O2 reduction. Furthermore, the obtained Co3O4 nanocubes have been employed as electrode materials for electrochemical sensing H2O2.

  14. Hydrogen gas sensor fabricated from polyanisidine nanofibers deposited on 36° YX LiTaO 3 layered surface acoustic wave transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashat, Laith; Tran, Henry D.; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Kaner, Richard B.; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2007-12-01

    Polyanisidine nanofibers gas sensor based on a ZnO/36° YX LiTaO 3 surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer was developed and tested at different concentrations of hydrogen gas in synthetic air. Nanofibrous mats of polyanisidine were synthesized without the need for templates or functional dopants by simply introducing an initiator into the reaction mixture of a rapidly mixed reaction between the monomer (anisidine) and the oxidant. The polyanisidine nanofibers are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-vis). Polyanisidine nanofibers were deposited onto the SAW transducer and exposed to different concentrations of hydrogen gas. The frequency shift due to the sensor response was 294 kHz towards 1% of H II. All tests were conducted at room temperature and the sensor performance was assessed for a two day period with a high degree of reproducibility obtained.

  15. A hydrogen peroxide sensor based on a horseradish peroxidase/polyaniline/carboxy-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube modified gold electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Mu-Yi, E-mail: huamy@mail.cgu.edu.t [Green Research Center, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Rd., Kuei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 33302, Taiwan (China); Biosensor Group, Biomedical Engineering Research Center, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Rd., Kuei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 33302, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yu-Chen [Green Research Center, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Rd., Kuei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 33302, Taiwan (China); Biosensor Group, Biomedical Engineering Research Center, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Rd., Kuei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 33302, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Rung-Ywan [Electronics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, 195, Sec. 4, Chung Hsing Rd., Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Liu, Yin-Chih [Green Research Center, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Rd., Kuei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 33302, Taiwan (China); Biosensor Group, Biomedical Engineering Research Center, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Rd., Kuei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 33302, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-30

    We have developed a polyaniline/carboxy-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (PAn/MWCNTCOOH) nanocomposite by blending the emeraldine base form of polyaniline (PAn) and carboxy-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in dried dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at room temperature. The conductivity of the resulting PAn/MWCNTCOOH was 3.6 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}, mainly as a result of the protonation of the PAn with the carboxyl group and the radical cations of the MWCNT fragments. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized within the PAn/MWCNTCOOH nanocomposite modified Au (PAn/MWCNTCOOH/Au) electrode to form HRP/PAn/MWCNTCOOH/Au for use as a hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) sensor. The adsorption between the negatively charged PAn/MWCNTCOOH nanocomposite and the positively charged HRP resulted in a very good sensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and an increased electrochemically catalytical current during cyclic voltammetry. The HRP/PAn/MWCNTCOOH/Au electrode exhibited a broad linear response range for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations (86 {mu}M-10 mM). This sensor exhibited good sensitivity (194.9 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), a fast response time (2.9 s), and good reproducibility and stability at an applied potential of -0.35 V. The construction of the enzymatic sensor demonstrated the potential application of PAn/MWCNTCOOH nanocomposites for the detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with high performance and excellent stability.

  16. Hydrogen sensors based on electrophoretically deposited Pd nanoparticles onto InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grym, Jan; Procházková, Olga; Yatskiv, Roman; Piksová, Kateřina

    2011-05-01

    Electrophoretic deposition of palladium nanoparticles prepared by the reverse micelle technique onto InP substrates is addressed. We demonstrate that the substrate pre-deposition treatment and the deposition conditions can extensively influence the morphology of the deposited palladium nanoparticle films. Schottky diodes based on these films show notably high values of the barrier height and of the rectification ratio giving evidence of a small degree of the Fermi level pinning. Moreover, electrical characteristics of these diodes are exceptionally sensitive to the exposure to gas mixtures with small hydrogen content.

  17. Hydrogen sensors based on electrophoretically deposited Pd nanoparticles onto InP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piksová Kateřina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Electrophoretic deposition of palladium nanoparticles prepared by the reverse micelle technique onto InP substrates is addressed. We demonstrate that the substrate pre-deposition treatment and the deposition conditions can extensively influence the morphology of the deposited palladium nanoparticle films. Schottky diodes based on these films show notably high values of the barrier height and of the rectification ratio giving evidence of a small degree of the Fermi level pinning. Moreover, electrical characteristics of these diodes are exceptionally sensitive to the exposure to gas mixtures with small hydrogen content.

  18. Highly selective fluorescence turn-on sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A displacement method of detecting hydrogen sulfide in aqueous media based on complex L–Cu ensemble is developed. Once combined with Cu2+, complex L–Cu displayed high specificity for sulfide anion. Among the various anions, only sulfide anion induce the revival of fluoresecence of compound L, which is quenched by Cu2+, resulting in turn-on type sensing sulfide anion. Complex L–Cu exhibits a highly sensitive fluorescent response toward S2− by releasing compound L to give a remarkable change with 20-fold fluorescence intensity enhancement under 2 equivalent of S2− added in Tris–HCl/ DMF (20 mM, 6/4, v/v), and also exhibits a dynamic response range for S2− from 5×10−7 to 5×10−6 M, with a detection limit of 0.18 μM. In addition, the turn-on fluorescent change upon the addition of S2− is also applied in cell imaging. -- Highlights: ► We have developed a displacement method with sensing hydrogen sulfide based on a complex L–Cu. ► It exhibits high selectivity, high sensitivity with a 20-fold fluorescence enhancement. ► It exhibited a low detection limit of 0.18 μM. ► It is applied in vitro imaging of S2− in the living cells

  19. Peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide elicit similar cellular stress responses mediated by the Ccp1 sensor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Dorival; Bakas, Iolie; McIntosh, Kelly; English, Ann M

    2015-08-01

    Peroxynitrite [ONOO(H)] is an oxidant associated with deleterious effects in cells. Because it is an inorganic peroxide that reacts rapidly with peroxidases, we speculated that cells may respond to ONOO(H) and H2O2 challenge in a similar manner. We exposed yeast cells to SIN-1, a well-characterized ONOO(H) generator, and observed stimulation of catalase and peroxiredoxin (Prx) activities. Previously, we reported that H2O2 challenge increases these activities in wild-type cells and in cells producing the hyperactive mutant H2O2 sensor Ccp1(W191F) but not in Ccp1-knockout cells (ccp1Δ). We find here that the response of ccp1Δ and ccp1(W191F) cells to SIN-1 mirrors that to H2O2, identifying Ccp1 as a sensor of both peroxides. SIN-1 simultaneously releases (•)NO and O2(•-), which react to form ONOO(H), but exposure of the three strains separately to an (•)NO donor (spermine-NONOate) or an O2(•-) generator (paraquat) mainly depresses catalase or Prx activity, whereas co-challenge with the NONOate and paraquat stimulates these activities. Because Ccp1 appears to sense ONOO(H) in cells, we examined its reaction with ONOO(H) in vitro and found that peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH) rapidly (k2>10(6)M(-1)s(-1)) oxidizes purified Ccp1 to an intermediate with spectral and ferrocytochrome-oxidizing properties indistinguishable from those of its well-characterized compound I formed with H2O2. Importantly, the nitrite released from ONOOH is not oxidized to (•)NO2 by Ccp1(׳)s compound I, unlike peroxidases involved in immune defense. Overall, our results reveal that yeast cells mount a common antioxidant response to ONOO(H) and H2O2, with Ccp1 playing a pivotal role as an inorganic peroxide sensor. PMID:25881547

  20. Palladium-decorated hydrogen-gas sensors using periodically aligned graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Yusin; Kim, Sang-Mook; Jeong, Huisu; Kang, Chang Goo; Park, Jung Su; Song, Hui; Lee, Ryeri; Myoung, NoSoung; Lee, Byoung Hun; Seo, Sunae; Kim, Jin Tae; Jung, Gun-Young

    2014-08-13

    Polymer residue-free graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) of 200 nm width at 1 μm pitch were periodically generated in an area of 1 cm(2) via laser interference lithography using a chromium interlayer prior to photoresist coating. High-quality GNRs were evidenced by atomic force microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Palladium nanoparticles were then deposited on the GNRs as catalysts for sensing hydrogen gases, and the GNR array was utilized as an electrically conductive path with less electrical noise. The palladium-decorated GNR array exhibited a rectangular sensing curve with unprecedented rapid response and recovery properties: 90% response within 60 s at 1000 ppm and 80% recovery within 90 s in nitrogen ambient. In addition, reliable and repeatable sensing behaviors were revealed when the array was exposed to various gas concentrations even at 30 ppm. PMID:25050896

  1. A hydrogen peroxide electrochemical sensor based on silver nanoparticles decorated three-dimensional graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Beibei; Liu, Changbing; Shi, Huaxia; Li, Chen; Wang, Lianhui [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Huang, Wei, E-mail: iamxcdong@njtech.edu.cn, E-mail: iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn; Dong, Xiaochen, E-mail: iamxcdong@njtech.edu.cn, E-mail: iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu-Singapore Joint Research Center for Organic/Bio-Electronics and Information Displays and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Nanjing Tech University, 30 South Puzhu Road, Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2014-06-16

    A facile strategy has been developed to synthesize sliver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) decorated three-dimensional graphene (3DG) through hydrothermal process. The AgNPs-3DG composites are directly fabricated into a free standing sensing electrode for electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in phosphate buffered solutions. Various techniques equipments including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the morphology and structure of the as-prepared composite. The electrochemical experiments reveal the AgNPs-3DG based biosensor exhibits fast amperometric sensing, low detection limitation, wide linear responding range, and perfect selectivity for non-enzyme H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detection, indicating the well synergistic effect of Ag NPs high electrocatalytic activity and 3DG high conductivity and large surface area.

  2. Highly selective fluorescence turn-on sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiaoliang [College of Chemistry and Environment Engineering, Hunan City University, Yiyang, Hunan 413000 (China); Long, Liping, E-mail: llping401@163.com [College of Chemistry and Environment Engineering, Hunan City University, Yiyang, Hunan 413000 (China); Xie, Dan; Zhan, Youwen [College of Chemistry and Environment Engineering, Hunan City University, Yiyang, Hunan 413000 (China)

    2013-07-15

    A displacement method of detecting hydrogen sulfide in aqueous media based on complex L–Cu ensemble is developed. Once combined with Cu{sup 2+}, complex L–Cu displayed high specificity for sulfide anion. Among the various anions, only sulfide anion induce the revival of fluoresecence of compound L, which is quenched by Cu{sup 2+}, resulting in turn-on type sensing sulfide anion. Complex L–Cu exhibits a highly sensitive fluorescent response toward S{sup 2−} by releasing compound L to give a remarkable change with 20-fold fluorescence intensity enhancement under 2 equivalent of S{sup 2−} added in Tris–HCl/ DMF (20 mM, 6/4, v/v), and also exhibits a dynamic response range for S{sup 2−} from 5×10{sup −7} to 5×10{sup −6} M, with a detection limit of 0.18 μM. In addition, the turn-on fluorescent change upon the addition of S{sup 2−} is also applied in cell imaging. -- Highlights: ► We have developed a displacement method with sensing hydrogen sulfide based on a complex L–Cu. ► It exhibits high selectivity, high sensitivity with a 20-fold fluorescence enhancement. ► It exhibited a low detection limit of 0.18 μM. ► It is applied in vitro imaging of S{sup 2−} in the living cells.

  3. Response Behaviour of a Hydrogen Sensor Based on IonicConducting Polymer-metal Interfaces Prepared by the ChemicalReduction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Weppner

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A solid-state amperometric hydrogen sensor based on a protonated Nafionmembrane and catalytic active electrode operating at room temperature was fabricated andtested. Ionic conducting polymer-metal electrode interfaces were prepared chemically byusing the impregnation-reduction method. The polymer membrane was impregnated withtetra-ammine platinum chloride hydrate and the metal ions were subsequently reduced byusing either sodium tetrahydroborate or potassium tetrahydroborate. The hydrogen sensingcharacteristics with air as reference gas is reported. The sensors were capable of detectinghydrogen concentrations from 10 ppm to 10% in nitrogen. The response time was in therange of 10-30 s and a stable linear current output was observed. The thin Pt films werecharacterized by XRD, Infrared Spectroscopy, Optical Microscopy, Atomic ForceMicroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and EDAX.

  4. A reagentless non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor presented using electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutyala, Sankararao; Mathiyarasu, Jayaraman

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we report a simple, facile and reproducible non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor using electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The modified electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-Visible, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) analysis revealed that ERGO/GCE exhibited virtuous charge transfer properties for a standard redox systems and showed excellent performance towards electroreduction of H2O2. Amperometric study using ERGO/GCE showed high sensitivity (0.3μA/μM) and faster response upon the addition of H2O2 at an applied potential of -0.25V vs. Ag/AgCl. The detection limit is assessed to be 0.7μM (S/N=3) and the time to reach a stable study state current is <3s for a linear range of H2O2 concentration (1-16μM). In addition, the modified electrode exhibited good reproducibility and long-term stability. PMID:27612728

  5. Silver Nanoparticles Confined in SBA-15 Mesoporous Silica and the Application as a Sensor for Detecting Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hai Lin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles within the pore channels of selectively grafted mesoporous silica SBA-15 were synthesized. Silanols on the external surface of as-SBA-15 were first capped by –Si(CH33 groups. After removal of the template of capped SBA-15 by calcination, silanols on the internal surface of SBA-15 were modified by 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS, and then formaldehyde was grafted by amino groups of APTMS, and further Ag(NH32NO3SBA-15. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, and UV-vis spectra confirm that the silver nanoparticles have been confined inside the channels of SBA-15. In addition, the Ag-mSBA-15 modified electrode (Ag-mSBA-15/GC exhibited an excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. The proposed H2O2 sensor exhibits a linear range of 48.5 μM–0.97 M with a detection limit of 12 μM (S/N=3 and analytical time of 10 seconds per sample.

  6. RECOMBINANT FLUORESCENT SENSOR OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE HyPer FUSED WITH ADAPTOR PROTEIN Ruk/CIN85: DESIGNING OF EXPRESSION VECTOR AND ITS FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Bazalii

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design the expression vector encoding fluorescent sensor of hydrogen peroxide HyPer fused with adaptor protein Ruk/CIN85 as well as to check its subcellular distribution and ability to sense hydrogen peroxide. It was demonstrated that in transiently transfected HEK293 and MCF-7 cells Ruk/CIN85-HyPer is concentrated in dot-like vesicular structures of different size while HyPer is diffusely distributed throughout the cell. Using live cell fluorescence microscopy we observed gradual increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in representative vesicular structures during the time of experiment. Thus, the developed genetic construction encoding the chimeric Ruk/CIN85-HyPer fluorescent protein represents a new tool to study localized H2O2 production in living cells.

  7. A high performance hydrogen sulfide gas sensor based on porous α-Fe2O3 operates at room-temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Novel porous α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. • The sensor based on porous α-Fe2O3 exhibits high sensitivity towards H2S gas. • The detection limit towards H2S gas was as low as 50 ppb at room temperature. • The sensor exhibits excellent selectivity against other toxic and noxious gases. - Abstract: Porous α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized by simple annealing of β-FeOOH precursor derived from a facile hydrothermal route, the structures and morphologies of the as-prepared product were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the average crystallite size of the obtained porous α-Fe2O3 was 34 nm and exits numerous irregularly distributed pores with a diameter varying from 2 nm to 10 nm on the particle surface. The gas-sensing properties of the sensor based on porous α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were investigated, and the result showed that the sensor exhibited a high performance in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) detection at room temperature. The highest sensitivity reached 38.4 for 100 ppm H2S, and the detection limit was as low as 50 ppb. In addition, the response of the sensor towards other gases including C2H5OH, CO, H2 and NH3 indicates the sensor has an excellent selectivity to detection H2S gas. Finally, the sensing mechanism of the sensor towards H2S was also discussed

  8. A high performance hydrogen sulfide gas sensor based on porous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} operates at room-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanwu; Chen, Weimei; Zhang, Shouchao; Kuang, Zhong; Ao, Dongyi [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China); Alkurd, Nooraldeen Rafat; Zhou, Weilie [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Liu, Wei [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China); Shen, Wenzhong [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan, 030001 (China); Li, Zhijie, E-mail: zhijieli@uestc.edu.cn [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Novel porous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. • The sensor based on porous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits high sensitivity towards H{sub 2}S gas. • The detection limit towards H{sub 2}S gas was as low as 50 ppb at room temperature. • The sensor exhibits excellent selectivity against other toxic and noxious gases. - Abstract: Porous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by simple annealing of β-FeOOH precursor derived from a facile hydrothermal route, the structures and morphologies of the as-prepared product were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the average crystallite size of the obtained porous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was 34 nm and exits numerous irregularly distributed pores with a diameter varying from 2 nm to 10 nm on the particle surface. The gas-sensing properties of the sensor based on porous α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated, and the result showed that the sensor exhibited a high performance in hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) detection at room temperature. The highest sensitivity reached 38.4 for 100 ppm H{sub 2}S, and the detection limit was as low as 50 ppb. In addition, the response of the sensor towards other gases including C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, CO, H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} indicates the sensor has an excellent selectivity to detection H{sub 2}S gas. Finally, the sensing mechanism of the sensor towards H{sub 2}S was also discussed.

  9. Non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide amperometric sensor based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with an MWCNT/polyaniline composite film and platinum nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a non-enzymatic amperometric sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). It was fabricated by electrodeposition of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and polyaniline along with platinum nanoparticles on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. The modification was probed by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The resulting sensor exhibits a high sensitivity (748.4 μA.mM-1.cm-2), a wide linear range (7.0 μM-2.5 mM), a low detection limit (2.0 μM) (S/N = 3), a short response time (>5 s), and long-term stability, and is not interfered by common species. It was successfully applied to determine H2O2 in disinfectants. (author)

  10. Development of sensitive amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor using a CuNPs/MB/MWCNT-C60-Cs-IL nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roushani, Mahmoud; Bakyas, Kobra; Zare Dizajdizi, Behruz

    2016-07-01

    A sensitive hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor was constructed based on copper nanoparticles/methylene blue/multiwall carbon nanotubes-fullerene-chitosan-ionic liquid (CuNPs/MB/MWCNTs-C60-Cs-IL) nanocomposites. The MB/MWCNTs-C60-Cs-IL and CuNPs were modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by the physical adsorption and electrodeposition of copper nitrate solution, respectively. The physical morphology and chemical composition of the surface of modified electrode was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The electrochemical properties of CuNPs/MB/MWCNTs-C60-Cs-IL/GCE were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry techniques and the sensor exhibited remarkably strong electrocatalytic activities toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The peak currents possess a linear relationship with the concentration of H2O2 in the range of 0.2μM to 2.0mM, and the detection limit is 55.0nM (S/N=3). In addition, the modified electrode was used to determine H2O2 concentration in human blood serum sample with satisfactory results. PMID:27127028

  11. A lossy mode resonance-based fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor for room temperature using coatings of ITO thin film and nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, the idea of employing lossy mode resonances (LMR) concertedly for gas sensing along with the reversible interaction of metal oxides with gases has been investigated. Fabrication and characterization of a LMR-based fiber optic probe with successive coatings of indium-tin oxide (ITO) film and nanoparticles over the unclad core of the fiber have been carried out for the detection of hydrogen gas (H2). The results have been compared with the probes having individual coatings of ITO thin film and nanoparticles. For calibrating and comparing, the wavelength interrogative spectra have been recorded for varying concentrations of H2 gas exploiting the sensor probes. A red shift of the spectrum has been observed with the increase in the concentration of the gas. The results uphold the fact that the LMR-based sensor with both thin film and nanoparticles layer has better sensitivity to H2 gas than the probes with the layer of either nanoparticles or thin film. A collective study on the three probes for different gases has predicted a maximum level of sensitivity for the probe with layers of thin film and nanoparticles along with the high selectivity and repeatability of the results for H2 gas. In addition to high sensitivity and selectivity, the proposed sensor can be used for online monitoring and remote sensing of the gas because of the fabrication of the probe on the optical fiber. (paper)

  12. Core-shell Au/Ag nanoparticles embedded in silicate sol-gel network for sensor application towards hydrogen peroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shanmugam Manivannan; Ramasamy Ramaraj

    2009-09-01

    The electrocatalytic activity of core-shell Au100-Ag ( = 15, 27, 46, and 60) bimetallic nanoparticles embedded in methyl functionalized silicate MTMOS network towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric techniques. Core-shell Au/Ag bimetallic nanoparticles were characterized by absorption spectra and HRTEM. The MTMOS silicate sol-gel embedded Au73Ag27 core-shell nanoparticles modified electrode showed better synergistic electrocatalytic effect towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide when compared to monometal MTMOS-Aunps and MTMOS-Agnps modified electrodes. These modified electrodes were studied without immobilizing any enzyme in the MTMOS sol-gel matrix. The present study highlights the influence of molar composition of Ag nanoparticles in the Au/Ag bimetallic composition towards the electrocatalytic reduction and sensing of hydrogen peroxide in comparison to monometal Au and Ag nanoparticles.

  13. Immobilization of redox mediators on functionalized carbon nanotube: A material for chemical sensor fabrication and amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D R Shobha Jeykumari; S Senthil Kumar; S Sriman Narayanan

    2005-10-01

    Chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with redox mediators, namely, toluidine blue and thionin have been carried out and the performance of graphite electrode modified with functionalized carbon nanotubes is described. Mechanical immobilization of functionalized single-walled nanotube (SWNT) on graphite electrode was achieved by gently rubbing the electrode surface on carbon nanotubes supported on a glass slide. The electrochemical behaviour of the modified electrodes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The SWNT-modified electrodes showed excellent electrocatalytic effect for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. A decrease in overvoltage was observed as well as an enhanced peak current compared to a bare graphite electrode for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic current was found to be directly proportional to the amount of hydrogen peroxide taken.

  14. H.sub.2O doped WO.sub.3, ultra-fast, high-sensitivity hydrogen sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland; Lee, Se-Hee

    2011-03-22

    An ultra-fast response, high sensitivity structure for optical detection of low concentrations of hydrogen gas, comprising: a substrate; a water-doped WO.sub.3 layer coated on the substrate; and a palladium layer coated on the water-doped WO.sub.3 layer.

  15. A Novel Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor via the Direct Electrochemistry of Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilized on Colloidal Gold Modified Screen-printed Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huangxian Ju

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP immobilized on a colloidal gold modified screen-printed carbon electrode (HRP-Au-SPCE and its application as a disposable sensor were studied. The immobilized HRP displayed a couple of stable and well-defined redox peaks with a formal potential of –0.338 V (vs. SCE and a heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of (0.75±0.04 s-1 in 0.1 M pH 7.0 PBS. It showed a highly thermal stability, fast amperometric response and an electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 without the aid of an electron mediator. The biosensor exhibited high sensitivity, good reproducibility, and long-term stability for the determination of H2O2 with a linear range from 0.8 μM to 1.0 mM and a detection limit of 0. 4 μM at 3σ. The variation coefficients are 2.7 % and 2.3 % for over 10 successive assays at the H2O2 concentrations of 8.0 and 20 μM, respectively. The K M app for H2O2 sensor was determined to be 1.3 mM.

  16. CuO SnO2 element as hydrogen sulfide gas sensor prepared by a sequential electron beam evaporation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Khanna, Atul; Tripathi, Pragya; Nandedkar, R. V.; Potdar, S. R.; Chaudhari, S. M.; Bhatti, S. S.

    2003-10-01

    CuO-SnO2 thin film elements were prepared by sequential evaporation of Sn and Cu metals in high vacuum conditions by an electron beam evaporation technique and subsequent oxidation of the metallic bilayer under flowing oxygen conditions. The electrical properties of the thin film element were studied by a two probe method in the temperature range 110-220°C. On exposing the CuO-SnO2 thin films to a H2S-air mixture, it is observed that the resistance decreases by several thousand times. The H2S sensitivity of the thin film element was measured at three sensor operating temperatures. While the sensitivity decreased with an increase in temperature, both the response and recovery times improved with increasing temperature. The sensor element was selective to H2S gas and did not show any sensitivity to hydrogen and ethanol. The extraordinarily high sensitivity to H2S gas is attributed to the outstanding promoter action of CuO along with the unique porous structure of the thin film element as revealed by scanning electron microscopy studies.

  17. Study and characterization of an integrated circuit-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensor for the detection of particles and radiations; Etude et caracterisation d'un capteur en silicium amorphe hydrogene depose sur circuit integre pour la detection de particules et de rayonnements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Despeisse, M

    2006-03-15

    Next generation experiments at the European laboratory of particle physics (CERN) require particle detector alternatives to actual silicon detectors. This thesis presents a novel detector technology, which is based on the deposition of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensor on top of an integrated circuit. Performance and limitations of this technology have been assessed for the first time in this thesis in the context of particle detectors. Specific integrated circuits have been designed and the detector segmentation, the interface sensor-chip and the sensor leakage current have been studied in details. The signal induced by the track of an ionizing particle in the sensor has been characterized and results on the signal speed, amplitude and on the sensor resistance to radiation are presented. The results are promising regarding the use of this novel technology for radiation detection, though limitations have been shown for particle physics application. (author)

  18. A Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Prepared by Electropolymerization of Pyrrole Based on Screen-Printed Carbon Paste Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A disposable amperometric biosensor for commercial use to detect hydrogenperoxide has been developed. The sensor is based on screen-printed carbon paste electrodesmodified by electropolymerization of pyrrole with horseradish peroxidase (HRP entrapped.The facture techniques of fabricating the enzyme electrodes are suitable for mass productionand quality control. The biosensor shows a linear amperometric response to H2O2 from 0.1to 2.0 mM, with a sensitivity of 33.24 μA mM-1 cm-2. Different operational parameters ofelectropolymerization are evaluated and optimized.

  19. Facile synthesis of silver nanostructures by using various deposition potential and time: A nonenzymetic sensor for hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, Mandana, E-mail: mandanaamiri@uma.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nouhi, Sima [Department of Chemistry, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar [Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanostructures have been successfully fabricated by using electrodeposition method onto indiumtinoxide (ITO) substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–Vis) techniques were employed for characterization of silver nanostructures. The results show nanostructures with different morphology and electrochemical properties can be obtained by various deposition potentials and times. Electrochemical behavior of the nanostructures has been studied by using cyclic voltammetry. Silver nanostructures exhibits good electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The presented electrode can be employed as sensing element for hydrogen peroxide. - Highlights: • Silver nanostructures (AgNS) have been fabricated using electrodeposition ITO. • AgNS with different morphology and electrochemical properties obtained. • AgNS exhibits good electrocatalytic activity for reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  20. Direct electrochemistry of catalase at amine-functionalized graphene/gold nanoparticles composite film for hydrogen peroxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Kejing, E-mail: kejinghuang@163.co [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, 237 Chang' an Road, Xinyang, He' nan 464000 (China); Niu Dejun; Liu Xue; Wu Zhiwei; Fan Yang; Chang Yafang; Wu Yingying [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xinyang Normal University, 237 Chang' an Road, Xinyang, He' nan 464000 (China)

    2011-02-28

    Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of catalase (Cat) was studied based on a nano-composite film consisting of amine functionalized graphene and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified glassy carbon electrode. Graphene was synthesized chemically by Hummers and Offeman method and then was functionalized with amino groups via chemical modification of carboxyl groups introduced on the graphene surface. The nano-composite film showed an obvious promotion of the direct electron transfer between Cat and the underlying electrode, which attributed to the synergistic effect of graphene-NH{sub 2} and AuNPs. The resultant bioelectrode retained its biocatalytic activity and offered fast and sensitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} quantification. Under the optimized experimental conditions, hydrogen peroxide was detected in the concentration range from 0.3 to 600 {mu}M with a detection limit of 50 nM at S/N = 3. The biosensor exhibited some advantages, such as short time respond (2 s), high sensitivity (13.4 {mu}A/mM) and good reproducibility (RSD = 5.8%).

  1. Electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide on platinum-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon sensors and evaluation of their biofouling properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tujunen, Noora; Kaivosoja, Emilia; Protopopova, Vera; Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Österberg, Monika; Koskinen, Jari; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is the product of various enzymatic reactions, and is thus typically utilized as the analyte in biosensors. However, its detection with conventional materials, such as noble metals or glassy carbon, is often hindered by slow kinetics and biofouling of the electrode. In this study electrochemical properties and suitability to peroxide detection as well as ability to resist biofouling of Pt-doped ta-C samples were evaluated. Pure ta-C and pure Pt were used as references. According to the results presented here it is proposed that combining ta-C with Pt results in good electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 oxidation with better tolerance towards aqueous environment mimicking physiological conditions compared to pure Pt. In biofouling experiments, however, both the hybrid material and Pt were almost completely blocked after immersion in protein-containing solutions and did not produce any peaks for ferrocenemethanol oxidation or reduction. On the contrary, it was still possible to obtain clear peaks for H2O2 oxidation with them after similar treatment. Moreover, quartz crystal microbalance experiment showed less protein adsorption on the hybrid sample compared to Pt which is also supported by the electrochemical biofouling experiments for H2O2 detection.

  2. A novel OxyR sensor and regulator of hydrogen peroxide stress with one cysteine residue in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Chen

    Full Text Available In bacteria, OxyR is a peroxide sensor and transcription regulator, which can sense the presence of reactive oxygen species and induce antioxidant system. When the cells are exposed to H(2O(2, OxyR protein is activated via the formation of a disulfide bond between the two conserved cysteine residues (C199 and C208. In Deinococcus radiodurans, a previously unreported special characteristic of DrOxyR (DR0615 is found with only one conserved cysteine. dr0615 gene mutant is hypersensitive to H(2O(2, but only a little to ionizing radiation. Site-directed mutagenesis and subsequent in vivo functional analyses revealed that the conserved cysteine (C210 is necessary for sensing H(2O(2, but its mutation did not alter the binding characteristics of OxyR on DNA. Under oxidant stress, DrOxyR is oxidized to sulfenic acid form, which can be reduced by reducing reagents. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR and global transcription profile results showed that OxyR is not only a transcriptional activator (e.g., katE, drb0125, but also a transcriptional repressor (e.g., dps, mntH. Because OxyR regulates Mn and Fe ion transporter genes, Mn/Fe ion ratio is changed in dr0615 mutant, suggesting that the genes involved in Mn/Fe ion homeostasis, and the genes involved in antioxidant mechanism are highly cooperative under extremely oxidant stress. In conclusion, these findings expand the OxyR family, which could be divided into two classes: typical 2-Cys OxyR and 1-Cys OxyR.

  3. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of hemoglobin on a glassy carbon electrode modified with poly(ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether) and gold nanoparticles on a quaternized cellulose support. A sensor for hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glassy carbon electrode was modified with gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) on a quaternized cellulose support in a film composed of poly(ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether) (PEGDGE), and Hb was immobilized on the Au-NPs. The sensor film was characterized by UV–vis spectra, scanning electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry of the Hb in the Au-Qc/PEGDGE film revealed a pair of well-defined and quasi reversible peaks for the protein heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple at about −0.333 V (vs. SCE). The sensor film also exhibited good electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide. The amperometric response of the biosensor depends linearly on the concentration of nitric oxide in the 0.9 to 160 μM range, and the detection limit is as low as 12 nM (at 3σ). The response to hydrogen peroxide is linear in the 59 nM to 4.6 μM concentration range, and the detection limit is 16 nM (at 3σ). This biosensor is sensitive, reproducible, and long-term stable. (author)

  4. Canadian hydrogen safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian hydrogen safety program (CHSP) is a project initiative of the Codes and Standards Working Group of the Canadian transportation fuel cell alliance (CTFCA) that represents industry, academia, government, and regulators. The Program rationale, structure and contents contribute to acceptance of the products, services and systems of the Canadian Hydrogen Industry into the Canadian hydrogen stakeholder community. It facilitates trade through fair insurance policies and rates, effective and efficient regulatory approval procedures and accommodation of the interests of the general public. The Program integrates a consistent quantitative risk assessment methodology with experimental (destructive and non-destructive) failure rates and consequence-of-release data for key hydrogen components and systems into risk assessment of commercial application scenarios. Its current and past six projects include Intelligent Virtual Hydrogen Filling Station (IVHFS), Hydrogen clearance distances, comparative quantitative risk comparison of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) refuelling options; computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling validation, calibration and enhancement; enhancement of frequency and probability analysis, and Consequence analysis of key component failures of hydrogen systems; and fuel cell oxidant outlet hydrogen sensor project. The Program projects are tightly linked with the content of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 19 Hydrogen Safety. (author)

  5. Corrosion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  6. Onboard Hydrogen/Helium Sensors in Support of the Global Technical Regulation: An Assessment of Performance in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Crash Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, M. B.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; O' Malley, K.; Ruiz, A.

    2012-09-01

    Automobile manufacturers in North America, Europe, and Asia project a 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell powered light-duty road vehicles. These vehicles will be for general consumer applications, albeit initially in select markets but with much broader market penetration expected by 2025. To assure international harmony, North American, European, and Asian regulatory representatives are striving to base respective national regulations on an international safety standard, the Global Technical Regulation (GTR), Hydrogen Fueled Vehicle, which is part of an international agreement pertaining to wheeled vehicles and equipment for wheeled vehicles.

  7. Highly sensitive hydrogen sensor based on graphite-InP or graphite-GaN Schottky barrier with electrophoretically deposited Pd nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdansky Karel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Depositions on surfaces of semiconductor wafers of InP and GaN were performed from isooctane colloid solutions of palladium (Pd nanoparticles (NPs in AOT reverse micelles. Pd NPs in evaporated colloid and in layers deposited electrophoretically were monitored by SEM. Diodes were prepared by making Schottky contacts with colloidal graphite on semiconductor surfaces previously deposited with Pd NPs and ohmic contacts on blank surfaces. Forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics of the diodes showed high rectification ratio and high Schottky barrier heights, giving evidence of very small Fermi level pinning. A large increase of current was observed after exposing diodes to flow of gas blend hydrogen in nitrogen. Current change ratio about 700,000 with 0.1% hydrogen blend was achieved, which is more than two orders-of-magnitude improvement over the best result reported previously. Hydrogen detection limit of the diodes was estimated at 1 ppm H2/N2. The diodes, besides this extremely high sensitivity, have been temporally stable and of inexpensive production. Relatively more expensive GaN diodes have potential for functionality at high temperatures.

  8. Electrochemical hydrogen peroxide sensor based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with nanosheets of copper-doped copper(II) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new electrochemical sensor for H2O2 was constructed by depositing copper doped CuO nanosheets on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The morphology and composition of the modified electrode were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical properties of the electrode were studied using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The catalytic performance of the sensor was studied in 100 mM NaOH solution via differential pulse voltammetry and revealed the sensor to display significantly improved electrocatalytic activity with respect to the analysis of the H2O2 in comparison to a plain GCE or a GCE modified with copper only. The response to H2O2 at a working voltage of −0.46 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) is linear in the 0.003 – 8 mM concentration range, and the detection limit is 0.21 mM (at an S/N ratio of 3). Satisfactory results were obtained in the analysis of tap, rain and river waters spiked with H2O2. The analytical performance of this electrode compares favorably to the results obtained with other commonly used techniques for analysis of H2O2. (author)

  9. Palladium Implanted Silicon Carbide for Hydrogen Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntele, C. I.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Muntele, L.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon carbide is intended for use in fabrication of high-temperature, efficient hydrogen sensors. Traditionally, when a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of SiC, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. We have produced both a palladium coated SiC as well as a palladium, ion implanted SiC sensor. The palladium implantation was done at 500 C into the Si face of 6H, N-type SiC at various energies, and at various fluences. Then, we measured the hydrogen sensitivity response of each fabricated sensor by exposing them to hydrogen while monitoring the current flow across the p-n junction(s), with respect to time. The sensitivity of each sensor was measured at temperatures between 27 and 300 C. The response of the SiC sensors produced by Pd implantation has revealed a completely different behaviour than the SiC sensors produced by Pd deposition. In the Pd-deposited SiC sensors as well as in the ones reported in the literature, the current rises in the presence of hydrogen at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures. In the case of Pd-implanted SiC sensors, the current decreases in the presence of hydrogen whenever the temperature is raised above 100 C. We will present the details and conclusions from the results obtained during this meeting.

  10. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  11. Room temperature hydrogen gas sensor based on ZnO nanorod arrays grown on a SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate via a microwave-assisted chemical solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, J.J., E-mail: j1j2h72@yahoo.com [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800 (Malaysia); Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Basrah, Basrah (Iraq); Mahdi, M.A. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800 (Malaysia); Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Basrah, Basrah (Iraq); Chin, C.W.; Abu-Hassan, H. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800 (Malaysia); Hassan, Z., E-mail: zai@usm.my [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory (N.O.R), School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang 11800 (Malaysia)

    2013-01-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly quality ZnO nanorods arrays were grown on SiO{sub 2} substrate using chemical solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use PVA-Zn(OH){sub 2} nanocomposites as seed layer to grow ZnO nanorods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanorods arrays show good sensitivity at room temperature to H{sub 2} gas. - Abstract: High-quality zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays were grown on a silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}/Si) substrate via a microwave irradiation-assisted chemical solution method. The SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate was seeded with polyvinyl alcohol-Zn (OH){sub 2} nanocomposites prior to the complete growth of ZnO nanorods through a chemical solution method. X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope, and photoluminescence results indicated the high quality of the produced ZnO nanorods. The hydrogen (H{sub 2})-sensing capabilities of the ZnO nanorod arrays were investigated at room temperature (RT), and the sensitivity was 294% in the presence of 1000 ppm of H{sub 2}. The sensing measurements for H{sub 2} gas at various temperatures (25-250 Degree-Sign C) were repeatable for over 100 min. The sensor exhibited a sensitivity of 1100% at 250 Degree-Sign C upon exposure to 1000 ppm of H{sub 2}. Hysteresis was observed in the sensor at different H{sub 2} concentrations at different temperatures. Moreover, the response times ranged from 60 to 25 s over the range of operating temperatures from RT to 250 Degree-Sign C.

  12. Taste sensor; Mikaku sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toko, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1998-03-05

    This paper introduces a taste sensor having a lipid/polymer membrane to work as a receptor of taste substances. The paper describes the following matters: this sensor uses a hollow polyvinyl chloride rod filled with KCl aqueous solution, and placed with silver and silver chloride wires, whose cross section is affixed with a lipid/polymer membrane as a lipid membrane electrode to identify taste from seven or eight kinds of response patterns of electric potential output from the lipid/polymer membrane; measurements of different substances presenting acidic taste, salty taste, bitter taste, sweet taste and flavor by using this sensor identified clearly each taste (similar response is shown to a similar taste even if the substances are different); different responses are indicated on different brands of beers; from the result of measuring a great variety of mineral waters, a possibility was suggested that this taste sensor could be used for water quality monitoring sensors; and application of this taste sensor may be expected as a maturation control sensor for Japanese sake (wine) and miso (bean paste) manufacturing. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Sensors for Highly Toxic Gases: Methylamine and Hydrogen Chloride Detection at Low Concentrations in an Ionic Liquid on Pt Screen Printed Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugappan, Krishnan; Silvester, Debbie S.

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available Pt screen printed electrodes (SPEs) have been employed as possible electrode materials for methylamine (MA) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas detection. The room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C2mim][NTf2]) was used as a solvent and the electrochemical behaviour of both gases was first examined using cyclic voltammetry. The reaction mechanism appears to be the same on Pt SPEs as on Pt microelectrodes. Furthermore, the analytical utility was studied to understand the behaviour of these highly toxic gases at low concentrations on SPEs, with calibration graphs obtained from 10 to 80 ppm. Three different electrochemical techniques were employed: linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV), with no significant differences in the limits of detection (LODs) between the techniques (LODs were between 1.4 to 3.6 ppm for all three techniques for both gases). The LODs achieved on Pt SPEs were lower than the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit (OSHA PEL) limits of the two gases (5 ppm for HCl and 10 ppm for MA), suggesting that Pt SPEs can successfully be combined with RTILs to be used as cheap alternatives for amperometric gas sensing in applications where these toxic gases may be released. PMID:26506358

  14. Sensors for Highly Toxic Gases: Methylamine and Hydrogen Chloride Detection at Low Concentrations in an Ionic Liquid on Pt Screen Printed Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Murugappan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available Pt screen printed electrodes (SPEs have been employed as possible electrode materials for methylamine (MA and hydrogen chloride (HCl gas detection. The room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylimide ([C2mim][NTf2] was used as a solvent and the electrochemical behaviour of both gases was first examined using cyclic voltammetry. The reaction mechanism appears to be the same on Pt SPEs as on Pt microelectrodes. Furthermore, the analytical utility was studied to understand the behaviour of these highly toxic gases at low concentrations on SPEs, with calibration graphs obtained from 10 to 80 ppm. Three different electrochemical techniques were employed: linear sweep voltammetry (LSV, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV and square wave voltammetry (SWV, with no significant differences in the limits of detection (LODs between the techniques (LODs were between 1.4 to 3.6 ppm for all three techniques for both gases. The LODs achieved on Pt SPEs were lower than the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit (OSHA PEL limits of the two gases (5 ppm for HCl and 10 ppm for MA, suggesting that Pt SPEs can successfully be combined with RTILs to be used as cheap alternatives for amperometric gas sensing in applications where these toxic gases may be released.

  15. A novel sensor for dopamine based on the turn-on fluorescence of Fe-MIL-88 metal-organic frameworks-hydrogen peroxide-o-phenylenediamine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao; Jiang, Zhongwei; Mu, Ruizhu; Li, Yuanfang

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a novel sensor based on fluorescence enhancement of Fe-MIL-88- H2O2-o-phenylenediamine (OPD) system for the determination of dopamine (DA) was developed. Fe-MIL-88 with intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity tended to oxidize the nonfluorescent OPD into the fluorescent 2,3-diaminophenazine (DAP) with the presence of H2O2. When DA was introduced, the autoxidation of DA to yield hydroxyl radical (·OH) was further enhanced by Fe(3+) site in Fe3-μ3-oxo clusters exiting in Fe-MIL-88 MOFs, meanwhile the generated Fe(2+) appeared to involve a Fenton type reaction in the presence of H2O2 to cause a continuous production of ·OH radicals which greatly enhanced the conversion efficiency of the OPD to fluorescent DAP. Thus, the turn-on fluorescence method for the DA detection was established. The linear range was from 50nm to 30μM with detection limit 46nm (3σ/s). Furthermore, the proposed method has been reliably applied to determine dopamine content in dopamine hydrochloride injection and human urine with satisfactory results, which suggests its great potential for assay DA in chemical and biological analytical applications. PMID:27474319

  16. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  17. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  18. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under th

  19. Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2005-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors; 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity; 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. This presentation discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  20. Hydrogen Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The series of absorption or emission lines that are characteristic of the hydrogen atom. According to the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, devised by Danish physicist Neils Bohr (1885-1962) in 1913, the hydrogen atom can be envisaged as consisting of a central nucleus (a proton) around which a single electron revolves. The electron is located in one of a number of possible permitted orbits, each...

  1. Drift-corrected nanoplasmonic hydrogen sensing by polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    Accurate and reliable hydrogen sensors are an important enabling technology for the large-scale introduction of hydrogen as a fuel or energy storage medium. As an example, in a hydrogen-powered fuel cell car of the type now introduced to the market, more than 15 hydrogen sensors are required for safe operation. To enable the long-term use of plasmonic sensors in this particular context, we introduce a concept for drift-correction based on light polarization utilizing symmetric sensor and sensing material nanoparticles arranged in a heterodimer. In this way the inert gold sensor element of the plasmonic dimer couples to a sensing-active palladium element if illuminated in the dimer-parallel polarization direction but not the perpendicular one. Thus the perpendicular polarization readout can be used to efficiently correct for drifts occurring due to changes of the sensor element itself or due to non-specific events like a temperature change. Furthermore, by the use of a polarizing beamsplitter, both polarization signals can be read out simultaneously making it possible to continuously correct the sensor response to eliminate long-term drift and ageing effects. Since our approach is generic, we also foresee its usefulness for other applications of nanoplasmonic sensors than hydrogen sensing.Accurate and reliable hydrogen sensors are an important enabling technology for the large-scale introduction of hydrogen as a fuel or energy storage medium. As an example, in a hydrogen-powered fuel cell car of the type now introduced to the market, more than 15 hydrogen sensors are required for safe operation. To enable the long-term use of plasmonic sensors in this particular context, we introduce a concept for drift-correction based on light polarization utilizing symmetric sensor and sensing material nanoparticles arranged in a heterodimer. In this way the inert gold sensor element of the plasmonic dimer couples to a sensing-active palladium element if illuminated in the dimer

  2. Hydrogen meter for service in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This standard establishes the requirements for the design, materials, fabrication, quality assurance, examination, and acceptance testing of a hydrogen meter and auxiliary equipment for use in radioactive or nonradioactive liquid sodium service. The meter shall provide a continuous and accurate indication of the hydrogen impurity concentration over the range 0.03 to 10 ppM hydrogen in sodium at temperatures between 800 and 10000F (427 and 5380C). The meter may also be used to rapidly monitor changes in hydrogen concentration, over the same concentration range, and, therefore can be used as a sensor for sodium-water reactions in LMFBR steam generators

  3. Metamaterial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their intriguing properties, as well as the large potential applications for designing functional devices. In this paper, we review the current status of metamaterial sensors, with an emphasis on the evanescent wave amplification and the accompanying local field enhancement characteristics. Examples of the sensors are given to illustrate the principle and the performance of the metamaterial sensor. The paper concludes with an optimistic outlook regarding the future of metamaterial sensor.

  4. Attention Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built us

  5. Quantification of the atomic hydrogen flux as a function of filament temperature and H2 flow rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugur, D.; Storm, A.J.; Verberk, R.; Brouwer, J.C.; Sloof, W.G.

    2012-01-01

    An isothermal sensor is developed to quantify the atomic hydrogen flux on a surface, which can be located at any distance from the molecular hydrogen cracking unit. This flux is determined from the measured heat effect due to recombination of atomic hydrogen at the sensor surface. The temperature of

  6. Characterization Test Report for the Mnemonics-UCS Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Joshua J.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this testing includes the Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System delivered to KSC: two interrogator (transceiver) systems, four temperature sensors, with wooden mounting blocks, two antennas, two power supplies, network cables, and analysis software. Also included are a number of additional temperature sensors and newly-developed hydrogen sensors

  7. Nanotube-Based Chemical and Biomolecular Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Koh; B.Kim; S.Hong; H.Lim; H.C.Choi

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief review about recent results regarding carbon nanotube (CNT)-based chemical and biomolecular sensors. For the fabrication of CNT-based sensors, devices containing CNT channels between two metal electrodes are first fabricated usually via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process or "surface programmed assembly" method. Then, the CNT surfaces are often functionalized to enhance the selectivity of the sensors. Using this process, highly-sensitive CNT-based sensors can be fabricated for the selective detection of various chemical and biological molecules such as hydrogen, ammonia, carbon monoxide, chlorine gas, DNA, glucose, alcohol, and proteins.

  8. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  9. Attention Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Börner, Dirk; KALZ Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketch was used in the context of an experiment for the PhD project “Ambient Learning Displays”. The sketch comprises a custom-built attention sensor. The sensor measured (during the experiment) whether a participant looked at and thus attended a public display. The sensor was built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment and the open source computer vision library OpenCV for Processing. Available under the GNU LGPL licence version 3 or higher.

  10. Generator cooling hydrogen purity improvement system using hydrogen absorbing alloy; Suiso kyuzo gokin riyo hatsudenkinai suiso jundo kojo system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, H.; Kabutomori, T.; Wakisaka, Y. [Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Y.; Kogi, T.; Sato, J.; Haruki, N. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan); Fujita, T. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-09-15

    Described herein is a system which uses a hydrogen-absorbing alloy to purify a hydrogen gas stream used as a coolant for power generator. Hydrogen in the stream containing impurities such as nitrogen can be selectively absorbed by sufficiently cooled hydrogen-absorbing alloy. Impurity gases concentrated in the alloy pores are released, and then the alloy is heated to release hydrogen. This purifies hydrogen to at least 99.99%. This system essentially consists of an hydrogen-absorbing unit, hot water production/supply system which circulates hot water of 80 to 90degC to release hydrogen out of the alloy, pretreatment unit, and temperature and pressure sensors. It is confirmed, by the test in which the system is connected to a commercial power generator of 600MW, that the system can be continuously operated to purify hydrogen to at least 99.9% for an extended period. 4 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  12. Microfabricated Chemical Sensors for Safety and Emission Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Chen, L.-Y.; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1998-01-01

    Chemical sensor technology is being developed for leak detection, emission monitoring, and fire safety applications. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Using these technologies, sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  13. Hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To the non-nonsense engineer, any talk of a hydrogen economy may seem like so much hot air. This paper reports that as legislative, safety and environmental issues continue to tighten, they're promoting hydrogen's chances as an energy source and, more immediately, its prospects as a chemical feedstock. Paradoxically, the environmental demands that are stimulating hydrogen demand are also inhibiting the gas's production. Previously, gasoline was made with benzene, which means that H2 was rejected. But now that the laws mandate lower aromatic and higher oxygenate levels in gasolines, there's less H2 available as byproduct. At the same time, H2 demand is rising in hydrodesulfurization units, since the same laws require refiners to cut sulfur levels in fuels. Supplementary sources for the gas are also shrinking. In the chlor-alkali industry, H2 output is dropping, as demand for its coproduct chlorine weakens. At the same time, H2 demand for the making of hydrogen peroxide is growing, as that environmentally safer bleach gains chlorine's market share

  14. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  15. Chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  16. Smart Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, C.

    2007-01-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refers to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduced inside the sensor some of the basic functions of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, non-uniformity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the front end of FPA microbolometers processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation thresholding.

  17. Pathogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Irudayaraj

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of sensors for detecting foodborne pathogens has been motivated by the need to produce safe foods and to provide better healthcare. However, in the more recent times, these needs have been expanded to encompass issues relating to biosecurity, detection of plant and soil pathogens, microbial communities, and the environment. The range of technologies that currently flood the sensor market encompass PCR and microarray-based methods, an assortment of optical sensors (including bioluminescence and fluorescence, in addition to biosensor-based approaches that include piezoelectric, potentiometric, amperometric, and conductometric sensors to name a few. More recently, nanosensors have come into limelight, as a more sensitive and portable alternative, with some commercial success. However, key issues affecting the sensor community is the lack of standardization of the testing protocols and portability, among other desirable elements, which include timeliness, cost-effectiveness, user-friendliness, sensitivity and specificity. [...

  18. Chemical Gas Sensors for Aeronautic and Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. Two areas of particular interest are safety monitoring and emission monitoring. In safety monitoring, detection of low concentrations of hydrogen at potentially low temperatures is important while for emission monitoring the detection of nitrogen oxides, hydrogen, hydrocarbons and oxygen is of interest. This paper discusses the needs of aeronautic and space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) Micromachining and microfabrication technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. (2) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. The number of dual-use commercial applications of this microfabricated gas sensor technology make this general area of sensor development a field of significant interest.

  19. Behaviour of hydrogen in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the behaviour of hydrogen in liquid sodium with the aid of the hydrogen sensor of nickel membrane. The study was carried out in a natural circulation sodium loop which consisted of a hot zone and a cold zone. It was observed that at constant cold zone temperature, the partial pressure of hydrogen in liquid sodium at hot zone decreases slightly with increasing temperature. On the other hand, at constant temperature of hot zone, a logarithmic plot of hydrogen partial pressure versus the reciprocal temperature of cold zone yielded a straight line. This study also showed that the diffusion of hydrogen in liquid sodium through the membrane is the rate controlling step for the process, rather than a surface reaction. (author)

  20. Gas sensor with attenuated drift characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Shin [Danbury, CT; Chen, Philip S. H. [Bethel, CT; Neuner, Jeffrey W [Bethel, CT; Welch, James [Fairfield, CT; Hendrix, Bryan [Danbury, CT; Dimeo, Jr., Frank [Danbury, CT

    2008-05-13

    A sensor with an attenuated drift characteristic, including a layer structure in which a sensing layer has a layer of diffusional barrier material on at least one of its faces. The sensor may for example be constituted as a hydrogen gas sensor including a palladium/yttrium layer structure formed on a micro-hotplate base, with a chromium barrier layer between the yttrium layer and the micro-hotplate, and with a tantalum barrier layer between the yttrium layer and an overlying palladium protective layer. The gas sensor is useful for detection of a target gas in environments susceptible to generation or incursion of such gas, and achieves substantial (e.g., >90%) reduction of signal drift from the gas sensor in extended operation, relative to a corresponding gas sensor lacking the diffusional barrier structure of the invention

  1. Advanced Sensor Arrays and Packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryter, John Wesley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Christopher J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ramaiyan, Kannan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brosha, Eric L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Novel sensor packaging elements were designed, fabricated, and tested in order to facilitate the transition of electrochemical mixed-potential sensors toward commercialization. Of the two designs completed, the first is currently undergoing field trials, taking direct measurements within vehicle exhaust streams, while the second is undergoing preliminary laboratory testing. The sensors’ optimal operating conditions, sensitivity to hydrogen, and long-­term baseline stability were also investigated. The sensing capabilities of lanthanum chromite (La0.8Sr0.2CrO3) and indium-­doped tin oxide (ITO) working electrodes were compared, and the ITO devices were selected for pre-­commercial field trials testing at a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle fueling station in California. Previous data from that fueling station were also analyzed, and the causes of anomalous baseline drift were identified.

  2. Piezoceramic Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, Valeriy

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the latest and complete information about various types of piezosensors. A sensor is a converter of the measured physical size to an electric signal. Piezoelectric transducers and sensors are based on piezoelectric effects. They have proven to be versatile tools for the measurement of various processes. They are used for quality assurance, process control and for research and development in many different industries. In each area of application specific requirements to the parameters of transducers and sensors are developed. This book presents the fundamentals, technical des

  3. Automotive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Jiri; Illing, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Sensors are an essential component of most electronic systems in the car. They deliver input parameters for comfort features, engine and emission control as well as for the active and passive safety systems. New technologies such as silicon micromachining play an important role for the introduction of these sensors in all vehicle classes. The importance and use of these sensor technologies in today"s automotive applications will be shown in this article. Finally an outlook on important current developments and new functions in the car will be given.

  4. An electrochemical hydrogen meter for measuring hydrogen in sodium using a ternary electrolyte mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Sridharan, R; Nagaraj, S; Gnanasekaran, T; Periaswami, G

    2003-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for measuring hydrogen concentration in liquid sodium that is based on a ternary mixture of LiCl, CaCl sub 2 and CaHCl as the electrolyte has been developed. DSC experiments showed the eutectic temperature of this ternary system to be approx 725 K. Impedance spectroscopic analysis of the electrolyte indicated ionic conduction through a molten phase at approx 725 K. Two electrochemical hydrogen sensors were constructed using the ternary electrolyte of composition 70 mol% LiCl:16 mol% CaHCl:14 mol% CaCl sub 2 and tested at 723 K in a mini sodium loop and at hydrogen levels of 60-250 ppb in sodium. The sensors show linear response in this concentration range and are capable of detecting a change of 10 ppb hydrogen in sodium over a background level of 60 ppb. Identification of this electrolyte system and its use in a sensor for measuring hydrogen in sodium are described in this paper.

  5. An electrochemical hydrogen meter for measuring hydrogen in sodium using a ternary electrolyte mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, R.; Mahendran, K. H.; Nagaraj, S.; Gnanasekaran, T.; Periaswami, G.

    2003-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for measuring hydrogen concentration in liquid sodium that is based on a ternary mixture of LiCl, CaCl 2 and CaHCl as the electrolyte has been developed. DSC experiments showed the eutectic temperature of this ternary system to be ˜725 K. Impedance spectroscopic analysis of the electrolyte indicated ionic conduction through a molten phase at ˜725 K. Two electrochemical hydrogen sensors were constructed using the ternary electrolyte of composition 70 mol% LiCl:16 mol% CaHCl:14 mol% CaCl 2 and tested at 723 K in a mini sodium loop and at hydrogen levels of 60-250 ppb in sodium. The sensors show linear response in this concentration range and are capable of detecting a change of 10 ppb hydrogen in sodium over a background level of 60 ppb. Identification of this electrolyte system and its use in a sensor for measuring hydrogen in sodium are described in this paper.

  6. Development of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors and Sensor Arrays for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, W. H.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring, fire detection, and environmental monitoring. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. However, due to issues of selectivity and cross-sensitivity, individual sensors are limited in the amount of information that they can provide in environments that contain multiple chemical species. Thus, sensor arrays are being developed to address detection needs in such multi-species environments. This paper discusses the needs of space applications as well as the point-contact sensor technology and sensor arrays being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, hydrazine, nitrogen oxides (NO,), carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed as well as arrays for leak, fire, and emissions detection. Demonstrations of the technology will also be discussed. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  7. Vibration sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These sensors, which aim is the surveillance of the fast breeder reactor internal structure, were designed considering the following requirements: - long term utilization under low frequencies conditions (1 to 50 Hz) and detection of accelerations lower than 0,01 g, - operation with a temperature up to 6000C and receiving important neutron and gamma flux. Monoaxial sensors with a liquid vibrating mass (sodium) were thus developed, based on the electromagnetic flow meter principles (Faraday effect)

  8. Wireless sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamberti, Vincent E.; Howell, JR, Layton N.; Mee, David K.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2016-02-09

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting a target material. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon exposure to vapor or liquid from the target material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The target material is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the changes in the tensile stress.

  9. Monitoring Biodegradation of Magnesium Implants with Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Daoli; Wang, Tingting; Guo, Xuefei; Kuhlmann, Julia; Doepke, Amos; Dong, Zhongyun; Shanov, Vesselin N.; Heineman, William R.

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium and its alloys exhibit properties such as high strength, light weight, and in vivo corrosion that make them promising candidates for the development of biodegradable metallic implant materials for bone repair, stents and other medical applications. Sensors have been used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium and its alloys by measuring the concentrations of the following corrosion products: magnesium ions, hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. The corrosion characterization system with home-made capillary pH and Mg2+ microsensors has been developed for real-time detection of magnesium corrosion in vitro. A hydrogen gas sensor was used to monitor the corrosion of magnesium by measuring the concentration of the hydrogen gas reaction product in vivo. The high permeability of hydrogen through skin allows transdermal monitoring of the biodegradation of a magnesium alloy implanted beneath the skin by detecting hydrogen gas at the skin surface. The sensor was used to map hydrogen concentration in the vicinity of an implanted magnesium alloy.

  10. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  11. Catalytic hydrogen peroxide decomposition on La1-xSrxCo03-d perovskite oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, Van-Ahn. T.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.; Berg, van den A.

    2005-01-01

    Lanthanide perovskite oxides are mentioned as material for hydrogen peroxide sensor because they can catalytically decompose hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous medium. The catalytic properties of these perovskite oxides to hydrogen peroxide are suggested due to their oxygen vacancies influenced by the

  12. MEMS sensor technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Zhuangde

    2012-01-01

    Since 1992 the author has led research group in Xi'an Jiaotong University to investigate and develop microelectro mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors, including pressure sensor, acceleration sensor, gas sensor, viscosity & density sensor, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip and integrated sensor etc. This paper introduces the technologies and research results related to MEMS sensors we achieved in the last 20 years.

  13. DISPLACEMENT SENSOR

    OpenAIRE

    Spronk, J.W.; Bonse, M.H.W.

    1996-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9641999 (A1) There is described a measuring system for detecting a positional variation of an object (V), comprising: a reference device (10) defining an X-direction; a first group (30) of at least three sensor members (31, 32, 33) for providing measuring signals indicative of a positional variation in a Z-direction relative to the reference device; a second group (40) of at least two sensor members (41, 42; 43, 44) for providing measuring signals indicative of a positional var...

  14. Load sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Ende, D.; Almeida, P.M.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a load sensor comprising a polymer matrix and a piezo-ceramic material such as PZT, em not bedded in the polymer matrix, which together form a compos not ite, wherein the polymer matrix is a liquid crystalline resin, and wherein the piezo-ceramic material is a PZT powder for

  15. Chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  16. Gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  17. Gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  18. CCD sensors.

    OpenAIRE

    O. S. Neuimin; S. M. Dyachenko

    2010-01-01

    The principle of action, the basic parameters, the application CCD and achievements of the leading companies in their improved performance are considered. Methods of color image acquisition existing today are described. The table of parameters of modern image sensors which are used in modern technics are made.

  19. CCD sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Neuimin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The principle of action, the basic parameters, the application CCD and achievements of the leading companies in their improved performance are considered. Methods of color image acquisition existing today are described. The table of parameters of modern image sensors which are used in modern technics are made.

  20. Vibration sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Matěj, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper lays out a design of a system for reading the radar antenna gearbox vibrations. Firstly it names different types of sensors and defines their suitability for this usage. It describes their important electric and frequency properties. Secondly it shows a design of the data transmission system from the transducer to a computer and describes measured data changes according to the gearbox faults.

  1. Optical fibre microwire sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Brambilla, G; Belal, M.; Jung, Y.; Song, Z; F. Xu; Newson, T. P.; Richardson, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews sensing applications of optical fibre microwires and nanowires. In addition to the usual benefits of sensors based on optical fibres, these sensors are extremely compact and have fast response speeds. In this review sensors will be grouped in three categories according to their morphology: linear sensors, resonant sensors and tip sensors. While linear and resonant sensors mainly exploit the fraction of power propagating outside the microwire physical boundary, tip sensors t...

  2. Nanoscale Electrocatlyst for Chemicalnd Biolgical Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Nan

    interests in understanding of fundamental electronic properties of hybrid nanomaterials and their potential applications in next generation ultra-sensitive chemical sensors and biosensors. As the first man-made coordination compound, Prussian Blue (PB) has a long history dating back over 300 years ago (the...... first synthesis in 1704). This interesting material has recently been used broadly as an electron transfer (ET) catalyst for new chemical and biological sensors. We have initiated efforts in synthesis, functional characterization and applications of PB in novel nanostructured forms focused on controlled......-standing graphene papers. PBNPs doped graphene paper shows highly efficient electrocatalysis towards reduction of hydrogen peroxide and can be used as flexible chemical sensors for potential applications in detection of hydrogen peroxide or/and other organic peroxides. The as-prepared PBNPs-RGO paper is further...

  3. Novel Hydrogen Bioreactor and Detection Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Ye, Xinhao; Del Campo, Julia Martin; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-01-01

    In vitro hydrogen generation represents a clear opportunity for novel bioreactor and system design. Hydrogen, already a globally important commodity chemical, has the potential to become the dominant transportation fuel of the future. Technologies such as in vitro synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB)-the use of more than 10 purified enzymes to catalyze unnatural catabolic pathways-enable the storage of hydrogen in the form of carbohydrates. Biohydrogen production from local carbohydrate resources offers a solution to the most pressing challenges to vehicular and bioenergy uses: small-size distributed production, minimization of CO2 emissions, and potential low cost, driven by high yield and volumetric productivity. In this study, we introduce a novel bioreactor that provides the oxygen-free gas phase necessary for enzymatic hydrogen generation while regulating temperature and reactor volume. A variety of techniques are currently used for laboratory detection of biohydrogen, but the most information is provided by a continuous low-cost hydrogen sensor. Most such systems currently use electrolysis for calibration; here an alternative method, flow calibration, is introduced. This system is further demonstrated here with the conversion of glucose to hydrogen at a high rate, and the production of hydrogen from glucose 6-phosphate at a greatly increased reaction rate, 157 mmol/L/h at 60 °C. PMID:25022362

  4. Novel Hydrogen Bioreactor and Detection Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Ye, Xinhao; Del Campo, Julia Martin; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-01-01

    In vitro hydrogen generation represents a clear opportunity for novel bioreactor and system design. Hydrogen, already a globally important commodity chemical, has the potential to become the dominant transportation fuel of the future. Technologies such as in vitro synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB)-the use of more than 10 purified enzymes to catalyze unnatural catabolic pathways-enable the storage of hydrogen in the form of carbohydrates. Biohydrogen production from local carbohydrate resources offers a solution to the most pressing challenges to vehicular and bioenergy uses: small-size distributed production, minimization of CO2 emissions, and potential low cost, driven by high yield and volumetric productivity. In this study, we introduce a novel bioreactor that provides the oxygen-free gas phase necessary for enzymatic hydrogen generation while regulating temperature and reactor volume. A variety of techniques are currently used for laboratory detection of biohydrogen, but the most information is provided by a continuous low-cost hydrogen sensor. Most such systems currently use electrolysis for calibration; here an alternative method, flow calibration, is introduced. This system is further demonstrated here with the conversion of glucose to hydrogen at a high rate, and the production of hydrogen from glucose 6-phosphate at a greatly increased reaction rate, 157 mmol/L/h at 60 °C.

  5. Tribology in Gaseous Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawae, Yoshinori; Sugimura, Joich

    Hydrogen is expected as a clean and renewable energy carrier for future environment-friendly society. Many machine elements in hydrogen energy systems should be operating within hydrogen gas and tribological behavior, such as friction and wear, of bearings and seals are affected by the hydrogen environment through some interactions between material surfaces and gaseous hydrogen, i.e., physisorption of hydrogen molecules and following chemisorptions of dissociated atoms on metal surfaces, formation of metal hydride and reduction of metal oxide layer by hydrogen atoms diffused into bulk. Therefore, friction and wear characteristics of tribomaterials in the hydrogen environment should be appropriately understood to establish a design guideline for reliable hydrogen utilizing systems. This paper reviews the current knowledge about the effect of hydrogen on friction and wear of materials, and then describes our recent progress of hydrogen research in the tribology field.

  6. Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, David L.; T-Raissi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This final report describes the R&D activities and projects conducted for NASA under the 6-year NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities grant program. Contained within this report are summaries of the overall activities, one-page description of all the reports funded under this program and all of the individual reports from each of the 29 projects supported by the effort. The R&D activities cover hydrogen technologies related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. In the span of 6 years, the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities program funded a total of 44 individual university projects, and employed more than 100 faculty and over 100 graduate research students in the six participating universities. Researchers involved in this program have filed more than 20 patents in all hydrogen technology areas and put out over 220 technical publications in the last 2 years alone. This 6 year hydrogen research program was conducted by a consortium of six Florida universities: Florida International University (FIU) in Miami, Florida State University (FSU) and Florida A&M University (FAMU) in Tallahassee, University of Central Florida (UCF) in Orlando, University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa, and University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) of the University of Central Florida managed the research activities of all consortium member universities except those at the University of Florida. This report does not include any of the programs or activities conducted at the University of Florida, but can be found in NASA/CR-2008-215440-PART 1-3.

  7. Novel colorimetric sensor for oral malodour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volatile sulphur compounds are the primary constituents of oral malodour. Quantitative tools for the detection of oral malodour are beneficial to evaluate the intensity of malodour, analyse its causes and monitor the effectiveness of customized treatments. We have developed an objective, cost effective, do-it-yourself colorimetric sensor for oral malodour quantification. The sensor consisted of a sensing solution, a gas sampling unit for collecting a known volume of mouth air and a photometric detector. The sensing solution was iodine and the depletion of iodine on reaction with hydrogen sulphide was detected colorimetrically using starch. The detection limit of the sensor is 0.05 μg L-1 of hydrogen sulphide, which is fit-for-purpose for oral malodour detection in healthy subjects as well as halitosis patients. Volatile sulphur compounds in mouth air were quantified in healthy human volunteers using this portable sensor and the detected levels were in the range of 0.2-0.4 μg L-1. There was a good correlation between the VSC levels detected by the colorimetric sensor and halimeter (R2 = 0.934). The developed sensor can be easily fabricated in the laboratory, and it shows high potential to be used as a clinical evaluation tool for oral malodour assessments.

  8. Novel colorimetric sensor for oral malodour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alagirisamy, Nethaji; Hardas, Sarita S. [Hindustan Unilever Research Center, 64 Main Road, Whitefield, Bangalore 560066 (India); Jayaraman, Sujatha, E-mail: sujatha.jayaraman@unilever.com [Hindustan Unilever Research Center, 64 Main Road, Whitefield, Bangalore 560066 (India)

    2010-02-19

    Volatile sulphur compounds are the primary constituents of oral malodour. Quantitative tools for the detection of oral malodour are beneficial to evaluate the intensity of malodour, analyse its causes and monitor the effectiveness of customized treatments. We have developed an objective, cost effective, do-it-yourself colorimetric sensor for oral malodour quantification. The sensor consisted of a sensing solution, a gas sampling unit for collecting a known volume of mouth air and a photometric detector. The sensing solution was iodine and the depletion of iodine on reaction with hydrogen sulphide was detected colorimetrically using starch. The detection limit of the sensor is 0.05 {mu}g L{sup -1} of hydrogen sulphide, which is fit-for-purpose for oral malodour detection in healthy subjects as well as halitosis patients. Volatile sulphur compounds in mouth air were quantified in healthy human volunteers using this portable sensor and the detected levels were in the range of 0.2-0.4 {mu}g L{sup -1}. There was a good correlation between the VSC levels detected by the colorimetric sensor and halimeter (R{sup 2} = 0.934). The developed sensor can be easily fabricated in the laboratory, and it shows high potential to be used as a clinical evaluation tool for oral malodour assessments.

  9. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept b

  10. Semiconductor sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Frank, E-mail: frank.hartmann@cern.c [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, KIT, Wolfgang-Gaede-Str. 1, Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany)

    2011-02-01

    Semiconductor sensors have been around since the 1950s and today, every high energy physics experiment has one in its repertoire. In Lepton as well as Hadron colliders, silicon vertex and tracking detectors led to the most amazing physics and will continue doing so in the future. This contribution tries to depict the history of these devices exemplarily without being able to honor all important developments and installations. The current understanding of radiation damage mechanisms and recent R and D topics demonstrating the future challenges and possible technical solutions for the SLHC detectors are presented. Consequently semiconductor sensor candidates for an LHC upgrade and a future linear collider are also briefly introduced. The work presented here is a collage of the work of many individual silicon experts spread over several collaborations across the world.

  11. Pressure sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  12. Development of chemiresponsive sensors for detection of common homemade explosives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brotherton, Christopher M.; Wheeler, David Roger

    2012-05-01

    Field-structured chemiresistors (FSCRs) are polymer based sensors that exhibit a resistance change when exposed to an analyte of interest. The amount of resistance change depends on the polymer-analyte affinity. The affinity can be manipulated by modifying the polymer within the FSCRs. In this paper, we investigate the ability of chemically modified FSCRs to sense hydrogen peroxide vapor. Five chemical species were chosen based on their hydrophobicity or reactivity with hydrogen peroxide. Of the five investigated, FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide exhibited a significant response to hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additionally, these same FSCRs were evaluated against a common interferrant in hydrogen peroxide detection, water vapor. For the conditions investigated, the FSCRs modified with allyl methyl sulfide were able to successfully distinguish between water vapor and hydrogen peroxide vapor. A portion of the results presented here will be submitted to the Sensors and Actuators journal.

  13. Position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Siegfried (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A radiant energy angle sensor is provided wherein the sensitive portion thereof comprises a pair of linear array detectors with each detector mounted normal to the other to provide X and Y channels and a pair of slits spaced from the pair of linear arrays with each of the slits positioned normal to its associated linear array. There is also provided electrical circuit means connected to the pair of linear array detectors and to separate X and Y axes outputs.

  14. Load sensor

    OpenAIRE

    van den Ende, D.; Almeida, P.M.R.; Dingemans, T.J.; Van der Zwaag, S.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a load sensor comprising a polymer matrix and a piezo-ceramic material such as PZT, em not bedded in the polymer matrix, which together form a compos not ite, wherein the polymer matrix is a liquid crystalline resin, and wherein the piezo-ceramic material is a PZT powder forming 30-60% by volume of the composite, and wherein the PZT powder forms 40-50% by volume of the composite.

  15. Variable reluctance proximity sensors for cryogenic valve position indication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyd, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A test was conducted to determine the performance of a variable reluctance proximity sensor system when installed in a space shuttle external tank vent/relief valve. The sensors were used as position indicators. The valve and sensors were cycled through a series of thermal transients; while the valve was being opened and closed pneumatically, the sensor's performance was being monitored. During these thermal transients, the vent valve was cooled ten times by liquid nitrogen and two times by liquid hydrogen. It was concluded that the sensors were acceptable replacements for the existing mechanical switches. However, the sensors need a mechanical override for the target similar to what is presently used with the mechanical switches. This override could insure contact between sensor and target and eliminate any problems of actuation gap growth caused by thermal gradients.

  16. A microBio reactor for hydrogen production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volponi, Joanne V.; Walker, Andrew William

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the potential of developing a microfluidic reactor capable of enzymatically converting glucose and other carbohydrates to hydrogen. This aggressive project was motivated by work in enzymatic hydrogen production done by Woodward et al. at OWL. The work reported here demonstrated that hydrogen could be produced from the enzymatic oxidation of glucose. Attempts at immobilizing the enzymes resulted in reduced hydrogen production rates, probably due to buffer compatibility issues. A novel in-line sensor was also developed to monitor hydrogen production in real time at levels below 1 ppm. Finally, a theoretical design for the microfluidic reactor was developed but never produced due to the low production rates of hydrogen from the immobilized enzymes. However, this work demonstrated the potential of mimicking biological systems to create energy on the microscale.

  17. Multi-model soft sensor for hydrogen purity in catalytic reforming process based on improved fast search clustering algorithm and Gaussian processes regression%基于改进的快速搜索聚类算法和高斯过程回归的催化重整脱氯前氢气纯度多模型建模方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    双翼帆; 顾幸生

    2016-01-01

    氢气是催化重整反应的重要副产物之一,建立氢气纯度软测量模型有助于指导生产。针对催化重整过程工况复杂多变、单一软测量模型难以满足精度要求,提出了一种基于改进的快速搜索聚类算法和高斯过程回归的多模型软测量建模方法。首先,针对快速搜索聚类算法中截断距离是由人为设定的问题,提出了一种截断距离确定方法。并用该改进算法对历史数据进行自动分类,建立各个数据子集的高斯过程回归模型,使各子模型在最大程度上反映不同工况点。然后,针对聚类后得到的带有类别标签的历史数据,建立类别辨识模型,与各子模型相结合,形成开关模式的组合模型。最后,将该建模方法应用于连续催化重整装置,建立了脱氯前氢气纯度的在线计算模型。结果表明,该多模型建模方法具有较高的预测精度,优于传统的单一模型,有一定的实用价值。%Hydrogen is one of the most important by-products in catalytic reforming process, a hydrogen purity soft sensor will contribute to guiding production. However, the working condition of catalytic reforming process is complex and changeable, a single model soft sensor is hard to ensure the prediction accuracy. Aiming at this problem, this paper present a combined soft sensor model based on modified fast search clustering algorithm and Gaussian processes regression (GPR). The history sample are classified by the novel clustering algorithm and then each sub-model is built through GPR with the classified sub sample. Meanwhile the class identification model has been built by GPR as well. Finally, the combined model soft sensor is established in a switcher form. The combined is applied to a catalytic reformer and the result indicates that the proposed method has a good result and has certain practical value.

  18. Thermal flow micro sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Elwenspoek, M

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on sensors fabricated by silicon micromachining technology using the thermal domain for the measurement of fluid flow. Attention is paid especially to performance and geometry of the sensors. Three basic types of thermal flow sensors are discussed: anemometers, calorimetric flow sensors and time of flight flow sensors. Anemometers may comprise several heaters and temperature sensors and from a geometric point of view are similar sometimes for calorimetric flow sensors. We fi...

  19. A brief review of biomedical sensors and robotics sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Yanli Luo; , Qiaoying Zhou; Wenbin Luo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a brief review of biomedical sensors and robotics sensors. More specifically, we will review the cochlear sensors and retinal sensors in the category of biomedical sensors and ultrasonic Sensors and infrared motion detection sensors in the category of robotic sensors. Our goal is to familiarize readers with the common sensors used in the fields of both biom

  20. CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR PRECISE CALIBRATION OF TEMPERATURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Solovyev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A calibration technique for cryogenic temperature sensors is proposed and implemented. The experimental setup is based on the helium cryogenerator, providing calibration of the temperature sensors of various types in wide temperature range, including cryogenic band (25-100K. A condensation thermometer with hydrogen, neon, argon and xenon as working gases is used as a reference sensor. The experimental setup was successfully used for precise (0.1K precision calibration of platinum resistive temperature detectors (Pt-100 for international nuclear physics experiments MuSun and PolFusion. The setup can also be used for calibration of temperature sensors of the other types.

  1. Smart gas sensors for mitigating environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the viewpoint of industrial and automobile exhaust pollution control sensors capable of detecting and metering the concentration of harmful gasers such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen, hydrocarbons, NO sub x, SO sub x, etc, in the ambient are desired. Solid state gas sensors based on semiconducting metal oxides have been widely used for the detection and metering of a host of reducing gases, albeit with varying degrees of success. In this presentation, development aspects of new solid-state CO and H2 sensors are described. Benevolent effect of second phases and catalyst on the sensing characteristics, and the possible sensing mechanism are discussed. In the case of titania-based CO sensors, test results in a Ford V6 engine under programmed near-stoichiometric combustion conditions are also presented. Some new concepts in the area of reliable metering of humidity (water content) in the ambient are briefly highlighted. (author)

  2. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  3. Cold weather hydrogen generation system and method of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreier, Ken Wayne (Madison, CT); Kowalski, Michael Thomas (Seymour, CT); Porter, Stephen Charles (Burlington, CT); Chow, Oscar Ken (Simsbury, CT); Borland, Nicholas Paul (Montpelier, VT); Goyette, Stephen Arthur (New Hartford, CT)

    2010-12-14

    A system for providing hydrogen gas is provided. The system includes a hydrogen generator that produces gas from water. One or more heat generation devices are arranged to provide heating of the enclosure during different modes of operation to prevent freezing of components. A plurality of temperature sensors are arranged and coupled to a controller to selectively activate a heat source if the temperature of the component is less than a predetermined temperature.

  4. LAYERS OF METALS NANOPARTICLES ON VARIOUS SEMICONDUCTORS FOR HYDROGEN DETECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Černohorský, O. (Ondřej); Žďánský, K. (Karel); Yatskiv, R. (Roman); Grym, J.

    2012-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles have many interesting properties which is given by their space restriction. Their large active surface is very well exploited during catalysis. Pd and Pt are metals know for their ability to dissociate molecular hydrogen on single atoms. We prepared Schottky diodes on semiconductors InP, GaN, GaAs, and InGaAs to obtain hydrogen sensor. Method of preparation such diodes is electrophoretic deposition of Pd or Pt nanoparticles from their colloid solution onto semiconductor su...

  5. Fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Nieuwland, R.A.; Toet, P.M.; Agovic, K.

    2010-01-01

    A brief overview of fiber Bragg grating based sensor technology from sensor head, read out unit and commercial applications is given. Fiber Bragg grating based sensor systems are becoming mature rapidly. Components for commercial pressure sensors and temperature sensors are available and slowly gett

  6. Influenza Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Basil I.; Song, Xuedong; Unkefer, Clifford; Silks, III, Louis A.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2005-05-17

    A sensor for the detection of tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase within a sample is disclosed, where a positive detection indicates the presence of a target virus within the sample. Also disclosed is a trifunctional composition of matter including a trifunctional linker moiety with groups bonded thereto including (a) an alkyl chain adapted for attachment to a substrate, (b) a fluorescent moiety capable of generating a fluorescent signal, and (c) a recognition moiety having a spacer group of a defined length thereon, the recognition moiety capable of binding with tetrameric multivalent neuraminidase.

  7. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  8. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular structures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhanting

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the advances in the studies of hydrogen-bonding-driven supramolecular systems  made over the past decade. It is divided into four parts, with the first introducing the basics of hydrogen bonding and important hydrogen bonding patterns in solution as well as in the solid state. The second part covers molecular recognition and supramolecular structures driven by hydrogen bonding. The third part introduces the formation of hollow and giant macrocycles directed by hydrogen bonding, while the last part summarizes hydrogen bonded supramolecular polymers. This book is designed to b

  9. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  10. Hydrogen, this hallucinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the origin of hydrogen for energetic use (mainly by extraction from water), the possible uses of this cumbersome gas (in vehicles, in electricity storage), and outlines that hydrogen economy consumes a lot of other energies (nuclear, wind, sun, biomass, and so on) for a high cost, and that hydrogen is therefore not a solution for the future. Other elements are given in appendix: production methods and processes, figures of energy production, ways to use and to store hydrogen in vehicles, assessment of possibilities for a vehicle, techniques and figures for hydrogen packaging, transport and distribution, energy cost, energetic assessment of hydrogen production, problems associated with distribution (tank filling)

  11. A hydrogen ice cube

    OpenAIRE

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept but where can we put the hydrogen? For many years now metal hydrides, which are compounds of metals and hydrogen, have been considered the perfect solution for this storage and safety problem but a ...

  12. Development and Application of Microfabricated Chemical Gas Sensors For Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Fralick, G.; Thomas, V.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Sawayda, M. S.; Jin, A.; Hammond, J.; Makel, D.; Hall, G.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace applications require the development of chemical sensors with capabilities beyond those of commercially available sensors. In particular, factors such as minimal sensor size, weight, and power consumption are particularly important. Development areas which have potential aerospace applications include launch vehicle leak detection, engine health monitoring and control, and fire detection. Sensor development for these applications is based on progress in three types of technology: 1) Micromachining and microfabrication (Microsystem) technology to fabricate miniaturized sensors. 2) The use of nanocrystalline materials to develop sensors with improved stability combined with higher sensitivity. 3) The development of high temperature semiconductors, especially silicon carbide. Sensor development for each application involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. This paper discusses the needs of space applications and the point-contact sensor technology being developed to address these needs. Sensors to measure hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides (Nox, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are being developed. A description is given of each sensor type and its present stage of development. Demonstration and application these sensor technologies will be described. The demonstrations range from use of a microsystem based hydrogen sensor on the Shuttle to engine demonstration of a nanocrystalline based sensor for NO, detection. It is concluded that microfabricated sensor technology has significant potential for use in a range of aerospace applications.

  13. Sensors for Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Rokne, Jon

    2016-07-15

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on "Sensors for Entertainment", developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored.

  14. Sensors, Update 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-12-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Treatments include current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides an overview of suppliers and market trends for a particular section, and Sensor Standards, reviews recent legislation and requirements for sensors. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  15. DNA and RNA sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; LIN; Lin; ZHAO; Hong; JIANG; Long

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes recent advances in DNA sensor. Major areas of DNA sensor covered in this review include immobilization methods of DNA, general techniques of DNA detection and application of nanoparticles in DNA sensor.

  16. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash

    2003-07-01

    The problem of hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied semiclassically. It is found that the local hydrogen concentration fluctuations-induced extra potential wells, if intense enough, lead to the localized electronic states in a-Si:H. These localized states are metastable. The trapping of electrons and holes in these states leads to the electrical degradation of the material. These states also act as recombination centers for photo-generated carriers (electrons and holes) which in turn may excite a hydrogen atom from a nearby Si–H bond and breaks the weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds.

  17. Advanced moisture sensor research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, C.

    1989-11-01

    This report details the progress in the Phase I, proof of principle study for the DOE sponsored development of an advanced moisture sensor for use in non-paper drying applications. Under this program Southwest Research Institute of San Antonio Texas has developed a novel sensing system based on the technique of hydrogen transient nuclear magnetic resonance (HTNMR). The purpose of the sensor is to improve the efficiency of the drying process. Wide scale application of such efficiency improvements would not only save the consumers money but also reduce the energy consumption, and hence oil imports of the United States. 33 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Super sensor network

    OpenAIRE

    Fjukstad, Bård

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation studies composing a super sensor network from the combination of three functional sensor networks; A Sensor data producing network, a sensor data computing network and a sensor controlling network. The target devices are today labeled as large sensor nodes. The communication are based on an IP network using HTTP as the main protocol. Bonjour is used for service discovery, with some adjustments for technical reasons. This allows for naming and location of available servi...

  19. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  20. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  1. On hydrogen energy strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article focuses on hydrogen energy strategies. Possible problems regarding world stability, progress of hydrogen energy, possible strategies for hydrogen, and essential factors for hydrogen energy technologies are investigated and discussed in detail. Technical, environmental, sustainability and other perspectives are taken into consideration. The importance of hydrogen energy in reducing world problems and achieving a sustainable energy system is also investigated. It is seen that hydrogen energy can play an important role in reducing global problems and improving the sustainability of energy systems. Accordingly, hydrogen strategies based non-fossil energy sources should be developed to reduce world problems and unrest and to increase the level of sustainable development. It is expected that this article will contribute to the development of hydrogen energy strategies that is alternative to fossil-based strategies. (author)

  2. Nuclear electrolytic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive study of hydrogen supply has recently been carried out by Ontario Hydro which indicates that electrolytic hydrogen produced from nuclear electricity could offer the lowest cost option for any future large scale hydrogen supply in the Province of Ontario, Canada. This paper provides a synopsis of the Ontario Hydro study, a brief overview of the economic factors supporting the study conclusion and discussion of a number of issues concerning the supply of electrolytic hydrogen by electric power utilities

  3. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  4. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    produced at relatively low cost. Therefore, they find wide use in lots of applications. However, the method requires a material that possesses some conflicting properties: stable and reproducible relations between air humidity, moisture uptake and a specific property (for instance the length of a hair, the electrical impedance of the material), fast absorption and desorption of the water vapour (to obtain a short response time), small hysteresis, wide range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature-independent output (only responsive to RH). For these reasons, much research is done and is still going on to find suitable materials that combine high performance and low price. In this special feature, three of the four papers report on absorption sensors, all with different focus. Aziz et al describe experiments with newly developed materials. The surface structure is extensively studied, in view of its ability to rapidly absorb water vapour and exhibit a reproducible change in the resistance and capacitance of the device. Sanchez et al employ optical fibres coated with a thin moisture-absorbing layer as a sensitive humidity sensor. They have studied various coating materials and investigated the possibility of using changes in optical properties of the fibre (here the lossy mode resonance) due to a change in humidity of the surrounding air. The third paper, by Weremczuk et al, focuses on a cheap fabrication method for absorption-based humidity sensors. The inkjet technology appears to be suitable for mass fabrication of such sensors, which is demonstrated by extensive measurements of the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of the absorbing layers. Moreover, they have developed a model that describes the relation between humidity and the electrical parameters of the moisture-sensitive layer. Despite intensive research, absorption sensors still do not meet the requirements for high accuracy applications. The dew-point temperature method is more appropriate

  5. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  6. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  7. Survey of hydrogen monitoring devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented are results of a survey of commercially available monitoring devices suitable for hydrogen detection in the secondary containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during the post postulated accident period. Available detectors were grouped into the following five classes: combustion, solid state, electrochemical, thermal conductivity, and absorption. The performance of most available sensors is likely to deteriorate when exposed to the postulated conditions which include moisture, which could be at high temperature, and radioactive noncondensibles. Of the commercial devices, those using metallic filament thermal conductivity detectors seem least susceptible to performance change. Absorption detectors are best suited for this monitoring task but the only available device is designed for pipeline corrosion assessment. Initiation of experimental study to assess apparent deficiencies of commercial detectors is recommended. Also recommended is an analytical/experimental effort to determine the optimum detector array for monitoring in the secondary containment vessels

  8. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  9. Hydrogen Bonds Involving Metal Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović, G.; Raos, N.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds involving metal center as a hydrogen donor or hydrogen acceptor are only a specific type of metal-hydrogen interactions; it is therefore not easy to differentiate hydrogen bond from other metal-hydrogen interactions, especially agostic ones. The first part of the review is therefore devoted to the results of structural chemistry and molecular spectroscopy (NMR, IR), as a tool for differentiating hydrogen bondings from other hydrogen interactions. The classical examples of Pt···...

  10. Electroactive gate materials for a hydrogen peroxide sensitive E-MOSFET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam T.V.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the detection principle of a hydrogen peroxide sensor based on the electrolyte metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (EMOSFET) and possibilities of using different types of redox materials as the gate material for the sensor with respect to the sensitivity and detection limit.

  11. Direct electron transfer biosensor for hydrogen peroxide carrying nanocomplex composed of horseradish peroxidase and Au-nanoparticle – Characterization and application to bienzyme systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Okawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A reagentless electrochemical biosensor for hydrogen peroxide was fabricated. The sensor carries a monolayer of nanocomplex composed of horseradish peroxidase and Au-nanoparticle, and responds to hydrogen peroxide through the highly efficient direct electron transfer at a mild electrode potential without any soluble mediator. Formation of the nanocomplex was studied with visible spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. The sensor performance was analyzed based on a hydrodynamic electrochemical technique and enzyme kinetics. The sensor was applied to fabrication of sensors for glucose and uric acid through further modification of the nanocomplex-carrying electrode with the corresponding hydrogen peroxide-generating oxidases, glucose oxidase and urate oxidase, respectively.

  12. Nanoparticle embedded enzymes for improved lateral flow sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özalp, Veli Cengiz; Zeydanlı, Uğur S.; Lunding, Anita;

    2013-01-01

    -entrapped with Texas Red dextran inside porous polyacrylamide nanoparticles. In this system, enzymes are protected in the porous matrix of polyacrylamide which freely allows the diffusion of the analyte. The sensor is rapid and sensitive for quantification of hydrogen peroxide concentrations. A test solution...... of hydrogen peroxides was quantified with this novel LFA-ROS sensor to obtain a linear range between 1 and 25 μM. Nanoparticle embedding of enzymes is proposed here as a general strategy for developing enzyme-based lateral flow assays, eliminating adverse effects associated with biological samples....

  13. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  14. TFA pixel sensor technology for vertex detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Jarron, P.; Moraes, D.; Despeisse, M.; Dissertori, G.; Dunand, S.; Kaplon. J.; Miazza, C.; Shah, Arvind; Viertel, G M.; Wyrsch, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Pixel microvertex detectors at the SLHC and a future linear collider face very challenging issues: extreme radiation hardness, cooling design, interconnections density and fabrication cost. As an alternative approach we present a novel pixel detector based on the deposition of a Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H) film on top of a readout ASIC. The Thin-Film on ASIC (TFA) technology is inspired by an emerging microelectronic technology envisaged for visible light Active Pixel Sensor (APS)...

  15. Photobiological hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Y; Miyake, J

    1999-01-01

    The principles and recent progress in the research and development of photobiological hydrogen production are reviewed. Cyanobacteria produce hydrogen gas using nitrogenase and/or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenases in cyanobacteria occurs under in the dark under anaerobic conditions by degradation of intracellular glycogen. In vitro and in vivo coupling of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic system with a clostridial hydrogenase via cyanobacterial ferredoxin was demonstrated in the presence of light. Genetic transformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum was successful; the active enzyme was expressed in PCC7942. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Coculture of Rhodobacter and Clostriudium was applied for hydrogen production from glucose. A mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV whose light-harvesting proteins were altered was obtained by UV irradiation. Hydrogen productivity by the mutant was improved when irradiated with monochromatic light of some wavelengths. The development of photobioreactors for hydrogen production is also reviewed.

  16. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  17. Low-cost fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Hishmeh, G.; Ciszek, P.; Lee, S.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The ability to detect hydrogen gas leaks economically and with inherent safety is an important technology that could facilitate commercial acceptance of hydrogen fuel in various applications. In particular, hydrogen fueled passenger vehicles will require hydrogen leak detectors to signal the activation of safety devices such as shutoff valves, ventilating fans, alarms, etc. Such detectors may be required in several locations within a vehicle--wherever a leak could pose a safety hazard. It is therefore important that the detectors be very economical. This paper reports progress on the development of low-cost fiber-optic hydrogen detectors intended to meet the needs of a hydrogen-fueled passenger vehicle. In the design, the presence of hydrogen in air is sensed by a thin-film coating at the end of a polymer optical fiber. When the coating reacts reversibly with the hydrogen, its optical properties are changed. Light from a central electro-optic control unit is projected down the optical fiber where it is reflected from the sensor coating back to central optical detectors. A change in the reflected intensity indicates the presence of hydrogen. The fiber-optic detector offers inherent safety by removing all electrical power from the leak sites and offers reduced signal processing problems by minimizing electromagnetic interference. Critical detector performance requirements include high selectivity, response speed and durability as well as potential for low-cost production.

  18. Ultralow-power hydrogen sensing with single palladium nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, P.; Tong, H.D.; Rijn, C.J.M. van; Merken, P.; Brongersma, S.H.; Crego-Calama, M.

    2009-01-01

    Palladium nanowires were fabricated on silicon substrates using conventional microfabrication techniques. Sensors based on such nanowires show a reversible response to hydrogen concentrations as low as 27 ppm with response times varying from 5 s (H2 concentrations >20%) to 30 s (H2 concentrations <1

  19. Integrated Optical Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambeck, Paul V.; Hoekstra, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    The optical (tele-) communication is the main driving force for the worldwide R&D on integrated optical devices and microsystems. lO-sensors have to compete with many other sensor types both within the optical domain (fiber sensors) and outside that domain, where sensors based on measurand induced c

  20. Sensors, Update 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    1996-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Furthermore, the sensor market as well as peripheral aspects such as standards are covered. Each volume is divided into four sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  1. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  2. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  3. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  4. Sensor sentinel computing device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damico, Joseph P.

    2016-08-02

    Technologies pertaining to authenticating data output by sensors in an industrial environment are described herein. A sensor sentinel computing device receives time-series data from a sensor by way of a wireline connection. The sensor sentinel computing device generates a validation signal that is a function of the time-series signal. The sensor sentinel computing device then transmits the validation signal to a programmable logic controller in the industrial environment.

  5. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  6. Allylammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażej Dziuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated molecular salt, C3H8N+·C2HO4−·0.5H2O, the water O atom lies on a crystallographic twofold axis. The C=C—C—N torsion angle in the cation is 2.8 (3° and the dihedral angle between the CO2 and CO2H planes in the anion is 1.0 (4°. In the crystal, the hydrogen oxalate ions are linked by O—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating [010] chains. The allylammonium cations bond to the chains through N—H...O and N—H...(O,O hydrogen bonds. The water molecule accepts two N—H...O hydrogen bonds and makes two O—H...O hydrogen bonds. Together, the hydrogen bonds generate (100 sheets.

  7. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up....... A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling...

  8. Note: Dissolved hydrogen detection in power transformer oil based on chemically etched fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Ma, Guo-ming; Song, Hong-tu; Zhou, Hong-yang; Li, Cheng-rong; Luo, Ying-ting; Wang, Hong-bin

    2015-10-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor based on chemically etched cladding to detect dissolved hydrogen is proposed and studied in this paper. Low hydrogen concentration tests have been carried out in mixed gases and transformer oil to investigate the repeatability and sensitivity. Moreover, to estimate the influence of etched cladding thickness, a physical model of FBG-based hydrogen sensor is analyzed. Experimental results prove that thin cladding chemically etched by HF acid solution improves the response to hydrogen detection in oil effectively. At last, the sensitivity of FBG sensor chemically etched 16 μm could be as high as 0.060 pm/(μl/l), increased by more than 30% in comparison to un-etched FBG. PMID:26521000

  9. Gas Sensor Evaluations in Polymer Combustion Product Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Rafael H.; Davis, Dennis D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    1999-01-01

    Toxic gases produced by the combustion or thermo-oxidative degradation of materials such as wire insulation, foam, plastics, or electronic circuit boards in space shuttle or space station crew cabins may pose a significant hazard to the flight crew. Toxic gas sensors are routinely evaluated in pure gas standard mixtures, but the possible interferences from polymer combustion products are not routinely evaluated. The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has developed a test system that provides atmospheres containing predetermined quantities of target gases combined with the coincidental combustion products of common spacecraft materials. The target gases are quantitated in real time by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and verified by grab samples. The sensor responses are recorded in real time and are compared to the IR and validation analyses. Target gases such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride can be generated by the combustion of poly(vinyl chloride), polyimide-fluoropolymer wire insulation, polyurethane foam, or electronic circuit board materials. The kinetics and product identifications for the combustion of the various materials were determined by thermogravimetric-IR spectroscopic studies. These data were then scaled to provide the required levels of target gases in the sensor evaluation system. Multisensor toxic gas monitors from two manufacturers were evaluated using this system. In general, the sensor responses satisfactorily tracked the real-time concentrations of toxic gases in a dynamic mixture. Interferences from a number of organic combustion products including acetaldehyde and bisphenol-A were minimal. Hydrogen bromide in the products of circuit board combustion registered as hydrogen chloride. The use of actual polymer combustion atmospheres for the evaluation of sensors can provide additional confidence in the reliability of the sensor response.

  10. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  11. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri Surabhi; De, Debojyoti; Dutta Debajyoti; Bhattacharya Sanjoy K

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to...

  12. Sensors an introductory course

    CERN Document Server

    Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2013-01-01

    Sensors: An Introductory Course provides an essential reference on the fundamentals of sensors. The book is designed to help readers in developing skills and the understanding required in order to implement a wide range of sensors that are commonly used in our daily lives. This book covers the basic concepts in the sensors field, including definitions and terminologies. The physical sensing effects are described, and devices which utilize these effects are presented. The most frequently used organic and inorganic sensors are introduced and the techniques for implementing them are discussed. This book: Provides a comprehensive representation of the most common sensors and can be used as a reference in relevant fields Presents learning materials in a concise and easy to understand manner Includes examples of how sensors are incorporated in real life measurements Contains detailed figures and schematics to assist in understanding the sensor performance Sensors: An Introductory Course is ideal for university stu...

  13. Sensors, Update 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-10-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  14. Sensors, Update 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2002-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  15. Sensors, Update 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-03-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field, presenting the current highlights of sensor and related microelectromechanical systems technology. Coverage includes most recent developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles based on micro- and nanotechnology. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update is of must-have value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  16. Sensors, Update 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Göpel, Wolfgang; Hesse, Joachim

    2001-02-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections: Sensor Technology reviews highlights in applied and basic research, while Sensor Applications covers new or improved applications of sensors, and Sensor Markets provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be invaluable to scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  17. Sensors, Update 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, Henry; Fedder, Gary K.; Korvink, Jan G.

    2003-04-01

    Sensors Update ensures that you stay at the cutting edge of the field. Built upon the series Sensors, it presents an overview of highlights in the field. Coverage includes current developments in materials, design, production, and applications of sensors, signal detection and processing, as well as new sensing principles. Each volume is divided into three sections. Sensor Technology, reviews highlights in applied and basic research, Sensor Applications, covers new or improved applications of sensors, Sensor Markets, provides a survey of suppliers and market trends for a particular area. With this unique combination of information in each volume, Sensors Update will be of value for scientists and engineers in industry and at universities, to sensors developers, distributors, and users.

  18. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  19. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the technical/economic feasibility of the use of hydrogen as an automotive fuel is made based on analyses of the following: the chemical- physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems - with water vapour injection, cryogenic injection, and the low or high pressure injection of hydrogen directly into the combustion chamber; the current commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. The paper concludes that, considering current costs for hydrogen fuel production, distribution and use, at present, the employment of hydrogen fuelled vehicles is feasible only in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives

  20. New hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an overview of the overall hydrogen system. There are separate sections for production, distribution, transport, storage; and applications of hydrogen. The most important methods for hydrogen production are steam reformation of natural gas and electrolysis of water. Of the renewable energy options, production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from wind turbines or by gasification of biomass were found to be the most economic for Finland. Direct use of this electricity or the production of liquid fuels from biomass will be competing alternatives. When hydrogen is produced in the solar belt or where there is cheap hydropower it must be transported over long distances. The overall energy consumed for the transport is from 25 to 40 % of the initial available energy. Hydrogen storage can be divided into stationary and mobile types. The most economic, stationary, large scale hydrogen storage for both long and short periods is underground storage. When suitable sites are not available, then pressure vessels are the best for short period and liquid H2 for long period. Vehicle storage of hydrogen is by either metal hydrides or liquid H2. Hydrogen is a very versatile energy carrier. It can be used to produce heat directly in catalytic burners without flame, to produce electricity in fuel cells with high efficiency for use in vehicles or for peak power shaving, as a fuel component with conventional fuels to reduce emissions, as a way to store energy and as a chemical reagent in reactions

  1. Smart Sensor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Stetter, J. R.; Hesketh, P. J.; Liu, C. C.

    Sensors and sensor systems are vital to our awareness of our surroundings and provide safety, security, and surveillance, as well as enable monitoring of our health and environment. A transformative advance in the field of sensor technology has been the development of "Smart Sensor Systems". The definition of a Smart Sensor may vary, but typically at a minimum a Smart Sensor is the combination of a sensing element with processing capabilities provided by a microprocessor. That is, Smart Sensors are basic sensing elements with embedded intelligence. The sensor signal is fed to the microprocessor, which processes the data and provides an informative output to an external user. A more expansive view of a Smart Sensor System, which is used in this article, is illustrated in Fig. 19.1: a complete self-contained sensor system that includes the capabilities for logging, processing with a model of sensor response and other data, self-contained power, and an ability to transmit or display informative data to an outside user. The fundamental idea of a smart sensor is that the integration of silicon microprocessors with sensor technology cannot only provide interpretive power and customized outputs, but also significantly improve sensor system performance and capabilities.

  2. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  3. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  4. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  5. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwel; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  6. Application of Flexible Micro Temperature Sensor in Oxidative Steam Reforming by a Methanol Micro Reformer

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-Man Lo; Chi-Chung Chang; Chia-Chieh Shen; Shuo-Jen Lee; Chi-Yuan Lee; Chuin-Tih Yeh

    2011-01-01

    Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated ...

  7. In situ measurement of gas composition changes in radio frequency plasmas using a quartz sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method using a quartz sensor (Q-sensor) was developed to observe gas composition changes in radio frequency (rf) plasmas. The output depends on the gases' absolute pressure, molecular weight, and viscosity. The pressure-normalized quartz sensor output depends only on the molecular weight and viscosity of the gas. Consequently, gas composition changes can be detected in the plasmas if a sensor can be used in the plasmas. Influences imparted by the plasmas on the sensor, such as those by reactive particles (e.g., radicals and ions), excited species, electrons, temperature, and electric potentials during measurements were investigated to test the applicability of this quartz sensor measurement to plasma. The Q-sensor measurement results for rf plasmas with argon, hydrogen, and their mixtures are reproducible, demonstrating that the Q-sensor measurement is applicable for plasmas. In this work, pressure- and temperature-normalized Q-sensor output (NQO) were used to obtain the gas composition information of plasma. Temperature-normalization of the Q-sensor output enabled quartz sensor measurements near plasma electrodes, where the quartz sensor temperature increases. The changes in NQO agreed with results obtained by gas analysis using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Results confirmed that the change in NQO is mainly attributable to changes in the densities and kinds of gas molecules in the plasma gas phase, not by other extrinsic influences of plasma. For argon, hydrogen, and argon-hydrogen plasmas, these changes correspond to reduction in nitrogen, production of carbon monoxide, and dissociation of hydrogen molecules, respectively. These changes in NQO qualitatively and somewhat quantitatively agreed with results obtained using gas analysis, indicting that the measurement has a potential application to obtain the gas composition in plasmas without disturbing industrial plasma processes.

  8. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  9. Operations and Maintenance Manual, Atmospheric Contaminant Sensor, Revision B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The sensor is a mass spectrometer system which continuously monitors the atmospheric constituents of hydrogen, water vapor, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide, and monitors the Freons on a demand sampling basis. The manual provides a system description, operational procedures, and maintenance and troubleshooting instructions. Circuit diagrams…

  10. EPRI hydrogen research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for near-term research on hydrogen behavior as it applies to water reactor safety requires the parallel efforts of a number of organizations. A program has been initiated by EPRI to help answer the most pressing generic questions involving small and large scale combustion, hydrogen mixing, and burn control. Experiments, model development, and code validation work are involved

  11. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.

  12. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  13. Hydrogen bonding in polyanilines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahceci, S. (Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)); Toppare, L. (Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)); Yurtsever, E. (Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey))

    1994-11-29

    Hydrogen bonding between poly(bisphenol A carbonate) (PC) and polyaniline (PAn) is analyzed using semi-empirical quantum methodology. Fully optimized AM1 molecular orbital calculations are reported for various aniline structures (monomer, dimer and trimer), the monomer of the PC and the hydrogen-bonded model of PAn-PC oligomer. ((orig.))

  14. Dark hydrogen fermentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The production of hydrogen is a ubiquitous, natural phenomenon under anoxic or anaerobic conditions. A wide variety of bacteria, in swamps, sewage, hot springs, the rumen of cattle etc. is able to convert organic matter to hydrogen, CO2 and metabolites like acetic acid, lactate, ethanol and alanine.

  15. Hydrogen Monitoring Requirements in the Global Technical Regulation on Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Hartmann, Kevin; Bubar, Max; Post, Matthew; Boon-Brett, Lois; Weidner, Eveline; Moretto, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    The United Nations Global Technical Regulation (GTR) Number 13 (Global Technical Regulation on Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles) is the defining document regulating safety requirements in hydrogen vehicles, and in particular fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). GTR Number 13 has been formally implemented and will serve as the basis for the national regulatory standards for FCEV safety in North America (Canada, United States), Japan, Korea, and the European Union. The GTR defines safety requirement for these vehicles, including specifications on the allowable hydrogen levels in vehicle enclosures during in-use and post-crash conditions and on the allowable hydrogen emissions levels in vehicle exhaust during certain modes of normal operation. However, in order to be incorporated into national regulations, that is, in order to be binding, methods to verify compliance to the specific requirements must exist. In a collaborative program, the Sensor Laboratories at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the United States and the Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport in the Netherlands have been evaluating and developing analytical methods that can be used to verify compliance to the hydrogen release requirement as specified in the GTR.

  16. Hydrogen Fuel Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16

    For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

  17. Hydrogen production methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Old, present and new proceses for producing hydrogen are assessed critically. The emphasis throughout is placed on those processes which could be commercially viable before the turn of the century for large-scale hydrogen manufacture. Electrolysis of water is the only industrial process not dependent on fossil resources for large-scale hydrogen production and is likely to remain so for the next two or three decades. While many new processes, including those utilizing sunlight directly or indirectly, are presently not considered to be commercially viable for large-scale hydrogen production, research and development effort is needed to enhance our understanding of the nature of these processes. Water vapour electrolysis is compared with thermochemical processes: the former has the potential for displacing all other processes for producing hydrogen and oxygen from water

  18. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Torrington, CT (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  19. Implementing a hydrogen economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Ritter

    2003-09-01

    In recent years, months, weeks, and even days, it has become increasingly clear that hydrogen as an energy carrier is ‘in’ and carbonaceous fuels are ‘out’1. The hydrogen economy is coming, with the impetus to transform our fossil energy-based society, which inevitably will cease to exist, into a renewable energy-based one2. However, this transformation will not occur overnight. It may take several decades to realize a hydrogen economy. In the meantime, research and development is necessary to ensure that the implementation of the hydrogen economy is completely seamless, with essentially no disruption of the day-to-day activities of the global economy. The world has taken on a monumental, but not insurmountable, task of transforming from carbonaceous to renewable fuels, with clean burning, carbon dioxide-free hydrogen as the logical choice.

  20. Fiber optic chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chuck C.; McCrae, David A.; Saaski, Elric W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of the field of fiber optic chemical sensors. Several different types of fiber optic sensors and probes are described, and references are cited for each category discussed.

  1. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  2. Digital Sensor Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  3. Sapphire optical fiber sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Feth, Shari

    1991-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors offer many advantages over conventional sensors, including; small size, low weight, high strength and durability. Standard silica optical fibers are limited by the material properties of silica. Temperatures above 700°C and other harsh environments are incompatible with standard optical fiber sensors. Sapphire fiber sensors offer another option for fiber optic sensing. Sapphire fibers are limited by the material properties of sapphire, which include high...

  4. DEPOSITION OF PVP-PROTECTED PLATINUM NANOPARTICLES ON SEMICONDUCTOR SUBSTRATES FOR HYDROGEN SENSING

    OpenAIRE

    Černohorský, O. (Ondřej); Yatskiv, R. (Roman); Grym, J.

    2015-01-01

    High quality Schottky diode hydrogen sensors were prepared by the deposition of colloidal graphite on n-type InP substrates partly covered with PVP-protected Pt nanoparticles (NPs). A sub-monolayer of the Pt NPs was created by simple evaporation of the solvent in which Pt NPs were dispersed. The Pt NPs serve to dissociate hydrogen molecules into atomic hydrogen, which is absorbed at the metal-semiconductor interface. Hydrogen absorption leads to the formation of the dipole layer, which change...

  5. Hydrogen sensing using reduced graphene oxide sheets supported by Pd nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated Schottky diode hydrogen sensors prepared by the deposition of reduced graphene oxide functionalized by nanocrystals of Pd on InP substrate. Schottky diodes were investigated by the measurement of current voltage characteristics and further tested for their sensitivity to hydrogen in a cell with a through-flow gas system. Pd nanocrystals which are in direct contact with the semiconductor substrate serve to dissociate hydrogen molecules into atomic hydrogen, lowering the work function of Pd, and resulting in the decreased Schottky barrier height.

  6. Hydrogen sensing using reduced graphene oxide sheets supported by Pd nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatskiv, Roman; Grym, Jan

    2013-06-01

    We investigated Schottky diode hydrogen sensors prepared by the deposition of reduced graphene oxide functionalized by nanocrystals of Pd on InP substrate. Schottky diodes were investigated by the measurement of current voltage characteristics and further tested for their sensitivity to hydrogen in a cell with a through-flow gas system. Pd nanocrystals which are in direct contact with the semiconductor substrate serve to dissociate hydrogen molecules into atomic hydrogen, lowering the work function of Pd, and resulting in the decreased Schottky barrier height.

  7. Sensors and actuators, Twente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the organization and the research programme of the Sensor and Actuator (S&A) Research Unit of the University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands. It includes short descriptions of all present projects concerning: micromachined mechanical sensors and actuators, optical sensors,

  8. Sensors for Entertainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Rokne, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on “Sensors for Entertainment”, developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored. PMID:27428981

  9. Environmental Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Kirk; Hart, Jane; Ong, Royan

    2004-01-01

    Sensor networks for the natural environment require an understanding of earth science, combined with sensor, communications and computer technology. We discuss the evolution from data logging to sensor networks, describe our research from a glacial environment and highlight future challenges in this field.

  10. Sensors for Entertainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Lamberti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on “Sensors for Entertainment”, developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored.

  11. Optical waveguide sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fluitman, J.; Popma, Th.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the field of optical waveguide sensors is presented. Some emphasis is laid on the development of a single scheme under which the diversity of sensor principles can be arranged. First three types of sensors are distinguished: intrinsic, extrinsic and active. Next, two steps are disting

  12. Sensors for Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Rokne, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Sensors are becoming ubiquitous in all areas of science, technology, and society. In this Special Issue on "Sensors for Entertainment", developments in progress and the current state of application scenarios for sensors in the field of entertainment is explored. PMID:27428981

  13. Thermal flow micro sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, M.

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on sensors fabricated by silicon micromachining technology using the thermal domain for the measurement of fluid flow. Attention is paid especially to performance and geometry of the sensors. Three basic types of thermal flow sensors are discussed: anemometers, calorimetric flow se

  14. Polymer waveguide sensor arrays for enhanced multichemical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Steven R.; Low, Aaron; Ruiz, David; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2007-09-01

    We report the development of absorption-based waveguide sensors for the toxic industrial chemicals hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen sulfide, and chlorine. Polymeric materials formulated as colorimetric sensors have been engineered into miniature waveguide channels. The channels have dimensions 30x0.6x0.05 mm (LxWxH) and are patterned on glass substrates using a photolithography process. Subsequent light coupling was achieved using optical fibers. Enhanced sensitivity is observed owing to the increased path length as described by the Beer-Lambert law. When the individual sensors are challenged with the IDLH concentrations of their target gases they react instantaneously with response times (T90) less than 20 seconds. When tested simultaneously as an array, a predictable level of cross interference was observed. The cross interference indicates that the inclusion of a signal processing algorithm is required to selectively resolve the analytes and reduce or eliminate false alarms.

  15. Nanoparticle embedded enzymes for improved lateral flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özalp, Veli C; Zeydanlı, Uğur S; Lunding, Anita; Kavruk, Murat; Öz, M Tufan; Eyidoğan, Füsun; Olsen, Lars F; Öktem, Hüseyin A

    2013-08-01

    In this study, combining the nanoparticle embedded sensors with lateral flow assays, a novel strategy for ensuring the quality of signalling in lateral flow assays (LFAs) was developed. A LFA for reactive oxygen species (ROS) is reported that is based on horse radish peroxidase (HRP) which is co-entrapped with Texas Red dextran inside porous polyacrylamide nanoparticles. In this system, enzymes are protected in the porous matrix of polyacrylamide which freely allows the diffusion of the analyte. The sensor is rapid and sensitive for quantification of hydrogen peroxide concentrations. A test solution of hydrogen peroxides was quantified with this novel LFA-ROS sensor to obtain a linear range between 1 and 25 μM. Nanoparticle embedding of enzymes is proposed here as a general strategy for developing enzyme-based lateral flow assays, eliminating adverse effects associated with biological samples.

  16. Development of conductometric polymer sensor for gaseous hydrogen chloride

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Qingli

    2005-01-01

    � Electropolymerized thin films from polyaniline and its derivatives and more than thirty copolymers with the derivatives were studied. Mainly, electrochemical methods were used. Anion-exchange and the influence of pH and electrode potential on the electrical parameters of the polymer films were studied. The results were also evaluated by the newly developed technique of simultaneous applications of two- and four point measurements. Optimization of polymerization conditions was further used f...

  17. Research activities on the hydrogen behaviour inside BWR containment after LOCA developed under the CNEN-AMN agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansaldo Meccanico Nucleare and CNEN begun in 1975 a research program on the impact of hydrogen on BWR safety, in order to increase the knowledge of hydrogen behaviour, concentration distribution inside the containment atmosphere, concentration measurement and concentration control. This report presents the research already completed with particular references to the hydrogen diffusion studies and to the hydrogen concentration measurement, also giving a general description of the experimental facilities erected in order to perform the required tests on hydrogen sensors. A short description of the research under development and of the future programs is also presented

  18. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack

    For interplanetary missions landing on a planet of potential biological interest, United States NASA planetary protection currently requires that the flight system must be assembled, tested and ultimately launched with the intent of minimizing the bioload taken to and deposited on the planet. Currently the only NASA approved microbial reduction method is dry heat sterilization process. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements. The VHP sterilization technology is widely used by the medical industry, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal of our study is determine the minimum VHP process conditions for PP acceptable microbial reduction levels. A series of experiments were conducted using Geobacillus stearothermophilus to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters -hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of pulses, and exposure duration -the investigation also considered the possible effect of environmental pa-rameters. Temperature, relative humidity, and material substrate effects on lethality were also studied. Based on the results, a most conservative D value was recommended. This recom-mended D value was also validated using VHP "hardy" strains that were isolated from clean-rooms and environmental populations collected from spacecraft relevant areas. The efficiency of VHP at ambient condition as well as VHP material compatibility will also be

  19. Superconductivity for hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emerging hydrogen economy is expected to deal with a large amount of liquid hydrogen produced from the renewable energy resources. The main advantage of liquid hydrogen in comparison with other forms of its storage and transportation is in allowing wide use of superconductivity, which would optimise energy efficiency of the economy. The basic element of the infrastructure for hydrogen economy is a network of superconducting pipelines carrying simultaneously liquid hydrogen and loss-free electricity. The most likely material for such infrastructure is MgB2, the only superconductor efficiently working at boiling temperature of liquid hydrogen and not showing strong critical current reduction on grain boundaries. The cheap techniques for the preparation of MgB2 are hot isostatic pressing, resistive sintering and paint coating. These and other advanced techniques are able to provide MgB2 with suitable for the infrastructure structural and superconducting properties. The preparation of a large-area superconducting joint between two pieces of MgB2 as a technique enabling this infrastructure is reported. A potential of synergy between liquid hydrogen and superconductivity is revealed in a range of possible new energy applications.

  20. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.; Misra, A.; Miller, E. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A significant component of the US DOE Hydrogen Program is the development of a practical technology for the direct production of hydrogen using a renewable source of energy. High efficiency photoelectrochemical systems to produce hydrogen directly from water using sunlight as the energy source represent one of the technologies identified by DOE to meet this mission. Reactor modeling and experiments conducted at UH provide strong evidence that direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency greater than 10% can be expected using photoelectrodes fabricated from low-cost, multijunction (MJ) amorphous silicon solar cells. Solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8% have been achieved using a 10.3% efficient MJ amorphous silicon solar cell. Higher efficiency can be expected with the use of higher efficiency solar cells, further improvement of the thin film oxidation and reduction catalysts, and optimization of the solar cell for hydrogen production rather than electricity production. Hydrogen and oxygen catalysts developed under this project are very stable, exhibiting no measurable degradation in KOH after over 13,000 hours of operation. Additional research is needed to fully optimize the transparent, conducting coatings which will be needed for large area integrated arrays. To date, the best protection has been afforded by wide bandgap amorphous silicon carbide films.

  1. Multifuctional integrated sensors (MFISES).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homeijer, Brian D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roozeboom, Clifton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Many emerging IoT applications require sensing of multiple physical and environmental parameters for: completeness of information, measurement validation, unexpected demands, improved performance. For example, a typical outdoor weather station measures temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, light intensity, rainfall, wind speed and direction. Existing sensor technologies do not directly address the demand for cost, size, and power reduction in multi-paramater sensing applications. Industry sensor manufacturers have developed integrated sensor systems for inertial measurements that combine accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers, but do not address environmental sensing functionality. In existing research literature, a technology gap exists between the functionality of MEMS sensors and the real world applications of the sensors systems.

  2. Multi-Sensor Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Ahmed, Zaki; Khan, M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    The use of multiple sensors typically requires the fusion of data from different type of sensors. The combined use of such a data has the potential to give an efficient, high quality and reliable estimation. Input data from different sensors allows the introduction of target attributes (target type......, size) into the association logic. This requires a more general association logic, in which both the physical position parameters and the target attributes can be used simultaneously. Although, the data fusion from a number of sensors could provide better and reliable estimation but abundance...... processing units for same type of multiple sensors, typically radar in our case....

  3. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M.; Lien, S.; Weaver, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  4. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M; Lien, S; Weaver, P F

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  5. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  6. A hydrogen utopia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Robert S. [National Academy of Engineering, Washington, DC (United States)

    2004-02-01

    The use of hydrogen as a fuel for transportation and stationary applications is receiving much favorable attention as a technical and policy issue. However, the widespread introduction of this technology is likely also to have negative consequences that are not being actively discussed in broad public forums. Such possibilities include, among others, delayed development of other energy alternatives, hazards of catalyst or hydride metals, disruptive employment shifts, land usage conflicts, and increased vehicle usage. Even though hydrogen is likely to be beneficial in its overall societal and environmental effects, hydrogen technology advocates must understand the range of problematic issues and prepare to address them. (Author)

  7. A Hydrogen Utopia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Robert Stephen; Reynolds, Bruce Allen

    2004-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as a fuel for transportation and stationary applications is receiving much favorable attention as a technical and policy issue. However, the widespread introduction of this technology is likely also to have negative consequences that are not being actively discussed in broad public forums. Such possibilities include, among others, delayed development of other energy alternatives, hazards of catalyst or hydride metals, disruptive employment shifts, land usage conflicts, and increased vehicle usage. Even though hydrogen is likely to be beneficial in its overall societal and environmental effects, hydrogen technology advocates must understand the range of problematic issues and prepare to address them.

  8. Inside the Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Nowakowski, M; Fierro, D Bedoya; Manjarres, A D Bermudez

    2016-01-01

    We apply the non-linear Euler-Heisenberg theory to calculate the electric field inside the hydrogen atom. We will demonstrate that the electric field calculated in the Euler-Heisenberg theory can be much smaller than the corresponding field emerging from the Maxwellian theory. In the hydrogen atom this happens only at very small distances. This effect reduces the large electric field inside the hydrogen atom calculated from the electromagnetic form-factors via the Maxwell equations. The energy content of the field is below the pair production threshold.

  9. Biological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  10. Develop Improved Materials to Support the Hydrogen Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Michael C. Martin

    2012-07-18

    The Edison Materials Technology Center (EMTEC) solicited and funded hydrogen infrastructure related projects that have a near term potential for commercialization. The subject technology of each project is related to the US Department of Energy hydrogen economy goals as outlined in the multi-year plan titled, 'Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan.' Preference was given to cross cutting materials development projects that might lead to the establishment of manufacturing capability and job creation. The Edison Materials Technology Center (EMTEC) used the US Department of Energy hydrogen economy goals to find and fund projects with near term commercialization potential. An RFP process aligned with this plan required performance based objectives with go/no-go technology based milestones. Protocols established for this program consisted of a RFP solicitation process, white papers and proposals with peer technology and commercialization review (including DoE), EMTEC project negotiation and definition and DoE cost share approval. Our RFP approach specified proposals/projects for hydrogen production, hydrogen storage or hydrogen infrastructure processing which may include sensor, separator, compression, maintenance, or delivery technologies. EMTEC was especially alert for projects in the appropriate subject area that have cross cutting materials technology with near term manufacturing and commercialization opportunities.

  11. Technoeconomic analysis of renewable hydrogen production, storage, and detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.; Kadam, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Technical and economic feasibility studies of different degrees of completeness and detail have been performed on several projects being funded by the Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Work this year focused on projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, although analyses of projects at other institutions are underway or planned. Highly detailed analyses were completed on a fiber optic hydrogen leak detector and a process to produce hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis followed by steam reforming of the pyrolysis oil. Less detailed economic assessments of solar and biologically-based hydrogen production processes have been performed and focused on the steps that need to be taken to improve the competitive position of these technologies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted on all analyses to reveal the degree to which the cost results are affected by market changes and technological advances. For hydrogen storage by carbon nanotubes, a survey of the competing storage technologies was made in order to set a baseline for cost goals. A determination of the likelihood of commercialization was made for nearly all systems examined. Hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis and steam reforming was found to have significant economic potential if a coproduct option could be co-commercialized. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production may have economic potential, but only if low-cost cells can be modified to split water and to avoid surface oxidation. The use of bacteria to convert the carbon monoxide in biomass syngas to hydrogen was found to be slightly more expensive than the high end of currently commercial hydrogen, although there are significant opportunities to reduce costs. Finally, the cost of installing a fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detection system in passenger vehicles was found to be very low and competitive with alternative sensor systems.

  12. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  13. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  14. MEMS optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an all-optical sensor utilizing effective index modulation of a waveguide and detection of a wavelength shift of reflected light and a force sensing system accommodating said optical sensor. One embodiment of the invention relates to a sensor system comprising...... at least one multimode light source, one or more optical sensors comprising a multimode sensor optical waveguide accommodating a distributed Bragg reflector, at least one transmitting optical waveguide for guiding light from said at least one light source to said one or more multimode sensor optical...... waveguides, a detector for measuring light reflected from said Bragg reflector in said one or more multimode sensor optical waveguides, and a data processor adapted for analyzing variations in the Bragg wavelength of at least one higher order mode of the reflected light....

  15. Silicon force sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  16. Digital Sensor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  17. Digital Sensor Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Quinn, Edward L. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States); Mauck, Jerry L. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States); Bockhorst, Richard M. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  18. Heterogeneous hydrogenation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main types of heterogeneous catalysts used for hydrogenation, the methods for their preparation, and the structure and chemistry of their surfaces are considered, as well as the catalytic activity and the mechanism of action in the hydrogenation of unsaturated and aromatic compounds, of CO, and of carbonyl compounds and in the hydrorefining of fuels. Chief attention is paid to supported Ni catalysts, to the methods for their preparation and physicochemical studies, and to the development of novel catalytic systems through modification. A novel type of catalyst for hydrogenation, viz. metal carbides, is described. Some aspects of the mechanochemical treatment of hydrogenation catalysts, including in situ methods, are discussed. Sulfide catalysts for hydrotreating are also discussed in detail. The bibliography includes 340 references.

  19. Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket test operations at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) result in substantial quantities of hydrogen gas that is flared from the facility and helium gas that is...

  20. Interstitial hydrogen storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, H.A.

    1980-09-30

    A metal hydride fuel system is described that incorporates a plurality of storage elements that may be individually replaced to provide a hydrogen fuel system for combustion engines having a capability of partial refueling is presented.

  1. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  2. Hydrogen on the rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Using hydrogen as an energy carrier has long been discussed as a route to a greener future, and although headway has been less significant than many hoped, recent developments point to tangible progress.

  3. Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Liquid hydrogen is used extensively by NASA to support cryogenic rocket testing. In addition, there are many commercial applications in which delivery and use of...

  4. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperature...

  5. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Misra, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. One promising option to meet this goal is direct photoelectrolysis in which light absorbed by semiconductor-based photoelectrodes produces electrical power internally to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Under this program, direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8 % have been demonstrated using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Detailed loss analysis models indicate that solar-to-chemical conversion greater than 10% can be achieved with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, the authors describe the continuing progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, results of outdoor testing, and efforts to develop high efficiency, stable prototype systems.

  6. Hydrogen Bonding in Hydrogenated Amorphous Germanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.S.Abo-Ghazala; S. Al Hazmy

    2004-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) were prepared by radio frequency glow discharge deposition at various substrate temperatures. The hydrogen distribution and bonding structure in a-Ge:H were discussed based on infrared absorption data. The correlation between infrared absorption spectra and hydrogen effusion measurements was used to determine the proportionality constant for each vibration mode of the Ge-H bonds. The results reveal that the bending mode appearing at 835 cm?1 is associated with the Ge-H2 (dihydride) groups on the internal surfaces of voids. While 1880 cm?1 is assigned to vibrations of Ge-H (monohydride) groups in the bulk, the 2000 cm?1 stretching mode is attributed to Ge-H and Ge-H2 bonds located on the surfaces of voids. For films associated with bending modes in the infrared spectra, the proportionality constant values of the stretching modes near 1880 and 2000 cm?1 are found to be lower than those of films which had no corresponding bending modes.

  7. The hydrogen issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-01-17

    Hydrogen is often proposed as the fuel of the future, but the transformation from the present fossil fuel economy to a hydrogen economy will need the solution of numerous complex scientific and technological issues, which will require several decades to be accomplished. Hydrogen is not an alternative fuel, but an energy carrier that has to be produced by using energy, starting from hydrogen-rich compounds. Production from gasoline or natural gas does not offer any advantage over the direct use of such fuels. Production from coal by gasification techniques with capture and sequestration of CO₂ could be an interim solution. Water splitting by artificial photosynthesis, photobiological methods based on algae, and high temperatures obtained by nuclear or concentrated solar power plants are promising approaches, but still far from practical applications. In the next decades, the development of the hydrogen economy will most likely rely on water electrolysis by using enormous amounts of electric power, which in its turn has to be generated. Producing electricity by burning fossil fuels, of course, cannot be a rational solution. Hydroelectric power can give but a very modest contribution. Therefore, it will be necessary to generate large amounts of electric power by nuclear energy of by renewable energies. A hydrogen economy based on nuclear electricity would imply the construction of thousands of fission reactors, thereby magnifying all the problems related to the use of nuclear energy (e.g., safe disposal of radioactive waste, nuclear proliferation, plant decommissioning, uranium shortage). In principle, wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power have the potential to produce enormous amounts of electric power, but, except for wind, such technologies are too underdeveloped and expensive to tackle such a big task in a short period of time. A full development of a hydrogen economy needs also improvement in hydrogen storage, transportation and distribution

  8. The hydrogen issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-01-17

    Hydrogen is often proposed as the fuel of the future, but the transformation from the present fossil fuel economy to a hydrogen economy will need the solution of numerous complex scientific and technological issues, which will require several decades to be accomplished. Hydrogen is not an alternative fuel, but an energy carrier that has to be produced by using energy, starting from hydrogen-rich compounds. Production from gasoline or natural gas does not offer any advantage over the direct use of such fuels. Production from coal by gasification techniques with capture and sequestration of CO₂ could be an interim solution. Water splitting by artificial photosynthesis, photobiological methods based on algae, and high temperatures obtained by nuclear or concentrated solar power plants are promising approaches, but still far from practical applications. In the next decades, the development of the hydrogen economy will most likely rely on water electrolysis by using enormous amounts of electric power, which in its turn has to be generated. Producing electricity by burning fossil fuels, of course, cannot be a rational solution. Hydroelectric power can give but a very modest contribution. Therefore, it will be necessary to generate large amounts of electric power by nuclear energy of by renewable energies. A hydrogen economy based on nuclear electricity would imply the construction of thousands of fission reactors, thereby magnifying all the problems related to the use of nuclear energy (e.g., safe disposal of radioactive waste, nuclear proliferation, plant decommissioning, uranium shortage). In principle, wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power have the potential to produce enormous amounts of electric power, but, except for wind, such technologies are too underdeveloped and expensive to tackle such a big task in a short period of time. A full development of a hydrogen economy needs also improvement in hydrogen storage, transportation and distribution

  9. Hydrogen sensing via anomalous optical absorption of palladium-based metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierro-Rodriguez, A.; Leite, I. T.; Rocha-Rodrigues, P.; Fernandes, P.; Araujo, J. P.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Santos, J. L.; Teixeira, J. M.; Guerreiro, A.

    2016-05-01

    A palladium (Pd)-based optical metamaterial has been designed, fabricated and characterized for its application in hydrogen sensing. The metamaterial can replace Pd thin films in optical transmission schemes for sensing with performances far superior to those of conventional sensors. This artificial material consists of a palladium-alumina metamaterial fabricated using inexpensive and industrial-friendly bottom-up techniques. During the exposure to hydrogen, the system exhibits anomalous optical absorption when compared to the well-known response of Pd thin films, this phenomenon being the key factor for the sensor sensitivity. The exposure to hydrogen produces a large variation in the light transmission through the metamembrane (more than 30% with 4% in volume hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixture at room temperature and atmospheric pressure), thus avoiding the need for sophisticated optical detection systems. An optical homogenization model is proposed to explain the metamaterial response. These results contribute to the development of reliable and low-cost hydrogen sensors with potential applications in the hydrogen economy and industrial processes to name a few, and also open the door to optically study the hydrogen diffusion processes in Pd nanostructures.

  10. Application of Flexible Micro Temperature Sensor in Oxidative Steam Reforming by a Methanol Micro Reformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Man Lo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM, with the relevant parameters optimized as well.

  11. Cryogenic hydrogen release research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this project was to devolop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. The necessary infrastructure has been specified and laboratory modifications are currently underway. Once complete, experiments from this platform will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  12. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  13. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  14. Pionic hydrogen and deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotta, Detlev, E-mail: d.gotta@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH and JHCP (Germany); Amaro, F. D. [Coimbra University, Department of Physics (Portugal); Anagnostopoulos, D. F. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (Greece); Buehler, P. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, SMI (Austria); Gorke, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH and JHCP (Germany); Covita, D. S. [Coimbra University, Department of Physics (Portugal); Fuhrmann, H.; Gruber, A. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, SMI (Austria); Hennebach, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH and JHCP (Germany); Hirtl, A.; Ishiwatari, T. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, SMI (Austria); Indelicato, P.; Bigot, E.-O. Le [LKB, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, Case 74 (France); Marton, J. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, SMI (Austria); Nekipelov, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH and JHCP (Germany); Santos, J. M. F. dos [Coimbra University, Department of Physics (Portugal); Schlesser, S. [LKB, UPMC-Paris 6, ENS, CNRS, Case 74 (France); Schmid, Ph. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, SMI (Austria); Simons, L. M. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) (Switzerland); Strauch, Th. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH and JHCP (Germany); and others

    2012-05-15

    The ground-state level shifts and broadenings of the hydrogen isotopes caused by the strong interaction have been redetermined by using a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. An additional measurement of muonic hydrogen reveals properties of the de-excitation cascade of such electrically neutral exotic atoms, in particular Coulomb de-excitation, the understanding of which is essential for the analysis of the hadronic-atom data.

  15. HEAT Sensor: Harsh Environment Adaptable Thermionic Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limb, Scott J. [Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    This document is the final report for the “HARSH ENVIRONMENT ADAPTABLE THERMIONIC SENSOR” project under NETL’s Crosscutting contract DE-FE0013062. This report addresses sensors that can be made with thermionic thin films along with the required high temperature hermetic packaging process. These sensors can be placed in harsh high temperature environments and potentially be wireless and self-powered.

  16. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  17. Hydrogen isotope technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen pumping speeds on panels of molecular sieve types 5A and Na-Y were compared for a variety of sieve (and chevron) temperatures between 10 and 30 K. Although pumping speeds declined with time, probably because of the slow diffusion of hydrogen from the surface of the sieve crystals into the internal regions, the different sieve materials and operating conditions could be compared using time-averaged pump speeds. The (average) pumping speeds declined with increasing temperature. Under some conditions, the Na-Y sieve performed much better than the 5A sieve. Studies of the effect of small concentrations (approx. 4%) of hydrogen on helium pumping indicate that compound cryopumps in fusion reactors will not have to provide complete screening of hydrogen from helium panels. The concentrations of hydrogen did not lower effective helium pumping speeds or shorten the helium operating period between instabilities. Studies of tritium recovery from blankets of liquid lithium focused on design and construction of a flowing-lithium test system and on ultimate removal of tritium from yttrium sorbents. At 5050C, tritium release from yttrium behaves as a diffusion-controlled process, but the release rates are very low. Apparently, higher temperatures will be required for effective sorbent regeneration. An innovative technique for separating hydrogen isotopes by using bipolar electrolysis with permeable electrodes was analyzed to determine its potential usefulness in multistage separation

  18. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  19. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  20. Hydrogen in intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic science of hydrogen-metal interactions is highly fascinating. In this paper, examples from the widely studied systems are included to demonstrate the basic aspects of hydriding phenomenon. It has been emphasised that the stabilisation of a ternary hydride phase is dependent not only on the temperature and H2 pressure but also on controlling the exothermic heat, generated during hydrogen absorption. By carefully suppressing the exothermic heat effects, we have succeeded, for the first time, in stabilizing new hydride phases of Zr2Fe (high temperature phase) and Zr2Rh (superconducting phase with Tc ∼ 11 K). It is also shown that ternary hydrides formed employing low temperature and low pressure generally contain higher hydrogen and may show different magnetic properties. The effect of hydrogen absorption on the structure, superconductivity, magnetic susceptibility. Moessbauer parameters and heat capacity of some C16 CuAl2 type IMCs has been described and the changes in the electronic density of states, Debye temperature and M-H interactions have been discussed. Moessbauer and magnetization studies are presented to show the effect of hydrogen absorption on the magnetic characteristics of some representative systems. The present status of understanding of the phenomenon of hydrogen induced amporphization, particularly with regard to the interstitial sites occupied by H- atoms in the amorphous vis-a-vis the crystalline ternary hydride phase, is presented. Some applications of the ternary hydrides are briefly mentioned. (author). 56 refs., 10 figs

  1. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  2. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  3. Sensor Management for Tracking in Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fuemmeler, Jason A; Veeravalli, Venugopal V

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of tracking an object moving through a network of wireless sensors. In order to conserve energy, the sensors may be put into a sleep mode with a timer that determines their sleep duration. It is assumed that an asleep sensor cannot be communicated with or woken up, and hence the sleep duration needs to be determined at the time the sensor goes to sleep based on all the information available to the sensor. Having sleeping sensors in the network could result in degraded tracking performance, therefore, there is a tradeoff between energy usage and tracking performance. We design sleeping policies that attempt to optimize this tradeoff and characterize their performance. As an extension to our previous work in this area [1], we consider generalized models for object movement, object sensing, and tracking cost. For discrete state spaces and continuous Gaussian observations, we derive a lower bound on the optimal energy-tracking tradeoff. It is shown that in the low tracking error regime, the g...

  4. Sensor for metal detection

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-06-26

    NOVELTY - The sensor has a microfluidic flow channel that is provided with an inlet port, an outlet port, and a detection chamber. The detection chamber is provided with a group of sensing electrodes (4) having a working electrode (8), a counter electrode (9), and a reference electrode (10). A flow sensor is configured to measure flow in the channel. A temperature sensor (6) is configured to measure temperature in the channel (3). An electrical connection is configured to connect the sensor to a sensing device. USE - Sensor for detecting metal such as toxic metal in sample such as clinical sample such as stool, saliva, sputum, bronchial lavage, urine, vaginal swab, nasal swab, biopsy, tissue, tears, breath, blood, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, joint fluid, and amniotic fluid, water sample, food sample, air sample, and soil sample (all claimed). ADVANTAGE - The sensor for use with the portable analytical instrument is configured for detection of metalsin samples. The sensor can provide the excellent solution for on-site metal detection, including heavy metal detection. The sensors can provide significant advantages in higher throughput, lower cost, at the same time being less labor intensive and less dependent on individual skills. The disposable design of the sensor, the enhanced reliability and repeatability of measurements can be obtained. The sensors can be widely applied in various industries. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - INDEPENDENT CLAIMS are included for the following: (1) a system for detecting metal in sample; and (2) a method for using sensor for detecting metal in sample. DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING(S) - The drawing shows a schematic view of the sensor prototype. Channel (3) Sensing electrodes (4) Temperature sensor (6) Working electrode (8) Counter electrode (9) Reference electrode (10)

  5. Neutron scattering and hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Ramirez-Cuesta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen has been identified as a fuel of choice for providing clean energy for transport and other applications across the world and the development of materials to store hydrogen efficiently and safely is crucial to this endeavour. Hydrogen has the largest scattering interaction with neutrons of all the elements in the periodic table making neutron scattering ideal for studying hydrogen storage materials. Simultaneous characterisation of the structure and dynamics of these materials during hydrogen uptake is straightforward using neutron scattering techniques. These studies will help us to understand the fundamental properties of hydrogen storage in realistic conditions and hence design new hydrogen storage materials.

  6. Sensor for automatic welding; Sensor ga yosetsu jidoka wo kirihiraku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugitani, Y. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    This paper explains sensors in welding automating systems, and introduces examples of sensor technologies. Roles of sensors in the automating systems include stabilization of welding phenomena, in-process control of welding processes, remote surveillance for quality assurance, complementing of robot teaching operation, and remote surveillance for operating conditions to control production. Types of sensors that are used most frequently are arc sensors, electrode contact sensors, and probe contact sensors, followed by photo-sensors and electromagnetic sensors. The arc sensor uses welding arc itself as a sensor, being incorporated in most of arc welding robots. A laser sensor irradiates laser light onto an object, and detects reflected light by using a light receiving element to recognize position and shape of the object. For vision sensors, a technology is advancing, which utilizes a CCD camera to detect root gap, molten pond shapes, electrode tip shapes, and arc shapes. 5 refs., 13 figs.

  7. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  8. Hydrogen response of porous palladium nano-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D.; Barman, P. B.; Hazra, S. K.

    2015-08-01

    Palladium nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing sodium tetrachloropalladate at 100°C using Ethylene Glycol as reducing agent. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy), and optical absorption spectroscopy. The average particle size (cleaned glass substrates. The high porosity of these films, as revealed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) studies, made these films suitable for hydrogen sensor applications. The resistance of the films, measured by making silver paste contacts on the porous surface, changed upon exposure to 1000 ppm hydrogen in nitrogen. Optimum sensor response was obtained at 50°C, beyond which it deteriorated. The total response comprising of initial rise and subsequent fall in resistance, is due to the formation of Pd-hydrides (whose resistivity is higher relative to Pd), and closure of interparticle gaps due to lattice expansion of palladium, respectively. A detailed analysis of the results based on the sensing mechanism has been discussed in the paper.

  9. The new hydrogen laboratory of the BAM. Papers; Das neue Wasserstofflabor der BAM. Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This volume contains six papers read on the occasion of the commissioning of the hydrogen laboratory of the BAM (Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung) on 18 October 2001. Subjects were: Hydrogen, a fuel for future propulsion technologies (A. Jungk); The BVG fuel cell bus project (R. Lemke); Safety aspects of the hydrogen technology (U. Schmidtchen); Tribological characteristics of CrNi steels in liquid hydrogen (W. Huebner); Calibration of hydrogen sensors (U. Banach); Introducing the hydrogen laboratory (T. Gradt). [German] Dieser Kolloquiumsband enthaelt sechs Vortraege, die aus Anlass der Einweihung des Wasserstofflabors der Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM) am 18. Oktober 2001 gehalten wurden. Die Themen waren: Wasserstoff - Kraftstoff fuer zukuenftige Antriebstechnologien (A. Jungk); Brennstoffzellenbus-Projekt der BVG (R. Lemke); Sicherheitsfragen der Wasserstofftechnik (U. Schmidtchen); Tribologisches Verhalten von CrNi-Staehlen in fluessigem Wasserstoff (W. Huebner); Kalibrierung von Wasserstoffsensoren (U. Banach); Vorstellung der Einrichtungen des Wasserstofflabors (T. Gradt).

  10. Hydrogen Storage In Nanostructured Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storag...

  11. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  12. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  13. TFA pixel sensor technology for vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pixel microvertex detectors at the SLHC and a future linear collider face very challenging issues: extreme radiation hardness, cooling design, interconnections density and fabrication cost. As an alternative approach we present a novel pixel detector based on the deposition of a Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H) film on top of a readout ASIC. The Thin-Film on ASIC (TFA) technology is inspired by an emerging microelectronic technology envisaged for visible light Active Pixel Sensor (APS) devices. We present results obtained with a-Si:H sensor films deposited on a glass substrate and on ASIC, including the radiation hardness of this material up to a fluence of 3.5x1015 p/cm2

  14. Intelligent Sensors Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bialas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the security issues of sensors provided with processors and software and used for high-risk applications. Common IT related threats may cause serious consequences for sensor system users. To improve their robustness, sensor systems should be developed in a restricted way that would provide them with assurance. One assurance creation methodology is Common Criteria (ISO/IEC 15408 used for IT products and systems. The paper begins with a primer on the Common Criteria, and then a general security model of the intelligent sensor as an IT product is discussed. The paper presents how the security problem of the intelligent sensor is defined and solved. The contribution of the paper is to provide Common Criteria (CC related security design patterns and to improve the effectiveness of the sensor development process.

  15. Binary MEMS gas sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel sensing mechanism for electrostatic MEMS that employs static bifurcation-based sensing and binary detection is demonstrated. It is implemented as an ethanol vapour sensor that exploits the static pull-in bifurcation. Sensor detection of 5 ppm of ethanol vapour in dry nitrogen, equivalent to a detectable mass of 165 pg, is experimentally demonstrated. Sensor robustness to external disturbances is also demonstrated. A closed-form expression for the sensitivity of statically detected electrostatic MEMS sensors is derived. It is shown that the sensitivity of static bifurcation-based binary electrostatic MEMS sensors represents an upper bound on the sensitivity of static detection for given sensor dimensions and material properties. (paper)

  16. The Ringcore Fluxgate Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brauer, Peter

    1997-01-01

    A model describing the fundamental working principle of the "ringcore fluxgate sensor" is derived. The model is solely based on geometrical and measurable magnetic properties of the sensor and from this a number of fluxgate phenomenon can be described and estimated. The sensitivity of ringcore...... fluxgate sensors is measured for a large variety of geometries and is for all measurements found to fall between two limits obtained by the fluxgate model. The model is used to explain the zero field odd harmonic output of the fluxgate sensor, called the "feedthrough". By assuming a non ideal sensor...... with spatially distributed magnetization, the model predicts feedthrough signals which exactly reflects the measured signals. The non-linearities in a feedback compensated ringcore fluxgate sensors, called the "transverse field effect", can also be explained by the model. Measurements on stress annealed...

  17. Medical Sensor Network Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob

    is required, such as taking a blood sample, mailing it to a lab, where it is analysed and the result returned by mail. Due to the continuing size and cost reduction of electronic equipment, future medical sensors will be much smaller, cheaper and often disposable. Furthermore, integration of these sensors...... with the electronic health record (EHR) IT-systems will save a lot of work (and human errors), as the sensor readings will be directly recorded in the patient’s records by the sensors themselves, rather than by a transcription performed by a busy clinician. Although this development has been going on for at least...... a decade, most sensors are still quite big, heavy and difficult to operate, and a lot of research is revolving around minimising the instruments and making them easier to use. Several research experiments have demonstrated the utility of such sensors, but few of these experiments consider security...

  18. Sensor technology foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Jørgensen, Birte Holst; Rasmussen, Birgitte

    2001-01-01

    The Sensor Technology Center A/S (STC) in co-operation with Risoe National Laboratory has carried out a sensor technology foresight in order to strengthen a strategic outlook on sensor technology. The technology foresight (with a timeframe of 2000 to2015) has been performed in the period October...... 2000 - September 2001. The conclusions of the sensor technology report are based on 1) a scanning of existing forward looking literature on sensor technology, 2) a number of workshops with Danish andinternational participants and 3) an international survey with 174 respondents. Half of the respondents...... came from universities and other research institutes, and approximately one-third came from industry. The study has analysed six types of sensors(covering 13 sub-types) and, in addition, a number of systemic issues. All three sources of information indicate the same pattern regarding future...

  19. Capacitive chemical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  20. Flexible magnetoimpedance sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-03-01

    Flexible magnetoimpedance (MI) sensors fabricated using a NiFe/Cu/NiFe tri-layer on Kapton substrate have been studied. A customized flexible microstrip transmission line was employed to investigate the MI sensors\\'s magnetic field and frequency responses and their dependence on the sensors\\'s deflection. For the first time, the impedance characteristic is obtained through reflection coefficient analysis over a wide range of frequencies from 0.1 MHz to 3 GHz and for deflections ranging from zero curvature to a radius of 7.2 cm. The sensor element maintains a high MI ratio of up to 90% and magnetic sensitivity of up to 9.2%/Oe over different bending curvatures. The relationship between the curvature and material composition is discussed based on the magnetostriction effect and stress simulations. The sensor\\'s large frequency range, simple fabrication process and high sensitivity provide a great potential for flexible electronics and wireless applications.

  1. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  2. Clementine sensor suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    LLNL designed and built the suite of six miniaturized light-weight space-qualified sensors utilized in the Clementine mission. A major goal of the Clementine program was to demonstrate technologies originally developed for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization Programs. These sensors were modified to gather data from the moon. This overview presents each of these sensors and some preliminary on-orbit performance estimates. The basic subsystems of these sensors include optical baffles to reject off-axis stray light, light-weight ruggedized optical systems, filter wheel assemblies, radiation tolerant focal plane arrays, radiation hardened control and readout electronics and low mass and power mechanical cryogenic coolers for the infrared sensors. Descriptions of each sensor type are given along with design specifications, photographs and on-orbit data collected.

  3. Intelligent Chemical Sensor Systems for In-space Safety Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Neudeck, P. G.; Makel, D. B.; Ward, B.; Liu, C. C.

    2006-01-01

    Future in-space and lunar operations will require significantly improved monitoring and Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) throughout the mission. In particular, the monitoring of chemical species is an important component of an overall monitoring system for space vehicles and operations. For example, in leak monitoring of propulsion systems during launch, inspace, and on lunar surfaces, detection of low concentrations of hydrogen and other fuels is important to avoid explosive conditions that could harm personnel and damage the vehicle. Dependable vehicle operation also depends on the timely and accurate measurement of these leaks. Thus, the development of a sensor array to determine the concentration of fuels such as hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or hydrazine as well as oxygen is necessary. Work has been on-going to develop an integrated smart leak detection system based on miniaturized sensors to detect hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or hydrazine, and oxygen. The approach is to implement Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensors incorporated with signal conditioning electronics, power, data storage, and telemetry enabling intelligent systems. The final sensor system will be self-contained with a surface area comparable to a postage stamp. This paper discusses the development of this "Lick and Stick" leak detection system and it s application to In-Space Transportation and other Exploration applications.

  4. Beam imaging sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature.

  5. Magnetic actuators and sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Brauer, John R

    2014-01-01

    An accessible, comprehensive guide on magnetic actuators and sensors, this fully updated second edition of Magnetic Actuators and Sensors includes the latest advances, numerous worked calculations, illustrations, and real-life applications. Covering magnetics, actuators, sensors, and systems, with updates of new technologies and techniques, this exemplary learning tool emphasizes computer-aided design techniques, especially magnetic finite element analysis, commonly used by today's engineers. Detailed calculations, numerous illustrations, and discussions of discrepancies make this text an inva

  6. Contact stress sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  7. Bioinspired Sensor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel del Valle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This editorial summarizes and classifies the contributions presented by different authors to the special issue of the journal Sensors dedicated to Bioinspired Sensor Systems. From the coupling of sensor arrays or networks, plus computer processing abilities, new applications to mimic or to complement human senses are arising in the context of ambient intelligence. Principles used, and illustrative study cases have been presented permitting readers to grasp the current status of the field.

  8. Nanosized sensor materials based on CeO2/SnO2-Sb2O5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksenko, L. P.; Maksymovych, N. P.; Matushko, I. P.; Chubaevskaya, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor nanosized SnO2-Sb2O5 materials with additives of cerium are synthesized by solgel method and the sensitivity to hydrogen of adsorption-semiconductor sensors, created on their basis, was investigated. It is shown that introducing cerium into the gas-sensitive layer of a sensor increases its sensitivity to microconcentrations of H2.

  9. Acondicionamiento de sensores capacitivos

    OpenAIRE

    Campos López, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Los sensores son componentes de instrumentación cuyo objetivo principal es detectar una magnitud física del entorno y transforarla en una magnitud eléctrica. El posterior tratamiento de esta señal permite valorar la magnitud física en su unidad característica. Actualmente en el mercado se encuentra una gran variedad de sensores y la tendencia destaca su aumento año tras año. Un tipo de sensor es clasificado como sensor capacitivo, cuya característica eléctrica es el valor de...

  10. Biomedical Sensors and Instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    The living body is a difficult object to measure: accurate measurements of physiological signals require sensors and instruments capable of high specificity and selectivity that do not interfere with the systems under study. As a result, detailed knowledge of sensor and instrument properties is required to be able to select the "best" sensor from one of the many designed to meet these challenges. From the underlying principles to practical applications, this updated edition of Biomedical Sensors and Instruments provides an easy-to-understand introduction to the various kinds of biome

  11. Improved Capacitive Liquid Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Francis A.

    1992-01-01

    Improved capacitive sensor used to detect presence and/or measure thickness of layer of liquid. Electrical impedance or admittance of sensor measured at prescribed frequency, and thickness of liquid inferred from predetermined theoretical or experimental relationship between impedance and thickness. Sensor is basically a three-terminal device. Features interdigitated driving and sensing electrodes and peripheral coplanar ground electrode that reduces parasitic effects. Patent-pending because first to utilize ground plane as "shunting" electrode. System less expensive than infrared, microwave, or refractive-index systems. Sensor successfully evaluated in commercial production plants to characterize emulsions, slurries, and solutions.

  12. Microfabricated Formaldehyde Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen C. Cheung

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that is widely used in textiles, paper, wood composites, and household materials. Formaldehyde will continuously outgas from manufactured wood products such as furniture, with adverse health effects resulting from prolonged low-level exposure. New, microfabricated sensors for formaldehyde have been developed to meet the need for portable, low-power gas detection. This paper reviews recent work including silicon microhotplates for metal oxide-based detection, enzyme-based electrochemical sensors, and nanowire-based sensors. This paper also investigates the promise of polymer-based sensors for low-temperature, low-power operation.

  13. Smart sensors and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kyung, Chong-Min; Yasuura, Hiroto; Liu, Yongpan

    2015-01-01

     This book describes for readers technology used for effective sensing of our physical world and intelligent processing techniques for sensed information, which are essential to the success of Internet of Things (IoTs).  The authors provide a multidisciplinary view of sensor technology from MEMS, biological, chemical, and electrical domains and showcase smart sensor systems in real applications including smart home, transportation, medical, environmental, agricultural, etc.  Unlike earlier books on sensors, this book will provide a “global” view on smart sensors covering abstraction levels from device, circuit, systems, and algorithms.  .

  14. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  15. Ultra-low power hydrogen sensing based on a palladium-coated nanomechanical beam resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksson, Jonas; Villanueva Torrijo, Luis Guillermo; Brugger, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sensing is essential to ensure safety in near-future zero-emission fuel cell powered vehicles. Here, we present a novel hydrogen sensor based on the resonant frequency change of a nanoelectromechanical clamped-clamped beam. The beam is coated with a Pd layer, which expands in the presence...... of H 2, therefore generating a stress build-up that causes the frequency of the device to drop. The devices are able to detect H2 concentrations below 0.5% within 1 s of the onset of the exposure using only a few hundreds of pW of power, matching the industry requirements for H 2 safety sensors. In......, whereby the responsivity of the sensors is fully restored and the chemo-mechanical process is accelerated, significantly decreasing response times. The sensors are fabricated using standard processes, facilitating their eventual mass-production. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  16. SEQUENTIAL LOCALIZATION OF SENSOR NETWORKS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, J.; Cao, M.; Morse, A. S.; Anderson, B. D. O.

    2009-01-01

    The sensor network localization problem with distance information is to determine the positions of all sensors in a network, given the positions of some of the sensors and the distances between some pairs of sensors. A definition is given for a sensor network in the plane to be "sequentially localiz

  17. Hydrogen Contractors Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering

    2006-05-16

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Hydrogen Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) on behalf of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Hydrogen Contractors Meeting held from May 16-19, 2006 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia. This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings sponsored by DMS&E held in conjunction with our counterparts in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the first with the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The focus of this year’s meeting is BES funded fundamental research underpinning advancement of hydrogen storage. The major goals of these research efforts are the development of a fundamental scientific base in terms of new concepts, theories and computational tools; new characterization capabilities; and new materials that could be used or mimicked in advancing capabilities for hydrogen storage.

  18. Hydrogen production unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgornyy, A.N.; Droshenkin, B.A.; Khmelnitskaya, I.A.; Varshavskiy, I.L.

    1981-01-01

    The unit for hydrogen production consists of a reactor, tank for fuel, tank for water, connected to the injector, and motor. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to reduce energy outlays by purifying the hydrogen and separating it from the gas mixture, it is equipped with a hydrogen separator arranged between the reactor and the motor. The separator is made in the form of a cylindrical shell separated by semipermeable partition into a chamber for pure hydrogen connected to the motor, and a chamber of ballast gas whose outlet is connected to the pressure nozzle of the injector. The use of the semipermeable partition for water vapor and permeable for hydrogen in combination with the injector makes it possible to exclude from the equipment a water pump and outlets of electricity associated with it. In addition, it is not necessary to install a current generator to power the electric motor of this pump. The heat exchanger for heating the water is also excluded.

  19. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.

  20. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  1. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century

  2. On the use of optical fibre sensors in nuclear environment; Utilisation des capteurs a fibre optique en environnement nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brichard, B. [SCK-CEN - Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Mol (Belgium)

    2010-03-15

    This paper aims to provide a new insight on the use of optical fibre sensors for nuclear applications. We report on the possibilities for radiation resistance improvement using hydrogenation techniques as well as on the behaviour of various sensors exposed to radiation such as the distributed temperature sensor based on Raman effect, high-temperature Bragg gratings and a gamma ray monitor using Cerenkov luminescence. A short discussion regarding the radiation resistance of photonic crystal fibres is also briefly presented. (author)

  3. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, B.;

    1983-01-01

    A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast at tempe......A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast...... at temperatures around 600 K and above, but the reversed reaction showed somewhat slower kinetics around 600 K. At higher temperatures the opposite was found. The enthalpy and entropy change by the hydrogenation, derived from pressure-concentration isotherms, agree fairly well with those reported earlier....

  4. Gas Sensors Based on Ceramic p-n Heterocontacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aygun, Seymen Murat [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic p-n heterocontacts based on CuO/ZnO were successfully synthesized and a systematic study of their hydrogen sensitivity was conducted. The sensitivity and response rates of CuO/ZnO sensors were studied utilizing current-voltage, current-time, and impedance spectroscopy measurements. The heterocontacts showed well-defined rectifying characteristics and were observed to detect hydrogen via both dc and ac measurements. Surface coverage data were derived from current-time measurements which were then fit to a two-site Langmuir adsorption model quite satisfactorily. The fit suggested that there should be two energetically different adsorption sites in the system. The heterocontacts were doped in an attempt to increase the sensitivity and the response rate of the sensor. First, the effects of doping the p-type (CuO) on the sensor characteristics were investigated. Doping the p-type CuO with both acceptor and isovalent dopants greatly improved the hydrogen sensitivity. The sensitivity of pure heterocontact observed via I-V measurements was increased from ~2.3 to ~9.4 with Ni doping. Dopants also enhanced the rectifying characteristics of the heterocontacts. Small amounts of Li addition were shown to decrease the reverse bias (saturation) current to 0.2 mA at a bias level of -5V. No unambiguous trends were observed between the sensitivity, the conductivity, and the density of the samples. Comparing the two phase microstructure to the single phase microstructure there was no dramatic increase in the sensitivity. Kinetic studies also confirmed the improved sensor characteristics with doping. The dopants decreased the response time of the sensor by decreasing the response time of one of the adsorption sites. The n-type ZnO was doped with both acceptor and donor dopants. Li doping resulted in the degradation of the p-n junction and the response time of the sensor. However, the current-voltage behavior of Ga-doped heterocontacts showed the best rectifying characteristics

  5. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  6. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    CERN Document Server

    Krol, R van de

    2012-01-01

    Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production describes the principles and materials challenges for the conversion of sunlight into hydrogen through water splitting at a semiconducting electrode. Readers will find an analysis of the solid state properties and materials requirements for semiconducting photo-electrodes, a detailed description of the semiconductor/electrolyte interface, in addition to the photo-electrochemical (PEC) cell. Experimental techniques to investigate both materials and PEC device performance are outlined, followed by an overview of the current state-of-the-art in PEC materia

  7. Implementing a hydrogen economy

    OpenAIRE

    James A Ritter; Armin D Ebner; Jun Wang; Ragaiy Zidan

    2003-01-01

    President Bush, during his State of the Union Address this year, pronounced a $1.2 billion jump-start to the hydrogen economy. The move would represent not only freedom from US-dependence on foreign oil, which is a national security issue, but also a necessary and gargantuan step toward improving the environment by reducing the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere. However, hydrogen storage is proving to be one of the most important issues and potentially biggest roadblock fo...

  8. Electrolytic hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, M. P. S.

    In the role of a secondary energy carrier complementary to electricity in a postfossil-fuel era, hydrogen produced by the elecrolytic splitting of water may be obtained by a variety of methods whose technology development status is presently assessed. Nuclear heat can be converted into hydrogen either directly, via thermal splitting of water, or by means of water electrolysis, which can be of the unipolar tank type or the bipolar filter-press type. An evaluation is made of advanced electrolytic techniques involving exotic materials, as well as solid polymer electrolyte electrolysis and high-temperature water-vapor electrolysis.

  9. Electrocatalysts for hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Losiewicz, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    This special topic volume deals with the development of novel solid state electrocatalysts of a high performance to enhance the rates of the hydrogen or oxygen evolution. It contains a description of various types of metals, alloys and composites which have been obtained using electrodeposition in aqueous solutions that has been identified to be a technologically feasible and economically superior technique for the production of the porous electrodes. The goal was to produce papers that would be useful to both the novice and the expert in hydrogen technologies. This volume is intended to be us

  10. The Application of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials for Chemical Sensor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing miniature chemical sensors for a variety of applications including fire detection, emissions monitoring, fuel leak detection, and environmental monitoring. Smart Lick and Stick sensor technology which integrates a sensor array, electronics, telemetry, and power into one microsystem are being developed. These microsystems require low power consumption for long-term aerospace applications. One approach to decreasing power consumption is the use of nanotechnology. Nanocrystalline tin oxide (SnO2) carbon monoxide (CO) sensors developed previously by this group have been successfully used for fire detection and emissions monitoring. This presentation will briefly review the overall NASA GRC chemical sensor program and discuss our further effort in nanotechnology applications. New carbon dioxide (CO2) sensing material using doped nanocrystalline SnO2 will be discussed. Nanocrystalline SnO2 coated solid electrolyte CO2 sensors and SnO2 nanorod and nanofiber hydrogen (H2) sensors operated at reduced or room temperatures will also be discussed.

  11. Polyhydride complexes for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application in hydrogen storage. Efforts have focused on developing complexes with improved available hydrogen weight percentages. We have explored the possibility that complexes containing aromatic hydrocarbon ligands could store hydrogen at both the metal center and in the ligands. We have synthesized novel indenyl hydride complexes and explored their reactivity with hydrogen. The reversible hydrogenation of [IrH{sub 3}(PPh{sub 3})({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 10}H{sub 7})]{sup +} has been achieved. While attempting to prepare {eta}{sup 6}-tetrahydronaphthalene complexes, we discovered that certain polyhydride complexes catalyze both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalene.

  12. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  13. Parylene MEMS patency sensor for assessment of hydrocephalus shunt obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian J; Jin, Willa; Baldwin, Alexander; Yu, Lawrence; Christian, Eisha; Krieger, Mark D; McComb, J Gordon; Meng, Ellis

    2016-10-01

    Neurosurgical ventricular shunts inserted to treat hydrocephalus experience a cumulative failure rate of 80 % over 12 years; obstruction is responsible for most failures with a majority occurring at the proximal catheter. Current diagnosis of shunt malfunction is imprecise and involves neuroimaging studies and shunt tapping, an invasive measurement of intracranial pressure and shunt patency. These patients often present emergently and a delay in care has dire consequences. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) patency sensor was developed to enable direct and quantitative tracking of shunt patency in order to detect proximal shunt occlusion prior to the development of clinical symptoms thereby avoiding delays in treatment. The sensor was fabricated on a flexible polymer substrate to eventually allow integration into a shunt. In this study, the sensor was packaged for use with external ventricular drainage systems for clinical validation. Insights into the transduction mechanism of the sensor were obtained. The impact of electrode size, clinically relevant temperatures and flows, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plasma sterilization on sensor function were evaluated. Sensor performance in the presence of static and dynamic obstruction was demonstrated using 3 different models of obstruction. Electrode size was found to have a minimal effect on sensor performance and increased temperature and flow resulted in a slight decrease in the baseline impedance due to an increase in ionic mobility. However, sensor response did not vary within clinically relevant temperature and flow ranges. H2O2 plasma sterilization also had no effect on sensor performance. This low power and simple format sensor was developed with the intention of future integration into shunts for wireless monitoring of shunt state and more importantly, a more accurate and timely diagnosis of shunt failure.

  14. Parylene MEMS patency sensor for assessment of hydrocephalus shunt obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian J; Jin, Willa; Baldwin, Alexander; Yu, Lawrence; Christian, Eisha; Krieger, Mark D; McComb, J Gordon; Meng, Ellis

    2016-10-01

    Neurosurgical ventricular shunts inserted to treat hydrocephalus experience a cumulative failure rate of 80 % over 12 years; obstruction is responsible for most failures with a majority occurring at the proximal catheter. Current diagnosis of shunt malfunction is imprecise and involves neuroimaging studies and shunt tapping, an invasive measurement of intracranial pressure and shunt patency. These patients often present emergently and a delay in care has dire consequences. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) patency sensor was developed to enable direct and quantitative tracking of shunt patency in order to detect proximal shunt occlusion prior to the development of clinical symptoms thereby avoiding delays in treatment. The sensor was fabricated on a flexible polymer substrate to eventually allow integration into a shunt. In this study, the sensor was packaged for use with external ventricular drainage systems for clinical validation. Insights into the transduction mechanism of the sensor were obtained. The impact of electrode size, clinically relevant temperatures and flows, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plasma sterilization on sensor function were evaluated. Sensor performance in the presence of static and dynamic obstruction was demonstrated using 3 different models of obstruction. Electrode size was found to have a minimal effect on sensor performance and increased temperature and flow resulted in a slight decrease in the baseline impedance due to an increase in ionic mobility. However, sensor response did not vary within clinically relevant temperature and flow ranges. H2O2 plasma sterilization also had no effect on sensor performance. This low power and simple format sensor was developed with the intention of future integration into shunts for wireless monitoring of shunt state and more importantly, a more accurate and timely diagnosis of shunt failure. PMID:27589973

  15. Localised hydrogen peroxide sensing for reproductive health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdey, Malcolm S.; Schartner, Erik P.; Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L.; Ritter, Lesley J.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2015-05-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to affect the developmental competence of embryos. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) an important reactive oxygen species, is also known to causes DNA damage and defective sperm function. Current techniques require incubating a developing embryo with an organic fluorophore which is potentially hazardous for the embryo. What we need is a localised ROS sensor which does not require fluorophores in solution and hence will allow continuous monitoring of H2O2 production without adversely affect the development of the embryo. Here we report studies on such a fibre-based sensor for the detection of H2O2 that uses a surface-bound aryl boronate fluorophore carboxyperoxyfluor-1(CPF1). Optical fibres present a unique platform due to desirable characteristics as dip sensors in biological solutions. Attempts to functionalise the fibre tips using polyelectrolyte layers and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) coatings resulted in a limited signal and poor fluorescent response to H2O2 due to a low tip surface density of the fluorophore. To increase the surface density, CPF1 was integrated into a polymer matrix formed on the fibre tip by a UV-catalysed polymerisation process of acrylamide onto a methacrylate silane layer. The polyacrylamide containing CPF1 gave a much higher surface density than previous surface attachment methods and the sensor was found to effectively detect H2O2. Using this method, biologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 were detected, enabling remote sensing studies into ROS releases from embryos throughout early development.

  16. Wireless Sensors Network (Sensornet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, J.

    2003-01-01

    The Wireless Sensor Network System presented in this paper provides a flexible reconfigurable architecture that could be used in a broad range of applications. It also provides a sensor network with increased reliability; decreased maintainability costs, and assured data availability by autonomously and automatically reconfiguring to overcome communication interferences.

  17. Exploring sensor data management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Sander

    2006-01-01

    The increasing availability of cheap, small, low-power sensor hardware and the ubiquity of wired and wireless networks has led to the prediction that `smart evironments' will emerge in the near future. The sensors in these environments collect detailed information about the situation people are in,

  18. Wearable Optical Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobnik, Aleksandra

    Wearable sensors can be used to provide valuable information about the wearer's health and/or monitor the wearer's surroundings, identify safety concerns and detect threats, during the wearer's daily routine within his or her natural environment. The "sensor on a textile", an integrated sensor capable of analyzing data, would enable early many forms of detection. Moreover, a sensor connected with a smart delivery system could simultaneously provide comfort and monitoring (for safety and/or health), non-invasive measurements, no laboratory sampling, continuous monitoring during the daily activity of the person, and possible multi-parameter analysis and monitoring. However, in order for the technology to be accessible, it must remain innocuous and impose a minimal intrusion on the daily activities of the wearer. Therefore, such wearable technologies should be soft, flexible, and washable in order to meet the expectations of normal clothing. Optical chemical sensors (OCSs) could be used as wearable technology since they can be embedded into textile structures by using conventional dyeing, printing processes and coatings, while fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCSs) as well as nanofiber sensors (NFSs) can be incorporated by weaving, knitting or laminating. The interest in small, robust and sensitive sensors that can be embedded into textile structures is increasing and the research activity on this topic is an important issue.

  19. Steerable Capacitive Proximity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Steerable capacitive proximity sensor of "capaciflector" type based partly on sensing units described in GSC-13377 and GSC-13475. Position of maximum sensitivity adjusted without moving sensor. Voltage of each driven shield adjusted separately to concentrate sensing electric field more toward one side or other.

  20. Systematic Description of Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regtien, Paul P.L.; Sydenham, Peter H.; Thorn, Richard

    2005-01-01

    A sensor performs the exchange of information (thus energy) from one domain to another and therefore it operates on the interface between different physical domains. Several frameworks have been developed for a systematic description of sensors. Basically, they are based on either of two different a

  1. Stretch Sensor Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for determining stretch values and movement of body parts, e.g. a foot, by analysing stretch data from a stretch sensor. By analysing data from the stretch sensor it is possible to determine stretch samples which are associated with particular motion phases...

  2. MEGAPIXEL IMAGE SENSORS TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Khosla, R.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss the technology of megapixel sensor and megapixel imager status in Europe, Japan, and U.S.A. The discussion will also include the applications of these sensors for high-definition television (HDTV) and high-quality electronic photography.

  3. Potentiometric anion selective sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, Martijn M.G.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1999-01-01

    In comparison with selective receptors (and sensors) for cationic species, work on the selective complexation and detection of anions is of more recent date. There are three important components for a sensor, a transducer element, a membrane material that separates the transducer element and the aqu

  4. Electrochemical response to hydrogen water chemistry at the J.A. FitzPatrick BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was the goal of the HWC campaign at the FitzPatrick BWR to determine the hydrogen injection rates required to mitigate IGSCC and IASCC in the reactor internals. Electrochemical sensors were installed at two elevations in one of the local power range monitors (LPRMs). In the summer of 1990 the HWC campaign was conducted. The feedwater hydrogen injection rate was varied from 12 to 90 standard cubic feet/minute (SCFM) and the ECPs from the sensors in the LPRM were measured. The relationship of hydrogen injection versus ECP was determined with specific emphasis on the injection rate required to decrease the ECP to -0.230 V(SHE) at each location in the LPRM. The LPRM lower position, equivalent to the outlet of the lower plenum, required three times more hydrogen injection than previously determined for the recirculation piping system to achieve -0.230 V(SHE). The upper position in the LPRM required far greater hydrogen injection rates to approach the protection potentials. Since completion of the FitzPatrick test, a program with similar objectives was conducted at an overseas BWR. It was found that in the high radiation environment of the core bypass newly designed platinum sensors performed quite adequately as reversible reference electrodes. These results provide a possible approach for protection of key reactor structurals with minimum hydrogen injection and low main steam line dose rates

  5. Fluorescence sensor for sequential detection of zinc and phosphate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Miran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Seo, Hansol; Helal, Aasif; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2016-12-01

    A new, highly selective turn-on fluorescent chemosensor based on 2-(2'-tosylamidophenyl)thiazole (1) for the detection of zinc and phosphate ions in ethanol was synthesized and characterized. Sensor 1 showed a high selectivity for zinc compared to other cations and sequentially detected hydrogen pyrophosphate and hydrogen phosphate. The fluorescence mechanism can be explained by two different mechanisms: (i) the inhibition of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and (ii) chelation-induced enhanced fluorescence by binding with Zn(2+). The sequential detection of phosphate anions was achieved by the quenching and subsequent revival of ESIPT. PMID:27343439

  6. Fiber optic gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  7. 2-Sensor Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Segal

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ad-hoc networks of sensor nodes are in general semi-permanently deployed. However, the topology of such networks continuously changes over time, due to the power of some sensors wearing out to new sensors being inserted into the network, or even due to designers moving sensors around during a network re-design phase (for example, in response to a change in the requirements of the network. In this paper, we address the problem of covering a given path by a limited number of sensors — in our case to two, and show its relation to the well-studied matrix multiplication problem.

  8. Sensor Network Motes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leopold, Martin

    This dissertation describes our efforts to improve sensor network performance evaluation and portability, within the context of the sensor network project Hogthrob. In Hogthrob, we faced the challenge of building an sensor network architecture for sow monitoring. This application has hard...... requirements on price and performance, and shows great potential for using sensor networks. Throughout the project we let the application requirements guide our design choices, leading us to push the technologies further to meet the specific goal of the application. In this dissertation, we attack two key...... to investigate these challenges and apart from developing the methodologies, we also present the results of our experiments. In particular, we present a new vector based methodology for performance evaluation of sensor network devices (motes) and applications, based on application specific benchmarking...

  9. Sensor Data Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plascencia, Alfredo; Stepán, Petr

    2006-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is to present a sensor fusion approach to scene environment mapping as part of a Sensor Data Fusion (SDF) architecture. This approach involves combined sonar array with stereo vision readings.  Sonar readings are interpreted using probability density functions...... to the occupied and empty regions. Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) feature descriptors are interpreted using gaussian probabilistic error models. The use of occupancy grids is proposed for representing the sensor readings. The Bayesian estimation approach is applied to update the sonar array......  and the SIFT descriptors' uncertainty grids. The sensor fusion yields a significant reduction in the uncertainty of the occupancy grid compared to the individual sensor readings....

  10. Nanowire sensor, sensor array, and method for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Minhee (Inventor); Myung, Nosang (Inventor); Vasquez, Richard (Inventor); Homer, Margie (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Pin (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar (Inventor); Choi, Daniel (Inventor); Goddard, William (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a nanowire sensor and method for forming the same. More specifically, the nanowire sensor comprises at least one nanowire formed on a substrate, with a sensor receptor disposed on a surface of the nanowire, thereby forming a receptor-coated nanowire. The nanowire sensor can be arranged as a sensor sub-unit comprising a plurality of homogeneously receptor-coated nanowires. A plurality of sensor subunits can be formed to collectively comprise a nanowire sensor array. Each sensor subunit in the nanowire sensor array can be formed to sense a different stimulus, allowing a user to sense a plurality of stimuli. Additionally, each sensor subunit can be formed to sense the same stimuli through different aspects of the stimulus. The sensor array is fabricated through a variety of techniques, such as by creating nanopores on a substrate and electrodepositing nanowires within the nanopores.

  11. Small hydrogen liquefier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the deign and construction of a small hydrogen liquefier (two liters per hour maximum production) is described. The isenthalpic expansion process is used, because its construction is simple and it is generally cheaper to operate. A comparison with other liquefier processes, and considerations about their basic theory are also presented. (author)

  12. Hydrogen Fuel Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Koryagin, A. A.; Vorobyeva, Viktoriya Vladimirovna

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays there are many environmental problems in the world. Atmosphericpollution is one of the major issues. Much pollution comes fromdifferent engines and vehicles. The solution lies in discovering of either anew energy resource or form of energy and this will lead to a new technologicalstage. This paper deals with issues facing hydrogen fuel as an alternativesource of energy, its advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Catalytic combustor for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercea, J.; Grecu, E.; Fodor, T.; Kreibik, S.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of catalytic combustors for hydrogen using platinum-supported catalysts is described. Catalytic plates of different sizes were constructed using fibrous and ceramic supports. The temperature distribution as well as the reaction efficiency as a function of the fuel input rate was determined, and a comparison between the performances of different plates is discussed.

  14. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  15. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward C. Heydorn

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a “real-world” retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation’s hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to

  16. Biomimetic Production of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Devens

    2004-03-01

    The basic reaction for hydrogen generation is formation of molecular hydrogen from two electrons and two protons. Although there are many possible sources for the protons and electrons, and a variety of mechanisms for providing the requisite energy for hydrogen synthesis, the most abundant and readily available source of protons and electrons is water, and the most attractive source of energy for powering the process is sunlight. Not surprisingly, living systems have evolved to take advantage of these sources for materials and energy. Thus, biology provides paradigms for carrying out the reactions necessary for hydrogen production. Photosynthesis in green plants uses sunlight as the source of energy for the oxidation of water to give molecular oxygen, protons, and reduction potential. Some photosynthetic organisms are capable of using this reduction potential, in the form of the reduced redox protein ferredoxin, to reduce protons and produce molecular hydrogen via the action of an hydrogenase enzyme. A variety of other organisms metabolize the reduced carbon compounds that are ultimately the major products of photosynthesis to produce molecular hydrogen. These facts suggest that it might be possible to use light energy to make molecular hydrogen via biomimetic constructs that employ principles similar to those used by natural organisms, or perhaps with hybrid "bionic" systems that combine biomimetic materials with natural enzymes. It is now possible to construct artificial photosynthetic systems that mimic some of the major steps in the natural process.(1) Artificial antennas based on porphyrins, carotenoids and other chromophores absorb light at various wavelengths in the solar spectrum and transfer the harvested excitation energy to artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.(2) In these centers, photoinduced electron transfer uses the energy from light to move an electron from a donor to an acceptor moiety, generating a high-energy charge-separated state

  17. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  18. Oxidation resistant organic hydrogen getters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2008-09-09

    A composition for removing hydrogen from an atmosphere, comprising a mixture of a polyphenyl ether and a hydrogenation catalyst, preferably a precious metal catalyst, and most preferably Pt. This composition is stable in the presence of oxygen, will not polymerize or degrade upon exposure to temperatures in excess of 200.degree. C., or prolonged exposure to temperatures in the range of 100-300.degree. C. Moreover, these novel hydrogen getter materials can be used to efficiently removing hydrogen from mixtures of hydrogen/inert gas (e.g., He, Ar, N.sub.2), hydrogen/ammonia atmospheres, such as may be encountered in heat exchangers, and hydrogen/carbon dioxide atmospheres. Water vapor and common atmospheric gases have no adverse effect on the ability of these getter materials to absorb hydrogen.

  19. Saga of hydrogen civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text': Fossil fuels (i.e., petroleum, natural gas and coal), which meet most of the world's energy demand today, are being depleted quickly. Also, their combustion products are causing global problems such as the greenhouse effect, ozone layer depletion, acid rains and pollution, all of which are posing great danger for our environment and eventually for the life on our planet. Many engineers and scientists agree that the solution to these global problems would be to replace the existing fossil fuel system by the hydrogen energy system. Hydrogen is a very efficient and clean fuel. Its combustion will produce no greenhouse gases, no ozone layer depleting chemicals, and little or no acid rain ingredients and pollution. Hydrogen, produced from renewable energy (e.g., solar) sources, would result in a permanent energy system which we would never have to change. However, there are other energy systems proposed for the post-petroleum era, such as a synthetic fossil fuel system. In this system, synthetic gasoline and synthetic natural gas will be produced using abundant deposits of coal. In a way, this will ensure the continuation of the present fossil fuel system. The two possible energy systems for the post-fossil fuel era (i.e., the solar-hydrogen energy system and the synthetic fossil fuel system) are compared with the present fossil fuel system by taking into consideration production costs, environmental damages and utilization efficiencies. The results indicate that the solar-hydrogen energy system is the best energy system to ascertain a sustainable future, and it should replace the fossil fuel system before the end of the 21st century. (author)

  20. Photovoltaic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, H.W.; Memory, S.B.; Veziroglu, T.N.; Padin, J. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is a new project, which started in June 1995, and involves photovoltaic hydrogen production as a fuel production method for the future. In order to increase the hydrogen yield, it was decided to use hybrid solar collectors to generate D.C. electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. In this way, some of the energy needed to dissociate the water is supplied in the form of heat (or low grade energy), to generate steam, which results in a reduction of electrical energy (or high grade energy) needed. As a result, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency is increased. In the above stated system, the collector location, the collector tracking sub-system (i.e., orientation/rotation), and the steam temperature have been taken as variables. Five locations selected - in order to consider a variety of latitudes, altitudes, cloud coverage and atmospheric conditions - are Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Plain PV and hybrid solar collectors for a stationary south facing system and five different collector rotation systems have been analyzed. Steam temperatures have been varied between 200{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The results show that higher steam temperatures, 2 dimensional tracking system, higher elevations and dryer climates causes higher conversion efficiencies. Cost effectiveness of the sub-systems and of the overall system will be analyzed during the second year. Also, initial studies will be made of an advanced high efficiency hybrid solar hydrogen production system.