WorldWideScience

Sample records for cavity resonance ionization

  1. Study of Low Work Function Materials for Hot Cavity Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Catherall, R; Fedosseev, V; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Menna, Mariano; Österdahl, F; Raeder, S; Schwellnus, F; Stora, T; Wendt, K; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization on the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high-temperature, low-work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE / CERN, Geneva and RISIKO / University of Mainz.

  2. Study of low work function materials for hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Schwellnus, F; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Mattolat, Ch; Menna, M; Österdahl, F K; Raeder, S; Stora, T; Wendta, K

    2009-01-01

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization of the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high temperature, low work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE/CERN, Geneva and RISIKO/University of Mainz.

  3. Study of low work function materials for hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selectivity of a hot cavity resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is most often limited by contributions from competing surface ionization of the hot walls of the ionization cavity. In this article we present investigations on the properties of designated high temperature, low work function materials regarding their performance and suitability as cavity material for RILIS. Tungsten test cavities, impregnated with a mixture of barium oxide and strontium oxide (BaOSrO on W), or alternatively gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) were studied in comparison to a standard tungsten RILIS cavity as being routinely used for hot cavity laser ionization at ISOLDE. Measurement campaigns took place at the off-line mass separators at ISOLDE/CERN, Geneva and RISIKO/University of Mainz.

  4. Resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis of thorium by external laser cavity enhancement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last several years, extensive effort has been directed towards the demonstration of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) as a generally-applicable isotopic analysis technique. The major problems in this task have been to achieve a high overall ionization efficiency as well as good sample utilization. Several aspects of these problems are apparent in the choice of the excitation and ionization sources for the selective RIMS process. Pulsed lasers have typically had low repetition rates, poor spectral and temporal behavior, and short pulse durations. These characteristics have limited the general utility of pulsed lasers because of the low duty cycle (low efficiency), pulse pile-up detection difficulties (limited dynamic range), and relatively poor stability (poor precision). In contrast, cw lasers offer 100% effective duty cycles, well-controlled laser profiles (spectrally, spatially and temporally), and excellent power stability. The main feature limiting the utility of cw lasers has been power. While sufficient intensity is available to saturate the resonant transition, efficient promotion of excited atoms to the ionization continuum is difficult. This last aspect is where the authors efforts have centered. Presently, they are pursuing an external cavity technique which will generate overall ionization efficiencies of tens of percent, as well as increase the available spectral range. Experimental aspects and process to date on thorium will be discussed in detail

  5. Optimization of a hot-cavity type resonant ionization laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is nowadays an important technique in many Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities for its reliability and ability to ionize efficiently and element selectively. Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds (GANIL) Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation (GISELE) is an off-line test bench for RILIS developed to study a fully operational resonant laser ion source at GANIL facility. The ion source body has been designed as a modular system to investigate different experimental approaches by varying the design parameters, to develop the future on-line laser ion source. The aim of this project is to determine the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. Latest results concerning emittance and time profile development as a function of the temperature for different ion source versions will be presented

  6. Optimization of a hot-cavity type resonant ionization laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henares, J. L., E-mail: henares@ganil.fr; Lecesne, N.; Hijazi, L.; Bastin, B.; Leroy, R.; Osmond, B.; Vignet, J. L. [GANIL, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Kron, T.; Naubereit, P.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Lassen, J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Le Blanc, F. [IPN Orsay, BP 1-91406 Orsay (France)

    2016-02-15

    Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is nowadays an important technique in many Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities for its reliability and ability to ionize efficiently and element selectively. Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds (GANIL) Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation (GISELE) is an off-line test bench for RILIS developed to study a fully operational resonant laser ion source at GANIL facility. The ion source body has been designed as a modular system to investigate different experimental approaches by varying the design parameters, to develop the future on-line laser ion source. The aim of this project is to determine the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. Latest results concerning emittance and time profile development as a function of the temperature for different ion source versions will be presented.

  7. Optimization of a hot-cavity type resonant ionization laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henares, J. L.; Lecesne, N.; Hijazi, L.; Bastin, B.; Kron, T.; Lassen, J.; Le Blanc, F.; Leroy, R.; Naubereit, P.; Osmond, B.; Vignet, J. L.; Wendt, K.

    2016-02-01

    Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is nowadays an important technique in many Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities for its reliability and ability to ionize efficiently and element selectively. Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation (GISELE) is an off-line test bench for RILIS developed to study a fully operational resonant laser ion source at GANIL facility. The ion source body has been designed as a modular system to investigate different experimental approaches by varying the design parameters, to develop the future on-line laser ion source. The aim of this project is to determine the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. Latest results concerning emittance and time profile development as a function of the temperature for different ion source versions will be presented.

  8. Hot-cavity studies for the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henares, J. L.; Lecesne, N.; Hijazi, L.; Bastin, B.; Kron, T.; Lassen, J.; Le Blanc, F.; Leroy, R.; Osmond, B.; Raeder, S.; Schneider, F.; Wendt, K.

    2016-09-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) has emerged as an important technique in many Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities for its reliability, and ability to ionize target elements efficiently and element selectively. GISELE is an off-line RILIS test bench to study the implementation of an on-line laser ion source at the GANIL separator facility. The aim of this project is to determine the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. The ion source geometry was tested in several configurations in order to find a solution with optimal ionization efficiency and beam emittance. Furthermore, a low work function material was tested to reduce the contaminants and molecular sidebands generated inside the ion source. First results with ZrC ionizer tubes will be presented. Furthermore, a method to measure the energy distribution of the ion beam as a function of the time of flight will be discussed.

  9. Ionizing Radiation Detectors Based on Ge-Doped Optical Fibers Inserted in Resonant Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saverio Avino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of ionizing radiation (IR is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. Optical fiber sensors have recently proven good candidates as radiation dosimeters. Here we investigate the effect of IR on germanosilicate optical fibers. A piece of Ge-doped fiber enclosed between two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs is irradiated with gamma radiation generated by a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. With respect to other FBG-based IR dosimeters, here the sensor is only the bare fiber without any special internal structure. A near infrared laser is frequency locked to the cavity modes for high resolution measurement of radiation induced effects on the fiber optical parameters. In particular, we observe a variation of the fiber thermo-optic response with the radiation dose delivered, as expected from the interaction with Ge defect centers, and demonstrate a detection limit of 360 mGy. This method can have an impact in those contexts where low radiation doses have to be measured both in small volumes or over large areas, such as radiation therapy and radiation protection, while bare optical fibers are cheap and disposable.

  10. Resonance ionization spectroscopy 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy and its Applications, held at the University College of Swansea, Wales, 1986. The Symposium is divided into eight main sections entitled: photophysics and spectroscopy, noble gas atom counting, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, materials and surface analysis, small molecules, medical and environmental applications, resonance ionization and materials separation, and elementary particles and nuclear physics. Thirty papers were chosen for INIS and indexed separately. (U.K.)

  11. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-06-01

    Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers has been demonstrated. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f 6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2 levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf 6F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 ground state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf 8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.

  12. Geometry-Invariant Resonant Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Liberal, Iñigo; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modeling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of its geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected in order to operate at a specific frequency. Here, we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, i.e., resonators whose eigenfrequency is invariant with respect to geometrical deformations. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, which enable decoupling of the time and spatial field variations. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  13. Resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) from its inception to the present is summarized. The uses of RIS are principally analytical, and these uses are classified in several different ways for this report. The classifications are: (1) basic ways of counting atoms; (2) RIS applications according to the type of particle detector; (3) applications according to source preparation; (4) applications in chemical physics and chemistry; and (5) applications involving daughter atom detection. Each classification is discussed in some detail, and examples of specific applications are mentioned under each classification. Some other potential applications not necessarily related to these classifications are also mentioned

  14. Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, B

    2013-01-01

    The application of the technique of laser resonance ionization to the production of singly charged ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an important component of many radioactive ion beam facilities. At CERN, for example, the RILIS is the most commonly used ion source of the ISOLDE facility, with a yearly operating time of up to 3000 hours. For some isotopes the RILIS can also be used as a fast and sensitive laser spectroscopy tool, provided that the spectral resolution is sufficiently high to reveal the influence of nuclear structure on the atomic spectra. This enables the study of nuclear properties of isotopes with production rates even lower than one ion per second and, in some cases, enables isomer selective ionization. The solutions available for the implementation of resonance laser ionization at radioactive ion beam facilities are summarized. Aspects such as the laser r...

  15. Theory of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can be defined as a state selective detection process in which pulsed tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. At least one resonance step is used in the stepwise ionization process, and it has been shown that the ionization probability of the spectroscopically selected species can nearly always be made close to unity. Since measurements of the number of photoelectrons or ions can be made very precisely and even one electron (or under vacuum conditions, one ion) can be detected, the technique can be used to make quantitative measurements of very small populations of the state-selected species

  16. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  17. Study of Condensable Ion Production by Resonant Laser Ionization

    OpenAIRE

    Henares Gonzalez, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    This doctoral thesis describes the implementation, optimization and development of a Resonant Ionization LaserIon Source (RILIS) at the GANIL facility (Caen, France). The RILIS is a selective ion source technique which isbased on a step-wise resonant excitation process where the elements of interest are ionized via atomic resonantexcitation by laser radiation. The off-line RILIS test bench at GANIL consists of three tunable titanium:sapphirelasers and a hot-cavity ion source. In this thesis, ...

  18. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  19. Resonance Ionization, Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is an analytical technique that uses photons from lasers to resonantly excite an electron from some initial state of a gaseous atom through various excited states of the atom or molecule. Described are the apparatus, some analytical applications, and the precision and accuracy of the technique. Lists 26 references. (CW)

  20. Parametric resonance in tunable superconducting cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Wustmann, Waltraut; Shumeiko, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theory of parametric resonance in tunable superconducting cavities. The nonlinearity introduced by the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) attached to the cavity and damping due to connection of the cavity to a transmission line are taken into consideration. We study in detail the nonlinear classical dynamics of the cavity field below and above the parametric threshold for the degenerate parametric resonance, featuring regimes of multistability and parametric radi...

  1. Trends in resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews the history of resonance ionization spectroscopy and then comments on the delineations of RIS with reference to many related laser processes. The substance of the paper deals with the trends in RIS and especially how the needs for sensitive analytical methods have overshadowed the orginal plan to study excited species. 9 refs., 1 fig

  2. Theory of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can be defined as a state selective detection process in which pulsed tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. The ability to make saturated RIS measurements opens up a wide variety of applications to both basic and applied research. In reviews of RIS the subject was treated generally, including the underlying photophysics applications, the ability to use it to count single atoms, and its applications to measurements in atomic and molecular physics. They view resonance ionization spectroscopy as a specific type of multiphoton ionization in which the goal is to make quantitative measurements of quantum-selected populations in atomic or molecular systems. This goal attained by requiring that the selective excitation steps be resonant in nature and involve only one- or two-photon (only one-photon if at all possible) absorption processes, thereby allowing the entire process to be carried to saturation without loss of spectroscopic selectivity due to laser power induced shifts or broadening

  3. Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The setup is elaborated for the trace detection of transuranium elements by the three-step laser resonance ionization combined with the time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The setup efficiency for detection of plutonium was measured to be about 0.5 centre dot 10-8 ion/atom, and its selectivity relative to atoms of another elements has the order of 1013 atom/atom

  4. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a magnetic confinement plasma device having a plasma. The plasma is immersed in a strong magnetic field and confined within an evacuated plasma chamber. A wave launcher for launching electromagnetic waves in the range of frequencies of 10 MHz to 200 MHz energizes and thereby heats the plasma. The wave launcher is spaced-apart from the plasma. The wave launcher comprises: a resonant cavity, including resonant chamber walls for containing electromagnetic fields; connection means connecting the resonant cavity to a transmission line carrying electromagnetic wave energy to the resonant cavity; at least one capacitive reactive element, and at least one inductive reactive element disposed within the resonant cavity; the capacitive reactive member separated from the chamber walls of the resonant cavity by a first predefined gap, with the capacitive reactive member and the chamber walls of the resonant cavity oriented approximately tangential to the strong magnetic field; the capacitive and the inductive reactive elements spaced apart from the plasma a second predetermined distance which at least partially determines the frequency of the launched waves; and the resonant cavity cooperating with the capacitive and the inductive reactive elements so as to launch electromagnetic waves in the range of frequencies, toward the plasma

  5. Cavities for electron spin resonance: predicting the resonant frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, John; Miller, Kyle; Meehan, Michael; Spencer, Ross

    Microwave cavities are used in electron spin resonance to enhance magnetic fields. Dielectric resonators (DRs), pieces of high dielectric material, can be used to tailor the resonant frequency of a cavity. However, designing cavities with DRs to obtain desired frequencies is challenging and in general can only be done numerically with expensive software packages. We present a new method for calculating the resonant frequencies and corresponding field modes for cylindrically symmetric cavities and apply it to a cavity with vertically stacked DRs. The modes of an arbitrary cavity are expressed as an expansion of empty cavity modes. The wave equation for D gives rise to an eigenvalue equation whose eigenvalues are the resonant frequencies and whose eigenvectors yield the electric and magnetic fields of the mode. A test against theory for an infinitely long dielectric cylinder inside an infinite cavity yields an accuracy better than 0.4% for nearly all modes. Calculated resonant frequencies are also compared against experiment for quasi-TE011 modes in resonant cavities with ten different configurations of DRs; experimental results agree with predicted values with an accuracy better than 1.0%. MATLAB code is provided at http://www.physics.byu.edu/research/coltonlab/cavityresonance.

  6. All short pulse multiphoton ionization is resonant ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy resolved photoelectron spectra of multiphoton ionization taken with a 300 fs laser pulse at 616 nm shows that the ionization probability is highly structured as a function of laser intensity. The spectrum is consistent with all of the ionization occurring at intensity resonances

  7. Hyperbolic Resonances of Metasurface Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Keene, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties which are tunable and are useful for multiple applications.

  8. Hyperbolic Resonances of Metasurface Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Keene, David; Durach, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties wh...

  9. Determination of Ionization Potential of Calcium by High-Resolution Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Geppert, Christopher; Kato, Masaaki; Oba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Wendt, Klaus D. A.

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy has been utilized to determine a precise ionization potential of Ca. Three-step resonance excitation with single-mode extended-cavity diode lasers populates long and unperturbed Rydberg series of 4snp (1P1) and 4snf (1F3) states in the range of n=20--150. Using an extended Ritz formula for quantum defects, the series convergence limit has been determined to be 49305.9240(20) cm-1 with the accuracy improved one order of magnitude higher than previously reported ones.

  10. Determination of ionization potential of calcium by high-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy has been utilized to determine a precise ionization potential of Ca. Three-step resonance with single-mode extended-cavity diode lasers populates long and unperturbed Rydberg series of 4snp (1P1) and 4snf (1F3) states in the range of n=20-150. Using an extended Ritz formula for quantum defects, the series convergence limit has been determined to be 49305.9240(20)cm-1 with the accuracy improved one order of magnitude higher than previously reported ones. (author)

  11. Hyperbolic resonances of metasurface cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, D; Durach, M

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties which are tunable and are useful for multiple applications. PMID:26191916

  12. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  13. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  14. Ionization wave propagation on a micro cavity plasma array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollny, Alexander; Hemke, Torben; Gebhardt, Markus; Peter Brinkmann, Ralf; Mussenbrock, Thomas [Institute of Theoretical Electrical Engineering, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Boettner, Henrik; Winter, Joerg; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker [Institute for Experimental Physics II, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2011-10-03

    Microcavity plasma arrays of inverse pyramidal cavities fabricated on p-Si wafers act as localized dielectric barrier discharges. When operated at atmospheric pressure in argon and excited with high voltage at 10 kHz, a strong interaction between individual cavities is observed leading to wave-like optical emission propagating along the surface of the array. This phenomenon is numerically investigated. The computed ionization wave propagates with a speed of 5 km/s, which agrees well with experiments. The wave propagation is due to the sequential drift of electrons followed by drift of ions between cavities seeded by photoemission of electrons by the plasma in adjacent cavities.

  15. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  16. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm−1 for the ionization potential of iron. (paper)

  17. Resonant three-Photon Ionization Spectroscopy of Atomic Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Mattolat, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti:Sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63737.686 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  18. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2015-02-01

    We study the cosmological evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. Because of the Einstein principle of equivalence (EEP), one can find a local coordinate system (a local freely falling frame), in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate, . Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to unambiguously decide whether atomic clocks based on quantum transitions of atoms, ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of a cavity. To resolve this ambiguity we have to analyse the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its electromagnetic modes in an expanding universe by employing the full machinery of the Maxwell equations irrespectively of the underlying theory of gravity. We proceed in this way and found out that the size of the cavity and the electromagnetic frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal (unphysical) coordinates as the universe expands in accordance with the Hubble law. We set up the oscillation equation for the resonant electromagnetic modes, solve it by the WKB approximation, and reduce the coordinate-dependent quantities to their counterparts measured by a local observer who counts time with atomic clock. The solution shows that there is a perfect mutual cancellation of the adiabatic drift of cavity's frequency by space transformation to local coordinates and the time counted by the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of cavity has the same rate as that of atomic clocks. We conclude that if general relativity is correct and the local expansion of space is isotropic there should be no cosmological drift of frequency of a

  19. Ionization wave propagation on a micro cavity plasma array

    CERN Document Server

    Wollny, Alexander; Gebhardt, Markus; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Boettner, Henrik; Winter, Joerg; der Gathen, Volker Schulz-von; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Microcavity plasma arrays are regular arrays of inverse pyramidal cavities created on positive doped silicon wafers. Each cavity acts as a microscopic dielectric barrier discharge. Operated at atmospheric pressure in argon and excited with high voltage at about 10 kHz frequency each cavity develops a localized microplasma. Experiments show a strong interaction of the individual cavities, leading to the propagation of wave-like emission structures along the array surface. This paper studies the ignition process of a micro cavity plasma array by means of a numerical simulation and confirms the experimental results. The propagation of an ionization wave is observed. Its propagation speed of 1 km/s matches experimental findings.

  20. Alkali suppression within laser ion-source cavities and time structure of the laser ionized ion-bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical selectivity of the target and ion-source production system is an asset for radioactive ion-beam (RIB) facilities equipped with mass separators. Ionization via laser induced multiple resonant steps has such selectivity. However, the selectivity of the ISOLDE resonant ionization laser ion-source (RILIS), where ionization takes place within high temperature refractory metal cavities, suffers from unwanted surface ionization of low ionization potential alkalis. In order to reduce this type of isobaric contaminant, surface ionization within the target vessel was used. On-line measurements of the efficiency of this method is reported, suppression factors of alkalis up to an order of magnitude were measured as a function of their ionization potential. The time distribution of the ion-bunches produced with the RILIS was measured for a variety of elements and high temperature cavity materials. While all ions are produced within a few nanoseconds, the ion-bunch sometimes spreads over more than 100 μs. This demonstrates that ions are confined within high temperature metallic cavities. It is the internal electrical field of these cavities that causes the ions to drifts to the extraction region and defines the dwell time of the ions in the cavity. Beam optics calculations were carried out to simulate the pulse shape of a RILIS ion-bunch and are compared to the actual measurements

  1. A resonant ionization laser ion source at ORNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Stracener, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    Multi-step resonance laser ionization has become an essential tool for the production of isobarically pure radioactive ion beams at the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) facilities around the world. A resonant ionization laser ion source (RILIS) has been developed for the former Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The RILIS employs a hot-cavity ion source and a laser system featuring three grating-tuned and individually pumped Ti:Sapphire lasers, especially designed for stable and simple operation. The RILIS has been installed at the second ISOL production platform of former HRIBF and has successfully provided beams of exotic neutron-rich Ga isotopes for beta decay studies. This paper reports the features, advantages, limitations, and on-line and off-line performance of the RILIS.

  2. Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics should allow an order of magnitude smaller final equilibrium transverse beam emittances than conventional ionization cooling alone. In this scheme, a half-integer parametric resonance is induced in a cooling channel causing the beam to be naturally focused with the period of the channel's free oscillations. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points then cool the beam?s angular divergence through the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. A special continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion was developed for PIC. We present the results of modeling PIC in such a channel using GEANT4/G4 beamline. We discuss the challenge of precise beam aberration control from one absorber to another over a wide angular spread

  3. Chemical sensors based on the modification of a resonator cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Oliver; Mendes, Sergio B.; Fallahi, Mahmoud; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, we present a chemical sensor based on the modification of an optical resonator: the optical path length of the resonant cavity is changed by the chemical in question, thus shifting its resonant frequency.

  4. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    We study evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic (EM) wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. One builds a local coordinate system in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate. Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to decide whether atomic clocks ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on EM modes of a cavity. To resolve the ambiguity we analyzed the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its EM modes in an expanding universe by employing the Maxwell equations. We found out that both the size of the cavity and the EM frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal coordinates as the universe expands. We set up the oscillation equation f...

  5. Calculation of the resonant ionization of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoionizing resonances in the compound system of an electron and a helium ion are observed in kinematically-complete ionization experiments for electrons on helium atoms. The differential cross section is calculated for comparison with these experiments in an equivalent-local form of the distorted-wave impulse approximation. Resonant scattering amplitudes are calculated by a six-state momentum-space coupled-channels method. 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  6. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  7. Weak interaction studies using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important developments in laser sources for the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum are making it possible to carry out resonance ionization of some of the noble gases. It has already been shown that xenon can be ionized in a two-photon allowed excitation from the ground state. Recently a new method of generating radiation by four-wave mixing in mercury vapor enables excitation of xenon in a one-photon resonance process. With these new laser sources we expect to have effective ionization volumes of 10-3 to 10-2 cm3 for the cases of argon, krypton, and xenon. This has important consequences in weak interaction physics and environmental research

  8. Resonance ionization spectroscopy for AVLIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectroscopic study of three-step resonance photoionization was carried out for atomic gadolinium and uranium. Over 60 high-lying odd-parity states and about 30 autoionizing states were revealed for gadolinium. J-values and radiative lifetimes were determined by the method based on the electric-dipole transition selection rules and by the delayed coincidence method, respectively. Photo-absorption cross-sections were measured by three different methods, and efficient photoionization schemes for AVLIS were determined. (author)

  9. Historical survey of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently celebrated the 10th birthday of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS), and this seems an appropriate time to review the history of its development. Basically, RIS is a photophysics process in which tunable light sources are used to remove a valence electron from an atom of selected atomic number, Z. If appropriate lasers are used as the light source, one electron can be removed from each atom of the selected Z in the laser pulse. This implies that RIS can be a very efficient, as well as selective, ionization process. In what we normally call RIS, laser schemes are employed which preserve both of these features. In contrast, multiphoton ionization (MPI) is more general, although not necessarily Z selective or very efficient because resonances are often not used. Early research completed in the USSR and described as selective two-step photoionization, employed resonances to ionize the rubidium atom and served to guide work on laser isotope separation. 29 references, 8 figures

  10. Conceptual basis of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can b defined as a state-selective detection process in which tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. At least one resonance step is used in the stepwise ionization process, and it has been shown that the ionization probability of the spectroscopically selected species can nearly always be made close to unity. Since measurements of the number of photoelectrons or ions can be made very precisely and even one electron (or under vacuum conditions, one ion) can be detected, the technique can be used to make quantitative measurements of very small populations of the state-selected species. Counting of individual atoms has special meaning for detection of rare events. The ability to make saturated RIS measurements opens up a wide variety of applications to both basic and applied research. We view RIS as a specific type of multi-photon ionization in which the goal is to make quantitative measurements of quantum-selected populations in atomic or molecular systems. 16 references

  11. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) has been used for the sensitive detection of uranium. The apparatus consists of a laser system with three dye lasers and two pulsed copper vapour lasers and a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The uranium atoms are ionized in a three step excitation with the third step leading to an autoionizing state. Several excitation schemes were investigated and for two schemes all three transitions could be saturated with the available laser power. The hyperfine structure splitting (HFS) of 235U, the isotopic shift (IS) between 235U and 238U as well as isotopic ratios in uranium samples were determined. (Author)

  12. THz parallel-plate waveguides with resonant cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichel, Kimberly S.; Astley, Victoria; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Mendis, Rajind; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    We characterize the terahertz resonance due to a cavity inside aparallel-plate waveguide, and discuss its use for refractive index sensing. Insidethe waveguide, we observe a broadband field enhancement associated with thisnarrowband resonance. © 2015 OSA.......We characterize the terahertz resonance due to a cavity inside aparallel-plate waveguide, and discuss its use for refractive index sensing. Insidethe waveguide, we observe a broadband field enhancement associated with thisnarrowband resonance. © 2015 OSA....

  13. Sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy (SIRIS), which provides an ultrasensitive analysis of solid samples for all elements except helium and neon is described in this paper. Sensitivities down to 1 part in 1012 should be available in routine SIRIS analysis, and greater sensitivities should be available for special cases. The basic concepts of this technology and early results in the development of the new SIRIS process and apparatus are presented. (Auth.)

  14. Cavity-resonator-integrated guided-mode resonance filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ura, Shogo; Kintaka, Kenji; Inoue, Junichi; Nishio, Kenzo; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2013-03-01

    A cavity-resonator-integrated guided-mode-resonance filter (CRIGF) consisting of a grating coupler (GC) and a pair of distributed-Bragg-reflectors (DBRs) on a thin-film dielectric waveguide is reviewed. The CRIGF has been recently proposed by the authors to provide a narrow-band reflection spectrum for an incident wave of a small beam width from the free space. A newly developed analysis model for device design with performance simulation is introduced. Curved gratings are utilized to construct a resonator for a small-aperture CRIGF. Design, fabrication and characterization of CRIGFs of 10 μm aperture are described with a resonance wavelength of 850 nm. A Ge:SiO2 guiding core layer was deposited on a SiO2 glass substrate, and GC and DBRs were formed by the electron-beam direct writing lithography. A normal polarization-dependent CRIGF is shown with a obtained narrowband reflection spectrum of 0.2 nm full width at half maximum. A crossed-CRIGF is also discussed to eliminate the polarization dependence. It is successfully demonstrated that measured reflection spectra for TE and TM incident beams were well coincident with each other.

  15. Weak interaction studies using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important developments in laser sources for the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum are making it possible to carry out resonance ionization of some of the noble gases. It has already been shown that xenon can be ionized in a two-photon allowed excitation from the ground state. Recently a new method of generating radiation by four-wave mixing in mercury vapor enables excitation of xenon in a one-photon resonance process. With these new laser sources they expect to have effective ionization volumes of 10-3-10-2 cm3 for the cases of argon, krypton, and xenon. This has important consequences in weak interaction physics and environmental research. Widespread applications of noble gas detectors are due to the fact that small numbers of the chemically inert atoms can be recovered from very large targets of materials where they may be generated by rare events. In this lecture they show how lasers can be combined with mass spectrometers to detect a few noble gas atoms of one isotope in the presence of very large numbers of atoms of a neighboring isotope. This technique (which they have called Maxwell's demon because of the atom-sorting functions performed in the apparatus) is described and then followed with a brief discussion of two applications in weak interaction physics - double-beta decay and the solar neutrino problem

  16. Feedback-free optical cavity with self-resonating mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Y.; Hosaka, Y.; Honda, Y.; Kosuge, A.; Sakaue, K.; Omori, T.; Takahashi, T.; Urakawa, J.; Washio, M.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated the operation of a high finesse optical cavity without utilizing an active feedback system to stabilize the resonance. The effective finesse, which is a finesse including the overall system performance, of the cavity was measured to be 394 000 ± 10 000, and the laser power stored in the cavity was 2.52 ± 0.13 kW, which is approximately 187 000 times greater than the incident power to the cavity. The stored power was stabilized with a fluctuation of 1.7%, and we confirmed continuous cavity operation for more than two hours. This result has the potential to trigger an innovative evolution for applications that use optical resonant cavities such as compact photon sources with laser-Compton scattering or cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

  17. Resonance statistics in a microwave cavity with a thin antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Exner, P.; Šeba, P.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a model for scattering in a flat resonator with a thin antenna. The results are applied to rectangular microwave cavities. We compute the resonance spacing distribution and show that it agrees well with experimental data provided the antenna radius is much smaller than wavelengths of the resonance wavefunctions.

  18. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two approaches to Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory are discussed. The first is the use of continuous-wave dye lasers as the ionization source, and the use of pulse counting detection; and results are presented for lutetium and technetium. The second approach is the use of multiphoton resonances in the pulsed laser excitation of atoms. Experiments with 2 + 1 [photons to resonance plus photons to ionize] RIMS schemes for several elements are discussed. (author)

  19. High Quality RF resonant cavity for high gradient linacs

    CERN Document Server

    TianXiu-fang,; Deguo, Xun; Kun, Liu; yong, Hou; Jian, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In traditional accelerating structures, maximum amplitudes of accelerating fields are restricted by Joule heating losses in conducting walls and electron breakdown. In this paper, a composite accelerating cavity utilizing a resonant, periodic structure with a dielectric sphere located at a spherical conducting cavity center is presented. The presence of the dielectric in the central part of the resonance cavity shifts the magnetic fields maximum from regions close to the metallic wall towards the dielectric surface, which strongly lowers the skin effect losses in the wall. By using the existing ultra-low loss Sapphire dielectrics, we make theory analyze and numerical calculations by MATLAB, and further make simulated calculation by CST for comparison. The results show that all field components at the metallic wall are either zero or very small, so one can expect the cavity to be less prone to electrical breakdowns than the traditional cavity. And the quality factor Q can be three orders of magnitude higher th...

  20. Einstein-Maxwell equations for asymmetric resonant cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Frasca, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the behavior of electromagnetic fields inside a resonant cavity by solving Einstein--Maxwell field equations. It is shown that the modified geometry of space-time inside the cavity due to a propagating mode can affect the propagation of a laser beam. It is seen that components of laser light with a shifted frequency appear originating from the coupling between the laser field and the mode cavity due to gravity. The analysis is extended to the case of an asymmetric resonant cavity taken to be a truncated cone. It is shown that a proper choice of the geometrical parameters of the cavity and dielectric can make the gravitational effects significant for an interferometric setup. This could make possible to realize table-top experiments involving gravitational effects.

  1. High-Q resonant cavities for terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, A; Consolino, L; Ravaro, M; Mazzotti, D; Vitiello, M S; Bartalini, S; De Natale, P

    2015-02-01

    We report on the realization and characterization of two different designs for resonant THz cavities, based on wire-grid polarizers as input/output couplers, and injected by a continuous-wave quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 2.55 THz. A comparison between the measured resonators parameters and the expected theoretical values is reported. With achieved quality factor Q ≈ 2.5 × 10(5), these cavities show resonant peaks as narrow as few MHz, comparable with the typical Doppler linewidth of THz molecular transitions and slightly broader than the free-running QCL emission spectrum. The effects of the optical feedback from one cavity to the QCL are examined by using the other cavity as a frequency reference. PMID:25836227

  2. Resonant microwave cavity for 8.5-12 GHz optically detected electron spin resonance with simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, J. S.; Wienkes, L. R.

    2009-03-01

    We present a newly developed microwave resonant cavity for use in optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) experiments. The cylindrical quasi-TE011 mode cavity is designed to fit in a 1 in. magnet bore to allow the sample to be optically accessed and to have an adjustable resonant frequency between 8.5 and 12 GHz. The cavity uses cylinders of high dielectric material, so-called "dielectric resonators," in a double-stacked configuration to determine the resonant frequency. Wires in a pseudo-Helmholtz configuration are incorporated into the cavity to provide frequencies for simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The system was tested by measuring cavity absorption as microwave frequencies were swept, by performing ODMR on a zinc-doped InP sample, and by performing optically detected NMR on a GaAs sample. The results confirm the suitability of the cavity for ODMR with simultaneous NMR.

  3. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  4. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry for isotopic abundance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a relatively new laser-based technique for the determination of isotopic abundances. The resonance ionization process depends upon the stepwise absorption of photons from the laser, promoting atoms of the element of interest through progressively higher electronic states until an ion is formed. Sensitivity arises from the efficiency of the resonant absorption process when coupled with the power available from commercial laser sources. Selectivity derives naturally from the distinct electronic structure of different elements. This isobaric discrimination has provided the major impetus for development of the technique. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used for analysis of the isotopic abundances of the rare earth lutetium. Isobaric interferences from ytterbium severely effect the ability to measure small amounts of the neutron-deficient Lu isotopes by conventional mass spectrometric techniques. Resonance ionization for lutetium is performed using a continuous-wave laser operating at 452 nm, through a sequential two-photon process, with one photon exciting the intermediate resonance and the second photon causing ionization. Ion yields for microgram-sized quantities of lutetium lie between 10(6) and 10(7) ions per second, at overall ionization efficiencies approaching 10(-4). Discrimination factors against ytterbium greater than 10(6) have been measured. Resonance ionization for technetium is also being explored, again in response to an isobaric interference, molybdenum. Because of the relatively high ionization potential for Tc, three-photon, two-color RIMS processes are being developed.

  5. Ionization efficiency calculations for cavity thermoionization ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerical model of ionization in a thermoionization ion source is presented. The review of ion source ionization efficiency calculation results for various kinds of extraction field is given. The dependence of ionization efficiency on working parameters like ionizer length and extraction voltage is discussed. Numerical simulations results are compared to theoretical predictions obtained from a simplified ionization model

  6. Ray and wave chaos in asymmetric resonant optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Nöckel, J U; Noeckel, Jens U.

    1998-01-01

    Optical resonators are essential components of lasers and other wavelength-sensitive optical devices. A resonator is characterized by a set of modes, each with a resonant frequency omega and resonance width Delta omega=1/tau, where tau is the lifetime of a photon in the mode. In a cylindrical or spherical dielectric resonator, extremely long-lived resonances are due to `whispering gallery' modes in which light circulates around the perimeter trapped by total internal reflection. These resonators emit light isotropically. Recently, a new category of asymmetric resonant cavities (ARCs) has been proposed in which substantial shape deformation leads to partially chaotic ray dynamics. This has been predicted to give rise to a universal, frequency-independent broadening of the whispering-gallery resonances, and highly anisotropic emission. Here we present solutions of the wave equation for ARCs which confirm many aspects of the earlier ray-optics model, but also reveal interesting frequency-dependent effects charac...

  7. A Resonant Cavity for Single-Shot Emittance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J S; Whittum, D H; Miller, R H; Tantawi, S G; Weidemann, A W

    2002-01-01

    We present a non-invasive, resonant cavity based approach to beam emittance measurement of a shot-to-shot non-circular beam pulse of multi-bunches. In a resonant cavity, desired field components can be enhanced up to Q_L_lambda/pi, where Q_L_lambda is the loaded Q of the resonance mode lambda, when the cavity resonant mode matches with the beam operating frequency. In particular, a Quad-cavity, with its quadrupole mode at beam operating frequency, extracts the beam quad-moment exclusively, utilizing the symmetry of the cavity and some simple networks to suppress common modes. Six successive beam quadrupole moment measurements, performed at different betatron phases in a linear transport system, allow us to determine the beam emittance, i.e., the beam size and shape in the beam's phase space. One measurement alone provides the rms-beam size if the beam position is given, for instance, by nearby beam-position-monitors. This paper describes the basic design and analysis of a Quad-cavity beam monitoring system.

  8. Subwavelength metallic cavities with high-Q resonance modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic cavities have been extensively studied to realize small-volume nanocavities and nanolasers. However cavity-resonance quality (Q) factors of nanolasers observed up to now remain low (up to ∼500) due to metal optical absorption. In this paper, we report the observation of highest Q factors of 9000 at low temperature and ∼6000 near room temperature in a metallic cavity with a probe of sub-bandgap emission of Si-doped GaAs. We analyze the temperature dependence of cavity-mode resonance wavelengths and show that the refractive-index term dominates the measured temperature dependence. We also show that this refractive-index term is cavity-mode dependent and the fitting procedure offers a new method to identify cavity modes. We simulate the metallic cavity with finite-element method and attribute the high-Q cavity mode to a whispering gallery optical mode. This mode is shown to have isotropic polarization dependence of the output emission, which is preferable for quantum information applications. (paper)

  9. Cavity QED with atom chips and micro-resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Benjamin; Barclay, Paul; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Painter, Oskar; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2006-05-01

    Cavity QED provides a rich experimental setting for quantum information processing, both in the implementation of quantum logic gates and in the development of quantum networks. Moreover, studies of cavity QED will help elucidate the dynamics of continuously observed open quantum systems with quantum- limited feedback. To achieve these goals in cavity QED, a neutral atom must be tightly confined inside a high-finesse cavity with small mode volume for long periods of time. Microfabricated wires on a substrate---known as an atom chip---can create sufficiently high-curvature magnetic potentials to trap atoms in the Lamb- Dicke regime. The integration of micro-resonators, such as microdisks and photonic bandgap cavities, with atom chips forms a robust and scalable system capable of probing the strong- coupling regime of cavity QED with magnetically trapped atoms. We have recently built an atom-cavity chip utilizing a fiber taper coupled microdisk resonator. This device combines laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms with magnetic microtraps and waveguides to deliver cold atoms to the small mode volume of the high-Q cavity. We will relate our progress toward detecting single atoms with this device.

  10. Cavity polariton optomechanics: Polariton path to fully resonant dispersive coupling in optomechanical resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Rozas, G.; Bruchhausen, A. E.; Fainstein, A.; Jusserand, B.; Lemaître, A.

    2014-01-01

    Resonant photoelastic coupling in semiconductor nanostructures opens new perspectives for strongly enhanced light-sound interaction in optomechanical resonators. One potential problem, however, is the reduction of the cavity Q-factor induced by dissipation when the resonance is approached. We show in this letter that cavity-polariton mediation in the light-matter process overcomes this limitation allowing for a strongly enhanced photon-phonon coupling without significant lifetime reduction in...

  11. Epicyclic helical channels for parametric resonance ionization cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johson, Rolland Paul [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-08-23

    Proposed next-generation muon colliders will require major technical advances to achieve rapid muon beam cooling requirements. Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. In PIC, a half-integer parametric resonance causes strong focusing of a muon beam at appropriately placed energy absorbers while ionization cooling limits the beam’s angular spread. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics in this way should then allow much smaller final transverse muon beam sizes than conventional ionization cooling alone. One of the PIC challenges is compensation of beam aberrations over a sufficiently wide parameter range while maintaining the dynamical stability with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion and dispersion. We explore use of a coupling resonance to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to shift the dynamics away from non-linear resonances. PIC simulations are presented.

  12. Theoretical aspects of multiphoton ionization with many resonant excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variety of the parameters involved in multi-color multi-step ionization makes it a formidable job to obtain a theoretically comprehensible overview of the process. We examine these parameters of such processes as well as commonly used assumptions in theoretical investigations of multiphoton ionization with many resonantly excited levels. The density matrix formalism is adequate to treat resonant multiphoton ionization when the number of the resonant levels involved is not too large, solving the resonantly coupled states separately beyond the lowest order perturbation theory, while the rest of the states are treated perturbatively. An example of such formalism is given for a four-level system ionized with three lasers each of which resonantly couples the adjacent pairs of the atomic states.

  13. Collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy of radium ions

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the neutron-decient radium isotopes with high-resolution collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. Probing the hyperne structure of the $7{s}\\,^2\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{1/2}$ and $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transitions in Ra II will provide atomic-structure measurements that have not been achieved for $^{{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transition in $^{{A}<214}$Ra will allow the spectroscopic quadrupole moments to be directly measured for the first time. In addition, the technique will allow tentative spin assignments to be conrmed and the magnetic dipole moments measured for $^{\\textit{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the hyperne structure (in particular the isotope shifts) of the neutron-decient radium will provide information to further constrain the nuclear models away from the N=126 shell closure.

  14. Slow wave cavity resonance in periodic stacks of anisotropic layers

    CERN Document Server

    Figotin, Alex

    2007-01-01

    We consider Fabry-Perot cavity resonance in periodic layered structures involving birefringent layers. Previously we have shown that the presence of birefringent layers with misaligned in-plane anisotropy can dramatically enhance the performance of the photonic-crystal cavity. It allows to reduce the size of a Fabry-Perot resonator by an order of magnitude without compromising on its performance. The key characteristic of the enhanced photonic-crystal cavity is that its Bloch dispersion relation displays a degenerate photonic band edge, rather than only regular ones. This can be realized in specially arranged stacks of misaligned anisotropic layers. On the down side, the presence of birefringent layers results in the Fabry-Perot resonance being coupled only with one (elliptic) polarization component of the incident wave, while the other polarization component is reflected back to space. In this paper we show how a small modification of the periodic layered array can solve the above fundamental problem and pro...

  15. Wireless overhead line temperature sensor based on RF cavity resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of maximizing power transfer through overhead transmission lines necessitates the use of dynamic power control to keep transmission line temperatures within acceptable limits. Excessive conductor operating temperatures lead to an increased sag of the transmission line conductor and may reduce their expected life. In this paper, a passive wireless sensor based on a resonant radio frequency (RF) cavity is presented which can be used to measure overhead transmission line temperature. The temperature sensor does not require a power supply and can be easily clamped to the power line with an antenna attached. Changing temperature causes a change of cavity dimensions and a shift in resonant frequency. The resonant frequency of the cavity can be interrogated wirelessly. This temperature sensor has a resolution of 0.07 °C and can be interrogated from distances greater than 4.5 m. The sensor has a deviation from linearity of less than 2 °C. (paper)

  16. Fish and chips: Analytical applications of resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry is becoming recognized as an analytical technique for a wide range of applications. The extremely high element specificity and sensitivity of the resonance ionization (RI) process is especially valuable for ultratrace element analysis in samples where the complexity of the matrix is frequently a serious source of interferences. In this paper, we will describe the implementation of sputter-initiated resonance ionization microprobe (SIRIMP) and laser atomization RIMP (LARIMP) to solve a number of analytical problems and illustrate the technique's salient characteristics with applications ranging from environmental monitoring using fish scales to semiconductor device and DNA diagnostics chips

  17. Coupled superconducting resonant cavities for a heavy ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A design for a superconducting niobium slow-wave accelerating structure has been explored that may have performance and cost advantages over existing technology. The option considered is an array of pairs of quarter-wave coaxial-line resonant cavities, the two elements of each pair strongly coupled through a short superconducting transmission line. In the linac formed by such an array, each paired structure is independently phased. A disadvantage of two-gap slow wave structures is that each cavity is relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased elements is required for a linac. Increasing the number of drift tubes per cavity reduces the number of independently-phased elements but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original, single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss in velocity acceptance. (Author) 2 figs., 8 refs

  18. Harmonically resonant cavity as a bunch-length monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B.; Hannon, F.; Ali, M. M.; Forman, E.; Grames, J.; Kazimi, R.; Moore, W.; Pablo, M.; Poelker, M.; Sanchez, A.; Speirs, D.

    2016-05-01

    A compact, harmonically resonant cavity with fundamental resonant frequency 1497 MHz was used to evaluate the temporal characteristics of electron bunches produced by a 130 kV dc high voltage spin-polarized photoelectron source at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) photoinjector, delivered at 249.5 and 499 MHz repetition rates and ranging in width from 45 to 150 picoseconds (FWHM). A cavity antenna attached directly to a sampling oscilloscope detected the electron bunches as they passed through the cavity bore with a sensitivity of ˜1 mV /μ A . The oscilloscope waveforms are a superposition of the harmonic modes excited by the beam, with each cavity mode representing a term of the Fourier series of the electron bunch train. Relatively straightforward post-processing of the waveforms provided a near-real time representation of the electron bunches revealing bunch-length and the relative phasing of interleaved beams. The noninvasive measurements from the harmonically resonant cavity were compared to measurements obtained using an invasive RF-deflector-cavity technique and to predictions from particle tracking simulations.

  19. Indirect Coupling between Two Cavity Photon Systems via Ferromagnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hyde, Paul; Harder, Michael; Match, Christophe; Hu, Can-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally realize indirect coupling between two cavity modes via strong coupling with the ferromagnetic resonance in Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). We find that some indirectly coupled modes of our system can have a higher microwave transmission than the individual uncoupled modes. Using a coupled harmonic oscillator model, the influence of the oscillation phase difference between the two cavity modes on the nature of the indirect coupling is revealed. These indirectly coupled microwave modes can be controlled using an external magnetic field or by tuning the cavity height. This work has potential for use in controllable optical devices and information processing technologies.

  20. Resonance frequencies of a cavity containing a compressible viscous fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conca, C.; Planchard, J.; Vanninathan, M.

    1993-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the resonance spectrum of a cavity containing a compressible viscous fluid. This system admits a discrete infinite sequence of eigenvalues whose real parts are negative, which is interpreted as the damping effect introduced by viscosity. Only a finite number of them have non-zero imaginary parts and this number depends on viscosity; a simple criterion is given for their position in the complex plane. The case of a cavity containing an elastic mechanical system immersed in the fluid is also examined; from a qualitative point of view, the nature of the resonance spectrum remains unchanged.

  1. Application of resonance ionization spectroscopy in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of resonance ionization spectroscopy in the measurement of the solar neutrino flux, baryon conservation and double beta decay in the search for fractional charge, superheavy ions and magnetic monopoles is discussed. (U.K.)

  2. Resonant photo-ionization of Yb+ to Yb2+

    OpenAIRE

    Heugel, Simon; Fischer, Martin; Elman, Vladimir; Maiwald, Robert; Sondermann, Markus; Leuchs, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the controlled creation of a $\\mathrm{^{174}Yb^{2+}}$ ion by photo-ionizing $\\mathrm{^{174}Yb^+}$ with weak continuous-wave lasers at ultraviolet wavelengths. The photo-ionization is performed by resonantly exciting transitions of the $\\mathrm{^{174}Yb^+}$ ion in three steps. Starting from an ion crystal of two laser-cooled $\\mathrm{^{174}Yb^+}$ ions localized in a radio-frequency trap, the verification of the ionization process is performed by characterizing the properties of ...

  3. Complex dielectric constant measurements by the microwave resonant cavities method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complex dielectric constant measurement method for solids, using cylindrical and parallelipipedic microwave resonant cavities is presented. This method provides high accuracy when calculating the value of epsilonsup(*) for dielectric, semiconductor, ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials. The paper contains a short theoretical approach, the description of the experimental method, as well as some experimental results obtained in the frequency band (19500 MHz). (author)

  4. Temperature compensation of resonant cavities with a teflon post

    OpenAIRE

    Bará Temes, Francisco Javier

    1982-01-01

    The negative temperature coefficient of E for teflon is used to compensate the frequency drift of a metal cavity due to thermal expansion. An experimental X-band transmission resonator was compensated in this way with a 10 mm teflon post. The results are considered of great interest for the compensation of waveguide millimiter wave oscillators. Peer Reviewed

  5. Dielectric microwave resonators in TE(011) cavities for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mett, Richard R; Sidabras, Jason W; Golovina, Iryna S; Hyde, James S

    2008-09-01

    The coupled system of the microwave cylindrical TE(011) cavity and the TE(01delta) dielectric modes has been analyzed in order to determine the maximum achievable resonator efficiency parameter of a dielectric inserted into a cavity, and whether this value can exceed that of a dedicated TE(01delta) mode dielectric resonator. The frequency, Q value, and resonator efficiency parameter Lambda for each mode of the coupled system were calculated as the size of the dielectric was varied. Other output parameters include the relative field magnitudes and phases. Two modes are found: one with fields in the dielectric parallel to the fields in the cavity center and the other with antiparallel fields. Results closely match those from a computer program that solves Maxwell's equations by finite element methods. Depending on the relative natural resonance frequencies of the cavity and dielectric, one mode has a higher Q value and correspondingly lower Lambda than the other. The mode with the higher Q value is preferentially excited by a coupling iris or loop in or near the cavity wall. However, depending on the frequency separation between modes, either can be excited in this way. A relatively narrow optimum is found for the size of the insert that produces maximum signal for both modes simultaneously. It occurs when the self-resonance frequencies of the two resonators are nearly equal. The maximum signal is almost the same as that of the dedicated TE(01delta) mode dielectric resonator alone, Lambda congruent with40 G/W(1/2) at X-band for a KTaO(3) crystal. The cavity is analogous to the second stage of a two-stage coupler. In general, there is no electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal benefit by use of a second stage. However, there is a benefit of convenience. A properly designed sample-mounted resonator inserted into a cavity can give EPR signals as large as what one would expect from the dielectric resonator alone. PMID:19044441

  6. Dielectric microwave resonators in TE011 cavities for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mett, Richard R.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Golovina, Iryna S.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-09-01

    The coupled system of the microwave cylindrical TE011 cavity and the TE01δ dielectric modes has been analyzed in order to determine the maximum achievable resonator efficiency parameter of a dielectric inserted into a cavity, and whether this value can exceed that of a dedicated TE01δ mode dielectric resonator. The frequency, Q value, and resonator efficiency parameter Λ for each mode of the coupled system were calculated as the size of the dielectric was varied. Other output parameters include the relative field magnitudes and phases. Two modes are found: one with fields in the dielectric parallel to the fields in the cavity center and the other with antiparallel fields. Results closely match those from a computer program that solves Maxwell's equations by finite element methods. Depending on the relative natural resonance frequencies of the cavity and dielectric, one mode has a higher Q value and correspondingly lower Λ than the other. The mode with the higher Q value is preferentially excited by a coupling iris or loop in or near the cavity wall. However, depending on the frequency separation between modes, either can be excited in this way. A relatively narrow optimum is found for the size of the insert that produces maximum signal for both modes simultaneously. It occurs when the self-resonance frequencies of the two resonators are nearly equal. The maximum signal is almost the same as that of the dedicated TE01δ mode dielectric resonator alone, Λ ≅40 G/W1/2 at X-band for a KTaO3 crystal. The cavity is analogous to the second stage of a two-stage coupler. In general, there is no electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal benefit by use of a second stage. However, there is a benefit of convenience. A properly designed sample-mounted resonator inserted into a cavity can give EPR signals as large as what one would expect from the dielectric resonator alone.

  7. Cavity optomechanics on a microfluidic resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Wonsuk; Liu, Jing; Tomes, Matthew; Fan, Xudong; Carmon, Tal

    2012-01-01

    Light pressure is known to excite or cool vibrations in microresonators for sensing quantum-optomechanical effects and we now show that it can be explored for investigations with liquids. Currently, optical resonances are utilized to detect analytes in liquids. However, optomechanical oscillations have never been excited when devices were immersed in liquid. This is because replacing the surrounding air with water inherently increases the acoustical impedance and the associated acoustical-radiation losses. Here we fabricate a hollow optomechanical bubble resonator with water inside, and use light pressure to excite 8 MHz - 140 MHz vibrations with 1 mW optical-threshold power and >2000 mechanical Q, constituting the first time that any microfluidic system is optomechanically actuated. Bridging between optomechanics and microfluidics will enable recently developed capillaries and on-chip bubbles to vibrate via optical excitation; and allow optomechanics with non-solid material phases including bio-analytes, sup...

  8. Cavity enhanced optical processes in microsphere resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzei, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Diese Arbeit beschreibt eine ausfŸhrliche Untersuchung der physikalischen Eigenschaften von Mikrokugelresonatoren aus Quarzglas. Diese Resonatoren unterstŸtzen sogennante whispering-gallery Moden (WGM), die GŸten so hoch bis 109 bieten. Als experimentelle Hilfsmittel wurden ein Nahfeld- und ein Konfokalmikroskop benutzt, um die Struktur der Moden bezŸglich der Topographie des Resonators eindeutig zu identifizieren, oder um einzelne Quantenemitter zu detektieren und anzuregen. Die resonante...

  9. Cylindrical Resonator Utilizing a Curved Resonant Grating as a Cavity Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Yamada

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A thin-film grating on a curved substrate functions as a highly reflective and wavelength sensitive mirror for a diverging wave that has the same curvature as the substrate. In this paper we propose a cylindrical cavity surrounded by a curved resonant grating wall, and describe its resonance characteristics. Through finite-difference time-domain (FDTD simulation we have clarified that this type of cavity supports two resonance modes: one is confined by Fresnel reflection and the other by resonance reflection of the wall. We have also demonstrated that the latter mode exhibits a Q factor several orders of magnitude higher than that of the former mode.

  10. Classical and wave chaos in asymmetric resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, A. Douglas

    2000-12-01

    Deformed cylindrical and spherical dielectric optical resonators are analyzed from the perspective of non-linear dynamics and quantum chaos theory. In the short-wavelength limit such resonators behave like billiard systems with non-zero escape probability due to refraction. A ray model is introduced to predict the resonance lifetimes and emission patterns from such a cavity. A universal wavelength-independent broadening is predicted and found for large deformations of the cavity, however there are significant wave-chaotic corrections as well. Highly directional emission is predicted from chaotic “whispering gallery” modes for index of refraction less than two. The detailed nature of the emission pattern can be understood from the nature of the phase space flow in the billiard, and a dramatic variation of this pattern with index of refraction is found due to an effect called “dynamical eclipsing”. Semiconductor resonators of this type also show highly directional emission and high output power but from different modes associated with periodic orbits. A semiclassical approach to these modes is briefly reviewed. These asymmetric resonant cavities (ARCs) show promise as components in future integrated optical devices.

  11. Process for treatment of inside surface of superconducting cavities (cavity resonators)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cavity of an acceleration unit built up from one or more individual resonators is filled to about half way with ceramic grinding bodies and with water, and turned slowly at about 9 rpm. The rotation is maintained for about a week. The inner surface of the cavity is thus smoothed and freed of faults, so that the cavity can be used without difficulty in superconducting operation with improved properties. By this simple process, success is achieved in increasing the practically possible longitudinal field strength for acceleration by at least a factor of 2 or more, i.e. one can save at least half the acceleration units. To remove grinding wear, the cavity is also filled with an acid mixture of about 1 part of HF, 1 part of HNO3 and 6 parts of H3PO4 and cleaned, and the surface is etched. (orig.)

  12. In-Source Laser Resonance Ionization at ISOL Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Bruce; Feddosseev, Valentin

    Resonance ionization laser ion source development has been carried out at two radioactive ion beam facilities: ISOLDE (CERN, Switzerland) and the IGISOL facility (Jyvaskyla, Finland). The scope of the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source has been extended to 27 elements with the development of new three-step ionization schemes for Sb, Sc, Dy, Y and Au. The efficiencies were determined to be in the range of 2 - 20 %. Additionally, a new two-step ionization scheme has been developed for bismuth in an off-line atomic beam unit. The scheme relies on ionization via a strong and broad auto-ionizing resonance at an energy of 63196.79 cm$^{−1}$. This scheme may offer an improvement over the existing RILIS efficiency and will be more convenient for use during resonance ionization spectroscopy of Bi isotopes. The RILIS can be used as a spectroscopic tool to probe features such as the hyperfine structures and the isotope-shifts of radioisotopes with low production rates. By coupling a laser scanning process that dire...

  13. Resonant cavity spectroscopy of radical species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Grant

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH, with contributions from Cl atoms, and at night by either NO3 radicals or ozone. Chemical oxidation cycles, which couple OH, HO2 and peroxy (RO2) radical species, remove primary emitted trace species which are harmful to humans or to the wider environment. However, many of the secondary products produced by atmospheric photo-oxidation are also directly harmful, for example O3, NO2, acidic and multifunctional species, many of which are of low volatility and are able to partition effectively to the condensed phase, creating secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which contributes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol, with associated impacts on climate and human health. The accuracy of atmospheric models to predict these impacts necessarily requires accurate knowledge of the chemical oxidative cycling. Two of the simplest intermediates are the hydroperoxy radical, HO2, and the smallest and dominant organic peroxy radical, CH3O2, formed directly by the reactions of OH with CO/O2 and CH4/O2, respectively, and indirectly following the oxidation of larger VOCs. OH, HO2 and RO2 (collectively known as ROx) are rapidly cycled, being at the centre of tropospheric oxidation, and hence are some of the best targets for models to compare with field data. The reaction of HO2 and RO2 with NO constitutes the only tropospheric in-situ source of O3. Despite their importance, neither HO2 nor CH3O2 is measured directly in the atmosphere. HO2 is only measured indirectly following its conversion to OH and CH3O2 is not measured at all. Typically only the sum of RO2 radicals is measured, making no distinction between different organic peroxy radicals. This contribution will detail recent studies using (i) optical feedback cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with both quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-IR, and (ii

  14. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfenning, Andreas, E-mail: Andreas.Pfenning@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas [Technische Physik, Physikalisches Institut, Universität Würzburg and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3 μm. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29 μm. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  15. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3 μm. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29 μm. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×104 A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found

  16. High-Q 3D coaxial resonators for cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Taekwan; Owens, John C.; Naik, Ravi; Lachapelle, Aman; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Schuster, David I.

    Three-dimensional microwave resonators provide an alternative approach to transmission-line resonators used in most current circuit QED experiments. Their large mode volume greatly reduces the surface dielectric losses that limits the coherence of superconducting circuits, and the well-isolated and controlled cavity modes further suppress coupling to the environment. In this work, we focus on unibody 3D coaxial cavities which are only evanescently coupled and free from losses due to metal-metal interfaces, allowing us to reach extremely high quality-factors. We achieve quality-factor of up to 170 million using 4N6 Aluminum at superconducting temperatures, corresponding to an energy ringdown time of ~4ms. We extend our methods to other materials including Niobium, NbTi, and copper coated with Tin-Lead solder. These cavities can be further explored to study their properties under magnetic field or upon coupling to superconducting Josephson junction qubits, e.g. 3D transmon qubits. Such 3D cavity QED system can be used for quantum information applications, or quantum simulation in coupled cavity arrays.

  17. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS), a laser is tuned to a wavelength that will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or non-resonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms: and because detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples of one-atom detection are given, including that of the noble gases, to show complementarity with accelerator mass spectrometry AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr by using RIS has interesting applications for solar-neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. (author)

  18. Principle and analytical applications of resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a very sensitive analytical technique for the detection of trace elements. This method is based on the excitation and ionization of atoms with resonant laser light followed by mass analysis. It allows element and, in some cases, isotope selective ionization and is applicable to most of the elements of the periodic table. A high selectivity can be achieved by applying three step photoionization of the elements under investigation and an additional mass separation for an unambiguous isotope assignment. An effective facility for resonance ionization mass spectrometry consists of three dye lasers which are pumped by two copper vapor lasers and of a linear time-of-flight spectrometer with a resolution better than 2500. Each copper vapor laser has a pulse repetition rate of 6,5 kHz and an average output power of 30 W. With such an apparatus measurements with lanthanide-, actinide-, and technetium-samples have been performed. By saturating the excitation steps and by using autoionizing states for ionization step a detection efficiency of 4 x 10-6 and 2,5 x 10-6 has been reached for plutonium and technetium, respectively, leading to a detection limit of less than 107 atoms in the sample. Measurements of isotope ratios of plutonium samples were in good agreement with mass-spectrometric data. The high elemental selectivity of the resonance ionization spectrometry could be demonstrated. (Authors)

  19. Fano resonances in a plasmonic waveguide system composed of stub coupled with a square cavity resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coupled plasmonic waveguide resonator system which can produce sharp and asymmetric Fano resonances was proposed and analyzed. Two Fano resonances are induced by the interactions between the narrow discrete whispering gallery modes in a plasmonic square cavity resonator and the broad spectrum of the metal–insulator–metal stub resonator. The relative peak amplitudes between the 1st and 2nd order Fano resonances can be adjusted by changing the structure parameters, such as the square cavity size, the stub size and the center-to-center distance between the square cavity and the stub resonators. And the 1st order Fano resonant peak, which is a standing-wave mode, will split into two resonant peaks (one standing-wave mode and one traveling-wave mode) when it couples with the 2nd Fano resonance. Also, the potential of the proposed Fano system as an integrated slow-light device and refractive index sensor was investigated. The results show that a maximum group index of about 100 can be realized, and a linear refractive index sensitivity of 938 nm/RIU with a figure of merit of about 1.35 × 104 can be obtained. (paper)

  20. Observation of generalized optomechanical coupling and cooling on cavity resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Sawadsky, Andreas; Nia, Ramon Moghadas; Tarabrin, Sergey P; Khalili, Farid Ya; Hammerer, Klemens; Schnabel, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Optomechanical coupling between a light field and the motion of a cavity mirror via radiation pressure plays an important role for the exploration of macroscopic quantum physics and for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs). It has been used to cool mechanical oscillators into their quantum ground states and has been considered to boost the sensitivity of GW detectors, e.g. via the optical spring effect. Here, we present the experimental characterization of generalized, that is, dispersive and dissipative optomechanical coupling, with a macroscopic (1.5mm)^2-sized silicon nitride (SiN) membrane in a cavity-enhanced Michelson-type interferometer. We report for the first time strong optomechanical cooling based on dissipative coupling, even on cavity resonance, in excellent agreement with theory. Our result will allow for new experimental regimes in macroscopic quantum physics and GW detection.

  1. Hybrid III-V/SOI resonant cavity enhanced photodetector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Park, Gyeong Cheol;

    2016-01-01

    as part of the HG reflector, enabling a very compact vertical cavity. Numerical investigations show that a quantum efficiency close to 100 % and a detection linewidth of about 1 nm can be achieved, which are desirable for wavelength division multiplexing applications. Based on these results, a hybrid......A hybrid III–V/SOI resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure comprising a high-contrast grating (HCG) reflector, a hybrid grating (HG) reflector, and an air cavity between them, has been proposed and investigated. In the proposed structure, a light absorbing material is integrated...... RCE-PD sample has been fabricated by heterogeneously integrating an InP-based material onto a silicon-on-insulator wafer and has been characterized, which shows a clear enhancement in photo-current at the designed wavelength. This indicates that the HG reflector provides a field enhancement sufficient...

  2. Selective enhancement of resonant multiphoton ionization with strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Min; Luo, Siqiang; Zhou, Yueming; Zhang, Qingbin; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution photoelectron momentum distributions of Xe atom ionized by 800-nm linearly polarized laser fields have been traced at intensities from 1.1*1013 W/cm2 to 3.5*1013 W/cm2 using velocity-map imaging techniques. At certain laser intensities, the momentum spectrum exhibits a distinct double-ring structure for low-order above-threshold ionization, which appears to be absent at lower or higher laser intensities. By investigating intensity-resolved photoelectron energy spectrum, we find that this double-ring structure originates from resonant multiphoton ionization involving multiple Rydberg states of atoms. Varying the laser intensity, we can selectively enhance multiphoton excitation of atomic Rydberg populations. The photoelectron angular distributions of multiphoton resonance are also investigated for the low-order above threshold ionization.

  3. Conditioning for the RF Resonant Cavities of the CYCIAE-100

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN; Zhi-guo; JI; Bin; ZHAO; Zhen-lu; FU; Xiao-liang; LEI; Yu; WANG; Chuan; YANG; Jian-jun; WEI; Jun-yi; LI; Peng-zhan; LV; Yin-long; ZHANG; Tian-jue; GE; Tao; CAI; Hong-ru; PAN; Gao-feng; ZHU; Peng-fei; AN; Shi-zhong; XING; Jian-sheng; YIN; Meng; CAO; Lei; ZHANG; Su-ping; WEN; Li-peng; HOU; Shi-gang; WU; Long-cheng; LIU; Geng-shou; LI; Zhen-guo; CUI; Bai-yao; DONG; Huan-jun

    2013-01-01

    The CYCIAE-100 cyclotron developed by the BRIF project group had finished installation of its main equipments and parts in 2012.The field mapping of the main magnet has been done afterward.In Dec.13th,2012,the vacuum of the main chamber reached 4×10-7 mbar,conditioning for the RF resonant cavities were started shortly after.When the cyclotron is opened the interior surface is exposed to air and

  4. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy with neptunium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonance ionization mass spectroscopy was one of the methods used for detection of the actinides. The principles of the method are: atoms of the elements to be measured are excited step by step through resonant irradiation with laser light, and are thus ionized. The ions are accelerated by electrical fields and can then be detected. The equipment for this process comprised a pulsed laser system consisting of two copper vapor lasers and three dye lasers, and a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a mass resolution M/ΔM of approx. 1500. Due to a two-step resonant excitation of atomic energy levels and subsequent population of an autoionized state, the three-step ionization method is particularly element-selective. Use of powerful lasers with a high pulse repetition rate yield a high sensitivity and thus allow low detection limits. (orig./BBR)

  5. Resonant photo-ionization of Yb+ to Yb2+

    CERN Document Server

    Heugel, Simon; Elman, Vladimir; Sondermann, Markus; Leuchs, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the three-step fully-resonant photo-ionization of 174Yb+ with weak continuous-wave lasers at ultra violet wavelengths. Starting from an ion crystal of two laser-cooled Yb+ ions localized in a radio-frequency trap, the verification of the ionization process is performed by characterizing the motional dynamics of the resulting mixed-species ion-crystal.

  6. Multiphoton resonance ionization for hydrogen atom in laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Schroedinger equation of hydrogen atom in laser field is expanded by Floquet wave and can be solved by the iterative method. The atomic ionization by laser field is a complex eigenvalue problem, which is formed from differential equation and boundary condition. Then the formula of the multiphoton resonance ionization in a linear polarization laser field was obtained and it is compared with the experiment

  7. Mechanical design of RFQ resonator cavities in the 400-MHz frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many RFQ resonator-cavity design concepts have been proposed in the 400-MHz frequency range. Los Alamos has been evaluating RFQ resonator-cavity designs that provide acceptable combinations of necessary mechanical features, easy tunability and long-term stability. Four RFQ resonator test cavities have been fabricated to test rf joints between the RFQ vanes and the resonator cavity. Two of these joints (the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint) allow vane movement for tuning. These test data, and the design of the present generation of RFQ resonator cavities, are presented

  8. Spectroscopic study of thorium using continuous-wave resonance ionization mass spectrometry with ultraviolet ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recent results on an improved method of ionization for the cw-RIMS process for thorium (Th). This method involves the application of a high power ultraviolet (UV) argon ion laser for the second step in a two-step (1 + 1) (photon-to-resonance plus photon-to-ionization) ionization scheme. Over 90 thorium transitions are identified for use in a (1 + 1) continuous-wave resonance ionization mass spectrometry (cw-RIMS) ionization scheme. The excitation cross-section of several strong transitions was determined to be 10-13cm2. The optimum cw excitation scheme was with the resonant laser tuned to the 384.08 nm (26 036 cm-1 transition when when using the multi-line UV argon ion laser for signal enhancement. For thorium, the increase in ionization efficiency was documented to be a minimum of one order-of-magnitude improvement that achieved by conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The measured total ionization efficiency (detected ion signal/sample atoms loaded) was as high as 0.41%, which easily provided signals levels for efficiency measurements on sample sizes down to 25 ng, and should provide sufficient signal for isotopic analysis of volcanic-like samples as small as 1-5 ng of thorium. Based on geometric overlap considerations, the cw-RIMS ionization efficiency within the laser focal volume approaches ∼ 100%. This cw-RIMS ionization efficiency promises to provide ample signal for the 230Th/232Th isotope ratio analysis of nanogram volcanic-like samples. The ability to determine accurately and precisely the 230Th/232Th isotopic ratios for nanogram samples represents an improvement over the TIMS technique, and is anticipated to have a significant effect on uranium-series disequilibrium measurements important in geochemistry and geochronology. (Author)

  9. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm

  10. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temirov, J. P.; Chigarev, N. V.; Matveev, O. I.; Omenetto, N.; Smith, B. W.; Winefordner, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm.

  11. Phase Measurement of Resonant Two-Photon Ionization in Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Swoboda, M; Klünder, K; Dahlström, J M; Miranda, M; Buth, C; Schafer, K J; Mauritsson, J; L'Huillier, A; Gisselbrecht, M

    2010-01-01

    We study resonant two-color two-photon ionization of Helium via the 1s3p 1P1 state. The first color is the 15th harmonic of a tunable titanium sapphire laser, while the second color is the fundamental laser radiation. Our method uses phase-locked high-order harmonics to determine the {\\it phase} of the two-photon process by interferometry. The measurement of the two-photon ionization phase variation as a function of detuning from the resonance and intensity of the dressing field allows us to determine the intensity dependence of the transition energy.

  12. Advanced quantification of plutonium ionization potential to support nuclear forensic evaluations by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lensegrav, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Ongoing work seeks to apply the technology of resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) to problems related to nuclear forensics and, in particular, to the analysis and quantification of the debris from nuclear detonations. As part of this effort, modeling and simulation methods are being applied to analyze and predict the potential for ionization by laser excitation of isotopes of both uranium and plutonium. Early work focused on ...

  13. Resonant Above-Threshold Ionization Peaks at Quantized Intensities

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, J; Guo, Dong-Sheng; Wu, Yong-Shi

    1998-01-01

    We suggest that electron-laser interactions can give rise to resonance phenomena as the intensity varies. A new QED perturbation theory is developed, in which the coupling between an electron and the second quantized laser mode is treated nonperturbatively. We predict, for example, the above-threshold ionization rate shows peaks at intensities with integer ponderomotive parameter. Such quantum resonance effects may be exploited to calibrate laser intensities in appropriate range.

  14. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  15. Resonance ionization detection of combustion radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cool, T.A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Fundamental research on the combustion of halogenated organic compounds with emphasis on reaction pathways leading to the formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds and the development of continuous emission monitoring methods will assist in DOE efforts in the management and disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. Selective laser ionization techniques are used in this laboratory for the measurement of concentration profiles of radical intermediates in the combustion of chlorinated hydrocarbon flames. A new ultrasensitive detection technique, made possible with the advent of tunable VUV laser sources, enables the selective near-threshold photoionization of all radical intermediates in premixed hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon flames.

  16. Mid-Infrared Tunable Resonant Cavity Enhanced Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Zogg

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Mid-infrared detectors that are sensitive only in a tunable narrow spectral band are presented. They are based on the Resonant Cavity Enhanced Detector (RCED principle and employing a thin active region using IV-VI narrow gap semiconductor layers. A Fabry-Pérot cavity is formed by two mirrors. The active layer is grown onto one mirror, while the second mirror can be displaced. This changes the cavity length thus shifting the resonances where the detector is sensitive. Using electrostatically actuated MEMS micromirrors, a very compact tunable detector system has been fabricated. Mirror movements of more than 3 μm at 30V are obtained. With these mirrors, detectors with a wavelength tuning range of about 0.7 μm have been realized. Single detectors can be used in mid-infrared micro spectrometers, while a detector arrangement in an array makes it possible to realize Adaptive Focal Plane Arrays (AFPA.

  17. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Free Radicals Produced by Ionizing Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter

    1984-01-01

    Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p-nitrobenzylchloride and...

  18. Experimental Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) studies of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmer, J. L.; Dehmer, P. M.; Pratt, S. T.; Ohalloran, M. A.; Tomkins, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of exciting opportunities for both basic and applied science. On the applied side, REMPI has great potential as an ultrasensitive, highly selective detector for trace, reactive, or transient species. On the basic side, REMPI affords an unprecedented means of exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. An overview of current studies of excited molecular states is given to illustrate the principles and prospects of REMPI.

  19. Cavity-assisted backaction cooling of mechanical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the quantum regime of the dynamical backaction cooling of a mechanical resonator assisted by a driven harmonic oscillator (cavity). Our treatment applies to both optomechanical and electromechanical realizations and includes the effect of thermal noise in the driven oscillator. In the perturbative case, we derive the corresponding motional master equation using the Nakajima-Zwanzig formalism and calculate the corresponding output spectrum for the optomechanical case. Then we analyze the strong optomechanical coupling regime in the limit of small cavity linewidth. Finally, we consider the steady state covariance matrix of the two coupled oscillators for arbitrary input power and obtain an analytical expression for the final mechanical occupancy. This is used to optimize the drive's detuning and input power for an experimentally relevant range of parameters that includes the resolved-sideband-limit ground state cooling regime.

  20. Dynamic resonances and tunnelling in the multiphoton ionization of argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of wavepacket simulations for multiphoton ionization in argon. A single active electron model is applied to estimate the single-electron ionization rates and photoelectron energy distributions for λ = 390 nm light with intensities up to I = 2 x 1014 W cm-2. The multiphoton ionization rates are compared with R-matrix Floquet calculations and found to be in very good agreement. The photoelectron energy distribution is used to study the nature of ionization at the higher intensities. Our results are consistent with recent calculations and experiments which show the imprint of the tunnelling process in the multiphoton regime. For few-cycle intense pulses, we find that the strong modulation of intensity and increased bandwidth leads to dynamic mixing of the 3d and 5s resonances.

  1. Status of the future SPIRAL2 resonance ionization laser ion source GISELE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy is a most powerful tool for efficient and selective production of ion beams in particular useful at on-line isotope breeders. For this purpose the future upgrade S3 (Super Separator Spectrometer) of the SPIRAL2 accelerator at GANIL (Caen, France) includes a gas cell at its fission target. Therein high resolution RIS on short lived isotopes will be performed, addressing either the in-cell or in-jet technology. The corresponding Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source project GISELE is furthermore designed to produce strong and pure radioisotope beams for experiments at the future hot cavity unit of SPIRAL2. Its laser system will combine sets of tunable high-repetition rate pulsed dye as well as titanium:sapphire lasers. Currently, off-line preparation studies are performed with the titanium:sapphire lasers for the day 1 requested beams of Zinc and Tin. A suitable excitation scheme was developed for Zinc and the ionization efficiency was determined. For Tin three known ionization schemes, a 3-step and two widely identical 2-step schemes, were tested and compared with published results from other facilities.

  2. Resonant cavity operation of a virtual cathode oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigawatt level virtual cathode sources have been proposed for several applications. These include microwave weapons and drivers for high-energy particle accelerators. Both of these require a microwave source with very high power output that is controllable in frequency and phase. A conventional virtual cathode oscillator will not meet these requirements. The addition of a resonant cavity surrounding the oscillating virtual cathode either alone or pumped with a low-power injection signal, causing it to operate as an amplifier, could greatly influence the performance of this type of source making it more practical for accelerator and weapon applications. The progress on an experiment to test these concepts will be discussed

  3. Dynamics of a Josephson Array in a Resonant Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Almaas, E.; Stroud, D.

    2001-01-01

    We derive dynamical equations for a Josephson array coupled to a resonant cavity by applying the Heisenberg equations of motion to a model Hamiltonian described by us earlier [Phys. Rev. B {\\bf 63}, 144522 (2001); Phys. Rev. B {\\bf 64}, 179902 (E)]. By means of a canonical transformation, we also show that, in the absence of an applied current and dissipation, our model reduces to one described by Shnirman {\\it et al} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 79}, 2371 (1997)] for coupled qubits, and that it co...

  4. QND Measurements in a Resonant Cavity-QED System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zilong; Bohnet, Justin G.; Dai; Thompson, James K.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate QND measurements on an ensemble of 10^6 ^87Rb atoms. Quantum state-dependent populations are determined at the projection noise level by measurements of the collective Vacuum Rabi Splitting for the resonantly coupled atom-cavity system. The splitting is measured by simultaneously scanning the frequency of two probes across the two transmission resonances and phase coherently detecting the full IQ response of the reflected electric fields. Measurement back-action imposes AC Stark shifts on the atoms, resulting in a reduction of the Ramsey fringe contrast due to inhomogeneity in the probe-atom coupling. We show that the spin-echo sequences that will be needed to achieve atomic spin-squeezing on the Rb clock transition also strongly suppress these AC stark shifts. The remaining probe-induced decoherence is close to the fundamental limit imposed by free space scattering of the probe photons.

  5. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy for trace analysis of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace amounts of plutonium are determined by means of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Plutonium atoms evaporated from a heated filament are ionized via a three-step excitation leading to an autoionizing state. The ions are mass-selectively detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Several types of filaments have been tested with respect to atomic yield after evaporation and reproducibility. The best results have been obtained using tantalum as backing and titanium as covering. An overall detection efficiency of 1·10-5 could be determined with such filaments yielding a detection limit of 2·106 atoms of 239Pu

  6. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy for trace analysis of plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, N.; Albus, F.; Deiβenberger, R.; Eberhardt, K.; Funk, H.; Hasse, H.-U.; Herrmann, G.; Huber, G.; Kluge, H.-J.; Köhler, S.; Nunnemann, M.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Urban, F.-J.

    1995-04-01

    Trace amounts of plutonium are determined by means of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Plutonium atoms evaporated from a heated filament are ionized via a three-step exciation leading to an autoionizing state. The ions are mass-selectively detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Several types of filaments have been tested with respect to atomic yield after evaporation and reproducibility. The best results have been obtained using tantalum as backing and titanium as covering. An overall detection efficiency of 1ṡ10-5 could be determined with such filaments yielding a detection limit of 2ṡ106 atoms of 239Pu.

  7. Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, K T; Ruiz, R F Garcia; Budincevic, I; Procter, T J; Fedosseev, V N; Lynch, K M; Cocolios, T E; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Strashnov, I; Stroke, H H; Rossel, R E; Heylen, H; Billowes, J; Rothe, S; Bissell, M L; Wendt, K D A; de Groote, R P; De Schepper, S

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic moments and isotope shifts of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes Fr202-205 were measured at ISOLDE-CERN with use of collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. A production-to-detection efficiency of 1\\% was measured for Fr-202. The background from nonresonant and collisional ionization was maintained below one ion in 10(5) beam particles. Through a comparison of the measured charge radii with predictions from the spherical droplet model, it is concluded that the ground-state wave function remains spherical down to Fr-205, with a departure observed in Fr-203 (N = 116).

  8. Chaotic light a theory of asymmetric resonant cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Nöckel, J U

    1996-01-01

    Spherical and cylindrical dielectric cavities support high Q whispering gallery modes due to total internal reflection of the trapped light. When such a cavity is deformed smoothly the ray dynamics of these modes becomes chaotic in a manner determined by the KAM theory of classical hamiltonian dynamics. The universal properties of the ray dynamics predicted by KAM theory allow a general understanding of the whispering gallery modes of such asymmetric resonant cavities (ARCs). This theory combined with simulations of the non-linear map describing the ray motion provides the basis for a ray-optics model of the Q-spoiling of these whispering gallery modes for large deformations (greater than 1% of the radius). The model predicts a sharp onset as a function of deformation for significant Q-spoiling of these modes and highly directional emission above this threshold. Solution of the wave equation for typical whispering gallery modes confirms the qualitative behavior predicted by the ray-optics model even when the ...

  9. Plasmonic mediated nucleation of resonant nano-cavities in metallic layers

    OpenAIRE

    Karpov, V. G.; Nardone, M.; Subashiev, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    We predict plasmonic mediated nucleation of pancake shaped resonant nano-cavities in metallic layers that are penetrable to laser fields. The underlying physics is that the cavity provides a narrow plasmonic resonance that maximizes its polarizability in an external field. The resonance yields a significant energy gain making the formation of such cavities highly favorable. Possible implications include nano-optics and generation of the dielectric bits in conductive films that underlie the ex...

  10. Interaction of a vircator microwave generator with an enclosing resonant cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction between a vircator microwave generator and a resonant cavity is produced by enclosing the virtual cathode inside a right circular cylinder appended to the anode foil. Cavity diameter is chosen to simultaneously minimize the number of resonant modes and to avoid significant perturbation of the virtual cathode formation. By varying the cavity length frequencies corresponding to the TM/sub 01n/ cavity modes are tuned to resonate with the broad band oscillating virtual cathode. The RF fields stored in the resonant cavities feedback on the virtual cathode and improve the kinetic to microwave power conversion efficiency. For each cavity only a single mode is excited; non-resonant frequencies are suppressed. Measured radiation patterns show that TM/sub 011/ mode microwave power extracted radially from the cavity is 1.5 times that with no cavity, and about 4 times that from a non resonant cavity. Resonant cavities suppress non-resonant frequencies decreasing the bandwidth of the emitting radiation by a factor ≥ 5

  11. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J. S., E-mail: johnsvogel@yahoo.com [University of California, 8300 Feliz Creek Dr., Ukiah, California 95482 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Focused Cs{sup +} beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm{sup 2} C{sup −} current density compared to the 20 μA/mm{sup 2} from a 1 mm recess.

  12. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Focused Cs+ beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm2 C- current density compared to the 20 μA/mm2 from a 1 mm recess.

  13. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focused Cs+ beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm2 C− current density compared to the 20 μA/mm2 from a 1 mm recess

  14. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Saturated two-photon resonance ionization of He(21S)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a photoionization method for complete conversion of a quantum-selected population to ionization, making possible sensitive and absolute measurement of the selected populations in a gas. Each photoionization involves the absorption of two photons (from a pulsed dye laser), one of which is resonant with an intermediate state. In this demonstration we measured the absolute number of He(21S) states per ion pair following interaction of pulses of 2-MeV photons with He

  16. Experiments on statistical mechanics using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five different fluctuation phenomena at the atomic and molecular levels have been studied by resonance ionization spectroscopy techniques with one-atom detection sensitivity. The Poisson distribution described the observed frequency distributions suggesting random behavior. In addition, a gedanken experiment suggested by Einstein and Furth on the diffusion of atoms was performed in order to test the equality between time and ensemble averages. The obtained results confirmed the ergodicity of the studied system

  17. Multiphoton ionization and multiphoton resonances in the tunneling regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of ionization of an atom of helium, argon, or hydrogen exposed to an intense monochromatic laser field and the quasienergy spectrum of their dressed states are studied for values of the Keldysh parameter between 1 and 0.6 and wavelengths between 390 and 1300 nm. The calculations are carried out within the non-Hermitian Floquet theory. Resonances with intermediate excited states significantly affect ionization from the dressed ground state at all the intensities and all the wavelengths considered. The dressed excited states responsible for these structures are large-α0 states akin to the Kramers-Henneberger states of the high-frequency Floquet theory. Within the single-active-electron approximation, these large-α0 states become species independent at sufficiently high intensity or sufficiently long wavelength. Apart for the resonance structures arising from multiphoton coupling with excited states, the ab initio Floquet ionization rate is in excellent agreement with the predictions of two different calculations in the strong field approximation, one based on a length-gauge formulation of this approximation and one based on a velocity-gauge formulation. The calculations also confirm the validity of the ω2 expansion as an alternative to the strong field approximation for taking into account the nonadiabaticity of the ionization process in intense low-frequency laser fields.

  18. RF, Thermal and Structural Analysis of the 201.25 MHz Muon Ionization Cooling Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A finite element analysis has been carried out to characterize the RF, thermal and structural behavior of the prototype 201.25 MHz cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. A single ANSYS model has been developed to perform all of the calculations in a multi-step process. The high-gradient closed-cell cavity is currently being fabricated for the MICE (international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) and MUCOOL experiments. The 1200 mm diameter cavity is constructed of 6 mm thick copper sheet and incorporates a rounded pillbox-like profile with an open beam iris terminated by 420 mm diameter, 0.38 mm thick curved beryllium foils. Tuning is accomplished through elastic deformation of the cavity, and cooling is provided by external water passages. Details of the analysis methodology will be presented including a description of the ANSYS macro that computes the heat loads from the RF solution and applies them directly to the thermal model. The process and results of a calculation to determine the resulting frequency shift due to thermal and structural distortion of the cavity will also be presented

  19. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectra of CO2. III. Autoionization dominates direct ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In (3+1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectra (REMPI-PES) of CO2, photoionization competes with dissociation. In addition to direct photoionization, autoionization is possible through accidental resonances embedded in the continuum at the four-photon level. Photoabsorption from these long-lived autoionizing states leads to resonance enhanced above threshold absorption (REATA). REATA produces photoelectron terminations on the C state of CO2+. Previous experiments did not indicate whether the dissociation occurred at the three-photon level or four-photon level. REMPI-PES of CO2 via several Rydberg states have been collected at a number of laser intensities, and it was found that the photoelectron spectra terminating on each individual ionic state do not change over the range of experimentally available laser intensities. This indicates that the dissociation of CO2 occurs at the four-photon level. The long vibrational progressions in the PES indicate that the dominant ionization process is autoionization rather than direct ionization. Relative intensities of the X and C state components of the PES do change with intensity, confirming the C state assignment and its five-photon mechanism

  20. Multiphoton resonant ionization of a hydrogen-like atom by a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One studies multiquantum resonant ionization in case when intermediate bound state is a two-fold degenerate one. One derived expressions for energy and angular distribution of photoelectrons and quasi-classical formula for the total rate of resonant ionization. It is shown that depending on ratios between parameters the ionization rate may be both higher and lower than the rate of ionization in the typical case. A situation when possibility of resonant ionization is strongly suppressed is possible. It is shown, as well, that in the near-the-threshold one observes weaker dependence of probability of photoelectron escape on the angle in contrast to the case of ionization through nondegenerate level

  1. Isotopic bias effects in resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is developing into a useful method for isotope ratio measurements with high selectivity and sensitivity of the technique for a large number of elements. The sensitivity of the technique relies on a number of experimental factors. Of primary importance is the proper coupling of the tunable laser output with the atomization source, which is most often a thermal filament. Use of pulsed thermal atomization can also improve efficiency. An increase in temporal efficiency can be achieved by using a continuous wave (CW) laser coupled to a continuous atomization source. CW lasers, in general, therefore must be tightly focused to saturate the ionization step in a resonance ionization process. However, this results in a lowered efficiency due to geometrical factors. The accuracy of isotope ratio measurements is also influenced by the choice of laser system for RIMS. The combination of isotope shifts and the analyte element with the spectral output of the laser will result in wavelength-dependant bias effects which must be controlled to obtain optimum analytical results. This problem has been studied and the results for both pulsed and CW lasers are given. (author)

  2. Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization studies of atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, S. N.; Levin, D.; Mckoy, V.

    1987-01-01

    In resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), an atom absorbs several photons making a transition to a resonant intermediate state and subsequently ionizing out of it. With currently available tunable narrow-band lasers, the extreme sensitivity of REMPI to the specific arrangement of levels can be used to selectively probe minute amounts of a single species (atom) in a host of background material. Determination of the number density of atoms from the observed REMPI signal requires a knowledge of the multiphoton ionization cross sections. The REMPI of atomic oxygen was investigated through various excitation schemes that are feasible with available light sources. Using quantum defect theory (QDT) to estimate the various atomic parameters, the REMPI dynamics in atomic oxygen were studied incorporating the effects of saturation and a.c. Stark shifts. Results are presented for REMPI probabilities for excitation through various 2p(3) (4S sup o) np(3)P and 2p(3) (4S sup o) nf(3)F levels.

  3. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiyuan; Rogers, Steven [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Jiang, Wei C. [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Lin, Qiang, E-mail: qiang.lin@rochester.edu [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  4. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xiyuan; Jiang, Wei C; Lin, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  5. Quantum nondemolition measurement of photon-number distribution for a weak cavity field with resonant atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑仕标

    2003-01-01

    We propose a quantum nondemolition measurement of the photon-number distribution for a weak cavity field with no more than two photons. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with the cavity field, and thus the required interaction time is much shorter than that using dispersive interaction. This is important in view of decoherence. Our scheme can also be used to generate even and odd coherent states for a weak cavity field with resonant atoms.

  6. Resonant two-color three-step ionization of an atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a computer program to calculate three-step ionization of a simple three- level atom and applied it to calculate two-color three-step doubly resonant three-photon ionization of atomic Li. Some preliminary results for fraction of ionization at two different interaction times as functions of the detunings from the two resonantly excited levels will be presented.

  7. Photodissociation of sodium iodide and resonant ionization of sodium atom produced

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Bing-hai; Z.T.Salim; A.H.Bakery

    2004-01-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy (RIS) and resonant ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) are employed to detect the photodissociation product of sodium iodide molecules in a molecular beam in an intense laser field in the absence of the buffer gases. Time of flight mass spectra is recorded. In particular, the appearances of multiphoton ionization are discussed.

  8. Continuous wave laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have observed two-color, three step resonance ionization of technetium with cw lasers. High power argon-ion lasers were used to pump two tunable, broad-band (≅cm-1) cw dye lasers. The first laser generated ≅400 mW in the spectral region near 420 nm, while the second generated ≅300 mW near 610nm. Technetium samples were prepared by electroplating onto rhenium filaments. Tc atoms were vaporized by resistive heating in the source region of a 12-in., 900 magnetic mass spectrometer. An electron multiplier and counting electronics were used to process the signal. Ionization proceeded through various sublevels of the z6po and e6S states for the sequential 3 photon process. Technetium count rates ≥104 sec -1 were generated for several hours in samples containing ≅1is contained ing of technetium, 10 ng samples gave proportionally smaller signals. No interfering laser-generated ions were detected, although thermal Tc ions were observed. A measurement of ionization efficiency on a traced (95/sup m/Tc) sample indicated that speciation severely limits ionization efficiency. It appears that less than 1 part in 103 of the technetium evaporates in the atomic ground state. This may prove to be a significant limitation to the application of RIMS for the solar neutrino experiment; alternative atomization sources are being explored

  9. Progress of resonant ionization laser ion source development at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPIRAL2 (Système de Production d’Ions Radioactifs Accélérés en Ligne) is a research facility under construction at GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds) for the production of radioactive ion beams by isotope separation on-line methods and low-energy in-flight techniques. A resonant ionization laser ion source will be one of the main techniques to produce the radioactive ion beams. GISELE (GANIL Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation) is a test bench developed to study a fully operational laser ion source available for Day 1 operations at SPIRAL2 Phase 2. The aim of this project is to find the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. Latest results about the new ion source geometry will be presented

  10. Resonance ionization of holmium for ion implantation in microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F.; Chrysalidis, K.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Haas, R.; Kieck, T.; Mokry, C.; Naubereit, P.; Schmidt, S.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    The determination of the electron neutrino mass by calorimetric measurement of the 163 Ho electron capture spectrum requires ultra-pure samples. Several collaborations, like ECHo or HOLMES, intend to employ microcalorimeters into which 163 Ho is implanted as an ion beam. This makes a selective and additionally very efficient ion source for holmium mandatory. For this purpose, laser resonance ionization of stable holmium 165 Ho was studied, using a three step excitation scheme driven by pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers. Five measurements with sample sizes of 1014 and 1015 atoms were performed for the efficiency investigation. In average, an excellent ionization efficiency of 32(5) % could be shown, demonstrating the suitability for ion beam implantation.

  11. Ion beam studies of surfaces by multiphoton resonance ionization of sputtered neutrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization of neutral atoms sputtered from ion bombarded solids by multiphoton resonance ionization has been recently demonstrated. The ionization efficiency is several orders of magnitude greater than other post-ionization methods. This approach should find applications in the characterization of the chemistry and structure of solid surfaces and in the trace analysis of a wide variety of materials. (author)

  12. Spectroscopic studies on technetium and silicon. A solid-state laser system for the resonance-ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This doctoral thesis describes advancement and refinement of the titanium:sapphire laser system of the working group LARISSA, Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg- Universitaet Mainz and its application to resonance ionization spectroscopy. Activities on the laser systems comprised three major tasks: The output power of the conventional titanium:sapphire lasers could be increased by a factor of two in order to match the needs at resonance ionization laser ion source at ISOL facilities. Additionally, the laser system was complemented by a titanium:sapphire laser in Littrow geometry, which ensures a mode-hop free tuning range from 700 nm to 950 nm, and by an injection seeded titanium:sapphire laser with a spectral width of 20 MHz (in respect to a spectral width of 3 GHz for the conventional lasers). The performance of the new laser system was tested in spectroscopic investigations of highly excited atomic levels of gold and technetium. From the measured level positions the ionization potential of gold could be verified by using the Rydberg-Ritz formula, while the ionization potential of technetium could be determined precisely for the first time. Using the seeded titanium: sapphire laser Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy inside a hot ionizer cavity was demonstrated. A width of the recorded resonances of 90 MHz was achieved and the hyperfine structure and isotope shift of stable silicon isotopes was well resolved with this method. (orig.)

  13. Multiphoton double ionization via field-independent resonant excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double ionization of xenon in the multiphoton regime has been studied at two wavelengths (0.77 and 0.79 μm) using an electron-ion coincidence technique and an intensity binned ion ratio method. Sharp resonant structures in the electron energy distribution correlated with the doubly charged ion, as well as a wavelength dependence of the Xe2+/Xe+ ratio provides new insights. A mechanism involving the shelving of population in Rydberg states followed by excitation of a core electron is proposed

  14. Lithographic wavelength control of an external cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal cavity-based resonant reflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Alexandros A; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new design for external cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with fiber reflector and a photonic crystal (PhC)-based resonant reflector on SOI. The silicon reflector is composed of an SU8 polymer bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and side-mode suppression ratios of more than 25 dB. PMID:26974073

  15. Realization of a Double-Barrier Resonant Tunneling Diode for Cavity Polaritons

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Hai Son; Vishnevsky, Dmitry; Sturm, Chris; Tanese, Dimitrii; Solnyshkov, Dmitry; Galopin, Elisabeth; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Amo, Alberto; Malpuech, Guillaume; Bloch, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    We report on the realization of a double barrier resonant tunneling diode for cavity polaritons, by lateral patterning of a one-dimensional cavity. Sharp transmission resonances are demonstrated when sending a polariton flow onto the device. We use a non-resonant beam can be used as an optical gate and control the device transmission. Finally we evidence distortion of the transmission profile when going to the high density regime, signature of polariton-polariton interactions.

  16. Laser resonant-ionization mass spectrometry of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser resonant-ionization mass spectrometry has been used to determine small amounts of actinides. The high sensitivity and selectivity of this method has been achieved by three-step photoionization of actinide atoms followed by time-of-flight measurement. The laser system for photoionization consists of a pulsed copper vapour laser of 30 W average power at a pulse repetition rate of 6.5 kHz which is coupled to three dye lasers. The time-of-flight spectrometer has a mass resolution of about 2500. Resonance signals with count rates of several kilohertz were obtained with actinide samples of 1010-1012 atoms yielding a detection limit of 108 atoms in the sample. With some improvements a detection sensitivity of about 106 atoms of plutonium, americium and curium should be reached. (orig.)

  17. Fano resonances control and slow light with Bose-Einstein Condensate in a cavity setup

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, M Javed; Khan, M Miskeen; Saif, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the probe field transmission in an optomechanical cavity setup with Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), where the standing wave that forms in the cavity results in an one-dimensional optical lattice potential. We report that in the presence of atom-atom interactions, the coupling of the cavity field with condensate (Bogoliubov mode), the cavity field fluctuations and the condensate fluctuations leads to the emergence of the tunable Fano resonances in the probe absorption spectrum. Within the experimental reach, based on analytical and numerical simulations, we find that the optomechanical system with BEC provides great flexibility to tune the Fano resonances, as the width of the resonance is controllable by the coupling field and additionally, with the atom-atom interaction. Moreover, Fano resonances are analyzed for the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the condensate with finite atomic two-body interaction, which shows an excellent compatibility with the origi...

  18. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization-photoelectron spectra of CO2. I. Photoabsorption above the ionization potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoabsorption above the first ionization potential of CO2 was observed at relatively low laser intensity, detected via resonant-enhanced multiphoton ionization-photoelectron spectra through several Rydberg states. This phenomenon can be explained by the presence of accidental resonances with long-lived autoionizing states which make photon absorption within the ionization continuum possible. Laser powers are too low for this to be explained in terms of a ponderomotive potential and conventional above-threshold ionization. This resonance-enhanced above-threshold absorption phenomenon is potentially useful in the study of excited and superexcited states. Photoelectron energies can be assigned to terminations on CO+2 ionic states at both the four- and five-photon levels, allowing measurement of states up to 22 eV. Two unassigned bands may represent terminations on a new state of CO+2, with an ionization potential of 21.4 eV

  19. Transient changes in quartz resonators following exposure to pulse ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a review of the transient effect of pulse ionization on the resonant frequency and Q of quartz resonators. A number of different samples of both natural and synthetic quartz crystals have been used. Fifth-overtone 5,32, and 125 MHz thickness shear (AT-cut) crystal units were fabricated and studied using several different oscillator circuits, one of which was designed such that the resistance Rsub(s)(αQ-1) of the crystal unit at series resonance as well as frequency could be measured after pulse exposure. With the exception of one purposely altered crystal, all the resonators exhibited a negative-transient frequency offset after irradiation which thereafter anneals as a function of tsup(-1/2) over nearly four decades of time. The pulse irradiation effect on Q-1 is most striking at 5 MHz in natural quartz units, which suffer a thirty-fold increase in acoustic absorption after exposure to 104 rad. The transient increase in the acoustic absorption in natural quartz anneals within 10 seconds to a value somewhat larger than the preirradiation absorption. Theoretical models are described which account for these observations. (author)

  20. A tuneable doubly stacked dielectric resonator housed in an intact TE 102 cavity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Saba M.; Emwas, Abdul H.

    2003-01-01

    An EPR resonator is constructed by inserting a pair of dielectric ceramic rings in an unmodified rectangular TE 102 cavity. It is tuneable over the range of 8.0-10.0 GHz. Therefore, existing EPR cavities can be easily converted to resonators with superior signal-to-noise ratios that are at least 24 times larger than the original ones in this extended frequency range. The resonator's performance is tested using DPPH, TEMPONE, MnO and Cu 2+ complexes and displays excellent resolution and sensitivity. Thus EPR spectra of small paramagnetic organic and inorganic samples and spin labeled biomolecules may be obtained without resorting to loop gap resonators.

  1. Laser-induced isotopic selectivity in the resonance ionization of Os

    OpenAIRE

    Wunderlich, R. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Blake, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    Isotope selective effects in resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) pose a potentially serious limitation to the application of this technique to the precise and reproducible measurement of isotope ratios. In order to identify some of the underlying causes of isotope selectivity in RIMS and to establish procedures for minimizing these effects, we investigated laser-induced isotope selectivity in the resonance ionization of Os. A single-color, one-photon resonant ionization scheme was u...

  2. Development of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation and Photochemistry Division has developed a Molecular Beam-Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization-Time-of-Flight spectrometer, a highly sensitive and selective analytical detection system, for investigation of photodissociation dynamics of isolated molecules. In this system, the molecular beam is intersected in the extraction region of a Wiley-McLaren type Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer by the photolysis laser beam, propagating perpendicular to both the molecular beams and the Time-of-Flight tube. The probe (ionization) laser beam counter propagating to the photolysis beam, ionizes the stable products and the radicals produced on photodissociation. The important features of the system, namely, the resolution and the detection limit, have been determined from the studies of aniline molecular beam, generated by seeding 1% aniline in helium. For the present configuration, using one metre long flight tube, the resolution has been found to be about 400, and detection limit is better than 106 species per cm3. The integrity of the set-up is obtained from the photodissociation dynamics studies of bromoform. (author)

  3. A microwave cavity resonator based sensor for the detection of carbon monoxide in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A resonant-cavity based microwave differential technique is proposed for the detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in hydrogen in the low-ppm range. The determination of the contaminant content is related to the shift in the resonant frequency of a measuring cavity compared to a reference cavity. We expect a CO-detection threshold of about 60 ppm in hydrogen at atmospheric pressure. Accordingly, preliminary measurements carried out when both cavities are filled with helium as a test gas show an equivalent detection threshold around 100 ppm of CO, which compares well with theoretical predictions. (author)

  4. Basic study on FP gas monitoring with Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) has recently got into the spotlight as an innovative technology for ultra high sensitive trace element analysis and/or efficient isotope separation and is being developed into more extensive application in various engineering fields with improvement of tunable laser performance. The present study is aiming to develop a new and advanced Failed Fuel Detection and Location (FFDL) technique based on fission product (FP) gas (such as Kr and Xe) monitoring with Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS), which combines RIS with mass spectrometry. Under collaborative works of advanced basic engineering research with JNC over four years since 1996, the feasibility study on the RIMS-FFDL have been made through basic experiments to detect Xe and Kr by using a RIMS system for common utilization installed at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of the University of Tokyo. This report describes the basic performance necessary to the design of RIMS-FFDL such as the detection limit, the elemental selectivity, etc. obtained from experiments and their theoretical analyses and also the successful results on the detection and isotopic ratio analysis of ppb level Xe/Kr tag gas in the cover gas sampled from the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO', which would lead to the conclusion that the RIMS-FFDL can satisfy all the requirements for conventional FFDL methods in addition to a novel function of no-line isotopic ratio analysis useful for the tag gas method adopted in the prototype fast reactor 'MONJU'. (author)

  5. Ionized Gas Characteristics in the Cavities of the Gas and Dust Disc of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 6946

    OpenAIRE

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Afanasiev, V.L.; Egorov, O. V.

    2011-01-01

    The parameters of the ionized gas in NGC 6946 (in the [NII]6548,6583, H-alpha and [SII]6717,6731 lines) are investigated with the SAO RAS BTA telescope along three positions of the long slit of the SCORPIO focal reducer, passing through a number of large and small cavities of the gaseous disc of the galaxy. Most of these cavities correspond exactly to the cavities in warm dust. We found that everywhere in the direction of NGC 6946 the lines of ionized gas are decomposed into two Gaussians, on...

  6. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Isselhardt, Brett Hallen

    2011-01-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with aut...

  7. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of Rydberg states of N2O below the X ionization limit

    OpenAIRE

    Scheper, C.R.; Kuijt, J.; Buma, W.J.; Lange

    1998-01-01

    A three-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopic study on N2O is carried out in the spectral range from 80 000 cm - 1 up to the lowest ionization limit at 103 963 cm - 1. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is used to identify and characterize the observed excited states. Eighteen origins are reported which have either not been assigned before or are reassigned now. Moreover, the photoelectron spectra taken at higher-lying resonances often show extensive vibronic ...

  8. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization and electrospray ionization combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Staneke, Paul O.; Nibbering, Nico M. M.

    1997-01-01

    During recent years, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) are successfully employed to analyze biomolecules and polymers. In combination with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, high mass resolution and mass measurement accuracy can be achieved to enable the determination of molecular weights and structural characterization of biochemical compounds larger than 10 kDa.

  9. Preparation of W state in resonant bimodal cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating entangled W states with four cavity modes. In this scheme, we send a Ⅴ-type three-level atom through two identical two-mode cavities in succession. After the atom exits from the second cavity,the four cavity modes are prepared in the W state. On the other hand we can obtain three-atom W states by sending three Ⅴ-type three-level atoms through a two-mode cavity in turn. The present scheme does not require conditional measurement, and it is easily generalized to preparing 2n-mode W states and n-atom W states.

  10. Enhanced Performance of Substrate Integrated Waveguide Bandstop Filter using Circular and Radial Cavity Resonator

    OpenAIRE

    M. N. Husain; G. S. Tan; K.S. Tan

    2014-01-01

    Circular and Radial SIW cavity resonators are proposed to enhance the performance of SIW bandstop filter. Prior to this research work, rectangular cavity resonator was used to produce bandstop response. The design of the circular and radial SIW bandstop filters are done by directly coupling circular and radial cavity resonators to the SIW line. The SIW bandstop filters are designed to operate at X-band and implemented on Rogers RO4350 substrate with a thickness of 0.508mm. Simulated and measu...

  11. Enhanced Performance of Substrate Integrated Waveguide Bandstop Filter using Circular and Radial Cavity Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Husain

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Circular and Radial SIW cavity resonators are proposed to enhance the performance of SIW bandstop filter. Prior to this research work, rectangular cavity resonator was used to produce bandstop response. The design of the circular and radial SIW bandstop filters are done by directly coupling circular and radial cavity resonators to the SIW line. The SIW bandstop filters are designed to operate at X-band and implemented on Rogers RO4350 substrate with a thickness of 0.508mm. Simulated and measured results show good bandstop responses and thus useful in microwave bandstop filter design.

  12. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are reporting experimental results on a microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency cryo-module. This discharge offers a mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the issues related to resonant detuning due to sustained multi-cell cavity plasma. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal

  13. Observation of Spatiotemporal Chaos Induced by a Cavity Soliton in a Fiber Ring Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Miles; Coen, Stephane; Erkintalo, Miro; Murdoch, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    We report on the experimental observation of temporal cavity soliton destabilization via spatiotemporal chaos in a coherently-driven optical fiber ring resonator. Numerical simulations and theoretical analyses are in good agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  15. A model for flow-induced noise of Helmholtz resonator-like cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golliard, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a single prediction model for the noise generated by a turbulent boundry layer flow grazing on the opening of a Helmholtz-resonator like cavity. The prediction model is validated by comparison with an experimental study. The measured spectra inside the cavity are correctly predic

  16. Recombining WMAP: Constraints on ionizing and resonance radiation at recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We place new constraints on sources of ionizing and resonance radiation at the epoch of the recombination process using the recent cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization spectra coming from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We find that non-standard recombination scenarios are still consistent with the current data. In light of this we study the impact that such models can have on the determination of several cosmological parameters. In particular, the constraints on curvature and baryon density appear to be weakly affected by a modified recombination scheme. However, it may affect the current WMAP constraints on inflationary parameters such as the spectral index ns and its running. Physically motivated models, such as those based on primordial black holes or super heavy dark matter decay, are able to provide a good fit to the current data. Future observations in both temperature and polarization will be needed to more stringently test these models

  17. Realization of a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode for cavity polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H S; Vishnevsky, D; Sturm, C; Tanese, D; Solnyshkov, D; Galopin, E; Lemaître, A; Sagnes, I; Amo, A; Malpuech, G; Bloch, J

    2013-06-01

    We report on the realization of a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode for cavity polaritons, by lateral patterning of a one-dimensional cavity. Sharp transmission resonances are demonstrated when sending a polariton flow onto the device. We show that a nonresonant beam can be used as an optical gate and can control the device transmission. Finally, we evidence distortion of the transmission profile when going to the high-density regime, signature of polariton-polariton interactions. PMID:25167519

  18. Realization of a Double-Barrier Resonant Tunneling Diode for Cavity Polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. S.; Vishnevsky, D.; Sturm, C.; Tanese, D.; Solnyshkov, D.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Sagnes, I.; Amo, A.; Malpuech, G.; Bloch, J.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the realization of a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode for cavity polaritons, by lateral patterning of a one-dimensional cavity. Sharp transmission resonances are demonstrated when sending a polariton flow onto the device. We show that a nonresonant beam can be used as an optical gate and can control the device transmission. Finally, we evidence distortion of the transmission profile when going to the high-density regime, signature of polariton-polariton interactions.

  19. Perturbing Open Cavities: Anomalous Resonance Frequency Shifts in a Hybrid Cavity-Nanoantenna System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Freek; Doeleman, Hugo M; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-13

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics, and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here, we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a nontrivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing backaction via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems. PMID:26613442

  20. Materials characterization using ion bombardment and multiphoton resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of energetic ion bombardment with multiphoton resonance ionization (MPRI) spectroscopy has proven to be an important advancement in surface science. The goal of this project is continuing the development of MPRI of desorbed neutrals as a surface analytical tool. The method for accomplishing this is a detailed examination of the factors which govern a measurement and the implementation of the optimum experimental approach. Initially, a review of the progress in laser post-ionization of desorbed neutral particles is presented. This is followed by a description of the newly redesigned instrument, emphasizing detailed characterization of the high current ion source and the reflecting time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Using the new apparatus, the quantitative aspects of the measurement are examined and the fractions of desorbed ions and neutrals are determined using several matrices. The In concentration in a set of silicon wafers is measured, yielding a detection limit of 9 parts-per-trillion. Finally, the prospects for employing this experiment for measuring the half-life of the rare double beta decay of 136Xe to 136Ba are assessed

  1. A new approach to the determination of air kerma using primary-standard cavity ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consistent formalism is presented using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the reference air kerma from the measured energy deposition in a primary-standard cavity ionization chamber. A global approach avoiding the use of cavity ionization theory is discussed and its limitations shown in relation to the use of the recommended value for W. The role of charged-particle equilibrium is outlined and the consequent requirements placed on the calculations are detailed. Values for correction factors are presented for the BIPM air-kerma standard for 60Co, making use of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, a detailed geometrical model of the BIPM 60Co source and event-by-event electron transport. While the wall correction factor kwall = 1.0012(2) is somewhat lower than the existing value, the axial non-uniformity correction kan = 1.0027(3) is significantly higher. The use of a point source in the evaluation of kan is discussed. A comparison is made of the calculated dose ratio with the Bragg-Gray and Spencer-Attix stopping-power ratios, the results indicating a preference for the Bragg-Gray approach in this particular case. A change to the recommended value for W of up to 2 parts in 103 is discussed. The uncertainties arising from the geometrical models, the use of phase-space files, the radiation transport algorithms and the underlying radiation interaction coefficients are estimated

  2. Recent Approaches for Broadening the Spectral Bandwidth in Resonant Cavity Optoelectronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gun Wu Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resonant cavity optoelectronic devices, such as vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs, resonant cavity enhanced photodetectors (RCEPDs, and electroabsorption modulators (EAMs, show improved performance over their predecessors by placing the active device structure inside a resonant cavity. The effect of the optical cavity, which allows wavelength selectivity and enhancement of the optical field due to resonance, allows the devices to be made thinner and therefore faster, while simultaneously increasing the quantum efficiency at the resonant wavelengths. However, the narrow spectral bandwidth significantly reduces operating tolerances, which leads to severe problems in applications such as optical communication, imaging, and biosensing. Recently, in order to overcome such drawbacks and/or to accomplish multiple functionalities, several approaches for broadening the spectral bandwidth in resonant cavity optoelectronic devices have been extensively studied. This paper reviews the recent progress in techniques for wide spectral bandwidth that include a coupled microcavity, asymmetric tandem quantum wells, and high index contrast distributed Bragg-reflectors. This review will describe design guidelines for specific devices together with experimental considerations in practical applications.

  3. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy to ultralow-level counting and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to directly detect a daughter atom, using resonance ionization spectroscopy, in delayed time coincidence with the decay of a parent species promises to drastically reduce the background in low-level counting experiments. Resonance ionization can also be used as an ion source for a mass spectrometer system that is capable of discriminating between isobars

  4. Resonant ionization of oxygen and hydrogen atoms following laser-induced photodissociation of nitrobenzene vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonant ionization of oxygen and hydrogen atoms has been observed in a linear time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer during studies of the resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of nitrobenzene vapour in the wavelength region 225-245 nm. (author)

  5. Resonant ionization of oxygen and hydrogen atoms following laser-induced photodissociation of nitrobenzene vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.; Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Marshall, A.; Singhal, R.P. (Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Campbell, M. (Glasgow Caledonian Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physical Sciences)

    1993-10-14

    The resonant ionization of oxygen and hydrogen atoms has been observed in a linear time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer during studies of the resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of nitrobenzene vapour in the wavelength region 225-245 nm. (author).

  6. Use of a radio-frequency resonance circuit in studies of alkali ionization in flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of a radio-frequency resonance system and its use in the study of alkali metal ionization in flames is described. The author re-determines the values of the alkali ionization rate constants for a CO flame with N2 as diluent gas of known temperature using the RF resonance method. (Auth.)

  7. Optical-optical double-resonant multiphoton ionization spectra of Rydberg states of nitrogen dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Gui-Yin; Zhang Lian-Shui; Sun Bo; Han Xiao-Feng; Yu Wei

    2005-01-01

    The optical-optical double-resonant multiphoton ionization(OODR-MPI) technique has been applied to the study of the Rydberg states of nitrogen dioxide. The results show that ,althougy the OODR-MPI spectra of NO2 are composed of regular progression bands at different pump laser intensities, their ionization pathways are different.The NO2 mollecule is ionized through the (3+1+1)double-resonant process as the pump laser intensity is in a high value, or else it is through the (1+2+1)rpocess.The final resonant states in the two ionizing processes have been attributed to different Rydberg states.

  8. The use of microperforated plates to attenuate cavity resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenech, Benjamin; Keith, Graeme; Jacobsen, Finn

    2006-01-01

    The use of microperforated plates to introduce damping in a closed cavity is examined. By placing a microperforated plate well inside the cavity instead of near a wall as traditionally done in room acoustics, high attenuation can be obtained for specific acoustic modes, compared with the lower...... attenuation that can be obtained in a broad frequency range with the conventional position of the plate. An analytical method for predicting the attenuation is presented. The method involves finding complex eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the modified cavity and makes it possible to predict Green......'s functions. The results, which are validated experimentally, show that a microperforated plate can provide substantial attenuation of modes in a cavity. One possible application of these findings is the treatment of boiler tones in heat-exchanger cavities....

  9. Cavity-coupled guided resonances with high quality factors in photonic crystal heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, M Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    We study the optical characteristics of a photonic crystal (PhC) heterostructure cavity consisting of two-dimensional monolayer PhC, sandwiched between two identical passive multilayers. In the range of stopband of the multilayer, guided resonance of the sandwiched PhC are excited by the evanescent waves of the multilayer stack and the quality factor of these cavity-coupled guided resonances is about 10e6. The calculated field distribution facilitates the distinction between the cavity defect modes and the coupled guided resonances of the proposed design. The line shapes of the resonances are explained using a theoretical model. Significant decrease in the lasing threshold is observed for these resonant modes in comparison to the defect modes. These results will find use in designing compact PhC-based ultra-low threshold lasers and narrow band filters.

  10. High-precision spectral tuning of micro and nanophotonic cavities by resonantly enhanced photoelectrochemical etching

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Santos, Eduardo; Lemaitre, Aristide; Gomez, Carmen; Ducci, Sara; Leo, Giuseppe; Favero, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method to tune optical micro- and nanocavities with picometer precision in the resonant wavelength, corresponding to an effective sub atomic monolayer control of the cavity dimension. This is obtained through resonant photo-electrochemical etching, with in-situ monitoring of the optical spectrum. We employ this technique to spectrally align an ensemble of resonant cavities in a permanent manner, overcoming the dimension variability resulting from current nanofabrication techniques. In a device containing several resonators, each is individually addressed and tuned, with no optical quality factor degradation. The technique is general and opens the way to multiple applications, such as the straightforward fabrication of networks of identical coupled resonators, or the tuning of chip-based cavities to external references.

  11. Implementation of n-qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm using resonant interaction in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hong-Fu; Zhang Shou

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the n-qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm based on resonant interaction between the atoms and a single-mode cavity. In the scheme, the resonant transitions between two ground states and one excited state of an atom are changed alternately by adjusting the cavity frequency appropriately, and the operations required to complete the algorithm can be significantly simplified following the increment of the number of qubits. The implementation of the scheme in experiment would show the full power of quantum algorithm and would be significative and important for more complicated quantum algorithm in cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  12. Resonant cavity Vircator driven by a thermionic cathode electron beam gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, R. [Texas Instrument, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A resonant cavity Vircator (virtual cathode oscillator) driven by an electron beam emitted from a broad area thermionic cathode has been tested at Textron Defense Systems. Narrow bandwidth (1.0 MHz at the {minus}3 dB level) excitation of the TM{sub 0.23} mode of a cylindrical resonant cavity was observed at a frequency of 986 MHz with a pulse length of 1.2 {mu}s. The single cavity mode excitation is attributed to the constant voltage and current electron beam emitted form the thermionic cathode.

  13. Modeling resonant cavities for single-photon waveguide sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral correlations between photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) in bulk non-linear optical crystals remain a hindrance to the implementation of efficient quantum communication architectures. It has been demonstrated that SPDC within a distributed micro-cavity can result in little or no correlation between photon pairs. We present results on modeling three different cavity configurations based on integrated Bragg gratings. Output from the SPDC process can be tailored by altering the periodicity and geometry of such nanostructures. We will discuss the merits of each cavity configuration from the standpoint of degenerate Type-II SPDC

  14. New resonant cavity-enhanced absorber structures for mid-infrared detector application

    OpenAIRE

    Zohar, Moshe; Auslender, Mark; Faraone, Lorenzo; Hava, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    A new dielectric Fabry-Perot cavity was designed for a resonant enhancing optical absorption by a thin absorber layer embedded into the cavity. In this cavity, the front mirror is a subwavelength grating with $\\sim 100$% retroreflection. For a HgCdTe absorber in a matching cavity of the new type, the design is shown to meet the combined challenges of increasing the absorbing efficiency of the entire device up to $\\sim 100$% and reducing its size and overall complexity, compared to a conventio...

  15. Laser resonance ionization scheme development for tellurium and germanium at the dual Ti:Sa-Dye ISOLDE RILIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Fedorov, D.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Forster, L.; Marsh, B. A.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Veinhard, M.

    2016-09-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source laser resonance ionization spectroscopy, a transition to a new autoionizing state of tellurium was discovered and applied as part of a three-step, three-resonance, photo-ionization scheme. In a second study, a three-step, two-resonance, photo-ionization scheme for germanium was developed and the ionization efficiency was measured at ISOLDE. This work increases the range of ISOLDE RILIS ionized beams to 31 elements. Details of the spectroscopy studies are described and the new ionization schemes are summarized.

  16. Identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for resonance photo-ionization at the ISOLDE-RILIS

    OpenAIRE

    Goodacre, T Day; Chrysalidis, K; Fedorovc, D; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B A; Molkanov, P; Rossel, R.E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C.

    2015-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscop...

  17. Spontaneous creation and annihilation of temporal cavity solitons in a coherently driven passive fiber resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kathy; Jang, Jae K; Coen, Stéphane; Murdoch, Stuart G; Erkintalo, Miro

    2015-08-15

    We report on the experimental observation of spontaneous creation and annihilation of temporal cavity solitons (CSs) in a coherently driven, macroscopic optical fiber resonator. Specifically, we show that CSs are spontaneously created when the frequency of the cavity driving field is tuned across a resonance, and that they can individually disappear at different stages of the scan. In contrast to previous experiments in monolithic microresonators, we are able to identify these dynamics in real time, thanks to the macroscopic dimensions of our resonator. Our experimental observations are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. We also discuss the mechanisms responsible for the one-by-one disappearance of CSs. PMID:26274647

  18. Resonant-cavity approach to noninvasive, pulse-to-pulse emittance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a resonant-cavity approach for noninvasive, pulse-to-pulse, beam emittance measurements of noncircular multibunch beams. In a resonant cavity, desired field components can be enhanced up to QLλ/π, where QLλ is the loaded quality factor of the resonant mode λ, when the cavity resonant mode matches the bunch frequency of a bunch-train beam pulse. In particular, a quad cavity, with its quadrupole mode (TM220 for rectangular cavities) at beam operating frequency, rotated 45 deg. with respect to the beamline, extracts the beam quadrupole moment exclusively, utilizing the symmetry of the cavity and some simple networks to suppress common modes. Six successive beam quadrupole-moment measurements, performed at different betatron phases in a linear transport system, determine the beam emittance, i.e., the beam size and shape in the beam's phase space, if the beam current and position at these points are known. In the presence of x-y beam coupling, ten measurements are required. One measurement alone provides the rms beam size of a large aspect ratio beam. The resolution for such a measurement of rms beam size with the rectangular quad-cavity monitor presented in this article is estimated to be on the order of 10 μm. A prototype quad cavity was fabricated and preliminary beam tests were performed at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The results were mainly limited by beam jitter and uncertainty in the beam position measurement at the cavity location. This motivated the development of a position-emittance integrated monitor [J. S. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 073302 (2005)

  19. Resonant-cavity approach to noninvasive, pulse-to-pulse emittance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. S.; Nantista, C. D.; Miller, R. H.; Weidemann, A. W.

    2005-12-01

    We present a resonant-cavity approach for noninvasive, pulse-to-pulse, beam emittance measurements of noncircular multibunch beams. In a resonant cavity, desired field components can be enhanced up to QLλ/π, where QLλ is the loaded quality factor of the resonant mode λ, when the cavity resonant mode matches the bunch frequency of a bunch-train beam pulse. In particular, a quad cavity, with its quadrupole mode (TM220 for rectangular cavities) at beam operating frequency, rotated 45° with respect to the beamline, extracts the beam quadrupole moment exclusively, utilizing the symmetry of the cavity and some simple networks to suppress common modes. Six successive beam quadrupole-moment measurements, performed at different betatron phases in a linear transport system, determine the beam emittance, i.e., the beam size and shape in the beam's phase space, if the beam current and position at these points are known. In the presence of x-y beam coupling, ten measurements are required. One measurement alone provides the rms beam size of a large aspect ratio beam. The resolution for such a measurement of rms beam size with the rectangular quad-cavity monitor presented in this article is estimated to be on the order of 10μm. A prototype quad cavity was fabricated and preliminary beam tests were performed at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The results were mainly limited by beam jitter and uncertainty in the beam position measurement at the cavity location. This motivated the development of a position-emittance integrated monitor [J. S. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 073302 (2005)].

  20. Reliable and integrated technique for determining resonant frequency in radio frequency resonators. Application to a high-precision resonant cavity-based displacement sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Rigoberto; Asua, Estibaliz; Portilla, Joaquin; Etxebarria, Victor

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a reliable and integrated technique for determining the resonant frequency of radio frequency resonators, which can be of interest for different purposes. The approach uses a heterodyne scheme as phase detector coupled to a voltage-controlled oscillator. The system seeks the oscillator frequency that produces a phase null in the resonator, which corresponds to the resonant frequency. A complete explanation of the technique to determine the resonant frequency is presented and experimentally tested. The method has been applied to a high-precision displacement sensor based on resonant cavity, obtaining a theoretical nanometric precision.

  1. Towards achieving strong coupling in three-dimensional-cavity with solid state spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Delhote, N.; Aubourg, M.; Madrangeas, V.; Cros, D.; Castelletto, S.; Tobar, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the microwave magnetic field confinement in several microwave three-dimensional (3D)-cavities, using a 3D finite-element analysis to determine the best design and achieve a strong coupling between microwave resonant cavity photons and solid state spins. Specifically, we design cavities for achieving strong coupling of electromagnetic modes with an ensemble of nitrogen vacancy (NV) defects in diamond. We report here a novel and practical cavity design with a magnetic filling factor of up to 4 times (2 times higher collective coupling) than previously achieved using one-dimensional superconducting cavities with a small mode volume. In addition, we show that by using a double-split resonator cavity, it is possible to achieve up to 200 times better cooperative factor than the currently demonstrated with NV in diamond. These designs open up further opportunities for studying strong and ultra-strong coupling effects on spins in solids using alternative systems with a wider range of design parameters. The strong coupling of paramagnetic spin defects with a photonic cavity is used in quantum computer architecture, to interface electrons spins with photons, facilitating their read-out and processing of quantum information. To achieve this, the combination of collective coupling of spins and cavity mode is more feasible and offers a promising method. This is a relevant milestone to develop advanced quantum technology and to test fundamental physics principles.

  2. RIS [Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy] applications to particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy, RIS, is a process in which valence electrons can be removed from a laser wavelength selected atom with nearly unit efficiency. The selectivity-sensitivity of RIS is an important joint property, making possible a range of new analytical capabilities. Thus, RIS has been combined with mass spectrometers for the Z-selective and A-selective counting of individual noble gas atoms or atoms ejected from solids by ion or laser sputtering. This presentation will concentrate on the noble gas analysis and describe the capability at Atom Sciences for counting Kr atoms with isotopic selectivity. An update will be given on the feasibility of a proposed solar neutrino experiment, in which 81Kr is produced by interaction with 81Br. Double beta-decay can product 82Kr from the decay of 82Se, and this experiment may also be feasible. Finally, 81Kr is useful for dating old groundwater, since the half-life is 200,000 years

  3. Collinear resonant ionization laser spectroscopy of rare francium isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Le blanc, F M; Ware, T; Procter, T J

    2008-01-01

    We propose a programme of collinear resonant ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) of the francium isotopes up to and including $^{201}$Fr and $^{218,219}$Fr. This work aims at answering questions on the ordering of quantum states, and effect of the ($\\pi s_{1/2}^{-1}$)1/2$^{+}$ intruder state, which is currently believed to be the ground state of $^{199}$Fr. This work will also study the edge of the region of reflection asymmetry through measurement of the moments and radii of $^{218,219}$Fr. This proposal forms the first part of a series of experiments that will study nuclei in this region of the nuclear chart. Based on the success of this initial proposal it is the intention of the collaboration to perform high resolution measurements on the isotopes of radium and radon that surround $^{201}$Fr and $^{218}$Fr and thus providing a comprehensive description of the ground state properties of this region of the nuclear chart. Recent in-source spectroscopy measurements of lead, bismuth and polonium have demonstrated a...

  4. Three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy of Zr in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that the composition of the solar wind could be measured directly by transporting ultrapure collectors into space, exposing them to the solar wind, and returning them to earth for analysis. In a study to help assess the applicability of present and future postionization secondary neutral mass spectrometers for measuring solar wind implanted samples, measurements of Zr in Si were performed. A three-color resonant ionization scheme proved to be efficient while producing a background count rate limited by secondary ion signal (5x10-4 counts/laser pulse). This lowered the detection limit for these measurements to below 500 ppt for 450,000 averages. Unexpectedly, the Zr concentration in the Si was measured to be over 4 ppb, well above the detection limit of the analysis. This high concentration is thought to result from contamination during sample preparation, since a series of tests were performed that rule out memory effects during the analysis. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  5. Multiphoton resonant ionization of hydrogen atom exposed to two-colour laser pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Pei-Jie; Fang Yan

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the multiphoton resonant ionization by two-colour laser pulses in the hydrogen atom by solving the time-dependent Schr(o)dinger equation.By fixing the parameters of fundamental laser field and scanning the frequency of second laser field,it finds that the ionization probability shows several resonance peaks and is also much larger than the linear superposition of probabilities by applying two lasers separately.The enhancement of the ionization happens when the system is resonantly pumped to the excited states by absorbing two or more colour photons non-sequentially.

  6. Multiphoton resonant ionization of hydrogen atom exposed to two-colour laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the multiphoton resonant ionization by two-colour laser pulses in the hydrogen atom by solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. By fixing the parameters of fundamental laser field and scanning the frequency of second laser field, it finds that the ionization probability shows several resonance peaks and is also much larger than the linear superposition of probabilities by applying two lasers separately. The enhancement of the ionization happens when the system is resonantly pumped to the excited states by absorbing two or more colour photons non-sequentially. (atomic and molecular physics)

  7. Ionized Gas Characteristics in the Cavities of the Gas and Dust Disc of the Spiral Galaxy NGC 6946

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, Yu N; Egorov, O V

    2011-01-01

    The parameters of the ionized gas in NGC 6946 (in the [NII]6548,6583, H-alpha and [SII]6717,6731 lines) are investigated with the SAO RAS BTA telescope along three positions of the long slit of the SCORPIO focal reducer, passing through a number of large and small cavities of the gaseous disc of the galaxy. Most of these cavities correspond exactly to the cavities in warm dust. We found that everywhere in the direction of NGC 6946 the lines of ionized gas are decomposed into two Gaussians, one of which shows almost constant [SII]/H-alpha and [NII]/H-alpha ratios, as well as an almost constant radial velocity within the measurement errors (about -35 - -50 km/s). This component is in fact the foreground radiation from the diffuse ionized gas of our Galaxy; a similar component is also present in the emission of neutral hydrogen. The analysis of the component of ionized gas, occurring in NGC 6946, has revealed that it shows signs of shock excitation in the cavities of the gaseous disc of the galaxy. It is as well...

  8. Teleportation of two-atom entangled state in resonant cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhen-Biao

    2007-01-01

    An alternative scheme is presented for teleportation of a two-atom entangled state in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is based on the resonant atom-cavity field interaction. In the scheme, only one cavity is involved, and the number of the atoms needed to be detected is decreased compared with the previous scheme. Since the resonant atom-cavity field interaction greatly reduces the interaction time, the decoherence effect can be effectively suppressed during the teleportation process. The experimental feasibility of the scheme is discussed. The scheme can easily be generalized to the teleportation of N-atom Greeninger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states. The number of atoms needed to be detected does not increase as the number of the atoms in the GHZ state increases.

  9. An extremely high velocity molecular jet surrounded by an ionized cavity in the protostellar source Serpens SMM1

    CERN Document Server

    Hull, Charles L H; Kristensen, Lars E; Dunham, Michael M; Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Cortés, Paulo C; Li, Zhi-Yun; Plambeck, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    We report ALMA observations of a one-sided, high-velocity ($\\sim$80 km s$^{-1}$) CO($J = 2 \\rightarrow 1$) jet powered by the intermediate-mass protostellar source Serpens SMM1-a. The highly collimated molecular jet is flanked at the base by a wide-angle cavity; the walls of the cavity can be seen in both 4 cm free-free emission detected by the VLA and 1.3 mm thermal dust emission detected by ALMA. This is the first time that ionization of an outflow cavity has been directly detected via free-free emission in a very young, embedded Class 0 protostellar source that is still powering a molecular jet. The cavity walls are ionized either by UV photons escaping from the accreting protostellar source, or by the precessing molecular jet impacting the walls. These observations suggest that ionized outflow cavities may be common in Class 0 protostellar sources, shedding further light on the radiation, outflow, and jet environments in the youngest, most embedded forming stars.

  10. Resonance suppression and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness improvement of an apertured rectangular cavity by using wall losses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao Chong-Qing; Zhu Hong-Zhao

    2013-01-01

    The cavity-mode resonance effect could result in significant degradation of the shielding effectiveness (SE) of a shielding enclosure around its resonance frequencies.In this paper,the influence of coated wall loss on the suppression of the resonance effect is investigated.For this purpose,an equivalent circuit model is employed to analyze the SE of an apertured rectangular cavity coated with an inside layer of resistive material.The model is developed by extending Robinson's equivalent circuit model through incorporating the effect of the wall loss into both the propagation constant and the characteristic impedance of the waveguide.Calculation results show that the wall loss could lead to great improvement on the SE for frequencies near the resonance but almost no effect on the SE for frequencies far away from the resonance.

  11. A new boundary integral approach to the determination of the resonant modes of arbitrary shaped cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer codes for the electromagnetic analysis of arbitrarily shaped cavities are very important for many applications, in particular for the design of interaction structures for particle accelerators. The design of accelerating cavities results in complicated shapes, that are obtained carrying on repeated analyses to optimize a number of parameters, such as Q-factors, beam coupling impedances, higher-order-mode spectrum, and so on. The interest in the calculation of many normalized modes derives also from the important role they play in the eigenvector expansion of the electromagnetic field in a closed region. The authors present an efficient algorithm to determine the resonant frequencies and the normalized modal fields of arbitrarily shaped cavity resonators filled with a lossless, isotropic, and homogeneous medium. The algorithm is based on the boundary integral method (BIM). The unknown current flowing on the cavity wall is considered inside a spherical resonator, rather than in free-space, as it is usual in the standard BIM. The electric field is expressed using the Green's function of the spherical resonator, approximated by a real rational function of the frequency. Consequently, the discretized problem can be cast into the form of a real matrix linear eigenvalue problem, whose eigenvalues and eigenvectors yield the resonant frequencies and the associated modal currents. Since the algorithm does not require any frequency-by-frequency recalculation of the system matrices, computing time is much shorter than in the standard BIM, especially when many resonances must be found

  12. Analysis of two stacked cylindrical dielectric resonators in a TE₁₀₂ microwave cavity for magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Saba M; Elnaggar, Sameh Y

    2011-04-01

    The frequency, field distributions and filling factors of a DR/TE₁₀₂ probe, consisting of two cylindrical dielectric resonators (DR1 and DR2) in a rectangular TE₁₀₂ cavity, are simulated and analyzed by finite element methods. The TE(+++) mode formed by the in-phase coupling of the TE₀₁(δ)(DR1), TE₀₁(δ)(DR2) and TE₁₀₂ basic modes, is the most appropriate mode for X-band EPR experiments. The corresponding simulated B(+++) fields of the TE(+++) mode have significant amplitudes at DR1, DR2 and the cavity's iris resulting in efficient coupling between the DR/TE₁₀₂ probe and the microwave bridge. At the experimental configuration, B(+++) in the vicinity of DR2 is much larger than that around DR1 indicating that DR1 mainly acts as a frequency tuner. In contrast to a simple microwave shield, the resonant cavity is an essential component of the probe that affects its frequency. The two dielectric resonators are always coupled and this is enhanced by the cavity. When DR1 and DR2 are close to the cavity walls, the TE(+++) frequency and B(+++) distribution are very similar to that of the empty TE₁₀₂ cavity. When all the experimental details are taken into account, the agreement between the experimental and simulated TE(+++) frequencies is excellent. This confirms that the resonating mode of the spectrometer's DR/TE₁₀₂ probe is the TE(+++) mode. Additional proof is obtained from B₁(x), which is the calculated maximum x component of B(+++). It is predominantly due to DR2 and is approximately 4.4 G. The B₁(x) maximum value of the DR/TE₁₀₂ probe is found to be slightly larger than that for a single resonator in a cavity because DR1 further concentrates the cavity's magnetic field along its x axis. Even though DR1 slightly enhances the performance of the DR/TE₁₀₂ probe its main benefit is to act as a frequency tuner. A waveguide iris can be used to over-couple the DR/TE₁₀₂ probe and lower its Q to ≈150. Under

  13. Analysis of two stacked cylindrical dielectric resonators in a TE 102 microwave cavity for magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Saba M.; ElNaggar, Sameh Y.

    2011-04-01

    The frequency, field distributions and filling factors of a DR/TE 102 probe, consisting of two cylindrical dielectric resonators (DR1 and DR2) in a rectangular TE 102 cavity, are simulated and analyzed by finite element methods. The TE +++ mode formed by the in-phase coupling of the TE 01δ(DR1), TE 01δ(DR2) and TE 102 basic modes, is the most appropriate mode for X-band EPR experiments. The corresponding simulated B +++ fields of the TE +++ mode have significant amplitudes at DR1, DR2 and the cavity's iris resulting in efficient coupling between the DR/TE 102 probe and the microwave bridge. At the experimental configuration, B +++ in the vicinity of DR2 is much larger than that around DR1 indicating that DR1 mainly acts as a frequency tuner. In contrast to a simple microwave shield, the resonant cavity is an essential component of the probe that affects its frequency. The two dielectric resonators are always coupled and this is enhanced by the cavity. When DR1 and DR2 are close to the cavity walls, the TE +++ frequency and B +++ distribution are very similar to that of the empty TE 102 cavity. When all the experimental details are taken into account, the agreement between the experimental and simulated TE +++ frequencies is excellent. This confirms that the resonating mode of the spectrometer's DR/TE 102 probe is the TE +++ mode. Additional proof is obtained from B1x, which is the calculated maximum x component of B +++. It is predominantly due to DR2 and is approximately 4.4 G. The B1x maximum value of the DR/TE 102 probe is found to be slightly larger than that for a single resonator in a cavity because DR1 further concentrates the cavity's magnetic field along its x axis. Even though DR1 slightly enhances the performance of the DR/TE 102 probe its main benefit is to act as a frequency tuner. A waveguide iris can be used to over-couple the DR/TE 102 probe and lower its Q to ≈150. Under these conditions, the probe has a short dead time and a large bandwidth

  14. Compact 400-Mhz Half-Wave Spoke Resonator Crab Cavity for the LHC Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crab cavities are proposed for the LHC upgrade to improve the luminosity. There are two possible crab cavity installations for the LHC upgrade: the global scheme at Interaction Region (IR) 4 where the beam-beam separation is about 420-mm, and the local scheme at the IR5 where the beam-beam separation is only 194-mm. One of the design requirements as the result of a recent LHC-Crab cavity workshop is to develop a 400-MHz cavity design that can be utilized for either the global or local schemes at IR4 or IR5. Such a design would offer more flexibility for the final upgrade installation, as the final crabbing scheme is yet to be determined, and save R and D cost. The cavity size of such a design, however, is limited by the beam-beam separation at IR5 which can only accommodate a cavity with a horizontal size of about 145-mm, which is a design challenge for a 400-MHz cavity. To meet the new design requirements, we have developed a compact 400-MHz half-wave spoke resonator (HWSR) crab cavity that can fit into the tight spaces available at either IR4 or IR5. In this paper, we present the optimization of the HWSR cavity shape and the design of HOM, LOM, and SOM couplers for wakefield damping.

  15. Analysis of photonic crystal double heterostructure resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Adam

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals represent a versatile technology platform for constructing photonic integrated circuits. Low-loss and small footprint waveguides and cavities can be combined to make delay lines, modulators, filters and lasers for efficient optical signal processing. However, this diverse functionality comes at the expense of higher complexity in both the fabrication and themodeling of these devices. This Thesis discusses the finite-difference time-domain numerical modeling of large quality factor photonic crystal cavities for chip-scale laser applications. In Chapter 2 the role of the quality factor in estimating laser threshold is derived starting from Maxwell's equations. Expressions for modal loss and gain are derived. Chapter 3 discusses methods for extracting the quality factor from finite-difference time-domain simulations. Even with large-scale parallel computing, only a short record of the time evolution of the fields can be recorded. To get around this issue, Pade functions are fitted to the available data in the frequency domain. Once the analysis tools have been described and demonstrated, they are applied to the photonic crystal double heterostructure cavity which has been shown to have quality factors in excess of one million and mode volumes on the order of a cubic wavelength. A detailed description of the spectral and modal properties of heterostructure cavities is presented, and a method for mode discrimination is discussed. The effect of heat sinking dielectric lower substrates on the optical loss of the heterostructure cavity is investigated, and it is seen that the quality factor is significantly reduced as the index of the lower substrate is increased. A modified heterostructure cavity with glide plane symmetry is shown to have significantly reduced out-of-plane leakage. An optimized design is proposed for continuous wave edge-emitting laser operation. Finally, a novel approach for laser simulation is introduced in which a

  16. Quantum path control using attosecond pulse trains via UV-assisted resonance enhance ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳; 魏来; 何志聪

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the quantum path selection in an ultraviolet (UV)-assisted near-infrared field with an UV energy below the ionization threshold. By calculating the ionization probability with different assistant UV frequencies, we find that a resonance-enhanced ionization peak emerges in the region Euvionization energy. With an attosecond pulse train (APT) centered in the resonance region, we show that the short quantum path can be well selected in the continuum case. By performing the electron trajectory analysis, we have further explained the physical mechanism of the quantum path selection. Moreover, we also demonstrate that in the resonance region, the harmonic emission from the selected paths is more efficient than that with the APT energy above the ionization threshold.

  17. Zero kinetic energy-pulsed field ionization and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy: ionization dynamics of Rydberg states in HBr.

    OpenAIRE

    Wales, N.P.L.; Buma, W.J.; Lange; Lefebvre-Brion, H.; Wang, K.; McKoy, V.

    1996-01-01

    The results of rotationally resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy‐pulsed field ionization studies on HBr via various rotational levels of the F^ 1Δ_2 and f^ 3Δ_2 Rydberg states are reported. These studies lead to an accurate determination of the lowest ionization threshold as 94 098.9±1 cm^(−1). Observed rotational and spin–orbit branching ratios are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. The differences between theor...

  18. Cavity optomechanics nano- and micromechanical resonators interacting with light

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenberg, Tobias; Marquardt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years cavity-optomechanics has emerged as a new field of research. This highly interdisciplinary field studies the interaction between micro- and nanomechanical systems and light. Possible applications range from novel high-bandwidth mechanical sensing devices through the generation of squeezed optical or mechanical states to even tests of quantum theory itself. This is one of the first books in this relatively young field. it is aimed at scientists, engineers, and students who want to obtain a concise introduction to the state of the art in the field of cavity optomechanics. It is valuable to researchers in nanoscience, quantum optics, quantum information, gravitational wave detection and other cutting edge fields. Possible applications include biological sensing, frequency comb applications, silicon photonics etc. The technical content will be accessible to those who have familiarity with basic undergraduate physics.

  19. Two-Dimensional Cavity Resonant Modes of Si Based Bragg Reflection Ridge Waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN San; Lu Hong-Yan; CHEN Kun-Ji; XU Jun; MA Zhong-Yuan; LI Wei; HUANG Xin-Fan

    2011-01-01

    @@ Si-based ridge-waveguides with Bragg reflectors are fabricated based on our method.Three resonant peaks could be obviously identified from the photoluminescence spectra, and field patterns of these resonant peaks, simulated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, confirm that these peaks originate from cavity resonances.The resonant wavelengths and spatial angular distribution are given by the resonant models, which agree well with the experimental data.Experimentally, a simple method is proposed to testify the experimental and theoretical results.Such devices based on Bragg reflectors may have potential applications in light-emitting diodes, lasers and integrated photonic circuits.%Si-based ridge-waveguides with Bragg reflectors are fabricated based on our method. Three resonant peaks could be obviously identified from the photoluminescence spectra, and field patterns of these resonant peaks, simulated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, confirm that these peaks originate from cavity resonances. The resonant wavelengths and spatial angular distribution are given by the resonant models, which agree well with the experimental data. Experimentally, a simple method is proposed to testify the experimental and theoretical results. Such devices based on Bragg reflectors may have potential applications in light-emitting diodes, lasers and integrated photonic circuits.

  20. Noise Reduction in Double‐Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‐panel structure. The double‐panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective transmission‐loss at high frequency. However, the resonance of the cavity and the poor transmission‐loss at low frequency limit its noise control performance. Applying active control forces on the panels or utili...

  1. Simulation of an axial vircator with a three-cavity resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Molchanov, P V; Tikhomirov, V V; Siahlo, S E

    2014-01-01

    We simulated an axial vircator with a three-cavity resonator and expected generation efficiency 6-7 percents. For adequate description of physical processes taking place inside a vircator we used two independent PIC codes: self-developed INPIC and free XOOPIC. Based on both the analysis of the vircator proposed in [1] and consideration of the devices operating at cathode-anode voltages under 450 kV we suggest 3 possible designs of a three-cavity resonator such that enable one to produce High Power Microwave in GW power range.

  2. Simulation of an axial vircator with a three-cavity resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Molchanov, P. V.; Gurnevich, E. A.; Tikhomirov, V. V.; Siahlo, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    We simulated an axial vircator with a three-cavity resonator and expected generation efficiency 6-7 percents. For adequate description of physical processes taking place inside a vircator we used two independent PIC codes: self-developed INPIC and free XOOPIC. Based on both the analysis of the vircator proposed in [1] and consideration of the devices operating at cathode-anode voltages under 450 kV we suggest 3 possible designs of a three-cavity resonator such that enable one to produce High ...

  3. Polariton Resonances for Ultrastrong Coupling Cavity Optomechanics in GaAs/AlAs Multiple Quantum Wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusserand, B; Poddubny, A N; Poshakinskiy, A V; Fainstein, A; Lemaitre, A

    2015-12-31

    Polariton-mediated light-sound interaction is investigated through resonant Brillouin scattering experiments in GaAs/AlAs multiple-quantum wells. Photoelastic coupling enhancement at exciton-polariton resonance reaches 10(5) at 30 K as compared to a typical bulk solid room temperature transparency value. When applied to GaAs based cavity optomechanical nanodevices, this result opens the path to huge displacement sensitivities and to ultrastrong coupling regimes in cavity optomechanics with couplings g(0) in the range of 100 GHz. PMID:26765028

  4. Photo- and chemo ionization processes in the saturated rubidium vapors at resonant-excited atomic transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutual competition of the two-photon, associative, and penning ionization of the resonant-excited rubidium atoms in a dye-laser field has been investigated. For each ionization channel the ranges of laser intensities and rubidium vapor pressure are determined within the limits of that its contribution is predominant. On the basis of the data obtained the cross section of photo- and collision ionization processes of excited atoms are determined. (author)

  5. Double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections for electron impact ionization of Ar5+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Configuration-average distorted-wave calculations are carried out for electron-impact ionization of Ar5+. Both direct ionization and the indirect excitation autoionization processes are included in our calculations. Our theoretical values are in quite reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The indirect processes contribute up to 50% to the total ionization cross sections. The possible origin of double-hump resonance structure of the cross sections is demonstrated and the contributions of metastable states are also taken into account.

  6. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy to ultralow-level counting and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper it is shown that the ability to directly detect a daughter atom, using resonance ionization spectroscopy, in delayed time coincidence with the decay of a parent species promises to drastically reduce the background in low-level counting experiments. In addition, resonance ionization can also be used as an ion source for a mass spectrometer system that is capable of discriminating between isobars

  7. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm-1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  8. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, Sebastian; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph; Rothe, Sebastian; Wendt, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm - 1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  9. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Sebastian, E-mail: raeder@uni-mainz.de; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Rothe, Sebastian [CERN, Engineering Department (Switzerland); Wendt, Klaus [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm{sup -1} were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  10. Development of failed fuel detection and location technique using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of experiments on justification of the procedure for failed element detection and localization using resonance ionization mass spectroscopy of Xe and Kr isotopes in gas probes at the JOYO fast research reactor and MONJU prototype unit (Japan) is presented. Selectivity and range of applicability of the resonance ionization mass spectroscopy and gas label methods were studied. Agreement between experimental values of the Kr and Xe isotopes abundance and known data is proof that the method is fitness for work

  11. Development of high resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry for trace analysis of 93mNb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    93Nb(n, n′)93mNb reaction allows retrospective estimation of integrated fast neutron dose in nuclear reactor. We proposed isomer-selective trace analysis of 93mNb by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) combined with a gas-jet atomic source and an injection locked Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at several kHz. Resonant ionization spectroscopy of Nb in gas-jet using Ti:Sapphire laser was demonstrated.

  12. Excitation and tuning of Fano-like cavity plasmon resonances in dielectric-metal core-shell resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ping; Wan, Mingjie; Wu, Wenyang; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-05-01

    Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a nearly perfect metal shell layer around a dielectric sphere. We demonstrate that these Fano resonances originate from the interference between the Mie cavity and sphere plasmon resonances. Moreover, we present that the variation on either the dielectric core size or core refractive index allows for easily tuning the observed Fano resonances over a wide spectral range. Our findings are supported by excellent agreement with analytical calculations, and offer unprecedented opportunities for realizing ultrasensitive bio-sensors, lasing and nonlinear optical devices.Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a

  13. Coupled modes, frequencies and fields of a dielectric resonator and a cavity using coupled mode theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaggar, Sameh Y.; Tervo, Richard; Mattar, Saba M.

    2014-01-01

    Probes consisting of a dielectric resonator (DR) inserted in a cavity are important integral components of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers because of their high signal-to-noise ratio. This article studies the behavior of this system, based on the coupling between its dielectric and cavity modes. Coupled-mode theory (CMT) is used to determine the frequencies and electromagnetic fields of this coupled system. General expressions for the frequencies and field distributions are derived for both the resulting symmetric and anti-symmetric modes. These expressions are applicable to a wide range of frequencies (from MHz to THz). The coupling of cavities and DRs of various sizes and their resonant frequencies are studied in detail. Since the DR is situated within the cavity then the coupling between them is strong. In some cases the coupling coefficient, κ, is found to be as high as 0.4 even though the frequency difference between the uncoupled modes is large. This is directly attributed to the strong overlap between the fields of the uncoupled DR and cavity modes. In most cases, this improves the signal to noise ratio of the spectrometer. When the DR and the cavity have the same frequency, the coupled electromagnetic fields are found to contain equal contributions from the fields of the two uncoupled modes. This situation is ideal for the excitation of the probe through an iris on the cavity wall. To verify and validate the results, finite element simulations are carried out. This is achieved by simulating the coupling between a cylindrical cavity's TE011 and the dielectric insert's TE01δ modes. Coupling between the modes of higher order is also investigated and discussed. Based on CMT, closed form expressions for the fields of the coupled system are proposed. These expressions are crucial in the analysis of the probe's performance.

  14. Exploring the distinction between experimental resonant modes and theoretical eigenmodes: from vibrating plates to laser cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, P H; Wen, C P; Yu, Y T; Liang, H C; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2014-02-01

    Experimentally resonant modes are commonly presumed to correspond to eigenmodes in the same bounded domain. However, the one-to-one correspondence between theoretical eigenmodes and experimental observations is never reached. Theoretically, eigenmodes in numerous classical and quantum systems are the solutions of the homogeneous Helmholtz equation, whereas resonant modes should be solved from the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation. In the present paper we employ the eigenmode expansion method to derive the wave functions for manifesting the distinction between eigenmodes and resonant modes. The derived wave functions are successfully used to reconstruct a variety of experimental results including Chladni figures generated from the vibrating plate, resonant patterns excited from microwave cavities, and lasing modes emitted from the vertical cavity. PMID:25353549

  15. Quantum feedback in a non-resonant cavity QED system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photon correlation measurements reveal the response of the conditional evolution of the cavity QED system to a novel quantum feedback protocol. A photodetection collapses the state of the system and triggers a feedback pulse with an adjustable delay and amplitude that alters the intensity driving the system. The conditional evolution of the system freezes into a new steady state where it resides until, after an amount of time determined by the experimenter, it re-equilibrates into the original steady state. We carry out a sensitivity analysis using a theoretical model with atomic detuning and make quantitative comparisons with measured results

  16. Spatially resolved measurement of singlet delta oxygen by radar resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili; Ombrello, Timothy M

    2013-07-01

    Coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) was demonstrated to directly and nonintrusively measure singlet delta oxygen, O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)), with high spatial resolution. Two different approaches, photodissociation of ozone and microwave discharge plasma in an argon and oxygen flow, were utilized for O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) generation. The d(1)Π(g)←a(1)Δ(g) (3-0) and d(1)Π(g)←a(1)Δ(g) (1-0) bands of O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) were detected by Radar REMPI for two different flow conditions. Quantitative absorption measurements using sensitive off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) was used simultaneously to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of the Radar REMPI technique. The detection limit of Radar REMPI was found to be comparable to the ICOS technique with a detection threshold of approximately 10(14) molecules/cm(3) but with a spatial resolution that was 8 orders of magnitude smaller than the ICOS technique. PMID:23811904

  17. Morphologic Differences in the Vocal Tract Resonance Cavities of Voice Professionals: An MRI-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra M. Rua Ventura; Diamantino Rui S. Freitas; Ramos, Isabel Maria A. P.; João Manuel R. S. Tavares

    2013-01-01

    The processes that take place during singing and acting are complex. However, morphologic and dynamic studies of the vocal tracts during speech have been gaining greater attention, mainly because of the rapid technical advances being made with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and image analysis and processing techniques. Objectives/Hypothesis and Methods. Our aim was to describe the morphologic differences in the vocal tract resonance cavities among voice professionals using MRI, and with the...

  18. Generation and detection of large and robust entanglement between two different mechanical resonators in cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, J; Malossi, N; Zippilli, S; Vitali, D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a general scheme for generating, either dynamically or in the steady state, continuous variable entanglement between two mechanical resonators with different frequencies. We employ an optomechanical system in which a single optical cavity mode driven by a suitably chosen two-tone field is coupled to the two resonators. Significantly large mechanical entanglement can be achieved, which is extremely robust with respect to temperature.

  19. Identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for resonance photo-ionization at the ISOLDE-RILIS

    CERN Document Server

    Goodacre, T Day; Fedorovc, D; Fedosseev, V N; Marsh, B A; Molkanov, P; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Seiffert, C

    2015-01-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 14 newly observed autoionizing states. This work increases the range of ISOLDE-RILIS ionized beams to 32 chemical elements. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized. A link to the complete version of this document will be added here following publication:

  20. Surface plasmon resonance optical cavity enhanced refractive index sensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Gagliardi, G.; Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; Iodice, M.; Adam, Pavel; Chadt, Karel; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 11 (2013), s. 1951-1953. ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP205/12/G118 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Resonators * Surface plasmon s * Optical sensing and sensors Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  1. Bright cavity solitons in metamaterials with internal resonances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yulin, A.V.; Kuzmiak, Vladimír; Eyderman, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 6 (2015), s. 063820. ISSN 1050-2947 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14028 Grant ostatní: COST(XE) MP1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Plasmons * Dissipative solitons * Resonators Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.808, year: 2014

  2. Resonant-frequency discharge in a multi-cell radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, S; Upadhyay, J; Mammosser, J; Nikolic, M; Vuskovic, L

    2014-11-07

    We are reporting experimental results on microwave discharge operating at resonant frequency in a multi-cell radio frequency (RF) accelerator cavity. Although the discharge operated at room temperature, the setup was constructed so that it could be used for plasma generation and processing in fully assembled active superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cryomodule (in situ operation). This discharge offers an efficient mechanism for removal of a variety of contaminants, organic or oxide layers, and residual particulates from the interior surface of RF cavities through the interaction of plasma-generated radicals with the cavity walls. We describe resonant RF breakdown conditions and address the problems related to generation and sustaining the multi-cell cavity plasma, which are breakdown and resonant detuning. We have determined breakdown conditions in the cavity, which was acting as a plasma vessel with distorted cylindrical geometry. We discuss the spectroscopic data taken during plasma removal of contaminants and use them to evaluate plasma parameters, characterize the process, and estimate the volatile contaminant product removal.

  3. Electrical conductivity of Jupiter's shallow interior and the formation of a resonant of a resonant planetary-ionospheric cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present consideration of hydrogenic atmospheric reactions on Jupiter, to a depth of 4000 km, notes the primary ion constituents at these depths to be both positive and negative ions of molecular hydrogen contributing less than 20 percent to total electrical conductivity by free electrons. An electrical surface defined by the boundary beneath which the interior is electrically conducting exists at depths which vary according to EM wave frequency, from 1100 km for 1 mHz to 3000 for 1 MHz. The presence of a lower electrical boundary within the shallow interior suggests that a planetary-ionosphere resonant cavity analogous to the earth-ionosphere cavity may exist. 36 refs

  4. Properties of Optical Resonant Modes in Ⅲ-Nitride Semiconductor Micro-Cone Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Lun; ZHANG Bei; LIN Jing-Yu; JIANG Hong-Xing

    2001-01-01

    Arrays of Ⅲ-nitride semiconductor micro-cone cavities with a base diameter of 3.3μm were fabricated by ion beam etching. The micro-cones consisted of 58 nm thick multiple quantum wells of ln0.22Ga0.78N/In0.06Ga0.94N as well as a 1.5μm thick epilayer of GaN. Optical resonant modes from a single micro-cone could be clearly observed in the photoluminescence spectra at temperatures up to 200K under a pumping power density two orders of magnitude lower than that for the Ⅲ-nitride semiconductor micro-disk or micro-ring cavity. Using a novel optical ray tracing method, we have figured out four main types of optical resonant cavities inside the three-dimensional micro-cone, including two Fabry-Perot (F-P) mode types as well as two Whispering Gallery mode types. The three corresponding mode spacings among the four agree perfectly with the experimental results. The advantages of this new class of micro-cavity over the other micro-cavities are discussed. These findings are expected to have an impact on the design of the ultraviolet/blue micro-cavity laser diodes.

  5. Ionized gas characteristics in the cavities of the gas and dust disc of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, Yu. N.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Egorov, O. V.

    2011-07-01

    The parameters of the ionized gas in NGC 6946 (in the [NII] λλ6548, 6583, H α and [SII] λλ6717, 6731 lines) are investigated with the SAO RAS BTA telescope along three positions of the long slit of the SCORPIO focal reducer, passing through a number of large and small cavities of the gaseous disc of the galaxy. These cavities correspond exactly to the cavities in warm dust, visible at 5 - 8µm. We found that everywhere in the direction of NGC 6946 the lines of ionized gas are decomposed into two Gaussians, one of which shows almost constant [SII]/H α and [NII]/H α ratios, as well as an almost constant radial velocity within the measurement errors (about -35… - 50 km/s). This component is in fact the foreground radiation from the diffuse ionized gas of our Galaxy, which is not surprising, given the low (12°) latitude of NGC 6946; a similar component is also present in the emission of neutral hydrogen. The analysis of the component of ionized gas, occurring inNGC 6946, has revealed that it shows signs of shock excitation in the cavities of the gaseous disc of the galaxy. This shock excitation is as well typical for the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (EDIG), observed in a number of spiral galaxies at their high Z-coordinates. This can most likely be explained by low density of the gas in the NGC 6946 disc (with the usual photoionization) inside the cavities, due to what we see the spectral features of the EDIG gas of NGC 6946, projected onto them, and located outside the plane of the galaxy. In the absence of separation of ionized gas into two components by radial velocities, there is an increasing contribution to the integral line parameters by the EDIG of our Galaxy when the gas density in NGC 6946 decreases, which explains some strange results, obtained in the previous studies. Themorphology of warmdust, visible in the infrared range and HI is almost the same (except for the peripheral parts of the galaxy, where there are no sources of dust heating

  6. Comparing the linewidths from single-pass SPDC and singly resonant cavity SPDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Oliver; Ma, Lijun; Kuo, Paulina; Tang, Xiao

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) is a common method to generate entangled photon pairs for use in quantum communications. The generated single photon linewidth is a critical issue for photon-atom interactions in quantum memory applications. We compare the linewidths of greatly non-degenerate single photon pairs from SPDC generated in the single-pass case and the singly-resonant cavity case. For a 6 mm periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal, the linewidth of the generated signal photons is reduced from 1 THz in the single pass case to tens of MHz in the singly-resonant cavity case, while the brightness within the modal lineiwdth is increased by a factor of the cavity finesse, though the overall SPDC generation rate remains unchanged.

  7. A study of tyre cavity resonance and noise reduction using inner trim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Zamri; Wang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    A study of tyre inner trim as a method for reducing tyre cavity resonance noise is presented. The tyre is modelled as a rectangular toroid where only the outside shell is flexible. A modal series solution of the sound pressure frequency response inside the tyre cavity is derived from the wave equation using modal superposition. In the solution with the rigid and flexible wall boundary condition, the effect of placing a trim layer onto the inner surface of the tyre tread plate wall is reflected by adding a damping loss term in the sound pressure frequency response function. The numerical simulation result was then compared with the result obtained from a roving impact test performed on a tyre. The results show that selective trim material may be effective for reducing the structure-borne noise magnitude resulting from the tyre cavity resonance.

  8. Development of 400- to 450-MHz RFQ resonator-cavity mechanical designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, the resonator cavity's mechanical design may be a challenge similar in magnitude to that of the development of the accelerator structure itself. Experience with the all-copper 425-MHz RFQ proof-of-principle linac has demonstrated that the resonator cavity must be structurally stiff and easily tunable. This experience has led to development of copper-plated steel structures having vanes that may be moved within a cylinder for tuning. Design of a flexible vane-to-cylinder radio-frequency (rf) joint, the vane, and the cylinder has many constraints dictated by the small-diameter cavities in the 400-MHz-frequency region. Two types of flexible, mechanical vane-to-cylinder rf joints are being developed at Los Alamos: the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint

  9. Cooling enhancement in optical refrigeration by non-resonant optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, B. G.; Gragossian, A.; Symonds, G.; Ghasemkhani, M. R.; Albrecht, A. R.; Sheik-Bahae, M.; Epstein, R. I.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of cooling enhancement in optical refrigerators by the implementation of advanced non-resonant optical cavities. Cavity designs have been studied to maximize pump light-trapping to improve absorption and thereby increase the efficiency of optical refrigeration. The approaches of non-resonant optical cavities by Herriott-cell and totalinternal- reflection were studied. Ray-tracing simulations and experiments were performed to analyze and optimize the different light-trapping configurations. Light trapping was studied for laser sources with high quality beams and for beams with large divergences, roughly corresponding to the output from fiber lasers and from diode lasers, respectively. We present a trade-off analysis between performance, reliability, and manufacturability.

  10. Cavity-enhanced surface-plasmon resonance sensing: Modeling and performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; Malara, P.; Zullo, R.; Gaglio, G.; Homola, Jiří; De Natale, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2014), 015205. ISSN 0957-0233 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : optical resonators * optical sensor s * cavity ring-down spectroscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.433, year: 2014

  11. Cavitation tunnel analysis of radiated sound from the resonance of a propeller tip vortex cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, P.C.; Westerweel, J.; Van Terwisga, T.J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to test the hypothesis that the resonance of a tip vortex cavity is responsible for high-amplitude broadband pressure-fluctuations, typically between 40 and 70 Hz,Hz, for a full scale propeller. This is achieved with a model propeller in a cavitation tunnel. Simultaneous hi

  12. Zero kinetic energy-pulsed field ionization and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy: Ionization dynamics of Rydberg states in HBr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of rotationally resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy-pulsed field ionization studies on HBr via various rotational levels of the F1Δ2 and f3Δ2 Rydberg states are reported. These studies lead to an accurate determination of the lowest ionization threshold as 94098.9±1 cm-1. Observed rotational and spin endash orbit branching ratios are compared to the results of ab initio calculations. The differences between theory and experiment highlight the dominant role of rotational and spin endash orbit interactions for the dynamic properties of the high-n Rydberg states involved in the pulsed field ionization process. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. Resonance overlap criterion for H atom ionization by circularly polarized microwave fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J. [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    1997-01-01

    The threshold for H atom ionization by circularly polarized microwave fields is discussed within the classical mechanics framework for high microwave frequencies. The Chirikov resonance overlap criterion predictions are compared with estimates obtained adopting the renormalization method. It is shown that the ionization threshold is highly sensitive to the helicity of microwaves. Among all possible initial electronic orbits, those of medium eccentricity are the first to ionize. The results obtained indicate that collisions with the nucleus play a negligible role for the onset of ionization. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Influence of laser intensity on the double-resonance multiphoton ionization process of NO molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiyin Zhang; Yidong Jin

    2008-01-01

    The analytic forrnula of the ionization efficiency in the process of double resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (DREMPI) is derived from the dynamic rate equation about the interaction of photon and material. Based on rids formula, the ionization efficiency arid the laser power index versus laser intensity in the DREMPI process of NO molecule, via A2∑ and S2∑ intermediate resonant states, is numerically sinnllated. It is shown that the ionization efficiency of NO molecule increases with the laser intensity until getting saturation, while the laser power index decreases with the enhancement of the laser intensity arid changes to zero at last. The variation of the laser power index with the laser intensity indicates that the ionization efficiency reaches saturation in the one, two, and three excitation steps respectively. It is also found that the narrower the laser pulse duration is, the higher becomes the laser intensity for saturation.

  15. Resonance ionization spectroscopy of argon, krypton, and xenon using vacuum ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonant, single-photon excitation of ground state inert gases requires light in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region. This paper discusses methods for generating this light. Efficient schemes for ionizing argon, krypton, and xenon using resonant, stepwise single-photon excitation are presented

  16. Demonstration of the stabilization technique for nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Funahashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Okugi, T.; Omori, T.; Shimizu, H.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Miyoshi, S.; Takahashi, T., E-mail: tohru-takahashi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, R.; Uesugi, Y.; Yoshitama, H. [AdSM Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Sakaue, K.; Washio, M. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku 169-8555 (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    Based on our previously developed scheme to stabilize nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization caused by a geometric phase in electromagnetic waves traveling along a twisted path, we report an application of the technique for a cavity installed in the Accelerator Test Facility, a 1.3-GeV electron beam accelerator at KEK, in which photons are generated by laser-Compton scattering. We successfully achieved a power enhancement of 1200 with 1.4% fluctuation, which means that the optical path length of the cavity has been controlled with a precision of 14 pm under an accelerator environment. In addition, polarization switching utilizing a geometric phase of the nonplanar cavity was demonstrated.

  17. Muon Tracking Studies in a Skew Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sy, Amy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Afanaciev, Andre [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Skew Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (SPIC) is an extension of the Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) framework that has previously been explored as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. The addition of skew quadrupoles to the PIC magnetic focusing channel induces coupled dynamic behavior of the beam that is radially periodic. The periodicity of the radial motion allows for the avoidance of unwanted resonances in the horizontal and vertical transverse planes, while still providing periodic locations at which ionization cooling components can be implemented. A first practical implementation of the magnetic field components required in the SPIC channel is modeled in MADX. Dynamic features of the coupled correlated optics with and without induced parametric resonance are presented and discussed.

  18. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bacteria produce acids that cause decay. Tooth pain occurs after decay reaches the inside of the tooth. Dentists can detect cavities by examining the teeth and taking x-rays periodically. Good oral hygiene and regular dental care plus a healthy diet can help prevent cavities. ...

  19. Modeling of Fano resonances in the reflectivity of photonic crystal cavities with finite spot size excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasco, J P; Vinck-Posada, H; Valentim, P T; Guimãraes, P S S

    2013-12-16

    We study the reflectivity spectra of photonic crystal slab cavities using an extension of the scattering matrix method that allows treating finite sizes of the spot of the excitation beam. The details of the implementation of the method are presented and then we show that Fano resonances arise as a consequence of the electromagnetic interference between the discrete contribution of the fundamental cavity mode and the continuum contribution of the light scattered by the photonic crystal pattern. We control the asymmetry lineshape of the Fano resonance through the polarization of the incident field, which determines the relative phase between the two electromagnetic contributions to the interference. We analyse the electric field profile inside and outside of the crystal to help in the understanding of the dependence on polarization of the reflectivity lineshape. We also study with our implementation the dependence of the Fano resonances on the size of the incident radiation spot. PMID:24514709

  20. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) off-line developments on Ga, Al and Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is an element selective, highly efficient and versatile tool for generation of radioactive ion beams at on-line mass separator facilities. Parallel to TRIUMF’s on-line RILIS at the Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (ISAC) facility, an off-line Laser Ion Source test stand (LIS STAND) is operated for systematic laser resonance ionization spectroscopy, ionization scheme and ion source development. Three titanium sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers optionally equipped with harmonic frequency generation units are used to resonantly step-wise excite and ionize elements of interest. A grating tuned Ti:Sa laser allows continuous laser wavelength scans of up to Δ≈200nm. With this laser inventory and the LIS STAND, atomic Rydberg series and auto-ionizing levels can systematically be studied. The LIS STAND has been in use since 2009 and so far the spectroscopy on Ga, Al and Ca has been performed. The development of efficient laser resonant ionization schemes, their investigation and comparison using the LIS STAND are discussed

  1. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) with Pulsed and CW-Lasers on Plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, P.; Huber, G.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Wendt, K.

    2005-04-01

    The detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in ultra-trace amounts by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a well-established routine method. Detection limits of 106 to 107 atoms and precise measurements of the isotopic composition have been achieved. In this work multi-step resonance ionization of plutonium atoms has been performed with tunable lasers having very different output intensities and spectral properties. In order to compare different ways for the resonance ionization of plutonium broadband pulsed dye and titanium:sapphire lasers as well as narrow-band cw-diode and titanium:sapphire lasers have been applied for a number of efficient excitation schemes. It has been shown, that for identical excitation schemes the optical isotope selectivity can be improved by using cw-lasers (bandwidths lasers (bandwidths > 2 GHz). Pulsed and cw-laser systems have been used simultaneously for resonance ionization enabling direct comparisons of pulsed and continuous ionization processes. So far, a three-step, three-color laser excitation scheme has been proven to be most practical in terms of efficiency, selectivity and laser wavelengths. Alternatively a newly discovered three-step, two-color excitation scheme which includes a strong two-photon transition from an excited state into a high-lying autoionizing state yields similar ionization efficiencies. This two-photon transition was characterized with respect to saturation behavior and line width.

  2. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) with Pulsed and CW-Lasers on Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in ultra-trace amounts by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a well-established routine method. Detection limits of 106 to 107 atoms and precise measurements of the isotopic composition have been achieved. In this work multi-step resonance ionization of plutonium atoms has been performed with tunable lasers having very different output intensities and spectral properties. In order to compare different ways for the resonance ionization of plutonium broadband pulsed dye and titanium:sapphire lasers as well as narrow-band cw-diode and titanium:sapphire lasers have been applied for a number of efficient excitation schemes. It has been shown, that for identical excitation schemes the optical isotope selectivity can be improved by using cw-lasers (bandwidths 2 GHz). Pulsed and cw-laser systems have been used simultaneously for resonance ionization enabling direct comparisons of pulsed and continuous ionization processes. So far, a three-step, three-color laser excitation scheme has been proven to be most practical in terms of efficiency, selectivity and laser wavelengths. Alternatively a newly discovered three-step, two-color excitation scheme which includes a strong two-photon transition from an excited state into a high-lying autoionizing state yields similar ionization efficiencies. This two-photon transition was characterized with respect to saturation behavior and line width.

  3. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isselhardt, Brett H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  4. Tunable terahertz plasmon in grating-gate coupled graphene with a resonant cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmon modes in graphene can be tuned into resonance with an incident terahertz electromagnetic wave in the range of 1–4 THz by setting a proper gate voltage. By using the finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method, we simulate a graphene plasmon device comprising a single-layer graphene, a metallic grating, and a terahertz cavity. The simulations suggest that the terahertz electric field can be enhanced by several times due to the grating–cavity configuration. Due to this near-field enhancement, the maximal absorption of the incident terahertz wave reaches up to about 45%. (paper)

  5. Beam steering via resonance detuning in coherently coupled vertical cavity laser arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherently coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser arrays offer unique advantages for nonmechanical beam steering applications. We have applied dynamic coupled mode theory to show that the observed temporal phase shift between vertical-cavity surface-emitting array elements is caused by the detuning of their resonant wavelengths. Hence, a complete theoretical connection between the differential current injection into array elements and the beam steering direction has been established. It is found to be a fundamentally unique beam-steering mechanism with distinct advantages in efficiency, compactness, speed, and phase-sensitivity to current

  6. Ionization branching ratio control with a resonance attosecond clock

    CERN Document Server

    Argenti, Luca

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the possibility to monitor the dynamics of autoionizing states in real time and control the yields of different ionization channels in helium by simulating XUV-pump IR-probe experiments focused on the N=2 threshold. The XUV pulse creates a coherent superposition of doubly excited states which is found to decay by ejecting electrons in bursts. Prominent interference fringes in the photoelectron angular distribution of the $2s$ and $2p$ ionization channels are observed, along with sizable out-of-phase quantum beats in the yields of the corresponding parent ions.

  7. Ionization Branching Ratio Control with a Resonance Attosecond Clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the possibility to monitor the dynamics of autoionizing states in real-time and control the yields of different ionization channels in helium by simulating extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pump IR-probe experiments focused on the N=2 threshold. The XUV pulse creates a coherent superposition of doubly excited states which is found to decay by ejecting electrons in bursts. Prominent interference fringes in the photoelectron angular distribution of the 2s and 2p ionization channels are observed, along with significant out-of-phase quantum beats in the yields of the corresponding parent ions.

  8. Selective enhancement of resonant multiphoton ionization with strong laser fields

    OpenAIRE

    Min LI; Zhang, Peng; Luo, Siqiang; Zhou, Yueming; Zhang, Qingbin; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution photoelectron momentum distributions of Xe atoms ionized by 800-nm linearly polarized laser fields have been traced at intensities from 1.1*1013 to 3.5*1013W/cm2 using velocity-map imaging techniques. At certain laser intensities, the momentum spectrum exhibits a distinct double-ring structure for low-order above-threshold ionization, which appears to be absent at lower or higher laser intensities. By investigating the intensity-resolved photoelectron energy spectrum, we find ...

  9. Influence of resonant charge exchange on the viscosity of partially ionized plasma in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of resonant charge exchange for ion-atom interaction on the viscosity of partially ionized plasma embedded in the magnetic field is investigated. The general system of equations used to derive the viscosity coefficients for an arbitrary plasma component in the 21-moment approximation of Grad’s method is presented. The expressions for the coefficients of total and partial viscosities of a multicomponent partially ionized plasma in the magnetic field are obtained. As an example, the coefficients of the parallel and transverse viscosities for the ionic and neutral components of the partially ionized hydrogen plasma are calculated. It is shown that the account for resonant charge exchange can lead to a substantial change of the parallel and transverse viscosity of the plasma components in the region of low degrees of ionization on the order of 0.1

  10. Resonant and nonresonant multiphoton ionization processes in the mass spectrometry of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamachi, Akifumi; Okuno, Tomoya; Imasaka, Tomoko; Kida, Yuichiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-03-01

    Multiphoton ionization processes were studied for three types of explosives using a line-tunable ultraviolet femtosecond laser. When peroxides such as triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) were ionized through a nonresonant two-photon process, a molecular ion was dominantly observed by reducing the excess energy remaining in the ion. However, an aromatic nitro compound such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) produced large signals arising from molecular and fragment ions by resonant two-photon ionization. In addition, only fragment ions were produced from a nonaromatic nitro compound such as 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), even when a resonant two-photon ionization process was employed, suggesting that a further reduction in excess energy would be necessary if a molecular ion were to be observed. PMID:25622138

  11. Modeling and simulation of two-step resonance ionization processes using CW and pulsed lasers

    CERN Document Server

    de Groote, Ruben; Flanagan, Kieran

    This thesis derives and discusses equations that describe the evolution of atomic systems subjected to two monochromatic and coherent radiation fields and treats both continuous and temporally pulsed irradiation. This theoretical description is de- veloped mainly to understand the influence of the photon field intensities on experimental ionization spectra. The primary ap- plication of this theoretical framework is on methods that rely on resonant laser excitation and non-resonant laser ionization to extract information on the hyperfine structure of atomic systems. In particular, qualitative and quantitative discussions on the laser-related changes in hyperfine splitting extracted from ion- ization spectra are presented. Also, a method for increasing the resolution of resonance ionization techniques (potentially up un- til the natural linewidth of the electronic transitions) is discussed and theoretically justified. Both topics are illustrated with exper- imental data.

  12. Pulsed plasma sources for the production of intense ion beams based on catalytic resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe a technique to produce planar and volumetric ion sources of nearly every element. This technique is based on a generalization of the LIBORS-process (Laser Ionization Based On Resonant Saturation) which because of its similarity to chemical catalytic reactions has been called CATRION (CATalytic Resonance IONization). A vapor containing the desired atomic species is doped with a suitable element processing resonance transitions that can be pumped ro saturation with a laser. By superelastic collisions with the excited atoms and by simulated bremsstrahlung absorption seed electrons are heated. It is the heated electron component which then by collisional processes ionizes the desired atomic species and are multiplied. 41 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  13. Enhancement of the isotopic abundance sensitivity of mass spectrometry by Doppler-free resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of two-photon Doppler-free excitation in atomic resonance ionization offers the possibility of considerable enhancement of the isotopic abundance sensitivity of conventional mass spectrometry. In some applications of interest, e.g. carbon dating, this technique may provide sensitivity comparable to that presently attained by accelerator-based high energy mass spectrometry. The basic physics underlying the method is discussed and preliminary experimental work on three-photon ionization of atomic carbon is described. (author)

  14. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy oflaser-ablated copper atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Andrejeva, Anna; Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2014-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of laser-ablated copper atoms entrainedin a supersonic free jet expansion are reported. Depending on the ionization scheme employed, andthe conditions under which the copper atoms are produced, very different spectra are produced, whichare discussed. In some circumstances, high proportions of metastable atoms survive the ablation andexpansion process and are clearly seen in the spectra. The spectroscopic transitions for the observedlin...

  15. The Application of Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Technique in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/REMPI-TOFMS) using a nanosecond laser has been applied to analyze the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The excited-state lifetime, absorption characters, and energy of electronic states of the 16 PAHs were investigated to optimize the ionization yield. A river water sample pretreated by means of solid phase extraction was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical instrumen...

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance study on the ionizing radiation induced defects of the tooth enamel hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite is the main constituent of calcified tissues. Defects induced by ionizing radiations in this biomineral can present high stability and then, these are used as biological markers in radiological accidents, irradiated food identifying and geological and archaeological dating. In this work, paramagnetic centers induced on the enamel of the teeth by environmental ionizing radiation, are investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Decay thermal kinetic presents high complexity and shows the formation of different electron ligation energy centers and structures

  17. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization and third-harmonic generation in krypton and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) and third-harmonic generation (THG) in gaseous krypton and xenon have been studied using multiple laser photons resonant with numerous atomic energy levels of the target gas. The MPI and THG were studied concurrently in a high-pressure ionization cell with a vacuum ultraviolet (Vuv) radiation detector. Mass-resolved MPI and photoelectron spectra were recorded at low pressure (-4 torr) using the time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer and double focusing spherical energy analyzer

  18. Density matrix equation analysis of optical–optical double-resonance multiphoton ionization probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical formula of the optical–optical double-resonance multi-photon ionization (OODR-MPI) probability is derived from the time-dependent density-matrix equations that describe the interaction of photon and material. Based on the formula, the variation of the multiphoton ionization (MPI) probability with laser resonance detuning, Rabi frequency, laser pulse duration and ionization rate is investigated theoretically. It is shown that the MPI probability will decrease with the increase of laser resonance detuning, to some extent, to zero. The influence of the pump laser resonance detuning on the ionization probability is more important with respect to the probe laser. It not only influences Rabi frequency for saturation, but also the saturation value of MPI probability. The MPI probability will increase with Rabi frequency, laser pulse duration and ionization rate. It is also found that though the variation of the populations in the ground, the first and the second resonance states is different at the beginning of laser radiation, but they will still decrease to zero as the time goes on. It is then that the ionization probability gets the maximum value. Thus long laser pulse duration and high laser intensity are in favor for improving the MPI probability. These theoretical research results can provide a useful guide for the practical application of OODR-MPI spectroscopy. - Highlights: • An analytical expression of OODR-MPI probability has been derived. • MPI probability decreases with the increase of laser resonance detuning. • The influence of pump laser on the MPI probability is larger than probe laser. • Larger laser pulse duration and intensity are in favor of higher MPI probability

  19. A non-resonant RF cavity loaded with amorphous alloy for proton cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Makita, Y; Nayayama, T; Tsuchidate, H; Tsukishima, C; Yoshida, K

    1999-01-01

    A non-resonant RF cavity loaded with amorphous alloy cores has been designed and tested. The cavity has a re-entrant structure loaded with 8 amorphous alloy toroidal core and its characteristic impedance is designed as 450 Omega . The RF power is fed by 1 kW solid state amplifier using a step-up transformer with 1:9 impedance ratio. In the high power test, an accelerating gap voltage of more than 900 V was measured with input power of 1 kW in the frequency range of 1 to 10 MHz. The voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) was less than 2.0. The results prove that the cavity may be used successfully within a compact proton synchrotron for a cancer therapy facility. (3 refs).

  20. Electromagnetic Response of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves by Coupling Open Resonant Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang-Yu; CHEN Ying; WANG Ping

    2007-01-01

    We present a new detecting scheme of high-frequency gravitational waves(HFGWs) in the GHz band,the scheme consists of a high-quality-factor open microwave cavity,a static magnetic field passing through the cavity and an electromagnetic (EM)normal mode stored in the cavity.It is found that under the resonant condition firstand second-order perturbation EM effects have almost the same detecting sensitivity to the HFGWs in the GHz band (h~10-26,v~5GHz),but the former contains more information from the HFGWs.We akso provide a very brief review for possible improving way of the sensitivity.This scheme would be Highly complementary to other schemes of detecting the HFGWs.

  1. A deterministic and statistical energy analysis of tyre cavity resonance noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Zamri; Wang, Xu

    2016-03-01

    Tyre cavity resonance was studied using a combination of deterministic analysis and statistical energy analysis where its deterministic part was implemented using the impedance compact mobility matrix method and its statistical part was done by the statistical energy analysis method. While the impedance compact mobility matrix method can offer a deterministic solution to the cavity pressure response and the compliant wall vibration velocity response in the low frequency range, the statistical energy analysis method can offer a statistical solution of the responses in the high frequency range. In the mid frequency range, a combination of the statistical energy analysis and deterministic analysis methods can identify system coupling characteristics. Both methods have been compared to those from commercial softwares in order to validate the results. The combined analysis result has been verified by the measurement result from a tyre-cavity physical model. The analysis method developed in this study can be applied to other similar toroidal shape structural-acoustic systems.

  2. Resonance Cavities in Parallel-Hetero Perturbation Photonic Crystal Waveguide Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We design a series of W1 waveguide-like parallel-hetero cavities (PHCs) made from the combination of parallelhetero perturbation (PHP) waveguides and photonic crystal waveguides and investigate their optical properties. Spectral properties are calculated numerically using the three-dimensional finite-difierence time-domain method. The resonant frequencies and quality factors are obtained for each type of PHC and comparisons are made among different types of PHC, which is helpful for predicting and understanding the properties of PHC and designing PHC based high-performance cavities. The PHCs can broaden the category of cavity design and find interesting applications in integrated optical devices and solid state lasers. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  3. Microwave resonant cavity method for the investigation of the corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A specially adjusted and modified microwave cavity method was applied in determining the electron density in the corona discharge at atmospheric pressure in air and in argon. The discharge was sustained between the inner and outer cylinders of an open coaxial cavity which had been specially developed for the investigation of the corona. The electromagnetic waves of TM011 mode and 3 cm resp. 10 cm wavelength bands were used for measurements. The modified method made it possible to measure electron densities in the corona about 4 orders lower as against the waveguide method. The shift observed in the resonance frequency of the cavity showed that the mean electron density in the corona discharge is less than 108 cm-3. (author)

  4. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of atomic vapor laser isotope separation [AVLIS] as the technology to meet the United States' future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. The authors discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques employed. The methodology adopted is illustrated with examples of other elements that are under study in the program. (author)

  5. Dosimetry of ionizing radiations by Electron paramagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, some historical and theoretical aspects about the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), its characteristics, the resonance detection, the paramagnetic species, the radiation effects on inorganic and organic materials, the diagrams of the instrumentation for the EPR detection, the performance of an EPR spectrometer, the coherence among EPR and dosimetry and, practical applications as well as in the food science there are presented. (Author)

  6. Resonance-mediated atomic ionization dynamics induced by ultraintense x-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Phay J.; Kanter, E. P.; Young, L.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the methodology of our recently developed Monte Carlo rate equation (MCRE) approach, which systematically incorporates bound-bound resonances to model multiphoton ionization dynamics induced by high-fluence, high-intensity x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. These resonances are responsible for ionization far beyond that predicted by the sequential single photon absorption model and are central to a quantitative understanding of atomic ionization dynamics in XFEL pulses. We also present calculated multiphoton ionization dynamics for Kr and Xe atoms in XFEL pulses for a variety of conditions, to compare the effects of bandwidth, pulse duration, pulse fluence, and photon energy. This comprehensive computational investigation reveals areas in the photon energy-pulse fluence landscape where resonances are critically important. We also uncover a mechanism, preservation of inner-shell vacancies (PIVS), whereby radiation damage is enhanced at higher XFEL intensities and identify the sequence of core-outer-Rydberg, core-valence, and core-core resonances encountered during multiphoton x-ray ionization.

  7. Phonon-mediated squeezing of the cavity field off-resonantly coupled with a coherently driven quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jia-pei [Department of Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); College of Science, Honghe University, Mengzi 661100 (China); Huang, Hui; Li, Gao-xiang, E-mail: gaox@phy.ccnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2014-01-21

    We theoretically propose a scheme for the quadrature squeezing of the cavity field via dissipative processes. The effects of the electron-phonon interaction (EPI) on the squeezing are investigated, where the cavity is off-resonantly coupled with a coherently driven quantum dot (QD) which is allowed to interact with an acoustic-phonon reservoir. Under certain conditions, the participation of the phonon induced by both the EPI and the off-resonant coupling of the cavity with the QD enables some dissipative processes to occur resonantly in the dressed-state basis of the QD. The cavity-mode photons emitted or absorbed during the phonon-mediated dissipative processes are correlated, thus leading to the squeezing of the cavity field. A squeezed vacuum reservoir for the cavity field is built up due to the EPI plus the off-resonant coupling between the cavity and the QD. The numerical results obtained with an effective polaron master equation derived using second-order perturbation theory indicate that, in low temperature limit, the degree of squeezing is maximal but the increasing temperature of the phonon reservoir could hinder the squeezing and degrade the degree of the squeezing of the cavity field. In addition, the presence of the photonic crystal could enhance the quadrature squeezing of the cavity field.

  8. High-performance Refractive Index Sensor Based on Photonic Crystal Single Mode Resonant Micro-cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengye Huang; Junfeng Shi; Dongsheng Wang; Wei Li

    2006-01-01

    An effective refractive index sensor built with square lattice photonic crystal is proposed, which can be applicable to photonic integrated circuits. Two photonic crystal waveguides rather than conventional ridge waveguides are used as entrance/exit waveguides to the micro-cavity. Three layers of photonic lattice are set between the photonic crystal waveguides and the micro-cavity to achieve both a high transmission and a high sensitivity. The plane wave method is utilized to calculate the disperse curves and the finite difference time domain scheme is employed to simulate the light propagation. At the resonant wavelength of about 1500 nm, the resonant wavelength shifts up by 0.7 nm for each increment of △n=0.001. A transmission of more than 0.75 is observed. Although the position disorder of the photonic crystal doesn't affect the sensitivity of the sensor,the transmission reduces rapidly as the disorder increases.

  9. Density measurement of a magnetized plasma column using a resonant cavity technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the application of high order TMomo modes of a cylindrical cavity to the measurement of the density of a magnetized plasma column is presented. It is shown theoretically that judiciously chosen high order modes have the potential advantages of both a wide operational range of densities, and a wide range for which a simple perturbation theory is valid. Furthermore, an experiment is described which shows that the TMo6o mode can be excited with a sufficiently high Q value to allow accurate determination of the resonant frequencies, and hence plasma density. Favourable comparison between densities in the range 1010 - 1012 cm-3 measured by means of the resonant cavity technique and microwave interferometry is presented. (author) 7 figs., 10 refs

  10. Tunable all-optical plasmonic diode based on Fano resonance in nonlinear waveguide coupled with cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Cairong; Shi, Fenghua; Wu, Hongxing; Chen, Yihang

    2015-06-01

    Tunable all-optical plasmonic diode is proposed based on the Fano resonance in an asymmetric and nonlinear system, comprising metal-insulator-metal waveguides coupled with nanocavities. The spatial asymmetry of the system gives rise to the nonreciprocity of the field localizations at the nonlinear gap between the coupled cavities and to the nonreciprocal nonlinear response. Nonlinear Fano resonance, originating from the interference between the discrete cavity mode and the continuum traveling mode, is observed and effectively tuned by changing the input power. By combining the unidirectional nonlinear response with the steep dispersion of the Fano asymmetric line shape, a transmission contrast ratio up to 41.46 dB can be achieved between forward and backward transmission. Our all-optical plasmonic diode with compact structure can find important applications in integrated optical nanocircuits. PMID:26030529

  11. Resonant cavity enhanced light harvesting in flexible thin-film organic solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sergeant, Nicholas P.

    2013-04-24

    Dielectric/metal/dielectric (DMD) electrodes have the potential to significantly increase the absorption efficiency and photocurrent in flexible organic solar cells. We demonstrate that this enhancement is attributed to a broadband cavity resonance. Silver-based semitransparent DMD electrodes with sheet resistances below 10 ohm/sq. are fabricated on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates in a high-throughput roll-to-roll sputtering tool. We carefully study the effect of the semitransparent DMD electrode (here composed of ZnxSnyOz/Ag/InxSn yOz) on the optical device performance of a copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60) bilayer cell and illustrate that a resonant cavity enhanced light trapping effect dominates the optical behavior of the device. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  12. Laser resonance ionization for ultra-trace analysis on long-lived radioactive isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Christopher Geppert; Klaus D A Wendt

    2010-12-01

    Benefiting from the continuous laser developments, resonance ionization can be applied for a variety of experiments on radioactive isotopes, e.g. as a laser ion source for producing pure beams of short-lived isotopes at on-line facilities. In this paper the application of a compact set-up for resonance ionization mass spectrometry for ultra-trace analysis of the long-lived isotope Ca-41 is described. With this set-up a purely optical selectivity of 3 × 109 and an overall detection efficiency of 1.2(4) × 10−5 are demonstrated.

  13. Observation of autoionizing states of beryllium by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have made the first observations of the Be 2p21S state, and of high-lying members of the Rydberg series 2pnd 1P0 (n less than or equal to 16), by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). The energy of the 1S state agrees well with theoretical predictions, if corrections are made for intershell electron correlations. These results show that precision specroscopy can be performed by RIMS with samples of a few hundred atoms, and that direct multiphoton excitation of autoionizing states may be a useful new addition to the existing catalogue of resonance ionization schemes

  14. Electrically detected magnetic resonance in a W-band microwave cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, V.; Lo, C. C.; George, R. E.; Lyon, S. A.; Bokor, J.; Schenkel, T.; Ardavan, A.; Morton, J. J. L.

    2011-01-14

    We describe a low-temperature sample probe for the electrical detection of magnetic resonance in a resonant W-band (94 GHz) microwave cavity. The advantages of this approach are demonstrated by experiments on silicon field-effect transistors. A comparison with conventional low-frequency measurements at X-band (9.7 GHz) on the same devices reveals an up to 100-fold enhancement of the signal intensity. In addition, resonance lines that are unresolved at X-band are clearly separated in the W-band measurements. Electrically detected magnetic resonance at high magnetic fields and high microwave frequencies is therefore a very sensitive technique for studying electron spins with an enhanced spectral resolution and sensitivity.

  15. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective

  16. Design of guided-mode resonance mirrors for short laser cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tomohiro; Ura, Shogo; Magnusson, Robert

    2015-08-01

    A guided-mode resonance mirror (GMRM) consists of a waveguide grating integrated on an optical buffer layer on a high-reflection substrate. An incident free-space wave at the resonance wavelength is once coupled by the grating to a guided mode and coupled again by the same grating back to free space. The reflection characteristics of a GMRM are numerically calculated and theoretically analyzed. It is predicted that notch filtering or flat reflection spectra are obtained depending on the optical buffer layer thickness. Design of short cavities using a GMRM is discussed for potential application in surface-mount packaging of diode lasers onto a photonic circuit board. PMID:26367288

  17. Simulation of Optical Resonators for Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (vcsel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mohy S.; Hassen, Mahmoud F. M.; El-Nozahey, Adel M.; Hafez, Alaa S.; Metry, Samer F.

    2010-04-01

    Simulation and modeling of the reflectivity and transmissivity of the multilayer DBR of VCSEL, as well as inside the active region quantum well are analyzed using the characteristic matrix method. The electric field intensity distributions inside such vertical-cavity structure are calculated. A software program under MATLAB environment is constructed for the simulation. This study was performed for two specific Bragg wavelengths 980 nm and 370 nm for achieving a resonant periodic gain (RPG)

  18. Pathologies of the uterine endometrial cavity: usual and unusual manifestations and pitfalls on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The endometrial cavity may demonstrate various imaging manifestations such as normal, reactive, inflammatory, and benign and malignant neoplasms. We evaluated usual and unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the uterine endometrial cavity, and described the diagnostic clues to differential diagnoses. Surgically proven pathologies of the uterine endometrial cavity were evaluated retrospectively with pathologic correlation. The pathologies included benign endometrial neoplasms such as endometrial hyperplasia and polyp, malignant endometrial neoplasms such as endometrial carcinoma and carcinosarcoma, endometrial-myometrial neoplasm such as endometrial stromal sarcoma, pregnancy-related lesions in the endometrial cavity such as gestational trophoblastic diseases (hydatidiform mole, invasive mole and choriocarcinoma) and placental polyp, myometrial lesions simulating endometrial lesions such as submucosal leiomyoma and some adenomyosis, endometrial neoplasms simulating myometrial lesions such as adenomyomatous polyp and endometrial lesions arising in the hemicavity of a septate/bicornate uterus, and fluid collections in the uterine cavity (hydro/hemato/pyometra). It is important to recognize various imaging findings in these diseases, in order to make a correct preoperative diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Integrated system modeling analysis of a cryogenic multi-cell deflecting-mode cavity resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A deflecting mode cavity is the integral element for six-dimensional phase-space beam control in bunch compressors and emittance transformers at high energy beam test facilities. RF performance of a high-Q device is, however, highly sensitive to operational conditions, in particular in a cryo-cooling environment. Using analytic calculations and RF simulations, we examined cavity parameters and deflecting characteristics of TM110,π mode of a 5 cell resonator in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, which has long been used at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector (A0PI). The sensitivity analysis indicated that the cavity could lose 30%–40% of deflecting force due to defective input power coupling accompanying non-uniform field distribution across the cells with 40 ∼ 50 MeV electron beam and 70–80 kW klystron power. Vacuum-cryomodules of the 5 cell cavity are planned to be installed at the Fermilab Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator facility. Comprehensive modeling analysis integrated with multi-physics simulation tools showed that RF loading of 1 ms can cause a ∼5 K maximum temperature increase, corresponding to a ∼4.3 μm/ms deformation and a 1.32 MHz/K maximum frequency shift. The integrated system modeling analysis will improve design process of a high-Q cavity with more accurate prediction of cryogenic RF performance under a high power pulse operation

  20. Pathologies of the uterine endometrial cavity: usual and unusual manifestations and pitfalls on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mayumi; Matsuzaki, Kenji; Yoshida, Shusaku; Nishitani, Hiromu [University of Tokushima, Department of Radiology, Tokushima (Japan); Uehara, Hisanori [University of Tokushima, Department of Molecular and Environmental Pathology, Tokushima (Japan); Shimazu, Hideki [Oe Kyoudo Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    The endometrial cavity may demonstrate various imaging manifestations such as normal, reactive, inflammatory, and benign and malignant neoplasms. We evaluated usual and unusual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the uterine endometrial cavity, and described the diagnostic clues to differential diagnoses. Surgically proven pathologies of the uterine endometrial cavity were evaluated retrospectively with pathologic correlation. The pathologies included benign endometrial neoplasms such as endometrial hyperplasia and polyp, malignant endometrial neoplasms such as endometrial carcinoma and carcinosarcoma, endometrial-myometrial neoplasm such as endometrial stromal sarcoma, pregnancy-related lesions in the endometrial cavity such as gestational trophoblastic diseases (hydatidiform mole, invasive mole and choriocarcinoma) and placental polyp, myometrial lesions simulating endometrial lesions such as submucosal leiomyoma and some adenomyosis, endometrial neoplasms simulating myometrial lesions such as adenomyomatous polyp and endometrial lesions arising in the hemicavity of a septate/bicornate uterus, and fluid collections in the uterine cavity (hydro/hemato/pyometra). It is important to recognize various imaging findings in these diseases, in order to make a correct preoperative diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. Modulation of attosecond beating in resonant two-photon ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro J; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the photoelectron attosecond beating at the basis of RABBIT (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating By Interference of Two-photon transitions) in the presence of autoionizing states. We show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, its sidebands exhibit a peaked phase shift as well as a modulation of the beating frequency itself. Furthermore, the beating between two resonant paths persists even when the pump and the probe pulses do not overlap, thus providing a sensitive non-holographic interferometric means to reconstruct coherent metastable wave packets. We characterize these phenomena quantitatively with a general finite-pulse analytical model that accounts for the effect of both intermediate and final resonances on two-photon processes, at a negligible computational cost. The model predictions are in excellent agreement with those of accurate ab initio calculations for the helium atom in the region of the N=2 doubly excited states.

  2. A data acquisition system for measuring ionization cross section in laser multi-step resonant ionization experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A CAMAC data acquisition system for measuring ionization cross section in laser multi-step resonant ionization experiment is described. The number of scalers in the front-end CAMAC can be adjusted by changing the data read-out table files. Both continuous and manual acquisition models are available, and there is a wide adjustable range from 1 ms to 800 s with the acquisition time unit. The long-term stability, Δt/t, for the data acquisition system with an acquisition time unit of 100 s was measured to be better than ±0.01%, thus validating its reliability in long-term online experimental data acquisition. The time response curves for three electrothermal power-meters were also measured by this DAQ system. (authors)

  3. Hyper-Raman scattering and three-photon resonant ionization: Competitive effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A semiclassical theory of hyper-Raman scattering and three-photon resonant ionization via the coupled density-matrix and Maxwell equations is presented. A simplified three-level atom model is obtained, which includes two-photon resonant pumping and time dependent photoionization rates. We consider conditions typically encountered in atomic vapours to simulate numerically pulse propagation. A strong depletion of the photoionization probability in the hyper-Raman field saturation regime is predicted. (author). 17 refs, 8 figs

  4. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolov, Sergei; Yüce, Emre; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo; Mosk, Allard P

    2015-01-01

    We perform a spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: helium and nitrogen. The use of high-conducting gas in combination with low-conducting semiconductor leads to a resonance control with a spatial resolution better than 4 microns.

  5. Resonant- and avalanche-ionization amplification of laser-induced plasma in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplification of laser-induced plasma in air is demonstrated utilizing resonant laser ionization and avalanche ionization. Molecular oxygen in air is ionized by a low-energy laser pulse employing (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) to generate seed electrons. Subsequent avalanche ionization of molecular oxygen and nitrogen significantly amplifies the laser-induced plasma. In this plasma-amplification effect, three-body attachments to molecular oxygen dominate the electron-generation and -loss processes, while either nitrogen or argon acts as the third body with low electron affinity. Contour maps of the electron density within the plasma obtained in O2/N2 and O2/Ar gas mixtures are provided to show relative degrees of plasma amplification with respect to gas pressure and to verify that the seed electrons generated by O2 2 + 1 REMPI are selectively amplified by avalanche ionization of molecular nitrogen in a relatively low-pressure condition (≤100 Torr). Such plasma amplification occurring in air could be useful in aerospace applications at high altitude.

  6. A Combined Laser Ablation-Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Surface Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardell, G.; Taylor, M. E.; Stewart, B. W.; Capo, R. C.; Crown, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the development of an instrument for direct geochronologic measurements on rocks in situ will be described. The instrument integrates laser ablation sampling, resonance ionization, and mass spectrometry to directly measure concentrations of the Rb-Sr isotope system. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Development of resonance ionization spectroscopy system for fusion material surface analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iguchi, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.; Satoh, Yasushi; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1996-10-01

    A Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) system is now under development aiming at in-situ observation and analysis neutral particles emitted from fusion material surfaces under irradiation of charged particles and neutrons. The basic performance of the RIS system was checked through a preliminary experiment on Xe atom detection. (author)

  8. Modeling of the initiation and evolution of a laser-ionized column in the lower atmosphere - 314.5 nm wavelength resonant multiphoton ionization of naturally occurring argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, G. J.; Stockley, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A 3+1 resonant multiphoton ionization process in naturally occurring argon is studied at 314.5 nm as a candidate for providing a long ionized channel through the atmosphere. Results are presented which indicate peak electron densities up to 10 exp 8/cu cm can be created using laser intensities on the order of 10 exp 8 W/sq cm.

  9. Skew-Quad Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling: Theory and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanaciev, Andre [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasiliy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Sy, Amy [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Johnson, Rolland P. [Muons Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Muon beam ionization cooling is a key component for the next generation of high-luminosity muon colliders. To reach adequately high luminosity without excessively large muon intensities, it was proposed previously to combine ionization cooling with techniques using a parametric resonance (PIC). Practical implementation of PIC proposal is a subject of this report. We show that an addition of skew quadrupoles to a planar PIC channel gives enough flexibility in the design to avoid unwanted resonances, while meeting the requirements of radially-periodic beam focusing at ionization-cooling plates, large dynamic aperture and an oscillating dispersion needed for aberration corrections. Theoretical arguments are corroborated with models and a detailed numerical analysis, providing step-by-step guidance for the design of Skew-quad PIC (SPIC) beamline.

  10. Determination of ultra-low levels of uranium using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of isotopic composition of actinides like U and Pu is important, due to their distribution in the environment as a result of nuclear weapons testing, fuel reprocessing, reactor operations and to a smaller extent from accidental releases. The analytical methods like fission track analysis (FTA), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) have evolved as sensitive techniques. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry yields rapid isotopic signature data for material containing actinides without requiring time-consuming sample preparation and chemical separation procedures. In this paper, authors presented the details of the methodology and results for low-level detection of uranium using RIMS

  11. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryavtsev, Yu; Ferrer, R; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.(KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven, 3001, Belgium)

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the In-Gas Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-g...

  12. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source Project at TRIUMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassen, J., E-mail: lassen@triumf.ca; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Lavoie, J. P. [TRIUMF (Canada); Geppert, Ch.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2005-04-15

    Resonant laser excitation and ionisation is one of the most successful tools for the selective production of radioactive ion beams (RIB) at on-line mass separator facilities. TRIUMF plans to augment the current ion sources with a resonant ionisation laser ion source (RILIS), to use the high production yields from the target, as shown by the delivery of 3*10{sup 4}/s {sup 11}Li ions from a standard target ion source with surface ionisation. The development and installation of TRIUMF's RILIS (TRILIS) is necessary to provide beams of short lived isotopes that conventional ion sources could not produce in sufficient intensity and purity for nuclear-, and nuclear astrophysics- experiments. A laser system consisting of three tunable titanium-sapphire (TiSa) lasers with frequency doubling and tripling was employed to demonstrate first off-line resonance ionisation of Ga, and is being installed for first on-line test and a run on {sup 62}Ga in December 2004.

  13. High-resolution, three-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry of gadolinium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaum, K.; Bushaw, B. A.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Wendt, K.

    2001-08-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure triple-resonance autoionization (AI) spectra of gadolinium. Al resonances as narrow as 10 MHz have been observed and isotope shifts and hyperfine structure have been measured in selected AI states. The strongest AI state observed at 49663.576 cm-1 with a photoionization cross section of >3.6×10-15 cm2 was found to have an overall detection efficiency of >3×10-5, allowing application to a number of ultratrace determination problems. Analytical measurements with a diode-laser-based system have been successfully performed on bio-medical tissue samples.

  14. High-resolution, three-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry of gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure triple-resonance autoionization (AI) spectra of gadolinium. Al resonances as narrow as 10 MHz have been observed and isotope shifts and hyperfine structure have been measured in selected AI states. The strongest AI state observed at 49663.576 cm-1 with a photoionization cross section of >3.6x10-15 cm2 was found to have an overall detection efficiency of >3x10-5, allowing application to a number of ultratrace determination problems. Analytical measurements with a diode-laser-based system have been successfully performed on bio-medical tissue samples

  15. Resonantly Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization under XUV FEL radiation: A case study of the role of harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed quantitative study of the possible role of a small admixture of harmonics on resonant two-photon ionization. The motivation comes from the occasional presence of 2nd and 3rd harmonics in FEL radiation. We obtain the dependence of ionic yields on the intensity of the fundamental, the percentage of 2nd harmonic and the detuning of the fundamental from resonance. Having examined the cases of one and two intermediate resonances, we arrive at results of general validity and global behavior, showing that even a small amount of harmonic may seem deceptively innocuous.

  16. The Application of Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Technique in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/REMPI-TOFMS using a nanosecond laser has been applied to analyze the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The excited-state lifetime, absorption characters, and energy of electronic states of the 16 PAHs were investigated to optimize the ionization yield. A river water sample pretreated by means of solid phase extraction was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical instrument. The results suggested that REMPI is superior to electron impact ionization method for soft ionization and suppresses the background signal due to aliphatic hydrocarbons. Thus, GC/REMPI-TOFMS is a more reliable method for the determination of PAHs present in the environment.

  17. Malignant tumors of the nasal cavity: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of deep tissue extension of malignant tumors of the nasal cavity. Twelve patients diagnosed with malignant tumors of the nasal cavity were retrospectively evaluated at the Departments of Diagnostic Imaging and Head and Neck Surgery of the 'Complexo Hospitalar Heliopolis', Sao Paulo, Brazil, between 1990 and 2000. All cases were confirmed by histopathologic examination. The results were: extension to the maxillary and ethmoid sinuses was identified in six patients, extension to contralateral nasal cavity, orbit and lamina cribosa in five patients, extension to nasal pharynx and masticator space in two patients, extension to cavernous sinus, anterior/middle cranial fossa, pterygomaxillary fossa, inferior/superior orbital fissure, frontal sinus, contralateral ethmoid sinus, contralateral lamina cribosa, hard palate and pterygopalatine fossa in one patient. Conclusion: It is important to precisely assess the local extension and spread of tumor by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in order to plan the approach to treatment, which will influence the prognosis. (author)

  18. Doubly resonant three-photon double ionization of Ar atoms induced by an EUV free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mechanism for three-photon double ionization of atoms by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser pulses is revealed, where in a sequential process the second ionization step, proceeding via resonant two-photon ionization of ions, is strongly enhanced by the excitation of ionic autoionizing states. In contrast to the conventional model, the mechanism explains the observed relative intensities of photoelectron peaks and their angular dependence in three-photon double ionization of argon.

  19. Narrow-band spectral features of structured silver surface with rectangular resonant cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is aimed to investigate spectral properties of structured silver surface with periodic rectangular hollow cavities. Numerical computation is conducted to obtain spectral distribution of surface absorptance with different structural parameters using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. By means of numerical examples, the effects of structural parameters, incident angle and azimuthal angle on the spectral features of the structured surface are discussed. It is found that the structured surface shows the characteristics of the peak absorption in the vicinity of resonant wavelength of rectangular cavity. For some special structure parameters, the peak absorptance of the incident plane wave can reach as high as above 80% due to the excitation of microcavity effect. The optimal narrow-band absorption can be achieved by the rational design of the structural parameters of rectangular cavity. The directional dependence of spectral absorptance is also analyzed and the results reveal that the absorption peak positions are incident-angle-independent. The results show that the microscaled rectangular cavities fabricated on the low-emissivity silver surface are very efficient for selective improvement of the radiative features, which provides guidance for the design of narrow-band infrared thermal emitters.

  20. A study of nasal cavity volume in patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Kenichi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    Nasal cavity volume was studied in 11 patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging. The areas of horizontal sections of the nasal cavity on the cleft and non-cleft sides were measured with the help of a personal computer and image analyzing software. Nasal cavity volume was determined by integrated volume calculation. The volume of each side was measured before and after cleft lip repair. Before cleft lip repair nasal cavity volume on the non-cleft side was larger than on the cleft side. However there was no significant difference in the volume of the cleft and non-cleft sides after cleft lip repair. (author)

  1. A study of nasal cavity volume in patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasal cavity volume was studied in 11 patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging. The areas of horizontal sections of the nasal cavity on the cleft and non-cleft sides were measured with the help of a personal computer and image analyzing software. Nasal cavity volume was determined by integrated volume calculation. The volume of each side was measured before and after cleft lip repair. Before cleft lip repair nasal cavity volume on the non-cleft side was larger than on the cleft side. However there was no significant difference in the volume of the cleft and non-cleft sides after cleft lip repair. (author)

  2. Production of radioactive ion beams and resonance ionization spectroscopy with the laser ion source at on-line isotope separator ISOLDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The resonance ionisation laser ion source (RILIS) of the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility at CERN is based on the method of laser step-wise resonance ionisation of atoms in a hot metal cavity. Using the system of dye lasers pumped by copper vapour lasers the ion beams of many different metallic elements have been produced at ISOLDE with an ionization efficiency of up to 27%. The high selectivity of the resonance ionization is an important asset for the study of short-lived nuclides produced in targets bombarded by the proton beam of the CERN Booster accelerator. Radioactive ion beams of Be, Mg, Al, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Tb, Yb, Tl, Pb and Bi have been generated with the RILIS. Setting the RILIS laser in the narrow line-width mode provides conditions for a high-resolution study of hyperfine structure and isotopic shifts of atomic lines for short-lived isotopes. The isomer selective ionization of Cu, Ag and Pb isotopes has been achieved by appropriate tuning of laser wavelengths

  3. Dual-wavelength distributed Bragg reflector semiconductor laser based on a composite resonant cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a monolithic integrated dual-wavelength laser diode based on a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) composite resonant cavity. The device consists of three sections, a DBR grating section, a passive phase section, and an active gain section. The gain section facet is cleaved to work as a laser cavity mirror. The other laser mirror is the DBR grating, which also functions as a wavelength filter and can control the number of wavelengths involved in the laser action. The reflection bandwidth of the DBR grating is fabricated to have an appropriate value to make the device work at the dual-wavelength lasing state. We adopt the quantum well intermixing (QWI) technique to provide low-absorption loss grating and passive phase section in the fabrication process. By tuning the injection currents on the DBR and the gain sections, the device can generate 0.596 nm-spaced dual-wavelength lasing at room temperature

  4. Investigation of Fano resonances induced by higher order plasmon modes on a circular nano-disk with an elongated cavity

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad Ruhul

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, a planar metallic nanostructure design, which supports two distinct Fano resonances in its extinction cross-section spectrum under normally incident and linearly polarized electromagnetic field, is proposed. The proposed design involves a circular disk embedding an elongated cavity; shifting and rotating the cavity break the symmetry of the structure with respect to the incident field and induce higher order plasmon modes. As a result, Fano resonances are generated in the visible spectrum due to the destructive interference between the sub-radiant higher order modes and super-radiant the dipolar mode. The Fano resonances can be tuned by varying the cavity\\'s width and the rotation angle. An RLC circuit, which is mathematically equivalent to a mass-spring oscillator, is proposed to model the optical response of the nanostructure design.

  5. A resonance shift prediction based on the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle for cylindrical cavities with a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco Santillan, Arturo; Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    An investigation on the resonance frequency shift for a plane-wave mode in a cylindrical cavity produced by a rigid sphere is reported in this paper. This change of the resonance frequency has been previously considered as a cause of oscillational instabilities in singlemode acoustic levitation...

  6. Resonance ionization laser ion sources for on-line isotope separators (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is today considered an essential component of the majority of Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) facilities; there are seven laser ion sources currently operational at ISOL facilities worldwide and several more are under development. The ionization mechanism is a highly element selective multi-step resonance photo-absorption process that requires a specifically tailored laser configuration for each chemical element. For some isotopes, isomer selective ionization may even be achieved by exploiting the differences in hyperfine structures of an atomic transition for different nuclear spin states. For many radioactive ion beam experiments, laser resonance ionization is the only means of achieving an acceptable level of beam purity without compromising isotope yield. Furthermore, by performing element selection at the location of the ion source, the propagation of unwanted radioactivity downstream of the target assembly is reduced. Whilst advances in laser technology have improved the performance and reliability of laser ion sources and broadened the range of suitable commercially available laser systems, many recent developments have focused rather on the laser/atom interaction region in the quest for increased selectivity and/or improved spectral resolution. Much of the progress in this area has been achieved by decoupling the laser ionization from competing ionization processes through the use of a laser/atom interaction region that is physically separated from the target chamber. A new application of gas catcher laser ion source technology promises to expand the capabilities of projectile fragmentation facilities through the conversion of otherwise discarded reaction fragments into high-purity low-energy ion beams. A summary of recent RILIS developments and the current status of laser ion sources worldwide is presented

  7. Trace analysis of actinides in the environment using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the resonant ionization of neutral atoms using laser radiation was applied and optimized for ultra-trace analysis of the actinides thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium. The sensitive detection of these actinides is a challange for the monitoring and quantification of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities. Using resonance ionization spectroscopy combined with a newly developed quadrupole-mass-spectrometer, numerous energy levels in the atomic structure of these actinides could be identified. With this knowledge efficient excitation schemes for the mentioned actinides could be identified and characterised. The applied in-source-ionization ensures for a high detection efficiency due to the good overlap of laser radiation with the atomic beam and allows therefore for a low sample consumption which is required for the analysis of radio nuclides. The selective excitation processes in the resonant ionization method supresses unwanted contaminations and was optimized for analytical detection of ultra-trace amounts in environmental samples as well as for determination of isotopic compositions. The efficient in-source-ionization combined with high power pulsed laser radiation allows for detections efficiency up to 1%. For plutonium detection limits in the range of 104-105 atoms could be demonstrated for synthetic samples as well as for first environmental samples. The usage of narrow bandwidth continuous wave lasers in combination with a transversal overlap of the laser radiation and the free propagating atomic beam enable for resolving individual isotopic shifts of the resonant transitions. This results in a high selectivity against dominant neighboring isotopes but with a significant loss in detection efficiency. For the ultra-trace isotope 236U a detection limit down to 10-9 for the isotope ratio N (236U)/N (238U) could be determined.

  8. An improved experimental procedure for multi-step laser resonant ionization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes improved experimental apparatus and techniques used in laser resonant ionization spectroscopy (RIS). With a special designed over difficult-melt substance can be evaporated and atomized by thermal heating-up to 2700 K. In order to reduce the uncertainties induced by the instability of atomic beam density and the instability of laser power, atom beam density and laser power are monitored simultaneously. The number of ionized ions, the laser beam power, and atomic beam densities are recorded simultaneously by the CAMAC multi-scaler acquisition system, using normalization procedure more accurate data can be obtained by off-line analysis. (authors)

  9. [Identification of high-lying odd energy levels of uranium by resonant ionization mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H; Shi, G; Huang, M; Jin, C

    2000-06-01

    Single-colour and two-colour multiphoton resonant ionization spectra of uranium atom were studied extensively with a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser atomic beam apparatus time-of-flight mass spectrometer in our laboratory. The energy locations of high-lying odd-parity levels in the region 33,003-34,264 cm-1, measured by a two-colour three-step ionization technique, were reported here. The angular momentum quantum number J was uniquely assigned for these levels by using angular momentum selection rules. PMID:12958925

  10. [Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-ming; Zhu, Feng-rong; Zhang, Zi-bin; Ren, Xiang-jun; Deng, Hu; Zhai, Li-hua; Zhang, Li-xing

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the investigation of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atoms by three-step three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS). Twenty-seven odd-parity highly excited levels, whose transition probability is high, were used in this research. One hundred and forty-one autoionization states were found by these channels with the third-step laser scanning in the wavelength range of 634-670 nm. The ionization probabilities of different channels, which had higher cross sections, were compared. On the basis of this, eight optimal photoionization schemes of cerium atom have been given. PMID:15828309

  11. Critical fields and anomalous loss mechanisms in superconducting cavity resonators made of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To increase the accelerating gradients and the quality factors of superconducting niobium cavities, this work aims at understanding and avoiding the limiting anomalous loss mechanisms. Special interest is applied to the non-resonant electron loading (field emission) and to the field dependent residual surface resistance. To study these effects, new types of high resolution X-ray- and temperature-mapping systems are developed. The experimental observations are interpreted on the basis of analytical approximations and numerical simulation calculations. In addition to the avoidance of anomalous losses, it is shown by model calculations and then confirmed experimentally that a high thermal conductivity of the cavity wall shifts the thermal breakdown of superconductivity at local surface defects to higher field strengths. To make use of this effect, solid state gettering techniques that lower the oxygen content of the niobium by evaporating a thin titanium layer onto the niobium surface at 1350 C are developed. In addition, this postpurification technique is shown to be necessary to prevent oxygen pickup from the residual gas of the vacuum furnace at temperatures above 1200 C. The experimental findings, obtained in test series on nineteen cavities with different chemical purity, are used to optimize the techniques to clean, handle, mount, and operate niobium cavities. This results in promising acceleration gradients of Eacc = 27, 22, 20, and 10 MV/m in the best 3-GHz-cavities with one, five, nine, and twenty cells, respectively. The quality factor at 1.4 K is always close to 1010. The advantages and disadvantages of the different surface preparation techniques are reported. (orig./MM)

  12. A pulsated weak-resonant-cavity laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking for injection-locked RZ transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Liao, Yu-Sheng; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Liao, Zhi-Wang; Wang, Hai-Lin; Lin, Gong-Cheng

    2012-06-18

    By spectrally slicing a single longitudinal-mode from a master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode with transient wavelength scanning and tracking functions, the broadened self-injection-locking of a slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is demonstrated to achieve bi-directional transmission in a 200-GHz array-waveguide-grating channelized dense-wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical network system. Both the down- and up-stream slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are non-return-to-zero modulated below threshold and coherently injection-locked to deliver the pulsed carrier for 25-km bi-directional 2.5 Gbits/s return-to-zero transmission. The master weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode is gain-switched at near threshold condition and delivers an optical coherent pulse-train with its mode linewidth broadened from 0.2 to 0.8 nm by transient wavelength scanning, which facilitates the broadband injection-locking of the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes with a threshold current reducing by 10 mA. Such a transient wavelength scanning induced spectral broadening greatly releases the limitation on wavelength injection-locking range required for the slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode. The theoretical modeling and numerical simulation on the wavelength scanning and tracking effects of the master and slave weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diodes are performed. The receiving power sensitivity for back-to-back transmission at bit-error-rate transmission is less than 2 dB for all 16 channels. PMID:22714427

  13. Design of Transparent Anodes for Resonant Cavity Enhanced Light Harvesting in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sergeant, Nicholas P.

    2012-01-03

    The use of an ITO-free MoO 3/Ag/MoO 3 anode to control the photon harvesting in PCDTBT:PC 70BM solar cells is proposed. At first sight, the fact that these anodes possess reduced far-field transmission compared to ITO may seem to be a disadvantage. But, despite this, we show that by carefully tuning the resonant optical cavity we can enhance the external quantum efficiency close to the band edge of PCDTBT, resulting in high photocurrent and power conversion efficiency on par with ITO. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karhu, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-01-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, $\

  15. Back-action evasion and squeezing of a mechanical resonator using a cavity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the quantum measurement of a cantilever using a parametrically coupled electromagnetic cavity which is driven at the two sidebands corresponding to the mechanical motion. This scheme, originally due to Braginsky et al (Braginsky V, Vorontsov Y I and Thorne K P 1980 Science 209 547), allows a back-action free measurement of one quadrature of the cantilever's motion, and hence the possibility of generating a squeezed state. We present a complete quantum theory of this system, and derive simple conditions on when the quantum limit on the added noise can be surpassed. We also study the conditional dynamics of the measurement, and discuss how such a scheme (when coupled with feedback) can be used to generate and detect squeezed states of the oscillator. Our results are relevant to experiments in optomechanics, and to experiments in quantum electromechanics employing stripline resonators coupled to mechanical resonators.

  16. Resonant cavity enhanced photodetectors for high-speed and polarization-sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, Bora M.

    1998-08-01

    The performance of today's optical components utilized in communication systems have reached the conventional limitations and require innovations in device structures for further improvements. We employ the unique properties of the resonant cavity enhanced (RCE) photodetection scheme to increase the functionality and performance of semiconductor photodiodes. The operation principle of RCE photodetection is based on a new family of opto-electronic devices whose performance is enhanced by placing the active device structure inside a Fabry-Perot resonant microcavity. The RCE devices benefit from the wavelength sensitivity and the large increase of the resonant optical field introduced by the cavity. The increased optical field allows photodetectors to be made thinner and therefore faster, while simultaneously increasing the quantum efficiency at the resonant wavelengths. The research effort implemented all aspects of the device development including simulation, design, fabrication and characterization of photodiodes for high-speed and polarization-sensing applications. We studied the performance of RCE photodiodes through simulations and experimentally demonstrated their high- speed operation. Our simulation results predict a three- fold increase in the bandwidth-efficiency product (BWE) for RCE photodiodes. We designed, fabricated and characterized RCE Schottky photodiodes where the semi- transparent metal contact also functions as the top reflector. The RCE Schottky photodiode design for 900 nm wavelength operation exhibited a 10 ps temporal pulse width, corresponding to an estimated device bandwidth of 100 GHz. A peak quantum efficiency of 20% was measured and the theoretical expected value is 70%. A similar RCE Schottky photodiode structure designed for 840 nm operation exhibited a quantum efficiency of 50%. High- speed characterization of these devices revealed an estimated 50 GHz bandwidth, corresponding to a BWE product of 25 GHz. To the best of our knowledge

  17. Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Mass Spectrometry (REMPI-MS): Applications for Process Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibel, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    Process analysis is an emerging discipline in analytical sciences that poses special requirements on analytical techniques, especially when conducted in an online manner. Mass spectrometric methods seem exceedingly suitable for this task, particularly if a soft ionization method is applied. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) provides a selective and sensitive means for monitoring (poly)aromatic compounds in process flows. The properties of REMPI and various variations of the ionization process are presented. The potential of REMPI for process analysis is highlighted with several examples, and drawbacks of the method are also noted. Applications of REMPI-TOFMS for the detection and monitoring of aromatic species in a large variety of combustion processes comprising flames, vehicle exhaust, and incinerators are discussed. New trends in technical development and combination with other analytical methods are brought forward.

  18. Use of a radio-frequency resonance circuit in studies of alkali ionization in flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The context of the investigations are outlined with a short review about recent flame studies at Utrecht University and a discussion about discrepancies and agreements in the literature concerning alkali ionization in flames. The measuring technique chosen is described and the general design of the radio-frequency resonance system presented. The optical track measurements and the theoretical calculations of flame rise velocity are dealt with. The collisional ionization rate constants for Na, K and Cs are determined. The collisional-ionization rate constant for lithium is treated separately by reason of the hydroxide formation. Finally a theoretical model for the conducting flame in a weak, alternating electric field is developed. The relation betaeen the admittance and the flame conductivity in first order approximations is derived. (Auth.)

  19. Surface characterization with ion-induced desorption and multiphoton resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that high-molecular-weight, thermally labile molecules can be desorbed intact using keV ion beams. This knowledge has led to numerous applications of fast atom bombardment and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) by mass spectrometric detection of the desorbed ions. These measurements can be enhanced significantly by using resonance-enhanced laser ionization to softly ionize the neutral component of the desorbed flux. This experimental configuration can produce sensitivity improvements of several orders of magnitude over SIMS while adding a certain degree of selectivity to the ionization process itself. Examples of this performance will be presented using a wide variety of molecules, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organic polymers, molecular salts and biologically important molecules. Results from model systems to complex samples are discussed, along with their implications for submicron molecular imaging using this technique. (author)

  20. State selective detection of sputtered Al neutrals by resonant laser ionization SNMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, S. [Nippon Steel Corporation, Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, 20-1 Shintomi, Futtsu, Chiba 293-8511 (Japan)], E-mail: hayashi.shunichi@nsc.co.jp; Kubota, N. [Nippon Steel Corporation, Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, 20-1 Shintomi, Futtsu, Chiba 293-8511 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    It is important to optimize the resonance ionization efficiency of the sputtered particle by evaluating the internal energy of it. And also the dependence of the change of the internal energy of it on primary ion species and accelerating voltages was investigated. For this study, we developed proto-type resonance laser ionization SNMS instrument, which is a quadrupole SIMS apparatus combined with a wavelength tunable laser. The internal energy of the sputtered aluminum atoms, which has lowly lying excited state (112 cm{sup -1}) on the ground state, was monitored. As the results, the internal energy of the sputtered aluminum atoms was not influenced by the change of the surface work function and primary ion beam energy at all. On the contrary, the density on lowly lying excited state drastically increased due to the existence of the oxygen on aluminum surface.

  1. State selective detection of sputtered Al neutrals by resonant laser ionization SNMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, S.; Kubota, N.

    2008-12-01

    It is important to optimize the resonance ionization efficiency of the sputtered particle by evaluating the internal energy of it. And also the dependence of the change of the internal energy of it on primary ion species and accelerating voltages was investigated. For this study, we developed proto-type resonance laser ionization SNMS instrument, which is a quadrupole SIMS apparatus combined with a wavelength tunable laser. The internal energy of the sputtered aluminum atoms, which has lowly lying excited state (112 cm -1) on the ground state, was monitored. As the results, the internal energy of the sputtered aluminum atoms was not influenced by the change of the surface work function and primary ion beam energy at all. On the contrary, the density on lowly lying excited state drastically increased due to the existence of the oxygen on aluminum surface.

  2. Convoy electron emission following ionization of highly-charged ions excited by resonant coherent excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, S.; Nakano, Y.; Metoki, K.; Shindo, T.; Ohtsuki, S.; Azuma, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Komaki, K.; Nakai, Y.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    2012-11-01

    Projectile ionization of highly-charged Ar and Fe ions in the excited states passing relativistically fast through a thin crystalline foil was experimentally studied. We selectively controlled the population of the excited states of the projectiles, and their alignment by choosing a specific m-state through three-dimensional resonant coherent excitation technique by periodical electric fields in a crystalline. We measured energy-differential spectra of electron emission released from projectiles at zero degree. Under the resonance condition, we found an evident enhancement of the convoy electron yield, which reflects the electron momentum distribution of the initial bound state of the excited ions.

  3. Neutral resonant ionization in a H− plasma source: Potential of doubly excited **H−

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen plasmas are optically dense to Lyman-α radiation, maintaining *H(n = 2) neutral atoms that may undergo neutral resonant ionization to **H−. One state, **H−(2p2 3Pe), is thought bound at 9.7 meV with a several nanosecond lifetime while all others are unbound resonances. Collision dynamics of two *H(2s) shows that an ionic pair of (p, **H−) resolves at least three long-standing collision experiments. The doubly excited anion also has a path to the unexcited ion pair whose only physical distinction is that both (p, H−) have energy of 3.7 eV

  4. Sensitivity of surface resistance measurement of HTS thin films by cavity resonator, dielectric resonator and microstrip line resonator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N D Kataria; Mukul Misra; R Pinto

    2002-05-01

    Microwave surface resistance s of silver-doped YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO) thin film, deposited by laser ablation technique on 10 mm × 10 mm LaAlO3 substrate, has been measured by resonant techniques in the frequency range from 5 GHz to 20 GHz. The geometrical factor of the sample and the resonator has been determined theoretically by the knowledge of the electromagnetic field distribution in the resonators. The microwave surface resistance of the superconducting sample is then extracted from the measured value as a function of temperature. The sensitivity of the s measurement, that is, the relative change in the value with the change in the s value is determined for each resonator.

  5. Resonance Energies, Absorption Oscillator Strengths and Ionization Potentials for the Element Hassium (Z=108)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ji-Guang; DONG Chen-Zhong; DING Xiao-Bin

    2007-01-01

    @@ On the basis of successfully predicting low-lying energy levels for the element fermium (Z = 100), we calculate the resonance energies, absorption oscillator strengths and the first ionization potential of the element hassium (Z = 108) by taking important relativistic and improved electron correlation effects into account using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. These calculations are carried out with the aim of assisting experimental investigations of hassium.

  6. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. (author)

  7. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. 10 references, 4 figures

  8. Two-step resonance ionization spectroscopy of Na atomic beam using cw and pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-step photoionization of sodium atomic beam has been carried out using a cw and a pulsed dye lasers. Sodium ions have been detected by a time of flight method in order to reduce background noise. With a proper power of the pulsed dye laser the sodium atomic beam has been irradiated by a resonant cw dye laser. The density of the sodium atomic beam is estimated to be 103 cm-3 at the ionization area. (author)

  9. Study of isotopic selectivity in laser resonance ionization of lutetium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using numerical simulation method in terms of rate equation approximation, laser-induced isotopic selectivity of the scheme of resonance ionization: 5d6s22D3/2(573.655 nm)→5d6s6p 4F3/2 (642.518 nm)→6s6p24P1/2(643.548 nm)→Autoionization state was studied. The function of isotopic selectivity on laser wavelength was calculated for the parameters matching real experimental conditions by this method. The results calculated were well met with the experimental. The dependences of laser-induced isotopic selectivity on the laser parameters, such as wavelength, bandwidth and intensity, were discussed in view of the interaction of linearly polarized light with lutetium atom. The approaches that isotopic ratio were accurately determined by laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry in the case of certain laser parameters were presented. This theoretical method may be also used to study the isotopic selectivity of other elements and select the scheme of resonance ionization of laser isotope separation

  10. Investigation of ultra-high sensitivity klystron cavity transducers for broadband resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, G. L.; Aguiar, O. D.; Barroso, J. J.; Tobar, M. E.

    2008-07-01

    Since the Stanford pioneering work of Paik in the 1970s, cryogenic resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors have used resonant transducers, which have the effect of increasing both the detector sensitivity and bandwidth. Now nanotechnology is opening new possibilities towards the construction of ultra-high sensitivity klystron cavity transducers. It might be feasible to construct TeraHz/micron parametric transducers in a near future. They would be so sensitive that there would be no need for multimode resonant transducers. The resonant-antenna would act as a broadband detector for gravitational waves. A spherical antenna, such as Schenberg or Mini-Grail, could add to this quality the advantage of wave position and polarity determination. Here we propose an extreme geometry for a re-entrant klystron cavity (df/dg ~ 1018 Hz/m, where f stands for the microwave pump frequency and g for variations in the cavity gap), obtaining a frequency response for the strain sensitivity of the Schenberg gravitational wave detector such that its bandwidth increases from 50 Hz (using the so-called resonant mode coupling) to ~4000 Hz when operating @ 20 mK, and, when compared to LIGO experimental curve, shows a competitive band of about 2000 Hz. We also study some of the technological complications that can be foreseen to design such a resonant cavity.

  11. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for complex thiophenic mixture analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Hourani, Nadim

    2013-10-01

    Rationale Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) are detrimental species for refining processes in petroleum industry. Current mass spectrometric Methods that determine their composition are often preceded by derivatization and dopant addition approaches. Different ionization Methods have different impact on the molecular assignment of complex PASHs. The analysis of such species under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is still considered limited due to uncontrolled ion generation with low- and high-mass PASHs. Methods The ionization behavior of a model mixture of five selected PASH standards was investigated using an APCI source with nitrogen as the reagent gas. A complex thiophenic fraction was separated from a vacuum gas oil (VGO) and injected using the same method. The samples were analyzed using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). RESULTS PASH model analytes were successfully ionized and mainly [M + H]+ ions were produced. The same ionization pattern was observed for the real thiophenic sample. It was found that S1 class species were the major sulfur-containing species found in the VGO sample. These species indicated the presence of alkylated benzothiophenic (BT), dibenzothiophenic (DBT) and benzonaphthothiophenic (BNT) series that were detected by APCI-FTICR MS. CONCLUSIONS This study provides an established APCI-FTICR MS method for the analysis of complex PASHs. PASHs were detected without using any derivatization and without fragmentation. The method can be used for the analysis of S-containing crude oil samples. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Ultratrace elemental and isotopic analysis of osmium and rhenium using resonance ionization mass spectrometry and thermal vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspects of atomization and optical spectroscopy are described for resonance ionization of the elements osmium and rhenium. Picogram sensitivities have been developed with 1-5 % precisions and accuracies in isotopic ratio measurement. (author)

  13. Photo-ionization of aluminum in a hot cavity for the selective production of exotic species project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, D.; Makhathini, L.; Tomaselli, A.; Grassi, D.; Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Vasquez, J.; Calderolla, M.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Andrighetto, A.; Prete, G.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) based accelerator facility that will be built in the Legnaro-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Laboratory (Italy), intended to provide intense neutron-rich radioactive ion beams obtained by proton-induced fission of a uranium carbide (UCx) target. Besides this main target material, silicon carbide (SiC) will be the first to be used to deliver p-rich beams. This target will also validate the functionality of the SPES facility with aluminum beam as result of impinging SiC target with proton beam. In the past, off line studies on laser photoionization of aluminum have been performed in Pavia Spectroscopy Laboratory and in Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro; a XeCl excimer laser was installed in order to test the laser ionization in the SPES hot cavity. With the new Wien filter installed a better characterization of the ionization process in terms of efficiency was performed and results are discussed.

  14. Bulk vertical micromachining of single-crystal sapphire using inductively coupled plasma etching for x-ray resonant cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To provide coherent x-ray sources for probing the dynamic structures of solid or liquid biological substances on the picosecond timescale, a high-aspect-ratio x-ray resonator cavity etched from a single crystal substrate with a nearly vertical sidewall structure is required. Although high-aspect-ratio resonator cavities have been produced in silicon, they suffer from unwanted multiple beam effects. However, this problem can be avoided by using the reduced symmetry of single-crystal sapphire in which x-ray cavities may produce a highly monochromatic transmitted x-ray beam. In this study, we performed nominal 100 µm deep etching and vertical sidewall profiles in single crystal sapphire using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching. The large depth is required to intercept a useful fraction of a stopped-down x-ray beam, as well as for beam clearance. An electroplated Ni hard mask was patterned using KMPR 1050 photoresist and contact lithography. The quality and performance of the x-ray cavity depended upon the uniformity of the cavity gap and therefore verticality of the fabricated vertical sidewall. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such deep, vertical etching of single-crystal sapphire. A gas mixture of Cl2/BCl3/Ar was used to etch the sapphire with process variables including BCl3 flow ratio and bias power. By etching for 540 min under optimal conditions, we obtained an x-ray resonant cavity with a depth of 95 µm, width of ∼30 µm, gap of ∼115 µm and sidewall profile internal angle of 89.5°. The results show that the etching parameters affected the quality of the vertical sidewall, which is essential for good x-ray resonant cavities. (paper)

  15. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of NO via X2П→A2∑ transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianshui Zhang(张连水); Guiyin Zhang(张贵银); Xiaodong Yang(杨晓冬); Yi Li(李裔); Xiaohui Zhao(赵晓辉)

    2003-01-01

    The resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectrum of NO has been obtained in the range of 420-480 nm with a Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric generator and amplifier. The spectral linescan be attributed to NO X2П(v" = 0, 1) → A2∑(v' = 0, 1) transitions. In this wavelength range, NO molecules are ionized via the resonant intermediate state A2∑+ and by a (2 + 2) REMPI process. The dependence of ion signals on laser intensity and gas pressure is discussed. The variation of the ionization signal versus laser intensity is near quartic. This is in good agreement with theory.

  16. Resonant multiphoton ionization of the 1s state of a hydrogen atom in a strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of resonant multiphoton ionization of hydrogen atom in the main state 1s is studied by the method of direct numerical integration of the Schroedinger nonstationary equation for quantum system in the field of an electromagnetic wave. A nonmonotonous dependence of photoionization probability on radiation intensity is found. It is ascertained that multiphoton resonances between the main and one of excited (Rydberg) atomic states induced by laser radiation field correspond to ionization minima. It is shown that ionization suppression occurs as a result of the Rydberg states restructuring in a strong field, being accompanied by effective Raman transitions binding the totality of the close-by Rydberg states

  17. Monte Carlo simulation for correction of cavity ionization chamber wall effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2 graphite cylindrical ionization chambers are used at AIST to measure absolute air-kerma in 60Co and 137Cs gamma ray fields. They differ in size: one having an ionization volume 40 mm in diameter and 50 mm long and the other 20 mm in diameter and 19.3 mm long. They are placed at 45 degrees angle from the direction of gamma ray beams so that gamma ray attenuation does not increase at the end or side walls. Correction factors for wall induced attenuation and scatter were determined by measuring the variation in chamber response as a function of wall thickness in the full build-up region, extrapolating to infer the response at zero wall thickness, and applying a correction factor to account for the center of electron production. These values are not logically valid, however, so we plan to use correction factors obtained by Monte Carlo calculation for primary standards of air kerma for 60Co and 137Cs gamma rays. In January 2001, we brought our ionization chambers to BIPM and measured air kerma in 60Co and 137Cs gamma ray fields for key comparisons, obtaining values for chamber wall correction factors by both measurement and Monte Carlo calculation. Correction factor kwall, corresponding to kat x ksc x kCEP, for points 1 m from gamma ray sources are shown. knu obtained by Monte Carlo calculation is also shown. Experimental values are noted as 1 because the nonuniformity effect has been neglected at AIST before. Table 3 shows kwall x knu. Differences between values obtained by Monte Carlo and experiments are small for both 60Co and 137Cs gamma rays and also for both ionization chambers. We reported to BIPM the values of air-kerma rate on August 22. BIPM replied that, for the first interpretation, our result was 1.0056 for the key comparison of air kerma in 60Co gamma rays with standard uncertainty of the comparison of 0.0023. After sending the previous report, we recalculated correction factors for wall effect and non-uniformity. Differences between new and previous

  18. Cavity ring-up spectroscopy for dissipative and dispersive sensing in a whispering gallery mode resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yong; Kasumie, Sho; Ward, Jonathan M; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-01-01

    In whispering gallery mode resonator sensing applications, the conventional way to detect a change in the parameter to be measured is by observing the steady state transmission spectrum through the coupling waveguide. Alternatively, cavity ring-up spectroscopy (CRUS) sensing can be achieved transiently. In this work, we investigate CRUS using coupled mode equations and find analytical solutions with a large spectral broadening approximation of the input pulse. The relationships between the frequency detuning, coupling gap and ring-up peak height are determined and experimentally verified using an ultrahigh \\textit{Q}-factor silica microsphere. This work shows that distinctive dispersive and dissipative transient sensing can be realised by simply measuring the peak height of the CRUS signal, which might improve the data collection rate.

  19. Blue resonant-cavity light-emitting diode with half milliwatt output power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Pinghui S.; Chang, Chi-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Ting; Lin, Da-Wei; Wu, Chun Chia; He, Jhao Hang; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2016-03-01

    GaN-based resonant-cavity light-emitting diode (RCLED) has a circular output beam with superior directionality than conventional LED and has power scalability by using two-dimensional-array layout. In this work, blue RCLEDs with a top reflector of approximately 50% reflectance were fabricated and characterized. An output power of more than 0.5 mW per diode was achieved before packaging under room-temperature continuous-wave (CW) operation. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the emission spectrum was approximately 3.5 and 4.5 nm for 10- and 20-μm-diameter devices, respectively. And the peak wavelength as well as the FWHM remained stable at various currents and temperatures.

  20. Cavity-aided magnetic-resonance microscopy of atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Purdy, Tom P; Brooks, Daniel W C; Botter, Thierry; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for investigating the microscopic properties and dynamics of physical systems. In this work we demonstrate state-sensitive MRI of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Single-shot spatial resolution is 120 nm, well below the lattice spacing, and number sensitivity is +/-2.4 for 150 atoms on a single site, well below Poissonian atom-number fluctuations. We achieve this by combining high-spatial-resolution control over the atomic spin using an atom chip, together with nearly quantum-limited spin measurement, obtained by dispersively coupling the atoms to light in a high-finesse optical cavity. The MRI is minimally disruptive of the atoms' internal state, preserving the magnetisation of the gas for subsequent experiments. Using this technique, we observe the nonequilibrium transport dynamics of the atoms among individual lattice sites. We see the atom cloud initially expand ballistically, followed by the onset of interaction-inhibited transport.

  1. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, P., E-mail: hahnp@ethz.ch; Dual, J. [Institute of Mechanical Systems (IMES), Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  2. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E.; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment.

  3. Dual-wavelength distributed Bragg reflector semiconductor laser based on a composite resonant cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Cheng; Zhao Ling-Juan; Qiu Ji-Fang; Liu Yang; Wang Wei; Lou Cai-Yun

    2012-01-01

    We report a monolithic integrated dual-wavelength laser diode based on a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) composite resonant cavity.The device consists of three sections,a DBR grating section,a passive phase section,and an active gain section.The gain section facet is cleaved to work as a laser cavity mirror.The other laser mirror is the DBR grating,which also functions as a wavelength filter and can control the number of wavelengths involved in the laser action.The reflection bandwidth of the DBR grating is fabricated to have an appropriate value to make the device work at the dual-wavelength lasing state.We adopt the quantum well intermixing (QWI) technique to provide low-absorption loss grating and passive phase section in the fabrication process.By tuning the injection currents on the DBR and the gain sections,the device can generate 0.596 nm-spaced dual-wavelength lasing at room temperature.

  4. Effects of Energetic Solar Emissions on the Earth-Ionosphere Cavity of Schumann Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sátori, Gabriella; Williams, Earle; Price, Colin; Boldi, Robert; Koloskov, Alexander; Yampolski, Yuri; Guha, Anirban; Barta, Veronika

    2016-03-01

    Schumann resonances (SR) are the electromagnetic oscillations of the spherical cavity bounded by the electrically conductive Earth and the conductive but dissipative lower ionosphere (Schumann in Z Naturforsch A 7:6627-6628, 1952). Energetic emissions from the Sun can exert a varied influence on the various parameters of the Earth's SR: modal frequencies, amplitudes and dissipation parameters. The SR response at multiple receiving stations is considered for two extraordinary solar events from Solar Cycle 23: the Bastille Day event (July 14, 2000) and the Halloween event (October/November 2003). Distinct differences are noted in the ionospheric depths of penetration for X-radiation and solar protons with correspondingly distinct signs of the frequency response. The preferential impact of the protons in the magnetically unshielded polar regions leads to a marked anisotropic frequency response in the two magnetic field components. The general immunity of SR amplitudes to these extreme external perturbations serves to remind us that the amplitude parameter is largely controlled by lightning activity within the Earth-ionosphere cavity.

  5. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible

  6. Effects of Energetic Solar Emissions on the Earth-Ionosphere Cavity of Schumann Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sátori, Gabriella; Williams, Earle; Price, Colin; Boldi, Robert; Koloskov, Alexander; Yampolski, Yuri; Guha, Anirban; Barta, Veronika

    2016-07-01

    Schumann resonances (SR) are the electromagnetic oscillations of the spherical cavity bounded by the electrically conductive Earth and the conductive but dissipative lower ionosphere (Schumann in Z Naturforsch A 7:6627-6628, 1952). Energetic emissions from the Sun can exert a varied influence on the various parameters of the Earth's SR: modal frequencies, amplitudes and dissipation parameters. The SR response at multiple receiving stations is considered for two extraordinary solar events from Solar Cycle 23: the Bastille Day event (July 14, 2000) and the Halloween event (October/November 2003). Distinct differences are noted in the ionospheric depths of penetration for X-radiation and solar protons with correspondingly distinct signs of the frequency response. The preferential impact of the protons in the magnetically unshielded polar regions leads to a marked anisotropic frequency response in the two magnetic field components. The general immunity of SR amplitudes to these extreme external perturbations serves to remind us that the amplitude parameter is largely controlled by lightning activity within the Earth-ionosphere cavity.

  7. Resonance ionization spectroscopy measurement of the vapor pressure of several molecular species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) has found increasing application to various problems involving detection of low levels of atomic, and more recently molecular, species. This work demonstrates the usefulness of RIS in measuring vapor pressure curves of molecular species at very low pressures. Specifically, the vapor pressures versus temperature relationship for rubidium iodide (RbI) and potassium iodide (KI) was measured by applying RIS to atomic Rb and K, using a two-laser system. A pulsed molecular nitrogen laser first dissociated the RbI to produce ground-state Rb atoms in the experimental cell. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser then ionized the Rb in a process wherein two photons of the same wavelength are absorbed, the first exciting Rb via an allowed transition to an upper state (52S/sub 1/2/ → 62/sub 1/2 or 3/2/) lying in energy slightly more than half the distance to the ionization limit, and the second photon ionizing the excited Rb. In the case of KI, an excimer-laser-pumped dye laser was used in a similar way. An applied dc electric field swept the photoelectrons to a proportional counter for subsequent amplification and detection. The photoelectron signal was then related back to RbI and KI concentrations

  8. Study of the ionization of sodium vapor in the presence of resonant laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionization of a diffuse sodium jet, excited by laser radiation (D2 resonance), either continuous or pulsed, is studied by electron spectroscopy. Results show: associative ionization (AI) in the collision of two Na(3p) excited atoms; occupancy of highly excited nl states in energy association collisions of two Na(3p) followed by Penning collisional ionization (CI) in the system Na(nl) + Na(3p); heating of electrons by 1, 2, or 3 superelastic collisions with Na(3p). For both the excitation cases (continuous or pulsed source) analysis of experiment results leads to a description of the whole of the ionized medium, characterized as being low density and the site of the ambipolar diffusion of charged particles. A highly simplified model describes the kinetic and electrokinetic equilibrium (continuous case) in which the different populations of distinct nonthermalized energy (low energy primary electrons, hot electrons) play specific roles. The cross sections associated with AI and CI are estimated from experiment results using the model

  9. Dynamics mechanism of optical-optical double-resonant multiphoton ionization of nitrogen dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiyin Zhang; Yidong Jin

    2007-01-01

    The optical-optical double-resonant multiphoton ionization (OODR-MPI) spectrum of NO2 molecule in the 460-605-nm wavelength region of the probe photon is presented. The mechanism of the OODR-MPI of NO2 molecule is analyzed. The results show that the resonant features can be assigned to the transitions from the first 3sσg Rydberg intermediate resonant state to the final npσu Rydberg series. The ionization pathway is NO2 (X2A1) 3hv1→ 3sσghv2→npσu hv2 or autoionization→NO2+ + e. It is found that the converging potential of the npσu Rydberg series and the quantum defect of np orbit about NO2 are (78803 ± 14) cm-1 and 0.652 ± 0.014, respectively. The bending vibration frequency of 5pσu state is determined also.

  10. Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry as a sensitive analytical method for actinides and technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been investigated as a method for the determination of trace amounts of actinides and technetium. A high sensitivity and selectivity have been achieved by three-step photoionization of the elements in the atomic state followed by time-of-flight measurement for mass analysis. The system for photoionization consists of three dye lasers which are pumped simultaneously by a copper vapour laser of 30 W average power at a pulse repetition rate of 6.5 KHz. The time-of-flight spectrometer has a mass resolution better than 2500. By ionization via autoionization states and by saturation in each excitation step a detection limit of less than 108 atoms of actinides or of technetium in the sample can be reached. (author)

  11. Selective isotope determination of lanthanum by diode-laser-initiated resonance-ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diode-laser step has been incorporated into a resonance-ionization mass spectrometry optical excitation process to enhance the isotopic selectivity of the technique. Lanthanum isotope ratio enhancements as high as 103 were achieved by use of a single-frequency cw diode laser tuned to excite the first step of a three-step excitation--ionization optical process; the subsequent steps were excited by use of a pulsed dye laser. Applying the same optical technique, we measured atomic hyperfine constants for the high-lying even-parity 4D5/2 state of lanthanum at 30 354 cm--1. The general utility of this spectral approach is discussed

  12. Ultrasensitive detection of actinides and technetium by laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry for the detection of extremely small numbers of atoms has been explored in the very recent years. High sensitivity and unambiguity in element and isotope identification can be achieved by three-step photoionization of the elements in the atomic state followed by time-of-flight mass analysis. The laser system for photoionization consists of three dye lasers which are pumped simultaneously by a copper vapor laser. For mass determination a time-of-flight spectrometer with a mass resolution better than 1500 is used. By ionization via autoionizing states and by saturation in each excitation step a detection limit of about 107 atoms of actinides or of technetium in the sample has been obtained

  13. A high repetition rate solid state laser system for resonance ionization mass spectrometry of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new, high repetition rate solid state laser system consisting of three Titanium-Sapphire (Ti:Sa) lasers pumped by one Nd:YAG laser has been set up for resonance ionization mass spectrometry for routine trace analysis of actinides. Each Ti:Sa laser produces up to 4 W of laser light with a bandwidth of 2-6 GHz continuously tuneable in a range from 725 to 900 nm. Using a three step ionization scheme with λ1=420.76 nm, λ2=847.28 nm and λ3239Pu, the overall detection efficiency of the setup has been measured to be ε=8.0x10-6. Thus a detection limit of 1x107 atoms of 239Pu is derived and opens up the way to use a reliable and easy to handle laser system for routine applications of RIMS

  14. Spectroscopic studies on technetium and silicon. A solid-state laser system for the resonance-ionization spectroscopy; Spektroskopische Untersuchungen an Technetium und Silizium. Ein Festkoerperlasersystem fuer die Resonanzionisationsspektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattolat, Christoph

    2010-11-15

    This doctoral thesis describes advancement and refinement of the titanium:sapphire laser system of the working group LARISSA, Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg- Universitaet Mainz and its application to resonance ionization spectroscopy. Activities on the laser systems comprised three major tasks: The output power of the conventional titanium:sapphire lasers could be increased by a factor of two in order to match the needs at resonance ionization laser ion source at ISOL facilities. Additionally, the laser system was complemented by a titanium:sapphire laser in Littrow geometry, which ensures a mode-hop free tuning range from 700 nm to 950 nm, and by an injection seeded titanium:sapphire laser with a spectral width of 20 MHz (in respect to a spectral width of 3 GHz for the conventional lasers). The performance of the new laser system was tested in spectroscopic investigations of highly excited atomic levels of gold and technetium. From the measured level positions the ionization potential of gold could be verified by using the Rydberg-Ritz formula, while the ionization potential of technetium could be determined precisely for the first time. Using the seeded titanium: sapphire laser Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy inside a hot ionizer cavity was demonstrated. A width of the recorded resonances of 90 MHz was achieved and the hyperfine structure and isotope shift of stable silicon isotopes was well resolved with this method. (orig.)

  15. Efficient intracavity frequency doubling of an Yb-doped fiber laser using an internal resonant enhancement cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Cieslak, R.; Sahu, J.K.; Clarkson, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a simple approach for efficient generation of visible light in high-power continuous-wave fiber lasers via second harmonic generation in an internal resonant cavity. Preliminary results for a cladding-pumped Yb fiber laser are presented.

  16. Methods for calculation of the coupling coefficients in the Coupling Cavity Model of arbitrary chain of resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Ayzatsky, M I

    2016-01-01

    We present the short description of the methods for calculation of the coupling coefficients in the Coupling Cavity Model of arbitrary chain of resonators. In the first part the procedure that is based on the Mode Matching Method is given. Then we present the new method that used only one eigen vector.

  17. Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (rempi) and Double Resonance Uv-Uv and Ir-Uv Spectroscopic Investigation Isocytosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Min, Ahreum; Ahn, Ahreum; Moon, Cheol Joo; Choi, Myong Yong; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki

    2013-06-01

    Isocytosine(iC), 2-aminouracil, is a non-natural nucleobase and its functional group's positions resemble those of guanine; therefore, its spectroscopic investigation is worthy of attention especially for the natural/unnatural base pairs with guanine and isoguanine. In this study, resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and UV/IR-UV double resonance spectra of iC in the gas phase are presented. The collaboration work between Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan and Gyeongsang National University, Korea using laser ablation and thermal evaporation, respectively, for producing jet-cooled iC is presented and discussed. The REMPI spectrum of iC monomers is recorded in the spectral range of 35000 to 36400cm-1, showing very congested π-π* vibronic bands. UV-UV hole burning spectroscopy is further conducted to investigate the conformational landscapes of iC monomers. Moreover, the presence of free OH band from IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations convinces that the iC monomer in free-jet expansion experiment is an enol tautomer. However, a possible presence of a keto tautomer of iC may be provided by employing a pico-second experiment on iC.

  18. Resonant coherent ionization in grazing ion/atom-surface collisions at high velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonant coherent interaction of a fast ion/atom with an oriented crystal surface under grazing incidence conditions is shown to contribute significantly to ionize the probe for high enough velocities and motion along a random direction. The dependence of this process on both the distance to the surface and the velocity of the projectile is studied in detail. We focus on the case of hydrogen moving with a velocity above 2 a.u. Comparison with other mechanisms of charge transfer, such as capture from inner shells of the target atoms, permits us to draw some conclusions about the charge state of the outgoing projectiles. (orig.)

  19. A search for new elementary particles using sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputter-Initiated Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy is being used to search for new elementary particles which may exist at very low concentrations in stable matter, perhaps as relics of the Big Bang. Details of developments which have reduced backgrounds in the method to the parts-per-trillion level are discussed in detail. The latest results in the search for heavy fractional- and integer-charged species are reported. Preliminary concentration limits of 2 x 10-11 and 5 x 10-?12, respectively, have been obtained. (author)

  20. Resonant coherent ionization in grazing ion/atom-surface collisions at high velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. (Dept. de Ciencias de la Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial, Facultad de Informatica, Univ. del Pais Vasco, San Sebastian (Spain)); Pitarke, J.M. (Materia Kondentsatuaren Fisika Saila, Zientzi Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Univ., Bilbo (Spain))

    1994-05-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of a fast ion/atom with an oriented crystal surface under grazing incidence conditions is shown to contribute significantly to ionize the probe for high enough velocities and motion along a random direction. The dependence of this process on both the distance to the surface and the velocity of the projectile is studied in detail. We focus on the case of hydrogen moving with a velocity above 2 a.u. Comparison with other mechanisms of charge transfer, such as capture from inner shells of the target atoms, permits us to draw some conclusions about the charge state of the outgoing projectiles. (orig.)

  1. Generation of slow muon beam by laser resonant ionization of muonium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report first results of re-acceleration of thermal muons, which were generated by laser resonant ionization of muonium atoms. The re-accelerated beam (slow muon beam) has better energy resolution and space distribution compared to initial surface muon beam, and its use will extend the scope of muon spin relaxation technique from bulk material to thin film, multi-layers, surfaces and extremely small samples. The yield of slow muons obtained during the first beam time was 0.03 muons/s

  2. Resonantly Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization Spectrum of the Neutral Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore

    OpenAIRE

    greenwood, jason; Miles, Jordan; De Camillis, Simone; Mulholland, Peter; Zhang, Lijuan; Parkes, Michael A.; Hailes, Helen C.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2014-01-01

    The photophysics of the green fluorescent protein is governed by the electronic structure of the chromophore at the heart of its β-barrel protein structure. We present the first two-color, resonance-enhanced, multiphoton ionization spectrum of the isolated neutral chromophore in vacuo with supporting electronic structure calculations. We find the absorption maximum to be 3.65 ± 0.05 eV (340 ± 5 nm), which is blue-shifted by 0.5 eV (55 nm) from the absorption maximum of the protein in its neut...

  3. New electronic states of NH and ND observed by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Russell D., III; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.

    1990-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced MultiPhoton Ionization (REMPI) spectra of NH and ND, which reveal four new electronic states are presented. Transitions from NH a 1 delta to 3s and 3p Rydberg states in both NH and ND have been observed and rotationally analyzed. The transitions were observed in the wavelength range of 258 to 288 nm. The state assignments are: e 1 pi (3s sigma) at 82857/cm, f 1 pi (3p sigma) at 86378/cm, g 1 delta (3p pi) at 88141/cm and h 1 sigma (3p pi) at 89151/cm.

  4. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE011 and TE102 cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE011 and TE102 cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE011 cavity was larger than that in the TE102 cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE011 cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE011 cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE102 cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE011 cavity to decentering problem

  5. Evaluation of resonance ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios in low-level samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) to reliably determine the ratio of 135Cs/137Cs in the presence of large backgrounds has been evaluated. Single-resonance excitation of Cs 6s 2S1/2(F = 4) → 6p 2P3/2(F'= 5) with an extended cavity diode laser was followed by photoionization with the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser. While the principal objective was to avoid isobaric interferences, an optical selectivity of 3 orders of magnitude against stable 133Cs was attained for both 135Cs and 137Cs. The overall RIMS efficiency was found to be ∝ 2 x 10-6 with a combined (laser and mass spectrometer) selectivity of ∝ 1010 for both 135Cs and 137Cs against 133Cs. The performance with respect to efficiency, selectivity, and isobar suppression has been compared to conventional thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Measurements to determine the chronological age of a burn-up sample have been performed using both methods. (orig.)

  6. Analysis of sample composition using resonant ionization and time-of-flight techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the setting up of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer that uses a tunable laser to produce resonant ionization of atoms and molecules in a pulsed supersonic beam. The ability of this kind of systems to produce time resolved signals for each species present in the samples allows quantitative analysis of its composition. By using a tunable laser beam of high spectral resolution to produce ionization, studies based on the structure of the photoionization spectra obtained are possible. In the present work several isotopic species of ordinary and deuterated benzene have been studies. special care has been dedicated to the influence of the presence of a ''13 C in the ring. In this way values for spectroscopic constants and isotopic shifts have been obtained. Another system based in a homemade proportional counter has been designed and used as an auxiliary system. The results obtained with it are independent of these mentioned above and compatible with them. This system is of great utility for laser wavelength tuning to produce ionization in the mass spectrometer

  7. Analysis of sample composition using resonant ionization and time-of-flight techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the setting up of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer that uses a tunable laser to produce resonant ionization of atoms and molecules in a pulsed supersonic beam. The ability of this kind of systems to produce time resolved signals for each species present in the sample allows quantitative analysis of its composition. By using a tunable laser beam of high spectral resolution to produce ionization, studies based on the structure of the photoionization spectra obtained are possible. In the present work several isotopic species of ordinary and deuterated benzene have been studied. Special care has been dedicated to the influence of the presence of a 13C in the ring. In this way values for spectroscopic constants and isotopic shifts have been obtained. Another system based in a homemade proportional counter has been designed and used is an auxiliary system. The results obtained with it are independent of these mentioned above and compatible with them. This system is of great utility for laser wavelength tuning to produce ionization in the mass spectrometer. (Author) 98 refs

  8. Performance evaluation of a resonance ionization mass spectrometer developed for the FFDL system of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prevent a fuel failure event from becoming a serious radiation accident, sodium-cooled fast reactors are equipped with a system for failed fuel detection and location (FFDL). The FFDL instrument employed in the prototype fast breeder reactor Monju is based on the gas tagging method, in which precise and accurate measurements of krypton and xenon isotope ratios (78Kr/80Kr, 82Kr/80Kr and 126Xe/129Xe) must be performed in a short time. Burnup measurements also contribute to accurate determination of 82Kr/80Kr. We have developed a highly sensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer for the isotopic analyses, which uses resonance ionization of Kr and Xe atoms by a pulsed laser at wavelengths of 216.7 and 249.6 nm, respectively. In evaluating the performance of our spectrometer, we find that systematic errors caused by isotope shifts can be reduced to negligible levels, and that statistical errors of 3% at a nuclide concentration of 7 ppt can be achieved with a single measurement time of about 40 minutes for each Kr and Xe isotope ratio. This means that, within one hour, about 200 fuel assemblies can be individually identified with a probability of 99%, verifying the applicability of our spectrometer to the FFDL system of fast reactors. (author)

  9. Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms: Quantitative analysis in the near-surface region of silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, W. F.; Spiegel, D. R.; Marshall, A. H.; Downey, S. W.; Pellin, M. J.

    1997-02-01

    The unambiguous identification and quantification of low levels of metallic impurities on Si wafers are difficult problems due to the rapidly changing chemical activity near the surface. Air-exposed Si surfaces typically possess a native oxide layer several atoms thick plus a top monolayer of various silicon-containing molecules. Resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) used for postionization in secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) is uniquely suited to this task. The high sensitivity of this technique allows detection of metals at parts per billion levels with monolayer sensitivity. The high selectivity of RIS allows unambiguous identification of elements, while the reduced matrix effects of SNMS allow quantification of the photoionized element. Characterization of Si surfaces using RIS/SNMS has been explored by measuring the concentration profiles of Ca in the near-surface region of Si wafers of varying degrees of cleanliness. Calcium detection can be problematic due to the isobaric interference with SiC, particularly in the near-surface region during fabrication of devices due to the use of organic photoresist. Three different resonance ionization schemes for Ca have been examined and compared for effectiveness by calculating detection limits for Ca in Si in the chemically active near-surface region.

  10. Ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer for evaluating krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer that can be applied to evaluate krypton (Kr) contamination in xenon (Xe) dark matter detectors has been developed for measuring Kr at the parts-per-trillion (ppt) or sub-ppt level in Xe. The gas sample is introduced without any condensation into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer through a pulsed supersonic valve. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 212.6 nm, 84Kr atoms in the sample are resonantly ionized along with other Kr isotopes. 84Kr ions are then mass separated and detected by the mass spectrometer in order to measure the Kr impurity concentration. With our current setup, approximately 0.4 ppt of Kr impurities contained in pure argon (Ar) gas are detectable with a measurement time of 1000 s. Although Kr detection sensitivity in Xe is expected to be approximately half of that in Ar, our spectrometer can evaluate Kr contamination in Xe to the sub-ppt level

  11. Suppression of ionization probability due to Rabi oscillations in the resonance two-photon ionization of He by EUV free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-photon resonance ionization probability of atoms in strong extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser (EUV FEL) pulses has been investigated by the model of time-dependent wave packet propagation of a light-coupled multilevel atom. Under the simulation within the model assuming single-mode FEL pulses, the ionization probability Pion has shown characteristic dependences on the scaled coupling parameter Ugi between two levels of the ground (g) and intermediate (i) resonance states, namely, Pion∝(Ugi)n, with n being equal to ∼2, less than 1, and ∼1 for the small, medium, and large Ugi regimes, respectively. This power dependence of the ionization probability has been interpreted due to Rabi oscillations between g and i states. To compare with recent experimental results on the same condition, the multimode nature of self-amplitude spontaneous emission (SASE) FEL pulses has been managed in the simulation. Then, the recent experimental laser-power dependence of the two-photon resonance ionization of He [Sato et al., J. Phys. B 44, 161001 (2011)] has been well described by that for the large Ugi regime of the simulation, i.e., n∼ 1. Thus, the observed linear laser-power dependence has been rationalized as being caused by the strong Rabi oscillations between the (2p)-(1s) states.

  12. Laser induced avalanche ionization in gases or gas mixtures with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization or femtosecond laser pulse pre-ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses the requirements for avalanche ionization in gas or gas mixtures initiated by REMPI or femtosecond-laser pre-ionization. Numerical examples of dependencies on partial composition for Ar:Xe gas mixture with REMPI of argon and subsequent classic avalanche ionization of Xe are presented.

  13. Efficient second-harmonic generation of continuous-wave Yb fiber lasers coupled with an external resonant cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. W.; Jeong, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, S. B.

    2012-09-01

    Efficient second-harmonic generation of continuous-wave Yb fiber lasers is reported. A simple bow-tie external resonant cavity incorporating a type I LBO nonlinear optical crystal was employed for second harmonic frequency conversion of a multi-longitudinal-mode Yb fiber laser. It is shown that strong coupling was formed between the Yb fiber laser and the external cavity and, as a result, the laser produced 9.1 W of green output at 535 nm for 43 W of absorbed diode pump power at 975 nm corresponding to an optical conversion efficiency of 21 % with respect to absorbed diode pump power. The prospects for further improvement are discussed.

  14. Calculation of the resonance frequency change for a cavity charged by a plasma with or without a static magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the mere case of a cold plasma with or without static magnetic field, are given two methods of calculation of resonance frequency shift and absorption in a cylindrical cavity crossed by a plasma column: 1. A perturbation method, already known and used for electronic density measurements is restated and its application is used for several high frequency cavity modes. 2. An exact method employing Maxwell's equations, which however necessitates a computer, is compared with the first one; it permits a determination of the validity limits of the perturbation method and to draw conclusions,

  15. Molecular photoelectron angular distribution rotations in multi-photon resonant ionization of H2+ by circularly polarized ultraviolet laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study effects of pulse durations on molecular photoelectron angular distributions (MPADs) in ultrafast circular polarization ultraviolet resonant ionization processes. Simulations performed on aligned H2+ by numerically solving time dependent Schrödinger equations show rotations of MPADs with respect to the molecular symmetry axes. It is found that in multi-photon resonant ionization processes, rotation angles are sensitive to pulse durations, which we attribute to the coherent resonant excitation between the ground state and the intermediate excited electronic state induced by Rabi oscillations. Multi-photon nonresonant and single photon ionization processes are simulated and compared which exhibit a constant rotation angle. An asymmetry parameter is introduced to describe the pulse duration sensitivity by perturbation theory models. Influence of pulse frequency detunings on MPADs is also investigated where oscillations of rotations are absent at long pulse durations due to nonresonance excitation

  16. Improving the selectivity of the ISOLDE resonance ionization laser ion source and in-source laser spectroscopy of polonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exotic atomic nuclei far away from stability are fascinating objects to be studied in many scientific fields such as atomic-, nuclear-, and astrophysics. Since these are often short-lived isotopes, it is necessary to couple their production with immediate extraction and delivery to an experiment. This is the purpose of the on-line isotope separator facility, ISOLDE, at CERN. An essential aspect of this laboratory is the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) because it provides a fast and highly selective means of ionizing the reaction products. This technique is also a sensitive laser-spectroscopy tool for the development and improvement of electron excitation schemes for the resonant laser photoionization and the study of the nuclear structure or fundamental atomic physics. Each of these aspects of the RILIS applications are subjects of this thesis work: a new device for the suppression of unwanted surface ionized contaminants in RILIS ion beams, known as the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST), was implemented into the ISOLDE framework, further developed and characterized; a new electron-excitation scheme for the laser ionization of calcium was developed; the ionization energy of polonium was determined by high-precision Rydberg spectroscopy; and finally, the first ever on-line physics operation of the highly selective LIST enabled the study of nuclear structure properties of 217Po by in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy.

  17. Xe-Kr laser induced collisional ionization system and experimental preparation of its initial state: Four-photon resonant excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hong-Ying; Lu Zhen-Zhong; Fan Rong-Wei; Chen De-Ying

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel one-colour Xe-Kr laser induced collisional ionization system. Considering the level scheme of the system, it finds that the initial state of the reaction-the four 4f levels with even J of Xe-can be prepared through method of four-photon resonant excitation by dye laser with wavelength of ~440 nm. Absorption of an additional photon (the transfer laser) of the same wavelength will complete the laser induced collisional ionization process. The resonance enhanced ionization spectrum of Xe by four laser photons at ~ 440 nm is measured through time-of-flight mass spectrometry, this aims at the preparation of the initial state of the system proposed. The Stark broadening of the measured spectrum is observed and consistent with the previous study. Analysis of the measured resonance ionization spectrum implies the feasibility of ~ 440 nm four-photon resonant excitation of the initial 4f state of the Xe-Kr system proposed in this paper, which prepares for a further experiment of laser induced collisional ionization.

  18. Xe–Kr laser induced collisional ionization system and experimental preparation of its initial state: Four-photon resonant excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a novel one-colour Xe–Kr laser induced collisional ionization system. Considering the level scheme of the system, it finds that the initial state of the reaction–the four 4f levels with even J of Xe–can be prepared through method of four-photon resonant excitation by dye laser with wavelength of ∼440 nm. Absorption of an additional photon (the transfer laser) of the same wavelength will complete the laser induced collisional ionization process. The resonance enhanced ionization spectrum of Xe by four laser photons at ∼440 nm is measured through time-of-flight mass spectrometry, this aims at the preparation of the initial state of the system proposed. The Stark broadening of the measured spectrum is observed and consistent with the previous study. Analysis of the measured resonance ionization spectrum implies the feasibility of ∼440 nm four-photon resonant excitation of the initial 4f state of the Xe–Kr system proposed in this paper, which prepares for a further experiment of laser induced collisional ionization. (atomic and molecular physics)

  19. Three-step resonant photoionization spectroscopy of Ni and Ge: ionization potential and odd-parity Rydberg levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, T.; Brück, K.; Baktash, C.; Beene, J. R.; Geppert, Ch; Havener, C. C.; Krause, H. F.; Liu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.; Stracener, D. W.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2007-12-01

    In preparation of a laser ion source, we have investigated multi-step laser ionization via Rydberg and autoionizing states for atomic Ni and Ge using a mass separator with an ion beam energy of 20 keV. For both elements resonant three-step excitation schemes suitable for modern Ti:sapphire laser systems were developed. Rydberg series in the range of principal quantum numbers 20 Ionization potentials (IP) were extracted from fits of the individual series and quantum defects of individual levels were analysed for confirmation of series assignment. For Ni the ionization potential could be extracted with significantly increased precision compared to literature with a value of EIP (Ni) = 61 619.77(14) cm-1. Also, at least one notable autoionizing state above the first IP was discovered for both elements, and the different ionization schemes via Rydberg or autoionizing states were compared with respect to line shape, ionization efficiency and selectivity.

  20. A Novel Micro- and Nano-Scale Positioning Sensor Based on Radio Frequency Resonant Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estibaliz Asua

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In many micro- and nano-scale technological applications high sensitivity displacement sensors are needed, especially in ultraprecision metrology and manufacturing. In this work a new way of sensing displacement based on radio frequency resonant cavities is presented and experimentally demonstrated using a first laboratory prototype. The principle of operation of the new transducer is summarized and tested. Furthermore, an electronic interface that can be used together with the displacement transducer is designed and proved. It has been experimentally demonstrated that very high and linear sensitivity characteristic curves, in the range of some kHz/nm; are easily obtainable using this kind of transducer when it is combined with a laboratory network analyzer. In order to replace a network analyzer and provide a more affordable, self-contained, compact solution, an electronic interface has been designed, preserving as much as possible the excellent performance of the transducer, and turning it into a true standalone positioning sensor. The results obtained using the transducer together with a first prototype of the electronic interface built with cheap discrete elements show that positioning accuracies in the micrometer range are obtainable using this cost-effective solution. Better accuracies would also be attainable but using more involved and costly electronics interfaces.

  1. Fano-resonance induced strong-coupling of a hyperbolic cavity to a quantum emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Hasan, Mehedi; Belov, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Light-matter interaction is studied for an open quantum system in the strong-coupling regime. A quantum dot and a hyperbolic cavity of spherical geometry is shown to couple light with large Rabi frequency and the role of Fano resonance is shown in the coupling mechanism. High Purcell factor and large Lamb shift are outlined. In the near-field spectrum, two distinct anti-crossings are evident, namely -- the one near the epsilon near zero (ENZ) frequency (from the effective medium description) which is detectable in the far-field, and the second anti-crossing is a pseudomode that does not appear in the far-field spectrum. This delineates the phenomenon `farfield propagating large Purcell factor'. Finally, we remark the fidelity of the strong-coupling, i.e. how prone the strong-coupling with respect to the loss mechanisms. This study on strong-coupling will have applications for spectroscopy, control over chemical reaction rate, microcavity, and in quantum information technology.

  2. AZO/Ag/AZO anode for resonant cavity red, blue, and yellow organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentle, A. R.; Yambem, S. D.; Burn, P. L.; Meredith, P.; Smith, G. B.

    2016-06-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is the transparent electrode of choice for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Replacing ITO for cost and performance reasons is a major drive across optoelectronics. In this work, we show that changing the transparent electrode on red, blue, and yellow OLEDs from ITO to a multilayer buffered aluminium zinc oxide/silver/aluminium zinc oxide (AZO/Ag/AZO) substantially enhances total output intensity, with better control of colour, its constancy, and intensity over the full exit hemisphere. The thin Ag containing layer induces a resonant cavity optical response of the complete device. This is tuned to the emission spectra of the emissive material while minimizing internally trapped light. A complete set of spectral intensity data is presented across the full exit hemisphere for each electrode type and each OLED colour. Emission zone modelling of output spectra at a wide range of exit angles to the normal was in excellent agreement with the experimental data and hence could, in principle, be used to check and adjust production settings. These multilayer transparent electrodes show significant potential for both eliminating indium from OLEDs and spectrally shaping the emission.

  3. Controllable optical response by modifying the gain and loss of a mechanical resonator and cavity mode in an optomechanical system

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yu-Long; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco; Liu, Yu-xi

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study a strongly-driven optomechanical system which consists of a passive optical cavity and an active mechanical resonator. When the optomechanical coupling strength is varied, phase transitions, which are similar those observed in $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric systems, are observed. We show that the optical transmission can be controlled by changing the gain of the mechanical resonator and loss of the optical cavity mode. Especially, we find that: (i) for balanced gain and loss, optical amplification and absorption can be tuned by changing the optomechanical coupling strength through a control field; (ii) for unbalanced gain and loss, even with a tiny mechanical gain, both optomechanically-induced transparency and anomalous dispersion can be observed around a critical point, which exhibits an ultra-long group delay. The time delay $\\tau$ can be optimized by regulating the optomechanical coupling strength through the control field and improved up to several orders of magnitude ($\\tau\\sim2$ $\\math...

  4. Fano Resonance Based on Metal-Insulator-Metal Waveguide-Coupled Double Rectangular Cavities for Plasmonic Nanosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhidong; Luo, Liang; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong; Yan, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    A refractive index sensor based on metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguides coupled double rectangular cavities is proposed and investigated numerically using the finite element method (FEM). The transmission properties and refractive index sensitivity of various configurations of the sensor are systematically investigated. An asymmetric Fano resonance lineshape is observed in the transmission spectra of the sensor, which is induced by the interference between a broad resonance mode in one rectangular and a narrow one in the other. The effect of various structural parameters on the Fano resonance and the refractive index sensitivity of the system based on Fano resonance is investigated. The proposed plasmonic refractive index sensor shows a maximum sensitivity of 596 nm/RIU. PMID:27164101

  5. Fano Resonance Based on Metal-Insulator-Metal Waveguide-Coupled Double Rectangular Cavities for Plasmonic Nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhidong; Luo, Liang; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong; Yan, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    A refractive index sensor based on metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguides coupled double rectangular cavities is proposed and investigated numerically using the finite element method (FEM). The transmission properties and refractive index sensitivity of various configurations of the sensor are systematically investigated. An asymmetric Fano resonance lineshape is observed in the transmission spectra of the sensor, which is induced by the interference between a broad resonance mode in one rectangular and a narrow one in the other. The effect of various structural parameters on the Fano resonance and the refractive index sensitivity of the system based on Fano resonance is investigated. The proposed plasmonic refractive index sensor shows a maximum sensitivity of 596 nm/RIU. PMID:27164101

  6. Fano Resonance Based on Metal-Insulator-Metal Waveguide-Coupled Double Rectangular Cavities for Plasmonic Nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhidong Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A refractive index sensor based on metal-insulator-metal (MIM waveguides coupled double rectangular cavities is proposed and investigated numerically using the finite element method (FEM. The transmission properties and refractive index sensitivity of various configurations of the sensor are systematically investigated. An asymmetric Fano resonance lineshape is observed in the transmission spectra of the sensor, which is induced by the interference between a broad resonance mode in one rectangular and a narrow one in the other. The effect of various structural parameters on the Fano resonance and the refractive index sensitivity of the system based on Fano resonance is investigated. The proposed plasmonic refractive index sensor shows a maximum sensitivity of 596 nm/RIU.

  7. DESIGN OF SQUARE SUBSTRATE INTEGRATED WAVEGUIDE CAVITY RESONATORS: COMPENSATION OF MODELLING ERRORS BY SUPPORT VECTOR REGRESSION MACHINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Angiulli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW resonators is usually a cumbersome process, especially due to the length “trial and error” procedure involved in this task. In this study Support Vector Regression Machines (SVRMs are employed to compensate the modeling errors associated to the design of SIW rectangular cavity resonators. To validate the proposed approach, we have compared the design outputs provided by our method with the results provided by commercial full wave software. The comparison between our predictions and the full wave simulations validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  8. Roles of resonances and recollisions in strong-field atomic phenomena: Above-threshold ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of a set of quantal and classical calculations designed for simulating the photoelectron spectra observed when atoms are submitted to an intense laser field. We have concentrated the discussion on the range of parameters where conspicuous enhancements are observed in the high-energy part of the above-threshold ionization (ATI) spectra. Our results confirm that these enhancements result from a resonant transfer of population into the Rydberg states. Subsequent multiple returns, with elastic or inelastic recollisions of the electrons with the nucleus, when they are released in the continuum, also play an essential part. Our analysis highlights also the similarities as well as the differences observed in simulations, depending on the choice of the model potential, i.e., if it is either long range (Coulomb-like) or short range (with an exponentially decreasing tail)

  9. Flame temperature measurements by radar resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of molecular oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang, Zhili; Adams, Steven F

    2012-10-01

    Here we report nonintrusive local rotational temperature measurements of molecular oxygen, based on coherent microwave scattering (radar) from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in room air and hydrogen/air flames. Analyses of the rotational line strengths of the two-photon molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition have been used to determine the hyperfine rotational state distribution of the ground X(3)Σ(v'=0) state. Rotationally resolved 2+1 REMPI spectra of the molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition at different temperatures were obtained experimentally by radar REMPI. Rotational temperatures have been determined from the resulting Boltzmann plots. The measurements in general had an accuracy of ~±60 K in the hydrogen/air flames at various equivalence ratios. Discussions about the decreased accuracy for the temperature measurement at elevated temperatures have been presented. PMID:23033104

  10. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  11. Combining desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance for differential metabolomics without sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanwen; Pan, Zhengzheng; Talaty, Nari; Raftery, Daniel; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are used to provide data on urine examined without sample preparation to allow differentiation between diseased (lung cancer) and healthy mice. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to shortlist compounds with potential for biomarker screening which are responsible for significant differences between control urine samples and samples from diseased animals. Similar PCA score plots have been achieved by DESI-MS and NMR, using a subset of common detected metabolites. The common compounds detected by DESI and NMR have the same changes in sign of their concentrations thereby indicating the usefulness of corroborative analytical methods. The effects of different solvents and surfaces on the DESI mass spectra are also evaluated and optimized. Over 80 different metabolites were successfully identified by DESI-MS and tandem mass spectrometry experiments, with no prior sample preparation. PMID:16628593

  12. Cosmological constraints in the presence of ionizing and resonance radiation at recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the recent measurement of full sky cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization from WMAP, key cosmological degeneracies have been broken, allowing tighter constraints to be placed on cosmological parameters inferred assuming a standard recombination scenario. Here we consider the effect on cosmological constraints if additional ionizing and resonance radiation sources are present at recombination. We find that the new CMB data significantly improve the constraints on the additional radiation sources, with log10[εα]10[εi]s are weakened to ns=0.98±0.03, with the ns=1 case now well inside the 95% c.l. The relaxation of constraints on tensor modes, scale invariance, dark energy and neutrino masses are also discussed

  13. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–Hen vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm−1). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Aln photoion with n larger than two

  14. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Young, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  15. Ultra slow muon microscopy by laser resonant ionization at J-PARC, MUSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the principal muon beam line at the J-PARC muon facility (MUSE), we are now constructing a Muon beam line (U-Line), which consists of a large acceptance solenoid made of mineral insulation cables (MIC), a superconducting curved transport solenoid and superconducting axial focusing magnets. There, we can extract 2 × 108/s surface muons towards a hot tungsten target. At the U-Line, we are now establishing a new type of muon microscopy; a new technique with use of the intense ultra-slow muon source generated by resonant ionization of thermal Muonium (designated as Mu; consisting of a μ +  and an e − ) atoms generated from the surface of the tungsten target. In this contribution, the latest status of the Ultra Slow Muon Microscopy project, fully funded, is reported.

  16. Ultra slow muon microscopy by laser resonant ionization at J-PARC, MUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Y., E-mail: yasuhiro.miyake@kek.jp; Ikedo, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Nishiyama, K.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Makimura, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nagatomo, T.; Kadono, R. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Muon Science Laboratory (Japan); Torikai, E. [Yamanashi University, Faculty of Engineering (Japan); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Advanced Meson Science Laboratory (Japan); Wada, S.; Saito, N. [RIKEN, Advanced Science Institute (Japan); Okamura, K. [RIKEN-WAKO Incubation Plaza 301, Megaopto Co., Ltd. (Japan); Yokoyama, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Advanced Meson Science Laboratory (Japan); Ito, T.; Higemoto, W. [J-PARC Center, Muon Section, Materials and Life Science Division (Japan)

    2013-04-15

    As one of the principal muon beam line at the J-PARC muon facility (MUSE), we are now constructing a Muon beam line (U-Line), which consists of a large acceptance solenoid made of mineral insulation cables (MIC), a superconducting curved transport solenoid and superconducting axial focusing magnets. There, we can extract 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}/s surface muons towards a hot tungsten target. At the U-Line, we are now establishing a new type of muon microscopy; a new technique with use of the intense ultra-slow muon source generated by resonant ionization of thermal Muonium (designated as Mu; consisting of a {mu}{sup + } and an e{sup - }) atoms generated from the surface of the tungsten target. In this contribution, the latest status of the Ultra Slow Muon Microscopy project, fully funded, is reported.

  17. Ultra slow muon microscopy by laser resonant ionization at J-PARC, MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Y.; Ikedo, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Nishiyama, K.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Makimura, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nagatomo, T.; Kadono, R.; Torikai, E.; Iwasaki, M.; Wada, S.; Saito, N.; Okamura, K.; Yokoyama, K.; Ito, T.; Higemoto, W.

    2013-04-01

    As one of the principal muon beam line at the J-PARC muon facility (MUSE), we are now constructing a Muon beam line (U-Line), which consists of a large acceptance solenoid made of mineral insulation cables (MIC), a superconducting curved transport solenoid and superconducting axial focusing magnets. There, we can extract 2 × 108/s surface muons towards a hot tungsten target. At the U-Line, we are now establishing a new type of muon microscopy; a new technique with use of the intense ultra-slow muon source generated by resonant ionization of thermal Muonium (designated as Mu; consisting of a μ + and an e - ) atoms generated from the surface of the tungsten target. In this contribution, the latest status of the Ultra Slow Muon Microscopy project, fully funded, is reported.

  18. Analysis of 81Kr in groundwater using laser resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new analytical technique based on resonant ionization of krypton with a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser source was used to determine low-level 81Kr concentrations in groundwater. The long half-life (210,000 years) and low concentration (1.3 x 10381Kr atoms per liter of modern water at 100C) make the detection of 81Kr by radioactive counting techniques extremely difficult. In this method, krypton gas was removed from water taken from an underground Swiss aquifer using standard cryogenic and chromatographic techniques. Stable krypton isotopes were then reduced by a factor of 107 by a two-stage isotopic enrichment cycle using a commercially available mass spectrometer. The enriched gas containing about 108 stable krypton atoms and about 103 atoms of 81Kr was implanted into a silicon disc. This disc was then placed in the high vacuum final counting chamber and the krypton was released by laser annealing. This chamber contained a quadrupole mass spectrometer which used a pulsed VUV laser source as the ionizer. The measured signal indicated that the sample contained 1200 (+-300) atoms of 81Kr

  19. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons.

  20. Developments for resonance ionization laser spectroscopy of the heaviest elements at SHIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschläger, F.; Chhetri, P.; Ackermann, D.; Backe, H.; Block, M.; Cheal, B.; Clark, A.; Droese, C.; Ferrer, R.; Giacoppo, F.; Götz, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Kaleja, O.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kunz, P.; Mistry, A. K.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lauth, W.; Raeder, S.; Walther, Th.; Wraith, C.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental determination of atomic levels and the first ionization potential of the heaviest elements (Z ⩾ 100) is key to challenge theoretical predictions and to reveal changes in the atomic shell structure. These elements are only artificially produced in complete-fusion evaporation reactions at on-line facilities such as the GSI in Darmstadt at a rate of, at most, a few atoms per second. Hence, highly sensitive spectroscopic methods are required. Laser spectroscopy is one of the most powerful and valuable tools to investigate atomic properties. In combination with a buffer-gas filled stopping cell, the Radiation Detected Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RADRIS) technique provides the highest sensitivity for laser spectroscopy on the heaviest elements. The RADRIS setup, as well as the measurement procedure, have been optimized and characterized using the α -emitter 155 Yb in on-line conditions, resulting in an overall efficiency well above 1%. This paves the way for a successful search of excited atomic levels in nobelium and heavier elements.

  1. Analysis of /sup 81/Kr in groundwater using laser resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.D.; Hurst, G.S.; Chen, C.H.; Payne, M.G.; Allman, S.L.; Phillips, R.C.; Lehmann, B.E.; Oeschger, H.; Loosli, H.H.; Willis, R.D.

    1985-10-01

    A new analytical technique based on resonant ionization of krypton with a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser source was used to determine low-level /sup 81/Kr concentrations in groundwater. The long half-life (210,000 years) and low concentration (1.3 x 10/sup 3/ /sup 81/Kr atoms per liter of modern water at 10/sup 0/C) make the detection of /sup 81/Kr by radioactive counting techniques extremely difficult. In this method, krypton gas was removed from water taken from an underground Swiss aquifer using standard cryogenic and chromatographic techniques. Stable krypton isotopes were then reduced by a factor of 10/sup 7/ by a two-stage isotopic enrichment cycle using a commercially available mass spectrometer. The enriched gas containing about 10/sup 8/ stable krypton atoms and about 10/sup 3/ atoms of /sup 81/Kr was implanted into a silicon disc. This disc was then placed in the high vacuum final counting chamber and the krypton was released by laser annealing. This chamber contained a quadrupole mass spectrometer which used a pulsed VUV laser source as the ionizer. The measured signal indicated that the sample contained 1200 (+-300) atoms of /sup 81/Kr.

  2. Competition between two-photon-resonant three-photon ionization and four-wave mixing in Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Competitive inhibition of a resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization process by a resonant four-wave mixing has been observed in Xe atoms. When an intense IR (1064 nm) laser was applied to a sample of Xe which was also being irradiated by a UV laser tuned to the two-photon absorption line of Xe, the two-photon-resonant three-photon ionization signals decreased with increasing IR laser power. This phenomenon is dependent on the resonant states of Xe and the polarization of the two laser beams. Three 6s excited states [5/2]2, [3/2]2, and [1/2]0 were examined. At the [1/2]0 resonant state, the ion signals were not decreased but slightly increased with the increase of the IR laser power. No suppression of the ion signal was observed at the [5/2]2 resonant state, when the polarization directions of the lasers were perpendicular to each other. The result of the polarization dependence reflects the selection rules of four-wave mixing. A simple rate equation analysis including the contribution of two-photon ionization from the [1/2]0 state by the IR laser well represents the IR laser-power dependence of the ion signal.

  3. Ionization Scheme Development at the ISOLDE RILIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Fedorov, D. V.; Köster, U.; Tengborn, E.

    2005-04-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) of the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility is based on the method of laser step-wise resonance ionization of atoms in a hot metal cavity. The atomic selectivity of the RILIS complements the mass selection process of the ISOLDE separator magnets to provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. Using a system of dye lasers pumped by copper vapour lasers, ion beams of 24 elements have been generated at ISOLDE with ionization efficiencies in the range of 0.5-15%. As part of the ongoing RILIS development off-line resonance ionization spectroscopy studies carried out in 2003 and 2004 have determined the optimal three-step ionization schemes for scandium, antimony, dysprosium and yttrium.

  4. Ionization Scheme Development at the ISOLDE RILIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) of the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility is based on the method of laser step-wise resonance ionization of atoms in a hot metal cavity. The atomic selectivity of the RILIS complements the mass selection process of the ISOLDE separator magnets to provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. Using a system of dye lasers pumped by copper vapour lasers, ion beams of 24 elements have been generated at ISOLDE with ionization efficiencies in the range of 0.5-15%. As part of the ongoing RILIS development off-line resonance ionization spectroscopy studies carried out in 2003 and 2004 have determined the optimal three-step ionization schemes for scandium, antimony, dysprosium and yttrium.

  5. Cavity optomechanical cooling of a mechanical resonator in presence of a quantum well

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Bijita

    2015-01-01

    Ground state cooling of micromechanical oscillator is a paradigmatic goal for observing quantum mechanical effects in cavity optomechanics. We study theoretically the ground state cooling of a mechanical oscillator in an optomechanical cavity in presence of a quantum well placed inside the cavity. Due to mode tailoring in presence of the quantum well, the cavity response gets modified and leads to asymmetric heating and cooling processes. This facilitates the cooling of the mechanical oscillator even in the unresolved-sideband regime, via inhibition of Stokes scattering.

  6. Theoretical analysis on the efficiency of optical-optical double-color double-resonance multiphoton ionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiyin Zhang; Yidong Jin

    2009-01-01

    @@ Analytic formula of the efficiency of optical-optical double-color double-resonance multi-photon ionization (OODR-MPI) is derived from the dynamic rate equation about the interaction of photon and material.Based on this formula, the influence of characteristic of the pump and probe laser on the ionization efficiency of (1+2+1) OODR-MPI process is simulated theoretically.It is shown that the pump laser will affect the ionization efficiency by the number control of the molecules excited to the first resonance state.The ionization efiiciency is decided by the probe laser directly.Both of the excited molecules and ionization efficiency increase with the intensity and pulse duration of the laser until saturation.It is also found that the longer the delay time of the probe laser to the pump one is, the lower the ionization efficiency would be.The delay time ought to be smaller than the lifetime of the excited molecule in the practical use of the OODR-MPI technique.

  7. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of nasal cavity hemangiomas according to histological type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Park, Sun Won; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Yeo Ju; Lee, Ha Young [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Tae Young [Dept. of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Hye [Dept. of Radiology, nha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To compare computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings between two histological types of nasal hemangiomas (cavernous hemangioma and capillary or lobular capillary hemangioma). CT (n = 20; six pre-contrast; 20 post-enhancement) and MRI (n = 7) images from 23 patients (16 men and seven women; mean age, 43 years; range, 13-73 years) with a pathologically diagnosed nasal cavity hemangioma (17 capillary and lobular capillary hemangiomas and six cavernous hemangiomas) were reviewed, focusing on lesion location, size, origin, contour, enhancement pattern, attenuation or signal intensity (SI), and bony changes. The 17 capillary and lobular hemangiomas averaged 13 mm (range, 4-37 mm) in size, and most (n = 13) were round. Fourteen capillary hemangiomas had marked or moderate early phase enhancement on CT, which dissipated during the delayed phase. Four capillary hemangiomas on MRI showed marked enhancement. Bony changes were usually not seen on CT or MRI (seen on five cases, 29.4%). Half of the lesions (2/4) had low SI on T1-weighted MRI images and heterogeneously high SI with signal voids on T2-weighted images. The six cavernous hemangiomas were larger than the capillary type (mean, 20.5 mm; range, 10-39 mm) and most had lobulating contours (n = 4), with characteristic enhancement patterns (three centripetal and three multifocal nodular), bony remodeling (n = 4, 66.7%), and mild to moderate heterogeneous enhancement during the early and delayed phases. CT and MRI findings are different between the two histological types of nasal hemangiomas, particularly in the enhancement pattern and size, which can assist in preoperative diagnosis and planning of surgical tumor excision.

  8. Ionization of sodium vapour by nanosecond resonant laser pulses tuned to 3S → 4P transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a model of dense sodium vapour ionization induced by nano-second resonant laser pulses exciting the 3S→4P transition. The results of calculations are compared with those obtained by means of a similar model for the case of 3S→3P excitation. The possibility of population inversion formation between excited sodium levels is also discussed. (orig.)

  9. Verification Results of Jet Resonance-enhanced Multiphoton Ionization as a Real-time PCDD/F Emission Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Jet REMPI (Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization) monitor was tested on a hazardous waste firing boiler for its ability to determine concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs). Jet REMPI is a real time instrument capable of highly selec...

  10. Deterministic cavity quantum electrodynamics with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have employed radio-frequency trapping to localize a single 40Ca+-ion in a high-finesse optical cavity. By means of laser Doppler cooling, the position spread of the ion's wavefunction along the cavity axis was reduced to 42 nm, a fraction of the resonance wavelength of ionized calcium (λ = 397 nm). By controlling the position of the ion in the optical field, continuous and completely deterministic coupling of ion and field was realized. The precise three-dimensional location of the ion in the cavity was measured by observing the fluorescent light emitted upon excitation in the cavity field. The single-ion system is ideally suited to implement cavity quantum electrodynamics under cw conditions. To this end we operate the cavity on the D3/2-P1/2 transition of 40Ca+ (λ 866 nm). Applications include the controlled generation of single-photon pulses with high efficiency and two-ion quantum gates

  11. Nonadiabatic dynamics and multiphoton resonances in strong-field molecular ionization with few-cycle laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliamonti, Vincent; Sándor, Péter; Zhao, Arthur; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Marquetand, Philipp; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We study strong-field molecular ionization using few- (four to ten) cycle laser pulses. Employing a supercontinuum light source, we are able to tune the optical laser wavelength (photon energy) over a range of ˜200 nm (500 meV). We measure the photoelectron spectrum for a series of different molecules as a function of laser intensity, frequency, and bandwidth and illustrate how the ionization dynamics vary with these parameters. We find that multiphoton resonances and nonadiabatic dynamics (internal conversion) play an important role and result in ionization to different ionic continua. Interestingly, while nuclear dynamics can be "frozen" for sufficiently short laser pulses, we find that resonances strongly influence the photoelectron spectrum and final cationic state of the molecule regardless of pulse duration—even for pulses that are less than four cycles in duration.

  12. Application of the Electron paramagnetic resonance to the ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is defined as the resonant absorption of electromagnetic energy in paramagnetic substances by the spin transition of a non-pairing electron between different energy levels in presence of a magnetic field. (Slighter, 1989). One of the more important characteristic of EPR is that the electron spin levels are subdivided by the electron interaction with the magnetic dipoles of the nearby nucleus giving occasion for a spectral structure called hyperfine structure. In this kind of interactions two limit cases are distinguished: 1. when the non-pairing electron is located in a central ion surrounded of atoms belonging to coordinate molecules. 2. When a non-pairing electron interactioning in the same form with a number of equivalent nucleus, which is common in organic radicals, these will give as result spectra. Some EPR spectrometer can be used to dosimetric purposes by free radicals via. In this work, it is presented the application of EPR to dosimetry of ionizing radiations by free radicals via which allows to determinations of high doses. (Author)

  13. Low-frequency resonances of the refractive index in weakly ionized plasma with an admixture of dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The propagation of low-frequency electromagnetic waves along the magnetic field in weakly ionized plasma with an admixture of dust is studied in the framework of the Hall magnetohydrodynamics. Explicit expressions for the coefficients of magnetic field diffusion in plasma are derived. The resonance of the refractive index is found to occur for either right- or left-hand polarized waves. A quantitative criterion is obtained that allows one to determine the polarization of waves that experience resonance at given plasma parameters. The physical mechanism of the resonance is discussed, and the obtained results are compared with the available literature data

  14. A resonance shift prediction based on the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle for cylindrical cavities with a rigid sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, Arturo O; Cutanda-Henríquez, Vicente

    2008-11-01

    An investigation on the resonance frequency shift for a plane-wave mode in a cylindrical cavity produced by a rigid sphere is reported in this paper. This change of the resonance frequency has been previously considered as a cause of oscillational instabilities in single-mode acoustic levitation devices. It is shown that the use of the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance allows the derivation of an expression for the resonance frequency shift in a simpler and more direct way than a method based on a Green's function reported in literature. The position of the sphere can be any point along the axis of the cavity. Obtained predictions of the resonance frequency shift with the deduced equation agree quite well with numerical simulations based on the boundary element method. The results are also confirmed by experiments. The equation derived from the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle appears to be more general, and for large spheres, it gives a better approximation than the equation previously reported. PMID:19045761

  15. Linear and nonlinear resonance features of an erbium-doped fibre ring laser under cavity-loss modulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aditi Ghosh; R Vijaya

    2014-07-01

    The continuous-wave output of a single-mode erbium-doped fibre ring laser when subjected to cavity-loss modulation is found to exhibit linear as well as nonlinear resonances. At sufficiently low driving amplitude, the system resembles a linear damped oscillator. At higher amplitudes, the dynamical study of these resonances shows that the behaviour of the system exhibits features of a nonlinear damped oscillator under harmonic modulation. These nonlinear dynamical features, including harmonic and subharmonic resonances, have been studied experimentally and analysed with the help of a simple time-domain and frequency-domain information obtained from the output of the laser. All the studies are restricted to the modulation frequency lying in a regime near the relaxation oscillation frequency.

  16. Three-step resonant photoionization spectroscopy of Ni and Ge: ionization potential and odd-parity Rydberg levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparation of a laser ion source, we have investigated multi-step laser ionization via Rydberg and autoionizing states for atomic Ni and Ge using a mass separator with an ion beam energy of 20 keV. For both elements resonant three-step excitation schemes suitable for modern Ti:sapphire laser systems were developed. Rydberg series in the range of principal quantum numbers 20 ≤ n ≤ 80 were localized, assigned and quantum numbers were allocated to the individual resonances. Ionization potentials (IP) were extracted from fits of the individual series and quantum defects of individual levels were analysed for confirmation of series assignment. For Ni the ionization potential could be extracted with significantly increased precision compared to literature with a value of EIP (Ni) = 61 619.77(14) cm-1. Also, at least one notable autoionizing state above the first IP was discovered for both elements, and the different ionization schemes via Rydberg or autoionizing states were compared with respect to line shape, ionization efficiency and selectivity

  17. Effects of laser pulse duration and intensity on Coulomb explosion of CO2: Signatures of charge-resonance enhanced ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinyuk, Igor V.; Bocharova, Irina; Sanderson, Joseph; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Légaré, François

    2009-11-01

    We studied laser-induced Coulomb explosion of CO2 by full triple-coincidence momentum resolved detection of resulting ion fragments. From the coincidence momentum data we can reconstruct molecular geometry immediately before explosion. We observe the dynamics of Coulomb explosion by comparing reconstructed CO2 geometries for different Ti:Sapphire laser pulse durations (at the same intensity) ranging from few cycles (7 fs) to 200 fs. We conclude that for longer pulse durations (>=100 fs) Coulomb explosion proceeds through the enhanced ionization mechanism taking place at the critical O-O distance of 8 a.u., similarly to well known charge-resonance enhanced ionization (CREI) in H2.

  18. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of atomic sulphur

    OpenAIRE

    Woutersen, S.; Milan,, M; Lange; Buma, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    Several previously unobserved Rydberg states of the sulphur atom above the lowest ionization threshold are identified and assigned using (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. All states were accessed by two-photon transitions from either the 3P ground or the 1D excited state, prepared by in situ photodissociation of H2S. The observed states derive from the (2Do)5p and (2Po)4p configurations. For the (2Do)5p 3F and (2Po)4p 3D triplets, extensive photoele...

  19. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of even-parity autoionizing Rydberg states of atomic sulphur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, S.; Milan, J. B.; Buma, W. J.; de Lange, C. A.

    1997-05-01

    Several previously unobserved Rydberg states of the sulphur atom above the lowest ionization threshold are identified and assigned using (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. All states were accessed by two-photon transitions from either the 3P ground or the 1D excited state, prepared by in situ photodissociation of H2S. The observed states derive from the (2Do)5p and (2Po)4p configurations. For the (2Do)5p 3F and (2Po)4p 3D triplets, extensive photoelectron spectroscopic studies enable a detailed comparison of the autoionization and photoionization rates of these states.

  20. Search for efficient laser resonance ionization schemes of tantalum using a newly developed time-of-flight mass-spectrometer in KISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, M.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Jung, H. S.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Kimura, S.; Ozawa, A.; Jeong, S. C.; Sonoda, T.

    2016-06-01

    The technique of laser resonance ionization is employed for an element-selective ionization of multi-nucleon transfer reaction products which are stopped and neutralized in a gas cell filled with argon gas at 50 kPa. We have been searching for efficient laser ionization schemes for refractory elements of Z = 73-78 using a time-of-flight mass-spectrometer (TOF-MS) chamber. To evaluate the isotope shift and ionization efficiency for each candidate of the ionization scheme, isotope separation using the TOF-MS was devised. The TOF-MS was designed to separate the isotopes using two-stage linear acceleration with a mass resolving power M / ΔM of >350. A mass resolving power of 250 was experimentally confirmed by measuring the TOF of laser-ionized tantalum (Z = 73) ions with mass number 181. We searched for a laser resonance ionization scheme of tantalum using the TOF-MS.

  1. Triple-resonant Brillouin light scattering in magneto-optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Haigh, J A; Ramsay, A J; Ferguson, A J

    2016-01-01

    An enhancement in Brillouin light scattering of optical photons with magnons is demonstrated in magneto-optical whispering gallery mode resonators tuned to a triple resonance point. This occurs when both the input and output optical modes are resonant with those of the whispering gallery resonator, with a separation given by the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency. The identification and excitation of specific optical modes allows us to gain a clear understanding of the mode-matching conditions. A selection rule due to wavevector matching leads to an intrinsic single-sideband excitation. Strong suppression of one sideband is essential for one-to-one frequency mapping in coherent optical-to-microwave conversion.

  2. Assessment of resonance ionization mass spectrometry for analytical chemistry and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a natural outgrowth of RIS. The result of an RIS process is an ion pair. The electron can be used to detect the process, and single atom detection has been demonstrated by this method. The cation resulting from the RIS process actually carries more easily accessible and useful information (i.e. the mass of the ion). RIMS is useful in mass analysis. The development of RIMS has proceeded along several different directions, using CW or pulsed lasers, narrow or wide band laser energies, different kinds of sample generation, and different kinds of mass separations. RIMS in various forms can be used to obtain either element or isotope selectivity. Even though the RIMS technique has developed along several lines, several things are common to all approaches. Ultimately RIMS requires gaseous, free, atoms. RIMS makes use of the photoionization of these atoms by absorption of photons through allowed transitions involving real energy levels. The ion once formed is detected by standard mass spectrometric techniques

  3. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  4. Diode laser based resonance ionization mass spectrometry for spectroscopy and trace analysis of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this doctoral thesis, the upgrade and optimization of a diode laser system for high-resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry is described. A frequency-control system, based on a double-interferometric approach, allowing for absolute stabilization down to 1 MHz as well as frequency detunings of several GHz within a second for up to three lasers in parallel was optimized. This laser system was used for spectroscopic studies on uranium isotopes, yielding precise and unambiguous level energies, total angular momenta, hyperfine constants and isotope shifts. Furthermore, an efficient excitation scheme which can be operated with commercial diode lasers was developed. The performance of the complete laser mass spectrometer was optimized and characterized for the ultra-trace analysis of the uranium isotope 236U, which serves as a neutron flux dosimeter and tracer for radioactive anthropogenic contaminations in the environment. Using synthetic samples, an isotope selectivity of (236U)/(238U) = 4.5(1.5) . 10-9 was demonstrated.

  5. Development of High Resolution Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Neutron Dosimetry Technique with93Nb(n,n')93mNb Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Hideki; Takatsuka, Takaaki; Takamatsu, Takahide; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Furuta, Yujin; Noto, Takuma; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Sonnenschein, Volker; Wendt, Klaus; Ito, Chikara; Maeda, Shigetaka

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed an advanced technique to measure the 93mNb yield precisely by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry, instead of conventional characteristic X-ray spectroscopy. 93mNb-selective resonance ionization is achievable by distinguishing the hyperfine splitting of the atomic energy levels between 93Nb and 93mNb at high resolution. In advance of 93mNb detection, we could successfully demonstrate high resolution resonant ionization spectroscopy of stable 93Nb using an all solid-state, narrow-band and tunable Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at 1 kHz repetition rate.

  6. Fano-resonance boosted cascaded field enhancement in a plasmonic nanoparticle-in-cavity nanoantenna array and its SERS application

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhendong; You, Oubo; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-01-01

    Cascaded optical field enhancement (CFE) can be realized in some specially designed multiscale plasmonic nanostructures, where the generation of extremely strong field at nanoscale volume is crucial for many applications, for example, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Here, we propose a strategy of realizing a high-quality plasmonic nanoparticle-in-cavity (PIC) nanoantenna array, where strong coupling between a nanoparticle dark mode with a high order nanocavity bright mode can produce Fano resonance at a target wavelength. The Fano resonance can effectively boost the CFE in the PIC, with a field enhancement factor up to 5X10^2. A cost-effective and reliable nanofabrication method is developed with room temperature nanoimprinting lithography to manufacture high-quality PIC arrays. This technique guarantees the generation of only one gold nanoparticle at the bottom of each nanocavity, which is crucial for the generation of the expected CFE. As a demonstration of the performance and application of the...

  7. Photofragmentation, state interaction, and energetics of Rydberg and ion-pair states: Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hróðmarsson, Helgi Rafn; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst, E-mail: agust@hi.is [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 3, 107 Reykjavík (Iceland)

    2014-06-28

    Mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization data for hydrogen iodide (HI), for two-photon resonance excitation to Rydberg and ion-pair states in the 69 600–72 400 cm{sup −1} region were recorded and analyzed. Spectral perturbations due to homogeneous and heterogeneous interactions between Rydberg and ion-pair states, showing as deformations in line-positions, line-intensities, and line-widths, were focused on. Parameters relevant to photodissociation processes, state interaction strengths and spectroscopic parameters for deperturbed states were derived. Overall interaction and dynamical schemes to describe the observations are proposed.

  8. (2 + 1) resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization of H2 via the E,F 1Sigma(+)g state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, H.; Lynch, D. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Mckoy, V.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the results of ab initio calculations of photoelectron angular distributions and vibrational branching ratios for the (2 + 1) resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of H2 via the E,F 1Sigma(+)g state are reported, and these are compared with the experimental data of Anderson et al. (1984). These results show that the observed non-Franck-Condon behavior is predominantly due to the R dependence of the transition matrix elements, and to a lesser degree to the energy dependence. This work presents the first molecular REMPI study employing a correlated wave function to describe the Rydberg-valence mixing in the resonant intermediate state.

  9. Improving the Selectivity of the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source and In-Source Laser Spectroscopy of Polonium

    OpenAIRE

    Fink, D.

    2014-01-01

    Exotic atomic nuclei far away from stability are fascinating objects to be studied in many scientic elds such as atomic-, nuclear-, and astrophysics. Since these are often short-lived isotopes, it is necessary to couple their production with immediate extraction and delivery to an experiment. This is the purpose of the on-line isotope separator facility, ISOLDE, at CERN. An essential aspect of this laboratory is the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) because it provides a fast and ...

  10. Simultaneous dual-element analyses of refractory metals in naturally occurring matrices using resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Calaway, W. F.; Wiens, R. C.; Burnett, D. S.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    The combination of secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) has been shown to be a powerful tool for the detection of low levels of elemental impurities in solids. Drawbacks of the technique have been the laser-repetition-rate-limited, low duty cycle of the analysis and the fact that RIS schemes are limited to determinations of a single element. These problems have been addressed as part of an ongoing program to explore the usefulness of RIS/SNMS ...

  11. Very high resolution saturation spectroscopy of lutetium isotopes via cw single-frequency laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we discuss the use of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) to perform isotopically selective saturation spectroscopy of lutetium isotopes. Utilizing this technique, it is shown that accurate measurements of the relative frequencies of hyperfine (HF) components for different isotopes easily can be made without the need for an isotopically enriched sample. The precision with which the HF splitting constants can be determined is estimated to be ∼5 times greater than in previous work

  12. A Study of the r-Process Path Nuclides,$^{137,138,139}$Sb using the Enhanced Selectivity of Resonance Ionization Laser Ionization

    CERN Multimedia

    Walters, W

    2002-01-01

    The particular features of the r-process abundances with 100 < A < 150 have demonstrated the close connection between knowledge of nuclear structure and decay along the r-process path and the astrophysical environement in which these elements are produced. Key to this connection has been the measurement of data for nuclides (mostly even-N nuclides) that lie in the actual r-process path. Such data are of direct use in r-process calculations and they also serve to refine and test the predictive power of nuclear models where little or no data now exist. In this experiment we seek to use the newly developed ionization scheme for the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) to achieve selective ionization of neutron-rich antimony isotopes in order to measure the decay properties of r-process path nuclides $^{137,138,139}$Sb. These properties include the half-lives, delayed neutron branches, and daughter $\\gamma$-rays. The new nuclear structure data for the daughter Te nuclides is also of considerable in...

  13. Dissociative ionization of H2+ in an intense laser field: Charge-resonance-enhanced ionization, Coulomb explosion, and harmonic generation at 600 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent Schroedinger equation for H2+ in a 600-nm, intense (I≥1014 W/cm2) laser field is solved numerically for a model which uses the exact three-body Hamiltonian with one-dimensional nuclear motion restricted to the direction of the laser electric field and three-dimensional electronic motion. High ionization rates of H2+ are found, exceeding those of neutral atomic hydrogen. This confirms, by the rigorous, full dynamical calculation, the recently discovered charge-resonance-enhanced ionization (CREI)emdash all previous demonstrations of CREI were based on the open-quote open-quote frozen nuclei close-quote close-quote model. The numerical kinetic-energy spectra of dissociating fragments are compared with recent experimental results. They can be interpreted by a simple bond softening mechanism (or laser-induced avoided crossing in a dressed-state representation), in which the binding forces are completely suppressed by the strong electric field and thus the dissociating fragments move as free particles with a kinetic energy close to their initial vibrational energy until they reach a critical distance R=Rc congruent 8 bohr, where they are rapidly ionized, due to CREI. The harmonic generation spectra calculated from our non-Born-Oppenheimer simulations show that the high harmonics are also generated when the nuclei cross this critical distance R=Rc. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  14. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    CERN Document Server

    Kudryavtsev, Yu; Huyse, M; Bergh, P Van den; Van Duppen, P

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the In-Gas Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-gas-cell ionization spectroscopy. Properties of supersonic beams, obtained from the de Laval-, the spike-, and the free jet nozzles that are important for the reduction of the spectral line broadening mechanisms in cold and low density environments are discussed. Requirements for the laser radiation and for the vacuum pumping system are also examined. Finally, first results of high-resolution spectroscopy in the supersonic free jet are presented for the 327.4 nm 3d^{10}4s^{2}S_{1/2} \\rightarrow 3d^{10}4p^{2}P_{1/2} transit...

  15. Nonlinear resonance phenomena of a doped fibre laser under cavity-loss modulation: Experimental demonstrations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ghosh; B K Goswami; R Vijaya

    2010-11-01

    Our experiments with an erbium-doped fibre ring laser (CW, single transverse mode and multiaxial mode) with an intracavity LiNbO3 electro-optic modulator (EOM) display the characteristic features of a nonlinear oscillator (e.g., harmonic and period-2 sub-harmonic resonances) when the EOM driver voltage is modulated periodically. Harmonic resonance leads to period-1 bistability and hysteresis. Inside the period-2 sub-harmonic resonance region, the laser exhibits Feigenbaum sequence and generalized bistability.

  16. Dynamic control of the asymmetric Fano resonance in side-coupled Fabry-Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tong; Chau, Fook Siong; Deng, Jie; Zhou, Guangya

    2015-11-01

    Fano resonance is a prevailing interference phenomenon that stems from the intersection between discrete and continuum states in many fields. We theoretically and experimentally characterize the asymmetric Fano lineshape in side-coupled waveguide Fabry-Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. The measured quality-factor of the Fano resonance before tuning is 28 100. A nanoelectromechanical systems bidirectional actuator is integrated seamlessly to control the shape of the Fano resonance through in-plane translations in two directions without sacrificing the quality-factor. The peak intensity level of the Fano resonance can be increased by 8.5 dB from 60 nW to 409 nW while the corresponding dip intensity is increased by 12.8 dB from 1 nW to 18 nW. The maximum recorded quality-factor throughout the tuning procedure is up to 32 500. Potential applications of the proposed structure include enhancing the sensitivity of sensing, reconfigurable nanophotonics devices, and on-chip intensity modulator.

  17. Dynamic control of the asymmetric Fano resonance in side-coupled Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano resonance is a prevailing interference phenomenon that stems from the intersection between discrete and continuum states in many fields. We theoretically and experimentally characterize the asymmetric Fano lineshape in side-coupled waveguide Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. The measured quality-factor of the Fano resonance before tuning is 28 100. A nanoelectromechanical systems bidirectional actuator is integrated seamlessly to control the shape of the Fano resonance through in-plane translations in two directions without sacrificing the quality-factor. The peak intensity level of the Fano resonance can be increased by 8.5 dB from 60 nW to 409 nW while the corresponding dip intensity is increased by 12.8 dB from 1 nW to 18 nW. The maximum recorded quality-factor throughout the tuning procedure is up to 32 500. Potential applications of the proposed structure include enhancing the sensitivity of sensing, reconfigurable nanophotonics devices, and on-chip intensity modulator

  18. Dynamic control of the asymmetric Fano resonance in side-coupled Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tong; Chau, Fook Siong; Zhou, Guangya, E-mail: mpezgy@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Deng, Jie [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2015-11-30

    Fano resonance is a prevailing interference phenomenon that stems from the intersection between discrete and continuum states in many fields. We theoretically and experimentally characterize the asymmetric Fano lineshape in side-coupled waveguide Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. The measured quality-factor of the Fano resonance before tuning is 28 100. A nanoelectromechanical systems bidirectional actuator is integrated seamlessly to control the shape of the Fano resonance through in-plane translations in two directions without sacrificing the quality-factor. The peak intensity level of the Fano resonance can be increased by 8.5 dB from 60 nW to 409 nW while the corresponding dip intensity is increased by 12.8 dB from 1 nW to 18 nW. The maximum recorded quality-factor throughout the tuning procedure is up to 32 500. Potential applications of the proposed structure include enhancing the sensitivity of sensing, reconfigurable nanophotonics devices, and on-chip intensity modulator.

  19. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  20. Linewidth broadening and emission saturation of a resonantly excited quantum dot monitored via an off-resonant cavity mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhaq, A.; Ates, Serkan; Weiler, S.; Ulrich, S.M.; Reitzenstein, S.; Löffler, A.; Höfling, S.; Worschech, L.; Forchel, A.; Michler, P.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the robustness of a detuned mode channel for reading out the relevant s-shell properties of a resonantly excited coupled quantum dot (QD) in a pillar microcavity. The line broadening of the QD s-shell is “monitored” by the mode signal with high conformity to the directly measured QD ...

  1. Double-electron above-threshold ionization resonances as interference phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report calculations of double-ionization energy spectra and momentum distributions of laser-driven helium due to few-cycle pulses of wavelength 195 nm. The results are obtained from full-dimensional numerical integration of the two-electron time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A momentum-space analysis of doubly ionizing wavepackets shows that the concentric-ring structure of above-threshold double ionization, together with the associated structure of peaks in the total kinetic energy spectrum, may be attributed to wavepacket interference effects, where at least two doubly ionizing wavepackets from different recollision events populate the same spatial hemisphere.

  2. Gamma-rays generation experiment with the optical resonant cavity for ILC polarized positron source at the KEK-ATF 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed a gamma-rays generation experiment by laser-Compton scattering at the KEK-ATF, aiming to develop a Compton based polarized positron source for linear colliders. In the experiment, laser pulses with a 357 MHz repetition rate were accumulated and their power was enhanced by up to 250 times in the Fabry-Perot optical resonant cavity. The control system for the laser pulse accumulation was improved because it had not been possible to accumulate in the optical resonant cavity until last summer. As a result, we succeeded in synchronizing the laser pulses and colliding them with the 1.3 GeV electron beam in the ATF ring while maintaining the laser pulse accumulation in the optical resonant cavity. (author)

  3. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: Stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    CERN Document Server

    Liarte, Danilo B; Transtrum, Mark K; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P

    2016-01-01

    We review our work on theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces. These limits are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-$T_c$ materials such as Nb$_3$Sn, NbN, and MgB$_2$. We summarize our calculations of the so-called superheating field $H_{\\mathrm{sh}}$, beyond which flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and disorder. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB$_2$? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. T...

  4. Resonant cavity enhanced InGaAs photodiodes for high speed detection of 1.55 μm infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniewski, J.; Muszalski, J.; Pawluczyk, J.; Piotrowski, J.

    2005-05-01

    Resonant cavity enhanced photodetectors are promising candidates for applications in high-speed optical communications due to their high quantum efficiency and large bandwidth. This is a consequence of placing the thin absorber of the photodetector inside a Fabry-Perot microcavity so the absorption could be enhanced by recycling the photons with resonance wavelength. The performance of uncooled resonant cavity enhanced InGaAs/InAlAs photovoltaic devices operating near 1.55 μm has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. The analyses include two different types of structures with cavity end mirrors made of semiconducting and metallic reflectors as well as semiconducting and hybrid (dielectric Si3N4/SiO2 + metal) Bragg reflectors. Optimization of the device design includes: absorption layer thickness, position of absorption layer within the cavity and number of layers in distributed Bragg reflectors. Dependence of absorption on wavelength and incidence angle are discussed. Various issues related to applications of resonance cavity enhanced photodiodes in optical systems are considered. Practical devices with metallic and hybrid mirrors were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy and by microwave-compatible processing. A properly designed device of this type has potential for subpicosecond response time.

  5. Aperiodic signals processing via parameter-tuning stochastic resonance in a photorefractive ring cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on solving numerically the generalized nonlinear Langevin equation describing the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic resonance by Fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, an aperiodic stochastic resonance based on an optical bistable system is numerically investigated. The numerical results show that a parameter-tuning stochastic resonance system can be realized by choosing the appropriate optical bistable parameters, which performs well in reconstructing aperiodic signals from a very high level of noise background. The influences of optical bistable parameters on the stochastic resonance effect are numerically analyzed via cross-correlation, and a maximum cross-correlation gain of 8 is obtained by optimizing optical bistable parameters. This provides a prospective method for reconstructing noise-hidden weak signals in all-optical signal processing systems.

  6. Improved analytical sensitivity for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples: Cavity ion source thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following successful field trials, environmental sampling has played a central role as a routine part of safeguards inspections since early 1996 to verify declared and to detect undeclared activity. The environmental sampling program has brought a new series of analytical challenges, and driven a need for advances in verification technology. Environmental swipe samples are often extremely low in concentration of analyte (ng level or lower), yet the need to analyze these samples accurately and precisely is vital, particularly for the detection of undeclared nuclear activities. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is the standard method of determining isotope ratios of uranium and plutonium in the environmental sampling program. TIMS analysis typically employs 1-3 filaments to vaporize and ionize the sample, and the ions are mass separated and analyzed using magnetic sector instruments due to their high mass resolution and high ion transmission. However, the ionization efficiency (the ratio of material present to material actually detected) of uranium using a standard TIMS instrument is low (0.2%), even under the best conditions. Increasing ionization efficiency by even a small amount would have a dramatic impact for safeguards applications, allowing both improvements in analytical precision and a significant decrease in the amount of uranium and plutonium required for analysis, increasing the sensitivity of environmental sampling

  7. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  8. Study of line shapes in the selective ionization of 176Yb isotope in a two-step resonance, three-step ionization scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ytterbium enriched in 176Yb is used for the production of the 177Lu radioisotope, which has applications in cancer treatment. We have theoretically studied the two-step resonant, three-step photoionization of the 176Yb isotope using the density-matrix approach. To simulate experimentally realistic conditions, the Doppler averaging, magnetic sublevel degeneracy, time-varying Rabi frequencies, ionization rate, angular divergence, and laser bandwidth have all been incorporated into the theoretical model. Calculations have been carried out to identify the optimized Rabi frequencies for evaluating the separation factor. The effect of the laser line shape on the excitation profile has also been thoroughly studied. We could obtain large separation factors of ∼5000 for the 176Yb isotope, and the excitation conditions identified in this work may be utilized in the separation of the desired isotope

  9. Enhanced asymmetry in few-cycle attosecond pulse ionization of He in the vicinity of autoionizing resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By solving the two-active-electron, time-dependent Schrödinger equation in its full dimensionality, we investigate the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) dependence of single ionization of He to the He+(1s) state triggered by an intense few-cycle attosecond pulse with carrier frequency ω corresponding to the energy ℏω = 36 eV. Effects of electron correlations are probed by comparing projections of the final state of the two-electron wave packet onto field-free highly correlated Jacobi matrix wave functions with projections onto uncorrelated Coulomb wave functions. Significant differences are found in the vicinity of autoionizing resonances. Owing to the broad bandwidths of our 115 and 230 as pulses and their high intensities (1–2 PW cm−2), asymmetries are found in the differential probability for ionization of electrons parallel and antiparallel to the linear polarization axis of the laser pulse. These asymmetries stem from interference of the one- and two-photon ionization amplitudes for producing electrons with the same momentum along the linear polarization axis. Whereas these asymmetries generally decrease with increasing ionized electron kinetic energy, we find a large enhancement of the asymmetry in the vicinity of two-electron doubly excited (autoionizing) states on an energy scale comparable to the widths of the autoionizing states. The CEP dependence of the energy-integrated asymmetry agrees very well with the predictions of time-dependent perturbation theory (Pronin et al 2009 Phys. Rev. A 80 063403). (paper)

  10. Microwave cavity piezo-opto-mechanical resonators based on film thickness modes operating beyond 10 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Tang, Hong

    Micromechanical resonators, which support and confine microwave frequency phonons on a scale comparable to optical wavelength, provide a valuable intermediate platform facilitating interactions among electrical, optical, and mechanical domains. High-frequency mechanical resonances ease the refrigeration conditions for reaching quantum mechanical ground state and also hold promise for practical device applications. However, efficient actuation of the highly stiff mechanical motions above gigahertz frequencies remains a challenging task. Here, we demonstrate a high-performance piezo-opto-mechanical resonator operating at 10.4 GHz by exploiting the acoustic thickness mode of an aluminum nitride micro-disk. In contrast to the in-plane mechanical modes, the thickness mode can be easily scaled to high frequencies with low mechanical and optical dissipations. A high f . Q product of 1 . 9 ×1013 ?Hz is achieved in ambient air at room temperature. Moreover, strong piezo-electro-mechanical coupling can be achieved by coupling the thickness mode with a microwave resonator, making it possible for coherent signal conversion. The thickness mode-based piezo-opto-mechanical resonators can be expected to serve as essential elements for advanced hybrid information networks.

  11. Investigation of the photoionization properties of pharmaceutically relevant substances by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy and single-photon ionization spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeblatt, Juliane; Ehlert, Sven; Hölzer, Jasper; Sklorz, Martin; Rittgen, Jan; Baumgärtel, Peter; Schubert, Jochen K; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-08-01

    The photoionization properties of the pharmaceutically relevant substances amantadine, diazepam, dimethyltryptamine, etomidate, ketamine, mescaline, methadone, and propofol were determined. At beamline U125/2-10m-NIM of the BESSY II synchrotron facility (Berlin, Germany) vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization spectra were recorded in the energy range 7.1 to 11.9 eV (174.6 to 104.2 nm), showing the hitherto unknown ionization energies and fragmentation appearance energies of the compounds under investigation. Furthermore, (1+1)-resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of selected compounds (amantadine, diazepam, etomidate, ketamine, and propofol) were recorded by a continuous scan in the energy range between 3.6 and 5.7 eV (345 to 218 nm) using a tunable optical parametric oscillator (spectral resolution: 0.1 nm) laser system. The resulting REMPI wavelength spectra of these compounds are discussed and put into context with already known UV absorption data. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for ion detection in both experiments. Finally, the implications of the obtained physical-chemical results for potential analytical applications are discussed. In this context, fast detection approaches for the considered compounds from breath gas using photoionization mass spectrometry and a rapid pre-concentration step (e.g., needle trap device) are of interest. PMID:23876725

  12. Roles of the vacuum field bath in a cavity QED system beyond the Weisskopf-Wigner approximation: Coupling renormalization, off-resonance assisted feeding, and pure dephasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Qun; Chen, Zhi-De

    2014-02-01

    We present nonperturbative treatment of the vacuum field bath for two cases, a two-level emitter (TLE) in free space and a lossy TLE coupled to a cavity mode (CM), and the condition that guarantees the validity of the perturbative treatment in both cases is studied. It is shown that the perturbative treatment in the first case is always valid for a real system. In the second case, nevertheless, the perturbative treatment ignores a coupling term, which can bring effects similar to a phonon bath, e.g., coupling renormalization, off-resonance assisted feeding, and pure dephasing inside the resonance region. All of these effects are important for understanding the experimental observations, including the far-off-resonance cavity fluorescence and the additional CM line inside the resonance region in the strong coupling regime.

  13. Formation of long-lived resonances in hexagonal cavities by strong coupling of superscar modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qinghai; Ge, Li; Wiersig, Jan; Cao, Hui

    2013-08-01

    The recent progresses in single crystalline wide bandgap hexagonal disk have stimulated intense research attention on pursuing ultraviolet (UV) laser diodes with low thresholds. While whispering-gallery modes based UV lasers have been successfully obtained in GaN, ZnO nanorods, and nanopillars, the reported thresholds are still very high, due to the low-quality (Q) factors of the hexagonal resonances. Here we demonstrate resonances whose Q factors can be more than two orders of magnitude higher than the hexagonal modes, promising the reduction of the energy consumption. The key to our finding is the avoided resonance crossing between superscar states along two sets of nearly degenerated triangle orbits, which leads to the formation of hexagram modes. The mode couplings suppress the field distributions at the corners and the deviations from triangle orbits simultaneously and therefore enhance the Q factors significantly.

  14. Rotationally Resolved Vacuum Ultraviolet Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (VUV REMPI) of Acetylene via the G̃ Rydberg State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-May, Alice F; Grütter, Monika; Neugebohren, Jannis; Kitsopoulos, T N; Wodtke, Alec M; Harding, Dan J

    2016-07-14

    We present a 1 + 1' resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) scheme for acetylene via the linear G̃ 4sσ (1)Πu Rydberg state, offering partial rotational resolution and the possibility to detect excitation in both the cis- and trans-bending modes. The resonant transition to the G̃ state is driven by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon, generated by resonant four-wave mixing (FWM) in krypton. Ionization from the short-lived G̃ state then occurs quickly, driven by the high intensity of the residual light from the FWM process. We have observed nine bands in the region between 79 200 cm(-1) and 80 500 cm(-1) in C2H2 and C2D2. We compare our results with published spectra in this region and suggest alternative assignments for some of the Renner-Teller split bands. Similar REMPI schemes should be applicable to other small molecules with picosecond lifetime Rydberg states. PMID:27073931

  15. Reactions of metal ions and their clusters in the gas phase using laser ionization: ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two subjects are discussed in this report: advances in proposed studies on metal ion chemistry and expansion of laboratory facilities. The development of a combined pulsed laser source-ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer has proven to be a convenient and powerful method for generating metal ions and for studying their subsequent chemistry in the gas phase. The main emphasis of this research has been on the application of metal ions as a selective chemical ionization reagents and progress in this area are discussed. The goal is to identify trends in reactivity i.e. mechanisms useful in interpreting the chemical ionization spectra of unknown compounds and to test for the functional group selectivity of the various metal ions. The feasibility of these goals have been demonstrated in extensive studies on Cu+ with esters and ketones, on Fe+ with ethers, ketones, and hydrocarbons, and on Ti+ with hydrocarbons. In addition, preliminary results on sulfur containing compounds and on a variety of other metallic ions have been obtained. Laboratory facilities were expanded from one ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometer to two, plus a third instrument the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) spectrometer

  16. Resonantly excited betatron hard X-Rays from Ionization Injected Electron Beam in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K; Li, Y F; Li, D Z; Tao, M Z; Mirzaie, M; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Li, M H; Chen, M; Hafz, N; Sokollik, T; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    A new scheme for bright hard x-ray emission from laser wakefield electron accelerator is reported, where pure nitrogen gas is adopted. Intense Betatron x-ray beams are generated from ionization injected K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating wave bucket. The x-ray radiation shows synchrotron-like spectrum with total photon yield 8$\\times$10$^8$/shot and $10^8$ over 110keV. In particular, the betatron hard x-ray photon yield is 10 times higher compared to the case of helium gas under the same laser parameters. Particle-in-cell simulation suggests that the enhancement of the x-ray yield results from ionization injection, which enables the electrons to be quickly accelerated to the driving laser region for subsequent betatron resonance. Employing the present scheme,the single stage nitrogen gas target could be used to generate stable high brightness betatron hard x-ray beams.

  17. Effects of laser pulse duration and intensity on Coulomb explosion of CO2: Signatures of charge-resonance enhanced ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied laser-induced Coulomb explosion of CO2 by full triple-coincidence momentum resolved detection of resulting ion fragments. From the coincidence momentum data we can reconstruct molecular geometry immediately before explosion. We observe the dynamics of Coulomb explosion by comparing reconstructed CO2 geometries for different Ti:Sapphire laser pulse durations (at the same intensity) ranging from few cycles (7 fs) to 200 fs. We conclude that for longer pulse durations (≥100 fs) Coulomb explosion proceeds through the enhanced ionization mechanism taking place at the critical O-O distance of 8 a.u., similarly to well known charge-resonance enhanced ionization (CREI) in H2.

  18. Vibronic spectra of the allyl radical at 6-8 eV with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The allyl radical was produced in molecular beam by pyrolysis of allyl iodide. The vibronic spectra from ground state to six new electronic states of the allyl radical at 6-8 eV, p?3dxz , p?3dxy, and p?ns (n=4, 6, 7, 8) were observed firstly with the aid of time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization technique. Vibrational progression of n7 (C3 bend) with gross spacing of about 430 cm-1 was observed in ns Rydberg states. The adiabatic ionization potential of the allyl radical was obtained to be (65641 ± 20) cm-1 ((8.138 ± 0.002) eV) by fitting the term values of ns (n=4,6,7,8) Rydberg states with Rydberg formula.

  19. Electromagnetic wave properties of polymer blends of single wall carbon nanotubes using a resonant microwave cavity as a probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. A.; Imholt, T.; Ye, Z.; Dyke, C. A.; Price, D. W.; Tour, J. M.

    2004-04-01

    A resonant microwave cavity operating in the TM010 mode was used to determine the microwave susceptibility of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) that are blended in polymer matricies. The frequencies of the probe signal were 9.8, 11.4, and 35.93 GHz. Samples of 3%-19% blends of SWNT in polycarbonate were tested to determine the best blends for shielding of devices from microwaves at these frequencies. It appears that blends of 9%-11% are very effective in shielding the electric vector of electromagnetic waves. Both the electric vector and the magnetic vectors were probed by the process to determine the nature of coupling between the SWNTs and the applied fields. Some details are given about the apparatus design that enables computer collection and processing of the data to be achieved. An electronic differentiation technique was used to allow the second derivative of the cavity absorption profile to be displayed for precise measurement. Data are presented to show the relative microwave absorption for different blends of the SWNTs with polycarbonates.

  20. Cavity quantum electrodynamics using a near-resonance two-level system: Emergence of the Glauber state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarabi, B.; Ramanayaka, A. N. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Burin, A. L. [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Wellstood, F. C. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Osborn, K. D. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States); Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Random tunneling two-level systems (TLSs) in dielectrics have been of interest recently because they adversely affect the performance of superconducting qubits. The coupling of TLSs to qubits has allowed individual TLS characterization, which has previously been limited to TLSs within (thin) Josephson tunneling barriers made from aluminum oxide. Here, we report on the measurement of an individual TLS within the capacitor of a lumped-element LC microwave resonator, which forms a cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system and allows for individual TLS characterization in a different structure and material than demonstrated with qubits. Due to the reduced volume of the dielectric (80 μm{sup 3}), even with a moderate dielectric thickness (250 nm), we achieve the strong coupling regime as evidenced by the vacuum Rabi splitting observed in the cavity spectrum. A TLS with a coherence time of 3.2 μs was observed in a film of silicon nitride as analyzed with a Jaynes-Cummings spectral model, which is larger than seen from superconducting qubits. As the drive power is increased, we observe an unusual but explicable set of continuous and discrete crossovers from the vacuum Rabi split transitions to the Glauber (coherent) state.

  1. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  2. Strong resonance effect in a lossy medium-based optical cavity for angle robust spectrum filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Seo, Sungyong; Lee, Jae Yong; Guo, L Jay

    2014-09-01

    Spectrum filters with a wide viewing angle exploiting strong resonance effects in lossy media are demonstrated. The designed filters show significantly improved color purity and the angle-robust characteristic can be preserved up to ±65° due to an interesting phase-cancellation effect. This strategy could provide new routes for numerous applications, such as image sensors and displays. PMID:25070749

  3. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy and pulsed field ionization via the F 1D2(v'=0) and f 3D2(v'=0) Rydberg states of HCl

    OpenAIRE

    Buma, W.J.; Beer, de, VHJ Vincent; Lange

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we report the first rotationally resolved one- and two-color resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (REMPI-PES) study of the HCl molecule. The agreement between our experimental branching ratios and theoretical investigations is excellent. We also report the first zero kinetic energy pulsed field ionization (ZEKE-PFI) experiments carried out in a "magnetic bottle'' electron spectrometer. A direct comparison is made between ZEKE-PFI and REMPI-PES sp...

  4. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy on nano- and picosecond timescales of Rydberg states of methyl iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Buma, W.J.; Dobber, M.R.; Lange

    1993-01-01

    Rydberg states of methyl iodide have been investigated using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in combination with photoelectron spectroscopy with nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses. The study of the ns (6n10) Rydberg states in two-, three-, and four-photon excitations has resulted in an unambiguous identification of state [1] in the 7s and 8s Rydberg states. As a consequence, it is concluded that the transition to 6s[1] in two- and three-photon excitations is anomalously weak. Th...

  5. Alignment dependence in above-threshold ionization of H2+: role of intermediate resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Jorge Fernández; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2009-01-01

    sσg) ground and the 2Σ+u(2pσu) first excited electronic states, in laser pulses of seven optical cycles (19 fs) with a wavelength of 800 nm and for different intensities. The numerical procedure combines two different techniques, a grid-based split-step method to propagate the wave packet during...... and final electron energies the orientation dependence of the above-threshold ionization spectrum reflects directly the charge distribution of the initial state, but in general intermediate resonances of symmetry different from that of the initial state are populated during the pulse leading to a distorted...

  6. A new method for measuring the low-temperature dielectric property of a low-loss material with a superconducting resonant cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A superconducting 6.5 GHz cylindrical TE011 mode cavity was used to measure the small dielectric loss of polytetrafluoroethylene at liquid helium temperature. First, the Q value and the resonance frequency of the unperturbed niobium cavity was measured by the decrement method. Then a thin cylindrical rod sample, suspended from the magnetic loop, was inserted into it through the coupling port. By the use of a gate valve and a vacuum by-pass the sample can be drawn out and reassembled without introducing air into the cavity. From the decrease of the Q value and the shift of the resonance frequency, the complex dielectric constant was obtained (epsilon'/epsilon0=1.9 and epsilon''/epsilon0=4.4x10-6 at 1.3 K). Loss tangent tan delta was estimated as 2.4x10-6. (auth.)

  7. Cavity optomechanics with whispering-gallery-mode optical micro-resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Schliesser, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Parametric coupling of optical and mechanical degrees of freedom forms the basis of many ultra-sensitive measurements of both force and mechanical displacement. An optical cavity with a mechanically compliant boundary enhances the optomechanical interaction, but also gives rise to qualitatively new coupled dynamics. As early as 1967, in a pioneering work, V. Braginsky analyzed theoretically the role of radiation pressure in the interferometric measurement process, but it has remained experimentally unexplored for many decades. Here, we use whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical microresonators to study these radiation pressure phenomena. Optical microresonators simultaneously host optical and mechanical modes, which are systematically analyzed and optimized to feature ultra-low mechanical dissipation, photon storage times exceeding the mechanical oscillation period (i.e. the "resolved-sideband regime") and large optomechanical coupling. It is demonstrated that dynamical backaction can be employed to cool mecha...

  8. Influence of Intrinsic Decoherence on Entanglement of Superconducting Charge Qubit in a Resonant Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Nan; SHAO Bin; ZOU Jian

    2005-01-01

    @@ Taking the intrinsic decoherence effect into account, we investigate the entanglement dynamics of a superconducting charge qubit in a single-mode optical cavity. Concurrence, as the measure of entanglement of the coupled field-junction system, is calculated. In comparison, we also consider the entanglement of the system by using the entanglement parameter based on the ratio between mutual entropy and partial Von-Neumann entropy to investigate how the intrinsic decoherence affects the entanglement of the coupling system. Our results show that the evolution of the entanglement parameter has the behaviour similar to the concurrence and it is thus the well measure of entanglement for the mixed state in such a coupling system.

  9. Effect of laser spectral bandwidth on coherent control of resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-resolution (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (REMPI-PS) can be obtained by measuring the photoelectron intensity at a given kinetic energy and scanning the single π phase step position. In this paper, we further demonstrate that the high-resolution (2 + 1) REMPI-PS cannot be achieved at any measured position of the kinetic energy by this measurement method, which is affected by the laser spectral bandwidth. We propose a double π phase step modulation to eliminate the effect of the laser spectral bandwidth, and show the advantage of the double π phase step modulation on achieving the high-resolution (2 + 1) REMPI-PS by considering the contributions involving on- and near-resonant three-photon excitation pathways

  10. Neutral resonant ionization in a H{sup −} plasma source: Potential of doubly excited **H{sup −}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J. S., E-mail: johnsvogel@yahoo.com [University of California (retired), 8300 Feliz Creek Dr., Ukiah, California 95482 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Hydrogen plasmas are optically dense to Lyman-α radiation, maintaining *H(n = 2) neutral atoms that may undergo neutral resonant ionization to **H{sup −}. One state, **H{sup −}(2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sup e}), is thought bound at 9.7 meV with a several nanosecond lifetime while all others are unbound resonances. Collision dynamics of two *H(2s) shows that an ionic pair of (p, **H{sup −}) resolves at least three long-standing collision experiments. The doubly excited anion also has a path to the unexcited ion pair whose only physical distinction is that both (p, H{sup −}) have energy of 3.7 eV.

  11. Gadolinium trace determination in biomedical samples by diode-laser-based multi-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diode laser based multi-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), which has been developed primarily for ultra trace analysis of long lived radioactive isotopes has been adapted for the application to elements within the sequence of the rare earths. First investigations concern Gd isotopes. Here high suppression of isobars, as provided by RIMS, is mandatory. Using a three step resonant excitation scheme into an autoionizing state, which has been the subject of preparatory spectroscopic investigations, high efficiency of >1x10-6 and good isobaric selectivity >107 was realized. Additionally the linearity of the method has been demonstrated over six orders of magnitude. Avoiding contaminations from the Titanium-carrier foil resulted in a suppression of background of more than one order of magnitude and a correspondingly low detection limit of 4x109 atoms, equivalent to lpg of Gd. The technique has been applied for trace determination of the Gd-content in animal tissue. Bio-medical micro samples were analyzed shortly after Gd-chelat, which is used as the primary contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in biomedical investigations, has been injected. Correlated in-vivo magnetic resonance images have been taken. The RIMS measurements show high reproducibility as a well as good precision, and contribute to new insight into the distribution and kinetics of Gd within different healthy and cancerous tissues

  12. Athabasca oil sands process water: characterization by atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Mark P; Witt, Matthias; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M

    2010-05-01

    The Athabasca oil sands in Canada are a less conventional source of oil which have seen rapid development. There are concerns about the environmental impact, with particular respect to components in oil sands process water which may enter the aquatic ecosystem. Naphthenic acids have been previously targeted for study, due to their implications in toxicity toward aquatic wildlife, but it is believed that other components, too, contribute toward the potential toxicity of the oil sands process water. When mass spectrometry is used, it is necessary to use instrumentation with a high resolving power and mass accuracy when studying complex mixtures, but the technique has previously been hindered by the range of compounds that have been accessible via common ionization techniques, such as electrospray ionization. The research described here applied Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in conjunction with electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes, to the characterization of oil sands process water for the first time. The results highlight the need for broader characterization when investigating toxic components within oil sands process water. PMID:20359201

  13. The design of double electrostatic-lens optics for resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron imaging experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to single ion/electron-optics for velocity-map imaging, a double-focusing lens assembly designed not only allows for mapping velocity imaging of photoelectrons but also allows for investigating the vibrational structure of the intermediate states of neutral species in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra. In this presentation, in order to record REMPI and photoelectron spectra separately, we have constructed a compact photoelectron velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus combined with an opposite linear Wiley-Mclaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). A mass resolution (m/Δm) of ∼1300 for TOFMS and electron energy resolution (ΔE/E) of 2.4% for VMI have been achieved upon three-photon ionization of Xe atom at 258.00 nm laser wavelength. As a benchmark, in combination of one-color (1 + 1) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of benzene via 61 and 6111 vibronic levels in the S1 state, the vibrational structures of the cation and photoelectron angular anisotropy are unraveled. In addition, two-color (1 + 1′) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of aniline was used to complete the accurate measurement of ionization potential (62 271 ± 3 cm−1). The results suggest that the apparatus is a powerful tool for studying photoionization dynamics in the photoelectron imaging using vibrational-state selected excitation to the intermediate states of neutrals based on REMPI technique

  14. The design of double electrostatic-lens optics for resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron imaging experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zehua; Li, Chunsheng; Qin, Zhengbo; Zheng, Xianfeng; Yao, Guanxin; Zhang, Xianyi; Cui, Zhifeng

    2015-06-01

    Compared to single ion/electron-optics for velocity-map imaging, a double-focusing lens assembly designed not only allows for mapping velocity imaging of photoelectrons but also allows for investigating the vibrational structure of the intermediate states of neutral species in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra. In this presentation, in order to record REMPI and photoelectron spectra separately, we have constructed a compact photoelectron velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus combined with an opposite linear Wiley-Mclaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). A mass resolution (m/Δm) of ∼1300 for TOFMS and electron energy resolution (ΔE/E) of 2.4% for VMI have been achieved upon three-photon ionization of Xe atom at 258.00 nm laser wavelength. As a benchmark, in combination of one-color (1 + 1) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of benzene via 6(1) and 6(1)1(1) vibronic levels in the S1 state, the vibrational structures of the cation and photoelectron angular anisotropy are unraveled. In addition, two-color (1 + 1') REMPI and photoelectron imaging of aniline was used to complete the accurate measurement of ionization potential (62,271 ± 3 cm(-1)). The results suggest that the apparatus is a powerful tool for studying photoionization dynamics in the photoelectron imaging using vibrational-state selected excitation to the intermediate states of neutrals based on REMPI technique. PMID:26133827

  15. Analysis of the resonance frequency shift in cylindrical cavities containing a sphere and its prediction based on the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco Santillán, Arturo; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    It is known that forces generated by high-level acoustic waves can compensate for the weight of small samples, which can be suspended in a fluid. To achieve this, a standing wave is created in a resonant enclosure, which can be open or closed to the external medium. This phenomenon, called Acoustic...... levitation, has numerous applications in containerless study and processing of materials. Although it is possible to levitate a sample for long periods of time, instabilities can appear under certain conditions. One of the causes of oscillational instabilities is the change of the resonance frequency...... of the cavity due to the presence of the levitated object. The Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle has been used to obtain an analytical expression for the resonance frequency shift in a cylindrical cavity produced by a small sphere, with kR

  16. Resonant enhancement of the zero-phonon emission from a colour centre in a diamond cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraon, Andrei; Barclay, Paul E.; Santori, Charles; Fu, Kai-Mei C.; Beausoleil, Raymond G.

    2011-05-01

    Integrated quantum photonic technologies are key for future applications in quantum information, ultralow-power opto-electronics and sensing. As individual quantum bits, nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond are among the most promising solid-state systems identified to date, because of their long-lived electron and nuclear spin coherence, and capability for individual optical initialization, readout and information storage. The major outstanding hurdle lies in interconnecting many nitrogen vacancies for large-scale computation. One of the most promising approaches in this regard is to couple them to optical resonators, which can be further interconnected in a photonic network. Here, we demonstrate coupling of the zero-phonon line of individual nitrogen vacancies to the modes of microring resonators fabricated in single-crystal diamond. Zero-phonon line enhancement by more than a factor of 10 is estimated from lifetime measurements. The devices are fabricated using standard semiconductor techniques and off-the-shelf materials, thus enabling integrated diamond photonics.

  17. Non-linear resonance of fluids in a crystal growth cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Francis C.

    1996-01-01

    In the microgravity environment, the effect of gravity on fluid motion is much reduced. Hence, secondary effects such as vibrations, jitters, surface tension, capillary effects, and electromagnetic forces become the dominant mechanism of fluid convection. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate fluid behavior in microgravity with the ultimate goal of developing processes with minimal influence from convection. Industrial applications such as crystal growth from solidification of melt and protein growth for pharmatheutical application are just a few examples of the vast potential benefit that can be reaped from material processing in space. However, a space laboratory is not immune from all undesirable disturbances and it is imperative that such disturbances be well understood, quantifiable, and controlled. Non-uniform and transient accelerations such as vibrations, jitters, and impulsive accelerations exist as a result of crew activities, space vehicle maneuvering, and the operations of on-board equipment. Measurements conducted on-board a U.S. Spacelab showed the existence of vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 100 Hz with a dominant mode of 17 Hz and harmonics of 54 Hz. The observed vibration is not limited to any coordinate plane but exists in all directions. Similar situation exists on-board the Russian MIR space station. Due to the large structure of its design, the future International Space Station will have its own characteristic vibration spectrum. It is well known that vibration can exert substantial influence on heat and mass transfer processes, thus hindering any attempts to achieve a diffusion-limited process. Experiments on vibration convection for a liquid-filled enclosure under one-g environment showed the existence of different flow regimes as vibration frequency and intensity changes. Results showed the existence of a resonant frequency, near which the enhancement is the strongest, and the existence of a high frequency asymptote

  18. Effect of laser beam non-uniformity and the AC stark shift on the two-photon resonant three-photon ionization process of the cesium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ac Stark effect and the effect of laser beam non-uniformity on the two-photon resonant three-photon ionization spectrum of cesium is investigated. The non-uniformity due to the temporal and the spatial variations of the pumping laser makes the ionization spectrum non-symmetric and shifts the peak frequency of the excited-state population from the peak frequency of the ionization yield. The order of the non-linearity of the ionization process is also studied near resonances, and it is found that the minimum of the curve is close to the peak frequency of the excited-state spectrum. Ways of applying these results to studies of autoionizing states are suggested

  19. Efficient three-step, two-color ionization of plutonium using a resonance enhanced 2-photon transition into an autoionizing state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, P.; Huber, G.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.

    2004-05-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has proven to be a powerful method for isotope selective ultra-trace analysis of long-lived radioisotopes. For plutonium detection limits of 106 to 107 atoms have been achieved for various types of samples. So far a three-step, three-color laser excitation scheme was applied for efficient ionization. In this work, a two-photon transition from an excited state into a high-lying autoionizing state, will be presented, yielding a similar overall efficiency as the three-step, three-color ionization scheme. In this way, only two tunable lasers are needed, while the advantages of a three-step, three-color excitation (high selectivity, good efficiency and low non-resonant background) are preserved. The two-photon transition has been characterized with respect to saturation behavior and line width. The three-step, two-color ionization is a possibility for an improved RIMS procedure.

  20. Efficient three-step, two-color ionization of plutonium using a resonance enhanced 2-photon transition into an autoionizing state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has proven to be a powerful method for isotope selective ultra-trace analysis of long-lived radioisotopes. For plutonium detection limits of to atoms have been achieved for various types of samples. So far a three-step, three-color laser excitation scheme was applied for efficient ionization. In this work, a two-photon transition from an excited state into a high-lying autoionizing state, will be presented, yielding a similar overall efficiency as the three-step, three-color ionization scheme. In this way, only two tunable lasers are needed, while the advantages of a three-step, three-color excitation (high selectivity, good efficiency and low non-resonant background) are preserved. The two-photon transition has been characterized with respect to saturation behavior and line width. The three-step, two-color ionization is a possibility for an improved RIMS procedure. (authors)