WorldWideScience

Sample records for cavity surface emitting

  1. Vertical external cavity surface emitting semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, M

    2001-01-01

    Active stabilisation showed a relative locked linewidth of approx 3 kHz. Coarse tuning over 7 nm was achieved using a 3-plate birefingent filter plate while fine-tuning using cavity length change allowed tuning over 250 MHz. Vertical external cavity semiconductor lasers have emerged as an interesting technology based on current vertical cavity semiconductor laser knowledge. High power output into a single transverse mode has attracted companies requiring good fibre coupling for telecommunications systems. The structure comprises of a grown semiconductor Bragg reflector topped with a multiple quantum well gain region. This is then included in an external cavity. This device is then optically pumped to promote laser action. Theoretical modelling of AIGaAs based VECSEL structures was undertaken, showing the effect of device design on laser characteristics. A simple 3-mirror cavity was constructed to assess the static characteristics of the structure. Up to 153 mW of output power was achieved in a single transver...

  2. Single Mode Photonic Crystal Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent D. Choquette

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the design, fabrication, and performance of photonic crystal vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs. Using a periodic pattern of etched holes in the top facet of the VCSEL, the optical cavity can be designed to support the fundamental mode only. The electrical confinement is independently defined by proton implantation or oxide confinement. By control of the refractive index and loss created by the photonic crystal, operation in the Gaussian mode can be insured, independent of the lasing wavelength.

  3. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for medical diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor

    This thesis deals with the design and fabrication of tunable Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The focus has been the application of tunable VCSELs in medical diagnostics, specifically OCT. VCSELs are candidates as light sources for swept-source OCT where their high sweep rate, wide...

  4. Current trends in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, TP

    1995-01-01

    With significant progress made in recent years, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) have emerged as potential lightwave sources with a variety of applications, including high speed optical interconnects, parallel data links, optical recording, 2-D scanning, and optical signal processing. This volume, which contains a collection of articles by outstanding experts on this topic, encompasses a broad discussion of the current trends in the development of VCSELs. Discussions include material growths, structure designs, processing methods, performance analysis, improvement strategies, a

  5. Photoreflectance spectroscopy study of vertical cavity surface emitting laser structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises the application of the laser-based electro-absorptive technique of photoreflectance (PR) for the study of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). PR results are shown to reveal the technologically important cavity mode and ground state quantum well exciton structures. AlGaAs/GaAs based quantum well VCSELs were examined with and without top mirror layers as a function of laser pump excitation conditions, with results compared with angle-dependent PR data. Cavity mode and quantum well alignments were also studied with reference to the un-modulated reflectance signal as well as correlated with photoluminescence data. The results demonstrate the importance of PR metrology for state-of-art VCSEL characterisation

  6. Polarization squeezing in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Golubev, Y M; Kolobov, M I; Giacobino, E

    2004-01-01

    We further elaborate the theory of quantum fluctuations in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), developed in Ref. \\cite{Hermier02}. In particular, we introduce the quantum Stokes parameters to describe the quantum self- and cross-correlations between two polarization components of the electromagnetic field generated by this type of lasers. We calculate analytically the fluctuation spectra of these parameters and discuss experiments in which they can be measured. We demonstrate that in certain situations VCSELs can exhibit polarization squeezing over some range of spectral frequencies. This polarization squeezing has its origin in sub-Poissonian pumping statistics of the active laser medium.

  7. Vector cavity solitons in broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Thienpont, Hugo; Ackemann, Thorsten; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of two-dimensional vector cavity solitons in a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) under linearly polarized optical injection when varying optical injection linear polarization direction. The polarization of the cavity soliton is not the one of the optical injection as it acquires a distinct ellipticity. These experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by the spin-flip VCSEL model. Our findings open the road to polarization multiplexing when using cavity solitons in broad-area lasers as pixels in information technology. PMID:26847004

  8. Micromechanical tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Bao-Lu; Guo Xia; Deng Jun; Qu Hong-Wei; Lian Peng; Dong Li-Min; Chen Min; Shen Guang-Di

    2006-01-01

    We report the study on a short wavelength-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser utilizing a monolithically integrated bridge tuning microelectromechanical system. A deformable-bridge top mirror suspended above an active region is utilized. Applied bridge-substrate bias produces an electrostatic force which reduces the spacing of air-gap and tunes the resonant wavelength toward a shorter wavelength (blue-shift). Good laser characteristics are obtained:such as continuous tuning ranges over 11 nm near 940 nm for 0-9 V tuning bias, the peak output power near 1 mW and the full-width-half-maximum limited to approximately 3.2-6.8 nm. A detailed simulation of the micromechanical and optical characteristics of these devices is performed, and the ratio of bridge displacement to wavelength shift has been found to be 3:1.

  9. Transverse-mode-selectable microlens vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Debernardi, Pierluigi; Lee, Yong Tak;

    2010-01-01

    A new vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structure employing a thin microlens is suggested and numerically investigated. The laser can be made to emit in either a high-power Gaussian-shaped single-fundamental mode or a high-power doughnut-shaped higher-order mode. The physical origin...

  10. Intracavity frequency-doubled green vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanrong Song; Peng Zhang; Xinping Zhang; Boxia Yan; Yi Zhou; Yong Bi; Zhigang Zhang

    2008-01-01

    @@ An intracavity frequency-doubled vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) with green light is demonstrated. The fundamental frequency laser cavity consists of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) of the gain chip and an external mirror. A 12-mW frequency-doubled output has been reached at 540 nm with a nonlinear crystal LBO when the fundamental frequency output is 44 mW at 1080 nm. The frequency doubling efficiency is about 30%.

  11. Integrated optoelectronic probe including a vertical cavity surface emitting laser for laser Doppler perfusion monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serov, Alexander N.; Nieland, Janharm; Oosterbaan, Sjoerd; Mul, de Frits F.M.; Kranenburg, van Herma; Bekman, Herman H.P.Th.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2006-01-01

    An integrated optoelectronic probe with small dimensions, for direct-contact laser Doppler blood flow monitoring has been realized. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), and a chip with photodetectors and all necessary electronics are integrated in a miniature probe head connected to a l

  12. Transverse Mode Dynamics and Ultrafast Modulation of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We show that multiple transverse mode dynamics of VCSELs (Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers) can be utilized to generate ultrafast intensity modulation at a frequency over 100 GHz, much higher than the relaxation oscillation frequency. Such multimode beating can be greatly enhanced by taking laser output from part of the output facet.

  13. Acetone vapor sensing using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode coated with polystyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent;

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical and experimental on a new vapor sensor, using a single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coated with a polymer sensor coating, which can detect acetone vapor at a volume fraction of 2.5%. The sensor provides the advantage of standard packaging, small form...

  14. Integrated Optoelectronic Probe Including a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser for Laser Doppler Perfusion Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serov, A.N.; Nieland, J.; Oosterbaan, S.; Steenbergen, W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Mul, F.F.M. de; Kranenburg, H. van

    2006-01-01

    An integrated optoelectronic probe with small dimensions, for direct-contact laser Doppler blood flow monitoring has been realized. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), and a chip with photodetectors and all necessary electronics are integrated in a miniature probe head connected to a l

  15. Polymer-coated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode vapor sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent;

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method for monitoring vapor concentration of volatile organic compounds using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The VCSEL is coated with a polymer thin film on the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The analyte absorption is transduced to the electrical domain ...

  16. Sub-gigahertz beam switching of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with transverse coupled cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahama, M.; Gu, X.; Sakaguchi, T. [Photonics Integration System Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-22, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsutani, A. [Semiconductor and MEMS Processing Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-22, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Ahmed, M.; Bakry, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Koyama, F. [Photonics Integration System Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-22, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-08-17

    We report a high-speed electrical beam switching of vertical cavity surface emitting laser with a transverse coupled cavity. A high speed (sub-gigahertz) and large deflection angle (>30°) beam switching is demonstrated by employing the transverse mode switching. The angular switching speed of 900 MHz is achieved with narrow beam divergence of below 4° and extinction ratio of 8 dB. We also measured the near- and far-field patterns to clarify the origin of the beam switching. We present a simple one-dimensional Bragg reflector waveguide model, which well predicts the beam switching characteristic.

  17. Vertical cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers with injection laser pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, D. L., Jr.; McInerney, J. G.; Raja, M. Y. A.; Schaus, C. F.; Brueck, S. R. J.

    1990-05-01

    Continuous-wave GaAs/GaAlAs edge-emitting diode lasers were used to pump GaAs/AlGaAs and InGaAs/AlGaAs vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with resonant periodic gain (RPG) at room temperature. Pump threshold as low as 11 mW, output powers as high as 27 mW at 850 nm, and external differential quantum efficiencies of about 70 percent were observed in GaAs/AlGaAs surface -emitters; spectral brightness 22 times that of the pump laser was also observed. Output powers as high as 85 mW at 950 nm and differential quantum efficiencies of up to 58 percent were recorded for the InGaAs surface-emitting laser. This is the highest quasi-CW output power ever reported for any RPG VCSEL, and the first time such a device has been pumped using an injection laser diode.

  18. High-energy terahertz wave parametric oscillator with a surface-emitted ring-cavity configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Yuye; Xu, Degang; Xu, Wentao; Duan, Pan; Yan, Chao; Tang, Longhuang; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-05-15

    A surface-emitted ring-cavity terahertz (THz) wave parametric oscillator has been demonstrated for high-energy THz output and fast frequency tuning in a wide frequency range. Through the special optical design with a galvano-optical scanner and four-mirror ring-cavity structure, the maximum THz wave output energy of 12.9 μJ/pulse is achieved at 1.359 THz under the pump energy of 172.8 mJ. The fast THz frequency tuning in the range of 0.7-2.8 THz can be accessed with the step response of 600 μs. Moreover, the maximum THz wave output energy from this configuration is 3.29 times as large as that obtained from the conventional surface-emitted THz wave parametric oscillator with the same experimental conditions. PMID:27176978

  19. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers: Advanced Modulation Formats and Coherent Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodes Lopez, Roberto

    This thesis expands the state-of-the-art in coherent detection for optical fiber access networks employing vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) as light sources. Bit rates up to 10 Gb/s over 25 km single-mode fibre (SMF) transmission distance have been achieved supporting a passive...... experimentally demonstrated to increase the capacity for a given bandwidth and reduce the impact of optical fiber chromatic dispersion for a given capacity. Finally, 2 Gb/s bipolar impulse-radio ultra-wide band (IR-UWB) data communication over a combined distance of 25 km SMF optical fiber and 4 m air. These......-generation access networks and high- speed shortrange systems employing vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers as light sources....

  20. Double-diamond high-contrast-gratings vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new design of vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) with diamond-based high contrast gratings is proposed. The self-consistent model of laser operation has been calibrated based on experimental results and used to optimize the new proposed device and to perform comparative thermal and optical analysis of conventional and double-diamond high-contrast-grating VECSELs. The proposed design considerably reduces the dimensions and complexity of the device and provides up to 80% increase of the maximum emitted power as compared with the conventional design. (paper)

  1. Polarization message encoding through vectorial chaos synchronization in vertical-cavity surface-emiting lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Scirè, Alessandro; Mulet, Josep; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Danckaert, Jan; San Miguel, Maxi

    2003-01-01

    We show that self-pulsating vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers can exhibit vectorial chaos, i.e., chaos in both intensity and polarization. The achievable synchronization degree of two such lasers is high when using a continuous control scheme and unidirectional coupling. We propose a novel encryption scheme, where the phase of the vectorial field is modulated. Therefore, the total intensity of these lasers remains synchronized while the intensities in the polarization modes (de)synchron...

  2. Tunable Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers Integrated with Two Wafers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xiu-Juan; GUAN Bao-Lu; GUO Shuai; LI Shuo; LI Chuan-Chuan; HAO Cong-Xia; ZHOU Hong-Yi; GUO Xiao

    2011-01-01

    A novel two-wafer concept for micro-electro-mechanically tunable vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)is presented. The VCSEL is composed by two wafers: one micro-electromechanical-system membrane wafer with four arms to adjust the cavity length through electrostatic actuation and a "half-VCSEL" wafer consisting of a fixed bottom mirror and an amplifying active region. The measurement results of the electricity pumped tunable VCSEL with more than 9mW output power at room temperature over the tuning range prove the feasibility of the proposition.%@@ A novel two-wafer concept for micro-electro-mechanically tunable vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is presented.The VCSEL is composed by two wafers: one micro-electromechanical-system membrane wafer with four arms to adjust the cavity length through electrostatic actuation and a "half-VCSEL" wafer consisting of a fixed bottom mirror and an amplifying active region.The measurement results of the electricity pumped tunable VCSEL with more than 9mW output power at room temperature over the tuning range prove the feasibility of the proposition.

  3. Buried heterostructure vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with semiconductor mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, G; Deppe, D G; Konthasinghe, K; Muller, A

    2012-01-01

    We report a buried heterostructure vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser fabricated by epitaxial regrowth over an InGaAs quantum well gain medium. The regrowth technique enables microscale lateral confinement that preserves a high cavity quality factor (loaded $Q\\approx$ 4000) and eliminates parasitic charging effects found in existing approaches. Under optimal spectral overlap between gain medium and cavity mode (achieved here at $T$ = 40 K) lasing was obtained with an incident optical power as low as $P_{\\rm th}$ = 10 mW ($\\lambda_{\\rm p}$ = 808 nm). The laser linewidth was found to be $\\approx$3 GHz at $P_{\\rm p}\\approx$ 5 $P_{\\rm th}$.

  4. Vectorial dissipative solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting Lasers with delays

    CERN Document Server

    Marconi, M; Barland, S; Balle, S; Giudici, M

    2014-01-01

    We show that the nonlinear polarization dynamics of a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers placed into an external cavity leads to the formation of temporal vectorial dissipative solitons. These vectorial solitons arise as cycles in the polarization orientation, leaving the total intensity constant. The long cavity enables the observation of different coexisting states with multiple solitons within the same round-trip. Such states encompass either independent or bound solitons, which can be distinguished by their noise-induced motion: while independent solitons exhibit uncorrelated random walks, soliton molecules evolve as rigid bodies. The theoretical proof of localization is given by the analysis of the Floquet exponents. Finally, we reduce the dynamics to a single delayed equation for the polarization orientation allowing interpreting the vectorial solitons as polarization kinks and anti-kinks.

  5. Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Huanlu; Wang, Xuyang; Ho, Daniel; Chen, Lifeng; Zhou, Xiaoqi; Zhu, Jiangbo; Yu, Siyuan; Cai, Xinlun

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) of light is an appealing approach to developing photonic technologies for future applications in optical communications and high- dimensional Quantum Key Distributions (QKD). An outstanding challenge to the widespread uptake of the OAM resource is its efficient generation. We design a new device which can directly emit an OAM-carrying light beam. By fabricating micro-scale Spiral Phase Plates (SPPs) within the aperture of a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSELs), the linearly polarized Gaussian beam emitted by the VCSEL is converted into a beam carrying specific OAM modes and their superposition states with high efficiency and high beam quality. The innovative OAM emitter opens a new horizon in the field of OAM-based optical and quantum communications, especially for short reach data interconnects and Quantum Key Distribution (QKD).

  6. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharthi, S. S.; Orchard, J.; Clarke, E.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization.

  7. Advances in commercial, mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempler, Nils; Lubeigt, Walter; Bialkowski, Bartlomiej; Hamilton, Craig J.; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2016-03-01

    In launching the Dragonfly, M Squared Lasers has successfully commercialized recent advances in mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting laser technologies operating between 920 nm - 1050 nm. This paper will describe the latest advances in the development of a new generation of Dragonfly lasers. The improved system has been engineered to utilise low-cost semiconductor gain media and integrated diode pumping, whilst exhibiting minimal footprint, diffraction limited beam quality and low intrinsic noise. Early experiments have resulted in pulses with 540mW of average output power and 150fs of duration at 200MHz pulse repetition frequency.

  8. Stable anticipation synchronization in mutually coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Two vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers(VCSELs) are mutually coupled through a partially transparent mirror (PTM) placed in the pathway. The PTM plays the role of external mirror,which controls the feedback strength and coupling strength.We numerically simulate this system by establishing a visible SIMULINK model.The results demonstrate that the anticipation synchronization is achieved and it can tolerate some extent frequency detuning.Moreover,the system shows similar chaos-pass filtering effect on unidirectionally coupled system even both VCSELs are modulated.This system allows simultaneously bidirectional secure message transmission on public channels.

  9. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser action of an all monolithic ZnO-based microcavity

    OpenAIRE

    Kalusniak, S.; Sadofev, S.; Halm, S.; Henneberger, F.

    2010-01-01

    We report on room temperature laser action of an all monolithic ZnO-based vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) under optical pumping. The VCSEL structure consists of a 2{\\lambda} microcavity containing 8 ZnO/Zn(0.92)Mg(0.08)O quantum wells embedded in epitaxially grown Zn(0.92)Mg(0.08)O/Zn(0.65)Mg(0.35)O distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). As a prerequisite, design and growth of high reflectivity DBRs based on ZnO and (Zn,Mg)O for optical devices operating in the ultraviolet and bl...

  10. Controllable spiking patterns in long-wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for neuromorphic photonics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple controllable spiking patterns are achieved in a 1310 nm Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in response to induced perturbations and for two different cases of polarized optical injection, namely, parallel and orthogonal. Furthermore, reproducible spiking responses are demonstrated experimentally at sub-nanosecond speed resolution and with a controlled number of spikes fired. This work opens therefore exciting research avenues for the use of VCSELs in ultrafast neuromorphic photonic systems for non-traditional computing applications, such as all-optical binary-to-spiking format conversion and spiking information encoding

  11. Controllable spiking patterns in long-wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for neuromorphic photonics systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.hurtado@strath.ac.uk [Institute of Photonics, SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, TIC Centre, 99 George Street, Glasgow G1 1RD (United Kingdom); Javaloyes, Julien [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, c/Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Mallorca (Spain)

    2015-12-14

    Multiple controllable spiking patterns are achieved in a 1310 nm Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in response to induced perturbations and for two different cases of polarized optical injection, namely, parallel and orthogonal. Furthermore, reproducible spiking responses are demonstrated experimentally at sub-nanosecond speed resolution and with a controlled number of spikes fired. This work opens therefore exciting research avenues for the use of VCSELs in ultrafast neuromorphic photonic systems for non-traditional computing applications, such as all-optical binary-to-spiking format conversion and spiking information encoding.

  12. Self-mixing interferometry in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for nanomechanical cantilever sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David; Greve, Anders; Hvam, Jørn Märcher;

    2009-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated self-mixing interference produced by the feedback of light from a polymer micrometer-sized cantilever into a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser for sensing applications. In particular we have investigated how the visibility of the optical output power and the...... junction voltage depends on the laser injection current and the distance to the cantilever. The highest power visibility obtained from cantilevers without reflective coatings was 60%, resulting in a very high sensitivity of 45 mV/nm with a noise floor below 1.2 mV. Different detection schemes are discussed....

  13. High-performance optoelectronic switching network with vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A schematic solution is proposed for creating a highly efficient switching network with fully connected switching topology for use in supercomputers and telecommunication systems. An important characteristic of this solution is the use of vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser arrays and polarising beamsplitters. Estimates show that the commercially available elemental base can be used for a practical realisation of an optoelectronic switching network with basic parameters and functional properties that are superior to those in known electronic analogues. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Cavity solitons in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers below threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavity solitons are stationary self-organized bright intensity peaks which form over a homogeneous background in the section of broad area radiation beams. They are generated by shining a writing/erasing laser pulse into a nonlinear optical cavity, driven by a holding beam. The ability to control their location and their motion by introducing phase or amplitude gradients in the holding beam makes them interesting as mobile pixels for all-optical processing units. We show the generation of a number of cavity solitons in broad-area vertical cavity semiconductor microresonators electrically pumped above transparency but slightly below threshold. We analyze the switching process in details. The observed spots can be written, erased, and manipulated as independent objects, as predicted by the theoretical model. An especially tailored one is used to simulate the studied phenomena and to compare our simulations to the experimental findings with good agreement

  15. Over 10 Watt, collinear blue and green vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowski, Michal L.; Hessenius, Chris; Meyer, Jason T.; Fallahi, Mahmoud

    2016-03-01

    A high power, two color, collinear, blue and green vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) is demonstrated. Two different InGaAs/GaAs VECSEL chips operating with gain centers near 970 nm and 1070 nm are used to make two separate V-folded laser cavities. Two critically phase-matched intracavity lithium triborate nonlinear crystals are used to generate blue and green outputs which are then combined in a polarizing beam splitter. This results in a single beam which contains over 10 watts of combined blue and green output power. This concept can be expanded upon by adding a red output for the creation of a high power, white laser source.

  16. Dynamics of a low-threshold optically pumped organic vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayesteh, Mohammad Reza; Darvish, Ghafar

    2016-06-01

    We propose a low-threshold optically pumped organic vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (OVCSEL). This device has the capability to apply both electrical and optical excitation. The microcavity structure consists of an organic light emitting diode with field-effect electron transport inserted in a high-quality factor double distributed Bragg reflector. The simulated quality factor of the microcavity is shown to be as high as 16,000. Also, we investigate threshold behaviour and the dynamics of the optically pumped OVCSEL with sub-picosecond pulses. Results from numerical simulation show that lasing threshold is 12.8 pJ/0.64 µJ cm-2 when pumped by sub-picosecond pulses of λ = 400 nm wavelength light.

  17. VCSELs Fundamentals, Technology and Applications of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The huge progress which has been achieved in the field is covered here, in the first comprehensive monograph on vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) since eight years. Apart from chapters reviewing the research field and the laser fundamentals, there are comprehensive updates on red and blue emitting VCSELs, telecommunication VCSELs, optical transceivers, and parallel-optical links for computer interconnects. Entirely new contributions are made to the fields of vectorial three-dimensional optical modeling, single-mode VCSELs, polarization control, polarization dynamics, very-high-speed design, high-power emission, use of high-contrast gratings, GaInNAsSb long-wavelength VCSELs, optical video links, VCSELs for optical mice and sensing, as well as VCSEL-based laser printing. The book appeals to researchers, optical engineers and graduate students.

  18. Progress and issues for high-speed vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, Kevin L.; Al-Omari, Ahmad N.

    2007-02-01

    Extrinsic electrical, thermal, and optical issues rather than intrinsic factors currently constrain the maximum bandwidth of directly modulated vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). Intrinsic limits based on resonance frequency, damping, and K-factor analysis are summarized. Previous reports are used to compare parasitic circuit values and electrical 3dB bandwidths and thermal resistances. A correlation between multimode operation and junction heating with bandwidth saturation is presented. The extrinsic factors motivate modified bottom-emitting structures with no electrical pads, small mesas, copper plated heatsinks, and uniform current injection. Selected results on high speed quantum well and quantum dot VCSELs at 850 nm, 980 nm, and 1070 nm are reviewed including small-signal 3dB frequencies up to 21.5 GHz and bit rates up to 30 Gb/s.

  19. Effect of SiO2 Reflection Reducing Coating on the Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of epitaxis SiO2 film on the characteristics of DBR reflectivity were simulated, and the reflectivity of graded interface DBR is lower than the abrupt one was studied. 850nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers were fabricated, the DBR is formed by graded heterojunction of AlxGa1-xAs, the top and bottom DBR have 22 and 34 pairs of mirror, and current was confined by oxide aperture, and then different thickness of SiO2 film were grew on the top DBR. and found that a certain thickness (λ/4) of the SiO2 reflection reducing coating could make the vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers output power increased about 3-5 mW, the threshold current does not increase obviously, the reason is external quantum efficiency increases more than the threshold current. So the SiO2 reflection reducing coating does not affect the lasing of lasers and threshold current obviously, but It can significantly improve the output power. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical expectation.

  20. Effect of SiO2 Reflection Reducing Coating on the Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen-Bo, Zhao; Chen, Xu; Yi-Yang, Xie; Kang, Zhou; Fa, Liu; Bao-Qiang, Wang; Ying-Ming, Liu; Guang-Di, Shen

    2011-02-01

    The effects of epitaxis SiO2 film on the characteristics of DBR reflectivity were simulated, and the reflectivity of graded interface DBR is lower than the abrupt one was studied. 850nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers were fabricated, the DBR is formed by graded heterojunction of AlxGa1-xAs, the top and bottom DBR have 22 and 34 pairs of mirror, and current was confined by oxide aperture, and then different thickness of SiO2 film were grew on the top DBR. and found that a certain thickness (λ/4) of the SiO2 reflection reducing coating could make the vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers output power increased about 3-5 mW, the threshold current does not increase obviously, the reason is external quantum efficiency increases more than the threshold current. So the SiO2 reflection reducing coating does not affect the lasing of lasers and threshold current obviously, but It can significantly improve the output power. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical expectation.

  1. Characteristics of selective oxidation during the fabrication of vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Yong-Qin; Zhong Jing-Chang; Ma Jian-Li; Zhang Yong-Ming; Wang Li-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Taking into account oxidation temperature, N2 carrier gas flow, and the geometry of the mesa structures this paper investigates the characteristics of selective oxidation during the fabrication of the vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) in detail. Results show that the selective oxidation follows a law which differs from any reported in the literature. Below 435°C selective oxidation of Al0.98 Ga0.02 As follows a linear growth law for the two mesa structures employed in VCSEL. Above 435°C approximately increasing parabolic growth is found, which is influenced by the geometry of the mesa structures. Theoretical analysis on the difference between the two structures for the initial oxidation has been performed, which demonstrates that the geometry of the mesa structures does influence on the growth rate of oxide at higher temperatures.

  2. Numerical model of capacitance in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiak, M.; Śpiewak, P.; Moser, P.; Walczak, J.; Sarzała, R. P.; Czyszanowski, T.; Lott, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present a model of impedance and modulation time constants for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating above threshold current. A 3D numerical model of potential distribution in the device under a constant bias is used to determine resistances and capacitances of an appropriate equivalent circuit. The model has been verified by comparing the theoretical and measured impedance as a function of frequency Z(f). The measured Z(f) is determined from S 11 small signal modulation experiments. The comparison has been performed for frequencies up to 40 GHz and a wide range of above threshold currents, for two oxide-confined VCSELs of different aperture diameters. We obtained a very good quantitative agreement for frequencies up to about 15 GHz and qualitative agreement over the entire range of currents and frequencies.

  3. Matrices of 960-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matrices of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with individual addressing of elements and radiation output through a gallium arsenide substrate are implemented. Individual laser emitters with a current aperture diameter of 6–7 μm exhibit continuous-wave room-temperature lasing at a wavelength of 958–962 nm with threshold currents of 1.1–1.3 mA, differential efficiency of 0.5–0.8 mW/mA, and a maximum output power of 7.5–9 mW. The parameter variation of individual emitters within a matrix chip containing 5 × 7 elements does not exceed ±20%.

  4. Comprehensive numerical model for cw vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, G.R.; Lear, K.L.; Warren, M.E.; Choquette, K.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scott, J.W. [Optical Concepts, Inc., Lompoc, CA (United States); Corzine, S.W. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The authors present a comprehensive numerical model for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers that includes all major processes effecting cw operation of axisymmetric devices. In particular, the model includes a description of the 2D transport of electrons and holes through the cladding layers to the quantum well(s), diffusion and recombination processes of these carriers within the wells, the 2D transport of heat throughout the device, and a multi-lateral-mode effective index optical model. The optical gain acquired by photons traversing the quantum wells is computed including the effects of strained band structure and quantum confinement. They employ the model to predict the behavior of higher-order lateral modes in proton-implanted devices, and to provide an understanding of index-guiding in devices fabricated using selective oxidation.

  5. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers incorporating an ion implanted aperture

    KAUST Repository

    Leonard, J. T.

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. We report on our recent progress in improving the performance of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) by using an Al ion implanted aperture and employing a multi-layer electron-beam evaporated ITO intracavity contact. The use of an ion implanted aperture improves the lateral confinement over SiNx apertures by enabling a planar ITO design, while the multi-layer ITO contact minimizes scattering losses due to its epitaxially smooth morphology. The reported VCSEL has 10 QWs, with a 3nm quantum well width, 1nm barriers, a 5nm electron-blocking layer, and a 6.95- λ total cavity thickness. These advances yield a single longitudinal mode 406nm nonpolar VCSEL with a low threshold current density (∼16kA/cm2), a peak output power of ∼12μW, and a 100% polarization ratio. The lasing in the current aperture is observed to be spatially non-uniform, which is likely a result of filamentation caused by non-uniform current spreading, lateral optical confinement, contact resistance, and absorption loss.

  6. Polarized optical injection in long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, A.; Schires, K.; Khan, N.; Al-Seyab, R.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.

    2011-05-01

    We report a comprehensive study of the effects of polarized optical injection in long-wavelength Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (LW-VCSELs) emitting at the telecom wavelength of 1550nm. We analyze the properties of the polarization switching and bistability that can be induced in a 1550nm-VCSEL under orthogonal and arbitrary polarized optical injection. Additionally, we study the injection locking bandwidth of these devices when subject to different polarized optical injection. Furthermore, we also analyze the relationship existing between the injection locking bandwidth and the polarization switching range when the device is subject to orthogonally-polarized optical injection. Finally, we have identified regions of different nonlinear dynamics outside the injection locking bandwidth, including regions of periodic dynamics (such as limit cycle and period doubling) and chaos when these devices are subject to parallel and to orthogonal optical injection. This rich variety of nonlinear effects observed at 1550nm offers exciting prospects for novel practical uses of VCSELs in optical switching/routing applications in optical networks.

  7. Efficient vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for infrared illumination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Guo, Baiming; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Pradhan, Prachi; Wynn, James D.; Khalfin, Viktor; Zou, Wei-Xiong; Ghosh, Chuni; Van Leeuwen, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Infrared illumination is used in the commercial and defense markets for surveillance and security, for high-speed imaging, and for military covert operations. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are an attractive candidate for IR illumination applications as they offer advantageous properties such as efficiency, intrinsically low diverging circular beam, low-cost manufacturing, narrow emission spectrum, and high reliability. VCSELs can also operate at high temperatures, thereby meeting the harsh environmental requirements of many illuminators. The efficiency and brightness of these VCSELs also reduce the requirements of the power supply compared to, for example, an LED approach. We present results on VCSEL arrays for illumination applications, as well as results on VCSEL-based illumination experiments. These VCSELs are used in illuminators emitting from a few Watts up to several hundred Watts. The emission of these VCSEL-based illuminators is speckle-free with no interference patterns. Infra-red illumination at up to 1,600ft (500m) from the source has been demonstrated using VCSEL-based illumination, without any optics.

  8. Integrated plasmonic circuitry on a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPolin, Cillian P. T.; Bouillard, Jean-Sebastien; Vilain, Sebastien; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Dickson, Wayne; O'Connor, Daniel; Wurtz, Gregory A.; Justice, John; Corbett, Brian; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2016-08-01

    Integrated plasmonic sources and detectors are imperative in the practical development of plasmonic circuitry for bio- and chemical sensing, nanoscale optical information processing, as well as transducers for high-density optical data storage. Here we show that vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be employed as an on-chip, electrically pumped source or detector of plasmonic signals, when operated in forward or reverse bias, respectively. To this end, we experimentally demonstrate surface plasmon polariton excitation, waveguiding, frequency conversion and detection on a VCSEL-based plasmonic platform. The coupling efficiency of the VCSEL emission to waveguided surface plasmon polariton modes has been optimized using asymmetric plasmonic nanostructures. The plasmonic VCSEL platform validated here is a viable solution for practical realizations of plasmonic functionalities for various applications, such as those requiring sub-wavelength field confinement, refractive index sensitivity or optical near-field transduction with electrically driven sources, thus enabling the realization of on-chip optical communication and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  9. Integrated plasmonic circuitry on a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPolin, Cillian P. T.; Bouillard, Jean-Sebastien; Vilain, Sebastien; Krasavin, Alexey V.; Dickson, Wayne; O'Connor, Daniel; Wurtz, Gregory A.; Justice, John; Corbett, Brian; Zayats, Anatoly V.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated plasmonic sources and detectors are imperative in the practical development of plasmonic circuitry for bio- and chemical sensing, nanoscale optical information processing, as well as transducers for high-density optical data storage. Here we show that vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be employed as an on-chip, electrically pumped source or detector of plasmonic signals, when operated in forward or reverse bias, respectively. To this end, we experimentally demonstrate surface plasmon polariton excitation, waveguiding, frequency conversion and detection on a VCSEL-based plasmonic platform. The coupling efficiency of the VCSEL emission to waveguided surface plasmon polariton modes has been optimized using asymmetric plasmonic nanostructures. The plasmonic VCSEL platform validated here is a viable solution for practical realizations of plasmonic functionalities for various applications, such as those requiring sub-wavelength field confinement, refractive index sensitivity or optical near-field transduction with electrically driven sources, thus enabling the realization of on-chip optical communication and lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:27491686

  10. Towards monolithic integration of mode-locked vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaz, Rafael I.

    2007-12-01

    The speed and performance of today's high end computing and communications systems have placed difficult but still feasible demands on off-chip electrical interconnects. However, future interconnect systems may need aggregate bandwidths well into the terahertz range thereby making electrical bandwidth, density, and power targets impossible to meet. Optical interconnects, and specifically compact semiconductor mode-locked lasers, could alleviate this problem by providing short pulses in time at 10s of GHz repetition rates for Optical Time Division Multiplexing (OTDM) and clock distribution applications. Furthermore, the characteristic spectral comb of frequencies of these lasers could also serve as a multi-wavelength source for Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) applications. A fully integrated mode-locked Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) is proposed as a low-cost high-speed source for these applications. The fundamental laser platform for such a device has been developed and a continuous-wave version of these lasers has been fabricated and demonstrated excellent results. Output powers close to 60mW have been obtained with very high beam quality factor of M2 unassisted ultrafast QD saturable absorbers, without the need to incorporate high concentrations of non radiative recombination centers by either ion-implantation or low temperature growth.

  11. Proton irradiation effects in oxide-confined vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diodes are employed as the emitter portion of opto-couplers that are used in space applications. Proton irradiation studies on VCSELs were performed at the Indiana University cyclotron facility. The beam energy was set at 192 MeV, the beam current was 200 nA that is equivalent to a flux of approximately 1*1011 protons/cm2.s. We conclude that the oxide confined VCSELs examined in this study show more than sufficient radiation hardness for nearly all space applications. The observed proton-induced decreases in light output and the corresponding increases in laser threshold current can be explained in terms of proton-induced displacement damage which introduces non-radiative recombination centers in the active region of the lasers and causes a decrease in laser efficiency. These radiation effects accentuate the detrimental thermal effects observed at high currents. We also note that forward bias annealing is effective in these devices in producing at least partial recovery of the light output, and that this may be a viable hardness assurance technique during a flight mission. (A.C.)

  12. Power dissipation in oxide-confined 980-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Guo-Zhu; Guan Bao-Lu; Li Shuo; Wang Qiang; Shen Guang-Di

    2013-01-01

    We presented 980-nm oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with a 16-μm oxide aperture.Optical power,voltage,and emission wavelength are measured in an ambient temperature range of 5 ℃-80 ℃.Measurements combined with an empirical model are used to analyse the power dissipation in the device and the physical mechanism contributing to the thermal rollover phenomenon in VCSEL.It is found that the carrier leakage induced self-heating in the active region and the Joule heating caused by the series resistance are the main sources of power dissipation.In addition,carrier leakage induced self-heating increases as the injection current increases,resulting in a rapid decrease of the internal quantum efficiency,which is a dominant contribution to the thermal rollover of the VCSEL at a larger current.Our study provides useful guidelines to design a 980-nm oxide-confined VCSEL for thermal performance enhancement.

  13. Effect of pump wave reflections on the excitation of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of pump wave reflections on the carrier generation rate and uniformity of carrier population in quantum wells (QWs) of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser has been numerically analyzed. The laser's active region has been described within a mathematical model allowing any number of QWs and arbitrary distribution of carrier generation rate. It is shown that the optimal arrangement of blocking layers in the active region of a dual-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser allows one to obtain a very uniform QW population. It is established that pump wave reflections significantly affect the local carrier generation rate and, therefore, the distribution of excited carriers in the laser structure.

  14. Molecular beam epitaxial regrowth on diffraction gratings for vertical-cavity, surface-emitting laser-based integrated optoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epitaxial regrowth techniques, using molecular beam epitaxy, were optimized for the inclusion of submicron diffraction gratings within a vertically resonant structure. Various growth conditions including chemical surface preparation, growth rate, and regrown interfacial structure were studied to determine the quality of the regrown materials and structures. Characteristics such as dislocation density and growth planarity (flatness of the regrown layers) were of particular importance due to the vertical geometry and resonance requirements of the structure. Threading dislocation densities of ≅3x106 cm-2 were measured, by means of transmission electron microscopy, in the regrown structures using optimized regrowth processes. Layer thickness variations, due to growth on nonplanar surfaces (diffraction gratings), were characterized using modeling and optical reflectometry. With these results, inclusion of diffraction gratings has been demonstrated with the accurate control over layer thickness needed for use in vertically oriented devices such as vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors

  15. Evolution of the Novalux extended cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser (NECSEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, John G.

    2016-03-01

    Novalux Inc was an enterprise founded by Aram Mooradian in 1998 to commercialise a novel electrically pumped vertical extended cavity semiconductor laser platform, initially aiming to produce pump lasers for optical fiber telecommunication networks. Following successful major investment in 2000, the company developed a range of single- and multi-mode 980 nm pump lasers emitting from 100-500 mW with excellent beam quality and efficiency. This rapid development required solution of several significant problems in chip and external cavity design, substrate and DBR mirror optimization, thermal engineering and mode selection. Output coupling to single mode fiber was exceptional. Following the collapse of the long haul telecom market in late 2001, a major reorientation of effort was undertaken, initially to develop compact 60-100 mW hybrid monolithically integrated pumplets for metro/local amplified networks, then to frequency-doubled blue light emitters for biotech, reprographics and general scientific applications. During 2001-3 I worked at Novalux on a career break from University College Cork, first as R&D Director managing a small group tasked with producing new capabilities and product options based on the NECSEL platform, including high power, pulsed and frequency doubled versions, then in 2002 as Director of New Product Realization managing the full engineering team, leading the transition to frequency doubled products.

  16. Control of emitted light polarization in a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser subject to circularly polarized optical injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alharthi, S. S., E-mail: ssmalh@essex.ac.uk; Hurtado, A.; Al Seyab, R. K.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ (United Kingdom); Korpijarvi, V.-M.; Guina, M. [Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC), Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-11-03

    We experimentally demonstrate the control of the light polarization emitted by a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) at room temperature. This is achieved by means of a combination of polarized optical pumping and polarized optical injection. Without external injection, the polarization of the optical pump controls that of the spin-VCSEL. However, the addition of the externally injected signal polarized with either left- (LCP) or right-circular polarization (RCP) is able to control the polarization of the spin-VCSEL switching it at will to left- or right-circular polarization. A numerical model has been developed showing a very high degree of agreement with the experimental findings.

  17. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alharthi, S. S., E-mail: ssmalh@essex.ac.uk; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ (United Kingdom); Orchard, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Clarke, E. [EPSRC National Centre for III-V Technologies, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, S1 3JD Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-12

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization.

  18. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization

  19. Comparison of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with tunnel junction and ITO intracavity contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. T.; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Shen, C.; Margalith, T.; Ng, T. K.; DenBaars, S. P.; Ooi, B. S.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the lasing of III-nitride nonpolar, violet, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with IIInitride tunnel-junction (TJ) intracavity contacts and ion implanted apertures (IIAs). The TJ VCSELs are compared to similar VCSELs with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts. Prior to analyzing device results, we consider the relative advantages of III-nitride TJs for blue and green emitting VCSELs. The TJs are shown to be most advantageous for violet and UV VCSELs, operating near or above the absorption edge for ITO, as they significantly reduce the total internal loss in the cavity. However, for longer wavelength III-nitride VCSELs, TJs primarily offer the advantage of improved cavity design flexibility, allowing one to make the p-side thicker using a thick n-type III-nitride TJ intracavity contact. This offers improved lateral current spreading and lower loss, compare to using ITO and p-GaN, respectively. These aspects are particularly important for achieving high-power CW VCSELs, making TJs the ideal intracavity contact for any III-nitride VCSEL. A brief overview of III-nitride TJ growth methods is also given, highlighting the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique used here. Following this overview, we compare 12 μm aperture diameter, violet emitting, TJ and ITO VCSEL experimental results, which demonstrate the significant improvement in differential efficiency and peak power resulting from the reduced loss in the TJ design. Specifically, the TJ VCSEL shows a peak power of ~550 μW with a threshold current density of ~3.5 kA/cm2, while the ITO VCSELs show peak powers of ~80 μW and threshold current densities of ~7 kA/cm2.

  20. Effect of SiO{sub 2} Reflection Reducing Coating on the Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Zhenbo; Xu Chen; Xie Yiyang; Zhou Kang; Liu Fa; Wang Baoqiang; Liu Yingming; Shen Guangdi, E-mail: taikong906@163.com, E-mail: zhaozhenbo@emails.bjut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Opto-electronics Technology (Beijing University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Technology, 100 Ping Le Yuan, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The effects of epitaxis SiO{sub 2} film on the characteristics of DBR reflectivity were simulated, and the reflectivity of graded interface DBR is lower than the abrupt one was studied. 850nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers were fabricated, the DBR is formed by graded heterojunction of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As, the top and bottom DBR have 22 and 34 pairs of mirror, and current was confined by oxide aperture, and then different thickness of SiO{sub 2} film were grew on the top DBR. and found that a certain thickness ({lambda}/4) of the SiO{sub 2} reflection reducing coating could make the vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers output power increased about 3-5 mW, the threshold current does not increase obviously, the reason is external quantum efficiency increases more than the threshold current. So the SiO{sub 2} reflection reducing coating does not affect the lasing of lasers and threshold current obviously, but It can significantly improve the output power. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical expectation.

  1. Temperature dependence of spontaneous switch-on and switch-off of laser cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic experimental and numerical investigation of the conditions for the spontaneous formation of laser cavity solitons in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback by a volume Bragg grating is reported. It is shown that the switching thresholds are controlled by a combination of frequency shifts induced by ambient temperature and Joule heating. The gain level has only a minor influence on the threshold but controls mainly the power of the solitons. At large initial detuning and high threshold gain, the first observed structure can be a high order soliton. In real devices spatial disorder in the cavity length causes a pinning of solitons and a dispersion of thresholds. The experimental observations are in good agreement with numerical simulations taking into account disorder and the coupling of gain and cavity resonance due to Joule heating. In particular, we demonstrate that the existence of the traps explain the spontaneous switch on of the solitons, but do not modify the soliton shape significantly, i.e. the observed solitons are a good approximation of the ones expected in a homogeneous system. (paper)

  2. Temperature dependence of spontaneous switch-on and switch-off of laser cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, J.; Oppo, G.-L.; Ackemann, T.

    2016-03-01

    A systematic experimental and numerical investigation of the conditions for the spontaneous formation of laser cavity solitons in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback by a volume Bragg grating is reported. It is shown that the switching thresholds are controlled by a combination of frequency shifts induced by ambient temperature and Joule heating. The gain level has only a minor influence on the threshold but controls mainly the power of the solitons. At large initial detuning and high threshold gain, the first observed structure can be a high order soliton. In real devices spatial disorder in the cavity length causes a pinning of solitons and a dispersion of thresholds. The experimental observations are in good agreement with numerical simulations taking into account disorder and the coupling of gain and cavity resonance due to Joule heating. In particular, we demonstrate that the existence of the traps explain the spontaneous switch on of the solitons, but do not modify the soliton shape significantly, i.e. the observed solitons are a good approximation of the ones expected in a homogeneous system.

  3. Broadband single-mode emission from two-dimensional ring cavity surface emitting quantum cascade laser arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We describe compact, two-dimensional single-mode quantum cascade laser arrays based on the ring cavity surface emitting laser, as a basic building block. The sixteen-element mid-infrared array shows a linear tuning range of ∼180 cm-1 (7.5 - 8.7 μm) in pulsed condition at room temperature. The measured spectral-dependent threshold current densities and optical power reflect the gain profile of the applied laser material. This suggests that the device performance is not affected by the individual grating design, given by the facet less nature of the incorporated single surface emitter. Such broadband laser arrays allow the realization of compact mid-infrared spectrometers. (author)

  4. Flattop mode shaping of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser using an external-cavity aspheric mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaohui; Leger, James

    2004-11-01

    Both square-shaped and circular-shaped flattop modes were experimentally demonstrated in extended-cavity broad-area VCSELs using aspheric feedback mirrors. These refractive aspheric mirrors were fabricated by electron-beam lithography on curved substrates. Excellent single-mode operation and improved power extraction efficiency were observed. The three-mirror structure of the VCSEL and the state-of-the-art fabrication of the aspheric mirror contribute to the superior VCSEL performance. The modal loss analysis using a rigid three-mirror-cavity simulation method is discussed. PMID:19484117

  5. Circular polarization switching and bistability in an optically injected 1300 nm spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alharthi, S. S., E-mail: ssmalh@essex.ac.uk; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ (United Kingdom); Hurtado, A. [School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ (United Kingdom); Institute of Photonics, Physics Department, University of Strathclyde, Wolfson Centre, 106 Rottenrow East, Glasgow G4 0NW, Scotland (United Kingdom); Korpijarvi, V.-M.; Guina, M. [Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC), Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2015-01-12

    We report the experimental observation of circular polarization switching (PS) and polarization bistability (PB) in a 1300 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). We demonstrate that the circularly polarized optical signal at 1300 nm can gradually or abruptly switch the polarization ellipticity of the spin-VCSEL from right-to-left circular polarization and vice versa. Moreover, different forms of PS and PB between right- and left-circular polarizations are observed by controlling the injection strength and the initial wavelength detuning. These results obtained at the telecom wavelength of 1300 nm open the door for novel uses of spin-VCSELs in polarization sensitive applications in future optical systems.

  6. Quantum well intermixing technique using proton implantation for carrier confinement of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Shouhei; Saitou, Minoru; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated quantum well intermixing (QWI) using proton implantation to form the carrier confinement structure in the active layer of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The required potential barrier height is discussed referring to the result of numerical analysis. The bandgap change due to the QWI was investigated experimentally for various quantum well structures, proton dose densities, and thermal annealing conditions. A potential barrier height of 30 meV was observed using a high-indium and thin-well structure. High crystalline quality was confirmed by photoluminescence intensity measurement, even after the QWI process, and the lasing of the fabricated QWI-VCSEL was observed without any deterioration. The proposed technique would be effective in improving the device performance in a simple fabrication process.

  7. Ring-cavity surface-emitting lasers as a building block for tunable and coherent quantum cascade laser arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe ring-cavity surface-emitting lasers (ring-CSELs) based on quantum cascade structures as an elementary building block for two-dimensional quantum cascade laser arrays. The light emitters operate at high temperatures as high as 380 K and above. The devices facilitate a reduction in threshold current density as well as enhanced radiation efficiency in comparison to Fabry–Pérot lasers. Single-mode emission is observed at a wavelength of around 8 µm with a side-mode suppression ratio of 30 dB at room temperature. A tuning of the resonance is achieved by a variation in the grating period or a change in temperature. Phase locking of two ring-CSELs is demonstrated which is based on a direct coupling scheme. Coherent operation of ring-type lasers results in light emission at an identical wavelength and thus in an enhancement of the spectral brightness

  8. Design concepts of monolithic metamorphic vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possible design concepts for long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range on GaAs substrates are suggested. It is shown that a metamorphic GaAs–InGaAs heterostructure with a thin buffer layer providing rapid transition from the lattice constant of GaAs to that of InxGa1–xAs with an indium fraction of x < 0.3 can be formed by molecular-beam epitaxy. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the effective localization of mismatch dislocations in the thin buffer layer and full suppression of their penetration into the overlying InGaAs metamorphic layer

  9. Circular polarization switching and bistability in an optically injected 1300 nm spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the experimental observation of circular polarization switching (PS) and polarization bistability (PB) in a 1300 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). We demonstrate that the circularly polarized optical signal at 1300 nm can gradually or abruptly switch the polarization ellipticity of the spin-VCSEL from right-to-left circular polarization and vice versa. Moreover, different forms of PS and PB between right- and left-circular polarizations are observed by controlling the injection strength and the initial wavelength detuning. These results obtained at the telecom wavelength of 1300 nm open the door for novel uses of spin-VCSELs in polarization sensitive applications in future optical systems

  10. Time-Delay Signature of Chaotic Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers with Polarization-Rotated Optical Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantitatively evaluate the time-delay (TD) signatures of chaotic signals generated by vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with polarization-rotated optical feedback (PROF), we propose four cases of resolution coefficients R based on correlation functions. The resolution coefficient characteristics for the x-polarization (XP) mode, y-polarization (YP) mode and the total output are considered. The dependences of R on the feedback strength and feedback delay are discussed and compared carefully. The two-dimensional maps of R show that the TD signatures for the single polarization mode (i.e., XP or YP mode) are much more difficult to retrieve than those for the total output in the entire parameter space. Thus, by using single polarization mode as a chaotic carrier, the TD signatures are extremely difficult to be identified, which contributes a lot in the security-enhanced VCSELs-based chaotic optical communication systems. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  11. Single-exposure two-dimensional superresolution in digital holography using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Luis; Zalevsky, Zeev; Micó, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    We present a new implementation capable of producing two-dimensional (2D) superresolution (SR) imaging in a single exposure by aperture synthesis in digital lensless Fourier holography when using angular multiplexing provided by a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser source array. The system performs the recording in a single CCD snapshot of a multiplexed hologram coming from the incoherent addition of multiple subholograms, where each contains information about a different 2D spatial frequency band of the object's spectrum. Thus, a set of nonoverlapping bandpass images of the input object can be recovered by Fourier transformation (FT) of the multiplexed hologram. The SR is obtained by coherent addition of the information contained in each bandpass image while generating an enlarged synthetic aperture. Experimental results demonstrate improvement in resolution and image quality. PMID:21479012

  12. Highly-efficient, diffraction-limited laser emission from a Vertical External Cavity Surface-emitting Organic Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Rabbani-Haghighi, Hadi; Chenais, Sebastien; Siove, Alain

    2010-01-01

    We report on a solid-state laser structure being the organic counterpart of the Vertical External-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VECSEL) design. The gain medium is a poly (methyl methacrylate) film doped with Rhodamine 640, spin-casted onto the High-Reflectivity mirror of a plano-concave resonator. Upon pumping by 7-ns pulses at 532 nm, a diffraction-limited beam (M^2=1) was obtained, with a conversion efficiency of 43%; higher peak powers (2kW) could be attained when resorting to shorter (0.5 ns) pump pulses. The spectrum was controlled by the thickness of the active layer playing the role of an intracavity etalon; tunability is demonstrated over up to 20 nm.

  13. Self-Mixing Fringes of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers under Dual Reflector Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiang; ZHANG Shu-Lian; ZHANG Lian-Qing; TAN Yi-Dong

    2006-01-01

    The self-mixing fringes which shift due to every one-twentieth wavelength displacement of the target are observed.Taking advantage of the dual reflectors in the external cavity of lasers, the resolution of the sensors has been improved by 10 times. The role of the each reflector has been discussed in detail.

  14. Towards high-frequency operation of polarization oscillations in spin vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Markus; Höpfner, Henning; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.; Pusch, Tobias; Michalzik, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Compared to purely charge based devices, spintronic lasers offer promising perspectives for new superior device concepts. Especially vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with spin-polarization (spin-VCSELs) feature ultrafast spin and polarization dynamics. Oscillations in the circular polarization degree can be generated using pulsed spin-injection. The oscillations evolve due to the carrier-spin-photon system that is coupled for the linear modes in the VCSEL's cavity via the birefringence. The polarization oscillations are independent of the conventional relaxation oscillations and have the potential to exceed frequencies of 100 GHz. The oscillations are switchable and can be the basis for ultrafast directly modulated spin-VCSELs for, e.g., communication purposes. The polarization oscillation frequency is mainly determined by the birefringence. We show a method to tune the birefringence and thus the polarization oscillation frequency by adding mechanical strain to the substrate in the vicinity of the laser. We achieved first experimental results for high-frequency operation using 850 nm oxide-confined single-mode VCSELs. The results are compared with simulations using the spin-flip-model for high birefringence values.

  15. Simulation of Optical Resonators for Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (vcsel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mohy S.; Hassen, Mahmoud F. M.; El-Nozahey, Adel M.; Hafez, Alaa S.; Metry, Samer F.

    2010-04-01

    Simulation and modeling of the reflectivity and transmissivity of the multilayer DBR of VCSEL, as well as inside the active region quantum well are analyzed using the characteristic matrix method. The electric field intensity distributions inside such vertical-cavity structure are calculated. A software program under MATLAB environment is constructed for the simulation. This study was performed for two specific Bragg wavelengths 980 nm and 370 nm for achieving a resonant periodic gain (RPG)

  16. Effect of Mesa Size on Thermal Characteristics of Vertical-cavity Surface-emitting Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Shi-hua; ZHAO Ding; SUN Yong-wei; TAN Man-qing; CHEN Liang-hui

    2005-01-01

    The effect of mesa size on the thermal characteristics of etched mesa vertical-cavity surfaceemitting lasers(VCSELs) is studied. The numerical results show that the mesa size of the top mirror strongly influences the temperature distribution inside the etched mesa VCSEL. Under a certain driving voltage, with decreasing mesa size, the location of the maximal temperature moves towards the p-contact metal, the temperature in the core region of the active layer rises greatly, and the thermal characteristics of the etched mesa VCSELs will deteriorate.

  17. Ultrafast pulse amplification in mode-locked vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fully microscopic many-body Maxwell–semiconductor Bloch model is used to investigate the influence of the non-equilibrium carrier dynamics on the short-pulse amplification in mode-locked semiconductor microlaser systems. The numerical solution of the coupled equations allows for a self-consistent investigation of the light–matter coupling dynamics, the carrier kinetics in the saturable absorber and the multiple-quantum-well gain medium, as well as the modification of the light field through the pulse-induced optical polarization. The influence of the pulse-induced non-equilibrium modifications of the carrier distributions in the gain medium and the saturable absorber on the single-pulse amplification in the laser cavity is identified. It is shown that for the same structure, quantum wells, and gain bandwidth the non-equilibrium carrier dynamics lead to two preferred operation regimes: one with pulses in the (sub-)100 fs-regime and one with multi-picosecond pulses. The recovery time of the saturable absorber determines in which regime the device operates

  18. Absorber and gain chip optimization to improve performance from a passively modelocked electrically pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an electrically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (EP-VECSEL) modelocked with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with significantly improved performance. In different cavity configurations, we present the shortest pulses (2.5 ps), highest average output power (53.2 mW), highest repetition rate (18.2 GHz), and highest peak power (4.7 W) to date. The simple and low-cost concept of EP-VECSELs is very attractive for mass-market applications such as optical communication and clocking. The improvements result from an optimized gain chip from Philips Technologie GmbH and a SESAM, specifically designed for EP-VECSELs. For the gain chip, we found a better trade-off between electrical and optical losses with an optimized doping scheme in the substrate to increase the average output power. Furthermore, the device's bottom contact diameter (60 μm) is smaller than the oxide aperture diameter (100 μm), which favors electro-optical conversion into a TEM00 mode. Compared to optically pumped VECSELs we have to increase the field enhancement in the active region of an EP-VECSEL which requires a SESAM with lower saturation fluence and higher modulation depth for modelocking. We therefore used a resonant quantum well SESAM with a 3.5-pair dielectric top-coating (SiNx and SiO2) to enhance the field in the absorber at the lasing wavelength of 980 nm. The absorption bandedge at room temperature is detuned (965 nm) compared to the resonance (980 nm), which enables temperature-tuning of the modulation depth and saturation fluence from approximately 2.5% up to 15% and from 20 μJ/cm2 to 1.1 μJ/cm2, respectively

  19. Proton Irradiation Effects in Oxide-Confined Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) Diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent space experience has shown that the use of commercial optocouplers can be problematic in spacecraft, such as TOPEX/Poseidon, that must operate in significant radiation environments. Radiation--induced failures of these devices have been observed in space and have been further documented at similar radiation doses in the laboratory. The ubiquitous use of optocouplers in spacecraft systems for a variety of applications, such as electrical isolation, switching and power transfer, is indicative of the need for optocouplers that can withstand the space radiation environment. In addition, the distributed nature of their use implies that it is not particularly desirable to shield optocouplers for use in radiation environments. Thus, it will be important for the space community to have access to radiation hardened/tolerant optocouplers. For many microelectronic and photonic devices, it is difficult to achieve radiation hardness without sacrificing performance. However, in the case of optocouplers, one should be able to achieve both superior radiation hardness and performance for such characteristics as switching speed, current transfer ratio (CTR), minimum power usage and array power transfer, if standard light emitting diodes (LEDs), such as those in the commercial optocouplers mentioned above, are avoided, and VCSELs are employed as the emitter portion of the optocoupler. The physical configuration of VCSELs allows one to achieve parallel use of an array of devices and construct a multichannel optocoupler in the standard fashion with the emitters and detectors looking at each other. In addition, detectors similar in structure to the VCSELs can be fabricated which allows bidirectional functionality of the optocoupler. Recent discussions suggest that VCSELs will enjoy widespread applications in the telecommunications and data transfer fields

  20. Fabrication of two-color surface emitting device of a coupled vertical cavity structure with InAs quantum dots formed by wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Hiroto; Lu, Xiangmeng; Kumagai, Naoto; Kitada, Takahiro; Isu, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    We fabricated a two-color surface emitting device of a coupled cavity structure, which is applicable to terahertz light source. GaAs/AlGaAs vertical multilayer cavity structures were grown on (001) and (113)B GaAs substrates and the coupled multilayer cavity structure was fabricated by wafer bonding them. The top cavity contains self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) as optical gain materials for two-color emission of cavity-mode lights. The bonding position was optimized for the equivalent intensity of two-color emission. We formed a current injection structure, and two-color emission was observed by current injection, although no lasing was observed.

  1. In-well pumped mid-infrared PbTe/CdTe quantum well vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical in-well pumped mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers based on PbTe quantum wells embedded in CdTe barriers are realized. In contrast to the usual ternary barrier materials of lead salt lasers such as PbEuTe of PbSrTe, the combination of narrow-gap PbTe with wide-gap CdTe offers an extremely large carrier confinement, preventing charge carrier leakage from the quantum wells. In addition, optical in-well pumping can be achieved with cost effective and readily available near infrared lasers. Free carrier absorption, which is a strong loss mechanism in the mid-infrared, is strongly reduced due to the insulating property of CdTe. Lasing is observed from 85 K to 300 K covering a wavelength range of 3.3–4.2 μm. The best laser performance is achieved for quantum well thicknesses of 20 nm. At low temperature, the threshold power is around 100 mWP and the output power more than 700 mWP. The significance of various charge carrier loss mechanisms are analyzed by modeling the device performance. Although Auger losses are quite low in IV–VI semiconductors, an Auger coefficient of CA = 3.5 × 10−27 cm6 s−1 was estimated for the laser structure, which is attributed to the large conduction band offset.

  2. Highly uniform and reproducible visible to near-infrared vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers grown by MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, H.Q.; Choquette, K.D.; Hammons, B.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Crawford, M.H.; Lear, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Compound Semiconductors Technology

    1997-05-01

    The authors present the growth and characterization of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) from visible to near-infrared wavelength grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Discussions on the growth issue of VCSEL materials include the control on growth rate and composition using an in situ normal-incidence reflectometer, optimization of ultra-high material uniformity, and comprehensive p- and n-type doping study in AlGaAs by CCl{sub 4} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} over the entire Al composition range. They will also demonstrate the recent achievements of selectively-oxidized VCSELs which include the first room-temperature continuous-wave demonstration of all-AlGaAs 700-nm red VCSELs, high-performance n-side up 850-nm VCSELs, and low threshold current and low-threshold voltage 1.06 {micro}m VCSELs using InGaAs/GaAsP strain-compensated quantum wells.

  3. Chaos synchronization in vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser based on rotated polarization-preserved optical feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the influence of the rotating polarization-preserved optical feedback on the chaos synchronization of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is investigated experimentally. Two VCSELs' polarization modes (XP) and (YP) are gradually rotated and re-injected back into the VCSEL. The anti-phase dynamics synchronization of the two polarization modes is evaluated using the cross-correlation function. For a fixed optical feedback, a clear relationship is found between the cross-correlation coefficient and the polarization angle θp. It is shown that high-quality anti-phase polarization-resolved chaos synchronization is achieved at higher values of θp. The maximum value of the cross-correlation coefficient achieved is −0.99 with a zero time delay over a wide range of θp beyond 65° with a poor synchronization dynamic at θp less than 65°. Furthermore, it is observed that the antiphase irregular oscillation of the XP and YP modes changes with θp. VCSEL under the rotating polarization optical feedback can be a good candidate as a chaotic synchronization source for a secure communication system

  4. Study on effect of quantum well number on performance characteristics of GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi Goharrizi, A.; Alahyarizadeh, Gh.; Hassan, Z.; Abu Hassan, H.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of number of quantum wells and quantum well thickness on the optical performance of InGaN vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) was numerically investigated using Integrated System Engineering Technical Computer Aided Design (ISE TCAD) simulation program. The simulation results indicated that the output power and differential quantum efficiency of the double quantum well (DQW) laser were increased and threshold current decreased as compared to the single and triplet quantum wells VCSEL. Threshold current enhancement in the single quantum well (SQW) is attributed to the electron carrier leakage increasing from active layers because of the lower optical confinement factor. Simulation results show that in the double quantum well, the optical material gain and electron and hole carrier densities are approximately uniform with respect to the SQW and TQW. Also these results indicated that the electron current density in the DQW is the lowest. In the active region, electrical field decreased for the double quantum well because of the built-in electrical field reduction inside the quantum well. Finally the effect of quantum well thickness in DQW GaN-based VCSEL was investigated and it was observed that DQW VCSEL with 3 nm quantum wells thickness had the optimum threshold current.

  5. Chaos synchronization in vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser based on rotated polarization-preserved optical feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazhan, Salam; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Busawon, Krishna [Optical Communications Research Group, NCRLab, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, the influence of the rotating polarization-preserved optical feedback on the chaos synchronization of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is investigated experimentally. Two VCSELs' polarization modes (XP) and (YP) are gradually rotated and re-injected back into the VCSEL. The anti-phase dynamics synchronization of the two polarization modes is evaluated using the cross-correlation function. For a fixed optical feedback, a clear relationship is found between the cross-correlation coefficient and the polarization angle θ{sub p}. It is shown that high-quality anti-phase polarization-resolved chaos synchronization is achieved at higher values of θ{sub p}. The maximum value of the cross-correlation coefficient achieved is −0.99 with a zero time delay over a wide range of θ{sub p} beyond 65° with a poor synchronization dynamic at θ{sub p} less than 65°. Furthermore, it is observed that the antiphase irregular oscillation of the XP and YP modes changes with θ{sub p}. VCSEL under the rotating polarization optical feedback can be a good candidate as a chaotic synchronization source for a secure communication system.

  6. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a photoelectrochemically etched air-gap aperture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a III-nitride nonpolar vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a photoelectrochemically (PEC) etched aperture. The PEC lateral undercut etch is used to selectively remove the multi-quantum well (MQW) region outside the aperture area, defined by an opaque metal mask. This PEC aperture (PECA) creates an air-gap in the passive area of the device, allowing one to achieve efficient electrical confinement within the aperture, while simultaneously achieving a large index contrast between core of the device (the MQW within the aperture) and the lateral cladding of the device (the air-gap formed by the PEC etch), leading to strong lateral confinement. Scanning electron microscopy and focused ion-beam analysis is used to investigate the precision of the PEC etch technique in defining the aperture. The fabricated single mode PECA VCSEL shows a threshold current density of ∼22 kA/cm2 (25 mA), with a peak output power of ∼180 μW, at an emission wavelength of 417 nm. The near-field emission profile shows a clearly defined single linearly polarized (LP) mode profile (LP12,1), which is in contrast to the filamentary lasing that is often observed in III-nitride VCSELs. 2D mode profile simulations, carried out using COMSOL, give insight into the different mode profiles that one would expect to be displayed in such a device. The experimentally observed single mode operation is proposed to be predominantly a result of poor current spreading in the device. This non-uniform current spreading results in a higher injected current at the periphery of the aperture, which favors LP modes with high intensities near the edge of the aperture

  7. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a photoelectrochemically etched air-gap aperture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, J. T., E-mail: jtleona01@gmail.com; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Megalini, L.; Speck, J. S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Lee, S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-01-18

    We demonstrate a III-nitride nonpolar vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a photoelectrochemically (PEC) etched aperture. The PEC lateral undercut etch is used to selectively remove the multi-quantum well (MQW) region outside the aperture area, defined by an opaque metal mask. This PEC aperture (PECA) creates an air-gap in the passive area of the device, allowing one to achieve efficient electrical confinement within the aperture, while simultaneously achieving a large index contrast between core of the device (the MQW within the aperture) and the lateral cladding of the device (the air-gap formed by the PEC etch), leading to strong lateral confinement. Scanning electron microscopy and focused ion-beam analysis is used to investigate the precision of the PEC etch technique in defining the aperture. The fabricated single mode PECA VCSEL shows a threshold current density of ∼22 kA/cm{sup 2} (25 mA), with a peak output power of ∼180 μW, at an emission wavelength of 417 nm. The near-field emission profile shows a clearly defined single linearly polarized (LP) mode profile (LP{sub 12,1}), which is in contrast to the filamentary lasing that is often observed in III-nitride VCSELs. 2D mode profile simulations, carried out using COMSOL, give insight into the different mode profiles that one would expect to be displayed in such a device. The experimentally observed single mode operation is proposed to be predominantly a result of poor current spreading in the device. This non-uniform current spreading results in a higher injected current at the periphery of the aperture, which favors LP modes with high intensities near the edge of the aperture.

  8. Maintaining maximum signal-to-noise ratio in uncooled vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser-based self-mixing sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Matharu, Ranveer S.; Perchoux, Julien; Kliese, Russell; Lim, Yah Leng; Rakic, Aleksandar D.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for maintaining the maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the signal obtained from the self-mixing sensor based on a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). It was found that the locus of the maximum SNR in the current-temperature space can be well approximated by a simple analytical model related to the temperature behavior of the VCSEL threshold current. The optimum sensor performance is achieved by tuning the laser current according to the proposed model, t...

  9. Characterization of 2.3 μm GaInAsSb-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structures using photo-modulated reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, G. M. T. [Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Hosea, T. J. C., E-mail: j.hosea@surrey.ac.uk [Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Fox, N. E.; Hild, K.; Ikyo, A. B.; Marko, I. P.; Sweeney, S. J. [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bachmann, A.; Arafin, S.; Amann, M.-C. [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universität Munchen, Am Coulombwall 4, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-01-07

    We report angle dependent and temperature dependent (9 K–300 K) photo-modulated reflectance (PR) studies on vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) structures, designed for 2.3 μm mid-infrared gas sensing applications. Changing the temperature allows us to tune the energies of the quantum well (QW) transitions relative to the VCSEL cavity mode (CM) energy. These studies show that this VCSEL structure has a QW-CM offset of 21 meV at room temperature. Consequently the QW ground-state transition comes into resonance with the CM at 220 ± 2 K. The results from these PR studies are closely compared with those obtained in a separate study of actual operating devices and show how the PR technique may be useful for device optimisation without the necessity of having first to process the wafers into working devices.

  10. Two-dimensional pseudo-random optical phased array based on tandem optical injection locking of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyah, Keyvan; Efimov, Oleg; Patterson, Pamela; Schaffner, James; White, Carson; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    We demonstrate, both theoretically and experimentally, a pseudo-random, two-dimensional optical phased array (OPA) concept based on tandem injection locking of 64-element vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays. A low cavity-Q VCSEL design resulted in an injection locking optical power of less than 1 μW per VCSEL, providing large OPA scaling potential. Tandem injection locking of two VCSEL arrays resulted in measured controllable optical phase change of 0-1.6π. A high quality beam formed with suppressed grating lobes due to the pseudo-random array design was demonstrated with performance close to simulated results. A preliminary 2.2° x 1.2° beam steering example using the tandem arrays was also demonstrated. PMID:26367600

  11. Usability limits of the scalar effective frequency method used to determine modes distributions in oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the commercially used, simplified scalar optical effective frequency method (EFM) is verified by comparing its results with those obtained using more accurate vectorial models represented by the method of lines (MoL). Both EFM and MoL methods are applied to the modern telecommunication oriented GaAs-based oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting diode laser (VCSEL) emitting 1.3 μm radiation from the InGaAsN/GaAs double quantum well active region. Although both methods are applied to the specific laser structure, the conclusion remains valid for a broad range of different VCSEL designs. The scalar EFM approach has been found to remain surprisingly often quite exact; nevertheless, it fails for structures violating its fundamental assumption of plane wave propagation within the laser cavity. Therefore, a noteworthy discrepancy between modes calculated with the aid of scalar and vectorial approaches occurs for weaker guidance, i.e. for higher-order modes, smaller aperture diameters, thinner oxidation layers and/or apertures shifted from the antinode position. These cases need an exclusive use of the more exact but also more time-consuming vectorial algorithms

  12. Low threshold continuous-wave lasing of yellow-green InGaN-QD vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Guoen; Mei, Yang; Liu, Jianping; Hofmann, Werner; Ying, Leiying; Zhang, Jiangyong; Bu, Yikun; Li, Zengcheng; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Baoping

    2016-07-11

    Low threshold continuous-wave (CW) lasing of current injected InGaN quantum dot (QD) vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) was achieved at room temperature. The VCSEL was fabricated by metal bonding technique on a copper substrate to improve the heat dissipation ability of the device. For the first time, lasing was obtained at yellow-green wavelength of 560.4 nm with a low threshold of 0.61 mA, corresponding to a current density of 0.78 kA/cm2. A high degree of polarization of 94% were measured. Despite the operation in the range of "green gap" of GaN-based devices, single longitudinal mode laser emission was clearly achieved due to the high quality of active region based on InGaN QDs and the excellent thermal design of the VCSELs. PMID:27410828

  13. The spin-flip model of spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers: asymptotic analysis, numerics, and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Susanto, H; Adams, M J; Henning, I D

    2016-01-01

    The spin-flip model describing optically pumped spin-polarized vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers is considered. The steady-state solutions of the model for elliptically-polarised fields are studied. Asymptotic analysis for the existence and stability of the steady-state solutions is developed, particularly in the presence of pump polarisation ellipticity. The expansion is with respect to small parameters representing the ellipticity and the difference between the total pump power and the lasing threshold. The analytical results are then confirmed numerically, where it is obtained that generally one of the steady-state solutions is stable while the other is not. The theoretical results are shown to be in qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  14. Dynamics of 1.55 μm Wavelength Single-Mode Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser Output under External Optical Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyong Hon Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the temporal dynamics of the laser output spectrum and polarization state of 1.55 μm wavelength single-mode (SM vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs induced by external optical beam injection. Injection of an external continuous-wave laser beam to a gain-switched SM VCSEL near the resonance wavelength corresponding to its main polarization-mode output was critical for improvement of its laser pulse generation characteristics, such as pulse timing-jitter reduction, linewidth narrowing, pulse amplitude enhancement, and pulse width shortening. Pulse injection of pulse width shorter than the cavity photon lifetime into the SM VCSEL in the orthogonal polarization direction with respect to its main polarization mode caused temporal delay of the polarization recovery after polarization switching (PS, and its delay was found to be the minimum at an optimized bias current. Polarization-mode bistability was observed even in the laser output of an SM VCSEL of a standard circularly cylindrical shape and used for all-optical flip-flop operations with set and reset injection pulses of very low pulse energy of order of the 3.5~4.5 fJ.

  15. Compact electro-absorption modulator integrated with vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser for highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalir, Hamed, E-mail: dalir.h.ac@m.titech.ac.jp [Precision and Intelligence Laboratory, Photonics Integration System Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-22 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-8503 (Japan); Ahmed, Moustafa; Bakry, Ahmed [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, 80203 Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Koyama, Fumio [Precision and Intelligence Laboratory, Photonics Integration System Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-22 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-8503 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, 80203 Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate a compact electro-absorption slow-light modulator laterally-integrated with an 850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), which enables highly efficient millimeter-wave modulation. We found a strong leaky travelling wave in the lateral direction between the two cavities via widening the waveguide width with a taper shape. The small signal response of the fabricated device shows a large enhancement of over 55 dB in the modulation amplitude at frequencies beyond 35 GHz; thanks to the photon-photon resonance. A large group index of over 150 in a Bragg reflector waveguide enables the resonance at millimeter wave frequencies for 25 μm long compact modulator. Based on the modeling, we expect a resonant modulation at a higher frequency of 70 GHz. The resonant modulation in a compact slow-light modulator plays a significant key role for high efficient narrow-band modulation in the millimeter wave range far beyond the intrinsic modulation bandwidth of VCSELs.

  16. Room-temperature CW operation of a nitride-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser using thick GaInN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takashi; Matsui, Kenjo; Horikawa, Kosuke; Ikeyama, Kazuki; Kozuka, Yugo; Yoshida, Shotaro; Akagi, Takanobu; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Iwaya, Motoaki; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated a room-temperature (RT) continuous-wave (CW) operation of a GaN-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) using a thick GaInN quantum well (QW) active region and an AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector. We first investigated the following two characteristics of a 6 nm GaInN 5 QWs active region in light-emitting diode (LED) structures. The light output power at a high current density (∼10 kA/cm2) from the 6 nm GaInN 5 QWs was the same or even higher than that from standard 3 nm 5 QWs. In addition, we found that hole injection into the farthest QW from a p-layer was sufficient. We then demonstrated a GaN-based VCSEL with the 6 nm 5 QWs, resulting in the optical confinement factor of 3.5%. The threshold current density under CW operation at RT was 7.5 kA/cm2 with a narrow (0.4 nm) emission spectrum of 413.5 nm peak wavelength.

  17. Demonstration of a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a III-nitride tunnel junction intracavity contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a III-nitride tunnel junction (TJ) intracavity contact. The violet nonpolar VCSEL employing the TJ is compared to an equivalent VCSEL with a tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contact. The TJ VCSEL shows a threshold current density (Jth) of ∼3.5 kA/cm2, compared to the ITO VCSEL Jth of 8 kA/cm2. The differential efficiency of the TJ VCSEL is also observed to be significantly higher than that of the ITO VCSEL, reaching a peak power of ∼550 μW, compared to ∼80 μW for the ITO VCSEL. Both VCSELs display filamentary lasing in the current aperture, which we believe to be predominantly a result of local variations in contact resistance, which may induce local variations in refractive index and free carrier absorption. Beyond the analyses of the lasing characteristics, we discuss the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) regrowth of the TJ, as well as its unexpected performance based on band-diagram simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the intrinsic advantages of using a TJ intracavity contact in a VCSEL using a 1D mode profile analysis to approximate the threshold modal gain and general loss contributions in the TJ and ITO VCSEL

  18. Demonstration of a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a III-nitride tunnel junction intracavity contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. T.; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Margalith, T.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-08-01

    We report on a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a III-nitride tunnel junction (TJ) intracavity contact. The violet nonpolar VCSEL employing the TJ is compared to an equivalent VCSEL with a tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contact. The TJ VCSEL shows a threshold current density (Jth) of ˜3.5 kA/cm2, compared to the ITO VCSEL Jth of 8 kA/cm2. The differential efficiency of the TJ VCSEL is also observed to be significantly higher than that of the ITO VCSEL, reaching a peak power of ˜550 μW, compared to ˜80 μW for the ITO VCSEL. Both VCSELs display filamentary lasing in the current aperture, which we believe to be predominantly a result of local variations in contact resistance, which may induce local variations in refractive index and free carrier absorption. Beyond the analyses of the lasing characteristics, we discuss the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) regrowth of the TJ, as well as its unexpected performance based on band-diagram simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the intrinsic advantages of using a TJ intracavity contact in a VCSEL using a 1D mode profile analysis to approximate the threshold modal gain and general loss contributions in the TJ and ITO VCSEL.

  19. Continuous wave vertical cavity surface emitting lasers at 2.5 μm with InP-based type-II quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprengel, S.; Andrejew, A.; Federer, F.; Veerabathran, G. K.; Boehm, G.; Amann, M.-C. [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-13

    A concept for electrically pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) for emission wavelength beyond 2 μm is presented. This concept integrates type-II quantum wells into InP-based VCSELs with a buried tunnel junction as current aperture. The W-shaped quantum wells are based on the type-II band alignment between GaInAs and GaAsSb. The structure includes an epitaxial GaInAs/InP and an amorphous AlF{sub 3}/ZnS distributed Bragg reflector as bottom and top (outcoupling) mirror, respectively. Continuous-wave operation up to 10 °C at a wavelength of 2.49 μm and a peak output power of 400 μW at −18 °C has been achieved. Single-mode emission with a side-mode suppression ratio of 30 dB for mesa diameters up to 14 μm is presented. The long emission wavelength and current tunability over a wavelength range of more than 5 nm combined with its single-mode operation makes this device ideally suited for spectroscopy applications.

  20. Application of a ring cavity surface emitting quantum cascade laser (RCSE-QCL) on the measurement of H2S in a CH4 matrix for process analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Harald; Genner, Andreas; Ofner, Johannes; Schwarzer, C; Strasser, Gottfried; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-03-21

    The present work reports on the first application of a ring-cavity-surface-emitting quantum-cascade laser (RCSE-QCL) for sensitive gas measurements. RCSE-QCLs are promising candidates for optical gas-sensing due to their single-mode, mode-hop-free and narrow-band emission characteristics along with their broad spectral coverage. The time resolved down-chirp of the RCSE-QCL in the 1227-1236 cm-1 (8.15-8.09 µm) spectral range was investigated using a step-scan FT-IR spectrometer (Bruker Vertex 80v) with 2 ns time and 0.1 cm-1 spectral resolution. The pulse repetition rate was set between 20 and 200 kHz and the laser device was cooled to 15-17°C. Employing 300 ns pulses a spectrum of ~1.5 cm-1 could be recorded. Under these laser operation conditions and a gas pressure of 1000 mbar a limit of detection (3σ) of 1.5 ppmv for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in nitrogen was achieved using a 100 m Herriott cell and a thermoelectric cooled MCT detector for absorption measurements. Using 3 µs long pulses enabled to further extend the spectral bandwidth to 8.5 cm-1. Based on this increased spectral coverage and employing reduced pressure conditions (50 mbar) multiple peaks of the target analyte H2S as well as methane (CH4) could be examined within one single pulse. PMID:27136847

  1. Influence of optical losses on the dynamic characteristics of linear arrays of near-infrared vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the level of internal and external optical losses on the dynamic characteristics of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) in the spectral region of 850 nm is studied. It is shown that an increase in optical losses leads to a decrease in the speed of laser response and to the predominance of thermal effects, while a decrease in losses for the output of radiation brings about an increase in the response speed of the laser and the dominance of damping of the effective modulation frequency. Linear matrix emitters with the 1 × 4 format based on fast-response VCSEL with individual element addressing are produced and studied. Individual laser emitters with a current-aperture diameter of 5–7 μm provide lasing in the continuous-wave mode at room temperature in the region of 850 nm with threshold currents no higher than 0.5 mA, a differential efficiency no lower than 0.6 W/A, a modulation frequency as high as 20 GHz, and a MCEF factor of ∼10 GHz/mA1/2.

  2. Demonstration of a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a III-nitride tunnel junction intracavity contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, J. T., E-mail: jtleona01@gmail.com; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Margalith, T.; Speck, J. S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-08-31

    We report on a III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a III-nitride tunnel junction (TJ) intracavity contact. The violet nonpolar VCSEL employing the TJ is compared to an equivalent VCSEL with a tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contact. The TJ VCSEL shows a threshold current density (J{sub th}) of ∼3.5 kA/cm{sup 2}, compared to the ITO VCSEL J{sub th} of 8 kA/cm{sup 2}. The differential efficiency of the TJ VCSEL is also observed to be significantly higher than that of the ITO VCSEL, reaching a peak power of ∼550 μW, compared to ∼80 μW for the ITO VCSEL. Both VCSELs display filamentary lasing in the current aperture, which we believe to be predominantly a result of local variations in contact resistance, which may induce local variations in refractive index and free carrier absorption. Beyond the analyses of the lasing characteristics, we discuss the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) regrowth of the TJ, as well as its unexpected performance based on band-diagram simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the intrinsic advantages of using a TJ intracavity contact in a VCSEL using a 1D mode profile analysis to approximate the threshold modal gain and general loss contributions in the TJ and ITO VCSEL.

  3. Smooth e-beam-deposited tin-doped indium oxide for III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser intracavity contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. T.; Cohen, D. A.; Yonkee, B. P.; Farrell, R. M.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-10-01

    We carried out a series of simulations analyzing the dependence of mirror reflectance, threshold current density, and differential efficiency on the scattering loss caused by the roughness of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts for 405 nm flip-chip III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). From these results, we determined that the ITO root-mean-square (RMS) roughness should be Motivated by this requirement, we investigated the surface morphology and optoelectronic properties of electron-beam (e-beam) evaporated ITO films, as a function of substrate temperature and oxygen flow and pressure. The transparency and conductivity were seen to increase with increasing temperature. Decreasing the oxygen flow and pressure resulted in an increase in the transparency and resistivity. Neither the temperature, nor oxygen flow and pressure series on single-layer ITO films resulted in highly transparent and conductive films with <1 nm RMS roughness. To achieve <1 nm RMS roughness with good optoelectronic properties, a multi-layer ITO film was developed, utilizing a two-step temperature scheme. The optimized multi-layer ITO films had an RMS roughness of <1 nm, along with a high transparency (˜90% at 405 nm) and low resistivity (˜2 × 10-4 Ω-cm). This multi-layer ITO e-beam deposition technique is expected to prevent p-GaN plasma damage, typically observed in sputtered ITO films on p-GaN, while simultaneously reducing the threshold current density and increasing the differential efficiency of III-nitride VCSELs.

  4. Surface state photonic bandgap cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Rahachou, A. I.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2005-01-01

    We propose and analyze a new type of a resonant high-Q cavity for lasing, sensing or filtering applications, which is based on a surface states of a finite photonic crystal. We demonstrate that such the cavity can have a Q factor comparable with that one of conventional photonic band-gap defect mode cavities. At the same time, the distinguished feature of the surface mode cavity is that it is situated directly at the surface of the photonic crystal. This might open up new possibilities for de...

  5. Composite Resonator Surface Emitting Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; CHOW,WENG W.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; GEIB,KENT M.

    2000-05-01

    The authors have developed electrically-injected coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers and have studied their novel properties. These monolithically grown coupled-cavity structures have been fabricated with either one active and one passive cavity or with two active cavities. All devices use a selectively oxidized current aperture in the lower cavity, while a proton implant was used in the active-active structures to confine current in the top active cavity. They have demonstrated optical modulation from active-passive devices where the modulation arises from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. The laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. They have also observed Q-switched pulses from active-passive devices with pulses as short as 150 ps. A rate equation approach is used to model the Q-switched operation yielding good agreement between the experimental and theoretical pulseshape. They have designed and demonstrated the operation of active-active devices which la.se simultaneously at both longitudinal cavity resonances. Extremely large bistable regions have also been observed in the light-current curves for active-active coupled resonator devices. This bistability can be used for high contrast switching with contrast ratios as high as 100:1. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers have shown enhanced mode selectivity which has allowed devices to lase with fundamental-mode output powers as high as 5.2 mW.

  6. A low-threshold and high-power oxide-confined 850-nm AlInGaAs strained quantum-well vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Bao-Lu; Ren Xiu-Juan; Li Chuan; Li Shuo; Shi Guo-Zhu; Guo Xia

    2011-01-01

    A low-threshold and high-power oxide-confined 850-nm AlInGaAs strained quantum-well (QW) vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) based on an intracavity contacted structure is fabricated. A threshold current of 1.5 mA for a 22 μm oxide aperture device is achieved,which corresponds to a threshold current density of 0.395 kA/cm2. The peak output optical power reaches 17.5 mW at an injection current of 30 mA at room temperature under pulsed operation. While under continuous-wave (CW) operation,the maximum power attains 10.5 mW. Such a device demonstrates a high characteristic temperature of 327 K within a temperature range from-12 0C to 96 0C and good reliability under a lifetime test. There is almost no decrease of the optical power when the device operates at a current of 5 mA at room temperature under the CW injection current.

  7. 2.5  W continuous wave output at 665  nm from a multipass and quantum-well-pumped AlGaInP vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Cherry May N; Brauch, Uwe; Kahle, Hermann; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Michler, Peter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    An output power of 2.5 W at a wavelength of 665 nm was obtained from a quantum-well (QW) and multipass-pumped AlGaInP-based vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser operated at a heat sink temperature of 10°C. Intracavity frequency doubling resulted in an output power of 820 mW at a wavelength of 333 nm. To the best of our knowledge, these are the highest continuous wave output powers from this type of laser both at the fundamental wavelength and in frequency-doubled operation. In fundamental wavelength operation, further power scaling by increasing the pump-spot size increased the output power to 3.3 W. However, at this power level, the laser was highly unstable. When the laser was operated at 50% pump duty cycle, a reproducible and stable peak output power of 3.6 W was obtained. These results demonstrate the potential of optical QW pumping combined with multipass pumping for the operation of AlGaInP-based semiconductor disk lasers. PMID:26977680

  8. A Novel, Free-Space Optical Interconnect Employing Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Diodes and InGaAs Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Photodetectors for Gbit/s RF/Microwave Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savich, Gregory R.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2006-01-01

    Emerging technologies and continuing progress in vertical-cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode and metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector research are making way for novel, high-speed forms of optical data transfer in communication systems. VCSEL diodes operating at 1550 nm have only recently become commercially available, while MSM photodetectors are pushing the limits of contact lithography with interdigitated electrode widths reaching sub micron levels. We propose a novel, free-space optical interconnect operating at about 1Gbit/s utilizing VCSEL diodes and MSM photodetectors. We report on development, progress, and current work, which are as follows: first, analysis of the divergent behavior of VCSEL diodes for coupling to MSM photodetectors with a 50 by 50 m active area and second, the normalized frequency response of the VCSEL diode as a function of the modulating frequency. Third, the calculated response of MSM photodetectors with varying electrode width and spacing on the order of 1 to 3 m as well as the fabrication and characterization of these devices. The work presented here will lead to the formation and characterization of a fully integrated 1Gbit/s free-space optical interconnect at 1550 nm and demonstrates both chip level and board level functionality for RF/microwave digital systems.

  9. Parameter Extraction of Rate Equations for Buried Tunnel Junction Vertical-cavity Surface-emitting Lasers%掩埋隧道结垂直面激光器速率方程参量提取

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭金花; 吴东升; 徐荃; 平兰兰

    2013-01-01

    In order to design and optimize high frequency performances of laser diodes, accurate extraction methods for the rate equation parameters are very important. A method for the rate equation parameter extraction for long-wavelength and high-bandwidth buried tunnel junction vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers is presented. This method bases on the threshold current, output power, resonance frequency, damping factor and nonlinear effect of the gain compression factor under high bias currents. By fitting the chip frequency responses with different bias currents, resonance frequency and damping factor values can be obtained. Finally, by considering gain compression factor and nonlinear fitting resonance frequency and damping factor values under different currents, parameters of rate equation model can be extracted.%为了设计和优化高速激光二极管的高频特性,其速率方程模型参量的精确提取方法非常重要.本文针对新型长波长高带宽的掩埋隧道结垂直面激光器,给出一种速率方程模型参量提取方法.此方法是主要基于阈值电流、输出光功率、张弛振荡频率、阻尼因子和高偏置下增益压缩因子非线性效应等因素,根据已测量的不同偏置下芯片的小信号频率响应来拟合出方程中的张弛振荡频率和阻尼因子.通过考虑增益压缩因子,分别非线性拟合已提取的偏置光功率下的张弛振荡频率和阻尼因子,即可提取速率方程模型中的参量.

  10. Room temperature continuous wave InGaAsN quantum well vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1.3 um

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; KLEM,JOHN F.; FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; FRITZ,IAN J.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; GEIB,KENT M.; SCOTT,J.W.; NAONE,R.L.

    2000-06-05

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1294 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al{sub 0.94}Ga{sub 0.06}As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the optical cavity, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55 C. These lasers exhibit the longest wavelength reported to date for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown on GaAs substrates.

  11. Submonolayer Quantum Dots for High Speed Surface Emitting Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov ND

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe report on progress in growth and applications of submonolayer (SML quantum dots (QDs in high-speed vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs. SML deposition enables controlled formation of high density QD arrays with good size and shape uniformity. Further increase in excitonic absorption and gain is possible with vertical stacking of SML QDs using ultrathin spacer layers. Vertically correlated, tilted or anticorrelated arrangements of the SML islands are realized and allow QD strain and wavefunction engineering. Respectively, both TE and TM polarizations of the luminescence can be achieved in the edge-emission using the same constituting materials. SML QDs provide ultrahigh modal gain, reduced temperature depletion and gain saturation effects when used in active media in laser diodes. Temperature robustness up to 100 °C for 0.98 μm range vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs is realized in the continuous wave regime. An open eye 20 Gb/s operation with bit error rates better than 10−12has been achieved in a temperature range 25–85 °Cwithout current adjustment. Relaxation oscillations up to ∼30 GHz have been realized indicating feasibility of 40 Gb/s signal transmission.

  12. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, P. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Intravia, F [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  13. Blue resonant-cavity light-emitting diode with half milliwatt output power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Pinghui S.; Chang, Chi-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lin, Da-Wei; Wu, Chun Chia; He, Jhao Hang; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2016-03-01

    GaN-based resonant-cavity light-emitting diode (RCLED) has a circular output beam with superior directionality than conventional LED and has power scalability by using two-dimensional-array layout. In this work, blue RCLEDs with a top reflector of approximately 50% reflectance were fabricated and characterized. An output power of more than 0.5 mW per diode was achieved before packaging under room-temperature continuous-wave (CW) operation. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the emission spectrum was approximately 3.5 and 4.5 nm for 10- and 20-μm-diameter devices, respectively. And the peak wavelength as well as the FWHM remained stable at various currents and temperatures.

  14. Quantum Cascade Surface-Emitting Photonic Crystal Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Colombelli, Raffaele; Srinivasan, Kartik; Troccoli, Mariano; Painter, Oskar; Gmachl, Claire F.; Tennant, Donald M.; Sergent, A. Michael; Sivco, Deborah L.; Cho, Alfred Y.; Capasso, Federico

    2003-01-01

    We combine photonic and electronic band structure engineering to create a surface-emitting quantum cascade microcavity laser. A high-index contrast two-dimensional photonic crystal is used to form a micro-resonator that simultaneously provides feedback for laser action and diffracts light vertically from the surface of the semiconductor surface. A top metallic contact allows electrical current injection and provides vertical optical confinement through a bound surface plasmon wave. The miniat...

  15. Quantum cascade photonic crystal surface emitting injection laser

    OpenAIRE

    Colombelli, R.; Srinivasan, K.; Troccoli, M.; Painter, O.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F; Tennant, D. M.; Sergent, A. M.; Sivco, D.L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2003-01-01

    A surface emitting quantum cascade injection laser is presented. Direct surface emission is obtained by using a 2D photonic-band-gap structure that simultaneously acts as a microcavity. The approach may allow miniaturization and on-chip-integration of the devices.

  16. Electrically driven surface plasmon light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed; Ou, Yiyu; Iida, Daisuke; Kopylov, Oleksii; Ou, Haiyan

    We investigate device performance of GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a 30-nm p-GaN layer. The metallization used to separate the p-contact from plasmonic metals, reveals limitations on current spreading which reduces surface plasmonic enhancement.......We investigate device performance of GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with a 30-nm p-GaN layer. The metallization used to separate the p-contact from plasmonic metals, reveals limitations on current spreading which reduces surface plasmonic enhancement....

  17. High Energy Terahertz Parametric Oscillator Based on Surface-Emitted Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De-Gang; Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Yu-Ye; Liu, Chang-Ming; Yu, Hong; Li, Zhong-Yang; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jian-Quan

    2013-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high power nanosecond pulsed terahertz (THz)-wave parametric oscillator (TPO) by using a wide pump beam. A surface emitted cavity configuration is employed to reduce the THz absorption in MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The THz wave can be tuned from 1 THz to 3 THz. A maximum THz output energy of 438 nJ/pulse is achieved at 1.56 Hz using a 4.5-mm-diameter pump beam with a pulse energy of 226 mJ pump energy with the repetition of 10 Hz, corresponding to the energy conversion efficiency of 1.94 × 10-6.

  18. Process for treatment of inside surface of superconducting cavities (cavity resonators)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cavity of an acceleration unit built up from one or more individual resonators is filled to about half way with ceramic grinding bodies and with water, and turned slowly at about 9 rpm. The rotation is maintained for about a week. The inner surface of the cavity is thus smoothed and freed of faults, so that the cavity can be used without difficulty in superconducting operation with improved properties. By this simple process, success is achieved in increasing the practically possible longitudinal field strength for acceleration by at least a factor of 2 or more, i.e. one can save at least half the acceleration units. To remove grinding wear, the cavity is also filled with an acid mixture of about 1 part of HF, 1 part of HNO3 and 6 parts of H3PO4 and cleaned, and the surface is etched. (orig.)

  19. AZO/Ag/AZO anode for resonant cavity red, blue, and yellow organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentle, A. R.; Yambem, S. D.; Burn, P. L.; Meredith, P.; Smith, G. B.

    2016-06-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is the transparent electrode of choice for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Replacing ITO for cost and performance reasons is a major drive across optoelectronics. In this work, we show that changing the transparent electrode on red, blue, and yellow OLEDs from ITO to a multilayer buffered aluminium zinc oxide/silver/aluminium zinc oxide (AZO/Ag/AZO) substantially enhances total output intensity, with better control of colour, its constancy, and intensity over the full exit hemisphere. The thin Ag containing layer induces a resonant cavity optical response of the complete device. This is tuned to the emission spectra of the emissive material while minimizing internally trapped light. A complete set of spectral intensity data is presented across the full exit hemisphere for each electrode type and each OLED colour. Emission zone modelling of output spectra at a wide range of exit angles to the normal was in excellent agreement with the experimental data and hence could, in principle, be used to check and adjust production settings. These multilayer transparent electrodes show significant potential for both eliminating indium from OLEDs and spectrally shaping the emission.

  20. Optimization of Textured-surface Light Emitting Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Li, EH; Chan, CC; Kwok, PCK

    1998-01-01

    We present an analysis of the efficiency and radiation pattern of the textured-surface LED by tracing the light rays that emits from the active layer. Through simulation, we discover that the efficiency depends on the thickness of the textured layer and its separation distance from the active layer. By carefully choosing these two parameters, maximum efficiency an be achieved. The radiation pattern of a texture-surface LED is found to be different from the flat-surfaced LED in that the textur...

  1. Laser polishing for topography management of accelerator cavity surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Klopf, J. Mike [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kelley, Michael J. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-07-20

    Improved energy efficiency and reduced cost are greatly desired for advanced particle accelerators. Progress toward both can be made by atomically-smoothing the interior surface of the niobium superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities at the machine's heart. Laser polishing offers a green alternative to the present aggressive chemical processes. We found parameters suitable for polishing niobium in all surface states expected for cavity production. As a result, careful measurement of the resulting surface chemistry revealed a modest thinning of the surface oxide layer, but no contamination.

  2. Monolithic arrays of surface emitting laser NOR logic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Song, J.-I-; Lee, Y. H.; Yoo, J. Y.; Shin, J H; Scherer, A.; Leibenguth, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Monolithic, cascadable, laser-logic-device arrays have been realized and characterized. The monolithic surface-emitting laser logic (SELL) device consists of an AlGaAs superlattice lasing around 780 nm connected to a heterojunction phototransistor (HPT) in parallel and a resistor in series. Arrays up to 8×8 have been fabricated, and 2×2 arrays show uniform characteristics. The optical logic output is switched off with 40 μW incident optical input.

  3. Gain chip design, power scaling and intra-cavity frequency doubling with LBO of optically pumped red-emitting AlGaInP-VECSELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Hermann; Mateo, Cherry M. N.; Brauch, Uwe; Bek, Roman; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Graf, Thomas; Michler, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The wide range of applications in biophotonics, television or projectors, spectroscopy and lithography made the optically-pumped semiconductor (OPS) vertical external cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) an important category of power scalable lasers. The possibility of bandgap engineering, inserting frequency selective and converting elements into the open laser cavity and laser emission in the fundamental Gaussian mode leads to ongoing growth of the area of applications for tuneable laser sources. We present an AlGaInP-VECSEL system with a multi quantum well structure consisting of compressively strained GaInP quantum wells in an AlxGa1-xInP separate confinement heterostructure with an emission wavelength around 665 nm. The VECSEL chip with its n-λ cavity is pumped by a 532nm Nd:YAG laser under an angle to the normal incidence of 50°. In comparison, a gain chip design for high absorption values at pump wavelengths around 640nm with the use of quantum dot layers as active material is also presented. Frequency doubling is now realized with an antireflection coated lithium borate crystal, while a birefringent filter, placed inside the laser cavity under Brewster's angle, is used for frequency tuning. Further, power-scaling methods like in-well pumping as well as embedding the active region of a VECSEL between two transparent ic heaspreaders are under investigation.

  4. Field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, T.

    2015-07-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied rf field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film induces heating of the inner cavity wall, resulting in a higher RS. Introducing helium gas in the cavity, and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by less than 120 mK when RS increases with Eacc by 100 n Ω . This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally, the effects of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for the current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered RS.

  5. Plasma Processing of Large Curved Surfaces for SRF Cavity Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The development of the technology based on Cl2/Ar plasma etching has to address several crucial parameters which influence the etching rate and surface roughness, and eventually, determine cavity performance. This includes dependence of the process on the frequency of the RF generator, gas pressure, power level, the driven (inner) electrode configuration, and the chlorine concentration in the gas mixture during plasma processing. To demonstrate surface layer removal in the asymmetric non-planar geometry, we are using a simple cylindrical cavity with 8 ports symmetrically distributed over the cylinder. The ports are used for diagnosing the plasma parameters and as holders for the samples to be etched. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (RF) circuit elements, chlorine concentration in the Cl2/Ar gas mixtures, residence...

  6. Surface plasmon enhanced ultraviolet light-emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 3888 Dongnanhu Road, Changchun 130033 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shan, Chong-Xin, E-mail: shancx@ciomp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 3888 Dongnanhu Road, Changchun 130033 (China); Zheng, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 3888 Dongnanhu Road, Changchun 130033 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Bing-Hui; Zhang, Zhen-Zhong; Shen, De-Zhen [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 3888 Dongnanhu Road, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2013-02-15

    In this paper, n-ZnO/i-ZnO/MgO/p-GaN structured light-emitting devices have been designed and constructed, and Ag nanoparticles whose surface plasmon resonance absorption spectrum overlaps well with the electroluminescence (EL) of the structure were employed to improve the emission characteristics of the devices. A noticeable enhancement in the EL intensity has been obtained, and the enhancement can be attributed to the resonant coupling between the electron-hole pairs in the structure and the surface plasmons of the Ag nanoparticles. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO-based LEDs with emission at around 400 nm have been constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag nanoparticles were employed to improve the emission of the LEDs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A noticeable enhancement in the EL intensity has been obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enhancement can be attributed to the coupling of the Ag surface plasmon modes.

  7. Investigation Of Breakdown Induced Surface Damage On 805 Mhz Pillbox Cavity Interior Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jana, M R; Leonova, M; Moretti, A; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, K; Freemire, B; Torun, Y; Bowring, D; Flanagan, G

    2014-01-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, we have tested two 805 MHz vacuum RF cavities in a multi-Tesla magnetic field to study the effects of the static magnetic field on the cavity operation. This study gives useful information on field emitters in the cavity, dark current, surface conditioning, breakdown mechanisms and material properties of the cavity. All these factors determine the maximum accelerating gradient in the cavity. This paper discusses the image processing technique for quantitative estimation of spark damage spot distribution on cavity interior surfaces. The distribution is compared with the electric field distribution predicted by a computer code calculation. The local spark density is proportional to probability of surface breakdown and shows a power law dependence on the maximum electric field (E). This E dependence is consistent with ...

  8. High efficiency, single-lobe surface-emitting DFB/DBR quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Yan, Fang-Liang; Jia, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Feng-Qi; Liang, Ping; Zhuo, Ning; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Shu-Man; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-08-22

    We demonstrate a surface-emitting quantum cascade laser (QCL) based on second-order buried distributed feedback/distributed Bragg reflector (DFB/DBR) gratings for feedback and outcoupling. The grating fabricated beneath the waveguide was found to fundamentally favor lasing in symmetric mode either through analysis or experiment. Single-lobe far-field radiation pattern with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.18° was obtained along the cavity-length direction. Besides, the buried DFB/DBR grating structure successfully provided an efficient vertical outcoupling mechanism with low optical losses, which manages to achieve a high surface outcouping efficiency of 46% in continuous-wave (CW) operation and 60% in pulsed operation at room temperature. Single-mode emission with a side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR) about 25 dB was continuously tunable by heat sink temperature or injection current. Our work contributes to the realization of high efficiency surface-emitting devices with high far-field beam quality that are significantly needed in many application fields. PMID:27557231

  9. Microstructured Air Cavities as High-Index Contrast Substrates with Strong Diffraction for Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yoon-Jong; Moon, Daeyoung; Jang, Jeonghwan; Na, Jin-Young; Song, Jung-Hwan; Seo, Min-Kyo; Kim, Sunghee; Bae, Dukkyu; Park, Eun Hyun; Park, Yongjo; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon

    2016-05-11

    Two-dimensional high-index-contrast dielectric gratings exhibit unconventional transmission and reflection due to their morphologies. For light-emitting devices, these characteristics help guided modes defeat total internal reflections, thereby enhancing the outcoupling efficiency into an ambient medium. However, the outcoupling ability is typically impeded by the limited index contrast given by pattern media. Here, we report strong-diffraction, high-index-contrast cavity engineered substrates (CESs) in which hexagonally arranged hemispherical air cavities are covered with a 80 nm thick crystallized alumina shell. Wavelength-resolved diffraction measurements and Fourier analysis on GaN-grown CESs reveal that the high-index-contrast air/alumina core/shell patterns lead to dramatic excitation of the low-order diffraction modes. Large-area (1075 × 750 μm(2)) blue-emitting InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated on a 3 μm pitch CES exhibit ∼39% enhancement in the optical power compared to state-of-the-art, patterned-sapphire-substrate LEDs, while preserving all of the electrical metrics that are relevant to LED devices. Full-vectorial simulations quantitatively demonstrate the enhanced optical power of CES LEDs and show a progressive increase in the extraction efficiency as the air cavity volume is expanded. This trend in light extraction is observed for both lateral- and flip-chip-geometry LEDs. Measurements of far-field profiles indicate a substantial beaming effect for CES LEDs, despite their few-micron-pitch pattern. Near-to-far-field transformation simulations and polarization analysis demonstrate that the improved extraction efficiency of CES LEDs is ascribed to the increase in emissions via the top escape route and to the extraction of transverse-magnetic polarized light. PMID:27045458

  10. Preparation and handling of surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortunately, surface treatment for s.c. cavities knows only one simple rule. If one observes this rule strictly one will be successful, if not, one will fail! The rule is CLEANLINESS. This means: clean material (high purity niobium without inclusions), clean (analytical grade) polishing chemicals and solvents, ultraclean (semiconductor grade) rinsing water, ultraclean (class 100) assembly environment. In general, if one applies the same working practice as the semiconductor industry, one will produce surfaces that are less clean than silicon wafers, due to the shape of the cavity (an inner surface is much more difficult to clean than a flat wafer); due to its size and due to the material (niobium is hydrophilic which makes the water with all the dirt in it stick to the surface). 9 references

  11. Vertical‐cavity surface‐emitting laser based digital coherent detection for multigigabit long reach passive optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodes Lopez, Roberto; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Zibar, Darko;

    2011-01-01

    We report on experimental demonstration of digital coherent detection based on a directly modulated vertical‐cavity surface‐emitting laser with bit rate up to 10 Gbps. This system allows a cooler‐less, free running, and unamplified transmission without optical dispersion compensation up to 105 km...... at 5 Gbps long reach passive optical links. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microwave Opt Technol Lett 53:2462–2464, 2011; View this article online at wileyonlinelibrary.com. DOI 10.1002/mop.26331...

  12. Correlation measurements of individual microwave photons emitted from a symmetric cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozyigit, D; Lang, C; Steffen, L; Fink, J M; Eichler, C; Baur, M; Bianchetti, R; Leek, P J; Filipp, S; Wallraff, A [Department of Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093, Zuerich (Switzerland); Da Silva, M P; Blais, A, E-mail: andreas.wallraff@phys.ethz.ch [Departement de Physique, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

    2011-01-10

    Superconducting circuits have been successfully established as systems to prepare and investigate microwave light fields at the quantum level. In contrast to optical experiments where light is detected using photon counters, microwaves are usually measured with well developed linear amplifiers. This makes measurements of correlation functions - one of the important tools in optics - harder to achieve because they traditionally rely on photon counters and beam splitters. Here, we demonstrate a system where we can prepare on demand single microwave photons in a cavity and detect them at the two outputs of the cavity using linear amplifiers. Together with efficient data processing, this allows us to measure different observables of the cavity photons, including the first-order correlation function. Using these techniques we demonstrate cooling of a thermal background field in the cavity.

  13. Correlation measurements of individual microwave photons emitted from a symmetric cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting circuits have been successfully established as systems to prepare and investigate microwave light fields at the quantum level. In contrast to optical experiments where light is detected using photon counters, microwaves are usually measured with well developed linear amplifiers. This makes measurements of correlation functions - one of the important tools in optics - harder to achieve because they traditionally rely on photon counters and beam splitters. Here, we demonstrate a system where we can prepare on demand single microwave photons in a cavity and detect them at the two outputs of the cavity using linear amplifiers. Together with efficient data processing, this allows us to measure different observables of the cavity photons, including the first-order correlation function. Using these techniques we demonstrate cooling of a thermal background field in the cavity.

  14. Energy scaling of a tunable terahertz parametric oscillator with a surface emitted configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-energy THz-wave output has been experimentally demonstrated with a terahertz-wave parametric oscillator based on a surface-emitted configuration. Through optimizing the cavity length and pump beam size, the maximum THz-wave output energy of 854 nJ pulse−1 was obtained at 1.62 THz. The conversion efficiency was 0.57  ×  10–5, corresponding to the photon conversion efficiency of 0.099%. The THz beam profile was measured with a THz imager, which had a Gaussian profile. The measured beam diameter sizes were 423 μm and 258 μm in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. A wide tunable range from 0.75 to 2.81 THz was realized. (paper)

  15. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~ 200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc. PMID:26727551

  16. Mode stability in photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers with large κ1DL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study mode stability in photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers (PCSELs) with large coupling-coefficient-length product κ1DL(>6). We observe that mode competition occurs at high current levels above threshold. Our combined experimental and theoretical study provides the first evidence of the mode competition originating from the high-order band-edge modes. The decreased threshold margin between these competing high-order modes and the main lasing mode with increasing cavity length as well as the spatial hole burning effect may deteriorate the single-mode stability. Our finding is essential for designing single-mode high-power PCSELs for which the strategy to suppress the high-order modes must be considered

  17. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc.

  18. Vegetable surface sterilization system using UVA light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Mutsumi; Lian, Xin; Shimohata, Takaaki; Uebanso, Takashi; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Harada, Yumi; Akutagawa, Masatake; Kinouchi, Yohsuke; Takahashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Surface sterilization of fresh produce has been needed in the food manufacturing/processing industry. Here we report a UVA-LED (Ultra Violet A-Light Emitting Diode) system for surface sterilization that is safe, efficacious, low cost, and apparently harmless to fresh produce. To test the system, Escherichia coli strain DH5α was spot-inoculated onto vegetable tissues, and treated under UVA-LED. Tissues were homogenized and bacteria quantified by colony-forming assay. Possible effects of UVA-LED on vegetable quality were evaluated by HPLC. Tissue weight changes were checked after treatment at 4℃, 15℃, and 30℃. Bacterial inactivation by UVA-LED radiation was observed after a 10 min treatment and increased with increasing time of irradiation. The log survival ratio reached -3.23 after a 90 min treatment. Bacterial cells surviving treatment grew slowly compared to non-irradiated control cells. Cabbage tissue lost weight over time after treatment, and weight loss increased with increasing incubation temperature, but there was no difference between losses by UVA-LED treated and control tissues at any temperature tested. In addition, no differences of Vitamin C content in cabbage tissue were detected by HPLC after UVA-LED treatment. These results suggest that UVA-LED treatment has great potential for vegetable surface sterilization in the food manufacturing/processing industry. PMID:25264046

  19. Cavity Investigation by Surface Wave Tomography and Microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Bitri, Adnand; Samyn, Kévin; Jacob, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    International audience Shallow cavities, such as karstic caves in carbonate bedrock and near-surface underground mine workings and tunnels, constitute serious hazards for persons and existing constructions due to the risk of collapse and subsidence involving damages to buildings and increased urban development costs. Detection of karstic features, voids, surficial dissolution, fissuring, alteration and unconsolidated material, is thus a major challenge for geophysical methods. Density and ...

  20. Water entry without surface seal: Extended cavity formation

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2014-03-01

    We report results from an experimental study of cavity formation during the impact of superhydrophobic spheres onto water. Using a simple splash-guard mechanism, we block the spray emerging during initial contact from closing thus eliminating the phenomenon known as \\'surface seal\\', which typically occurs at Froude numbers Fr= V0 2/(gR0) = O(100). As such, we are able to observe the evolution of a smooth cavity in a more extended parameter space than has been achieved in previous studies. Furthermore, by systematically varying the tank size and sphere diameter, we examine the influence of increasing wall effects on these guarded impact cavities and note the formation of surface undulations with wavelength λ =O(10)cm and acoustic waves λa=O(D0) along the cavity interface, which produce multiple pinch-off points. Acoustic waves are initiated by pressure perturbations, which themselves are generated by the primary cavity pinch-off. Using high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques we study the bulk fluid flow for the most constrained geometry and show the larger undulations ( λ =O (10cm)) have a fixed nature with respect to the lab frame. We show that previously deduced scalings for the normalized (primary) pinch-off location (ratio of pinch-off depth to sphere depth at pinch-off time), Hp/H = 1/2, and pinch-off time, τ α (R0/g) 1/2, do not hold for these extended cavities in the presence of strong wall effects (sphere-to-tank diameter ratio), ε = D 0/Dtank 1/16. Instead, we find multiple distinct regimes for values of Hp/H as the observed undulations are induced above the first pinch-off point as the impact speed increases. We also report observations of \\'kinked\\' pinch-off points and the suppression of downward facing jets in the presence of wall effects. Surprisingly, upward facing jets emanating from first cavity pinch-off points evolve into a \\'flat\\' structure at high impact speeds, both in the presence and absence of wall effects.

  1. Manipulation of the p olarization switching and the nonlinear dynamic b ehaviors of the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser sub jected to optical injection by EO mo dulation%电光调制对外部光注入垂直腔表面发射激光器的偏振转换及其非线性动力学行为的操控性研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟东洲; 计永强; 邓涛; 周开利

    2015-01-01

    For the polarization switching (PS) and the nonlinear dynamic behaviors (NDBs) of the optically injected laser system composed of master vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (M-VCSEL) and slave vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (S-VCSEL), we put forward a novel manipulation scheme and explore their control law by means of electro-optic (EO) modulation with quasi-phase matched technology in periodically poled LiNbO3. It is found that the PS of the S-VCSEL subjected to parallel or orthogonal optical injection undergoes a change of periodic oscillation with the applied transverse electric field. The envelope trajectory of the oscillation peak appears to be a cosine curve, and that of the oscillation wave trough becomes a sine curve. Besides, the PS of the S-VCSEL only depends on the applied transverse electric field and the bias current of the M-VCSEL, and is independent of the bias current of the S-VCSEL. When the bias current of the M-VCSEL takes a different value, the PS of the S-VCSEL shows a different evolution law in one period of the applied electric field. For a certain fixed bias current of the M-VCSEL, the optically injected S-VCSEL can emit an arbitrary polarization mode and its NDBs experience different evolutions when the light from the M-VCSEL goes through EO intensity modulation. If the output light of the M-VCSEL is subjected to EO intensity modulation and EO phase modulation simultaneously, while the bias current of the S-VCSEL is fixed at 1.06, that of the M-VCSEL is fixed at 1.18, and the optical injection strength is set at 5 ns−1, then the output polarization of the S-VCSEL is in turn switched from the y-LP to the left-handed elliptic polarization (EP), then the right-handed EP circular polarization, and lastly the left-handed EP. And its NDB shows in turn a single period, four doubled periods, chaos, four doubled periods, and chaos with the increase of the applied electric field.%针对主和副垂直腔表面发射激光器构成的外

  2. Field-dependent surface resistance of a superconducting RF cavity caused by impurity of surface

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, M; Liepe, M; Hoffstaetter, G

    2015-01-01

    Q-slope issue, which is caused by the field dependent surface resistance, puzzled people for a long time in SRF fields. In this paper, we related the Q-slope with surface treatments; and proposed a surface-impurity model to explain the field-dependent of surface resistance of SRF cavities. Eighteen cavity-test results have been analyzed to examine the model. These cavities were treated by different recipes: Nitrogen-doping; BCP and HF-rinsing; EP with 120{\\deg}C baking; and EP without 120{\\deg}C baking. The performance of these cavities, which is normally represented by cavity quality factor versus accelerating gradient or surface magnetic field curves (Q0 vs. Eacc or Q0 vs. B), has included all types of Q-slope, such as Low-field Q-slope, Medium-field Q-slope, and Anti-Q-slope. The data fittings are quite successful; the fitting results will be shown. The model can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the surface treatments. At last, the paper discussed the way to build a high-Q high-gradient SRF cavity.

  3. The influence of spherical cavity surface charge distribution on the sequence of partial discharge events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a model representing partial discharge (PD) behaviour of a spherical cavity within a homogeneous dielectric material has been developed to study the influence of cavity surface charge distribution on the electric field distribution in both the cavity and the material itself. The charge accumulation on the cavity surface after a PD event and charge movement along the cavity wall under the influence of electric field magnitude and direction has been found to affect the electric field distribution in the whole cavity and in the material. This in turn affects the likelihood of any subsequent PD activity in the cavity and the whole sequence of PD events. The model parameters influencing cavity surface charge distribution can be readily identified; they are the cavity surface conductivity, the inception field and the extinction field. Comparison of measurement and simulation results has been undertaken to validate the model.

  4. High-power, surface-emitting quantum cascade laser operating in a symmetric grating mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, C.; Sigler, C.; Kirch, J. D.; Lindberg, D. F.; Earles, T.; Botez, D.; Mawst, L. J.

    2016-03-01

    Grating-coupled surface-emitting (GCSE) lasers generally operate with a double-lobed far-field beam pattern along the cavity-length direction, which is a result of lasing being favored in the antisymmetric grating mode. We experimentally demonstrate a GCSE quantum-cascade laser design allowing high-power, nearly single-lobed surface emission parallel to the longitudinal cavity. A 2nd-order Au-semiconductor distributed-feedback (DFB)/distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) grating is used for feedback and out-coupling. The DFB and DBR grating regions are 2.55 mm- and 1.28 mm-long, respectively, for a total grating length of 5.1 mm. The lasers are designed to operate in a symmetric (longitudinal) grating mode by causing resonant coupling of the guided optical mode to the antisymmetric surface-plasmon modes of the 2nd-order metal/semiconductor grating. Then, the antisymmetric modes are strongly absorbed by the metal in the grating, causing the symmetric mode to be favored to lase, which, in turn, produces a single-lobed beam over a range of grating duty-cycle values of 36%-41%. Simulations indicate that the symmetric mode is always favored to lase, independent of the random phase of reflections from the device's cleaved ends. Peak pulsed output powers of ˜0.4 W were measured with nearly single-lobe beam-pattern (in the longitudinal direction), single-spatial-mode operation near 4.75 μm wavelength. Far-field measurements confirm a diffraction-limited beam pattern, in agreement with simulations, for a source-to-detector separation of 2 m.

  5. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bacteria produce acids that cause decay. Tooth pain occurs after decay reaches the inside of the tooth. Dentists can detect cavities by examining the teeth and taking x-rays periodically. Good oral hygiene and regular dental care plus a healthy diet can help prevent cavities. ...

  6. INVESTIGATION OF BREAKDOWN INDUCED SURFACE DAMAGE ON 805 MHZ PILLBOX CAVITY INTERIOR SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Torun, Y.; Bowring, D.; Flanagan, G.

    2013-09-25

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, we have tested two 805 MHz vacuum RF cavities in a multi-Tesla magnetic field to study the effects of the static magnetic field on the cavity operation. This study gives useful information on field emitters in the cavity, dark current, surface conditioning, breakdown mechanisms and material properties of the cavity. All these factors determine the maximum accelerating gradient in the cavity. This paper discusses the image processing technique for quantitative estimation of spark damage spot distribution on cavity interior surfaces. The distribution is compared with the electric field distribution predicted by a computer code calculation. The local spark density is proportional to probability of surface breakdown and shows a power law dependence on the maximum electric field (E). This E dependence is consistent with the dark current calculated from the Fowler-Nordheim equation.

  7. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop the fundamental understanding and practical techniques for enhancement of Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes (PhOLEDs) performance by utilizing radiative decay control technology. Briefly, the main technical goal is the acceleration of radiative recombination rate in organometallic triplet emitters by using the interaction with surface plasmon resonances in noble metal nanostructures. Increased photonic output will enable one to eliminate constraints imposed on PhOLED efficiency by triplet-triplet annihilation, triplet-polaron annihilation, and saturation of chromophores with long radiative decay times. Surface plasmon enhanced (SPE) PhOLEDs will operate more efficiently at high injection current densities and will be less prone to degradation mechanisms. Additionally, introduction of metal nanostructures into PhOLEDs may improve their performance due to the improvement of the charge transport through organic layers via multiple possible mechanisms ('electrical bridging' effects, doping-like phenomena, etc.). SPE PhOLED technology is particularly beneficial for solution-fabricated electrophosphorescent devices. Small transition moment of triplet emitters allows achieving a significant enhancement of the emission rate while keeping undesirable quenching processes introduced by the metal nanostructures at a reasonably low level. Plasmonic structures can be introduced easily into solution-fabricated PhOLEDs by blending and spin coating techniques and can be used for enhancement of performance in existing device architectures. This constitutes a significant benefit for a large scale fabrication of PhOLEDs, e.g. by roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Besides multieexciton annihilation, the power efficacy of PhOLEDs is often limited by high operational bias voltages required for overcoming built-in potential barriers to injection and transport of electrical charges through a device. This problem is especially

  8. Surface temperature measurements on superconducting cavities in superfluid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two thermometry systems have been developed: a scanning thermometer system routinely used for the 1.5 GHz monocell cavity studies and a fixed thermometer array used to investigate spatial surface resistance distribution on various SC removable endplates of a cylindrical TE011mode cavity. Thermometers used in these systems are thermally insulated from the surrounding HeII bath by an epoxy housing ('epoxy'thermometers). Accurate calibration of the fixed thermometers was conducted by using different test cells and the experimental results were compared to model calculations performed with a finite element computational code. Measured thermometer efficiency and linearity are in good agreement with numerical results. Some typical temperature maps of different Nb samples obtained with the TE011 array (40 epoxy thermometers) are discussed. On the basis of numerical modelling results, a new type of thermometer with an improved efficiency has been designed. The thermal insulation against Helium II has been drastically improved by placing the sensitive part of the thermometer in a small vacuum jacket ('vacuum' thermometers). Two main goals have been reached with the first prototypes: improved efficiency by a factor of 2.5 - 3, and a bath temperature dependence of the thermal response in good agreement with the expected Kapitza conductance behaviour. Fitting experimental results with numerical modelling data, allow us to estimate the Kapitza conductance. The obtained values are in good agreement with the previous results reported by several authors using a different measurement method. The 'vacuum' thermometers are currently used on the TE011 mode cavity with Nb and NbTiN plates and the first results are presented

  9. Electrically Pumped Vertical-Cavity Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Tine

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the design of electrically pumped vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (eVCAs) for use in a mode-locked external-cavity laser has been developed, investigated and analysed. Four different eVCAs, one top-emitting and three bottom emitting structures, have been designed and...... discussed. The thesis concludes with recommendations for further work towards the realisation of compact electrically pumped mode-locked vertical externalcavity surface emitting lasers....

  10. Enhanced light emission from top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes by optimizing surface plasmon polariton losses

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Cornelius; Wieczorek, Martin; Gather, Malte C; Hofmann, Simone; Reineke, Sebastian; Leo, Karl; Scholz, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate enhanced light extraction for monochrome top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The enhancement by a factor of 1.2 compared to a reference sample is caused by the use of a hole transport layer (HTL) material possessing a low refractive index (1.52). The low refractive index reduces the in-plane wave vector of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excited at the interface between the bottom opaque metallic electrode (anode) and the HTL. The shift of the SPP dispersion relation decreases the power dissipated into lost evanescent excitations and thus increases the outcoupling efficiency, although the SPP remains constant in intensity. The proposed method is suitable for emitter materials owning isotropic orientation of the transition dipole moments as well as anisotropic, preferentially horizontal orientation, resulting in comparable enhancement factors. Furthermore, for sufficiently low refractive indices of the HTL material, the SPP can be modeled as a propagating plane wave within ot...

  11. Final report on LDRD project: Semiconductor surface-emitting microcavity laser spectroscopy for analysis of biological cells and microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; McDonald, A.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure and Semiconductor Physics Dept.; Gourley, M.F. [Washington Hospital Center, DC (United States); Bellum, J. [Coherent Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This article discusses a new intracavity laser technique that uses living or fixed cells as an integral part of the laser. The cells are placed on a GaAs based semiconductor wafer comprising one half of a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser. After placement, the cells are covered with a dielectric mirror to close the laser cavity. When photo-pumped with an external laser, this hybrid laser emits coherent light images and spectra that depend sensitively on the cell size, shape, and dielectric properties. The light spectra can be used to identify different cell types and distinguish normal and abnormal cells. The laser can be used to study single cells in real time as a cell-biology lab-on-a-chip, or to study large populations of cells by scanning the pump laser at high speed. The laser is well-suited to be integrated with other micro-optical or micro-fluidic components to lead to micro-optical-mechanical systems for analysis of fluids, particulates, and biological cells.

  12. TEM observations of crack tip: cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crack tip-cavity interactions have been studied by performing room temperature deformation experiments in a transmission electron microscope on ion-irradiated type 316 stainless steel with small helium containing cavities. Slip dislocations emitted from a crack tip cut, sheared, and thereby elongated cavities without a volume enlargement. As the crack tip approached, a cavity volume enlargement occurred. Instead of the cavities continuing to enlarge until they touch, the walls between the cavities fractured. Fracture surface dimples do not correlate in size or density with these enlarged cavities

  13. Defect Detection in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity Surface Using C + + and OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Samantha; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) uses superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities to accelerate an electron beam. If theses cavities have a small particle or defect, it can degrade the performance of the cavity. The problem at hand is inspecting the cavity for defects, little bubbles of niobium on the surface of the cavity. Thousands of pictures have to be taken of a single cavity and then looked through to see how many defects were found. A C + + program with Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) was constructed to reduce the number of hours searching through the images and finds all the defects. Using this code, the SRF group is now able to use the code to identify defects in on-going tests of SRF cavities. Real time detection is the next step so that instead of taking pictures when looking at the cavity, the camera will detect all the defects.

  14. Plasmonic coupled-cavity system for enhancement of surface plasmon localization in plasmonic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, K. J. A.; Bai, P.; Gu, M. X.; Ang, L. K.

    2012-07-01

    A plasmonic coupled-cavity system, which consists of a quarter-wave coupler cavity, a resonant Fabry-Pérot detector nanocavity, and an off-resonant reflector cavity, is used to enhance the localization of surface plasmons in a plasmonic detector. The coupler cavity is designed based on transmission line theory and wavelength scaling rules in the optical regime, while the reflector cavity is derived from off-resonant resonator structures to attenuate transmission of plasmonic waves. We observed strong coupling of the cavities in simulation results, with an 86% improvement of surface plasmon localization achieved. The plasmonic coupled-cavity system may find useful applications in areas of nanoscale photodetectors, sensors, and an assortment of plasmonic-circuit devices.

  15. One Innovation of Mechanical Polishing Apparatus for Surface Treatment of 6 GHz TESLA Superconducting Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Guo-long; A.A.Rossi; R.K.Thakur; V.Palmieri

    2013-01-01

    6 GHz spinning seamless superconducting radio frequency(SRF)cavities are a very useful tool for testing alternative surface treatments in the fabrication of TESLA cavity.However,the surface is damaged in internal part for the using of the collapsible mandrel during spinning.The first important step of the

  16. Fabrication methods for a quantum cascade photonic crystal surface emitting laser

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant, D. M.; Colombelli, R.; Srinivasan, K.; Troccoli, M.; Painter, O.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F; Sergent, A. M.; Sivco, D.L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional quantum cascade (QC) lasers are intrinsically edge-emitting devices with mode confinement achieved via a standard mesa stripe configuration. Surface emission in edge emitting QC lasers has therefore necessitated redirecting the waveguided laser emission using a second order grating. This paper describes the methods used to fabricate a 2D photonic crystal (PC) structure with or without a central defect superimposed on an electrically pumped QC laser structure with the goal of achi...

  17. Evaluation of surface contamination and cleaning techniques on superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface contamination is a major factor influencing field performance in superconducting rf cavities. Present processing techniques used to clean niobium surfaces leave substantial particulate densities in the 20 to 100 μm range. A capability to quantify contamination from cavity-cleaning processes has been established using optical and SEM microscopy on niobium samples which can be run in parallel to cavity-processing steps. Laser surface scanning has also been used on silicon samples to quantify noncorrosive steps. Niobium cavities at 3 GHz and 805 MHz processed with various cleaning procedures have obtained peak surface electric fields as high as 78 and 44 MV/m, respectively. Results from the evaluations and the cavity tests will be presented. (Author) 6 figs., 4 refs

  18. Automated Surface Classification of SRF Cavities for the Investigation of the Influence of Surface Properties onto the Operational Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2015-07-15

    Superconducting niobium radio-frequency cavities are fundamental for the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider. To use the operational advantages of superconducting cavities, the inner surface has to fulfill quite demanding requirements. The surface roughness and cleanliness improved over the last decades and with them, the achieved maximal accelerating field. Still, limitations of the maximal achieved accelerating field are observed, which are not explained by localized geometrical defects or impurities. The scope of this thesis is a better understanding of these limitations in defect free cavities based on global, rather than local, surface properties. For this goal, more than 30 cavities underwent subsequent surface treatments, cold RF tests and optical inspections within the ILC-HiGrade research program and the XFEL cavity production. An algorithm was developed which allows an automated surface characterization based on an optical inspection robot. This algorithm delivers a set of optical surface properties, which describes the inner cavity surface. These optical surface properties deliver a framework for a quality assurance of the fabrication procedures. Furthermore, they shows promising results for a better understanding of the observed limitations in defect free cavities.

  19. Automated Surface Classification of SRF Cavities for the Investigation of the Influence of Surface Properties onto the Operational Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting niobium radio-frequency cavities are fundamental for the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider. To use the operational advantages of superconducting cavities, the inner surface has to fulfill quite demanding requirements. The surface roughness and cleanliness improved over the last decades and with them, the achieved maximal accelerating field. Still, limitations of the maximal achieved accelerating field are observed, which are not explained by localized geometrical defects or impurities. The scope of this thesis is a better understanding of these limitations in defect free cavities based on global, rather than local, surface properties. For this goal, more than 30 cavities underwent subsequent surface treatments, cold RF tests and optical inspections within the ILC-HiGrade research program and the XFEL cavity production. An algorithm was developed which allows an automated surface characterization based on an optical inspection robot. This algorithm delivers a set of optical surface properties, which describes the inner cavity surface. These optical surface properties deliver a framework for a quality assurance of the fabrication procedures. Furthermore, they shows promising results for a better understanding of the observed limitations in defect free cavities.

  20. Study on the GaAs(110) surface using emitted atom spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The facilities implemented at Bariloche for the ion scattering spectrometry is described, and recent examples of the technique application to determine the atomic structure and the composition of metallic and semiconductor surfaces, pure and with different adsorbates. The surface analysis technique using emitted atom spectrometry is discussed. The sensitivity to the GaAs(110) surface atomic relaxation is presented, and the kinetic of hydrogen adsorption by the mentioned surface is studied

  1. Improving the work function of the niobium surface of SRF cavities by plasma processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Doleans, M.; Hannah, B.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C.; Stewart, S.; Mammosser, J.; Howell, M.; Saunders, J.; Degraff, B.; Kim, S.-H.

    2016-04-01

    An in situ plasma processing technique using chemically reactive oxygen plasma to remove hydrocarbons from superconducting radio frequency cavity surfaces at room temperature has been developed at the spallation neutron source, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. To understand better the interaction between the plasma and niobium surface, surface studies on small samples were performed. In this article, we report the results from those surface studies. The results show that plasma processing removes hydrocarbons from top surface and improves the surface work function by 0.5-1.0 eV. Improving the work function of RF surface of cavities can help to improve their operational performance.

  2. A Computational Study of Transient Couette Flow Over an Embedded Cavity Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; Lang, Amy; Schreiber, Will; Leibenguth, Chase; Palmore, John

    2011-11-01

    Insect flight has become a topic of increased study due to bio-inspired applications for Micro-Air-Vehicles (MAVs). The complex yet efficient flight mechanism of butterflies relies upon flexible, micro-geometrically surface patterned, scaled wings. Effective vortex control, when flapping as well as low-drag gliding, may result from the wing's texture. This hypothesis was tested by focusing on the formation of embedded vortices between the rows of scales on butterfly wings. To calculate the total surface drag induced on the moving cavity surface a computational fluid dynamics study using FLUENT simulated the flow inside and above the embedded cavities under transient Couette flow conditions with Reynolds numbers varied from 0.01 to 100. The computational model consisted of a single embedded cavity with a periodic boundary condition. Based on SEM pictures of Monarch (Danaus plexippus) butterfly scales, various cavity geometries were tested to deduce drag reduction. Results showed that the embedded vortex size and shape generated within the cavity depended on which surface moved (top, flat wall or bottom, cavity wall) as well as aspect ratio. Surface drag reduction was confirmed over the cavity surfaces when compared to that of a flat plate, and increased with aspect ratio. Funded by REU SITE EEC - 1062611.

  3. Laterally emitted surface second harmonic generation in a single ZnTe nanowire

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Weiwei; Liu, Zhe; Shen, Guozhen; Lu, Peixiang

    2012-01-01

    We report a direct observation on the unique laterally emitted surface second harmonic generation (SHG) in a single ZnTe nanowire. The highly directional surface SHG signal that polarizes along the direction vertical to the nanowire growth axis, is significantly larger than the bulk SHG contribution, indicating a high efficiency of surface SHG. Two strong SHG peaks are observed on both sides of the nanowire surfaces in the far-field scanning images, which is further supported by FDTD simulations, demonstrating that the unique laterally emitted signal is ascribed to surface SHG in the ZnTe nanowire. The surface SHG in a single ZnTe nanowire with unique lateral emission and high conversion efficiency shows great potential applications in short-wavelength nanolasers, nonlinear microscopy and polarization dependent photonic integrating.

  4. Light emitting diode cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS): a novel technique for monitoring atmospheric trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalman, Ryan M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.

    2009-08-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light- Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced DOAS (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e., does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0). We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420-490nm) to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), iodine monoxide (IO), water (H2O) and oxygen dimers (O4). Aerosol extinction is retrieved at two wavelengths by means of observing water and O4 and measuring pressure, temperature and relative humidity independently. The instrument components are presented, and the approach to measure aerosol extinction is demonstrated by means of a set of experiments where laboratory generated monodisperse aerosols are added to the cavity. The aerosol extinction cross section agrees well with Mie calculations, demonstrating that our setup enables measurements of the above gases in open cavity mode.

  5. Surface analyses of electropolished niobium samples for superconducting radio frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities is sometimes limited by contaminations present on the cavity surface. In the recent years extensive research has been done to enhance the cavity performance by applying improved surface treatments such as mechanical grinding, electropolishing (EP), chemical polishing, tumbling, etc., followed by various rinsing methods such as ultrasonic pure water rinse, alcoholic rinse, high pressure water rinse, hydrogen per oxide rinse, etc. Although good cavity performance has been obtained lately by various post-EP cleaning methods, the detailed nature about the surface contaminants is still not fully characterized. Further efforts in this area are desired. Prior x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of EPed niobium samples treated with fresh EP acid, demonstrated that the surfaces were covered mainly with the niobium oxide (Nb2O5) along with carbon, in addition a small quantity of sulfur and fluorine were also found in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. In this article, the authors present the analyses of surface contaminations for a series of EPed niobium samples located at various positions of a single cell niobium cavity followed by ultrapure water rinsing as well as our endeavor to understand the aging effect of EP acid solution in terms of contaminations presence at the inner surface of the cavity with the help of surface analytical tools such as XPS, SIMS, and scanning electron microscope at KEK.

  6. Surface Emitting Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Laser around 8.3 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers emitting at wavelengths from 8.1 μm at 90 K to 8.4 μm at 210 K. The second-order metalized grating is carefully designed using a modified coupled-mode theory and fabricated by contact lithography. The devices show single mode behavior with a side mode suppression ratio above 18 dB at all working temperatures. At 90 K, the device emits an optical power of 101 mW from the surface and 199 mW from the edge. In addition, a double-lobe far-field pattern with a separation of 2.2° is obtained in the direction along the waveguide. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  7. Laser diode-pumped dual-cavity high-power fiber laser emitting at 1150  nm employing hybrid gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yizhu; Xiao, Hu; Xu, Jiangming; Leng, Jinyong; Zhou, Pu

    2016-05-10

    We demonstrate a laser diode-pumped dual-cavity high-power fiber laser emitting at 1150 nm. The laser employs Yb and Raman gains simultaneously. The fiber laser with a simple structure achieves high-efficiency operation while efficiently suppressing the amplified spontaneous emission and parasitic oscillation. The maximum output power at 1150 nm is 110.8 W, with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 57%. Further power scaling at 1150 nm is expected with the optimization of the system design. PMID:27168299

  8. Ultimate Cavity Dynamics of Hydrophobic Spheres Impacting on Free Water Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2012-12-01

    Cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research owing to its practical relevance in naval, military, industrial, sports and biological applications. The cavity formed by an impacting hydrophobic sphere normally seals at two places, one below (deep seal) and the other above the water surface (surface seal). For Froude numbers , the air flow into the resulting cavity is strong enough to suck the splash crown above the surface and disrupt the cavity dynamics before it deep seals. In this research work we eliminate surface seals by means of a novel practice of using cone splash-guards and examine the undisturbed transient cavity dynamics by impact of hydrophobic spheres for Froude numbers ranging . This enabled the measurement of extremely accurate pinch-off heights, pinch-off times, radial cavity collapse rates, and jet speeds in an extended range of Froude numbers compared to the previous work of Duclaux et al. (2007). Results in the extended regime were in remarkable agreement with the theoretical prediction of scaled pinch-off depth, and experimentally derived pinch-off time for . Furthermore, we investigated the influence of confinement on cavity formation by varying the cross-sectional area of the tank of liquid. In conjunction with surface seal elimination we observed the formation of multiple pinch-off points where a maximum of four deep seals were obtained in a sequential order for the Froude number range investigated. The presence of an elongated cavity beneath the first pinch-off point 5 resulted in evident "kinks" primarily related to the greatly diminished air pressure at the necking region caused by supersonic air flows (Gekle et al. 2010). Such flows passing through second pinch-offs were also found to choke the cavities beneath the first pinch- off depths causing radial expansion and hence disappearance of downward jets.

  9. Non-paraxial contributions to the far-field pattern of surface-emitting lasers: a manifestation of the momentum-space wavefunctions of quantum billiards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated experimentally non-paraxial contributions to the high-order far-field pattern of large-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers in order to explore by analogy the momentum-space wave distributions of quantum billiards. Our results reveal that non-paraxial contributions significantly influence the morphology of the high-order far-field pattern. A fast reliable method is developed for transforming the experimental far-field patterns to the correct Fourier transform of the corresponding near-field lasing modes. In this way we visualize the momentum-space (p–q) wavefunctions of quantum billiards

  10. Observation of Stable Low Surface Resistance in Large-Grain Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, Shichun [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP)/Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou (China)

    2016-05-01

    Low surface resistance, or high unloaded quality factor (Q0), superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are being pursued actively nowadays as their application in large-scale CW SRF accelerators can save capital and operational cost in cryogenics. There are different options in realization of such cavities. One of them is the large-grain (LG) niobium cavity. In this contribution, we present new experimental results in evaluation of LG niobium cavities cooled down in the presence of an external magnetic field. High Q0 values are achieved even with an ambient magnetic field of up to 100 mG. More over, it is observed that these high Q0 values are super-robust against repeated quench, literally not affected at all after the cavity being deliberately quenched for hundreds of times in the presence of an ambient magnetic field of up to 200 mG.

  11. Thermal Stress of Surface of Mold Cavities and Parting Line of Silicone Molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajčičák Martin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the study of thermal stress of surface of mold cavities and parting line of silicone molds after pouring. The silicone mold White SD - THT was thermally stressed by pouring of ZnAl4Cu3 zinc alloy with pouring cycle 20, 30 and 40 seconds. The most thermally stressed part of surface at each pouring cycle is gating system and mold cavities. It could be further concluded that linear increase of the pouring cycle time leads to the exponential increasing of the maximum temperature of mold surface after its cooling. The elongated pouring cycle increases the temperature accumulated on the surface of cavities and the ability of silicone mold to conduct the heat on its surface decreases, because the low thermal conductivity of silicone molds enables the conduction of larger amount of heat into ambient environment.

  12. Dependence of the surface resistance of niobium coated copper cavities on the coating temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six hydro-formed copper 1.5 GHz cavities have been baked and coated with niobium at different temperatures between 100 deg C and 200 deg C, while keeping the other discharge parameters unchanged. Their surface resistance has been measured as a function RF field and trapped magnetic field. Its dependence on deposition temperature confirms earlier indications obtained using 350 MHz LEP cavities that 150 deg C leads to optimal performances. The critical temperatures of Nb/Cu and bulk niobium cavities have also been measured. (author)

  13. Development of an optical inspection bench for the inspection of internal surfaces of 650 MHz SCRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical inspection system has been developed for inspection of internal surfaces of 650 MHz superconducting RF cavities. The cavity parts are welded either using Electron Beam or Laser Beam Welding for making a good quality of weld joints. Surface defects like pits, scratches, welding spatters etc. on the internal surface of the cavity deteriorates cavity performance. Surface quality of the cavity equator joint plays an important role in the cavity performance. To study the quality of equator surface, the inspection bench offers high resolution images with a linear resolution of 45 m/pixel at a distance of ∼200 mm. The bench comprises of two major sub-systems, optical imaging system and cavity positioning system. A digital camera and multi coloured illumination system is used to obtain high resolution images. The camera is mounted inside a long cylindrical tube. The cylindrical tube can be inserted into a SCRF cavity. The length of the cylinder is long enough to inspect five-cell 650 MHz SCRF cavity. The cavity is placed on a set of PTFE rollers, which are mounted on a trolley. The cavity can be moved linearly with the help of ball screw-servomotor mechanism. The camera along with cylindrical tube can be rotated around its axis with a stepper motor to scan the cavity's internal surface. The paper presents the details about the optical inspection bench and optical inspection results. (author)

  14. Pool boiling on surfaces with mini-fins and micro-cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental studies presented here focused on pool boiling heat transfer on mini-fin arrays, mini-fins with perforated covering and surfaces with micro-cavities. The experiments were carried out for water and fluorinert FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. Mini-fins of 0.5 and 1 mm in height were uniformly spaced on the base surface. The copper foil with holes of 0.1 mm in diameter (pitch 0.2/0.4 mm), sintered with the fin tips, formed a system of connected perpendicular and horizontal tunnels. The micro-cavities were obtained through spark erosion. The maximal depth of the craters of these cavities was 15 – 30 μm and depended on the parameters of the branding-pen settings. At medium and small heat fluxes, structures with mini-fins showed the best boiling heat transfer performance both for water and FC-72. At medium and high heat fluxes (above 70 kW/m2 for water and 25 kW/m2 for FC-72), surfaces with mini-fins without porous covering and micro-cavities produced the highest heat transfer coefficients. The surfaces obtained with spark erosion require a proper selection of geometrical parameters for particular liquids – smaller diameters of cavities are suitable for liquids with lower surface tension (FC-72).

  15. Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down detection of cytochrome c on surface-modified prisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneppen, van der L.; Gooijer, C.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Ariese, F.

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption kinetics and molecular interactions on different Surface interfaces are studied by means of evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy, using total internal reflection surfaces Onto Which different self-assembled monolayers are covalently attached. The adsorption of cytochrome c (a pos

  16. Comparison of 3 methods on fabricating micro- /nano- structured surface on 3D mold cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano;

    2015-01-01

    limited to flat or simple shaped geometries. In this paper, 3 approaches for fabricating micro and nano- structured surfaces on a mold cavity for injection moulding are investigated and compared. The first approach is to use pre-fabricated plate with micro-structured surface as an insert for the mold, in...

  17. The HIE-ISOLDE Superconducting Cavities: Surface Treatment and Niobium Thin Film Coating

    CERN Document Server

    Lanza, G; Ferreira, L M A; Gustafsson, A E; Pasini, M; Trilhe, P; Palmieri, V

    2010-01-01

    CERN has designed and prepared new facilities for the surface treatment and niobium sputter coating of the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting cavities. We describe here the design choices, as well as the results of the first surface treatments and test coatings.

  18. 30% external quantum efficiency from surface textured, thin-film light-emitting diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Schnitzer, I.; Yablonovitch, E.; Caneau, C.; Gmitter, T. J.; Scherer, A.

    1993-01-01

    There is a significant gap between the internal efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and their external efficiency. The reason for this shortfall is the narrow escape cone for light in high refractive index semiconductors. We have found that by separating thin-film LEDs from their substrates (by epitaxial lift-off, for example), it is much easier for light to escape from the LED structure and thereby avoid absorption. Moreover, by nanotexturing the thin-film surface using "natural litho...

  19. Linear polarization of photons emitted from excited hydrogen atoms formed above metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents theoretical results for linear polarization of Lyman-α and Balmer-α emission following single electron capture by hydrogen nuclei to excited levels above Mo surfaces. The polarization degrees are evaluated for photons from the hydrogen atoms outgoing along surface normal with translation velocities of 0.05-1 au. In this geometry, the excited states are aligned with respect to the surface normal (quantization axis). Finite polarization degrees are obtained for electric-dipole photons emitted at right angle to the surface normal; the linear polarization preferentially along the surface plane at lower translation velocities turns to the surface normal at higher velocities (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. On the field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The surface resistance Rs of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a thin niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied RF field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that due to the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film Rs is enhanced due to global heating of the inner cavity wall. Introducing helium gas in the cavity and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by only 60+/-60 mK when Rs increases with Eacc by 100 nOhm. This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally the effect of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered Rs.

  1. Analysis of surface emitting distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser based on a surface-plasmon waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of a surface emitting distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) based on a surface-plasmon waveguide is presented. The second-order grating realized by the sole patterning of the top metal provides strong feedback. The analysis is based on a coupled-mode theory derived from exact Floquet-Bloch solutions of the infinite periodic structure. The surface outcoupling efficiency and threshold gain for the optimized device design are 43% and 12 cm -1, respectively, which represent great improve ments on the conventional dielectric waveguide based DFB QCL with typical values of 17.5% and 20 cm-1.

  2. Analysis of surface emitting distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser based on a surface-plasmon waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Wanhong; Lu Quanyong; Liu Junqi; Zhang Wei; Jiang Yuchao; Li Lu; Wang Lijun; Liu Fengqi; Wang Zhanguo, E-mail: jqliu@semi.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-11-15

    An analysis of a surface emitting distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) based on a surface-plasmon waveguide is presented. The second-order grating realized by the sole patterning of the top metal provides strong feedback. The analysis is based on a coupled-mode theory derived from exact Floquet-Bloch solutions of the infinite periodic structure. The surface outcoupling efficiency and threshold gain for the optimized device design are 43% and 12 cm {sup -1}, respectively, which represent great improve ments on the conventional dielectric waveguide based DFB QCL with typical values of 17.5% and 20 cm{sup -1}.

  3. Near-infrared wafer-fused vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for HF detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Nevrlý, V.; Dorogan, A.; Ferus, Martin; Iakovlev, V.; Sirbu, A.; Mereuta, A.; Caliman, A.; Suruceanu, G.; Kapon, E.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 147, NOV 2014 (2014), s. 53-59. ISSN 0022-4073 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14022 Grant ostatní: Ministerstvo financí, Centrum zahraniční pomoci(CZ) PF049 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : High resolution absorption spectroscopy * Monitoring of hydrogen fluoride, methane, and ammonia * Tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.645, year: 2014

  4. Theory and Modeling of Lasing Modes in Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Klein

    1998-01-01

    modes that the VCSEL can support are then determined by matching the gain necessary for the optical system in both magnitude and phase to the gain available from the laser's electronic system. Examples are provided.

  5. Broadband subwavelength grating mirror and its application to vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper; Gilet, Philippe; Chelnokov, Alexei

    2008-01-01

    Various high-index-contrast sub-wavelength grating (HCG) mirror designs have been investigated. It reveals that transverse magnetic (TM-) and transverse electric (TE-) HCG reflect the incident fields in quite different ways and that the TM-HCG enables very thin gap below the grating. Based on the...

  6. Surfaces of electron-emitting glasses studied by a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semi-conducting glasses used for electron multipliers and microchannel plate devices are obtained by surface modification of Pb or Bi-reach silicon-based glasses. The reduced layer extends down to 200-500 nm, much more than the effective depth of the electron-emitting layer. By the use of slow-positron beam we monitor the structural changes undergoing in near-to-surface layers after isothermal annealing. The measurements suggest a possible correlation between secondary-electron emission coefficient and the Doppler- broadening S-parameter. On these samples there were also performed atomic force microscopy, secondary electron emission, differential scanning calorimetry, and electric conductivity measurements. (author)

  7. Controlled impact of a disk on a water surface: Cavity dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bergmann, Raymond; Gekle, Stephan; van der Bos, Arjan; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we study the transient surface cavity which is created by the controlled impact of a disk of radius h0 on a water surface at Froude numbers below 200. The dynamics of the transient free surface is recorded by high speed imaging and compared to boundary integral simulations. An excellent agreement is found between both. The flow surrounding the cavity is measured with high speed particle image velocimetry and is found to also agree perfectly with the flow field obtained from the simulations. We present a simple model for the radial dynamics of the cavity based on the collapse of an infinite cylinder. This model accounts for the observed asymmetry of the radial dynamics between the expansion and contraction phase of the cavity. It reproduces the scaling of the closure depth and total depth of the cavity which are both found to scale roughly proportional to Fr^{1/2} with a weakly Froude number dependent prefactor. In addition, the model accurately captures the dynamics of the minimal radius of the ...

  8. Experimental Observation of Dark Soliton Emitting with Spectral Sideband in an All-Fiber Ring Cavity Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-Yi; XU Wen-Cheng; LUO Zhi-Chao; LUO Ai-Ping; CAO Wen-Jun; DONG Jiang-Li; WANG Lu-Yan

    2011-01-01

    @@ The dark soliton pulse with spectral sideband is experimentally observed in a dispersion-managed ail-fiber ring laser with net negative cavity group velocity dispersion.We find that, for single or multiple dark solitons, the spectral sidebands always appear and exhibit asymmetric characteristics which are similar to bright solitons.The experimental measurements of spectral sideband positions are carried out and the results are in good agreement with the calculated values.Our results show that spectral sideband effect is also an intrinsic feature of a dark soliton fiber laser.%The dark soliton pulse with spectral sideband is experimentally observed in a dispersion-managed all-fiber ring laser with net negative cavity group velocity dispersion. We find that, for single or multiple dark solitons, the spectral sidebands always appear and exhibit asymmetric characteristics which are similar to bright solitons. The experimental measurements of spectral sideband positions are carried out and the results are in good agreement with the calculated values. Our results show that spectral sideband effect is also an intrinsic feature of a dark soliton fiber laser.

  9. Following interfacial kinetics in real time using broadband evanescent wave cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy: a comparison of light-emitting diodes and supercontinuum sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sneppen, Lineke; Hancock, Gus; Kaminski, Clemens; Laurila, Toni; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Neil, Simon R T; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D; Schnippering, Mathias; Unwin, Patrick R

    2010-01-01

    A white light-emitting diode (LED) with emission between 420 and 700 nm and a supercontinuum (SC) source with emission between 450 and 2500 nm have been compared for use in evanescent wave broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (EW-BB-CEAS). The method is calibrated using a dye with known absorbance. While the LED is more economic as an excitation source, the SC source is superior both in terms of baseline noise (noise equivalent absorbances lower than 10(-5) compared to 10(-4) absorbance units (a.u.)) and accuracy of the measurement; these baseline noise levels are comparable to evanescent wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) studies while the accessible spectral region of EW-BB-CEAS is much larger (420-750 nm in this study, compared to several tens of nanometres for EW-CRDS). The improvements afforded by the use of an SC source in combination with a high sensitivity detector are demonstrated in the broadband detection of electrogenerated Ir(IV) complexes in a thin-layer electrochemical cell arrangement. Excellent signal to noise is achieved with 10 micros signal accumulation times at a repetition rate of 600 Hz, easily fast enough to follow, in real time, solution kinetics and interfacial processes. PMID:20024193

  10. Multi-wavelength surface emitting quantum cascade laser based on equivalent phase shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. C., E-mail: zhangjinchuan@semi.ac.cn; Liu, F. Q., E-mail: fqliu@semi.ac.cn; Yao, D. Y.; Wang, L. J.; Yan, F. L.; Liu, J. Q.; Wang, Z. G. [Institute of Semiconductors, Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100083, People’s Republic of China and Beijing Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Semiconductor Materials and Devices, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-01-21

    A novel surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting around λ ∼ 4.6 μm is demonstrated by employing an equivalent phase shift (EPS) of quarter-wave (λ/4). The EPS is fabricated through extending one sampling period by 50% in the center of a sampled Bragg grating. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern with a low divergence angle of about 0.6° × 16.8° is obtained. Selective single-mode lasing with a mean side mode suppression ratio above 20 dB and wavelength coverage range of 72 nm is achieved simultaneously on a single wafer only by changing the sampling period.

  11. Multi-wavelength surface emitting quantum cascade laser based on equivalent phase shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting around λ ∼ 4.6 μm is demonstrated by employing an equivalent phase shift (EPS) of quarter-wave (λ/4). The EPS is fabricated through extending one sampling period by 50% in the center of a sampled Bragg grating. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern with a low divergence angle of about 0.6° × 16.8° is obtained. Selective single-mode lasing with a mean side mode suppression ratio above 20 dB and wavelength coverage range of 72 nm is achieved simultaneously on a single wafer only by changing the sampling period

  12. Measurement of activity of surfaces contaminated by beta-emitting nuclides and 55Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The responses of a variety of different types of surface contamination monitoring probes to both small area and distributed sources of the β-emitting nuclides, 90Sr/90Y, 204Tl, 147Pm, 14C and 63Ni, have been measured. The responses to the low-energy X-ray emitting electron-capture nuclide, 55Fe, have also been measured. A figure of merit for the comparison of different types of probe has been derived and applied to the measured responses. The responses of a beryllium-window sodium iodide scintillation probe to 55Fe with integral and differential bias is described in detail; calculated responses to the electron-capture nuclides, 109Cd and 125I, are also included in this report. (author)

  13. Narrow-band spectral features of structured silver surface with rectangular resonant cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is aimed to investigate spectral properties of structured silver surface with periodic rectangular hollow cavities. Numerical computation is conducted to obtain spectral distribution of surface absorptance with different structural parameters using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. By means of numerical examples, the effects of structural parameters, incident angle and azimuthal angle on the spectral features of the structured surface are discussed. It is found that the structured surface shows the characteristics of the peak absorption in the vicinity of resonant wavelength of rectangular cavity. For some special structure parameters, the peak absorptance of the incident plane wave can reach as high as above 80% due to the excitation of microcavity effect. The optimal narrow-band absorption can be achieved by the rational design of the structural parameters of rectangular cavity. The directional dependence of spectral absorptance is also analyzed and the results reveal that the absorption peak positions are incident-angle-independent. The results show that the microscaled rectangular cavities fabricated on the low-emissivity silver surface are very efficient for selective improvement of the radiative features, which provides guidance for the design of narrow-band infrared thermal emitters.

  14. Surface plasmon resonance optical cavity enhanced refractive index sensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Gagliardi, G.; Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; Iodice, M.; Adam, Pavel; Chadt, Karel; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 11 (2013), s. 1951-1953. ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Resonators * Surface plasmon s * Optical sensing and sensors Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  15. Cavity Light-Emitting Diode for Durable, High-Brightness and High-Efficiency Lighting Applications: First Budget Period Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yijian Shi

    2009-09-30

    COLED will be exposed to air and processing chemicals during the COLED fabrication process, these low-work-function metals cannot be used directly in the COLED structure. Thus, new materials with low work function and better chemical stability are needed for the COLED cathode. (3) Increase active device area: Since photons are only generated from perimeters of the cavities, the actual active area in a COLED device is smaller than the device surface area. The cavity diameter and cavity spacing of the COLED devices previously produced at SRI by conventional photolithography processing are typically in the range of 3 to 7 {mu}m with an estimated active area of 2-3%. To achieve the same brightness of a traditional OLED at the same applied voltage, the active device area of a COLED should be at least 20% (1/5) of the device surface area, provided the COLED has 5 times higher EQE. This requires reducing the cavity diameter and cavity spacing to the sub-micrometer region, which can be achieved by electron-beam lithography or nanoimprint lithography. (4) Improve metal/polymer interfaces: The polymer/metal interfaces are critical issues to improve and optimize since they directly affect the effectiveness and balance of hole and electron injection, and consequently the device performance. Conventional approaches for improving a metal/polymer interface include deposition of a special interfacial material on the selected electrode surface or applying a proper surface treatment prior to deposition of the LEP. Since these approaches are generally nonselective to the cathode and anode, they cannot be directly adopted for COLED devices. Generally, the interface integration in current OLED technology still needs a better chemical approach. Hence, advanced methodology developed for the COLED technology as promoted in this project may be also suitable for other OLED devices.

  16. Field emission of electrons from cathodes made of carbon fibers with a nanostructured emitting surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupekhin, S. M.; Ibragimov, A. A.

    2011-06-01

    Field electron emission from cathodes made of a bunch of carbon fibers under the condition of technical vacuum is studied experimentally. A model to optimize the field emission properties of the cathode by optimizing its macrogeometry with regard to the emitting surface structure is suggested. The current-voltage characteristics of the cathode are taken in the working voltage range 1-3 kV and for anode-cathode spacings varying from 1 to 10 mm. The current density from the cathode may reach 10 A/cm2 or more.

  17. Surface emitting multi-wavelength array of single frequency quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouy, P.; Bonzon, C., E-mail: bonzonc@phys.ethz.ch; Wolf, J.; Beck, M.; Faist, J. [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH-Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Gini, E. [FIRST Laboratory ETH-Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-02-16

    We present a surface emitting laser array design based on distributed Bragg reflectors together with a second order extractor, providing a deterministic mode selection mechanism. The technology is implemented as a buried heterostructure compatible with continuous-wave operation and low dissipation. A proof of principle featured 10 regularly spaced single mode devices with a coverage of 175 cm{sup −1} in the 8–10 μm wavelength range and milliwatt output powers with a far-field pattern full-width half-maximum of 8.3° in the longitudinal direction.

  18. Protection of enamel surfaces in the oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazovic, Maja Bruvo

    and foodstuffs or gastric juice can cause dental erosion. During a lifetime the enamel surface is also exposed to fluids that can have protective effects against dental caries and erosion such as saliva, various foodstuffs, drinking water and many types of drinks. However, little is still known about...... with dental caries and erosion. Drinking water was used as a model system to test previously undetermined inorganic effects with importance for dental caries and the pellicle forming properties of the saliva proteins were used to test organic effects of importance for dental erosion. Inorganic effects...... on enamel integrity were determined by testing the effect of 22 standard chemical variables in drinking water on caries experience (DMF-S) among 15-year-olds schoolchildren. By iterative search and testing calcium and fluoride were identified to explain 45 % of the variations in DMF-S among 52,057 15...

  19. Controlling the surface plasmon excitation efficiency using dielectric magneto-optical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffraction of a plane wave by a magneto-optical cavity located on a metal interface is investigated theoretically. We show that the excitation of localized eigenmodes of the cavity allows one to efficiently excite the surface plasmon polariton (SPP). We exploit the polarization and symmetry properties of the cavity modes to propose an efficient approach for controlling the SPP intensity through an external magnetic field. The presented theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the rigorous computations based on the generalized Lorentz reciprocity theorem and aperiodic Fourier modal method. The magnetization-induced relative intensity variation of the excited SPP demonstrated in numerical computations varies from a few percent to 100% depending on the polarization of the incident wave. Such large modulation opens new possibilities for efficient SPP modulation with considered magneto-optical intensity effect. (paper)

  20. Surface-plasmon-polariton hybridized cavity modes in submicrometer slits in a thin Au film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, R.; Fritz, S.; Müller, E.; Schneider, R.; Maniv, T.; Cohen, H.; Matyssek, C.; Busch, K.; Gerthsen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The excitation of cavity standing waves in double-slit structures in thin gold films, with slit lengths between 400 and 2560 nm, was probed with a strongly focused electron beam in a transmission electron microscope. The energies and wavelengths of cavity modes up to the 11 th mode order were measured with electron energy loss spectroscopy to derive the corresponding dispersion relation. For all orders, a significant redshift of mode energies accompanied by a wavelength elongation relative to the expected resonator energies and wavelengths is observed. The resultant dispersion relation is found to closely follow the well-known dispersion law of surface-plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagating on a gold/air interface, thus providing direct evidence for the hybridized nature of the detected cavity modes with SPPs.

  1. Dependence of the surface resistance of niobium coated copper cavities on the coating temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six hydro-formed copper 1.5 GHz cavities have been baked and coated with niobium at different temperatures between 100 deg C and 200 deg C, while keeping the other discharge parameters unchanged. Their surface resistance has been measured as a function of RF field and trapped magnetic field. Its dependence on deposition temperature confirms earlier indications obtained using 350 MHz LEP cavities that 150 deg C leads to optimal performances. The critical temperatures of Nb/Cu and bulk niobium cavities have also been measured: the result obtained for Nb/Cu, 9.56 K±0.02 K, differs from the Nb value, 9.231 K±0.007 K, in qualitative agreement with expectation from the different lattice parameters. (author)

  2. Surface tension of cavities and Tolman’s length in n-alkanes. A positron study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Surface tension in cavities produced by Ps in alkanes is larger than in flat surface. ► Absolute value of Tolman’s length rises with temperature. ► Ortho-Ps lifetime near the melting point is identical for all liquid alkanes. ► No change of ortho-Ps lifetime at the transition liquid–rotator phase for n > 24. - Abstract: Positron annihilation lifetime spectra were measured in n-alkanes. From the lifetime of ortho-positronium (o-Ps) one can determine the surface tension and Tolman’s length for the cavity produced by positronium in the liquid. This tension is found increased by factor of 1.4 ÷ 1.7 comparing to that of flat surface. The Tolman’s length is temperature dependent; in n-nonadecane it rises from about 0.06 nm at melting point to 0.08 nm at the temperature 100 K higher. Near the melting point the value of surface tension of Ps cavities is practically identical for all alkanes under study, i.e. from heptane C7H16 to pentacontane C50H102

  3. Terahertz-wave generation by surface-emitted four-wave mixing in optical fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Zhou; Dianyuan Fan

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel terahertz-wave source through the four-wave mixing effect in a conventional singlemode optical fiber pumped by a dual-wavelength laser whose difference frequency lies in the terahertz range.Surface-emitted geometry is employed to decrease absorption loss.A detailed derivation of the terahertz-wave power expression is presented using the coupled-wave theory.This is a promising way for realizing a reasonable narrow-band terahert-wave source.%@@ We propose a novel terahertz-wave source through the four-wave mixing effect in a conventional singlemode optical fiber pumped by a dual-wavelength laser whose difference frequency lies in the terahertz range.Surface-emitted geometry is employed to decrease absorption loss.A detailed derivation of the terahertz-wave power expression is presented using the coupled-wave theory.This is a promising way for realizing a reasonable narrow-band terahertz-wave source.

  4. Superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic properties of superconducting cavities for electron accelerators are discussed with special emphasis on the following topics: technical motivation for the use of superconducting cavities; surface impedance; the critical field of superconductors; anomalous losses; materials other than niobium; technological achievements for accelerating cavities. (author)

  5. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  6. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  7. Analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Chaoyue [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Posen, Sam; Hall, Daniel Leslie [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Groll, Nickolas; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: prolier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Cook, Russell [Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Schlepütz, Christian M. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Liepe, Matthias [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Pellin, Michael [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    We present an analysis of Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb{sub 3}Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (T{sub c}) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ∼2 μm thick Nb{sub 3}Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb{sub 3}Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low T{sub c} regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb{sub 3}Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators.

  8. Analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Chaoyue; Posen, Sam; Groll, Nickolas; Cook, Russell; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Hall, Daniel Leslie; Liepe, Matthias; Pellin, Michael; Zasadzinski, John; Proslier, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    We present an analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb3Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (Tc) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ˜2 μm thick Nb3Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb3Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low Tc regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb3Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators.

  9. Microleakage in conservative cavities varying the preparation method and surface treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Abdallah Atoui

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess microleakage in conservative class V cavities prepared with aluminum-oxide air abrasion or turbine and restored with self-etching or etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Forty premolars were randomly assigned to 4 groups (I and II: air abrasion; III and IV: turbine and class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces. Conditioning approaches were: groups I/III - 37% phosphoric acid; groups II/IV - self-priming etchant (Tyrian-SPE. Cavities were restored with One Step Plus/Filtek Z250. After finishing, specimens were thermocycled, immersed in 50% silver nitrate, and serially sectioned. Microleakage at the occlusal and cervical interfaces was measured in mm and calculated by a software. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05. RESULTS: Marginal seal provided by air abrasion was similar to high-speed handpiece, except for group I. There was SIGNIFICANT difference between enamel and dentin/cementum margins for to group I and II: air abrasion. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system promoted a better marginal seal. At enamel and dentin/cementum margins, the highest microleakage values were found in cavities treated with the self-etching adhesive system. At dentin/cementum margins, high-speed handpiece preparations associated with etch-and-rinse system provided the least dye penetration. CONCLUSION: Marginal seal of cavities prepared with aluminum-oxide air abrasion was different from that of conventionally prepared cavities, and the etch-and-rinse system promoted higher marginal seal at both enamel and dentin margins.

  10. Mass Spectrum Analysis of Gas Emitted during Organic Contaminant Removal from a Metal Surface with an Arc in Low Vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas emitted during organic contaminant removal from a metal surface with an arc in low vacuum is investigated using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The experimental results show that fragment molecules of the contaminant material, which are created by the decomposition of the contaminant material, exist in the emitted gas. The decomposition rate of the contaminant increased with the treatment current, which indicates that the decomposition occurs not in the cathode spot, but in the arc column

  11. Thermal simulation and analysis of flat surface flip-chip high power light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional GaN-based flip-chip light-emitting diodes (CFC-LEDs) use Au bumps to contact the LED chip and Si submount, however the contact area is constrained by the number of Au bumps, limiting the heat dissipation performance. This paper presents a flat surface high power GaN-based flip-chip light emitting diode (SFC-LED), which can greatly improve the heat dissipation performance of the device. In order to understand the thermal performance of the SFC-LED thoroughly, a 3-D finite element model (FEM) is developed, and ANSYS is used to simulate the thermal performance. The temperature distributions of the SFC-LED and the CFC-LED are shown in this article, and the junction temperature simulation values of the SFC-LED and the CFC-LED are 112.80 °C and 122.97 °C, respectively. Simulation results prove that the junction temperature of the new structure is 10.17 °C lower than that of the conventional structure. Even if the CFC-LED has 24 Au bumps, the thermal resistance of the new structure is still far less than that of the conventional structure. The SFC-LED has a better thermal property. (semiconductor devices)

  12. Surface-Emitting Distributed Feedback Terahertz Quantum-Cascade Lasers in Metal-Metal Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sushil; Williams, Benjamin S.; Qin, Qi; Lee, Alan W. M.; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2007-01-01

    Single-mode surface-emitting distributed feedback terahertz quantumcascade lasers operating around 2.9 THz are developed in metal-metal waveguides. A combination of techniques including precise control of phase of reflection at the facets, and u e of metal on the sidewalls to eliminate higher-order lateral modes allow robust single-mode operation over a range of approximately 0.35 THz. Single-lobed far-field radiation pattern is obtained using a pi phase-shift in center of the second-order Bragg grating. A grating device operating at 2.93 THz lased up to 149 K in pulsed mode and a temperature tuning of 19 .7 GHz was observed from 5 K to 147 K. The same device lased up to 78 K in continuous-wave (cw) mode emitting more than 6 m W of cw power at 5 K. ln general, maximum temperature of pulsed operation for grating devices was within a few Kelvin of that of multi-mode Fabry-Perot ridge lasers

  13. Interaction between natural convection and surface thermal radiation in tilted slender cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, R.; Xaman, J.; Alvarez, G. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, CENIDET-DGEST-SEP, Prol. Av. Palmira s/n, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos, C.P. 62490 (Mexico); Hinojosa, J. [Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales, Col. Centro, Hermosillo, Sonora, C.P. 83000 (Mexico)

    2008-04-15

    In this paper a numerical investigation of the interaction between two modes of heat transfer, natural convection and surface thermal radiation, in a tilted slender cavity is studied. The bottom and top surfaces of the cavity are heated and cooled at constant temperatures, while its sidewalls remain thermally insulated. The studied parameters are: the Rayleigh number (10{sup 4}{<=}Ra{<=}10{sup 6}), the aspect ratio (8{<=} A{<=}16) and the inclination angle (15 {<=}{lambda}{<=}35 ). The steady state 2-D governing equations have been solved by the finite volume method. All the inner surfaces are assumed to be gray diffuse emitters and reflectors of radiation. The numerical model was reduced and compared to cases reported in the literature finding a good agreement. Streamlines, isotherms and total Nusselt numbers as a function of Rayleigh number for different inclinations are presented. The interaction between the two modes of heat transfer reveals that the decoupling of two mechanisms of heat transfer is not possible; the performance of the flow patterns, the isotherms and the radiative behavior on the walls was different for the uncoupled and coupled modes of heat transfer in the tilted slender cavity. The steady state results indicated that the radiative surface radiation coupled with natural convection modifies appreciably the flow patterns and the average heat transfer in the slender cavity. The total heat transfer increases when the inclination angle increases, except when the flow structure changes from the multi-cell to the unit-cell pattern. However, the total heat transfer decreases when the aspect ratio increases. A comprehensive correlation for the total Nusselt number has been proposed. (author)

  14. Realization of a semiconductor-based cavity soliton laser

    OpenAIRE

    Tanguy, Y.; Ackemann, T.; Firth, W. J.; Jaeger, R.

    2007-01-01

    The realization of a cavity soliton laser using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor gain structure coupled to an external cavity with a frequency-selective element is reported. All-optical control of bistable solitonic emission states representing small microlasers is demonstrated by injection of an external beam. The control scheme is phase-insensitive and hence expected to be robust for all-optical processing applications. The motility of these structures is also demonstrated.

  15. Surface polishing of niobium for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Niobium cavities are important components in modern particle accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology. The interior of SRF cavities are cleaned and polished in order to produce high accelerating field and low power dissipation on the cavity wall. Current polishing methods, buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electro-polishing (EP), have their advantages and limitations. We seek to improve current methods and explore laser polishing (LP) as a greener alternative of chemical methods. The topography and removal rate of BCP at different conditions (duration, temperature, sample orientation, flow rate) was studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Differential etching on different crystal orientations is the main contributor to fine grain niobium BCP topography, with gas evolution playing a secondary role. The surface of single crystal and bi-crystal niobium is smooth even after heavy BCP. The topography of fine grain niobium depends on total removal. The removal rate increases with temperature and surface acid flow rate within the rage of 0~20 °C, with chemical reaction being the possible dominate rate control mechanism. Surface flow helps to regulate temperature and avoid gas accumulation on the surface. The effect of surface flow rate on niobium EP was studied with optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and power spectral density (PSD) analysis. Within the range of 0~3.7 cm/s, no significant difference was found on the removal rate and the macro roughness. Possible improvement on the micro roughness with increased surface flow rate was observed. The effect of fluence and pulse accumulation on niobium topography during LP was studied with optical microscopy, SEM, AFM, and PSD analysis. Polishing on micro scale was achieved within fluence range of 0.57~0.90 J/cm2, with pulse accumulation adjusted accordingly. Larger area treatment was proved possible by

  16. Automated 3D Damaged Cavity Model Builder for Lower Surface Acreage Tile on Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, Shannon; Zhang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The 3D Automated Thermal Tool for Damaged Acreage Tile Math Model builder was developed to perform quickly and accurately 3D thermal analyses on damaged lower surface acreage tiles and structures beneath the damaged locations on a Space Shuttle Orbiter. The 3D model builder created both TRASYS geometric math models (GMMs) and SINDA thermal math models (TMMs) to simulate an idealized damaged cavity in the damaged tile(s). The GMMs are processed in TRASYS to generate radiation conductors between the surfaces in the cavity. The radiation conductors are inserted into the TMMs, which are processed in SINDA to generate temperature histories for all of the nodes on each layer of the TMM. The invention allows a thermal analyst to create quickly and accurately a 3D model of a damaged lower surface tile on the orbiter. The 3D model builder can generate a GMM and the correspond ing TMM in one or two minutes, with the damaged cavity included in the tile material. A separate program creates a configuration file, which would take a couple of minutes to edit. This configuration file is read by the model builder program to determine the location of the damage, the correct tile type, tile thickness, structure thickness, and SIP thickness of the damage, so that the model builder program can build an accurate model at the specified location. Once the models are built, they are processed by the TRASYS and SINDA.

  17. Effect of the surface thermal radiation on turbulent natural convection in tall cavities of facade elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xaman, J.P.; Flores, J.J. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, CENIDET-DGEST-SEP, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica-Termica, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Hinojosa, J.F.; Cabanillas, R.E. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Metalurgia, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2008-12-15

    The effect of the surface thermal radiation in tall cavities with turbulent natural convection regime was analyzed and quantified numerically. The parameters considered were: the Rayleigh number 10{sup 9}-10{sup 12}, the aspect ratio 20, 40 and 80 and the emmisivity 0.0-1.0. The percentage contribution of the radiative surface to the total heat transfer has a maximum value of 15.19% (Ra=10{sup 9}, A=20) with emissivity equal to 1.0 and a minimum of 0.5% (Ra=10{sup 12}, A=80) with {epsilon}*=0.2. The average radiative Nusselt number for a fixed emissivity is independent of the Rayleigh number, but for a fixed Rayleigh number diminishes with the increase of the aspect ratio. The results indicate that the surface thermal radiation does not modify significantly the flow pattern in the cavity, just negligible effects in the bottom and top of the cavity were observed. Two different temperature patterns were observed a conductive regime Ra=10{sup 9} and a boundary layer regime Ra=10{sup 12}. (orig.)

  18. Surface Properties of Particles Emitted from Selected Coal-Fired Heating Plants and Electric Power Stations in Poland: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastuszka Józef S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The surface properties of particles emitted from six selected coal-fired power and heating plants in Poland have been studied in this work for the first time. Samples were collected beyond the control systems. Surface composition of the size-distributed particles was obtained by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS.

  19. Enhancing the brightness of Si nanocrystal light-emitting devices with electro-excited surface plasmons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of electro-excited surface plasmons (SPs) in Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) is shown to enhance the brightness of Si nanocrystal light-emitting devices (Si-NC LEDs). The Ag-NPs are prepared on the Si-NC thin film by ultrasonic irradiation and postannealing treatments. Electro-excited SPs on Ag-NPs are found, which are induced by electron impact on Ag-NPs and the front electrode Al layer during the charge injection process of LED. The electro-excited SPs enhance the electroluminescence of Si-NC, or LED brightness, via the SP field coupling to the exciton dipole moment of Si-NC. A maximal 5.2-fold brightness enhancement of Si-NC LED is achieved at the postannealing temperature of 200 °C. Remnant far-field radiations arising from electro-excited SPs are detected, which further supports the existence of such SPs. (paper)

  20. Localized surface plasmon resonance effect in organic light-emitting devices with Ag islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Noritaka; Naka, Shigeki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2014-04-01

    We report on luminescence enhancement of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) with silver islands (i-Ag) by a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect. The devices were fabricated using tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) as the red emission material, bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenyl] benzidine (α-NPD) as the blue emission and hole transport material, and 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) as the electron transport material. To clarify the position of emission enhancement by energy transfer from i-Ag, an ultrathin TPP layer located within the α-NPD layer. In the device with i-Ag and the TPP layer located over 10 nm from i-Ag, TPP emission was enhanced in comparison with the device without i-Ag. The enhancement of TPP emission was suggested to be the effect of the enhanced electric field resulting from LSPR excited by α-NPD emission.

  1. Enhancing the brightness of Si nanocrystal light-emitting devices with electro-excited surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhou, Zhi-Quan; Hao, Hong-Chen; Lu, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The use of electro-excited surface plasmons (SPs) in Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) is shown to enhance the brightness of Si nanocrystal light-emitting devices (Si-NC LEDs). The Ag-NPs are prepared on the Si-NC thin film by ultrasonic irradiation and postannealing treatments. Electro-excited SPs on Ag-NPs are found, which are induced by electron impact on Ag-NPs and the front electrode Al layer during the charge injection process of LED. The electro-excited SPs enhance the electroluminescence of Si-NC, or LED brightness, via the SP field coupling to the exciton dipole moment of Si-NC. A maximal 5.2-fold brightness enhancement of Si-NC LED is achieved at the postannealing temperature of 200 °C. Remnant far-field radiations arising from electro-excited SPs are detected, which further supports the existence of such SPs.

  2. Band structure and waveguide modelling of epitaxially regrown photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe elements of photonic crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) design and operation, highlighting that epitaxial regrowth may provide advantages over current designs incorporating voids. High coupling coefficients are shown to be possible for all-semiconductor structures. We introduce type I and type II photonic crystals (PCs), and discuss the possible advantages of using each. We discussed band structure and coupling coefficients as a function of atom volume for a circular atom on a square lattice. Additionally we explore the effect PC atom size has on in-plane and out-of-plane coupling. We conclude by discussing designs for a PCSEL combined with a distributed Bragg reflector to maximize external efficiency. (paper)

  3. Detection of near-surface cavities by generalized S-transform of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guang-zhou; Tsoflias, George P.; Li, Chang-jiang

    2016-06-01

    The near-surface cavities can cause a huge hidden trouble for urban infrastructure construction, such as, foundation settlement and roadbed subsidence, and so on. So, it is an important task to detect the underground cavities effectively for many engineering projects. At the same time, because of the complexity of near-surface materials and the limited resolution of geophysical methods, detecting the location of the hidden cavities quantitatively is still a technical challenge which needs to be studied further. Base on the study of Xia et al. (Xia et al., 2007), we performed a little modification to the travel time equation for the Rayleigh-wave diffraction. We put forward another way to detect the shallow subsurface voids. The generalized S-transform was adopted to extract the arrival times of the diffracted Rayleigh waves from the near and far-offset boundaries of the void at a certain receiver. Then the arrival times were used to calculate the boundary locations of the void. Three half-space void models and a two-layered void model were used to demonstrate the feasibility and effect of detecting a void with the generalized S-transform. A rotated staggered-grid finite-difference method was adopted in wave field modeling to obtain the synthetic seismic record. Finally, a real world field data was used to verify the detecting effect. The theoretical models and the real world example showed that it is feasible and effective to use the generalized S-transform to detect the near-surface cavities.

  4. Increased light extraction efficiency from top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes employing a mask-free plasma-etched stochastic polymer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo-Young; Kwon, Yongwon; Cheong, Hee-Woon; Lee, Changhee; Whang, Ki-Woong

    2016-03-01

    Top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TEOLEDs) are drawing interest as future devices for both high-quality display and lighting. However, the current TEOLEDs have external quantum efficiencies of approximately 20%, which still need improvement. To attain high device efficiencies in TEOLEDs, waveguide and surface plasmon polariton modes should be minimised. Many efforts have been made using nano- or micrometre-scale periodic gratings to extract the confined photons. However, significant angular distortion or colour shifts occur as the Bragg condition calls for. Here, an effective method is demonstrated for enhancing the light extraction efficiency from TEOLEDs employing a mask-free plasma-etched polymer surface with stochastically distributed nano-hemispheres. TEOLEDs with the stochastic polymer surface allowed us to achieve a device efficiency enhancement up to 1.55-fold relative to conventional devices without introducing spectral changes and angular emission distortion, unlike periodic grating-embedded devices. Because of the independence of the improvement from the particular emission wavelengths, the proposed TEOLEDs are attractive and practical for use in full colour and white lighting as well as display applications.

  5. Analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers for superconducting RF cavity applications

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Chaoyue; Posen, Samuel; Groll, Nickolas; Cook, Russell; Schlepuetz, Christian M.; Hall, Daniel Leslie; Liepe, Matthias; Pellin, Michael; Zasadzsinski, John; Proslier, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Nb3Sn surface layers grown on a bulk niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb3Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 meV and superconducting critical temperature (Tc) up to 16.3 K. Scanning Electron microscopy (STEM) performed on cross section of the s...

  6. Plasma Processing of Large Surfaces with Application to SRF Cavity Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Leposova; Im, Do; Valente, Anne-Marie; Phillips, H

    2013-09-01

    Plasma based surface modifications of SRF cavities present promising alternatives to the wet etching technology currently applied. To understand and characterize the plasma properties and chemical kinetics of plasma etching processes inside a single cell cavity, we have built a specially-designed cylindrical cavity with 8 observation ports. These ports can be used for holding niobium samples and diagnostic purposes simultaneously. Two frequencies (13.56 MHz and 2.45 GHz) of power source are used for different pressure, power and gas compositions. The plasma parameters were evaluated by a Langmuir probe and by an optical emission spectroscopy technique based on the relative intensity of two Ar 5p-4s lines at 419.8 and 420.07 nm. Argon 5p-4s transition is chosen to determine electron temperature in order to optimize parameters for plasma processing. Chemical kinetics of the process was observed using real-time mass spectroscopy. The effect of these parameters on niobium surface would be measured, presented at this conference, and used as guidelines for optimal design of SRF etching process.

  7. Couple molecular excitons to surface plasmon polaritons in an organic-dye-doped nanostructured cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Shi, Wen-Bo; Wang, Di; Xu, Yue; Peng, Ru-Wen; Fan, Ren-Hao; Wang, Qian-Jin; Wang, Mu

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate experimentally the hybrid coupling among molecular excitons, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and Fabry-Perot (FP) mode in a nanostructured cavity, where a J-aggregates doped PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) layer is inserted between a silver grating and a thick silver film. By tuning the thickness of the doped PVA layer, the FP cavity mode efficiently couples with the molecular excitons, forming two nearly dispersion-free modes. The dispersive SPPs interact with these two modes while increasing the incident angle, leading to the formation of three hybrid polariton bands. By retrieving the mixing fractions of the polariton band components from the measured angular reflection spectra, we find all these three bands result from the strong coupling among SPPs, FP mode, and excitons. This work may inspire related studies on hybrid light-matter interactions, and achieve potential applications on multimode polariton lasers and optical spectroscopy.

  8. Does UHV annealing above 1100C as a final surface treatment reduce field emission loading in superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on advancing high field capability of Nb microwave cavities for application to future e+e- colliders is being conducted with 1-cell 1500 MHz elliptical cavities, equipped with a high speed temperature mapping diagnostic system. Above 10 MeV/m accelerating field, field emission severely loads cavity Q. One of the most interesting questions addressed regarding field emission (FE) in superconducting cavities is whether heat treatment (HT) reduces emission and permits higher fields, as suggested by dc FE experiments on Nb surfaces, conducted at the U. of Geneva. Comparison between heat treated and chemically treated cavities gives an encouraging picture for the benefits of HT. On the average, 75% higher fields are possible, and the best surface electric and magnetic fields reached were 1260 Oe and 50 MV/m. 8 refs., 5 figs

  9. Thoracic cavity segmentation algorithm using multiorgan extraction and surface fitting in volumetric CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop and validate a semiautomatic segmentation method for thoracic cavity volumetry and mediastinum fat quantification of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: The thoracic cavity region was separated by segmenting multiorgans, namely, the rib, lung, heart, and diaphragm. To encompass various lung disease-induced variations, the inner thoracic wall and diaphragm were modeled by using a three-dimensional surface-fitting method. To improve the accuracy of the diaphragm surface model, the heart and its surrounding tissue were segmented by a two-stage level set method using a shape prior. To assess the accuracy of the proposed algorithm, the algorithm results of 50 patients were compared to the manual segmentation results of two experts with more than 5 years of experience (these manual results were confirmed by an expert thoracic radiologist). The proposed method was also compared to three state-of-the-art segmentation methods. The metrics used to evaluate segmentation accuracy were volumetric overlap ratio (VOR), false positive ratio on VOR (FPRV), false negative ratio on VOR (FNRV), average symmetric absolute surface distance (ASASD), average symmetric squared surface distance (ASSSD), and maximum symmetric surface distance (MSSD). Results: In terms of thoracic cavity volumetry, the mean ± SD VOR, FPRV, and FNRV of the proposed method were (98.17 ± 0.84)%, (0.49 ± 0.23)%, and (1.34 ± 0.83)%, respectively. The ASASD, ASSSD, and MSSD for the thoracic wall were 0.28 ± 0.12, 1.28 ± 0.53, and 23.91 ± 7.64 mm, respectively. The ASASD, ASSSD, and MSSD for the diaphragm surface were 1.73 ± 0.91, 3.92 ± 1.68, and 27.80 ± 10.63 mm, respectively. The proposed method performed significantly better than the other three methods in terms of VOR, ASASD, and ASSSD. Conclusions: The proposed semiautomatic thoracic cavity segmentation method, which extracts multiple organs (namely, the rib, thoracic wall, diaphragm, and heart

  10. Fundamental Restructuring of the Collisional Presheath Near Electron-Emitting Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanell, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Recent work showed that intense electron emission can make the sheath potential become positive. This ``inverse sheath'' differs strongly from the ``space-charge limited sheath'' predicted in conventional models. Here we show that intense emission also makes the plasma interior restructure. The collisional presheath structure is dominated not by ion acceleration but by emission thermalization. Since the sheath potential is positive, emitted electrons are not accelerated away from the surface. They enter the presheath with low velocities and actually have a higher spatial density than the hotter plasma electrons by a ratio √{ Tep / Temit } . This leads to a surprising result that the quasineutral plasma density must increase from the bulk towards the presheath edge, opposite from the case of Bohm presheaths. The force balance throughout the plasma interior is altered by the electrons originating from the surface. Simulation and experimental evidence of ``inverted presheaths'' will be shown. The results could be pertinent to various plasma systems with intense emission. *M.D. Campanell, POP 22, 040702 (2015). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-674970.

  11. Simultaneous 60-GHz RoF Transmission of Lightwaves Emitted by ECL, DFB, and VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedev, Alexander; Pang, Xiaodan; Vegas Olmos, Juan José;

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous 60-GHz radio over fiber upconversion and fiber transmission of lightwaves produced by an external cavity laser, a distributed feedback laser, and a $C$ -band vertical cavity surface emitting laser are demonstrated. The 1.25-Gb/s data are transmitted concurrently on each of the...

  12. Sealing of poly-SiGe surface micromachined cavities for MEMS-above-CMOS applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents for the first time a study of different methods to seal SiGe surface micromachined cavities for above-CMOS MEMS applications. Four different sealing layers are proposed: sputter-deposited AlCu, sub-atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposited Si-oxide and a porous microcrystalline-SiGe cover in combination with either high-density plasma chemical vapour deposited Si-oxide or AlCu. The maximum processing temperature is kept below 460 °C to allow for the post-processing on top of standard CMOS. To verify the sealing process, optical measurements of membrane deflection were carried out both in air and in vacuum. Analytical modelling and finite element analysis were used to study the load-deflection behaviour of the (poly-SiGe/sealing layer) composite membranes and derive the pressure inside the cavities. In order to study the behaviour of the diaphragms under 0-pressure difference, micro-venting holes were drilled, using focused ion beam, in some of the sealed membranes. The results indicate that both oxide and AlCu layers provide air-tight sealing and that, for AlCu direct sealing, a near-vacuum cavity pressure is obtained.

  13. Self-assembled large-area annular cavity arrays with tunable cylindrical surface plasmons for sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming; Shen, Tianyi; Zhou, Jing

    2015-02-24

    Surface plasmons that propagate along cylindrical metal/dielectric interfaces in annular apertures in metal films, called cylindrical surface plasmons (CSPs), exhibit attractive optical characteristics. However, it is challenging to fabricate these nanocoaxial structures. Here, we demonstrate a practical low-cost route to manufacture highly ordered, large-area annular cavity arrays (ACAs) that can support CSPs with great tunability. By employing a sol-gel coassembly method, reactive ion etching and metal sputtering techniques, regular, highly ordered ACAs in square-centimeter-scale with a gap width tunable in the range of several to hundreds of nanometers have been produced with good reproducibility. Ag ACAs with a gap width of 12 nm and a gap height of 635 nm are demonstrated. By finite-difference time-domain simulation, we confirm that the pronounced dips in the reflectance spectra of ACAs are attributable to CSP resonances excited in the annular gaps. By adjusting etching time and Ag film thickness, the CSP dips can be tuned to sweep the entire optical range of 360 to 1800 nm without changing sphere size, which makes them a promising candidate for forming integrated plasmonic sensing arrays. The high tunability of the CSP resonant frequencies together with strong electric field enhancement in the cavities make the ACAs promising candidates for surface plasmon sensors and SERS substrates, as, for example, they have been used in liquid refractive index (RI) sensing, demonstrating a sensitivity of 1505 nm/RIU and a figure of merit of 9. One of the CSP dips of ACAs with a certain geometry size is angle- (0-70 degrees) and polarization-independent and can be used as a narrow-band absorber. Furthermore, the nano annular cavity arrays can be used to construct solar cells, nanolasers and nanoparticle plasmonic tweezers. PMID:25639937

  14. Niobium thin film deposition studies on copper surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin film coatings have the potential to increase both the thermal efficiency and accelerating gradient in superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. However, before this potential can be realized, systematic studies on structure-property correlations in these thin films need to be carried out since the reduced geometry, combined with specific growth parameters, can modify the physical properties of the materials when compared to their bulk form. Here, we present our systematic studies of Nb thin films deposited onto Cu surfaces to clarify possible reasons for the limited success that this process exhibited in previous attempts. We compare these films with Nb grown on other surfaces. In particular, we study the crystal structure and surface morphology and their effect on superconducting properties, such as critical temperature and lower critical field. We found that higher deposition temperature leads to a sharper critical temperature transition, but also to increased roughness indicating that there are competing mechanisms that must be considered for further optimization.

  15. Temperature variation on root surface with three root-end cavity preparation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodrumlu Emre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thermal changes can occur on the external root surface when root-end cavity preparation is performed, which may damage periodontal ligament cells and alveolar bone. Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temperature changes during preparation of the root-end cavities at 1 and 3 mm to the sectioned apical root surfaces when either tungsten carbide round bur, diamond round bur or ultrasonic diamond tip was used. Methods. Root-end resection was performed at 90° to the long axis of the root, 3 mm from the apex. Specimens were randomly divided into three groups of 12 teeth each for three different root-end cavity preparation techniques to be used, i.e. tungsten carbide bur, diamond bur and ultrasonic diamond retro tip. Thermocouples were used to measure temperature changes at 1 mm (T1 and 3 mm (T2 to the cutting plane during the preparations. Results. For T1, the lowest and the highest mean temperature increases of 3.53°C and 4.34°C were recorded for the carbide and diamond burs, respectively. For T2, the lowest and the highest mean temperature increases of 2.62°C and 4.39°C where recorded for the carbide and diamond burs, respectively. The mean temperatures with the ultrasonic tip were 3.68 and 3.04 ºC at T1 and T2 region, respectively. For root-end preparation, the ultrasonic preparation technique took the shortest preparation time (10.25 sec and the diamond bur took the longest time (28.17 sec. Conclusion. Ultrasonic retro tips and burs caused temperature to rise from 2.62° to 4.39°C, and these rises were within safety levels.

  16. Nonlinear Surface-Plasmon Whispering-Gallery Modes in Metallic Nanowire Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Biris, Claudiu G

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that the surface second-harmonic generation can lead to the formation of nonlinear plasmonic whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) in microcavities made of metallic nanowires. Since these WGMs are excited by induced surface nonlinear dipoles, they can be generated even when they are not coupled to the radiation continuum. Consequently, the quality factor of these nonlinear modes can be as large as the theoretical limit imposed by the optical losses in the metal. Remarkably, our theoretical analysis shows that nonlinear plasmonic WGMs are characterized by fractional azimuthal modal numbers. This suggests that the plasmonic cavities investigated here can be used to generate multi-color optical fields with fractional angular momentum. Applications to plasmonic sensors are also discussed.

  17. Study on hydrogen sulfide plasma passivation of 790-nm laser diode cavity surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Liu; Yanping Yao; Chunwu Wang; Xin Gao; Zhongliang Qiao; Mei Li; Yuxia Wang; Baoxue Bo

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve the optical properties of the Ⅲ-Ⅴ laser diodes(LDs) by means of H2S plasma passivation technology,H2S plasma passivation treatment is performed on the GaAs(110) surface.The optimum passivation conditions obtained are 60-W radio frequency(RF)power and 20-min duration.So the laser cavity surfaces axe treated under the optimum passivation conditions.Consequently,compared with unpassivated lasers with only AR/HR-coatings,the catastrophic optical damage (COD) threshold value of the passivated lasers by H2S plasma treatment is increased by 33%,which is almost the same as that of (NH4)2Sx treatment.And the life-test experiment has demonstrated that this passivation method is more stable than(NH4)2Sx solution wet-passivated treatment.

  18. Study of the surface resistance of niobium sputter-coated copper cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Campisi, I E; Darriulat, Pierre; Peck, M A; Russo, R; Valente, A M

    1999-01-01

    A systematic study of the superconducting properties of niobium films deposited on the inner wall of copper radiofrequency cavities is presented. Films are grown by sputtering with different discharge gases (Xe, Kr, Ar and Ar/Ne mixtures) on substrates prepared under different conditions. The measured quantities include the surface resistance at 1.5 GHz, the critical temperature and the penetration depth. The surface resistance is analyzed in terms of its dependence on temperature, RF field and the density of trapped fluxons. Once allowance for electron scattering is made by means of a single mean free path parameter, good agreement with BCS theory is observed. The residual resistance is observed to be essentially noncorrelated with the superconducting properties, although influenced by specific coating conditions. On occasions, very low residual resistances, in the nano-ohm range, have been maintained over a broad range of RF field, indicating the absence of fundamental limitations specific to the film techn...

  19. Radioactivity Determination of Sealed Beta-Emitting Sources by Surface Dose Measurements and Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four primary radiation measurement systems considered to be necessary for the modern radionuclide measurement laboratory are gas-flow proportional counters, liquid scintillation counters, Si spectrometer systems, and Ge spectrometer systems. A national institute of standards recognized by BIPM (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures) use these measurement systems have some limitation. For a gas-filled detector, the source size should not be larger than that determined by the counter geometry and the measurements are limited to sources with the activities of less than 20,000 Bq. A liquid scintillation detector can only be used to measure an activity of liquid mixture isotope. Therefore it can't be used to measure activities of sealed sources. Further it is quite difficult to measure a radioactivity of beta-isotope accurately due to self-absorption and scattering. In particular an radioactivity generated by a nuclear reactor is approximately calculated by using target material compositions, cross-sections, and neutron flux, which the nuclear reactor. However, the results from this approach involve a high uncertainty. We develop a Monte Carlo applied radioactivity determination for beta sources. The extrapolation ion-chamber was used to measure the surface dose rate for a standard source. The Sr/Y-90 standard source is calibrated by NIST used for this study. There was about 1.7% difference in the reference dose rates measured by the two techniques. These difference and relative errors were comparable to those of other studies. It should be noticed that the area of collecting electrode was nine times larger than that of radiation field. It the diameter of the source is smaller than the area of collecting electrode, the source should be located at a sufficiently large distance from the detector surface so that the radiation field at the detector surface was larger than the area of collecting electrode. In addition, beta particles from the applicator interact

  20. Theoretical and experimental study of natural convection with surface thermal radiation in a side open cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a theoretical and experimental study of heat transfer by natural convection and thermal radiation on a solar open cubic cavity-type receiver is presented. The theoretical study consists on solving the laminar natural convection and the surface thermal radiation on a square open cavity at one end. The overall continuity, momentum, and energy equations in primitive variables are solved numerically by using the finite-volume method and the SIMPLEC algorithm. The thermophysical properties of the fluid are considered, for the first case, as temperature dependent in all the governing equations, and for the second case, constant, except for the density at the buoyancy term (Boussinesq approximation), with the purpose of comparing the results of both theoretical models with experimentally obtained results. Numerical calculations are conducted for Rayleigh number (Ra) values in the range of 104–106. The temperature difference between the hot wall and the bulk fluid (ΔT) is varied between 10 and 400 K, and is represented as a dimensionless temperature difference (φ) for the purpose of generalization of the trends observed. Experimental results include air temperature measurements inside the receiver. These results are compared with theoretically obtained air temperatures, and the average deviation between both results is around 3.0%, when using the model with variable thermophysical properties, and is around 5.4% when using the Boussinesq approximation

  1. High-Q operation of SRF cavities: The potential impact of thermocurrents on the RF surface resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, J -M; Knobloch, J

    2015-01-01

    For many new accelerator applications, superconducting radio frequency (SRF) systems are the enabling technology. In particular for CW applications, much effort is being expended to minimize the power dissipation (surface resistance) of niobium cavities. Starting in 2009, we suggested a means of reducing the residual resistance by performing a thermal cycle [1], a procedure of warming up a cavity after initial cooldown to about 20K and cooling it down again. In subsequent studies [2], this technique was used to manipulate the residual resistance by more than a factor of 2. It was postulated that thermocurrents during cooldown generate additional trapped magnetic flux that impacts the cavity quality factor. Here, we present a more extensive study that includes measurements of two additional passband modes and that confirms the effect. In this paper, we also discuss simulations that support the claim. While the layout of the cavity LHe tank system is cylindrically symmetric, we show that the temperature depende...

  2. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Peter Gwin [IIT, Chicago

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  3. Efficiency enhancement of organic light emitting diodes by NaOH surface treatment of the ITO anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, P.

    2009-09-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on tris-(8-idroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq 3) with enhanced efficiency are reported here. This is obtained by improving the charge carrier balance, through a preliminary NaOH surface treatment of the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode, in order to decrease its work function and, consequently, reduce the hole injection. The obtained devices exhibit a 1.36% external quantum efficiency and a 1.2 lm/W power efficiency at a current density of 60 mA/cm 2. These values are more than double as compared with those of identical reference devices fabricated without the preliminary NaOH surface treatment.

  4. Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

  5. Impact of nitrogen doping of niobium superconducting cavities on the sensitivity of surface resistance to trapped magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, Dan; Kaufman, John; Liepe, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac require hundreds of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium cavities operating in continuous wave mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0) to keep cryogenic losses within feasible limits. To reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping of niobium cavities has been selected as the cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1 × 1010, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here, we show that the sensitivity to RF losses from trapped magnetic field in a cavity's walls is strongly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120 °C baked cavities show a sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜0.6 and ˜0.8 nΩ/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a higher sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜1 to 5 nΩ/mG trapped. We show that this difference in sensitivities is directly related to the mean free path of the RF surface layer of the niobium: shorter mean free paths lead to less sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the dirty limit (ℓ ≪ ξ0), while longer mean free paths lead to lower sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the clean limit (ℓ ≫ ξ0). These experimental results are also shown to have good agreement with recent theoretical predictions for pinned vortex lines oscillating in RF fields.

  6. Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb) presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7 (micro)m/min using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

  7. Surface Emitting, High Efficiency Near-Vacuum Ultraviolet Light Source with Aluminum Nitride Nanowires Monolithically Grown on Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S; Djavid, M; Mi, Z

    2015-10-14

    To date, it has remained challenging to realize electrically injected light sources in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength range (∼200 nm or shorter), which are important for a broad range of applications, including sensing, surface treatment, and photochemical analysis. In this Letter, we have demonstrated such a light source with molecular beam epitaxially grown aluminum nitride (AlN) nanowires on low cost, large area Si substrate. Detailed angle dependent electroluminescence studies suggest that, albeit the light is TM polarized, the dominant light emission direction is from the nanowire top surface, that is, along the c axis, due to the strong light scattering effect. Such an efficient surface emitting device was not previously possible using conventional c-plane AlN planar structures. The AlN nanowire LEDs exhibit an extremely large electrical efficiency (>85%), which is nearly ten times higher than the previously reported AlN planar devices. Our detailed studies further suggest that the performance of AlN nanowire LEDs is predominantly limited by electron overflow. This study provides important insight on the fundamental emission characteristics of AlN nanowire LEDs and also offers a viable path to realize an efficient surface emitting near-vacuum ultraviolet light source through direct electrical injection. PMID:26375576

  8. R&D Status for In-Situ Plasma Surface Cleaning of SRF Cavities at Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.-H. Kim, M.T. Crofford, M. Doleans, J.D. Mammosser, J. Saunders

    2011-03-01

    The SNS SCL is reliably operating at 0.93 GeV output energy with an energy reserve of 10MeV with high availability. Most of the cavities exhibit field emission, which directly or indirectly (through heating of end groups) limits the gradients achievable in the high beta cavities in normal operation with the beam. One of the field emission sources would be surface contaminations during surface processing for which mild surface cleaning, if any, will help in reducing field emission. An R&D effort is in progress to develop in-situ surface processing for the cryomodules in the tunnel without disassembly. As the first attempt, in-situ plasma processing has been applied to the CM12 in the SNS SRF facility after the repair work with a promising result. This paper will report the R&D status of plasma processing in the SNS.

  9. Dependence of the residual surface resistance of SRF cavities on the cooling rate through $T_\\mathrm{c}$

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, A; Melnychuk, O; Sergatskov, D A

    2014-01-01

    We report a strong effect of the cooling rate through $T_\\mathrm{c}$ on the amount of trapped external magnetic flux in superconducting niobium cavities. The effect is similar for all surface treatments including electropolishing with and without 120$^\\circ$C baking, and nitrogen doping. Direct magnetic field measurements on the cavity walls show that the effect stems from changes in the flux trapping efficiency at different cooling rates. Slow cooling leads to almost complete flux trapping and higher residual resistance while fast cooling leads to the much more efficient flux expulsion and lower residual resistance.

  10. The use of Erbium: Yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser in cavity preparation and surface treatment: 3-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukhatipoglu, Isil; Secilmis, Asli

    2015-01-01

    From the currently available choices, esthetic restorative materials for posterior teeth are limited to composite and ceramic restoration. Ceramic inlays/onlays are reliable solutions for both of these treatments. For successful treatment planning, usable ceramic and adhesive systems should be chosen by the dentist. Since the Federal Drug Administration approval of the erbium: Yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser-for caries removal, cavity preparation and the conditioning of tooth substance-in 1997, there have been many reports on the use of this technique in combination with composite resins. In addition, cavity pretreatment with the Er:YAG laser (laser etching) has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching of enamel and dentin. This case report presents the use of the Er:YAG in cavity preparation for composite resin restoration and surface treatment for ceramic onlay restoration of adjacent permanent molars. PMID:26038665

  11. Electronic control of coherence in a two-dimensional array of photonic crystal surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. J. E.; Childs, D. T. D.; Ivanov, P.; Stevens, B. J.; Babazadeh, N.; Crombie, A. J.; Ternent, G.; Thoms, S.; Zhou, H.; Hogg, R. A.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a semiconductor PCSEL array that uniquely combines an in-plane waveguide structure with nano-scale patterned PCSEL elements. This novel geometry allows two-dimensional electronically controllable coherent coupling of remote vertically emitting lasers. Mutual coherence of the PCSEL elements is verified through the demonstration of a two-dimensional Young’s Slits experiment. In addition to allowing the all-electronic control of the interference pattern, this type of device offers new routes to power and brightness scaling in semiconductor lasers, and opportunities for all-electronic beam steering.

  12. Improved performance of organic light-emitting devices with plasma treated ITO surface and plasma polymerized methyl methacrylate buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae-Sung; Shin, Paik-Kyun

    2007-02-01

    Transparent indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode surface was modified using O 3 plasma and organic ultra-thin buffer layers were deposited on the ITO surface using 13.56 MHz rf plasma polymerization technique. A plasma polymerized methyl methacrylate (ppMMA) ultra-thin buffer layer was deposited between the ITO anode and hole transporting layer (HTL). The plasma polymerization of the buffer layer was carried out at a homemade capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) equipment. N, N'-Diphenyl- N, N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine (TPD) as HTL, Tris(8-hydroxy-quinolinato)aluminum (Alq 3) as both emitting layer (EML)/electron transporting layer (ETL), and aluminum layer as cathode were deposited using thermal evaporation technique. Electroluminescence (EL) efficiency, operating voltage and stability of the organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) were investigated in order to study the effect of the plasma surface treatment of the ITO anode and role of plasma polymerized methyl methacrylate as an organic ultra-thin buffer layer.

  13. Photoelectron Emission from Metal Surfaces Induced by Radiation Emitted by a 14 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    CERN Document Server

    Laulainen, Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Tarvainen, Olli

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a room-temperature 14 GHz ECR ion source. It is shown that the photoelectron emission from Al, Cu, and stainless steel (SAE 304) surfaces, which are common plasma chamber materials, is predominantly caused by radiation emitted from plasma with energies between 8 eV and 1 keV. Characteristic X-ray emission and bremsstrahlung from plasma have a negligible contribution to the photoelectron emission. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum conceivable photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 10 % of the estimated total electron losses from the plasma.

  14. Larger-area single-mode photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers enabled by an accidental Dirac point

    CERN Document Server

    Chua, Song-Liang; Bravo-Abad, Jorge; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2013-01-01

    By altering the lattice geometry of the photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers (PCSELs), we tune the regular lasing band edges of quadratic dispersions to form a single accidental Dirac point of linear dispersion at the Brillouin zone center. This not only increases the mode spacing by orders of magnitude, but also eliminates the distributed in-plane feedback to enable single-mode PCSELs of substantially larger area thus substantially higher output power. The advantages of using accidental Dirac cones are systematically evaluated through two-dimensional in-plane calculations and confirmed by three-dimensional simulations of photonic crystal slab devices.

  15. Self-assembly surface modified indium-tin oxide anodes for single-layer light-emitting diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Morgado, J; Charas, A; Matos, M; Alcacer, L; Cacialli, F

    2003-01-01

    We study the effect of indium-tin oxide surface modification by self assembling of highly polar molecules on the performance of single-layer light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated with polyfluorene blends and aluminium cathodes. We find that the efficiency and light-output of such LEDs is comparable to, and sometimes better than, the values obtained for LEDs incorporating a hole injection layer of poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulphonic acid. This effect is attributed to the dipole-induced work function modification of indium-tin oxide.

  16. Materials and surface aspects in the development of SRF Niobium cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, C

    2012-01-01

    Foreword from author; When I joined the CEA Saclay SRF group in 1989, my initial background was physical chemistry and surface science, which I completed later on with solid state physics and metallurgy. Most accelerator physicists at that time had training in RF, plasma physics, nuclear or particle physics. We were very few with a background in material science. Working with people with a different background than yours reveals to be both challenging and funny: you can impress them with things you consider basic while they simply do not believe you for other things you consider so well admitted that you do not even remember where it comes from. At the end it obliges you to reconsider your basics and re-question many results, which opens many new and sometimes unexpected paths. Like usual in science, answering one question rises many new ones, and trying to improve cavities performance led to fascinating physics problems. Exploring some of these problems often requires techniques and expertise that are far be...

  17. Selection of Optical Cavity Surface Coatings for 1micron Laser Based Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgeland, Randy J.; Straka, Sharon; Matsumura, Mark; Hammerbacher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    The particulate surface cleanliness level on several coatings for aluminum and beryllium substrates were examined for use in the optical cavities of high pulse energy Nd:YAG Q-switched, diode-pumped lasers for space flight applications. Because of the high intensity of the lasers, any contaminants in the laser beam path could damage optical coatings and limit the instrument mission objectives at the operating wavelength of 1 micron (micrometer). Our goal was to achieve an EST-STD-CC1246D Level 100 particulate distribution or better to ensure particulate redistribution during launch would not adversely affect the performance objectives. Tapelifts were performed to quantify the amount of particles using in-house developed procedures. The primary candidate coatings included chromate conversion coating aluminum (Al), uncoated Al electroless Nickel (Ni) on Al, Ni-gold (Au) on Al, anodized Al, and gold (Au)/Ni on Beryllium (Be). The results indicate that there were advantages in Ni and Au coating applications for the two major substrates, Al and Be, when considering applications that need to meet launch environments.

  18. Microwave band gap and cavity mode in spoof–insulator–spoof waveguide with multiscale structured surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a multiscale spoof–insulator–spoof (SIS) waveguide by introducing periodic geometry modulation in the wavelength scale to a SIS waveguide made of a perfect electric conductor. The MSIS consists of multiple SIS subcells. The dispersion relationship of the fundamental guided mode of the spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SSPPs) is studied analytically within the small gap approximation. It is shown that the multiscale SIS possesses microwave band gap (MBG) due to the Bragg scattering. The ‘gap maps’ in the design parameter space are provided. We demonstrate that the geometry of the subcells can efficiently adjust the effective refraction index of the elementary SIS and therefore further control the width and the position of the MBG. The results are in good agreement with numerical calculations by the finite element method (FEM). For finite-sized MSIS of given geometry in the millimeter scale, FEM calculations show that the first-order symmetric SSPP mode has zero transmission in the MBG within frequency range from 4.29 to 5.1 GHz. A cavity mode is observed inside the gap at 4.58 GHz, which comes from a designer ‘point defect’ in the multiscale SIS waveguide. Furthermore, ultrathin MSIS waveguides are shown to have both symmetric and antisymmetric modes with their own MBGs, respectively. The deep-subwavelength confinement and the great degree of control of the propagation of SSPPs in such structures promise potential applications in miniaturized microwave device. (paper)

  19. Horizontally assembled green InGaN nanorod LEDs: scalable polarized surface emitting LEDs using electric-field assisted assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hoo Keun; Yoon, Seong Woong; Eo, Yun Jae; Chung, Won Woo; Yoo, Gang Yeol; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Keyong Nam; Kim, Woong; Do, Young Rag

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the concerted fabrication process, which is easy to transform the size of active emitting area and produce polarized surface light, using the electric-field-assisted assembly for horizontally assembled many tiny nanorod LEDs between two metal electrodes. We fabricate the millions of individually separated 1D nanorod LEDs from 2D nanorod arrays using nanosphere lithography, etching and cutting process of InGaN/GaN LED structure on a flat sapphire substrate. The horizontally assembled InGaN-based nanorods LED device shows bright (~2,130 cd/m(2)) and uniform polarized (polarization ratio, ρ = ~0.61) green emissions from large area (0.7 cm × 0.6 cm) planar surface. The realization of a horizontally assembled nanorod LED device can prove the concept of an innovative idea to fabricate formable and scalable polarized surface LED lighting. PMID:27324568

  20. Horizontally assembled green InGaN nanorod LEDs: scalable polarized surface emitting LEDs using electric-field assisted assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hoo Keun; Yoon, Seong Woong; Eo, Yun Jae; Chung, Won Woo; Yoo, Gang Yeol; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Keyong Nam; Kim, Woong; Do, Young Rag

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report the concerted fabrication process, which is easy to transform the size of active emitting area and produce polarized surface light, using the electric-field-assisted assembly for horizontally assembled many tiny nanorod LEDs between two metal electrodes. We fabricate the millions of individually separated 1D nanorod LEDs from 2D nanorod arrays using nanosphere lithography, etching and cutting process of InGaN/GaN LED structure on a flat sapphire substrate. The horizontally assembled InGaN-based nanorods LED device shows bright (~2,130 cd/m2) and uniform polarized (polarization ratio, ρ = ~0.61) green emissions from large area (0.7 cm × 0.6 cm) planar surface. The realization of a horizontally assembled nanorod LED device can prove the concept of an innovative idea to fabricate formable and scalable polarized surface LED lighting.

  1. Oscillations of the fluid flow and the free surface in a cavity with a submerged bifurcated nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Self-sustained oscillations in a thin cavity with submerged nozzle were observed. • Three flow regimes are detected depending on nozzle depth and inlet velocity. • The three flow regimes have been summarized in a flow regime map. • PIV measurements are performed to link free surface behavior to the bulk-flow. • We report a close correlation between jet-behavior and free surface dynamics. -- Abstract: The free surface dynamics and sub-surface flow behavior in a thin (height and width much larger than thickness), liquid filled, rectangular cavity with a submerged bifurcated nozzle were investigated using free surface visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Three regimes in the free surface behavior were identified, depending on nozzle depth and inlet velocity. For small nozzle depths, an irregular free surface is observed without clear periodicities. For intermediate nozzle depths and sufficiently high inlet velocities, natural mode oscillations consistent with gravity waves are present, while at large nozzle depths long term self-sustained asymmetric oscillations occur. For the latter case, time-resolved PIV measurements of the flow below the free surface indicated a strong oscillation of the direction with which each of the two jets issue from the nozzle. The frequency of the jet oscillation is identical to the free surface oscillation frequency. The two jets oscillate in anti-phase, causing the asymmetric free surface oscillation. The jets interact through a cross-flow in the gaps between the inlet channel and the front and back walls of the cavity

  2. Effects of A Top SiO2 Surface Layer on Cavity Formation and Helium Desorption in Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Cz n-type Si (100) samples with and without a top SiO2 layer were implanted with 40 keV helium ions at the same dose of 5×1016 cm-2. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (THDS) were used to study the thermal evolution of cavities upon and helium thermal release, respectively. XTEM results show that the presence of the top SiO2 layer could suppress the thermal growth of cavities mainly formed in the region close to the SiO2/Si interface, which leads to the reduction in both the cavity band and cavity density. THDS results reveal that the top oxide layer could act as an effective barrier for the migration of helium atoms to the surface, and it thus gives rise to the formation of more overpresurrized bubbles and to the occurrence of a third release peak located at about 1100 K. The results were qualitively discussed by considering the role of the oxide surface layer in defect migration and evolution upon annealing.

  3. Interaction of surface radiation and free convection in open and closed cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research focussing on the interaction of all the modes of heat transfer in closed cavities, open cavities and L corners are scarce. Hence an earnest attempt to explore the interaction between the various modes of heat transfer in the above mentioned geometries to gain insight into the nature of interaction, and, develop useful correlations for computing the overall heat transfer are the main thrusts of the present study. 21 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs

  4. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­‐Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S‐I‐S hetero‐structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  5. Jaynes-Cummings Models with trapped surface-state electrons in THz cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Miao; Huang, J S; Wei, L F

    2009-01-01

    An electron floating on the liquid Helium is proposed to be trapped (by a micro-electrode set below the liquid Helium) in a high finesse cavity. Two lowest levels of the vertical motion of the electron acts as a two-level "atom", which could resonantly interact with the THz cavity. In the Lamb-Dicke regime, wherein the electron's in-plane activity region is much smaller than the wavelength of the cavity mode, the famous Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM) could be realized. By applying an additional external classical laser beam to the electron, a driven JCM could also be implemented. With such a driven JCM certain quantum states, e.g., coherent states and the Schrodinger cat states, of the THz cavity field could be prepared by one-step evolution. The numerical results show that, for the typical parameters of the cavity and electron on liquid Helium, a strong coupling between the artificial atom and the THz cavity could be obtained.

  6. Further enhancement of light extraction efficiency from light emitting diode using triangular surface grating and thin interface layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, R; Haldar, A; Ghosh, K K; Chakraborty, R

    2015-02-01

    Analysis has been done of improvement of forward directional light extraction efficiency of light emitting diodes (LEDs) by surface patterning of different types of one-dimensional profiles on indium-zinc-oxide films developed recently by our group using sol-gel technique. Finite-difference time-domain simulations by MEEP software have been used for this purpose. From the analysis, it is found that the patterned film is suitable for near-infrared LED. The optimized structure, which gives maximum improvement at around 1.040 μm wavelength, is determined and fabricated using soft lithography. Further enhancement of the light output of the LED with the fabricated gratings is possible by introducing an interlayer within the top contact layer. The mathematical formulation of the coupling of light in structured/multilayered surfaces is also discussed. PMID:25967806

  7. RF surface resistance of copper-on-beryllium at cryogenic temperatures measured by a 22-GHZ demountable cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jianfei; Krawczyk, F. L. (Frank L.); Kurennoy, S. (Sergey); Schrage, D. L. (Dale L.); Shapiro, A. H. (Alan H.); Tajima, T. (Tsuyoshi); Wood R. L. (Richard L.)

    2003-01-01

    A 22-GHz demountable cavity on the cold head of a compact refrigerator system was used to measure the RF performance of several coppt:r-plated Beryllium samples. The cavity inner surfce was treated by chemical polishing and heat treatment., as well as an OFE copper coupon to provide a baseline for comparison. The measured surhce resistance was reasonable and repeatable during either cooling or warming. Materials tested included four grades of Beryllium, OFE copper, alumina-dispersion strengthened copper (Glidcop), and Cu-plated versions of all of the above. Two coupons, Cuplated on Beryllium 0-30 and 1-70, offered comparable surface resistance to pure OFE copper or Cu-plated Glidcop. The RF surface resistance of Cu-on-Beryllium samples at cryogenic temperatures is reported together with that of other reference materials.

  8. Near Infrared Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Isotopic Analyses of CH4 on Future Martian Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Mahaffy P.; Holmes, V.; Burris, J.; Morey, P.; Lehmann, K.K.; Lollar, B. Sherwood; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Onstott, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A compact Near Infrared Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (near-IR-cw-CRDS) was developed as a candidate for future planetary surface missions. The optical cavity was made of titanium with rugged quartz windows to protect the delicate super cavity from the harsh environmental changes that it would experience during space flight and a Martian surface mission. This design assured the long-term stability of the system. The system applied three distributed feedback laser diodes (DFB-LD), two of which were tuned to the absorption line peaks of (sup 12)CH4 and (sup 13)CH4 at 6046.954 inverse centimeters and 6049.121 inverse centimeters, respectively. The third laser was tuned to a spectral-lines-free region for measuring the baseline cavity loss. The multiple laser design compensated for typical baseline drift of a CRDS system and, thus, improved the overall precision. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was used instead of an Acousto-Optic Module (AOM) to initiate the cavity ring-down events. It maintained high acquisition rates such as AOM, but consumed less power. High data acquisition rates combined with improved long-term stability yielded precise isotopic measurements in this near-IR region even though the strongest CH4 absorption line in this region is 140 times weaker than that of the strongest mid-IR absorption band. The current system has a detection limit of 1.4 times 10( sup –12) inverse centimeters for (sup 13)CH4. This limit corresponds to approximately 7 parts per trillion volume of CH4 at 100 Torrs. With no further improvements the detection limit of our current near IR-cw-CRDS at an ambient Martian pressure of approximately 6 Torrs (8 millibars) would be 0.25 parts per billion volume for one 3.3 minute long analysis.

  9. Study on the structure of bridge surface of the micro Fabry-Perot cavity tunable filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro Fabry-Perot cavity tunable filters are widely applied in the area of Pushbroom Hyperspectral imaging, DWDM optical communication system and self-adaptive optics. With small volume, lower consumption and cost, the Micro Fabry-Perot cavity tunable filter can realize superior response speed, large spectral range, high definition and high reliability. By deposition metal membrane on silicon chip by MEMS technology, the micro Fabry-Perot cavity has been achieved, which is actuated by electrostatic force and can realize the function of an optical filter. In this paper, the micro-bridge structure of the micro Fabry-Perot cavity tunable filter has been studied. Finite element analysis software COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted to design the structure of the micro-bridge of the micro filter. In order to simulate the working mechanism of the micro Fabry-Perot cavity and study the electrical and mechanical characteristics of the micro tunable filter,the static and dynamic characteriastics are analyzed, such as stress, displacement, transient response, etc. The corresponding parameters of the structure are considered as well by optimizition the filter's sustain structure.

  10. Photoluminescence studies of organic phosphor coated diffusing surface using blue inorganic light-emitting diode as excitation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the studies on photoluminescence (PL) of organic phosphor coated on a diffusing surface using a blue inorganic light-emitting diode (LED) array as an excitation source. The organic phosphor composite coated diffuser was used to scatter the directional blue light from the LED array. Some of the blue light is absorbed by the organic phosphor composite and the phosphor molecules are excited and re-emit light at longer wavelengths due to the PL process. The output light consists of scattered blue light plus phosphor generated broadband yellow light, thus making white light. The diffuser was made up of a plastic substrate coated with an organic composite of small molecule fluorescent material zinc(II)bis(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Znq2) doped with different percentages of electro-phosphorescent metal complex iridium(III)bis(2-methyldibenzo-[f, h] quinoxaline) (acetylacetonate) ([Ir(MDQ)2(acac)]). By means of changing the concentration and the thickness of the phosphor composite material the colour coordinates of white light were achieved. The CIE coordinates and correlated colour temperature were calculated for various thicknesses and phosphor composite concentrations and the results are reported. (paper)

  11. Tracking the complete revolution of surface westerlies over Northern Hemisphere using radionuclides emitted from Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Ceballos, M.A. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Hong, G.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan 426-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lozano, R.L. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Kim, Y.I. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Uljin 767-813 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.M.; Kim, S.H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan 426-744 (Korea, Republic of); Yeh, S.-W. [Department of Environmental Marine Science, Hanyang University, Ansan, 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bolivar, J.P., E-mail: bolivar@uhu.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Baskaran, M. [Department of Geology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radionuclides were released from the nuclear reactors located in Fukushima (northeastern Japan) between 12 and 16 March 2011 following the earthquake and tsunami. Ground level air radioactivity was monitored around the globe immediately after the Fukushima accident. This global effort provided a unique opportunity to trace the surface air mass movement at different sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Based on surface air radioactivity measurements around the globe and the air mass backward trajectory analysis of the Fukushima radioactive plume at various places in the Northern Hemisphere by employing the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model, we show for the first time, that the uninterrupted complete revolution of the mid-latitude Surface Westerlies took place in less than 21 days, with an average zonal velocity of > 60 km/h. The position and circulation time scale of Surface Westerlies are of wide interest to a large number of global researchers including meteorologists, atmospheric researchers and global climate modellers. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence of the South Korea contamination with released radiocesium from Fukushima. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Field samples and air mass analysis were utilized to elucidate the transport of those radionuclides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of the air mass movements at different sites at the Earth's surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Verification of the uninterrupted complete revolution of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of the velocity of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima.

  12. Tracking the complete revolution of surface westerlies over Northern Hemisphere using radionuclides emitted from Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radionuclides were released from the nuclear reactors located in Fukushima (northeastern Japan) between 12 and 16 March 2011 following the earthquake and tsunami. Ground level air radioactivity was monitored around the globe immediately after the Fukushima accident. This global effort provided a unique opportunity to trace the surface air mass movement at different sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Based on surface air radioactivity measurements around the globe and the air mass backward trajectory analysis of the Fukushima radioactive plume at various places in the Northern Hemisphere by employing the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model, we show for the first time, that the uninterrupted complete revolution of the mid-latitude Surface Westerlies took place in less than 21 days, with an average zonal velocity of > 60 km/h. The position and circulation time scale of Surface Westerlies are of wide interest to a large number of global researchers including meteorologists, atmospheric researchers and global climate modellers. -- Highlights: ► Evidence of the South Korea contamination with released radiocesium from Fukushima. ► Field samples and air mass analysis were utilized to elucidate the transport of those radionuclides. ► Characterization of the air mass movements at different sites at the Earth's surface. ► Verification of the uninterrupted complete revolution of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima. ► Quantification of the velocity of the artificial radionuclides released in Fukushima.

  13. Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy for enhanced detection of surface binding under flow injection analysis conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sneppen, L; Buijs, J B; Gooijer, C; Ubachs, W; Ariese, F

    2008-06-01

    The feasibility of liquid-phase evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) for surface-binding studies under flow-injection analysis (FIA) conditions is demonstrated. The EW-CRDS setup consists of an anti-reflection coated Dove prism inside a linear cavity (with standard or super-polishing of the total internal reflective (TIR) surface). A teflon spacer with an elliptical hole clamped on this surface acts as a 20 muL sized flow cell. The baseline noise of this system is of the order of 10(-4) absorbance units; the baseline remains stable over a prolonged time and the prism surface does not become contaminated during repeated injections of the reversibly adsorbing test dyes Crystal Violet (CV) and Direct Red 10 (DR10). At typical FIA or liquid chromatography (LC) flow rates, the system has sufficient specificity to discriminate between species with different surface affinities. For CV a much stronger decrease in ring-down time is observed than calculated based on its bulk concentration and the effective depth probed by the evanescent wave, indicating binding of this positively charged dye to the negatively charged prism surface. The amount of adsorption can be influenced by adjusting the flow rate or the eluent composition. At a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min, an enrichment factor of 60 was calculated for CV; for the poorly adsorbing dye DR10 it is 5. Super-polishing of the already polished TIR surface works counter-productively. The adsorbing dye Crystal Violet has a detection limit of 3 muM for the standard polished surface; less binding occurs on the super-polished surface and the detection limit is 5 muM. Possible applications of EW-CRDS for studying surface binding or the development of bio-assays are discussed. PMID:18559152

  14. Adsorption of cytochrome c to silica surfaces studied using evanescent wave broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, L. J.; van der Sneppen, L.; Peverall, R.; Hancock, G.; Ritchie, G. A. D.

    2010-08-01

    The adsorption of cytochrome c (cyt c) to a silica surface has been studied by use of evanescent wave broadband cavityenhanced absorption spectroscopy (EW-BBCEAS). Visible radiation from a supercontinuum source is coupled into an optical cavity consisting of a pair of broadband high reflectivity mirrors, and a total internal reflection (TIR) event at the prism/water interface. Aqueous solutions of cyt c are placed onto the TIR footprint on the prism surface and the subsequent protein adsorption is probed by the resulting evanescent wave. The time integrated cavity output is directed into a spectrometer, where it is dispersed and analysed. The high spectral brilliance of the SC affords a baseline noise comparable to evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), and the broadband nature of the source allows observation of a wide spectral range (ca 250 nm in the visible). The system is calibrated by measuring the absorption spectra of dyes of a known absorbance. Absorption spectra of cyt c are obtained for both S and P polarized radiation, allowing information about the orientation of the adsorbed protein to be extracted.

  15. High-powered tunable terahertz source based on a surface-emitted terahertz-wave parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyang; Bing, Pibin; Yao, Jianquan; Xu, Degang; Zhong, Kai

    2012-09-01

    A high-powered pulsed terahertz (THz)-wave has been parametrically generated via a surface-emitted THz-wave parametric oscillator (TPO). The effective parametric gain length under the noncollinear phase matching condition was calculated for optimization of the parameters of the TPO. A large volume crystal of MgO:LiNbO3 was used as the gain medium. THz-wave radiation covering a frequency range from 0.87 to 2.73 THz was obtained. The average power of the THz-wave was 9.12 μW at 1.75 THz when the pump energy was 94 mJ, corresponding to an energy conversion efficiency of about 9.7×10-6 and a photon conversion efficiency of about 0.156%. The THz-wave power in our experiments is high enough for practical applications to spectrum analysis and imaging.

  16. Field limit and nano-scale surface topography of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of extreme type II superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The field limit of superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of type II superconductor with a large Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied with taking effects of nano-scale surface topography into account. If the surface is ideally flat, the field limit is imposed by the superheating field. On the surface of cavity, however, nano-defects almost continuously distribute and suppress the superheating field everywhere. The field limit is imposed by an effective superheating field given by the product of the superheating field for ideal flat surface and a suppression factor that contains effects of nano-defects. A nano-defect is modeled by a triangular groove with a depth smaller than the penetration depth. An analytical formula for the suppression factor of bulk and multilayer superconductors are derived in the framework of the London theory. As an immediate application, the suppression factor of the dirty Nb processed by the electropolishing is evaluated by using results of surface topographic study. The estimat...

  17. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavitytThere is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  18. Charges on the surface of a lentil cavity in a two-dimensional homogeneous conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batkin, V. I.

    2010-09-01

    The linear charge density on arc segments of a lentil cavity in a two-dimensional homogeneous conductor in a uniform external electric field is determined analytically. A singularity of the current density on the edges of the segments makes the resultant relations a helpful test for numerical computational algorithms.

  19. Cavity-enhanced surface-plasmon resonance sensing: Modeling and performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Zullo, R.; Gaglio, G.; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2014), 015205. ISSN 0957-0233 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : optical resonators * optical sensor s * cavity ring-down spectroscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.433, year: 2014

  20. Beam steering via resonance detuning in coherently coupled vertical cavity laser arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherently coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser arrays offer unique advantages for nonmechanical beam steering applications. We have applied dynamic coupled mode theory to show that the observed temporal phase shift between vertical-cavity surface-emitting array elements is caused by the detuning of their resonant wavelengths. Hence, a complete theoretical connection between the differential current injection into array elements and the beam steering direction has been established. It is found to be a fundamentally unique beam-steering mechanism with distinct advantages in efficiency, compactness, speed, and phase-sensitivity to current

  1. Surface-emitting quantum cascade laser with 2nd-order metal-semiconductor gratings for single-lobe emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, C.; Sigler, C.; Kirch, J. D.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.; Botez, D.; Mawst, L. J.

    2016-03-01

    Grating-coupled, surface-emitting (GCSE) quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are demonstrated with high-power, single-lobe surface emission. A 2nd-order Au-semiconductor distributed-feedback (DFB)/ distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) grating is used for feedback and out-coupling. The DFB and DBR grating regions are 2.55 mm- and 1.28 mm-long, respectively, for a total grating length of 5.1 mm. The lasers are designed to operate in a symmetric longitudinal mode by causing resonant coupling of the guided optical mode to the antisymmetric surface-plasmon modes of the 2nd-order metal/semiconductor grating. In turn, the antisymmetric longitudinal modes are strongly absorbed by the metal in the grating, causing the symmetric longitudinal mode to be favored to lase, which produces a single lobe beam over a grating duty-cycle range of 36-41 %. Simulations indicate that the symmetric mode is always favored to lase, independent of the random phase of residual reflections from the device's cleaved ends. Peak pulsed output powers of ~ 0.4 W were measured with single-lobe, single-mode operation near 4.75 μm.

  2. Morphological evaluation of cavity preparation surface after duraphat and Er:YAG laser treatment by scanning electronic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of dental surface using different lasers to prevent dental caries has been studied for several on last years. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the morphological changes on dentin surface from pulpal wall of cavity preparations performed by high-speed drill, treated with 2,26% fluoride varnish (Duraphat) and Er:YAG laser, and then submitted after receiving or not to EDTA 15% treatment. Twenty Class V cavities were performed on ten humans molars. The specimens were randomly divided in to 4 groups: group 1- treatment with Duraphat followed by Er:YAG laser irradiation (120 mJ/ 4 Hz); group 2: Er:YAG laser irradiation, same parameters, followed by Duraphat treatment; group 3- same group 1 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min); group 4 - same as group 2 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min). The specimens were processed for SEM analysis. The micrographs showed that Duraphat treatment promoted morphological changes on dentin, closing dentinal tubules; the specimens treated by Duraphat and Er:YAG laser and immersed in EDTA (group 3) showed homogeneous surface, closed and protected dentinal tubules, maintenance of the fluoride varnish on the dentin surface and around the dentinal tubules, showing feasible and efficiency of these therapies the feasibility.(author)

  3. Impact of forming, welding, and electropolishing on pitting and the surface finish of SRF cavity niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad range of coupon electropolishing experiments are described to ascertain the mechanism(s) by which large defects are formed near superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity welds. Cold-worked vs. annealed metal, the presence of a weld, and several variations of electropolishing (EP) parameters were considered. Pitting is strongly promoted by cold work and agitation of the EP solution. Welding also promotes pitting, but less so compared with the other factors above. Temperature increase during EP did not strongly affect glossiness or pitting, but the reduced viscosity made the electrolyte more susceptible to agitation. The experiments suggest that several factors that are rather benign alone are combined by the cavity forming, welding, and processing sequence to promote the formation of defects such as pits. Process changes to mitigate these risks are discussed.

  4. Impact of forming, welding, and electropolishing on pitting and the surface finish of SRF cavity niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, L.D.; Burk, D.; Cooper, C.; Dhanaraj, N.; Foley, M.; Ford, D.; Gould, K.; Hicks, D.; Novitski, R.; Romanenko, A.; Schuessler, R.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    A broad range of coupon electropolishing experiments are described to ascertain the mechanism(s) by which large defects are formed near superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity welds. Cold-worked vs. annealed metal, the presence of a weld, and several variations of electropolishing (EP) parameters were considered. Pitting is strongly promoted by cold work and agitation of the EP solution. Welding also promotes pitting, but less so compared with the other factors above. Temperature increase during EP did not strongly affect glossiness or pitting, but the reduced viscosity made the electrolyte more susceptible to agitation. The experiments suggest that several factors that are rather benign alone are combined by the cavity forming, welding, and processing sequence to promote the formation of defects such as pits. Process changes to mitigate these risks are discussed.

  5. Output Enhancement of a THz Wave Based on a Surface-Emitted THz-Wave Parametric Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong-Yang; YAO Jian-Quan; XU De-Gang; BING Pi-Bin; ZHONG Kai

    2011-01-01

    High-power nanosecond pulsed THz-wave radiation is achieved via a surface-emitted THz-wave parametric oscillator.One MgO:LiNbO3 crystal with large volume is used as the gain medium.THz-wave radiation from 1.084 THz to 2.654 THz is obtained.The maximum THz-wave average power is 5.8 μ W at 1.93 THz when the pump energy is 84 m J,corresponding to a energy conversion efficiency of 6.9 × 10-6.The polarization characteristics of THz wave are analyzed.During the experiments the radiations of the first-order and the second-order Stokes wave are observed.The THz wave has great scientific research value and wide applications in imaging,material detection,environmental monitoring,communication,astronomy,life sciences,national defense security and so on.[1-4] THz-wave parametric oscillators (TPOs)based on stimulated polariton scattering have many advantages,such as high efficient,coherent,tuning,narrow linewidth,compactness and room-temperature operation.[5-7] In recent years,TPOs have been developed rapidly.Stothard et al.[8] reported on a line-narrowed and widely tunable intracavity TPO,in which the linewidth of the THz wave is about 1 GHz,the tunning range is from 1 to 3 THz,and the peak power of the THz wave is about 3W.Wu et al.[9]reported on a TPO with recycled pump beam,and their experiment results show that the THz-wave out-put power increases almost four times in magnitude.%High-power nanosecond pulsed THz-wave radiation is achieved via a surface-emitted THz-wave parametric oscillator. One MgO:LiNbO3 crystal with large volume is used as the gain medium. THz-wave radiation from 1.084THz to 2.654THz is obtained. The maximum THz-wave average power is 5.8μW at 1.93THz when the pump energy is 84mJ, corresponding to a energy conversion efficiency of 6.9×10-6. The polarization characteristics of THz wave are analyzed. During the experiments the radiations of the first-order and the second-order Stokes wave are observed.

  6. Effect of surface radiation on the breakdown of steady natural convection flows in a square, air-filled cavity containing a centered inner body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical model considered in the present numerical work is a square air-filled cavity cooled from below and above, with a heated square body located at the cavity center. The aim is to establish the effects of radiation interchanges amongst surfaces on the transition from steady, symmetric flows about the cavity centerline to complex periodic flows. Owing to the low temperature differences involved (1 K ≤ ΔT ≤ 5 K), the two-dimensional model is based on the Boussinesq approximation and constant thermophysical fluid properties at room temperature. The cavity walls are assumed gray and diffuse. The flow structure is investigated for various Rayleigh numbers, emissivities of the wall surfaces and sizes of the inner body. The results clearly establish the influence of surface radiation, both for steady and unsteady flows. For the geometry and thermal boundary conditions considered, the Rayleigh number for the transition to unsteady flows is considerably increased under the influence of radiation. This work underlines the difficulties in comparing experimental data and numerical solutions for gas-filled cavities partly subjected to wall heat flux boundary conditions. - Research highlights: → Heat transfer in cavities cooled from below and above with an inner heated body. → Effects of radiation on the transitions to unsteady flows are numerically studied. → The surfaces are gray and diffuse and the temperature differences are from 1 K to 5 K. → Critical Rayleigh numbers are considerably increased by radiation. → According to the thermal boundary conditions, combined analyses are required.

  7. Effects of cavity surface temperature on mechanical properties of specimens with and without a weld line in rapid heat cycle molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Higher cavity surface temperature reduces tensile strength of non-weldline part. ► Higher cavity surface temperature increases weldline tensile strength for PS and PP. ► Higher cavity surface temperature reduces weldline tensile strength for ABS, ABS/PMMA, ABS/PMMA/nano-CaCO3 and FRPP. ► Tensile strength is reduced more by the weldline than impact strength. ► FRPP has the lowest weld line factor than other plastics without reinforced fibers. - Abstract: Rapid heat cycle molding (RHCM) is a recently developed injection molding technology to enhance surface esthetic of the parts. By rapid heating and cooling of mold cavity surfaces in molding process, it can greatly alleviate or even eliminate the surface defects such as flow mark, weld line, glass fiber rich surface, silver mark, jetting mark, and swirl mark, and also improve gloss finish and dimensional accuracy without prolonging the molding cycle. Besides surface esthetic, mechanical property is also a very import issue for the molded plastic part. The aim of this study is focusing on the effects of the cavity surface temperature just before filling, Tcs, in RHCM on the mechanical strength of the specimen with and without weld line. Six kinds of typical plastics including polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene/polymethylmethacrylate (ABS/PMMA), ABS/PMMA/nano-CaCO3 and glass fiber reinforced polypropylene (FRPP) are used in experiments. The specimens with and without a weld line are produced with the different Tcs on the developed electric-heating RHCM system. Tensile tests and notched Izod impact tests are conducted to characterize the mechanical strength of the specimens molded with different cavity surface temperatures. Simulations, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope are implemented to explain the impact mechanism of Tcs on mechanical properties

  8. Study on Surface Modification of Indium Tin Oxide and Resist Surfaces Using CF4/O2 Plasma for Manufacturing Organic Light-Emitting Diodes by Inkjet Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikagawa, Masakuni; Tohno, Ichiro; Shinmura, Tadashi; Takagi, Shigeyuki; Kataoka, Yoshinori; Fujihira, Masamichi

    2008-12-01

    We studied a surface modification technique for indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes without precleaning and resist banks for manufacturing organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by inkjet printing. The ITO surface modified by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with an optimized CF4/O2 (7:3) gas mixture improved both its hydrophilicity and its work function, while the resist surface treated by the plasma became hydrophobic. The resist and ITO surfaces treated by plasmas of various gas mixtures (i.e., CF4, CF4/Ar (1:2), CF4/O2 (x:1; x=1, 7/3, 4, and 9) were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the C 1s, F 1s, O 1s, and In 3d5/2 core levels. On the uncleaned ITO surfaces modified by CF4/O2 plasmas, organic contaminants were removed more efficiently and the deposition of CFx on the remaining contaminants decreased with increasing oxygen. The amount of F in the form of InFx increased using the CF4/O2 (7:3) plasma in comparison with that using the CF4/Ar and CF4 plasmas. We investigated the effect of adding oxygen to CF4 on the change in gaseous species produced in the plasma chamber by mass spectrometry. In the CF4/O2 (7:3) plasma, the peak intensities of F+, HF+, F2+, O+, and O2+ were higher than those in the CF4 plasma. The results suggest that In2O3 was generated by the oxidation of indium with O, and InFx was generated by the fluoridation of indium with HF. By introducing InFx onto ITO surfaces using the CF4/O2 plasma, the hole-injection energy barrier could be reduced.

  9. Design of surface emitting distributed feedback quantum cascade laser with single-lobe far-field pattern and high outcoupling efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 7.8-μm surface emitting second-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) structure with metallized surface grating is studied. The modal property of this structure is described by utilizing coupled-mode theory where the coupling coefficients are derived from exact Floquet–Bloch solutions of infinite periodic structure. Based on this theory, the influence of waveguide structure and grating topography as well as device length on the laser performance is numerically investigated. The optimized surface emitting second-order DFB QCL structure design exhibits a high surface outcoupling efficiency of 22% and a low threshold gain of 10 cm−1. Using a π phase-shift in the centre of the grating, a high-quality single-lobe far-field radiation pattern is obtained. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  10. A sensitive and quantitative biosensing method for the determination of {gamma}-ray emitting radionuclides in surface water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolterbeek, H.Th.; Meer, A.J.G.M. van der [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Inst.

    1996-11-01

    A quantitative and sensitive biosensing method has been developed for the determination of {gamma}-ray emitting radionuclides in surface water. The method is based on the concept that at equilibrium the specific radioactivity in the biosensor is equal to the specific radioactivity in water. The method consists of the measurement of both the radionuclide and the element in the biosensor and the determination of the element level in water. This three-way analysis eliminates problems such as unpredictable biosensor behaviour, effects of water elemental composition or further abiotic parameters: what remains is the generally high enrichment (bioaccumulation factor BCF) of elements and radionuclides in the biosensor material. Measurements were performed with floating water plants (Azolla filiculoides Lamk., Spirodela polyrhiza/Lemna sp.) and the fully submerged water plant Ceratophyllum demersum L., which were sampled from ditch water. Concentrations of elements and radionuclides were determined in both water and biosensor plants, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), ICP-MS, and {gamma}-ray spectrometry, respectively. For the latter, both 1 litre samples (Marinelli-geometry) and 1 cm{sup 3} samples (well-type detectors) were applied in measurements. (author).

  11. Enhanced external quantum efficiency in GaN-based vertical-type light-emitting diodes by localized surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yung-Chi; Hwang, Jung-Min; Yang, Zu-Po; Haung, Jing-Yu; Lin, Chia-Ching; Shen, Wei-Chen; Chou, Chun-Yang; Wang, Mei-Tan; Huang, Chun-Ying; Chen, Ching-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Lin, Tzu-Neng; Shen, Ji-Lin; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2016-03-01

    Enhancement of the external quantum efficiency of a GaN-based vertical-type light emitting diode (VLED) through the coupling of localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance with the wave-guided mode light is studied. To achieve this experimentally, Ag nanoparticles (NPs), as the LSP resonant source, are drop-casted on the most top layer of waveguide channel, which is composed of hydrothermally synthesized ZnO nanorods capped on the top of GaN-based VLED. Enhanced light-output power and external quantum efficiency are observed, and the amount of enhancement remains steady with the increase of the injected currents. To understand the observations theoretically, the absorption spectra and the electric field distributions of the VLED with and without Ag NPs decorated on ZnO NRs are determined using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results prove that the observation of enhancement of the external quantum efficiency can be attributed to the creation of an extra escape channel for trapped light due to the coupling of the LSP with wave-guided mode light, by which the energy of wave-guided mode light can be transferred to the efficient light scattering center of the LSP.

  12. Sensing properties of light-emitting single walled carbon nanotubes prepared via click chemistry of ylides bound to the nanotube surface.

    OpenAIRE

    Bayazit, M. K.; Palsson, L. O.; Coleman, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pyridinium ylide functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) generated from simple quaternary pyridinium salts covalently bound to the SWCNT surface undergo a 1, 3 dipolar cycloaddition with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate in a ‘click’ chemistry type fashion to yield indolizine modified light-emitting SWCNTs. Conversion of quaternary pyridinium salts into indolizines on the SWCNT surface was confirmed by XPS, fluorescence spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The resulting modified ...

  13. TCO/metal hybrid structures for surface plasmon enhanced light emitting in the near infrared range (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xu; Zhang, Shiyu; Xia, Liang; Ye, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Transparent conductive oxides (TCOs, such as Sn:In2O3, Al:ZnO, Ga: ZnO et al) have re-drawn people's attention as alternative candidates of noble metals (particularly Ag or Au) in the field of plasmonic for the reasons of property tunable and low losses et al. However even for Sn:In2O3 (ITO, reported highest conductivity), the metallic property lies in the near infrared (NIR) range exhibiting the real part permittivity ɛ' was around -3 at communication wavelength of 1.55μm. Under this circumstance, surface plasma polaritons (SPPs) was hard to be exited on the interface between ITO and surrounded dielectric materials with large permittivity. Hence, in order to explore the potential use of TCOs in the applications of silicon photonics (for permittivity of silicon and germanium are 11.6 and 16 at 300K, respectively), we design a hybrid structure of ITO/metal or ITO/metal/ITO as surface plasmonic materials in NIR. The electrical and optical property of hybrid structure was manipulated accordingly by changing the portion of the introduced metal while maintaining a lower loss than bare metals. The highest carrier concentration of the hybrid structure reached 3×10^22cm^-3, definitely the same magnitude of noble metals. Magnetron sputtering and atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to deposit the hybrid ITO/metal structure, in which metal represents gold (Au), and iridium (Ir). The normalized radiative decay rate of light emitted by germanium quantum dots reaches a maximum enhancement of ~8-fold with the assistance of ITO/metal hybrid structure according to the finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation.

  14. Cavity-free plasmonic nanolasing enabled by dispersionless stopped light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Tim; Hamm, Joachim M; Page, A Freddie; Wuestner, Sebastian; Hess, Ortwin

    2014-01-01

    When light is brought to a standstill, its interaction with gain media increases dramatically due to a singularity in the density of optical states. Concurrently, stopped light engenders an inherent and cavity-free feedback mechanism, similar in effect to the feedback that has been demonstrated and exploited in large-scale disordered media and random lasers. Here we study the spatial, temporal and spectral signatures of lasing in planar gain-enhanced nanoplasmonic structures at near-infrared frequencies and show that the stopped-light feedback mechanism allows for nanolasing without a cavity. We reveal that in the absence of cavity-induced feedback, the subwavelength lasing mode forms dynamically as a phase-locked superposition of quasi dispersion-free waveguide modes. This mechanism proves remarkably robust against interface roughness and offers a new route towards nanolasing, the experimental realization of ultra-thin surface emitting lasers, and cavity-free active quantum plasmonics. PMID:25230337

  15. Silicon-integrated short-wavelength hybrid-cavity VCSEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Emanuel P; Kumari, Sulakshna; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan S; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel; Larsson, Anders

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate a short-wavelength hybrid-cavity vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) heterogeneously integrated on silicon. A GaAs-based "half-VCSEL" has been attached to a dielectric distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) on a silicon wafer using ultra-thin divinylsiloxane-bis-benzocyclobutene (DVS-BCB) adhesive bonding, thereby creating a cavity with the standing-wave optical field extending over the silicon- and GaAs-based parts of the cavity. A 9 µm oxide aperture diameter VCSEL with a threshold current of 1.2 mA produces 1.6 mW optical output power at 6.0 mA bias current with a wavelength of ~845 nm. PMID:26832027

  16. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-01-30

    This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done to support several different programs that desire access to the ground surface above expended underground nuclear tests. The programs include: the Borehole Management Program, the Environmental Restoration Program, and the National Center for Nuclear Security Gas-Migration Experiment. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Evaluation of cavity collapse and crater formation is input into the safety decisions. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who participated in weapons testing activities perform these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. The evaluations do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011 was published on March 2, 2011. This report, considered Part 2 of work undertaken in calendar year 2011, compiles evaluations requested after the March report. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater

  17. Characterization of cellular response to thiol-modified gold surfaces implanted in mouse peritoneal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, H; Kanagaraja, S; Braide, M; Eriksson, C; Lundström, I

    1999-05-01

    The early inflammatory reaction in vivo to three well defined surfaces-gold, gold coated with glutathione (GSH), and 3-mercapto-1, 2-propanediol (MG)-was assessed as manifested by the adherence and activation of inflammatory cells during implantation intraperitoneally in mice. Evaluation of cell adhesion and activation was done by immunohistochemistry using specific monoclonal antibodies directed against cell differentiation antigens CD11b/CD18, CD74, and CD25 or by measurement by chemoluminescence of reactive oxygen radical species produced by adhering cells. Cell recruitment and activation was slow on the GSH-coated gold surfaces. These surfaces also had the highest percentage of adhering cells with an intact cell membrane. The MG-coated surfaces, on the other hand, rapidly recruited and activated cells and also caused cell membrane leakage to propidium iodide, suggesting cell membrane damage or cell death. The respiratory burst of adhering cells was stimulated by phorbol-myristate acetate on the GSH-coated surface but not on the MG-coated surface and by opsonized zymosan on the Mg-coated surface but only to a small degree on the GSH-coated surface. The respiratory burst following zymosan activation of cells adhering to the MG-coated surface was inhibited by treatment with 2. 3-diphosphoglycerate, a phospholipase D inhibitor. The presented data suggest that peritoneal leukocytes adhering to foreign materials may raise a respiratory burst response via a phospholipase D-dependent and protein kinase C-independent pathway. PMID:10397965

  18. A very fast program for visualizing protein surfaces, channels and cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Voorintholt, Richard; Kosters, M.T.; Vegter, G.; Vriend, Gerrit; Hol, W.G.J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for visualizing molecular surfaces is described that uses a grid to store the distance to the nearest atom. Using on-the-fly three-dimensional (3D) contouring of a molecular graphics program such as FRODO, one can obtain a good impression of van der Waals surfaces and solvent-accessible surfaces. The main advantages of the method described here are its high speed and the fact that no recalculations need to be done to obtain the solvent-accessible surface visualized for a probe with a...

  19. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawloski, G A; Raschke, K

    2006-03-16

    This report describes evaluation of collapse evolution for selected LLNL underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The work is being done at the request of Bechtel Nevada and supports the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Association Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year Bechtel Nevada establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program and the Chemistry Biology and Nuclear Sciences Division who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty.

  20. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, S K; Pawloski, G A; Raschke, K

    2007-04-26

    This report describes evaluation of collapse evolution for selected LLNL underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The work is being done at the request of NSTec and supports the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Association Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program and the Chemical Sciences Division who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. The following unclassified summary

  1. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete β/γ -emitting sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete Β- and γ-emitting (ΒγE) sources (e.g., ΒγE hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot ΒγE particles are 60Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 μm and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 μCi) of radioactivity. For such ΒγE sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete ΒγE sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete ΒγE sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized Β irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete ΒγE sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to Β radiation from ΒγE sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects

  2. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  3. Moving Detectors in Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Obadia, N

    2007-01-01

    We consider two-level detectors, coupled to a quantum scalar field, moving inside cavities. We highlight some pathological resonant effects due to abrupt boundaries, and decide to describe the cavity by switching smoothly the interaction by a time-dependent gate-like function. Considering uniformly accelerated trajectories, we show that some specific choices of non-adiabatic switching have led to hazardous interpretations about the enhancement of the Unruh effect in cavities. More specifically, we show that the emission/absorption ratio takes arbitrary high values according to the emitted quanta properties and to the transients undergone at the entrance and the exit of the cavity, {\\it independently of the acceleration}. An explicit example is provided where we show that inertial and uniformly accelerated world-lines can even lead to the same ``pseudo-temperature''.

  4. Surface Texturing with Hemispherical Cavities to Improve Efficiency in Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    De Lima Monteiro, D.W.; F. P. Honorato; R. F. de Oliveira Costa; L.P. Salles

    2012-01-01

    Improvement of solar-cell efficiency at a minimum possible cost addition is constantly sought, and this is often achieved at incremental percentage steps. Among a number of alternatives, antireflective coatings and surface texturing are the most prominent. This paper presents an alternative texturing method of crystalline silicon in an attempt to improve the efficiency of photon transmission through the surface and collection in the bulk. The method relies on anisotropic etching of bulk silic...

  5. Interactions between nano-TiO2 and the oral cavity: impact of nanomaterial surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubl, Birgit J; Schimpel, Christa; Leitinger, Gerd; Bauer, Bettina; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Zimmer, Andreas; Roblegg, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are available in a variety of oral applications, such as food additives and cosmetic products. Thus, questions about their potential impact on the oro-gastrointestinal route rise. The oral cavity represents the first portal of entry and is known to rapidly interact with nanoparticles. Surface charge and size contribute actively to the particle-cell interactions, but the influence of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity has never been shown before. This study addresses the biological impact of hydrophilic (NM 103, rutile, 20 nm) and hydrophobic (NM 104, rutile, 20 nm) TiO2 particles within the buccal mucosa. Particle characterization was addressed with dynamic light scattering and laser diffraction. Despite a high agglomeration tendency, 10% of the particles/agglomerates were present in the nanosized range and penetrated into the mucosa, independent of the surface properties. However, significant differences were observed in intracellular particle localization. NM 104 particles were found freely distributed in the cytoplasm, whereas their hydrophobic counterparts were engulfed in vesicular structures. Although cell viability/membrane integrity was not affected negatively, screening assays demonstrated that NM 104 particles showed a higher potential to decrease the physiological mitochondrial membrane potential than NM 103, resulting in a pronounced generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:25590824

  6. Surface-emitting circular DFB, disk-, and ring-Bragg resonator lasers with chirped gratings. II: nonuniform pumping and far-field patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xiankai; Yariv, Amnon

    2009-01-01

    This is a continuation of our previous work [Opt. Express 16, 9155 (2008)]. In this paper we investigate the effect of nonuniform pumping on the modal properties of surface-emitting chirped circular grating lasers. By numerically solving the coupled-mode equations and matching the boundaries we compare and discuss the threshold pump levels and frequency detuning factors for three pumping profiles: uniform, Gaussian, and annular. Depending on the overlap of the pumping and modal profiles, Gaus...

  7. Enhanced Light Output of Dipole Source in GaN-Based Nanorod Light-Emitting Diodes by Silver Localized Surface Plasmon

    OpenAIRE

    Huamao Huang; Haiying Hu; Hong Wang; Kuiwei Geng

    2014-01-01

    The light output of dipole source in three types of light-emitting diodes (LEDs), including the conventional planar LED, the nanorod LED, and the localized surface plasmon (LSP) assisted LED by inserting silver nanoparticles in the gaps between nanorods, was studied by use of two-dimensional finite difference time domain method. The height of nanorod and the size of silver nanoparticles were variables for discussion. Simulation results show that a large height of nanorod induces strong wavele...

  8. Equilibrator-based measurements of dissolved methane in the surface ocean using an integrated cavity output laser absorption spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuhong; ZHAN Liyang; ZHANG Jiexia; CHEN Liqi

    2015-01-01

    A new off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) is coupled to Weiss equilibrator for continuous high-resolution dissolved methane measurement in the surface ocean. The time constant for the equilibrator in freshwater at room temperature is determined via dis-equilibration and re-equilibration experiments. The constant for methane is about 40 min. The system is calibrated using a standard gas of 3.980×10–6, and the precision of the ICOS for methane is 0.07%. This system is equipped onboard to measure the spatial distribution in methane concentrations of South Yellow Sea (SYS) along the cruise track from Shanghai to Qingdao. Result shows that the methane concentration varies from 2.79 to 36.36 nmol/L, reveals a significant pattern of methane source in SYS, and a distinct decreasing trend from south to north. The peak value occurs at the coast area outside mouth of the Changjiang River, likely to be affected by the Changjiang diluted water mass dissolving a large amount of rich in methane. Moreover, all the surface waters are oversaturated, air-to-sea fluxes range from 98.59 to 5 485.35 μmol/(m2·d) (average value (1 169.74±1 398.46) μmol/(m2·d)), indicating a source region for methane to the atmosphere.

  9. 200 nm-1000 nm spectra of light emitted in the impact of 40Ar10+ upon Al and Si solid surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小安; 赵永涛; 李福利; 杨治虎; 肖国青; 詹文龙

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the measured results of the 200 nm-1000 nm characteristic spectral lines of Al, Si and Ar atoms when highly charged ions 40Ar10+ are incident upon Al and P-type Si surfaces. The ion 40Ar10+ is provided by the ECR ion source of the National Laboratory of the Heavy Ion Accelerator in Lanzhou. The results show that when the low-speed ions in the highly charged state interact with the solid surfaces, the characteristic spectral lines of the target atoms and ions spurted from the surfaces can be effectively excited. Moreover, because of the competition of the non-radiation de-excitation of the hollow atom by emitting secondary electrons with the de-excitation process by radiating photons, the spectral intensity of the characteristic spectral lines of Ar atoms on the P-type Si surface is, as a whole, greater than that of Ar atoms on the Al surface.

  10. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  11. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  12. Surface quality of extruding metal special-shape products and frictional behavior in optimized die cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Hong-yuan; ZHU Heng-jun

    2004-01-01

    With the help of Complex Function Mapping theory, the complicated three-dimensional deformation problems are transferred into two-dimensional problems, and the function of strain ratio field is analyzed in the metal plastic extruding deformation. Taking the strain-hardening effect of metal deformation into account, the relationship between friction behavior and optimized mathematical model is analyzed by the numerical analysis friction energy dissipation function. As a result, the method of lowering the material hardening and decreasing the reduction ratio over multi-procedures can be used to improve the surface quality of metal special-shape extrusion products.

  13. Superconducting cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and development work of the superconducting cavities for the Neutron Science Project is being continued since 1995. In the cavity design work, RF and structural analyses were carried out in order to determine the cavity shape and to obtain the RF and structural parameters. In the cavity development work, preparation of the test facility, fabrication and tests of the two single-cell prototype cavities of β=0.5 were performed. Good performance of the cavity was demonstrated in the test; obtained surface peak electric field of 44 MV/m is much higher than the design value of 16 MV/m. Resonant frequency shifts due to the vacuum load and the Lorentz force were also measured in the test. (author)

  14. Interactions between nano-TiO2 and the oral cavity: Impact of nanomaterial surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic TiO2 NPs agglomerated under oral physiological conditions. • Particles penetrated the upper and lower buccal epithelium, independent on the degree of hydrophilicity. • Most of the hydrophobic particles were found in vesicular structures, while hydrophilic particles were freely distributed in the cytoplasm. • Hydrophilic particles had a higher potential to trigger toxic effects (e.g., ROS) than hydrophobic particles. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are available in a variety of oral applications, such as food additives and cosmetic products. Thus, questions about their potential impact on the oro-gastrointestinal route rise. The oral cavity represents the first portal of entry and is known to rapidly interact with nanoparticles. Surface charge and size contribute actively to the particle–cell interactions, but the influence of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity has never been shown before. This study addresses the biological impact of hydrophilic (NM 103, rutile, 20 nm) and hydrophobic (NM 104, rutile, 20 nm) TiO2 particles within the buccal mucosa. Particle characterization was addressed with dynamic light scattering and laser diffraction. Despite a high agglomeration tendency, 10% of the particles/agglomerates were present in the nanosized range and penetrated into the mucosa, independent of the surface properties. However, significant differences were observed in intracellular particle localization. NM 104 particles were found freely distributed in the cytoplasm, whereas their hydrophobic counterparts were engulfed in vesicular structures. Although cell viability/membrane integrity was not affected negatively, screening assays demonstrated that NM 104 particles showed a higher potential to decrease the physiological mitochondrial membrane potential than NM 103, resulting in a pronounced generation of reactive oxygen species

  15. Interactions between nano-TiO{sub 2} and the oral cavity: Impact of nanomaterial surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teubl, Birgit J.; Schimpel, Christa [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); Leitinger, Gerd [Institute of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Research Unit Electron Microscopic Techniques, Medical University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz 8010 (Austria); Bauer, Bettina [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); Fröhlich, Eleonore [Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz 8010 (Austria); Zimmer, Andreas [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz 8010 (Austria); Roblegg, Eva, E-mail: eva.roblegg@uni-graz.at [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 8010 (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz 8010 (Austria)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • Hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic TiO{sub 2} NPs agglomerated under oral physiological conditions. • Particles penetrated the upper and lower buccal epithelium, independent on the degree of hydrophilicity. • Most of the hydrophobic particles were found in vesicular structures, while hydrophilic particles were freely distributed in the cytoplasm. • Hydrophilic particles had a higher potential to trigger toxic effects (e.g., ROS) than hydrophobic particles. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles are available in a variety of oral applications, such as food additives and cosmetic products. Thus, questions about their potential impact on the oro-gastrointestinal route rise. The oral cavity represents the first portal of entry and is known to rapidly interact with nanoparticles. Surface charge and size contribute actively to the particle–cell interactions, but the influence of surface hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity has never been shown before. This study addresses the biological impact of hydrophilic (NM 103, rutile, 20 nm) and hydrophobic (NM 104, rutile, 20 nm) TiO{sub 2} particles within the buccal mucosa. Particle characterization was addressed with dynamic light scattering and laser diffraction. Despite a high agglomeration tendency, 10% of the particles/agglomerates were present in the nanosized range and penetrated into the mucosa, independent of the surface properties. However, significant differences were observed in intracellular particle localization. NM 104 particles were found freely distributed in the cytoplasm, whereas their hydrophobic counterparts were engulfed in vesicular structures. Although cell viability/membrane integrity was not affected negatively, screening assays demonstrated that NM 104 particles showed a higher potential to decrease the physiological mitochondrial membrane potential than NM 103, resulting in a pronounced generation of reactive oxygen species.

  16. Vertical cavity lasing from melt-grown crystals of cyano-substituted thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical-cavity organic lasers are fabricated with melt-grown crystals of a cyano-substituted thiophene-phenylene co-oligomer. Due to lying molecular orientation, surface-emitting lasing is achieved even in the half-cavity crystal grown on a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) under optical pumping at room temperature. Anticrossing splits in angle-resolved photoluminescence spectra suggest the formation of exciton-polaritons between the cavity photons and the confined Frenkel excitons. By constructing the full-cavity structure sandwiched between the top and bottom DBRs, the lasing threshold is reduced to one order, which is as low as that of the half cavity. Around the threshold, the time profile of the full-cavity emission is collapsed to a pulsed shape accompanied by a finite turn-on delay. We discuss these observed characteristics in terms of a polariton contribution to the conventional photon lasing

  17. Vertical cavity lasing from melt-grown crystals of cyano-substituted thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Yanagi, Hisao, E-mail: yanagi@ms.naist.jp [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Sasaki, Fumio [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2015-10-19

    Vertical-cavity organic lasers are fabricated with melt-grown crystals of a cyano-substituted thiophene-phenylene co-oligomer. Due to lying molecular orientation, surface-emitting lasing is achieved even in the half-cavity crystal grown on a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) under optical pumping at room temperature. Anticrossing splits in angle-resolved photoluminescence spectra suggest the formation of exciton-polaritons between the cavity photons and the confined Frenkel excitons. By constructing the full-cavity structure sandwiched between the top and bottom DBRs, the lasing threshold is reduced to one order, which is as low as that of the half cavity. Around the threshold, the time profile of the full-cavity emission is collapsed to a pulsed shape accompanied by a finite turn-on delay. We discuss these observed characteristics in terms of a polariton contribution to the conventional photon lasing.

  18. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  19. Passivated niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  20. Design for high-power, single-lobe, grating-surface-emitting quantum cascade lasers enabled by plasmon-enhanced absorption of antisymmetric modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigler, C.; Kirch, J. D.; Mawst, L. J.; Yu, Z.; Botez, D., E-mail: botez@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Earles, T. [Intraband, LLC, 200 N. Prospect Ave, Madison, Wisconsin 53726 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Resonant coupling of the transverse-magnetic polarized (guided) optical mode of a quantum-cascade laser (QCL) to the antisymmetric surface-plasmon modes of 2nd-order distributed-feedback (DFB) metal/semiconductor gratings results in strong antisymmetric-mode absorption. In turn, lasing in the symmetric mode, that is, surface emission in a single-lobe far-field beam pattern, is strongly favored over controllable ranges in grating duty cycle and tooth height. By using core-region characteristics of a published 4.6 μm-emitting QCL, grating-coupled surface-emitting (SE) QCLs are analyzed and optimized for highly efficient single-lobe operation. For infinite-length devices, it is found that when the antisymmetric mode is resonantly absorbed, the symmetric mode has negligible absorption loss (∼0.1 cm{sup −1}) while still being efficiently outcoupled, through the substrate, by the DFB grating. For finite-length devices, 2nd-order distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) gratings are used on both sides of the DFB grating to prevent uncontrolled reflections from cleaved facets. Equations for the threshold-current density and the differential quantum efficiency of SE DFB/DBR QCLs are derived. For 7 mm-long, 8.0 μm-wide, 4.6 μm-emitting devices, with an Ag/InP grating of ∼39% duty cycle, and ∼0.22 μm tooth height, threshold currents as low as 0.45 A are projected. Based on experimentally obtained internal efficiency values from high-performance QCLs, slope efficiencies as high as 3.4 W/A are projected; thus, offering a solution for watt-range, single-lobe CW operation from SE, mid-infrared QCLs.

  1. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 3. Inventories of some long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides associated with lagoon surface sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.

    1997-12-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected during 1979 from 87 locations in the lagoon at Bikini Atoll. The collections were made to better define the concentrations and distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred to the composition of the surface sediment from the nuclear testing program conducted by the United States at the Atoll between 1946 and 1958. This is the last of three reports on Bikini sediment studies. In this report, we discuss the concentrations and inventories of the residual long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in sediments from the lagoon. The gamma-emitting radionuclides detected most frequently in sediments collected in 1979, in addition to Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) (discussed in the second report of this series), included Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), Bismuth-207 ({sup 207}Bi), Europium-155 ({sup 155}Eu), and Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Other man-made, gamma-emitting radionuclides such as Europium-152,154 ({sup 152,154}Eu), Antimony-125 ({sup 125}Sb), and Rhodium-101,102m ({sup 101,102m}Rh) were occasionally measured above detection limits in sediments near test site locations. The mean inventories for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 207}Ei, {sup 155}Eu, and {sup 60}Co in the surface 4 cm of the lagoon sediment to be 1.7, 0.56, 7.76, and 0.74 TBq, respectively. By June 1997, radioactive decay would reduce these values to 1.1, 0.38, 0.62, and 0.07 TBq, respectively. Some additional loss results from a combination of different processes that continuously mobilize and return some amount of the radionuclides to the water column. The water and dissolved constituents are removed from the lagoon through channels and exchange with the surface waters of the north equatorial Pacific Ocean. Highest levels of these radionuclides are found in surface deposits lagoonward of the Bravo Crater. Lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with sediment lagoonward of the eastern reef. The quantities in

  2. Tunable Ultraviolet Vertically-emitting Organic Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Forget, Sebastien; Diffalah, Nordine; Siove, Alain; Chenais, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    A solid-state organic thin-film laser with intracavity frequency doubling is reported. Tunable ultraviolet emission from 309 to 322 nm is achieved from a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser, with 2 % efficiency (1 $\\mu$J at 315 nm). The laser comprises a polymethyl(methacrylate) layer doped with Rhodamine 640, spun-cast onto a plane mirror, a remote concave mirror, a nonlinear crystal and a dichroic separator. The output is spectrally narrow (<0.5 nm FWHM) and tunable through phase-matching selection of the fundamental radiation lasing modes. These results highlight a low-cost and portable alternative to tunable UV laser sources, useful for spectroscopic applications.

  3. Effect of Eugenol on Cell Surface Hydrophobicity, Adhesion, and Biofilm of Candida tropicalis and Candida dubliniensis Isolated from Oral Cavity of HIV-Infected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Suelen Balero de Paula; Thais Fernanda Bartelli; Vanessa Di Raimo; Jussevania Pereira Santos; Alexandre Tadachi Morey; Marina Andrea Bosini; Celso Vataru Nakamura; Lucy Megumi Yamauchi; Sueli Fumie Yamada-Ogatta

    2014-01-01

    Most Candida spp. infections are associated with biofilm formation on host surfaces. Cells within these communities display a phenotype resistant to antimicrobials and host defenses, so biofilm-associated infections are difficult to treat, representing a source of reinfections. The present study evaluated the effect of eugenol on the adherence properties and biofilm formation capacity of Candida dubliniensis and Candida tropicalis isolated from the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients. All is...

  4. New surface-modified zinc oxide nanoparticles with aminotriethylene oxide chains linked by 1,2,3-triazole ring: Preparation, and visible light-emitting and noncytotoxic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Moriyuki; Shimatani, Kanako; Iwasaki, Yuko; Morito, Shigekazu; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Fujita, Yasuhisa; Nakamura, Morihiko

    2011-11-01

    Novel surface-modified, visible light-emitting and noncytotoxic ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (ZPAZ) having aminotriethylene oxide chains linked by 1,4- and/or 1,5-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole rings were prepared from ZnO NPs (ZPA) with ethynyl groups on the surfaces and an azide derivative of triethylene oxide chain linking terminal amino group (ATA) via 1,3-dipolar azide/alkyne click reaction by heating without Cu(I) catalyst. FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, XRD analysis and TEM observation suggested that the resulting ZPA and ZPAZ NPs have the particle sizes below 10 nm in diameters, triethylene oxide chains linking the terminal amino groups and wurtzite crystal structure. UV-vis absorption spectrum of the ZPAZ NPs in methanol showed maximum absorption band at 346.5 nm, supporting the TEM observation. PL spectra depicted that the ZPA and ZPAZ NPs display broad light green and lightly greenish yellow visible light emitting bands in methanol. Zeta potentials measured in distilled water suggested that the ZPAZ NPs have a low tendency to aggregate and possess better stability than the ZPA NPs. Cytotoxicity assay revealed that the ZPAZ NPs, having water-dispersion properties, are noncytotoxic at low concentrations and almost all RAW264.7 cells are alive after 24 h of treatment.

  5. New surface-modified zinc oxide nanoparticles with aminotriethylene oxide chains linked by 1,2,3-triazole ring: Preparation, and visible light-emitting and noncytotoxic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel surface-modified, visible light-emitting and noncytotoxic ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (ZPAZ) having aminotriethylene oxide chains linked by 1,4- and/or 1,5-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazole rings were prepared from ZnO NPs (ZPA) with ethynyl groups on the surfaces and an azide derivative of triethylene oxide chain linking terminal amino group (ATA) via 1,3-dipolar azide/alkyne click reaction by heating without Cu(I) catalyst. FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, XRD analysis and TEM observation suggested that the resulting ZPA and ZPAZ NPs have the particle sizes below 10 nm in diameters, triethylene oxide chains linking the terminal amino groups and wurtzite crystal structure. UV-vis absorption spectrum of the ZPAZ NPs in methanol showed maximum absorption band at 346.5 nm, supporting the TEM observation. PL spectra depicted that the ZPA and ZPAZ NPs display broad light green and lightly greenish yellow visible light emitting bands in methanol. Zeta potentials measured in distilled water suggested that the ZPAZ NPs have a low tendency to aggregate and possess better stability than the ZPA NPs. Cytotoxicity assay revealed that the ZPAZ NPs, having water-dispersion properties, are noncytotoxic at low concentrations and almost all RAW264.7 cells are alive after 24 h of treatment.

  6. An enhanced surface passivation effect in InGaN/GaN disk-in-nanowire light emitting diodes for mitigating Shockley–Read–Hall recombination

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2015-07-24

    We present a detailed study on the effects of dangling bond passivation and the comparison of different sulfides passivation process on the properties of InGaN/GaN quantum-disk (Qdisk)-in-nanowire based light emitting diodes (NW-LEDs). Our results demonstrated the first organic sulfide passivation process for nitride nanowires (NWs). The results from Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed octadecylthiol (ODT) effectively passivated the surface states, and altered the surface dynamic charge, thereby recovered the band-edge emission. The effectiveness of the process with passivation duration was also studied. Moreover, we also compared the electro-optical performance of NW-LEDs emitting at green wavelength before and after ODT passivation. We have shown that the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) non-radiative recombination of NW-LEDs can be greatly reduced after passivation by ODT, which led to a much faster increasing trend of quantum efficiency, and higher peak efficiency. Our results highlighted the research opportunity in employing this technique for further design and realization of high performance NW-LEDs and NW-lasers.

  7. White emission from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes based on a blue emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated that white emission can be obtained from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TEOLEDs) based on a blue emitting layer (EML). The nano-structured TEOLEDs were fabricated on nano-patterned substrates, in which both optical micro-cavity and scattering effects occur simultaneously. Due to the combination of these two effects, the electroluminescence spectra of the nano-structured device with a blue EML exhibited not only blue but also yellow colours, which corresponded to the intrinsic emission of the EML and the resonant emission of the micro-cavity effect. Consequently, it was possible to produce white emission from nano-structured TEOLEDs without employing a multimode micro-cavity. The intrinsic emission wavelength can be varied by altering the dopant used for the EML. Furthermore, the emissive characteristics turned out to be strongly dependent on the nano-pattern sizes of the nano-structured devices. (paper)

  8. Magnetic field integral equation analysis of interaction between a surface plasmon polariton and a circular dielectric cavity embedded in the metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chremmos, Ioannis

    2009-12-01

    A rigorous integral equation (IE) analysis of the interaction between a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) and a circular dielectric cavity embedded in a metal half-space is presented. The device is addressed as the plasmonic counterpart of the established integrated optics filter comprising a whispering gallery (WG) resonator coupled to a waveguide. The mathematical formulation is that of a transverse magnetic scattering problem. Using a magnetic-type Green's function of the two-layer medium with boundary conditions that cancel the line integral contributions along the interface, an IE for the magnetic field inside the cavity is obtained. The IE is treated through an entire-domain method of moments (MoM) with cylindrical-harmonic basis functions. The entries of the MoM matrix are determined analytically by utilizing the inverse Fourier transform of Green's function and the Jacobi-Anger formula for interchanging between plane and cylindrical waves. Complex analysis techniques are applied to determine the transmitted, reflected, and radiated field quantities in series forms. The numerical results show that the scattered SPPs' spectra exhibit pronounced wavelength selectivity that is related to the excitation of WG-like cavity modes. It seems feasible to exploit the device as a bandstop or reflective filter or even as an efficient radiating element. In addition, the dependence of transmission on the cavity refractive index endows this structure with a sensing functionality. PMID:19956333

  9. Design, Construction, and Initial Test of High Spatial Resolution Thermometry Arrays for Detection of Surface Temperature Profiles on SRF Cavities in Super Fluid Helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Grigory Eremeev

    2011-07-01

    We designed and built two high resolution (0.6-0.55mm special resolution [1.1-1.2mm separation]) thermometry arrays prototypes out of the Allen Bradley 90-120 ohm 1/8 watt resistor to measure surface temperature profiles on SRF cavities. One array was designed to be physically flexible and conform to any location on a SRF cavity; the other was modeled after the common G-10/stycast 2850 thermometer and designed to fit on the equator of an ILC (Tesla 1.3GHz) SRF cavity. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each array and their construction. In addition we will present a case study of the arrays performance on a real SRF cavity TB9NR001. TB9NR001 presented a unique opportunity to test the performance of each array as it contained a dual (4mm separation) cat eye defect which conventional methods such as OST (Oscillating Superleak second-sound Transducers) and full coverage thermometry mapping were unable to distinguish between. We will discuss the new arrays ability to distinguish between the two defects and their preheating performance.

  10. Improvement of optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide layer of GaN-based light-emitting diode by surface plasmon in silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chu-Young [Applied Device and Material Department, Korea Advanced Nano fab Center, Suwon 443–270 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sang-Hyun [Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500–712 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Ju, E-mail: esjpark@gist.ac.kr [Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500–712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the effect of silver (Ag) nanoparticles on the optical transmittance and electrical conductivity of indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent conducting layer deposited on p-GaN layer of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The sheet resistance of ITO and the series resistance of LEDs were decreased due to the increased electrical conductivity of ITO by Ag nanoparticles, compared with those of the LEDs with a bare ITO only. The ITO transmittance was also improved by localized surface plasmon resonance between the incident light and the randomly distributed Ag nanoparticles on ITO. The optical output power of LEDs with Ag nanoparticles on ITO was increased by 16% at 20 mA of injection current. - Highlights: • We studied the effect of Ag nanoparticles deposited on ITO on the properties of LED. • The optical power of LED and transmittance of ITO were improved by Ag surface plasmon. • The electrical conductivity of ITO was increased by Ag nanoparticles.

  11. Improvement of optical and electrical properties of indium tin oxide layer of GaN-based light-emitting diode by surface plasmon in silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the effect of silver (Ag) nanoparticles on the optical transmittance and electrical conductivity of indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent conducting layer deposited on p-GaN layer of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The sheet resistance of ITO and the series resistance of LEDs were decreased due to the increased electrical conductivity of ITO by Ag nanoparticles, compared with those of the LEDs with a bare ITO only. The ITO transmittance was also improved by localized surface plasmon resonance between the incident light and the randomly distributed Ag nanoparticles on ITO. The optical output power of LEDs with Ag nanoparticles on ITO was increased by 16% at 20 mA of injection current. - Highlights: • We studied the effect of Ag nanoparticles deposited on ITO on the properties of LED. • The optical power of LED and transmittance of ITO were improved by Ag surface plasmon. • The electrical conductivity of ITO was increased by Ag nanoparticles

  12. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  13. SPS RF cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. A power of up to 790 kW can be supplied to each giving a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities.

  14. Development of a cavity enhanced aerosol albedometer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, W.; Xu, X.; Dong, M.; Chen, W.; X. Gu; Hu, C; Huang, Y.; Gao, X; Huang, W.; Zhang, W

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development of a cavity enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach and an integrating sphere (IS) for simultaneous in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients in the exact same sample volume. The cavity enhanced albedometer employed a blue light-emitting diode (LED) based IBBCEAS approach for the measurement of wavelength-resolv...

  15. Deviation of the effective point of measurement of the Markus chamber from the front surface of its air cavity in electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA International Code of Practice TRS-381 recommends design requirements for plane parallel chambers allowing to assume cavity perturbation effects to be negligible and the effective point of measurement to be situated on the front surface of the air volume. For the Markus chamber which does not meet these requirements it is shown that the effective point of measurement is shifted from the front surface by about 0.5 mm. Neglecting this effect may lead to dose errors of a few percent in the vicinity of the therapeutic range. (author)

  16. Development of a large-area planar surface-wave plasma source with a cavity launcher driven by a 915 MHz UHF wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large-area planar surface-wave plasma (SWP) source driven by a 915 MHz ultrahigh frequency (UHF) wave was developed. To avoid using large, thick dielectric plates as vacuum windows, we propose a cavity launcher consisting of a cylindrical cavity with several small quartz discs at the bottom. Three types of launchers with quartz discs located at different positions were tested to compare their plasma production efficiencies and spatial distributions of electron density. With the optimum launcher, large-area plasma discharges with a radial uniformity within ±10% were obtained in a radius of about 25–30 cm in Ar gas at 8 Pa for incident power in the range 0.5–2.5 kW. The maximum electron density and temperature were approximately (0.95–1.1) × 1011 cm−3 and 1.9–2.0 eV, respectively, as measured by a Langmuir probe located 24 cm below the bottom of the cavity launcher. Using an Ar/NH3 SWP with the optimum launcher, we demonstrated large-area amino-group surface modification of polyurethane sheets. Experimental results indicated that a uniform amino-group modification was achieved over a radius of approximately 40 cm, which is slightly larger than the radial uniformity of the electron density distribution. (paper)

  17. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  18. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  19. Enhanced optical output and reduction of the quantum-confined Stark effect in surface plasmon-enhanced green light-emitting diodes with gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chu-Young; Park, Seong-Ju

    2016-04-01

    We report the optical properties of localized surface plasmon (LSP)-enhanced green light-emitting diodes (LEDs) containing gold (Au) nanoparticles embedded in a p-GaN layer. The photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) intensities of a green LED with Au nanoparticles were enhanced by the coupling between excitons and LSPs. Excitation power-dependent PL and injection current-dependent EL measurements revealed that the blue-shift of PL and EL peaks with increasing carrier density was smaller for the LSP-enhanced LED compared with that for a conventional LED. The increased optical output power and decrease in blue-shift of the LED with Au nanoparticles were attributed to the increased radiative recombination efficiency of carriers induced by the LSP-coupling process and the compensation of the polarization-induced electric fields with LSP-enhanced local fields, both of which suppressed the quantum-confined Stark effect. PMID:27137038

  20. Band engineering for surface emission enhancement in Al-rich AlGaN-based deep-ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huimin; Yu, Tongjun; Chen, Xinjuan; Wang, Jianping; Zhang, Guoyi

    2016-05-01

    The optical polarization properties of Al-rich AlGaN/AlN quantum wells (QWs) with different structure parameters were analyzed using the modified theoretical model based on the effective mass equation. It is demonstrated that the optical polarization properties of AlGaN-based QWs are determined by the valence subband structure, including the energy level order and the valence subband coupling. The results show that the TE-polarized emission is enhanced in Al-rich AlGaN/AlN QWs with smaller well width, a buffer layer inducing compressive stress, and a staggered well layer owing to the change in the valence subband structure. Hence, the enhancement of surface emission from deep-ultraviolet (DUV) AlGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) can be realized by adjusting the QW structure parameters to induce a valence subband change.

  1. Study on the generation of high-power terahertz wave from surface-emitted THz-wave parametric oscillator with MgO:LiNbO3 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyang; Yao, Jianquan; Xu, Degang; Zhong, Kai; Bing, Pibin; Wang, Jingli

    2010-11-01

    High-power nanosecond pulsed THz-wave radiation was achieved via a surface-emitted THz-wave parametric oscillator (TPO). The effective parametric gain length under the condition of noncollinear phase matching was calculated to optimize the parameters of the TPO. Only one MgO:LiNbO3 crystal with large volume was used as gain medium. THz-wave radiation from 0.8 to 2.9 THz was obtained. The maximum THz-wave output was 289.9 nJ/pulse at 1.94 THz when pump power density was 211 MW/cm2, corresponding to the energy conversion efficiency of 3.43×10-6 and the photon conversion efficiency of about 0.05%. The far-field divergence angle of THz-wave radiation was 0.0204 rad at vertical direction and 0.0068 rad at horizontal direction.

  2. Effect of sheath potential on electromagnetic radiation emitted from the rear surface of a metallic foil target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In ultra-intense laser-matter interactions, intense electric fields formed at the rear surface of a foil target may have strong influences on the motion of energetic electrons, and thereby affect the electromagnetic emissions from the rear surface, usually ascribed to transition radiation. Due to the electric fields, transition radiation occurs twice and bremsstrahlung radiation also happens because the electrons will cross the rear surface twice and have large accelerations.In the optic region, transition radiation is dominant. The radiation spectrum depends on the electric field only when the electrons are monochromatic, and becomes independent of the electric field when the electrons have a broadband momentum distribution. Therefore, in an actual experiment, the electric field at the rear surface of a foil could not be studied just with the measurement of optic emissions. In the terahertz region, both bremsstrahlung and transition radiations should be taken into account, and the radiation power could be enhanced in comparison with that without the inclusion of bremsstrahlung radiation. The frequency at which the maximum terahertz radiation appears depends on the electric field.

  3. Hybrid vertical-cavity laser with lateral emission into a silicon waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Gyeong Cheol; Xue, Weiqi; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper; Chung, Il-Sug

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an optically-pumped III-V/Si vertical-cavity laser with lateral emission into a silicon waveguide. This on-chip hybrid laser comprises a distributed Bragg reflector, a III-V active layer, and a high-contrast grating reflector, which simultaneously funnels light into...... the waveguide integrated with the laser. This laser has the advantages of long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, such as low threshold and high side-mode suppression ratio, while allowing integration with silicon photonic circuits, and is fabricated using CMOS compatible processes...

  4. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  5. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  6. Detection of the surface contamination with nuclides emitting low-energy β-rays by direct measurement method using a GM survey-meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a direct measurement method using a GM survey-meter, the detection efficiency and detection limit against surface contamination with nuclides emitting β-rays on a polyethylene-coated paper were examined. Three nuclides, 14C, 35S and 32P were used as a source. The detection efficiency against 14C, 35S and 32P at the place of 5.0 mm distance from the detection face of the survey-meter was approximately 1.4, 1.9 and 34.5%, respectively. Although the detection efficiency obtained for 32P was the same as the value showed in the instruction manual, that of 14C was smaller than that of the instruction manual. It is considered that such a difference in detection efficiency between 32P and 14C is ascribed to difference in source efficiency. Furthermore the detection limit against 14C, 35S and 32P at the distance of 5.0 mm was about 3.6, 2.6 and 0.2 Bq/cm2, respectively. Hence it appears that the direct measurement method using the GM survey-meter is useful to check the surface contamination with 14C or 35S in a controlled area since the surface contamination density limit in a controlled area is 40 Bq/cm2. (author)

  7. High Resolution Trichromatic Road Surface Scanning with a Line Scan Camera and Light Emitting Diode Lighting for Road-Kill Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Lopes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a road surface scanning system that operates with a trichromatic line scan camera with light emitting diode (LED lighting achieving road surface resolution under a millimeter. It was part of a project named Roadkills—Intelligent systems for surveying mortality of amphibians in Portuguese roads, sponsored by the Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation. A trailer was developed in order to accommodate the complete system with standalone power generation, computer image capture and recording, controlled lighting to operate day or night without disturbance, incremental encoder with 5000 pulses per revolution attached to one of the trailer wheels, under a meter Global Positioning System (GPS localization, easy to utilize with any vehicle with a trailer towing system and focused on a complete low cost solution. The paper describes the system architecture of the developed prototype, its calibration procedure, the performed experimentation and some obtained results, along with a discussion and comparison with existing systems. Sustained operating trailer speeds of up to 30 km/h are achievable without loss of quality at 4096 pixels’ image width (1 m width of road surface with 250 µm/pixel resolution. Higher scanning speeds can be achieved by lowering the image resolution (120 km/h with 1 mm/pixel. Computer vision algorithms are under development to operate on the captured images in order to automatically detect road-kills of amphibians.

  8. Study of ethanolamine surface treatment on the metal-oxide electron transport layer in inverted InP quantum dot light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ilwan; Kim, Jiwan; Park, Chang Jun; Ippen, Christian; Greco, Tonino; Oh, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongno; Kim, Won Keun; Wedel, Armin; Han, Chul Jong; Park, Sung Kyu

    2015-11-01

    The present work shows the effect of ethanolamine surface treatment on inverted InP quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) with inorganic metal oxide layers. In the inverted structure of ITO/ZnO/InP QDs/CBP/MoO3/Al, a sol-gel derived ZnO film was used as an electron transport layer (ETL) and MoO3 was used as a hole injection layer (HIL). First, ethanolamine was treated as a surface modifier on top of the ZnO electron transport layer. The optical performance of the QD-LED device was improved by the ethanolamine surface treatment. Second, low temperature annealing (<200°C) was performed on the ZnO sol-gel electron transport layer, followed by an investigation of the effect of the ZnO annealing temperature. The efficiency of the inverted QD-LEDs was significantly enhanced (more than 3-fold) by optimization of the ZnO annealing temperature. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. High Resolution Trichromatic Road Surface Scanning with a Line Scan Camera and Light Emitting Diode Lighting for Road-Kill Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Gil; Ribeiro, A Fernando; Sillero, Neftalí; Gonçalves-Seco, Luís; Silva, Cristiano; Franch, Marc; Trigueiros, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a road surface scanning system that operates with a trichromatic line scan camera with light emitting diode (LED) lighting achieving road surface resolution under a millimeter. It was part of a project named Roadkills-Intelligent systems for surveying mortality of amphibians in Portuguese roads, sponsored by the Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation. A trailer was developed in order to accommodate the complete system with standalone power generation, computer image capture and recording, controlled lighting to operate day or night without disturbance, incremental encoder with 5000 pulses per revolution attached to one of the trailer wheels, under a meter Global Positioning System (GPS) localization, easy to utilize with any vehicle with a trailer towing system and focused on a complete low cost solution. The paper describes the system architecture of the developed prototype, its calibration procedure, the performed experimentation and some obtained results, along with a discussion and comparison with existing systems. Sustained operating trailer speeds of up to 30 km/h are achievable without loss of quality at 4096 pixels' image width (1 m width of road surface) with 250 µm/pixel resolution. Higher scanning speeds can be achieved by lowering the image resolution (120 km/h with 1 mm/pixel). Computer vision algorithms are under development to operate on the captured images in order to automatically detect road-kills of amphibians. PMID:27104535

  10. Earth Abundant Iron-Rich N-Doped Graphene Based Spacer and Cavity Materials for Surface Plasmon-Coupled Emission Enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Vernekar, Dnyanesh; Jaiswal, Garima; Jagadeesan, Dinesh; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2016-05-18

    We demonstrate for the first time the use of Fe-based nanoparticles on N-doped graphene as spacer and cavity materials and study their plasmonic effect on the spontaneous emission of a radiating dipole. Fe-C-MF was produced by pyrolizing FeOOH and melamine formaldehyde precursor on graphene, while Fe-C-PH was produced by pyrolizing the Fe-phenanthroline complex on graphene. The use of the Fe-C-MF composite consisting of Fe-rich crystalline phases supported on N-doped graphene presented a spacer material with 116-fold fluorescence enhancements. On the other hand, the Fe-C-PH/Ag based cavity resulted in an 82-fold enhancement in Surface Plasmon-Coupled Emission (SPCE), with high directionality and polarization of Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) emission owing to Casimir and Purcell effects. The use of a mobile phone as a cost-effective fluorescence detection device in the present work opens up a flexible perspective for the study of different nanomaterials as tunable substrates in cavity mode and spacer applications. PMID:27128348

  11. Detection of cell surface calreticulin as a potential cancer biomarker using near-infrared emitting gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Bala Subramaniyam; Giorgakis, Emmanouil; Lopez-Davila, Victor; Dashtarzheneha, Ashkan Kamali; Loizidou, Marilena

    2016-07-15

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a cytoplasmic calcium-binding protein. The aim of this study was to investigate CRT presence in cancer with the use of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and to explore AuNC synthesis using mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) as a coating agent. MSA-coated AuNCs conferred well-dispersed, bio-stable, water-soluble nanoparticles with bioconjugation capacity and 800-850 nm fluorescence after broad-band excitation. Cell-viability assay revealed good AuNC tolerability. A native CRT amino-terminus corresponding peptide sequence was synthesised and used to generate rabbit site-specific antibodies. Target specificity was demonstrated with antibody blocking in colorectal and breast cancer cell models; human umbilical vein endothelial cells served as controls. We demonstrated a novel route of AuNC/MSA manufacture and CRT presence on colonic and breast cancerous cell surface. AuNCs served as fluorescent bio-probes specifically recognising surface-bound CRT. These results are promising in terms of AuNC application in cancer theranostics and CRT use as surface biomarker in human cancer. PMID:27255548

  12. Detection of cell surface calreticulin as a potential cancer biomarker using near-infrared emitting gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyam Ramesh, Bala; Giorgakis, Emmanouil; Lopez-Davila, Victor; Kamali Dashtarzheneha, Ashkan; Loizidou, Marilena

    2016-07-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a cytoplasmic calcium-binding protein. The aim of this study was to investigate CRT presence in cancer with the use of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and to explore AuNC synthesis using mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) as a coating agent. MSA-coated AuNCs conferred well-dispersed, bio-stable, water-soluble nanoparticles with bioconjugation capacity and 800–850 nm fluorescence after broad-band excitation. Cell-viability assay revealed good AuNC tolerability. A native CRT amino-terminus corresponding peptide sequence was synthesised and used to generate rabbit site-specific antibodies. Target specificity was demonstrated with antibody blocking in colorectal and breast cancer cell models; human umbilical vein endothelial cells served as controls. We demonstrated a novel route of AuNC/MSA manufacture and CRT presence on colonic and breast cancerous cell surface. AuNCs served as fluorescent bio-probes specifically recognising surface-bound CRT. These results are promising in terms of AuNC application in cancer theranostics and CRT use as surface biomarker in human cancer.

  13. An Analysis of the Temperature and Field Dependence of the RF Surface Resistance of Nitrogen-Doped Niobium SRF Cavities with Respect to Existing Theoretical Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Charles E. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Palczewski, Ari D. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress with the reduction of rf surface resistance (Rs) of niobium SRF cavities via the use of high temperature surface doping by nitrogen has opened a new regime for energy efficient accelerator applications. For particular doping conditions one observes dramatic decreases in Rs with increasing surface magnetic fields. The observed variations as a function of temperature may be analyzed in the context of recent theoretical treatments in hopes of gaining insight into the underlying beneficial mechanism of the nitrogen treatment. Systematic data sets of Q0 vs. Eacc vs. temperature acquired during the high Q0 R&D work of the past year will be compared with theoretical model predictions..

  14. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to cavities. Treatment may involve: Fillings Crowns Root canals Dentists fill teeth by removing the decayed tooth ... gold, porcelain, or porcelain attached to metal. A root canal is recommended if the nerve in a tooth ...

  15. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  16. Improved light emission of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by efficient localized surface plasmon coupling with silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: • A simply fabricated platform for high efficiency plasmonic LED is demonstrated. • Blue light emission is increased by 4.4-fold via localized surface plasmon coupling. • A 1.5-fold higher spontaneous emission rate confirms the fast recombination channel. • 53% enhancement in internal quantum efficiency was performed. -- Abstract: An approach for fabricating localized surface plasmon (LSP)-enhanced light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with Ag nanoparticles (NPs) in close proximity to the active layers is demonstrated. The blue light emission from InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) is increased by 4.4-fold at a wavelength of 470 nm. A faster decay time and a ∼1.5-fold higher spontaneous emission rate confirm the fast recombination channel provided by the LSP coupling mode of the Ag NPs. The internal quantum efficiency is improved by ∼53%. The proposed approach provides a low-cost, large-area, and simple platform for the development of high-efficiency InGaN-based plasmonic LEDs

  17. Development of a cost effective surface-patterned transparent conductive coating as top-contact of light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sol-gel process has been used to form indium zinc oxide films using an optimized combination of zinc to indium concentration in the precursor solutions. Different structures, like one (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) gratings and diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in the form of Fresnel lens are fabricated on the film surface of proposed top metal contact of LED by imprint soft lithography technique. These structures can enhance the LED's light extraction efficiency (LEE) or can shape the output beam pattern, respectively. Several characterizations are done to analyze the material and structural properties of the films. The presence of 1D and 2D gratings as well as DOEs is confirmed from field emission scanning electron and atomic force microscopes analyses. Although, X-ray diffraction shows amorphous nature of the film, but transmission electron microscopy study shows that it is nano crystalline in nature having fine particles (∼8 nm) of hexagonal ZnO. Shrinkage behaviour of gratings as a function of curing temperature is explained by Fourier transform infra-red spectra and thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The visible transmission and sheet resistance of the sample are found comparable to tin doped indium oxide (ITO). Therefore, the film can compete as low cost substitute of ITO as top metal contact of LEDs

  18. Development of a cost effective surface-patterned transparent conductive coating as top-contact of light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haldar, Arpita [Department of Applied Optics and Photonics, University of Calcutta, Kolkata-700009 (India); Sol-Gel Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032 (India); Bera, Susanta; Jana, Sunirmal, E-mail: sjana@cgcri.res.in, E-mail: srirajib@yahoo.com [Sol-Gel Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032 (India); Bhattacharya, Kallol; Chakraborty, Rajib, E-mail: sjana@cgcri.res.in, E-mail: srirajib@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Optics and Photonics, University of Calcutta, Kolkata-700009 (India)

    2014-05-21

    Sol-gel process has been used to form indium zinc oxide films using an optimized combination of zinc to indium concentration in the precursor solutions. Different structures, like one (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) gratings and diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in the form of Fresnel lens are fabricated on the film surface of proposed top metal contact of LED by imprint soft lithography technique. These structures can enhance the LED's light extraction efficiency (LEE) or can shape the output beam pattern, respectively. Several characterizations are done to analyze the material and structural properties of the films. The presence of 1D and 2D gratings as well as DOEs is confirmed from field emission scanning electron and atomic force microscopes analyses. Although, X-ray diffraction shows amorphous nature of the film, but transmission electron microscopy study shows that it is nano crystalline in nature having fine particles (∼8 nm) of hexagonal ZnO. Shrinkage behaviour of gratings as a function of curing temperature is explained by Fourier transform infra-red spectra and thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The visible transmission and sheet resistance of the sample are found comparable to tin doped indium oxide (ITO). Therefore, the film can compete as low cost substitute of ITO as top metal contact of LEDs.

  19. Study of optical radiation emitted during ion sputtering and its meaning for surface and in depth elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical radiation from ion sputtered target particles was studied. Spectra were recorded in the range 2000-6000 A for various monoelemental (Al, Ag, C, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, In, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti, V, Th and U) and few compound (B203, GaP, SiO2 and glass) targets. Besides discrete lines a continuous structure in the spectrum of Mo, Nb, V, Th and U was observed. Contrary to other reports continuous features were absent for Ni and Ti targets. During sputtering of a pure Si crystal opticall transitions from B 1 were detected. Their intensities depended on the surface preparation. The implanted profiles of 11B and 69Ga in Si for different energies of implanted ions have been determined by optical means. The sputtering yields of Ni target were also determined for various projectiles (N, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe and Bi) of energies (25-75 keV). A possibility of using the secondary ion photon emission for chemical analysis has been discussed. (author)

  20. Three-dimensional analysis of the pulp cavity on surface models of molar teeth, using X-ray micro-computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvart, Merete; Bjørndal, Lars; Darvann, Tron Andre;

    2012-01-01

    im. The purpose of this study was to investigate the scanning and segmentation precision of surface models of molars for the detection of small volumes, such as the reduced pulp cavity; formation of mineral deposits; detection of narrow root canals and to improve the clinical and morphological...... understanding of the number of root canals and their configuration. Methods. Eighteen human molars were scanned using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The reconstruction of the surface models had a precision of <1 voxel, using three-dimensional software and quantitative color mapping. In order to relate the...... measurements to changes over time the size of the pulp chambers was classified in two well-defined groups. Results. The mineral deposits were more evenly distributed in small pulp chambers than in large, but complete root canal calcification was never observed. No difference was observed in the material with...

  1. Deterministic cavity quantum electrodynamics with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have employed radio-frequency trapping to localize a single 40Ca+-ion in a high-finesse optical cavity. By means of laser Doppler cooling, the position spread of the ion's wavefunction along the cavity axis was reduced to 42 nm, a fraction of the resonance wavelength of ionized calcium (λ = 397 nm). By controlling the position of the ion in the optical field, continuous and completely deterministic coupling of ion and field was realized. The precise three-dimensional location of the ion in the cavity was measured by observing the fluorescent light emitted upon excitation in the cavity field. The single-ion system is ideally suited to implement cavity quantum electrodynamics under cw conditions. To this end we operate the cavity on the D3/2-P1/2 transition of 40Ca+ (λ 866 nm). Applications include the controlled generation of single-photon pulses with high efficiency and two-ion quantum gates

  2. Analysis of relative concentration of ethanol and other odorous compounds (OCs emitted from the working surface at a landfill in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    Full Text Available Estimating odor emissions from landfill sites is a complicated task because of the various chemical and biological species that exist in landfill gases. In this study, the relative concentration of ethanol and other odorous compounds emitted from the working surface at a landfill in China was analyzed. Gas sampling was conducted at the landfill on a number of selected days from March 2012 to March 2014, which represented different periods throughout the two years. A total of 41, 59, 66, 54, 63, 54, 41, and 42 species of odorous compounds were identified and quantified in eight sampling activities, respectively; a number of 86 species of odorous compounds were identified and quantified all together in the study. The measured odorous compounds were classified into six different categories (Oxygenated compounds, Halogenated compounds, Terpenes, Sulfur compounds, Aromatics, and Hydrocarbons. The total average concentrations of the oxygenated compounds, sulfur compounds, aromatics, halogenated compounds, hydrocarbons, and terpenes were 2.450 mg/m3, 0.246 mg/m3, 0.203 mg/m3, 0.319 mg/m3, 0.530 mg/m3, and 0.217 mg/m3, respectively. The relative concentrations of 59 odorous compounds with respect to the concentration of ethyl alcohol (1000 ppm were determined. The dominant contaminants that cause odor pollution around the landfill are ethyl sulfide, methyl mercaptan, acetaldehyde, and hydrogen sulfide; dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl sulfide also contribute to the pollution to a certain degree.

  3. Technical tasks in superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kenji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The feature of superconducting rf cavities is an extremely small surface resistance on the wall. It brings a large energy saving in the operation, even those are cooled with liquid helium. That also makes possible to operate themselves in a higher field gradient comparing to normal conducting cavities, and brings to make accelerators compact. These merits are very important for the future accelerator engineering which is planed at JAERI for the neutron material science and nuclear waste transmutation. This machine is a high intensity proton linac and uses sc cavities in the medium and high {beta} sections. In this paper, starting R and D of proton superconducting cavities, several important technical points which come from the small surface resistance of sc cavities, are present to succeed it and also differences between the medium and high - {beta} structures are discussed. (author)

  4. Optofluidic Fabry-Pérot Micro-Cavities Comprising Curved Surfaces for Homogeneous Liquid Refractometry—Design, Simulation, and Experimental Performance Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Gaber

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the scope of miniaturized optical sensors for liquid refractometry, this work details the design, numerical simulation, and experimental characterization of a Fabry-Pérot resonator consisting of two deeply-etched silicon cylindrical mirrors with a micro-tube in between holding the liquid analyte under study. The curved surfaces of the tube and the cylindrical mirrors provide three-dimensional light confinement and enable achieving stability for the cavity illuminated by a Gaussian beam input. The resonant optofluidic cavity attains a high-quality factor (Q—over 2800—which is necessary for a sensitive refractometer, not only by providing a sharp interference spectrum peak that enables accurate tracing of the peak wavelengths shifts, but also by providing steep side peaks, which enables detection of refractive index changes by power level variations when operating at a fixed wavelength. The latter method can achieve refractometry without the need for spectroscopy tools, provided certain criteria explained in the details are met. By experimentally measuring mixtures of acetone-toluene with different ratios, refractive index variations of 0.0005 < Δn < 0.0022 could be detected, with sensitivity as high as 5500 μW/RIU.

  5. Narrow-band amplified photoluminescence of amorphous silicon quantum dots via the coupling between localized surface plasmon and Fabry-Pérot cavity modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Lin, Ming-Yi; Hsiao, Li-Jen; Choi, Wing-Kit; Lin, Hoang Yan

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally investigate the multifold intensity enhancement and spectral narrowing of photoluminescence (PL) from amorphous silicon quantum dots (a-Si QDs) embedded in a silicon-rich SiOx film of the Ag/SiOx:a-Si QDs/Au plasmonic nanocavity, through the resonance coupling between the localized surface plasmon (LSP) mode and the Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity mode, by tuning a one-dimensional (1-D) Ag grating on the top. The LSP resonance can be precisely tuned by adjusting the Ag line widths of the 1-D Ag grating. It is found that the LSP mode strongly couples with the FP cavity mode, resulting in a narrower emission line width and a larger PL enhancement. An optimized Ag grating structure is found to exhibit a narrow emission line width of 15 nm and 2.77-fold enhancement in the PL peak intensity, as compared to an SiOx:a-Si QDs/Au structure without 1-D Ag grating, due to the strong resonance coupling between the two modes.

  6. Effect of External Magnetic Fields on the Operation of RF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments have shown severe surface damage and a reduction of the maximum accelerating gradient for an rf cavity that is operating under external magnetic fields. This implies that serious problems may occur in lattices where rf cavities and external magnetic fields coexist, such as those of the proposed neutrino factory and muon collider. Although existing data suggest that this magnetic field dependent breakdown is associated with the emission of electrons from locally enhanced field regions on the cavity surface, the mechanism that drives this effect is not yet well understood. Here, we show that such field emitted electrons are accelerated by the cavity and focused by the magnetic field to the other side of the cavity where they heat its surface. We show that if the magnetic field is strong, significant surface deformation can occur that eventually could limit the accelerating gradient of the cavity. Results of our model are compared to the existing experimental data from an 805 MHz cavity. The geometry of the pillbox cavity in our case is more complicated, and the analysis depends on the electron energies, focused dimensions, and angle of impact, but damage may reasonably be expected with similar cyclical heating above 40 C. However, it is not yet known what the mechanism is for such surface damage to cause a cavity to breakdown. One possibility is that if electrons are focused on a location with a high surface gradient, then the local damage will generate new asperities with higher FN enhancement factors, thus initiating breakdown. While our preliminary analysis offers some quantification on the effects of the magnetic fields on the cavity's operation, other theoretical issues were not addressed. For instance, emission from secondary electrons was disregarded, the asperity was placed on axis, the magnetic field was assumed as uniform, the thermal-diffusion calculation ignored the shape of the rise time, and adopted an approximate calculation. On the

  7. CLASSIFYING NODULAR LESIONS OF ORAL CAVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Sumit Bhateja

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of many lesions of the oral cavity is challenging to most cliniciansbecause of their uncommon prevalence. A number of cystic, osteodystrophic,microbial, tumor and tumor like lesions of the oral cavity are present withcharacteristic exophytic/raised surface; which makes their diagnosis and studysimpler. The present article is attempted at classifying the common nodular lesions ofthe oral cavity.

  8. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  9. Cavity-water interface is polar

    OpenAIRE

    Friesen, Allan D.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of numerical simulations of the electrostatics and dynamics of water hydration shells surrounding Kihara cavities given by a Lennard-Jones (LJ) layer at the surface of a hard-sphere cavity. The local dielectric response of the hydration layer substantially exceeds that of bulk water, with the magnitude of the dielectric constant peak in the shell increasing with the growing cavity size. The polar shell propagates into bulk water to approximately the cavity radius. The s...

  10. Two-element phased array of antiguided vertical-cavity lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate antiguided coupling of two adjacent vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), obtaining a 1x2 phase-locked array at 869 nm. The lateral index modification required for antiguiding is achieved by a patterned 3 nm etch performed between two epitaxial growths. In contrast with prior coupled VCSELs, adjacent antiguided VCSELs can emit in phase and produce a single on-axis lobe in the far field. Greater than 2 mW of in-phase output power is demonstrated with two VCSELs separated by 8 μm. Moreover, phase locking of two VCSELs separated by 20 μm is observed, indicating the possibility of a promising class of optical circuits based upon VCSELs that interact horizontally and emit vertically. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics

  11. Cryogenic rf test of the first plasma etched SRF cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyay, J.; Palczewski, A.; Popović, S.; Valente-Feliciano, A. -M.; Im, D.; Phillips, L; Vušković, L.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma etching has a potential to be an alternative processing technology for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. An apparatus and a method are developed for plasma etching of the inner surfaces of SRF cavities. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity is used. The single cell cavity is mechanically polished, buffer chemically etched afterwards and rf tested at cryogenic temperatures for a baseline test. This cavity i...

  12. Green (In,Ga,Al)P-GaP light-emitting diodes grown on high-index GaAs surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, N. N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Lyytikäinen, J.; Okhotnikov, O.; Cherkashin, N. A.; Shernyakov, Yu M.; Payusov, A. S.; Gordeev, N. Y.; Maximov, M. V.; Schlichting, S.; Nippert, F.; Hoffmann, A.

    2015-03-01

    We report on green (550-560 nm) electroluminescence (EL) from (Al0.5Ga0.5)0.5In0.5P-(Al0.8Ga0.2)0.5In0.5P double p-i-n heterostructures with monolayer-scale tensile strained GaP insertions in the cladding layers and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based thereupon. The structures are grown side-by-side on high-index and (100) GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies indicate that GaP insertions are flat, thus the GaP-barrier substrate orientation-dependent heights should match the predictions of the flat model. At moderate current densities (~500 A/cm2) the EL intensity of the structures is comparable for all substrate orientations. Opposite to the (100)-grown strictures, the EL spectra of (211) and (311)-grown devices are shifted towards shorter wavelengths (~550 nm at room temperature). At high current densities (>1 kA/cm2) a much higher EL intensity is achieved for the devices grown on high-index substrates. The integrated intensity of (311)-grown structures gradually saturates at current densities above 4 kA/cm2, whereas no saturation is revealed for (211)-grown structures up to the current densities above 14 kA/cm2. We attribute the effect to the surface orientation-dependent engineering of the GaP band structure which prevents the escape of the nonequilibrium electrons into the indirect conduction band minima of the p- doped (Al0.8Ga0.2)0.5In0.5P cladding layers.

  13. Properties of a gold-deposited surface plasmon resonance-based glass rod sensor with various light-emitting diodes and its application to a refractometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsushio, Masaru; Higo, Morihide

    2012-08-01

    The performance of a simple sensor system prepared using gold (Au)-deposited glass rods of 1 to 4 mm in diameter with a deposition length of 100 mm based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is presented. The sensor properties of the Au-deposited glass rods of 2 mm in diameter with deposition lengths of 10 to 100 mm are also presented. The sensor system consists of a light-emitting diode (LED) as the light source and a photodiode (PD) as the detector. The response curves and sensor properties of the Au-deposited glass rod with a Au film thickness of 45 nm obtained by using three LEDs with yellowish green (563 nm), red (660 nm), and infrared (940 nm) emissions were investigated. The results were compared with those of a corresponding Au-deposited optical fiber sensor with a core diameter of 0.2 mm. Though the sensitivity, response, and detection limit of the Au-deposited glass rod sensor are lower than those of the optical fiber sensor, the fabrication and handling of the Au-deposited glass rod sensor are easier because of the robustness. Since the dielectric constant of Au changes with the light wavelength, the sensor properties of both the Au-deposited glass rod sensor and the optical fiber sensor depend strongly on the wavelength of the incident light and can be controlled by changing the LED emission wavelength. This sensor system is a new SPR-based refractometer with easy construction and operation. Ethanol concentrations in various spirits were measured with this SPR-based refractometer and the results agreed well with those measured with an Abbe refractometer.

  14. Effectiveness of charged noncovalent polymer coatings against protein adsorption to silica surfaces studied by evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy and capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselberg, Rob; van der Sneppen, Lineke; Ariese, Freek; Ubachs, Wim; Gooijer, Cees; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W

    2009-12-15

    Protein adsorption to silica surfaces is a notorious problem in analytical separations. Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) were employed to investigate the capability of positively charged polymer coatings to minimize the adsorption of basic proteins. Adsorption of cytochrome c (cyt c) to silica coated with a single layer of polybrene (PB), or a triple layer of PB, dextran sulfate (DS), and PB, was studied and compared to bare silica. Direct analysis of silica surfaces by EW-CRDS revealed that both coatings effectively reduce irreversible protein adsorption. Significant adsorption was observed only for protein concentrations above 400 microM, whereas the PB-DS-PB coating was shown to be most effective and stable. CE analyses of cyt c were performed with and without the respective coatings applied to the fused-silica capillary wall. Monitoring of the electroosmotic flow and protein peak areas indicated a strong reduction of irreversible protein adsorption by the positively charged coatings. Determination of the electrophoretic mobility and peak width of cyt c revealed reversible protein adsorption to the PB coating. It is concluded that the combination of results from EW-CRDS and CE provides highly useful information on the adsorptive characteristics of bare and coated silica surfaces toward basic proteins. PMID:19921852

  15. Recent Approaches for Broadening the Spectral Bandwidth in Resonant Cavity Optoelectronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gun Wu Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resonant cavity optoelectronic devices, such as vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs, resonant cavity enhanced photodetectors (RCEPDs, and electroabsorption modulators (EAMs, show improved performance over their predecessors by placing the active device structure inside a resonant cavity. The effect of the optical cavity, which allows wavelength selectivity and enhancement of the optical field due to resonance, allows the devices to be made thinner and therefore faster, while simultaneously increasing the quantum efficiency at the resonant wavelengths. However, the narrow spectral bandwidth significantly reduces operating tolerances, which leads to severe problems in applications such as optical communication, imaging, and biosensing. Recently, in order to overcome such drawbacks and/or to accomplish multiple functionalities, several approaches for broadening the spectral bandwidth in resonant cavity optoelectronic devices have been extensively studied. This paper reviews the recent progress in techniques for wide spectral bandwidth that include a coupled microcavity, asymmetric tandem quantum wells, and high index contrast distributed Bragg-reflectors. This review will describe design guidelines for specific devices together with experimental considerations in practical applications.

  16. Light emitting device having peripheral emissive region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-05-28

    Light emitting devices are provided that include one or more OLEDs disposed only on a peripheral region of the substrate. An OLED may be disposed only on a peripheral region of a substantially transparent substrate and configured to emit light into the substrate. Another surface of the substrate may be roughened or include other features to outcouple light from the substrate. The edges of the substrate may be beveled and/or reflective. The area of the OLED(s) may be relatively small compared to the substrate surface area through which light is emitted from the device. One or more OLEDs also or alternatively may be disposed on an edge of the substrate about perpendicular to the surface of the substrate through which light is emitted, such that they emit light into the substrate. A mode expanding region may be included between each such OLED and the substrate.

  17. RF superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Y

    1980-01-01

    The history and present activity in research on RF superconducting cavities in various countries are reviewed. The program of the July 1980 Karlsruhe workshop is reproduced and research activity in this field at Stanford HEPL and SLAC, Cornell, Oregon, Brookhaven, KEK (Japan), Weismann (Israel), Genoa, CERN and Karlsruhe (KfK) listed. The theoretical basis of surface resistance and intracavity magnetic field, multipacing and non-resonant electron loading are outlined. (20 refs).

  18. Sensitivity of surface resistance measurement of HTS thin films by cavity resonator, dielectric resonator and microstrip line resonator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N D Kataria; Mukul Misra; R Pinto

    2002-05-01

    Microwave surface resistance s of silver-doped YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO) thin film, deposited by laser ablation technique on 10 mm × 10 mm LaAlO3 substrate, has been measured by resonant techniques in the frequency range from 5 GHz to 20 GHz. The geometrical factor of the sample and the resonator has been determined theoretically by the knowledge of the electromagnetic field distribution in the resonators. The microwave surface resistance of the superconducting sample is then extracted from the measured value as a function of temperature. The sensitivity of the s measurement, that is, the relative change in the value with the change in the s value is determined for each resonator.

  19. Radiation Simulations of Top-Emitting Organic Light-Emitting Devices With Two- and Three-Microcavity Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiun-Haw; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Hsiao, Chia-Chiang; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, C. C.

    2006-06-01

    We demonstrate the simulation results of the radiation properties from top-emitting organic light-emitting devices (top-emitting OLEDs) with two- and three-microcavity structures based on the general electromagnetic theory. The parameters of the layer thickness and complex refractive index of each layer, the locations and density of the oscillating dipoles, and the emission photoluminescence spectrum are varied to optimize the device performance. In evaluating the deice performances, the output spectrum, the intensity distribution, and the viewing-angle characteristics of a top-emitting OLED are concerned. The simulation results are consistent with the Fabry-Pérot cavity equation, which can be used as a guideline for designing a two-cavity top-emitting OLED. In such a design process, the dipole position is chosen first. Then the thicknesses of the whole organic layer, the semi-transparent cathode, and the dielectric layer are adjusted for optimizing the device performance. In a three-cavity top-emitting OLED, not only the emission intensity and the viewing angle can be optimized at the same time, but also the emission wavelength can be independently tuned. Besides, the use of a three-cavity structure helps to narrow the spectral width and increase the color purity.

  20. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  1. Development of gas cluster ion beam surface treatments for reducing field emission and breakdown in RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, D R; Degenkolb, E; Wu, A T; Insepov, Z

    2006-11-01

    Sub-micron-scale surface roughness and contamination cause field emission that can lead to high voltage breakdown of electrodes, and these are limiting factors in the development of high gradient RF technology. We are studying various Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) treatments to smooth, clean, etch and/or chemically alter electrode surfaces to allow higher fields and accelerating gradients, and to reduce the time and cost of conditioning high voltage electrodes. For this paper, we have processed Nb, Stainless Steel, and Ti electrode materials using beams of Ar, O2, or NF3 +O2 clusters with accelerating potentials up to 35 kV. Using a Scanning Field Emission Microscope (SFEM), we have repeatedly seen a dramatic reduction in the number of field emission sites on Nb coupons treated with GCIB. Smoothing effects on Stainless steel and Ti substrates have been evaluated using AFM imaging and show that 200-nm wide polishing scratch marks are greatly attenuated. A 150-mm diameter GCIB treated stainless steel electrode has now shown virtually no DC field emission current at gradients over 20 MV/m.

  2. Guided access cavity preparation using cone-beam computed tomography and optical surface scans - an ex vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, J; Buchgreitz, M; Mortensen, D;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ex vivo, the accuracy of a preparation procedure planned for teeth with pulp canal obliteration (PCO) using a guide rail concept based on a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan merged with an optical surface scan. METHODOLOGY: A total of 48 teeth were mounted in acrylic blocks....... An apical canal preparation was created to simulate remnants of an apical root canal that acted as the target for a drill path. The test blocks were surface scanned, and merged with a CBCT scan, and a guide rail was made. A pathway for the bur was created through a metal sleeve within the guide rail...... into dentine. The distance was measured between the centres of the performed drill path and the apical target by two examiners. A maximum distance of 0.7 mm was defined based on the radius of the bur (0.6 mm) and the radius of a root canal just visible on a radiograph (0.1 mm). The t-test was used for...

  3. Enhancement of light output power of GaN-based light-emitting diodes with photonic quasi-crystal patterned on p-GaN surface and n-side sidewall roughing

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Fang-I; Yang, Jui-Fu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) structure on p-GaN surface and n-side roughing by nano-imprint lithography are fabricated and investigated. At an injection current of 20 mA, the LED with PQC structure on p-GaN surface and n-side roughing increased the light output power of the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well LEDs by a factor of 1.42, and the wall-plug efficiency is 26% higher than the conventional GaN-based LED type. After 500-h life tes...

  4. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  5. SPS RF System an Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X.

  6. Scaled experiments of explosions in cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grun, J.; Cranch, G. A.; Lunsford, R.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Weaver, J.; Dunlop, W.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-05-01

    Consequences of an explosion inside an air-filled cavity under the earth's surface are partly duplicated in a laboratory experiment on spatial scales 1000 smaller. The experiment measures shock pressures coupled into a block of material by an explosion inside a gas-filled cavity therein. The explosion is generated by suddenly heating a thin foil that is located near the cavity center with a short laser pulse, which turns the foil into expanding plasma, most of whose energy drives a blast wave in the cavity gas. Variables in the experiment are the cavity radius and explosion energy. Measurements and GEODYN code simulations show that shock pressures measured in the block exhibit a weak dependence on scaled cavity radius up to ˜25 m/kt1/3, above which they decrease rapidly. Possible mechanisms giving rise to this behavior are described. The applicability of this work to validating codes used to simulate full-scale cavity explosions is discussed.

  7. Proposal of a fluid flow layout to improve the heat transfer in the active absorber surface of solar central cavity receivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of concentrated solar power is to increase the thermal energy of a fluid, for the fluid to be used, for example, in a power cycle to generate electricity. Such applications present the requirement of appropriately designing the receiver active absorber surface, as the incident radiation flux can be very high. Besides that, the solar image in the receiver is not uniform, so conventional boilers designs are not well suited for these purposes. That point is particularly critical in solar central receivers systems (CRS), where concentrated solar flux is usually above 500 kW/m2, causing thermal and mechanical stress in the absorber panels. This paper analyzes a new thermofluidynamic design of a solar central receiver, which optimizes the heat transfer in the absorber surface. This conceptual receiver presents the following characteristics: the fluid flow pattern is designed according to the radiation flux map symmetry, so more uniform fluid temperatures at the receiver outlet are achieved; the heat transfer irreversibilities are reduced by circulating the fluid from the lower temperature region to the higher temperature region of the absorber surface; the width of each pass is adjusted to the solar flux gradient, to get lower temperature differences between the side tubes of the same pass; and the cooling requirement is ensured by means of adjusting the fluid flow velocity per tube, taking into account the pressure drop. This conceptual scheme has been applied to the particular case of a molten salt single cavity receiver, although the configuration proposed is suitable for other receiver designs and working fluids. - Highlights: ► The solar receiver design proposed optimizes heat transfer in the absorber surface. ► The fluid flow pattern is designed according to the solar flux map symmetry at noon. ► The fluid circulates from the lower to the higher temperature regions. ► The width of each pass is adjusted to the solar flux gradient. ► The

  8. Superconducting RF cavity R&D for future accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Ginsburg, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    High-beta superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) elliptical cavities are being developed for several accelerator projects including Project X, the European XFEL, and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Fermilab has recently established an extensive infrastructure for SRF cavity R&D for future accelerators, including cavity surface processing and testing and cavity assembly into cryomodules. Some highlights of the global effort in SRF R&D toward improving cavity performance, and Fermilab SR...

  9. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    Mechanical oscillators have been recently widely utilized to couple with optical and microwave photons in a variety of hybrid quantum systems, but they all lack the tunability. The magnetostrictive force provides an alternative mechanism to allow phonon to couple with a different type of information carrier-magnon, the collective excitation of magnetization whose frequency can be tuned by a bias magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate an intriguing hybrid system that consists of a magnonic, a mechanical, and a microwave resonator. The magnon-phonon interaction results in hallmark coherent phenomena such as magnomechanically induced transparency/absorption and magnomechanical parametric amplification. The magnetic field dependence of magnon provides our system with unprecedented tunability. Moreover, the great flexibility of our system allows us to achieve triple resonance among magnon, phonon and photon, which drastically enhances the magnomechanical interaction. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnetomechanics, opening up great opportunities in various applications, such as tunable microwave filter and amplifier, long-lifetime quantum memories, microwave-to-optics conversion.

  10. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  11. Scanning electron microscope observations on the monogenean parasite Paraquadriacanthus nasalis from the nasal cavities of the freshwater fish Clarias gariepinus in Egypt with a note on some surface features of its microhabitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Safaa Zaky

    2012-05-01

    Surface features of the monogenean Paraquadriacanthus nasalis Ergens, 1988 (quoted by Kritsky, 1990) inhabiting the nasal cavities of the freshwater fish Clarias gariepinus were studied for the first time using scanning electron microscopy. The anterior adhesive areas possess two slit-like openings. Many small openings were detected on the tegument covering the anterior-most region of the head. Some considerably large openings were also found in the median region between the two slit-like openings of the adhesive sacs. A transverse slit-like mouth opening with two lip-like structures was detected on the ventral surface of the body. Three types of presumed sensory structures were found associated with the tegument of the anterior adhesive area and anterior region of the body. These are surface ciliary sensilla, dome-shaped structures, and many spherical structures. The possible functions of these presumed sensory structures were discussed. The tegument covering the anterior adhesive area lacks microvilli, while the tegument covering the haptor is associated with microvilli. The haptoral sclerites were found in two different positions. Some surface features of the nasal cavities of C. gariepinus (microhabitat of P. nasalis) were also studied using scanning electron microscopy. Many lamellae-like and spine-like structures were recognized. The epithelium lining in some regions of the nasal cavities has small and large openings and covered with mucus. The possible roles of some haptoral sclerites in the attachment of the parasite to the host tissues were discussed. PMID:22015385

  12. Electroluminescence from InGaN quantum dots in a monolithically grown GaN/AlInN cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dartsch, Heiko; Tessarek, Christian; Figge, Stephan; Aschenbrenner, Timo; Kruse, Carsten; Hommel, Detlef [University of Bremen, Institute of Solid State Physics - Semiconductor Epitaxy (Germany); Schowalter, Marco; Rosenauer, Andreas [University of Bremen, Institute of Solid State Physics - Electron Microscopy (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    InGaN quantum dots (QDs) and their implementation into the micro cavity of a vertical distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) resonator are the key elements to achieve single photon emission required for quantum cryptography. However, the epitaxial overgrowth of InGaN QDs is challenging because they are easily destroyed by elevated temperatures. For this reason a common approach is the fabrication of a hybrid cavity structure by non epitaxial deposition of a dielectric top DBR. We present the first successful implementation of electrically driven InGaN QDs into a monolithic GaN/AlInN cavity structure fully epitaxial grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. A single layer of InGaN QDs has been embedded in a n- and p-type doped 5{lambda} GaN cavity surrounded by a 40 fold bottom- and a 10 fold GaN/AlInN top-DBR. The bottom DBR shows a reflectivity of 97%. Structural properties were investigated by scanning transmission microscopy (STEM) and will be discussed. Electroluminescence of the InGaN QDs was achieved by the application of intra cavity contacts. This demonstrates for the first time the possibility of using InGaN QD in fully epitaxial made devices like vertical cavity surface emitting lasers or single photon sources. We present the first successful implementation of electrically driven InGaN QDs into a monolithic GaN/AlInN cavity structure fully epitaxial grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. Therefore a single layer of InGaN QDs has been embedded in a n- and p-type doped 5{lambda} GaN cavity surrounded by a 40 fold bottom- and a 10 fold GaN/AlInN top-DBR. The bottom DBR shows a reflectivity of 97%. Electroluminescence of the InGaN QDs was achieved by the application of intra cavity contacts. Optical and structural properties of the device are discussed. This demonstrates for the first time the possibility of using InGaN QD in fully epitaxial made devices like vertical cavity surface emitting lasers or single photon sources.

  13. Spontaneous emission and collection efficiency enhancement of single emitters in diamond via plasmonic cavities and gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Choy, Jennifer T; Hausmann, Birgit J M; Janitz, Erika; Huang, I-Chun; Lončar, Marko

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach, based on plasmonic apertures and gratings, to enhance the radiative decay rate of single NV centers in diamond, while simultaneously improving their collection efficiency. Our structures are based on metallic resonators formed by surrounding sub-wavelength diamond nanoposts with a silver film, which can enhance the spontaneous emission rate of an embedded NV center. However, the collection efficiency of emitted photons remains low due to losses to surface plasmons and reflections at the diamond-air interface. In this work, we mitigate photon losses into these channels by incorporating grating structures into the plasmonic cavity system.

  14. An optical cavity with a strongly focused mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durak, Kadir; Victor, Leong Xu Heng; Huan, Nguyen Chi; Maslennikov, Gleb; Kurtsiefer, Christian [NUS, Center for Quantum Technologies/Physics Dept, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 (Singapore); Straupe, Stanislav [NUS, Center for Quantum Technologies/Physics Dept, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543, Singapore and Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-16

    Atom-photon interfaces are one of the building blocks of the future quantum information protocols. Accomplishing a strong interaction between the atom and the photons can be successfully done by high finesse and small mode volume cavities. However, this method requires sophisticated dielectric coatings and stabilization of the cavity against even small vibrations and small line width of those cavities impose higher input photon numbers if spontaneously emitted photons are to be used, which make it seem hard to scale up such atom-light interfaces to form quantum networks. An alternative method is to use a nearly concentric cavity, which has a strongly focused optical mode.

  15. Ring Cavity Induced Performance Enhancement in Mid-Infrared and Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are well established as reliable laser sources from the midinfrared (MIR) to the terahertz (THz) spectral region. These coherent sources of light are attractive compact emitters for a broad range of applications, such as free space communications, spectroscopy, imaging and heterodyne detection. For most of these applications, symmetric far fields and low beam divergence are of special interest. However, due to small dimensions and elongated shape of the resonator, the emitted light of standard Fabry-Perot and surface emitting QCLs is typically broad and asymmetric. Especially for THz QCLs, the sub wavelength dimensions of laser ridge facet lead to inhomogeneous diffractive-like patterns and limited output intensities. We describe ring cavity surface emitting lasers (RCSELs) and demonstrate how MIR and THz emission can effectively be emitted using an advanced ring geometry. Beam narrowing is given by constructive interference of light waves passing through the slits of a radial, light out-coupling grating on top of the laser. This results in the realization of single-mode operating ring-cavity QCLs with strongly collimated symmetric surface emission, with a full width at half maximum of 3o and 15o for MIR and THz emitters, respectively. For the latter the reduced divergence gives a twofold power enhancement compared to standard edge-emitters. We will present an extensive study in terms of output power, threshold behavior, beam shaping, dynamic beam steering and polarization characteristics. Furthermore we will talk about coherent coupling, two-dimensional integration of ring QCLs and their applicability in spectroscopy. (author)

  16. Radiation emitting devices act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Act, entitled the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, is concerned with the sale and importation of radiation emitting devices. Laws relating to the sale, lease or import, labelling, advertising, packaging, safety standards and inspection of these devices are listed as well as penalties for any person who is convicted of breaking these laws

  17. Single transverse mode selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; GEIB,KENT M.; BRIGGS,RONALD D.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; HINDI,JANA JO

    2000-04-26

    Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) which operate in multiple transverse optical modes have been rapidly adopted into present data communication applications which rely on multi-mode optical fiber. However, operation only in the fundamental mode is required for free space interconnects and numerous other emerging VCSEL applications. Two device design strategies for obtaining single mode lasing in VCSELs based on mode selective loss or mode selective gain are reviewed and compared. Mode discrimination is attained with the use of a thick tapered oxide aperture positioned at a longitudinal field null. Mode selective gain is achieved by defining a gain aperture within the VCSEL active region to preferentially support the fundamental mode. VCSELs which exhibit greater than 3 mW of single mode output power at 850 nm with mode suppression ratio greater than 30 dB are reported.

  18. Wheat Under LED's (Light Emitting Diodes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Astroculture is a suite of technologies used to produce and maintain a closed controlled environment for plant growth. The two most recent missions supported growth of potato, dwarf wheat, and mustard plants, and provided scientists with the first opportunity to conduct true plant research in space. Light emitting diodes have particular usefulness for plant growth lighting because they emit a much smaller amount of radiant heat than do conventional lighting sources and because they have potential of directing a higher percentage of the emitted light onto plants surfaces. Furthermore, the high output LED's have emissions in the 600-700 nm waveband, which is of highest efficiency for photosynthesis by plants.

  19. Radiation shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    The results of radiation shielding studies for the vertical test cryostat VTS1 at Fermilab performed with the codes FISHPACT and MARS15 are presented and discussed. The analysis is focused on operations with two RF cavities in the cryostat. The vertical cavity test facility (VCTF) for superconducting RF cavities in Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab has been in operation since 2007. The facility currently consists of a single vertical test cryostat VTS1. Radiation shielding for VTS1 was designed for operations with single 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities, and the shielding calculations were performed using a simplified model of field emission as the radiation source. The operations are proposed to be extended in such a way that two RF cavities will be in VTS1 at a time, one above the other, with tests for each cavity performed sequentially. In such a case the radiation emitted during the tests from the lower cavity can, in part, bypass the initially designed shielding which can lead to a higher dose in the building. Space for additional shielding, either internal or external to VTS1, is limited. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the radiation shielding was performed. An essential part of the present analysis is in using realistic models for cavity geometry and spatial, angular and energy distributions of field-emitted electrons inside the cavities. The calculations were performed with the computer codes FISHPACT and MARS15.

  20. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  1. Theoretical study on controlling nonlinear behaviors of a coupled-cavity VCSEL by external optical injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Li(李孝峰); Wei Pan(潘炜); Bin Luo(罗斌); Dong Ma(马冬); Zheng Zhao(赵峥); Guo Deng(邓果)

    2004-01-01

    A master-slave configuration used to control the nonlinear behaviors arising in a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with strong external optical feedback is established. In terms of bifurcation diagram, time and frequency domain, the influence of the continuous optical injection from the master VCSEL on the nonlinear characteristics of the slave is investigated theoretically. For relatively weak injection, the slave still keeps its intrinsic nonlinear state. With increasing the injection strength, these nonlinear behaviors evolve to periodic fluctuation, and at last are replaced by the steady-state (e.g. the critical injection parameter for steady-state is 1.2 when external cavity's reflectivity and length are 4% and 4 cm, respectively). During this evolution the bifurcation-contraction phenomena are also observed.

  2. Theoretical study on controlling nonlinear behaviors of a coupled-cavity VCSEL by external optical injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李孝峰; 潘炜; 罗斌; 马冬; 赵峥; 邓果

    2004-01-01

    A master-slave configuration used to control the nonlinear behaviors arising in a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with strong external optical feedback is established. In terms of bifurcation diagram, time and frequency domain, the influence of the continuous optical injection from the master VCSEL on the nonlinear characteristics of the slave is investigated theoretically. For relatively weak injection, the slave still keeps its intrinsic nonlinear state. With increasing the injection strength, these nonlinear behaviors evolve to periodic fluctuation, and at last are replaced by the steady-state (e.g. the critical injection parameter for steady-state is 1.2 when external cavity's reflectivity and length are 4%and 4 cm, respectively). During this evolution the bifurcation-contraction phenomena are also observed.

  3. Hybrid vertical-cavity laser with lateral emission into a silicon waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Gyeong Cheol; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper; Chung, Il-Sug

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an optically-pumped III-V/Si vertical-cavity laser with lateral emission into a silicon waveguide. This on-chip hybrid laser comprises a distributed Bragg reflector, a III-V active layer, and a high-contrast grating reflector, which simultaneously funnels light into the waveguide integrated with the laser. This laser has the advantages of long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, such as low threshold and high side-mode suppression ratio, while allowing integration with silicon photonic circuits, and is fabricated using CMOS-compatible processes. It has the potential for ultrahigh-speed operation beyond 100 Gbit/s and features a novel mechanism for transverse mode control.

  4. Enhancement of RF Breakdown Threshold of Microwave Cavities by Magnetic Insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    surfaces of the cavity are perfect planes. Subsequently, a stream of emitted electrons can be accelerated by the rf electric field toward the opposing cavity walls. Upon impact, they heat a localized region, resulting in the eventual breakdown by a variety of secondary mechanisms. Therefore, it is advantageous to develop techniques that could suppress field emission within rf cavities. It has been proposed that high voltages up to about a gigavolt range may be sustained in voltage transformers, by adopting the principle of magnetic insulation in ultrahigh vacuum. The basic idea is to suppress field emission by applying a suitably directed magnetic field of sufficient strength to force the electrons orbits back on to the rf emitting surface. More recently, it was shown that magnetic insulation could be very effective in suppressing field emission and multipacting in rectangular coupler waveguides. Hence, the question arises whether the same principle is applicable to rf accelerating structures. In this Letter, we shall consider application of the concept to low-frequency (201-805 MHz) muon accelerator cavities.

  5. Updating of Optical Inspection System for 6 GHz Superconducting Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Guo-long

    2013-01-01

    As a validation tool for the material properties and the surface treatment process,6 GHz superconducting cavity needs complex surface treatment process during its manufacture.It is verynecessary to record and monitor the statues of the internal surface of the cavity after each surface treatment,such as ultrasonic washing,mechanical polishing,electronic polishing(EP),buffered chemical

  6. Preparation and handling of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper outlines the recent preparation methods for superconducting cavities used in various laboratories and universities, and reports the problems of the cavity fabrication at KEK as an example of mass production. Preparation and handling are first addressed, focusing on material, fabrication, surface treatment, rinsing, clean environment, and heat treatment. Cavity production at KEK is then described, centering on defects on the surface and clean environments. Field gradients of more than 20 MV/m have been obtained by 1.5-3 GHz single cavities, for multi-cell cavities Eacc of 10 MV/m are available at any frequency range. The successful construction of thirty-two cavities for TRISTAN at KEK is due to the careful checking of the surface and quality control of all processes against the surface defects and contaminations. Eacc of 5 MV/m has been achieved by 94 % of the TRISTAN cavities at the first cold test, but 6 % of them had to be reworked because of the surface defects. These defects could not be detected by an X-ray photograph or visual inspections during the fabrication processes. (N.K.)

  7. Light-emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opel, Daniel R.; Hagstrom, Erika; Pace, Aaron K.; Sisto, Krisanne; Hirano-Ali, Stefanie A.; Desai, Shraddha

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the early 1990s, the biological significance of light-emitting diodes was realized. Since this discovery, various light sources have been investigated for their cutaneous effects. Study design: A Medline search was performed on light-emitting diode lights and their therapeutic effects between 1996 and 2010. Additionally, an open-label, investigator-blinded study was performed using a yellow light-emitting diode device to treat acne, rosacea, photoaging, alopecia areata, and androgenetic alopecia. Results: The authors identified several case-based reports, small case series, and a few randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of four different wavelengths of light-emitting diodes. These devices were classified as red, blue, yellow, or infrared, and covered a wide range of clinical applications. The 21 patients the authors treated had mixed results regarding patient satisfaction and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of improvement in clinical appearance. Conclusion: Review of the literature revealed that differing wavelengths of light-emitting diode devices have many beneficial effects, including wound healing, acne treatment, sunburn prevention, phototherapy for facial rhytides, and skin rejuvenation. The authors’ clinical experience with a specific yellow light-emitting diode device was mixed, depending on the condition being treated, and was likely influenced by the device parameters. PMID:26155326

  8. VECSELs emitting at 976nm designed for second harmonic generation in the blue wavelength region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszalski, Jan; Broda, Artur; Jasik, Agata; Wójcik-Jedlińska, Anna; Trajnerowicz, Artur; Kubacka-Traczyk, Justyna; Sankowskaa, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Using a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL) "as-grown" heterostructure we set-up a laser emitting at 488 nm with the output power approaching 20mW. The short wavelength emission was due to the conversion of the 976nm emission by a second harmonic generation process in a type-I lithum triborate (LBO). The V-type external cavity permitted efficient focusing of the laser beam on both the VECSEL heterostructure and the non linear crystal. A small diameter focused spot on the gain mirror is required when "as-grown" heterostructures are used. No birefringent filter was used in the resonator. In the case of our heterostructure we observed that the light was spontaneously polarized along the one of the crystallographic direction. The polarization ratio was 1000:1. The VECSEL heterostructure was of the resonant type strongly enhancing a single wavelength emission. The wavelength fine tuning was performed by heatsink temperature adjustment. The heterostructure was grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It consisted of 12 InGaAs quantum wells enclosed by GaAs barriers and a AlAs/GaAs DBR.

  9. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  10. An analytic study on laminar film condensation along the interior surface of a cave-shaped cavity of a flat plate heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytic approach has been employed to study condensate film thickness distribution inside cave-shaped cavity of a flat plate heat pipe. The results indicate that the condensate film thickness largely depends on mass flow rate and local velocity of condensate. The increasing rate of condensate film for circular region reveals about 50% higher value than that of vertical region. The physical properties of working fluid affect significantly the condensate film thickness, such as the condensate film thickness for the case of FC-40 are 5 times larger than that of water. In comparison with condensation on a vertical wall, the average heat transfer coefficient in the cave-shaped cavity presented 10∼15% lower values due to the fact that the average film thickness formed inside the cave-shaped cavity was larger than that of the vertical wall with an equivalent flow length. A correlation formula which is based on the condensate film analysis for the cave-shaped cavity to predict average heat transfer coefficient is presented. Also, the critical minimum fill charge ratio of working fluid based on condensate film analysis has been predicted, and the minimum fill charge ratios for FC-40 and water are about Ψcrit=3∼7%, Ψcrit=0.5∼1.3%, respectively, in the range of heat flux q=5∼90kW/m2

  11. A cavity and further radial substructures in the disk around HD~97048

    CERN Document Server

    van der Plas, G; Ménard, F; Casassus, S; Canovas, H; Pinte, C; Maddison, S T; Maaskant, K; Avenhaus, H; Cieza, L; Perez, S; Ubach, C

    2016-01-01

    Context: Gaps, cavities and rings in circumstellar disks are signposts of disk evolution and planet-disk interactions. We follow the recent suggestion that Herbig Ae/Be disks with a flared disk harbour a cavity, and investigate the disk around HD~97048. Aims: We aim to resolve the 34$\\pm$ 4 au central cavity predicted by Maaskant et al. (2013) and to investigate the structure of the disk. Methods: We image the disk around HD~97048 using ALMA at 0.85~mm and 2.94~mm, and ATCA (multiple frequencies) observations. Our observations also include the 12CO J=1-0, 12CO J=3-2 and HCO+ J=4-3 emission lines. Results: A central cavity in the disk around HD~97048 is resolved with a 40-46 au radius. Additional radial structure present in the surface brightness profile can be accounted for either by an opacity gap at ~90 au or by an extra emitting ring at ~150 au. The continuum emission tracing the dust in the disk is detected out to 355 au. The 12CO J=3-2 disk is detected 2.4 times farther out. The 12CO emission can be trac...

  12. Cavity QED on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. Using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  13. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm−2 sr−1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date

  14. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M., E-mail: razeghi@eecs.northwestern.edu [Center for Quantum Devices, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  15. Superconducting crab cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete overlapping of the electron and positron bunches at colliding point can be attained by using the strong time-depending electromagnetic RF field in the superconducting crab cavity. Commissioning of the crab cavities started in February 2007 at KEKB. Effective head-on collision of electron and positron has been achieved successfully. After introduction of crab crossing and crab cavity, the structure and the fabrication of the KEKB superconducting crab cavity are discussed. (author)

  16. RF Cavity Design

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2014-01-01

    After a short overview of a general approach to cavity design, we sketch the derivation of waveguide modes from plane waves and of cavity fields from waveguide modes. The characteristic parameters describing cavities and their performance are defined and explained. An equivalent circuit is introduced and extended to explain beam loading and higher order modes. Finally travelling- and standing-wave multi-gap cavities are introduced using the Brillouin diagram.

  17. Study of luminous phenomena observed on contaminated metallic surfaces submitted to high RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RF field emission from a sample subjected to high RF fields in a copper cavity has been investigated. The study is focused on the luminous emissions occurring on the RF surface simultaneously with the electron emission. The optical apparatus attached to the cavity permits to observe the evolution of the emitters and the direct effects of the surface conditioning. Also, the parameters of the emitted radiation (intensity, glowing duration, spectral distribution) may provide additional informations on the field emission phenomena. Some results concerning samples intentionally contaminated with particles (metallic or dielectric) are presented. (K.A.)

  18. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  19. Light emitting ceramic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Paul; Edwards, Doreen D.; Walker, Jr., William John; Slack, Lyle H.; Brown, Wayne Douglas; Osborne, Cathy; Norton, Michael; Begley, Richard

    2010-05-18

    A light-emitting ceramic based panel, hereafter termed "electroceramescent" panel, is herein claimed. The electroceramescent panel is formed on a substrate providing mechanical support as well as serving as the base electrode for the device. One or more semiconductive ceramic layers directly overlay the substrate, and electrical conductivity and ionic diffusion are controlled. Light emitting regions overlay the semiconductive ceramic layers, and said regions consist sequentially of a layer of a ceramic insulation layer and an electroluminescent layer, comprised of doped phosphors or the equivalent. One or more conductive top electrode layers having optically transmissive areas overlay the light emitting regions, and a multi-layered top barrier cover comprising one or more optically transmissive non-combustible insulation layers overlay said top electrode regions.

  20. Omega3P: A Parallel Finite-Element Eigenmode Analysis Code for Accelerator Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Omega3P is a parallel eigenmode calculation code for accelerator cavities in frequency domain analysis using finite-element methods. In this report, we will present detailed finite-element formulations and resulting eigenvalue problems for lossless cavities, cavities with lossy materials, cavities with imperfectly conducting surfaces, and cavities with waveguide coupling. We will discuss the parallel algorithms for solving those eigenvalue problems and demonstrate modeling of accelerator cavities through different examples.

  1. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  2. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  3. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Ivo R; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disk on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  4. Casimir forces of metallic microstructures into cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenanakis, George; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical estimate of the Casimir force of a metallic structure embedded into a cubic cavity is proposed. We demonstrate that by calculating the eigenmodes of the system we can determine the Casimir force, which can be either attractive or repulsive, by simply changing the geometry of the structures relative to the walls of the cavity. In this analysis, several cases of structures are taken into account, from rectangular slabs to chiral "omega" particles, and the predicted data are consistent with recent literature. We demonstrate that the sidewalls of the studied cavity contribute decisively to the repulsive Casimir force between the system and the nearby top surface of the cavity. Finally, we provide evidence that the medium embedded into the studied cavity (and especially its permittivity) can change the intensity of the Casimir force, while its repulsive nature, once established (owing to favorable geometrical features), remains quite robust.

  5. Niobium Cavity Electropolishing Modelling and Optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, L M A; Forel, S; Shirra, J A

    2013-01-01

    It’s widely accepted that electropolishing (EP) is the most suitable surface finishing process to achieve high performance bulk Nb accelerating cavities. At CERN and in preparation for the processing of the 704 MHz high-beta Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cavities a new vertical electropolishing facility has been assembled and a study is on-going for the modelling of electropolishing on cavities with COMSOL® software. In a first phase, the electrochemical parameters were taken into account for a fixed process temperature and flow rate, and are presented in this poster as well as the results obtained on a real SPL single cell cavity. The procedure to acquire the data used as input for the simulation is presented. The modelling procedure adopted to optimise the cathode geometry, aimed at a uniform current density distribution in the cavity cell for the minimum working potential and total current is explained. Some preliminary results on fluid dynamics is also briefly described.

  6. Striped-double cavity fabry-perot interferometers using both glass and air cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, S; Steinmetz, L

    1998-07-08

    We have used piezo-driven Fabry-Perot interferometers in the past far many continuous velocity-time measurements of fast moving surfaces. In order to avoid the annoying drift of some of these devices, we have developed and used inexpensive, solid glass, striped etalons with lengths up to 64 mm. Usable apertures are 35 mm by 80 mm with a finess of 25. A roundabout technique was devised for double cavity operation. We built a passive thermal housing for temperature stability, with tilt and height adjustments. We have also developed and used our first fixed etalon air-spaced cavity with a rotatable glass double- cavity insert. The rotation allows the referee cavity fractional order to be adjusted separately from that of the main cavity. It needs very little thermal protection, and eliminates the need for a roundabout scheme for double cavity operation, but is more costly than the solid glass version I

  7. Light-Emitting Pickles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, M.; Mollmann, K-P.

    2015-01-01

    We present experiments giving new insights into the classical light-emitting pickle experiment. In particular, measurements of the spectra and temperatures, as well as high-speed recordings, reveal that light emission is connected to the polarity of the electrodes and the presence of hydrogen.

  8. Inkjet-printed vertically emitting solid-state organic lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhibik, Oussama; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien; Defranoux, Christophe; Sanaur, Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we show that Inkjet Printing can be successfully applied to external-cavity vertically emitting thin-film organic lasers and can be used to generate a diffraction-limited output beam with an output energy as high as 33.6 μJ with a slope efficiency S of 34%. Laser emission shows to be continuously tunable from 570 to 670 nm using an intracavity polymer-based Fabry-Perot etalon. High-optical quality films with several μm thicknesses are realized, thanks to ink-jet printing. We introduce a new optical material where EMD6415 commercial ink constitutes the optical host matrix and exhibits a refractive index of 1.5 and an absorption coefficient of 0.66 cm-1 at 550-680 nm. Standard laser dyes like Pyrromethene 597 and Rhodamine 640 are incorporated in solution to the EMD6415 ink. Such large size "printed pixels" of 50 mm2 present uniform and flat surfaces, with roughness measured as low as 1.5 nm in different locations of a 50 μm × 50 μm AFM scan. Finally, as the gain capsules fabricated by Inkjet printing are simple and do not incorporate any tuning or cavity element, they are simple to make, have a negligible fabrication cost, and can be used as fully disposable items. This work opens the way towards the fabrication of really low-cost tunable visible lasers with an affordable technology that has the potential to be widely disseminated.

  9. Large-mode enhancement cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Henning; Holzberger, Simon; Kaster, Jan; Weitenberg, Johannes; Pervak, Volodymyr; Apolonski, Alexander; Fill, Ernst; Krausz, Ferenc; Pupeza, Ioachim

    2013-05-01

    In passive enhancement cavities the achievable power level is limited by mirror damage. Here, we address the design of robust optical resonators with large spot sizes on all mirrors, a measure that promises to mitigate this limitation by decreasing both the intensity and the thermal gradient on the mirror surfaces. We introduce a misalignment sensitivity metric to evaluate the robustness of resonator designs. We identify the standard bow-tie resonator operated close to the inner stability edge as the most robust large-mode cavity and implement this cavity with two spherical mirrors with 600 mm radius of curvature, two plane mirrors and a round trip length of 1.2 m, demonstrating a stable power enhancement of near-infrared laser light by a factor of 2000. Beam radii of 5.7 mm × 2.6 mm (sagittal × tangential 1/e(2) intensity radius) on all mirrors are obtained. We propose a simple all-reflective ellipticity compensation scheme. This will enable a significant increase of the attainable power and intensity levels in enhancement cavities. PMID:23670017

  10. A broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for aircraft measurements of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, nitrous acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K.-E.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Langford, A. O.; Edwards, P. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Stutz, J.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a two-channel broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS) for aircraft measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO), methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO), nitrous acid (HONO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and water (H2O). The instrument spans 361-389 and 438-468 nm, using two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a single grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. Robust performance is achieved using a custom optical mounting system, high-power LEDs with electronic on/off modulation, high-reflectivity cavity mirrors, and materials that minimize analyte surface losses. We have successfully deployed this instrument during two aircraft and two ground-based field campaigns to date. The demonstrated precision (2σ) for retrievals of CHOCHO, HONO and NO2 are 34, 350, and 80 parts per trillion (pptv) in 5 s. The accuracy is 5.8, 9.0, and 5.0 %, limited mainly by the available absorption cross sections.

  11. Radiative heat transfer in a semi-transparent medium enclosed in a two-dimensional square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exact analytical description of the internal radiative field inside an emitting-absorbing gray semi-transparent medium at radiative equilibrium, enclosed in a square cavity bounded by hot and black surfaces is proposed. It is shown that purely geometrical coefficients (in the case of optical constants non-depending on the temperature) completely describe the radiative field inside the cavity. The temperature field and two-dimensional vectorial radiative flux field are then easily deduced. It is worth noting that no angular discretization has to be done (no ray effect), the only numerical discretization being purely spatial. Some examples show that the proposed method gives perfectly smooth results of good accuracy for both the temperature and flux fields inside the medium.

  12. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  13. Clamshell microwave cavities having a superconductive coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Piel, Helmut (Wuppertal, DE)

    1994-01-01

    A microwave cavity including a pair of opposing clamshell halves, such halves comprised of a metal selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, or a silver-based alloy, wherein the cavity is further characterized as exhibiting a dominant TE.sub.011 mode is provided together with an embodiment wherein the interior concave surfaces of the clamshell halves are coated with a superconductive material. In the case of copper clamshell halves, the microwave cavity has a Q-value of about 1.2.times.10.sup.5 as measured at a temperature of 10K and a frequency of 10 GHz.

  14. Q degradations in superconducting niobium cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past year, several laboratories around the world have observed degradations of the Q value of superconducting niobium cavities made from high thermal conductivity niobium under certain cooldown conditions. Especially under slow cooldown or warmup to temperatures < 200 K of larger systems severe degradations have been reported. A systematic study of the influence of the cooldown speed, warmup conditions, multiple cooldowns and chemical surface treatment on cavity performance of cavities manufactured from niobium of different purity has been conducted. Possible cures such as anodic oxidation are being explored and results of these investigations are reported

  15. Coherent continuous-wave dual-frequency high-Q external-cavity semiconductor laser for GHz-THz applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Romain; Blin, Stéphane; Myara, Mikhaël; Gratiet, Luc Le; Sellahi, Mohamed; Chomet, Baptiste; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Sagnes, Isabelle; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-08-15

    We report a continuous-wave highly-coherent and tunable dual-frequency laser emitting at two frequencies separated by 30 GHz to 3 THz, based on compact III-V diode-pumped quantum-well surface-emitting semiconductor laser technology. The concept is based on the stable simultaneous operation of two Laguerre-Gauss transverse modes in a single-axis short cavity, using an integrated sub-wavelength-thick metallic mask. Simultaneous operation is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally by recording intensity noises and beat frequency, and time-resolved optical spectra. We demonstrated a >80  mW output power, diffraction-limited beam, narrow linewidth of 45  dB), and low intensity noise class-A dynamics of <0.3% rms, thus opening the path to a compact low-cost coherent GHz to THz source development. PMID:27519080

  16. Cryogenic rf test of the first plasma etched SRF cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Im, D; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2016-01-01

    Plasma etching has a potential to be an alternative processing technology for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. An apparatus and a method are developed for plasma etching of the inner surfaces of SRF cavities. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity is used. The single cell cavity is mechanically polished, buffer chemically etched afterwards and rf tested at cryogenic temperatures for a baseline test. This cavity is then plasma processed. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish segmented plasma processing. The cavity is rf tested afterwards at cryogenic temperatures. The rf test and surface condition results are presented.

  17. Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy with a Quantum Cascade Laser.

    OpenAIRE

    Maisons, G.; Gorrotxategi Carbajo, P.; Carras, M.; Romanini, D.

    2010-01-01

    Optical{feedback cavity{enhanced absorption spectroscopy is demonstrated in the mid{IR using a quantum cascade laser (emitting at 4.46 ¹m). The laser linewidth reduction and frequency locking by selective optical feedback from the resonant cavity ¯eld turns out to be particularly important in this spectral range: It allows strong cavity transmission which compensates for low light sensitivity, especially when using room temperature detectors. We obtain a noise equivalent absorption coe±cient ...

  18. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  19. Optically measuring interior cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2009-11-03

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  20. Inkjet-printed vertically emitting solid-state organic lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Mhibik, Oussama; Forget, Sébastien; Defranoux, Christophe; Sanaur, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we show that Inkjet Printing can be successfully applied to external-cavity vertically-emitting thin-film organic lasers, and can be used to generate a diffraction-limited output beam with an output energy as high as 33.6 uJ with a slope efficiency S of 34%. Laser emission shows to be continuously tunable from 570 to 670 nm using an intracavity polymer-based Fabry-Perot etalon. High-optical quality films with several um thicknesses are realized thanks to ink-jet printing. We introduce a new optical material where EMD6415 commercial ink constitutes the optical host matrix and exhibits a refractive index of 1.5 and an absorption coefficient of 0.66 cm-1 at 550-680 nm. Standard laser dyes like Pyromethene 597 and Rhodamine 640 are incorporated in solution to the EMD6415 ink. Such large size " printed pixels " of 50 mm 2 present uniform and flat surfaces, with roughness measured as low as 1.5 nm in different locations of a 50um x 50um AFM scan. Finally, as the gain capsules fabricated by Inkjet pri...

  1. Collapse of Non-Axisymmetric Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Enriquez, Oscar R.; Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Schmidt, Laura; Versluis, Michel; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    A round disk with a harmonic disturbance impacts on a water surface and creates a non-axisymmetric cavity which collapses under the influence of hydrostatic pressure. We use disks deformed with mode m=2 to m=6. For all mode numbers we find clear evidence for a phase inversion of the cavity wall during the collapse. We present a fluid dynamics video showing high speed imaging of different modes, pointing out the characteristic features during collapse.

  2. Rapid cavity prototyping using mode matching and globalised scattering matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Shinton, I

    2009-01-01

    Cavity design using traditional mesh based numerical means (such as the finite element or finite difference methods) require large mesh calculations in order to obtain accurate values and cavity optimisation is often not achieved. Here we present a mode matching scheme which utilises a globalised scattering matrix approach that allows cavities with curved surfaces (i.e. cavities with elliptical irises and or equators) to be accurately simulated allowing rapid cavity prototyping and optimisation to be achieved. Results on structures in the CLIC main

  3. Mass renormalization in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the presence of a background medium and a boundary surface or surfaces in cavity QED produces no change in the energy shift of a free charged particle due to its coupling to the fluctuating electromagnetic field of the vacuum. This clarifies that the electromagnetic and the observed mass of the charged particle are not affected by the modification of the field of the vacuum. The calculations are nonrelativistic and restricted to the dipole approximation but are otherwise based on the general requirements of causality.

  4. Enhanced waveguide-type ultraviolet electroluminescence from ZnO/MgZnO core/shell nanorod array light-emitting diodes via coupling with Ag nanoparticles localized surface plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cen; Marvinney, Claire Elizabeth; Xu, Hai Yang; Liu, Wei Zhen; Wang, Chun Liang; Zhang, Li Xia; Wang, Jian Nong; Ma, Jian Gang; Liu, Yi Chun

    2014-12-01

    Localized surface plasmon (LSP) enhanced waveguide-type ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated by sputtering Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) onto ZnO/MgZnO core/shell nanorod array (CS-NRA)/p-GaN heterostructures. A ~9-fold enhancement of ZnO ultraviolet electroluminescence (EL) was demonstrated by the Ag-NPs decorated LED compared with the device without Ag-NPs. Angle-dependent EL measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain simulations of the EL intensity spatial distribution, confirmed the waveguide-type EL transmission mode along the NR's axial direction. The increased spontaneous emission rate observed in time-resolved spectroscopy suggested that the ZnO EL enhancement was attributed to LSP-exciton/polariton coupling. However, a direct coupling is very difficult to achieve between Ag-LSPs and electron-hole pairs in the active region due to their ``remote'' separation. Thereby, two possible models involving the dynamic process of interactions among excitons, photons, and LSPs, were established to understand the selective enhancement of ZnO EL.Localized surface plasmon (LSP) enhanced waveguide-type ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated by sputtering Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) onto ZnO/MgZnO core/shell nanorod array (CS-NRA)/p-GaN heterostructures. A ~9-fold enhancement of ZnO ultraviolet electroluminescence (EL) was demonstrated by the Ag-NPs decorated LED compared with the device without Ag-NPs. Angle-dependent EL measurements, as well as finite-difference time-domain simulations of the EL intensity spatial distribution, confirmed the waveguide-type EL transmission mode along the NR's axial direction. The increased spontaneous emission rate observed in time-resolved spectroscopy suggested that the ZnO EL enhancement was attributed to LSP-exciton/polariton coupling. However, a direct coupling is very difficult to achieve between Ag-LSPs and electron-hole pairs in the active region due to their ``remote'' separation

  5. Resonant cavity Vircator driven by a thermionic cathode electron beam gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, R. [Texas Instrument, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A resonant cavity Vircator (virtual cathode oscillator) driven by an electron beam emitted from a broad area thermionic cathode has been tested at Textron Defense Systems. Narrow bandwidth (1.0 MHz at the {minus}3 dB level) excitation of the TM{sub 0.23} mode of a cylindrical resonant cavity was observed at a frequency of 986 MHz with a pulse length of 1.2 {mu}s. The single cavity mode excitation is attributed to the constant voltage and current electron beam emitted form the thermionic cathode.

  6. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  7. Superconducting RF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    It was 20 years ago when the research and development programme for LEP superconducting cavities was initiated. It lasted about 10 years. Today, my aim is not to tell you in great detail about the many innovations made thanks to our research, but I would like to point out some milestones in the development of superconducting cavities where Emilio's influence was particularly important.

  8. Ferrite loaded rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of a ferrite-loaded rf cavity is explained from the point of view of its operation. Then, an analysis of the automatic cavity-tuning system is presented using the transfer function; and a systematic analysis of a beam-feedback system using transfer functions is also presented. (author)

  9. Present status of superconducting cavity developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Hasegawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-11-01

    An R and D work of a superconducting (SC) cavity for the high intensity proton linac has begun at JAERI in collaboration with KEK. The RF field calculation and the structural analysis have been made to determine the cavity shape in the proton energy range between 100 and 1500 MeV. The results indicate the feasibility of a SC proton linac. A vertical test stand with clean room, water rinsing system, cavity evacuation pumping system, cryostat and data acquisition system has been installed to demonstrate the cavity performance. A single cell cavity of {beta}=0.5 has been fabricated and tested at the test stand to obtain the Q-value and the maximum surface electric field strength. The measured Q-values have been found to be high enough for our requirement while the field strength was limited to about 75% of the specification by the multipacting. We describe the preliminary design of the SC cavity, the overview of the vertical test stand and experimental results of the single cell cavity. (author)

  10. Present status of superconducting cavity developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An R and D work of a superconducting (SC) cavity for the high intensity proton linac has begun at JAERI in collaboration with KEK. The RF field calculation and the structural analysis have been made to determine the cavity shape in the proton energy range between 100 and 1500 MeV. The results indicate the feasibility of a SC proton linac. A vertical test stand with clean room, water rinsing system, cavity evacuation pumping system, cryostat and data acquisition system has been installed to demonstrate the cavity performance. A single cell cavity of β=0.5 has been fabricated and tested at the test stand to obtain the Q-value and the maximum surface electric field strength. The measured Q-values have been found to be high enough for our requirement while the field strength was limited to about 75% of the specification by the multipacting. We describe the preliminary design of the SC cavity, the overview of the vertical test stand and experimental results of the single cell cavity. (author)

  11. Viscoelastic analysis of cavity propagation in gel with electrical discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative information on the charge and stress profile during partial discharges (PDs) is required in order to discuss and clarify the process of electrical degradation in solids. Such PDs cause cavities to grow. Therefore, we have proposed a procedure for analysing discharges within cavities, based on motion observation in viscoelastic material. The proposed procedure was applied to surface discharges in silicone gel. Spherical sub-cavities (voids) which form along the cavities were analysed. The temporal response of calculated stress exerted on the void surface depends on the location of the void: whether it is at the tip of the cavity or at the root of the cavity. The results indicated that streamers propagate through the tree structure of the cavity and accumulate electrical charges at the void surface at the tip of the cavity. The temporal response of surface charges had a strong asymmetry according to the polarity of the applied field in contrast to the symmetry of the apparent charge. The amount of charge accumulated in a void was calculated to be approximately 0.1–1%. For voids near the electrode an increase in surface conductivity was observed, whereas voids at the tip of the cavity were non-conductive. (paper)

  12. Buoyant Bubbles and Cavities in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas

    The latest generation of X-ray observatories has revealed a rich array of complex structures in galaxy intracluster media (ICMs). Remarkable among these discoveries is the common existence of X-ray ICM 'cavities' filled with radio synchrotron-emitting relativistic plasma. The cavities, which are generally paired and often multiple, range in size from a few kpc up to hundreds of kpc, are evidently the depositories of AGN jets. The energy contents of these 'bubbles' range above 1060 erg, making them potentially important players in ICM thermodynamics. They also carry potentially important cosmic ray and magnetic field constituents. The important problems of understanding their stability and dynamics, including how and where they share their contents are very active research topics that I will address in this talk. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation and the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  13. Laser plasma interactions in fused silica cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Yoo, Jong H.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-06-24

    The effect of laser energy on formation of a plasma inside a cavity was investigated. The temperature and electron number density of laser-induced plasmas in a fused silica cavity were determined using spectroscopic methods, and compared with laser ablation on a flat surface. Plasma temperature and electron number density during laser ablation in a cavity with aspect ratio of 4 increased faster with irradiance after the laser irradiance reached a threshold of 5 GW/cm{sup 2}. The threshold irradiance of particulate ejection was lower for laser ablation in a cavity compared with on a flat surface; the greater the cavity aspect ratio, the lower the threshold irradiance. The ionization of silicon becomes saturated and the crater depths were increased approximately by an order of magnitude after the irradiance reached the threshold. Phase explosion was discussed to explain the large change of both plasma characteristics and mass removal when irradiance increased beyond a threshold value. Self-focusing of the laser beam was discussed to be responsible for the decrease of the threshold in cavities.

  14. Flux expulsion variation in SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Posen, S; Romanenko, A; Melnychuk, O; Sergatskov, D A; Martinello, M; Checchin, M; Crawford, A C

    2015-01-01

    Treating a cavity with nitrogen doping significantly increases $Q_0$ at medium fields, reducing cryogenic costs for high duty factor linear accelerators such as LCLS II. N-doping also makes cavities more sensitive to increased residual resistance due to trapped magnetic flux, making it critical to either have extremely effective magnetic shielding, or to prevent flux from being trapped in the cavity during cooldown. In this paper, we report on results of a study of flux expulsion. We discuss possible ways in which flux can be pinned in the inner surface, outer surface, or bulk of a cavity, and we present experimental results studying these mechanisms. We show that grain structure appears to play a key role and that a cavity that expelled flux poorly changed to expelling flux well after a high temperature furnace treatment. We further show that after furnace treatment, this cavity exhibited a significant improvement in quality factor when cooled in an external magnetic field. We conclude with implications for ...

  15. High-Q ferrite-tuned cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Initial tests of a small (10-cm-diam) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by several different ferrites indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity

  16. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  17. Formation of cavities in Si and their chemisorption of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanometer-size cavities formed in Si by He+ implantation and annealing are examined with cross-section TEM. During annealing at 700 C or above, He degasses from the specimens, leaving uhv cavities with reactive Si bonds on their walls. Cavity microstructures have been characterized in detail for an implanted fluence of 1 x 1017 He/cm2: cavity volume remains approximately constant (0.75 lattice sites/He) for anneals from 700 to ∼1000 C, while surface area (3 to 7 times the wafer area) decreases with temperature as the cavities coarsen. The cavities are found to getter up to ∼1 monolayer of Cu or Au from solution in Si without second-phase formation, thus identifying the trapping mechanism as chemisorption on the cavity walls

  18. Efficient Characterization of Protein Cavities within Molecular Simulation Trajectories: trj_cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramo, Teresa; East, Alexandra; Garzón, Diana; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Bond, Peter J

    2014-05-13

    Protein cavities and tunnels are critical in determining phenomena such as ligand binding, molecular transport, and enzyme catalysis. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enable the exploration of the flexibility and conformational plasticity of protein cavities, extending the information available from static experimental structures relevant to, for example, drug design. Here, we present a new tool (trj_cavity) implemented within the GROMACS ( www.gromacs.org ) framework for the rapid identification and characterization of cavities detected within MD trajectories. trj_cavity is optimized for usability and computational efficiency and is applicable to the time-dependent analysis of any cavity topology, and optional specialized descriptors can be used to characterize, for example, protein channels. Its novel grid-based algorithm performs an efficient neighbor search whose calculation time is linear with system size, and a comparison of performance with other widely used cavity analysis programs reveals an orders-of-magnitude improvement in the computational cost. To demonstrate its potential for revealing novel mechanistic insights, trj_cavity has been used to analyze long-time scale simulation trajectories for three diverse protein cavity systems. This has helped to reveal, respectively, the lipid binding mechanism in the deep hydrophobic cavity of a soluble mite-allergen protein, Der p 2; a means for shuttling carbohydrates between the surface-exposed substrate-binding and catalytic pockets of a multidomain, membrane-proximal pullulanase, PulA; and the structural basis for selectivity in the transmembrane pore of a voltage-gated sodium channel (NavMs), embedded within a lipid bilayer environment. trj_cavity is available for download under an open-source license ( http://sourceforge.net/projects/trjcavity ). A simplified, GROMACS-independent version may also be compiled. PMID:26580540

  19. Coupled cavity terahertz quantum cascade lasers with integrated emission monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Michael; Martl, Michael; Bachmann, Dominic; Deutsch, Christoph; Andrews, Aaron M; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the on-chip generation and detection of terahertz radiation in coupled cavity systems using a single semiconductor heterostructure. Multiple sections of a terahertz quantum cascade laser structure in a double-metal waveguide are optically coupled and operate either as a laser or an integrated emission monitor. A detailed analysis of the photon-assisted carrier transport in the active region below threshold reveals the detection mechanism for photons emitted by the very same structure above threshold. Configurations with a single laser cavity and two coupled laser cavities are studied. It is shown that the integrated detector can be used for spatial sensing of the light intensity within a coupled cavity. PMID:25836210

  20. High-Q resonant cavities for terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, A; Consolino, L; Ravaro, M; Mazzotti, D; Vitiello, M S; Bartalini, S; De Natale, P

    2015-02-01

    We report on the realization and characterization of two different designs for resonant THz cavities, based on wire-grid polarizers as input/output couplers, and injected by a continuous-wave quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 2.55 THz. A comparison between the measured resonators parameters and the expected theoretical values is reported. With achieved quality factor Q ≈ 2.5 × 10(5), these cavities show resonant peaks as narrow as few MHz, comparable with the typical Doppler linewidth of THz molecular transitions and slightly broader than the free-running QCL emission spectrum. The effects of the optical feedback from one cavity to the QCL are examined by using the other cavity as a frequency reference. PMID:25836227

  1. Micro-cavity lasers with large device size for directional emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chang-ling; Li, Peng; Shi, Jian-wei; Feng, Yuan; Hao, Yong-qin; Zhu, Dongda

    2014-10-01

    Optical micro-cavity structures, which can confine light in a small mode volume with high quality factors, have become an important platform not only for optoelectronic applications with densely integrated optical components, but also for fundamental studies such as cavity quantum electrodynamics and nonlinear optical processes. Micro-cavity lasers with directional emission feature are becoming a promising resonator for the compact laser application. In this paper, we presented the limason-shaped cavity laser with large device size, and fabricated this type of micro-cavity laser with quantum cascade laser material. The micro-cavity laser with large device size was fabricated by using InP based InGaAs/InAlAs quantum cascade lasers material at about 10um emitting wavelength, and the micro-cavity lasers with the large device size were manufactured and characterized with light output power, threshold current, and the far-field pattern.

  2. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  3. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  4. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  5. >8W GaInNAs VECSEL emitting at 615 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Tomi; Penttinen, Jussi-Pekka; Korpijärvi, Ville-Markus; Kantola, Emmi; Guina, Mircea

    2015-03-01

    We report a high-power VECSEL emitting LBO crystal for second harmonic generation. The cavity incorporated also an etalon and a birefringent filter for controlling the output wavelength. With the aid of the secondharmonic output and the infrared light leaking out from the laser cavity, the single-pass conversion efficiency of the crystal was estimated to have a value of 0.75%.

  6. Synchronized Q-switching of 1064 and 1342 nm laser cavities using a V:YAG saturable absorber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Janousek, Jiri; Buchhave, Preben

    We prove that pumping of a V:YAG saturable absorber with 1064 nm pulses modulates the transmission of 1342 nm light. We then demonstrate a dual-cavity laser emitting synchronized, Q-switched pulses at 1064 and 1342 nm.......We prove that pumping of a V:YAG saturable absorber with 1064 nm pulses modulates the transmission of 1342 nm light. We then demonstrate a dual-cavity laser emitting synchronized, Q-switched pulses at 1064 and 1342 nm....

  7. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8202397: View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  8. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  9. Hydrodynamic modeling of semi-planing hulls with air cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matveev Konstantin I.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available High-speed heavy loaded monohull ships can benefit from application of drag-reducing air cavities under stepped hull bottoms. The subject of this paper is the steady hydrodynamic modeling of semi-planing air-cavity hulls. The current method is based on a linearized potential-flow theory for surface flows. The mathematical model description and parametric calculation results for a selected configuration with pressurized and open air cavities are presented.

  10. First Test Results of the 4-ROD Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Burt, G; Calaga, R; Capatina, O; Calatroni, S; Ciapala, E; Doherty, D; Ferreira, L; Jensen, E; Hall, B; Lingwood, C; Maesen, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M

    2013-01-01

    The first compact prototype crab cavity with the 4rod geometry has undergone surface treatment and cold testing. Due to the complex geometry and unique fabrication procedure, RF validation of the field at beyond the nominal operating voltage at a sufficiently high Q0 is an important pre-requisite. Preliminary results of the first cold tests are presented along with cavity performance at different stages of the cavity processing is described.

  11. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Murat İnanç Cengiz; Seda Cengiz; Hom-Lay Wang

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferatio...

  12. Oral cavity and leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Shambulingappa Pallagatti; Soheyl Sheikh; Anupreet Kaur; Amit Aggarwal; Ravinder Singh2

    2012-01-01

    Although leprosy involves the oral cavity in up to 60% of the patients, examination of the oral cavity in leprosy clinics or oral health science clinics is often neglected. Oral involvement in leprosy can broadly be divided into non-specific and specific lesions. In this review, we discuss various oral manifestations in leprosy patients so as to increase the awareness about this aspect among dermatologists and dental surgeons.

  13. Hydroforming of Elliptical Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    W. Singer; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area ...

  14. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  15. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  16. GaInNAs-based Hellish-vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifier for 1.3 μm operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Maxime

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hot electron light emission and lasing in semiconductor heterostructure (Hellish devices are surface emitters the operation of which is based on the longitudinal injection of electrons and holes in the active region. These devices can be designed to be used as vertical cavity surface emitting laser or, as in this study, as a vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifier (VCSOA. This study investigates the prospects for a Hellish VCSOA based on GaInNAs/GaAs material for operation in the 1.3-μm wavelength range. Hellish VCSOAs have increased functionality, and use undoped distributed Bragg reflectors; and this coupled with direct injection into the active region is expected to yield improvements in the gain and bandwidth. The design of the Hellish VCSOA is based on the transfer matrix method and the optical field distribution within the structure, where the determination of the position of quantum wells is crucial. A full assessment of Hellish VCSOAs has been performed in a device with eleven layers of Ga0.35In0.65N0.02As0.08/GaAs quantum wells (QWs in the active region. It was characterised through I-V, L-V and by spectral photoluminescence, electroluminescence and electro-photoluminescence as a function of temperature and applied bias. Cavity resonance and gain peak curves have been calculated at different temperatures. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical results has been obtained.

  17. Thermal and dynamic effects in electron beam welding cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental and analytical study of the temperature distributions along the molten metal surface in an electron beam welding cavity is described. Surface temperature distributions in cavities were measured with a narrow band infrared radiation pyrometer. The availability of the cavity temperature measurements allowed estimates to be made for the vapor pressure and surface energy forces as a function of cavity position. The results indicated a force imbalance occurred in the cavity. It is postulated that at the location of the force imbalance a liquid material projection forms periodically and moves into the path of the electron beam. The liquid in this projection is driven towards the bottom, partially filling the cavity. This action is followed by the electron beam pushing the liquid aside to form a maximum depth cavity. This process is then repeated. An analysis for predicting cavity oscillation frequency shows reasonable agreement with frequencies measured at the weld root determined from weld sections. A study of the measured temperature distributions in cavities of varying depth combined with the force imbalance observations led to an interpretation of when spiking might occur. A procedure is proposed for determining the spiking tendency for a given set of weld parameters. The results of this study permit a designer to select apriori the best set of weld parameters to achieve a weld of predictable quality

  18. The influence of MoOx gap states on hole injection from aluminum doped zinc oxide with nanoscale MoOx surface layer anodes for organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective workfunction of Al doped ZnO films (AZO) increased from 4.1 eV to 5.55 eV after surface modification with nanoscale molybdenum sub-oxides (MoOx). Hole only devices with anodes consisting of 3 nm of MoOx on AZO exhibited a lower turn-on voltage (1.5 vs 1.8 V), and larger charge injection (190 vs 118 mA/cm2) at the reference voltage, compared to indium tin oxide (ITO). AZO devices with 10 nm of MoOx exhibited the highest workfunction but performed poorly compared to devices with 3 nm of MoOx, or standard ITO. Ultraviolet photoelectron, X-ray photoelectron, and optical spectroscopies indicate that the 3 nm MoOx films are more reduced and farther away from MoO3 stoichiometry than their 10 nm equivalents. The vacancies associated with non-stoichiometry result in donor-like gap states which we assign to partially occupied Mo 4d levels. We propose that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling from these levels is responsible for the reduction in threshold voltage measured in devices with 3 nm of MoOx. A schematic band diagram is proposed. The thicker MoOx layers are more stoichiometric and resistive, and the voltage drop across these layers dominates their electrical performance, leading to an increase in threshold voltage. The results indicate that AZO with MoOx layers of optimal thickness may be potential candidates for anode use in organic light emitting diodes

  19. The influence of MoO{sub x} gap states on hole injection from aluminum doped zinc oxide with nanoscale MoO{sub x} surface layer anodes for organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Jitendra Kumar; Santos-Ortiz, Reinaldo; Du, Jincheng; Shepherd, Nigel D., E-mail: Nigel.shepherd@unt.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The effective workfunction of Al doped ZnO films (AZO) increased from 4.1 eV to 5.55 eV after surface modification with nanoscale molybdenum sub-oxides (MoO{sub x}). Hole only devices with anodes consisting of 3 nm of MoO{sub x} on AZO exhibited a lower turn-on voltage (1.5 vs 1.8 V), and larger charge injection (190 vs 118 mA/cm{sup 2}) at the reference voltage, compared to indium tin oxide (ITO). AZO devices with 10 nm of MoO{sub x} exhibited the highest workfunction but performed poorly compared to devices with 3 nm of MoO{sub x}, or standard ITO. Ultraviolet photoelectron, X-ray photoelectron, and optical spectroscopies indicate that the 3 nm MoO{sub x} films are more reduced and farther away from MoO{sub 3} stoichiometry than their 10 nm equivalents. The vacancies associated with non-stoichiometry result in donor-like gap states which we assign to partially occupied Mo 4d levels. We propose that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling from these levels is responsible for the reduction in threshold voltage measured in devices with 3 nm of MoO{sub x}. A schematic band diagram is proposed. The thicker MoO{sub x} layers are more stoichiometric and resistive, and the voltage drop across these layers dominates their electrical performance, leading to an increase in threshold voltage. The results indicate that AZO with MoO{sub x} layers of optimal thickness may be potential candidates for anode use in organic light emitting diodes.

  20. "Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Barber

    2012-07-08

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

  1. Self-healing of creep cavities formed in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In austenitic stainless steels creep cavities nucleate at grain boundaries by long time use at high temperatures. These creep cavities grow along grain boundaries, form grain boundary cracks by linking up each other, and cause premature and low ductility fracture. Therefore long time creep rupture life and ductilities chiefly depend upon the behavior of nucleation and growth of creep cavities. If the growth of creep cavities could be suppressed, creep rupture life and ductilities should be improved remarkably. The present work is intended to propose a self-healing process for the cavitation by utilization of thin filmy precipitation at creep cavity surface and improve the creep rupture properties by the self-healing process. In ordinary austenitic stainless steels, sulfur is contained as impurity and segregates to creep cavity surface because of its high surface activity. It is thought that a stable compound can precipitate at creep cavity surface if the sulfur is completely removed. Therefore in order to remove sulfur completely and precipitate a stable compound at creep cavity surface, a modified 304 stainless steel added with cerium, titanium, boron and nitrogen was laboratory-melted. The modified steel showed high rupture strength and high rupture ductilities, and it was confirmed that boron nitride precipitates at creep cavity surface in the steel. It was thought that the boron nitride at creep cavity surface suppresses the creep cavity growth and improves creep rupture properties by the self-healing effect on creep cavities. (author)

  2. Rf field emission in superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field emission is the most serious problem faced today to achieve higher gradients in superconducting accelerator cavities. Both multipacting and thermal breakdown, which used to be dominant problems of the past are well understood and under control in accelerating cavities designed for velocity of light particles. Experience at CERN, Cornell, DESY, KEK and Wuppertal show that FE is now the usual mechanism limiting achievable accelerating fields for single and multi-cell structures. Peak surface electric fields between 12 and 30 Mv/m and peak surface magnetic fields between 200 and 600 Oersted are achieved in full scale structures corresponding to accelerating gradients between 5 and 12 MeV/m. In single cell cavities peak surface electric fields up to 60 Mv/m and magnetic fields up to 1050 Oe have been achieved. When compared with the 200 Mv/m dc surface fields achieved with cm2 size, clean, heat-treated Nb surfaces, and with the 2400 Oe theoretical rf critical magnetic field capability of Nb it is clear that there remains much room for improvement with Nb cavities. Results with 3000 Mhz heat treated cavities have shown that overall FE loading is less after heat treatment and high fields can be reached more frequently. To improve the understanding of FE behavior in rf fields from cold surfaces, a high speed, superfluid He, thermometer based diagnostic system has been completed. Studies indicate that condensed gases play an important role in FE, so that it would be a worthwhile attempt to look for comparable phenomena in dc FE studies. It has also been established that a Nb surface which can withstand a field of 30 Mv/m does not degrade on exposure to dust-free air, so that this avenue is not a rich source of emitters. 11 references, 13 figures, 1 table

  3. Low-frequency fluctuations in vertical cavity lasers: Experiments versus Lang-Kobayashi dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The limits of applicability of the Lang-Kobayashi (LK) model for a semiconductor laser with optical feedback are analyzed. The model equations, equipped with realistic values of the parameters, are investigated below the solitary laser threshold where low-frequency fluctuations (LFF's) are usually observed. The numerical findings are compared with experimental data obtained for the selected polarization mode from a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to polarization selective external feedback. The comparison reveals the bounds within which the dynamics of the LK model can be considered as realistic. In particular, it clearly demonstrates that the deterministic LK model, for realistic values of the linewidth enhancement factor α, reproduces the LFF's only as a transient dynamics towards one of the stationary modes with maximal gain. A reasonable reproduction of real data from VCSEL's can be obtained only by considering the noisy LK or alternatively deterministic LK model for extremely high α values

  4. Radionuclide distribution in a nuclear test cavity: the baseball event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1994 two holes were drilled into the cavity formed in 1981 by the underground nuclear test named Baseball. An extensive set of side wall samples were collected in these holes. We have analyzed the samples for tritium and for gamma-emitting radionuclides (both fission products and neutron activation products). It appears that the distribution pattern of these radioactive materials, established at the time of the detonation, have persisted even though the cavity has been under water for 13 years. These findings are discussed in the context of radionuclide migration and groundwater contamination at the Nevada Test Site. (orig.)

  5. Vertical-cavity laser with a novel grating mirror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Gyeong Cheol

    Hybrid III-V on silicon (Si) ‘vertical cavity lasers’ (hybrid VCLs), which can emit light laterally into a Si waveguide, are fabricated and investigated. The Si-integrated hybrid VCL consists of a top dielectric Bragg reflector (DBR), a III-V active layer, and a bottom high contrast grating (HCG...... a very short evanescent tail. This reduces the photon lifetime of the laser cavity significantly without reducing the mirror reflectivity, leading to a very high intrinsic speed. A 3 dB frequency of 27.2 GHz was measured at a pumping power corresponding to a current injection of 0.7 mA. Since the...

  6. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  7. Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique called photodynamic therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source releasing long wavelengths of light) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can also be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED probe consists of 144 tiny pinhead-size diodes, is 9-inches long, and about one-half-inch in diameter. The small balloon aids in even distribution of the light source. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy by the Marshall Space Flight Center under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research program grant.

  8. Polymer light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study sandwich type semiconducting polymer light emitting diodes; anode/polymer/cathode. ITO is selected as anode, this polymer is a blend of a commercially available polymer with a high hole transport ability: polyvinyl-carbazole and a laser dye: coumarin-515. Magnesium covered with silver is chosen for the anode. We study the influence of polymer thickness and coumarin doping ratio on electroluminescence spectrum, electric characteristics and quantum efficiency. An important drawback is that diodes lifetime remains low. In the second part of our study we determine degradations causes with X-Ray reflectivity experiments. It may be due to ITO very high roughness. We realize a new type of planar electroluminescent device: a channel type electroluminescent device in which polymer layer is inserted into an aluminium channel. Such a device is by far more stable than using classical sandwich structures with the same polymer composition: indeed, charges are generated by internal-field ionization and there is no injection from the electrode to the polymer. This avoids electrochemical reactions at electrodes, thus reducing degradations routes. (author)

  9. Ionization wave propagation on a micro cavity plasma array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollny, Alexander; Hemke, Torben; Gebhardt, Markus; Peter Brinkmann, Ralf; Mussenbrock, Thomas [Institute of Theoretical Electrical Engineering, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Boettner, Henrik; Winter, Joerg; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker [Institute for Experimental Physics II, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2011-10-03

    Microcavity plasma arrays of inverse pyramidal cavities fabricated on p-Si wafers act as localized dielectric barrier discharges. When operated at atmospheric pressure in argon and excited with high voltage at 10 kHz, a strong interaction between individual cavities is observed leading to wave-like optical emission propagating along the surface of the array. This phenomenon is numerically investigated. The computed ionization wave propagates with a speed of 5 km/s, which agrees well with experiments. The wave propagation is due to the sequential drift of electrons followed by drift of ions between cavities seeded by photoemission of electrons by the plasma in adjacent cavities.

  10. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  11. Positron emitting pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of physiology at the molecular level bridges the gap between laboratory science and clinical medicine by providing the most specific and sensitive means for imaging molecular pathways and interactions in tissues of man. PET-imaging requires the use Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals (PRPs), which are radioactively labeled 'true metabolites' i.e., sugars, amino acids, fatty acids etc., essentially made of H, C, N and O which the cells in the body can metabolize. The PET-isotopes: 11C, 15O, 13N and 18F (instead of H) are cyclotron produced and are short-lived, which places several constraints on the synthesis time for the PRPs, quality control and their clinical use as compared to the conventional 99mTc- and other SPECT-RPs widely used in nuclear medicine. There are large number of published reports showing the utility of several PRPs labeled with 18F (T1/2 = 110 min) and 11C (T1/2 = 20 min). A few PRPs have been labeled with 13N (T1/2 = 10 min). 15O (T1/2 = 2min) is used mostly as H215O, C15 or C15O2. 18F-radiopharmaceuticals can be made at a medical cyclotron facility and sent to PET -imaging centres, which can be reached in a couple of hours. The sensitivity of PET -imaging has encouraged R and D in several other PRPs, labeled with viz., 68Ga (generator produced, T1/2 68 min), 124I (cyclotron, T1/2 4.2 d), 82Rb (generator, T1/2 75s), 64Cu (cyclotron, T1/2 12h), and 94mTc (cyclotron, T1/2 52 min). Due to its relevance in several diseases, particularly cancer, PET-imaging has made major scientific contribution to drug development, particularly for neurological diseases and cancer treatment. (author)

  12. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The FLUFF code for calculating finned surface heat transfer -description and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FLUFF is a computer code for calculating heat transfer from finned surfaces by convection and radiation. It can also represent heat transfer by radiation to a partially emitting and absorbing medium within the fin cavity. The FLUFF code is useful not only for studying the behaviour of finned surfaces but also for deriving heat fluxes which can be applied as boundary conditions to other heat transfer codes. In this way models of bodies with finned surfaces may be greatly simplified since the fins need not be explicitly represented. (author)

  14. Progress in diagnostic techniques for sc cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While routinely achieved performance characteristics of superconducting cavities have now reached a level which makes them useful in large scale applications, achieving this level has come only through the knowledge gained by systematic studies of performance limiting phenomena. Despite the very real progress that has been made, the routine performance of superconducting cavities still falls far short of both the theoretical expectations and the performance of a few exception examples. It is the task of systematically applied diagnostic techniques to reveal additional information concerning the response of superconducting surfaces to applied RF fields. Here recent developments in diagnostic techniques are discussed. 18 references, 12 figures

  15. A Coupled Cavity Micro Fluidic Dye Ring Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Gersborg-Hansen, M.; Balslev, S.; Mortensen, N. A.; Kristensen, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present a laterally emitting, coupled cavity micro fluidic dye ring laser, suitable for integration into lab-on-a-chip micro systems. The micro-fluidic laser has been successfully designed, fabricated, characterized and modelled. The resonator is formed by a micro-fluidic channel bounded by two isosceles triangle mirrors. The micro-fluidic laser structure is defined using photo lithography in 10 microns thick SU-8 polymer on a glass substrate. The micro fluidic channel is sealed by a glass...

  16. WE-A-17A-01: Absorbed Dose Rate-To-Water at the Surface of a Beta-Emitting Planar Ophthalmic Applicator with a Planar, Windowless Extrapolation Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Currently there is no primary calibration standard for determining the absorbed dose rate-to-water at the surface of β-emitting concave ophthalmic applicators and plaques. Machining tolerances involved in the design of concave window extrapolation chambers are a limiting factor for development of such a standard. Use of a windowless extrapolation chamber avoids these window-machining tolerance issues. As a windowless extrapolation chamber has never been attempted, this work focuses on proof of principle measurements with a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber to verify the accuracy in comparison to initial calibration, which could be extended to the design of a hemispherical, windowless extrapolation chamber. Methods: The window of an extrapolation chamber defines the electrical field, aids in aligning the source parallel to the collector-guard assembly, and decreases the backscatter due to attenuation of lower electron energy. To create a uniform and parallel electric field in this research, the source was made common to the collector-guard assembly. A precise positioning protocol was designed to enhance the parallelism of the source and collector-guard assembly. Additionally, MCNP5 was used to determine a backscatter correction factor to apply to the calibration. With these issues addressed, the absorbed dose rate-to-water of a Tracerlab 90Sr planar ophthalmic applicator was determined using National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) calibration formalism, and the results of five trials with this source were compared to measurements at NIST with a traditional extrapolation chamber. Results: The absorbed dose rate-to-water of the planar applicator was determined to be 0.473 Gy/s ±0.6%. Comparing these results to NIST's determination of 0.474 Gy/s yields a −0.6% difference. Conclusion: The feasibility of a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber has been demonstrated. A similar principle will be applied to developing a

  17. WE-A-17A-01: Absorbed Dose Rate-To-Water at the Surface of a Beta-Emitting Planar Ophthalmic Applicator with a Planar, Windowless Extrapolation Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, A [of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center, Madison, WI (United States); Soares, C [NIST (Retired), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Micka, J; Culberson, W [University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center, Madison, WI (United States); DeWerd, L [University of WIMadison/ ADCL, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Currently there is no primary calibration standard for determining the absorbed dose rate-to-water at the surface of β-emitting concave ophthalmic applicators and plaques. Machining tolerances involved in the design of concave window extrapolation chambers are a limiting factor for development of such a standard. Use of a windowless extrapolation chamber avoids these window-machining tolerance issues. As a windowless extrapolation chamber has never been attempted, this work focuses on proof of principle measurements with a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber to verify the accuracy in comparison to initial calibration, which could be extended to the design of a hemispherical, windowless extrapolation chamber. Methods: The window of an extrapolation chamber defines the electrical field, aids in aligning the source parallel to the collector-guard assembly, and decreases the backscatter due to attenuation of lower electron energy. To create a uniform and parallel electric field in this research, the source was made common to the collector-guard assembly. A precise positioning protocol was designed to enhance the parallelism of the source and collector-guard assembly. Additionally, MCNP5 was used to determine a backscatter correction factor to apply to the calibration. With these issues addressed, the absorbed dose rate-to-water of a Tracerlab 90Sr planar ophthalmic applicator was determined using National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) calibration formalism, and the results of five trials with this source were compared to measurements at NIST with a traditional extrapolation chamber. Results: The absorbed dose rate-to-water of the planar applicator was determined to be 0.473 Gy/s ±0.6%. Comparing these results to NIST's determination of 0.474 Gy/s yields a −0.6% difference. Conclusion: The feasibility of a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber has been demonstrated. A similar principle will be applied to developing a

  18. Superconducting cavity material for the European XFEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Brinkmann, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Navitski, A.; Tamashevich, Y.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of the strategy for superconducting cavity material procurement and quality management is done on the basis of the experience with the cavity production for the European x-ray free electron laser (EXFEL) facility. An adjustment of the material specification to EXFEL requirements, procurement of material, quality control (QC), documentation, and shipment to cavity producers have been worked out and carried out by DESY. A multistep process of qualification of the material suppliers included detailed material testing, single- and nine-cell cavity fabrication, and cryogenic radiofrequency tests. Production of about 25 000 semi-finished parts of high purity niobium and niobium-titanium alloy in a period of three years has been divided finally between companies Heraeus, Tokyo Denkai, Ningxia OTIC, and PLANSEE. Consideration of large-grain (LG) material as a possible option for the EXFEL has resulted in the production of one cryogenic module consisting of seven (out of eight) LG cavities. LG materials fulfilled the EXFEL requirements and showed even 25% to 30% higher unloaded quality factor. A possible shortage of the required quantity of LG material on the market led, however, to the choice of conventional fine-grain (FG) material. Eddy-current scanning (ECS) has been applied as an additional QC tool for the niobium sheets and contributed significantly to the material qualification and sorting. Two percent of the sheets have been rejected, which potentially could affect up to one-third of the cavities. The main imperfections and defects in the rejected sheets have been analyzed. Samples containing foreign material inclusions have been extracted from the sheets and electrochemically polished. Some inclusions remained even after 150 μm surface layer removal. Indications of foreign material inclusions have been found in the industrially fabricated and treated cavities and a deeper analysis of the defects has been performed.

  19. Apparatus and method for plasma processing of SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Peshl, J; Bašović, M; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vuškovića, L

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are described for plasma etching of the inner surface of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Accelerator SRF cavities are formed into a variable-diameter cylindrical structure made of bulk niobium, for resonant generation of the particle accelerating field. The etch rate non-uniformity due to depletion of the radicals has been overcome by the simultaneous movement of the gas flow inlet and the inner electrode. An effective shape of the inner electrode to reduce the plasma asymmetry for the coaxial cylindrical rf plasma reactor is determined and implemented in the cavity processing method. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise way to establish segmented plasma columns. The test structure was a pillbox cavity made of steel of similar dimension to the standard SRF cavity. This was adopted to experimentally verify the plasma surface reaction on cylindrical structures with variable diameter using the segment...

  20. Cavity formation by the impact of Leidenfrost spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2012-05-01

    We report observations of cavity formation and subsequent collapse when a heated sphere impacts onto a liquid pool. When the sphere temperature is much greater than the boiling point of the liquid, we observe an inverted Leidenfrost effect where the sphere is encompassed by a vapour layer that prevents physical contact with the liquid. This creates the ultimate non-wetting scenario during sphere penetration through a free surface, producing very smooth cavity walls. In some cases during initial entry, however, the liquid contacts the sphere at the equator, leading to the formation of a dual cavity structure. For cold sphere impacts, where a contact line is observed, we reveal details of the contact line pinning, which initially forms a sawtooth pattern. We also observe surface waves on the cavity interface for cold spheres. We compare our experimental results to previous studies of cavity dynamics and, in particular, the influence of hydrophobicity on the entry of the sphere. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.