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Sample records for cavity cancer treatment

  1. Childhood Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cavity cancer in children is usually lymphoma or sarcoma, but most tumors of the mouth are benign. Get information about the risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, and treatment of oral cavity cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  2. Childhood Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx has an increased incidence in adolescent and young adult females. This pattern is consistent with the national increase in orogenital sexual intercourse in younger females and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Get detailed information about the incidence, histology, and treatment of oral cavity cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  3. Results of combined modality treatment in patients with primary unresectable cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawecki, A.; Starosciak, S.; Towpik, E.; Jagielska, B.; Lenartowicz, B.; Pietras, M.; Szutkowski, Z.; Kiprian, D.

    2001-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may improve the results of treatment for primarily unresectable cancer of the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to estimate the tolerance and early results of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of oral cavity cancer, with immediate reconstruction and adjuvant radiotherapy. 56 patients hospitalized at the Department of Head and Neck Cancer of the Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre - Institute of Oncology between August 1997 and June 2000 were enrolled for the purpose of the study. When tumour regresion was observed after 2-4 courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, vinblastin, etoposide and leucovorin, the patients were referred for surgical resection with immediate reconstruction, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Regression of the primary tumor and lymph nodes of the neck was observed in 41 patients, all of whom were referred for radical surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. The tolerance of combined treatment was acceptable. Complete regression was obtained in 37/56 patients. During observation 12 patients failed due to locoregional progression and 2 due to distant metastases. 23/56 patients (41 %) are alive without evidence of disease. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy allows for radical resection in a majority of patients with primarily unresectable cancer of the oral cavity. The tolerance of treatment is good. What is important, radiotherapy and chemotherapy do not impair wound healing and vascularity of musculo-cutaneous island flaps

  4. Oral cavity infection: an adverse effect after the treatment of oral cancer in aged individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Zhao, Jun; Jiang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The immune compromised patients after treatment of oral cancer may have a chance of infection by drug-resistant opportunistic microbes. We investigated the occurrence of opportunistic microorganisms in aged individuals receiving follow-up examinations after treatment of oral cancer in China. These patients were used as test group and the respective age grouped healthy individuals as control group. In this study, the oral cavity microorganisms such as bacteria and yeast were taken for the analysis. After the screening of representative microorganisms, their aptitude of pervasiveness against drugs was studied. Here, we used antimicrobial agents which are common in clinical practice. We also performed studies to investigate the presence of toxin genes in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The results indicate that the prevalence of drug-resistant microbes was more pronounced in oral cancer patients after initial treatment above 70 years old. The oxacillin resistance of S. aureus isolate confirms that the prevalence of MRSA is increasing in accordance to age-factor and immune compromise in elderly patients. This study reveals the occurrence of drug-resistant opportunistic microorganisms in oral cavity after treatment for oral cancer in aged individuals. Special attention should be directed to MRSA during the treatment of oral cancer, and to realize the fact of immune compromise in elderly patients.

  5. ACTOplus Met XR in Treating Patients With Stage I-IV Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer Undergoing Definitive Treatment | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This randomized phase IIb trial studies how well ACTOplus met XR works in treating in patients with stage I-IV oral cavity or oropharynx cancer that are undergoing definitive treatment. Chemoprevention is the use of drugs to keep oral cavity or oropharynx cancer from forming or coming back. The use of ACTOplus met XR may slow disease progression in patients with oral cavity or

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhung, Joanne E.; Gomez, Jennifer; Chan, Kelvin; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2006, 35 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. The sites included were buccal mucosa in 8, oral tongue in 11, floor of the mouth in 9, gingiva in 4, hard palate in 2, and retromolar trigone in 1. Most patients had Stage III-IV disease (80%). Ten patients (29%) also received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy with IMRT. The median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 28.1 months (range, 11.9-85.1). Treatment failure occurred in 11 cases as follows: local in 4, regional in 2, and distant metastases in 5. Of the 5 patients with distant metastases, 2 presented with dermal metastases. The 2- and 3-year estimates of locoregional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 84% and 77%, 85% and 85%, 70% and 64%, and 74% and 74%, respectively. Acute Grade 2 or greater dermatitis, mucositis, and esophageal reactions were experienced by 54%, 66%, and 40% of the patients, respectively. Documented late complications included trismus (17%) and osteoradionecrosis (5%). Conclusion: IMRT as an adjuvant treatment after surgical resection for oral cavity tumors is feasible and effective, with promising results and acceptable toxicity

  7. Results of using artificial hyperglycemia in chemoradiation treatment of patients with local spread cancer of oral cavity mucous membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchinina, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    The comparative estimation of the recent results of chemoradiation therapy using artificial hyperglycemia of 115 patients with local spread cancer of the 3rd and 4th stages of body of the tongue and oral cavity mucous membranes is given. Optimal combinations of irradiation and hyperglycemia are determined. It is shown that the application of artificial hyperglycemia in chemoradiation treatment of cancer of oral cavity mucous membranes is reasonable and it provides an opportunity to improve the results, especially at the 3rd stage of cancer. 15 refs

  8. Cancer of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Pablo H; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Although early diagnosis is relatively easy, presentation with advanced disease is not uncommon. The standard of care is primary surgical resection with or without postoperative adjuvant therapy. Improvements in surgical techniques combined with the routine use of postoperative radiation or chemoradiation therapy have resulted in improved survival. Successful treatment is predicated on multidisciplinary treatment strategies to maximize oncologic control and minimize impact of therapy on form and function. Prevention of oral cancer requires better education about lifestyle-related risk factors, and improved awareness and tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Postoperative radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers: Impact of anatomic subsite on treatment outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, M.J.; Harrison, L.B.; Fass, D.E.; Armstrong, J.; Spiro, R.H.; Shah, J.P.; Strong, E.W.

    1990-01-01

    We have retrospectively reviewed the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for advanced oral cavity cancers. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of anatomic subsite on the results of treatment. Between 1975 and 1985, 51 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (OT = 29 patients) and floor of mouth (FOM = 22 patients) were treated with combined surgery plus RT. All had an indication(s) for RT including advanced primary disease (T3 or T4) (29 patients), close or positive margins (34 patients), and multiple positive neck nodes and/or extracapsular extension (41 patients). With a median follow-up of 6 years, the 5-year actuarial local control rate was 74% and the rate of distant metastasis (DM) was 34%. Despite the similar T stage, margin status and median RT dose, the 5-year actuarial local failure rate was 38% for OT vs. 11% for FOM (p = 0.03). Furthermore, the median survival after recurrence was 9 months for OT and 40 months for FOM (p = 0.02). At 5 years the determinate survival for both sites was (55%), and the likelihood of developing a second malignancy was 31%. The likelihood of developing DM was 50% for FOM (N0-N1 = 3 of 12, N2-N3 = 8 of 10) and 21% for OT (N0-N1 = 4 of 21, N2-N3 = 1 of 8). This study highlights significant differences between FOM and OT cancers in response to combined surgery and RT. Future strategies should be directed at the enhancement of local control for OT and better systemic therapy for those with advanced N-stage FOM

  10. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Prognosis and outcome of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsen, M.H.; Larsen, S.K.; Kirkegaard, J.; Hansen, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study of 121 patients, 77 men and 44 women, with sino-nasal cancer, admitted to the National University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, during the period 1983-1993, is presented. The median follow-up time was 21 months, (range 3-124). Forty-six percent of the tumors originated from the nasal cavity, 29% from the maxillary sinuses and 5% from the ethmoid sinuses. In 18% of the cases, the site of origin was not clear due to advanced local growth. Sixty-five patients received primary radiation therapy with curative intention of whom 5 underwent secondary surgery. Forty-nine patients underwent primary surgery, 38 of them received postoperative radiation therapy. The overall 5-year survival rate in this material was 35% and the disease-specific 5-year survival was 45%. Patients with well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas had a significantly higher 5-year survival rate than patients with poorly differentiated carcinomas and patients with regional metastases had a significantly poorer 5-year survival than patients without. The 5-year local control was 48% (41/121). Six of 9 patients with regional metastases at admission were controlled locally, whereas 16 patients developed regional metastases after primary treatment. (orig.)

  11. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. Methods From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84% or without (16% chemotherapy. Results The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  12. Image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy with helical tomotherapy for postoperative treatment of high-risk oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Lin, Shoei Long; Chen, Chun-Yi; Chen, Chien-An; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Kuo, Ying-Shiung; Liao, Li-Jen; Hu, Kawang-Yu; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Wu, Le-Jung; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wang, Li-Ying

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the treatment results and toxicity profiles of helical tomotherapy (HT) for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer. From December 6, 2006 through October 9, 2009, 19 postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients were enrolled. All of the patients received HT with (84%) or without (16%) chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 17 months. The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control, and distant metastasis-free rates were 94%, 84%, 92%, and 94%, respectively. The package of overall treatment time > 13 wk, the interval between surgery and radiation ≤ 6 wk, and the overall treatment time of radiation ≤ 7 wk was 21%, 84%, and 79%, respectively. The percentage of grade 3 mucositis, dermatitis, and leucopenia was 42%, 5% and 5%, respectively. HT achieved encouraging clinical outcomes for postoperative high-risk oral cavity cancer patients with high compliance. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings

  13. Studies of metronidazole radiosensitizing effect in radiation treatment of patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, P.Yu.; Daryalova, S.L.; Pelevina, I.I.; Karakulov, R.K.; Zel'vin, B.M.; Kiseleva, E.S.; Kvasov, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical observations of 26 patients with tongue, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer receiving telegammatherapy by dynamic dose fractionation scheme in combination with metronidazole (MZ), and of 38 patients from the control group treated using the identical schedule without MZ suggest that MZ favors increasing radiation damage in tumors in those sites without changing the character or intensifying early radiation reactions. After oral administration of MZ in single doses of 5-6 g/m 2 it reached its maximum in the blood serum within 2-4 h. When the total dose of 30-60 g of MZ was used, a marked toxic effect manifest in gastrointestinal symptoms was observed in 33.3% of patients. MZ has a negative effect on liver functions; however, changes in biochemical tests were reversible and within normal values. Simultaneous studies of biopsy material from 22 patients (11 from each group) in terms of proliferation activity showed that oral cavity tumors contain a significant portion of proliferating cells which notably decrease in the course of radiation therapy. The decrease is marked to a greater extent after irradiation in combination with MZ. (author)

  14. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  15. Treatment of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer with modern radiotherapy techniques in the postoperative setting-the MSKCC experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Stegman, Lauren D.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Patel, Snehal G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective analysis of patients with paranasal sinus (PNS) cancer treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and July 2005, 85 patients with PNS and nasal cavity cancer underwent postoperative RT. Most patients had squamous cell carcinoma (49%; n = 42), T4 tumors (52%; n = 36), and the maxillary sinus (53%; n = 45) as the primary disease site. The median radiation dose was 63 Gy. Of the 85 patients, 76 underwent CT simulation and 53 were treated with either three-dimensional conformal RT (27%; n = 23) or intensity-modulated RT (35%; n = 30). Acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Results: With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 60 months, the 5-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival rates were 62%, 87%, 82%, 55%, and 67%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, squamous cell histology and cribriform plate involvement predicted for an increased likelihood of local recurrence, and squamous cell histologic features predicted for worse overall survival. None of the patients who underwent CT simulation and were treated with modern techniques developed a Grade 3-4 late complication of the eye. Conclusion: Complete surgical resection followed by adjuvant RT is an effective and safe approach in the treatment of PNS cancer. Emerging tools, such as three-dimensional conformal treatment and, in particular, intensity-modulated RT for PNS tumors, may minimize the occurrence of late complications associated with conventional RT techniques. Local recurrence remains a significant problem

  16. Clinical evaluation of high dose rate intra-cavitary irradiation for treatment of uterine cervical cancer, combined with pepleomycin suppository in uterine cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanashi, Shunji; Abe, Tatsuyuki; Mochizuki, Sachio; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Iida, Nobuhisa.

    1990-01-01

    By means of re-irradiation using pepleomycin suppository in uterine cavity, we attained local control for one patient who had local recurrence in uterine cavity and suffered from uterine fluor in which viable cancer cells were confirmed. We were enlightened by this therapeutic experience, so we attempted combination therapy using pepleomycin suppositories to supplement intra-cavitary irradiation, for the 11 selected patients who were suffering from uterine fluor. We investigated the treatment results in 7 patients of stage III out of 11 patients (of all stages), in comparison with 13 patients of stage III who were treated by irradiation alone. Consequently, these treatment results were approximately equivalent, and the incidence of sigmoid complications could be decreased. Side effects which were followed by the combination therapy were not serious, and so we believe that pepleomycin suppository is a simple method and valuable to supplement radiation therapy of uterine cervical cancer. (author)

  17. Clinical evaluation of high dose rate intra-cavitary irradiation for treatment of uterine cervical cancer, combined with pepleomycin suppository in uterine cavity

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    Yamanashi, Shunji; Abe, Tatsuyuki; Mochizuki, Sachio (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Murakami, Yoshitaka; Iida, Nobuhisa

    1990-02-01

    By means of re-irradiation using pepleomycin suppository in uterine cavity, we attained local control for one patient who had local recurrence in uterine cavity and suffered from uterine fluor in which viable cancer cells were confirmed. We were enlightened by this therapeutic experience, so we attempted combination therapy using pepleomycin suppositories to supplement intra-cavitary irradiation, for the 11 selected patients who were suffering from uterine fluor. We investigated the treatment results in 7 patients of stage III out of 11 patients (of all stages), in comparison with 13 patients of stage III who were treated by irradiation alone. Consequently, these treatment results were approximately equivalent, and the incidence of sigmoid complications could be decreased. Side effects which were followed by the combination therapy were not serious, and so we believe that pepleomycin suppository is a simple method and valuable to supplement radiation therapy of uterine cervical cancer. (author).

  18. Factors associated with lip and oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Isabella Lima Arrais; de Medeiros, Júlia Julliêta; Rodrigues, Larycia Vicente; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim; Lima Neto, Eufrásio de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify factors associated with the occurrence of primary cancer of the lip and oral cavity regions compared to other types of head and neck cancers according to demographic, socioeconomic data and lifestyle, in Brazil, from 2000 to 2011. A study was conducted using Hospital Cancer Records (Instituto Nacional do Câncer), from 2000 to 2011, totaling 23,153 cases. Data were analyzed by binary logistic regression (response category: primary cancers located in the lip and oral cavity; comparison category; other types of primary cancer in the head and neck, which does not affect the lip and oral cavity) at a significance level α = 5%. The study showed factors associated with higher incidence of cancer in the lip and oral cavity: being of advanced age (OR = 1.16), not having a family history of cancer (OR = 2.38), alcohol consumption (OR = 1.17); former tobacco use (OR = 1.51) or current tobacco use (OR = 1.65); having a previous diagnosis of cancer without treatment (OR =1.66). Being female (OR = 0.92), having completed basic (OR = 0.71) and higher (OR = 0.46) education and having previous diagnosis of cancer with treatment (OR = 0.74) constituted factors associated with lower prevalence of cancer of the lip and oral cavity. Age, absence of family history of cancer, smoking habits and alcohol consumption, and previous diagnosis of cancer without treatment were associated with a higher incidence of cancer of the lip and oral cavity.

  19. Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jae Won

    1993-01-01

    Eighty five patients of oral cavity cancer, treated with radiation at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, during the period from March 1985 to September 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 85 patients, 37 patients were treated with radiation only and 48 patients were treated with radiation following surgery And 70 patients received external irradiation only by 60 Co with or without electron, the others were 7 patients for external irradiation plus interstitial implantation and 8 patients for external irradiation plus oral cone electron therapy. Primary sites were mobile tongue for 40 patients, mouth floor for 17 patients, palate for 12 patients, gingiva including retromolar trigone for 10 patients, buccal mucosa for 5 patients, and lip for 1 patient. According to pathologic classification, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (77 patients). According to AJC TNM stage, stage I + II were 28 patients and stage III + IV were 57 patients. Acturial overall survival rate at 3 years was 43.9%, 3 year survival rates were 60.9% for stage I + II, and 23.1% for stage III + IV, respectively. As a prognostic factor, primary T stage was a significant factor (p<0.01). The others, age, location, lymph node metastasis, surgery, radiation dose, and cell differentiation were not statistically significant. Among those factors, radiation plus surgery was more effective than radiation only in T3 + T4 or in any N stage although it was not statistically sufficient(p<0.1). From those results, it was conclusive that definitive radiotherapy was more effective than surgery especially in the view of pertaining of anatomical integrity and function in early stage, and radiation plus surgery was considered to be better therapeutic tool in advanced stage

  20. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genden, E.M.; Ferlito, A.; Silver, C.E.; Takes, R.P.; Suarez, C.; Owen, R.P.; Haigentz Jr, M.; Stoeckli, S.J.; Shaha, A.R.; Rapidis, A.D.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction

  1. Cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity are curable. When early tumor (T1 and T2) is diagnosed and treated, cure rates by surgery or irradiation are high. The choice of therapeutic modalities for these lesions is complex and depends on the site of origin and size of the tumor, the presence or absence of nodal metastases, and the age, physical, medical, and socioeconomic status of the patient. Other factors include the willingness of the patient to return for a protracted course of radiation therapy, the skill of the physician, and the relative morbidity and cosmesis of the two forms of treatment. In general, surgery may be considered for early (T1) lesions if the deformity resulting from surgery is minimal. If resection involves major morbidity, such as a deformity that alters cosmesis or the function of the speech and swallowing mechanisms, then radiation therapy is preferred. For medium-sized (T2) tumors, superficial radiation therapy is the treatment of choice, for it controls the disease and preserves normal function and anatomy. Surgery is reserved for radiation failures. Extensive disease (T3 and T4) often associated with bone and muscle involvement and cervical lymph node metastases is rarely curable by radiation therapy or surgery alone; a combined approach using radiation therapy and surgery is therefore the procedure of choice

  2. Overview of surgery for oral cavity cancer in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskander, Antoine; Irish, Jonathan; Gullane, Patrick; Gilbert, Ralph; de Almeida, John R; Freeman, Jeremy; Giuliani, Meredith; Urbach, David R; Goldstein, David P

    2016-07-01

    The pupose of this study was to describe variations in incidence and resection rates of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in Ontario. All oral cavity SCCs in Ontario between 2003 and 2010 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry. Incidence and resection rates along with variations in care were compared by sociodemographic factors and Ontario health regions. The 8-year incidence rates for oral cavity SCC was 21.3 per 100,000 with variations by sex, age group, neighborhood income, and community size. Seventy-four percent of patients underwent an oral cavity cancer resection, of which 91% were at a regional head and neck cancer center. Variations in resection rates existed by region of residence and treatment. Oral cavity cancer incidence rates vary by sex, age, neighborhood income, community size, and health region. Resection rates vary by age and health region. Oral cavity cancer care is highly regionalized in Ontario. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: 1113-1118, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. ACTOplus Met XR in Treating Patients With Stage I-IV Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer Undergoing Definitive Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Oral Cavity Neoplasm; Oropharyngeal Neoplasm; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7

  4. Oral cavity and lip cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerawala, C; Roques, T; Jeannon, J-P; Bisase, B

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. It provides recommendations on the assessment and management of patients with cancer of the oral cavity and the lip. Recommendations • Surgery remains the mainstay of management for oral cavity tumours. (R) • Tumour resection should be performed with a clinical clearance of 1 cm vital structures permitting. (R) • Elective neck treatment should be offered for all oral cavity tumours. (R) • Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in the presence of advanced neck disease or positive margins improves control rates. (R) • Early stage lip cancer can be treated equally well by surgery or radiation therapy. (R).

  5. Treatment of Childhood Head and Neck Cancer - Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find diagnosis, staging, and treatment information for these head and neck cancers: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  6. Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Adults - Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find diagnosis, staging, and treatment information for these head and neck cancers: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  7. Cancer treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000901.htm Cancer treatments To use the sharing features on this page, ... or IV. Immunotherapy Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that relies on the body's ability to fight ...

  8. Neoadjuvant polychemotherapy in combined treatment for oral cavity mucosa carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protsyk, V.S.; Trembach, A.M.; Korobko, E.V.; Garbar, L.I.

    2007-01-01

    Neoadjuvant polychemotherapy and radiotherapy as a pre surgeon combined treatment was applied to 144 patients with cancer of oral cavity mucosa. That method of treatment permit to obtain maximum destroy of tumoral parenchyma and clinical effect to all patients. (authors)

  9. Atraumatic restorative treatment in atypical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Simino Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The atraumatic restorative treatment has been widely divulged among professionals in the area of Pediatric Dentistry. This restorative technique is included in the philosophy of Minimal Intervention and is considered one of the most conservative treatments, because only the layer of infected dentin caries is removed. Moreover, the atraumatic restorative treatment has been shown to be less painful than conventional approaches, and local anesthesia is rarely required. After the removal of the infected dentin, the cavities are filled with glass ionomer cement, a material that has antimicrobial capacity, good marginal sealing and constant fluorine release and recharge. In spite of the increasing number of studies about atraumatic restorative treatment, only studies related to restorations in occlusal cavities have shown scientific evidences about the technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of atraumatic restorative treatment in cavities with 3 or more surfaces involved, by means of a clinical case report of a patient with extensive dstruction in primary teeth, who was submitted to atraumatic restorative treatment, and observe the result of the treatment after one year of clinical and radiographic control.

  10. Quality of Life of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzebo, Senada; Mahmutovic, Jasmina; Erkocevic, Hasiba

    2017-03-01

    In recent years the quality of life of patients is very important in monitoring the treatment and therapeutic procedure success. It has become a significant factor in assessing the therapeutic procedure accomplishment, and for the first time the patient alone can access the success of the respective therapy. Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common cancers of the head and neck, and is one of the ten most common causes of death in the world. In the majority of cases, cancer of the oral cavity is detected in an advanced stage when therapeutic options are reduced, and the prognosis is much worse. Cancer of the oral cavity is 10 times more common in men. Assessment of quality of life should be an indicator of the multidisciplinary treatment success and it should point to areas in which the affected person requires support. To examine the quality of life of patients with oral cavity cancer. The study was conducted at the Clinic of Maxillofacial Surgery of the Clinical Center University of Sarajevo (CCUS), through a survey on patients with verified oral cavity cancer, questionnaire related to socio-demographic characteristics of the patients and the University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire (UW-QOL). The results were included in the database and statistically processed in the SPSS program, 19.0 version for Windows. Afterwards, the results were thoroughly analyzed and documented, presented in absolute numbers and statistical values using statistical indicators in simple and understandable tables and figures. The study results showed that out of the total score of 100, the median value of quality of life of patients with oral cavity cancer, for the physical health component in the definition of quality was M=69.75 ±29.12 and for social-emotional health M=65.11 ± 27.47. This could be considered as satisfactory quality of life, in the sphere above half of the rating scale, although both values significantly deviate from the UW-QOL scale norm

  11. Does buccal cancer have worse prognosis than other oral cavity cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilon, P Ryan; Stokes, William A; Fuller, Colin W; Nguyen, Shaun A; Lentsch, Eric J

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether buccal squamous cell carcinoma has worse overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) than cancers in the rest of the oral cavity. Retrospective analysis of a large population database. We began with a Kaplan-Meier analysis of OS and DSS for buccal versus nonbuccal tumors with unmatched data, followed by an analysis of cases matched for race, age at diagnosis, stage at diagnosis, and treatment modality. This was supported by a univariate Cox regression comparing buccal cancer to nonbuccal cancer, followed by a multivariate Cox regression that included all significant variables studied. With unmatched data, buccal cancer had significantly lesser OS and DSS values than cancers in the rest of the oral cavity (P cancer versus nonbuccal oral cancer were no longer significant. Univariate Cox regression models with respect to OS and DSS showed a significant difference between buccal cancer and nonbuccal cancer. However, with multivariate analysis, buccal hazard ratios for OS and DSS were not significant. With the largest series of buccal carcinoma to date, our study concludes that the OS and DSS of buccal cancer are similar to those of cancers in other oral cavity sites once age at diagnosis, tumor stage, treatment, and race are taken into consideration. The previously perceived poor prognosis of buccal carcinoma may be due to variations in tumor presentation, such as later stage and older patient age. 2b. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Use of next-generation sequencing in oral cavity cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads

    Background: Oral cavity cancer is a subgroup of head and neck cancer which is the world’s 6th most common cancer form. Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) constitute almost all oral cavity cancers, and OSCC are primarily attributed by excessive alcohol consumption and tobacco exposure...... of tumour cells exists. Conclusions: Use of next generation sequencing in oral cavity cancer can give valuable insight into the biology of the disease. By investigating intra tumour heterogeneity we see that the different tumour specimens in each patient are quite homogenous, but evidence of heterogeneous...

  13. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... can be addressed as quickly as possible. Recurrent breast cancer If the cancer does return after treatment for ...

  14. Human Papilloma Virus in Oral Cavity Cancer and Relation to Change in Quality of Life Following Treatment-a Pilot Study from Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Kushwaha, Jitendra Kumar; Anand, Akshay; Sonkar, Abhinav Arun; Husain, Nuzhat; Srivastava, Kirti; Singh, Sudhir

    2016-12-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated head and neck cancer (HNC) has generated significant amount of research interest in recent times with focus shifted to oral cavity squamous cell cancer (OCSCC) after oropharyngeal cancer. Due to high incidence of OCSCC and anecdotal reports on association of HPV infection from northern region of India, this study was conceived to investigate HPV infection and establish its association with lifestyle habits such as tobacco, alcohol consumption, oro-genital sex, number of sexual contacts, and change in quality of life posttreatment. A total of 43 primary OCSCC biopsy specimens were collected. These samples were analyzed for HPV DNA genotyping which was done by using 13 high-risk HPV real-time PCR kits. Quality of life was assessed using University of Washington questionnaire for HNC patients, which was administered pretreatment and 3-months posttreatment. HPV presence was confirmed in only three patients (7.0 %). HPV positivity did not find any statistical correlation with age, gender, residence, addiction habit, stage, tumor size, nodal status, tumor grade, and number of sexual contacts. There was no significant ( p  > 0.05) difference in the average percent change in QOL parameters from pretreatment to posttreatment when correlated with HPV status.

  15. Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Content ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About ...

  16. Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Adults - Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find information about prognosis, staging, and treatment for adult head and neck cancer sites: hypopharynx, larynx, lip and oral cavity, neck cancer with occult primary, nasopharynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity, and salivary gland cancer.

  17. Oral Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decrease the risk of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer are diseases in ... and treatment of oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer: Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention Lip and Oral ...

  18. Radiologic and clinical observation of tuberculous cavity in initial treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Jin Do

    1986-01-01

    Tuberculous cavity is important in diagnosis and observation in the course of pulmonary tuberculosis. Author analyzed the radiologic findings of cavity and average months of negative conversion in AFB culture in 89 cases of initial treatment. The results were as follows: 1. The more number of cavities, the longer period in negative conversion of AFB culture. 2. No relation between sums of diameter and thickness of cavity and average months of negative conversion in AFB culture. 3. In the cases of cavity with air-fluid level took longer period in negative conversion og AFB culture than those of cavity without air-fluid level, significantly. 4. No relation between radiologic findings of cavity and results of chemotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis.

  19. Survival of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listl, Stefan; Jansen, Lina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Freier, Kolja; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002–2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well as grade and tumor stage. Overall five-year relative survival for oral cavity cancer patients was 54.6%. According to tumor localization, five-year survival was 86.5% for lip cancer, 48.1% for tongue cancer and 51.7% for other regions of the oral cavity. Differences in survival were identified with respect to age, sex, tumor grade and stage. The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive overview on survival of oral cavity cancer patients in Germany. PMID:23349710

  20. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1995-01-01

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  1. Treatment of Pediatric Head and Neck Cancer - Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find information about prognosis, staging, and treatment for the following head and neck cancer sites in children: esthesioneuroblastoma, larynx and papillomatosis, nasopharynx, oral cavity, and salivary gland.

  2. ROC analysis of benefit and limitation in radiotherapy for cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Zajusz, A.

    1993-01-01

    The ROC (receiver operating characteristic) analysis of optimization of radiation treatment of cancer of oral cavity was carried out. Material of 210 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity was included into the study. Based on dose-response curves for tumor and late mucosal reactions, iso-utility curves and optimal k values were estimated. Optimal k values decreased from 0.792 to 0.584 with extension of overall treatment time from 35 to 49 days. This may suggest that the planning of additional dose to compensate tumor clonogens repopulation during prolonged treatment does not improve the therapeutic gain in radiotherapy for cancer of the oral cavity. The ROC is a useful model to estimate the optimal radiation treatment for a given tumor because it is independent of any arbitrary consensus or theoretical assumption. (author) 1 tab., 3 figs., 5 refs

  3. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  4. Management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, Bhadrasain

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To review the general principles and the specific techniques employed in the management of cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx, for the judicious utilization of external radiotherapy, brachytherapy, surgery and chemotherapy, in order to maximize both the cure rates and the quality of life. The oral cavity consists of lips, buccal mucosae, lower and upper alveolar ridges, floor of the mouth, hard palate and anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The oropharynx consists of the base of tongue, tonsillar regions, soft palate and posterior pharyngeal wall. This anatomical complexity means that the choice of treatment can be significantly influenced by just a few millimeters difference in the site of the origin or spread of the cancer. The choice can be critical not only for the cure but also the patients' subsequent quality of life. It can have a tremendous impact on the appearance, the ability to eat and the ability to talk. The great majority of cancers in the oral cavity and oropharynx are squamous cell carcinomas, but cancers arising from minor salivary glands are not infrequently seen. The staging system, though useful in treatment planning, has shortcomings which will be discussed. For purposes of discussion it is useful to divide the cancers broadly into Early (T1, T2, N0 N1), Advanced Resectable, and Advanced Unresectable. Early cancers can be cured, in a large proportion of the patients, by either surgery or irradiation; the latter is particularly successful when brachytherapy can be employed to administer a significant part of the dose. Brachytherapy is usually not feasible when the cancer involves bone or is in close proximity to it, due to a high risk of osteoradionecrosis. Poor oral hygiene, in general, and poor dentition, in particular, also increases the risk of osteoradionecrosis. It is, therefore, important to be proactive with regard to dental prophylaxis for any patient contemplating irradiation for oral or pharyngeal cancer. Another

  5. HPV and cancer of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübbers, Christian U; Akgül, Baki

    2015-01-01

    Increased awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological cause of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has increased the interest in analysis of distinct oral sub-sites. It is currently under debate, whether HPV plays a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). The weakness in most published studies is the lack of performing different HPV detection tests combined with analysis for biological activity of the virus. In addition, different sub-sites of the oral cavity had been combined to a single entity, which retrospectively leads to a highly heterogeneous basis of data. In this review we mainly discuss the unclear role of HPV in OSCC development.

  6. Preoperative concurrent irradiation and cisplatin for cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbolsheimer, M.; Richter, E.; Weber, W.; Aydin, H.; Wuerzburg Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Tumors of the oral cavity are commonly treated by surgery, RT or a combination of both. The results are poor especially in patients with advanced regional disease. Many attempts were made to improve the results by combining chemotherapy with irradiation and surgery. The combination of irradiation and cisplatin gave encouraging results in the treatment of advanced and often inoperable cancers of the head and neck. We evaluated patients with operable cancer of the oral cavity. Most of these patients have been entered on a prospective intergroup study of DOESAK (Deutsch-oesterreichisch-schweizerischer Arbeitskreis fuer Tumoren im Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtsbereich). (orig.)

  7. Adverse reactions of radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Treatment of radiation reactions in the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Czerżyńska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to painless nature and poorly specific symptoms, such as hoarseness or sore throat, head and neck cancers are usually diagnosed when the disease is locally advanced. A typical patient is older than 50 years. Low social awareness concerning the occurrence of these cancers and rare appointments with specialist physicians escalate the problem. As a result, patients usually seek medical advice when the disease is advanced and prognosis poor. The risk of these cancers increases by regular consumption of weak alcoholic beverages, cigarette smoking and infection with human papilloma virus. The head and neck location, which is a richly vascularised and innervated anatomic region, necessitates the application of highly specialised treatment, i.e. intensitymodulated radiation therapy. Radiation reactions can be divided into early (acute and late (chronic based on the time of occurrence. Early reactions include inflammation and fibrosis of the oral mucosa. Late reactions are more troublesome and persistent. They include: mandible necrosis or permanent impairment of salivary gland secretory function. The most common adverse effects of radiotherapy include mucositis. Patients irradiated for head and neck cancers usually suffer from persistent oral mucosa dryness that requires particular care and hygiene. Preventive measures in patients undergoing radiotherapy include: systematic plaque removal, using high-fluoride agents for oral hygiene, following a low-sugar diet and regular dental check-ups.

  8. Primary Surgery vs Radiotherapy for Early Stage Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Mark A; Graboyes, Evan M; Wahlquist, Amy E; Neskey, David M; Kaczmar, John M; Schopper, Heather K; Sharma, Anand K; Morgan, Patrick F; Nguyen, Shaun A; Day, Terry A

    2018-04-01

    Objective The goal of this study is to determine the effect of primary surgery vs radiotherapy (RT) on overall survival (OS) in patients with early stage oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC). In addition, this study attempts to identify factors associated with receiving primary RT. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting National Cancer Database (NCDB, 2004-2013). Subjects and Methods Reviewing the NCDB from 2004 to 2013, patients with early stage I to II OCSCC were identified. Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival, Cox regression analysis, and propensity score matching were used to examine differences in OS between primary surgery and primary RT. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with primary RT. Results Of the 20,779 patients included in the study, 95.4% (19,823 patients) underwent primary surgery and 4.6% (956 patients) underwent primary RT. After adjusting for covariates, primary RT was associated with an increased risk of mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.97; 99% confidence interval [CI], 1.74-2.22). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with primary RT included age ≥70 years, black race, Medicaid or Medicare insurance, no insurance, oral cavity subsite other than tongue, clinical stage II disease, low-volume treatment facilities, and earlier treatment year. Conclusion Primary RT for early stage OCSCC is associated with increased mortality. Approximately 5% of patients receive primary RT; however, this percentage is decreasing. Patients at highest risk for receiving primary RT include those who are elderly, black, with public insurance, and treated at low-volume facilities.

  9. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  10. Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  11. Working during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000834.htm Working during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Many people continue to work throughout their cancer treatment. Cancer, or the side effects of treatment, may ...

  12. After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Better Home Your Health Resources Healthcare Management After Cancer Treatment After Cancer Treatment Share Print From the day you were diagnosed ... of the questions you may have after your cancer treatment ends. Path to well being Will I need ...

  13. Locally advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Barriers related to effective treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Lakshmaiah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral cavity cancer is a significant health problem in India. Majority of patients present with locally advanced disease requiring multimodality treatment. Compliance to recommended treatment is an important factor affecting outcome. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the outcome of locally advanced oral cavity cancer patients with regards to treatment adherence and to assess reasons of noncompliance. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study. We included patients referred to Department of Medical Oncology for induction chemotherapy in view of locally advanced oral cavity cancer. Results: Only 15 (26% patients completed planned treatment schedule. Their 1 year overall survival was 93%. The remaining 43 patients who received inadequate treatment had a dismal 21% 1 year overall survival. Illiteracy, poverty, long waiting list for surgery, prolonged delay for health scheme treatment plan approval and dissatisfaction with attitude of hospital staffs are major barriers related to effective treatment of these patients. Conclusions: A detailed discussion with patient and their relatives regarding recommended treatment, proper implementation of health schemes, increasing trained manpower to avoid long waiting list for surgery, provision of additional financial support for family member accompanying the patient and a sympathetic approach toward patients are needed to help these patients overcome the battle.

  14. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  15. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  16. The Patient Care During Before Radiotherapy in Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Byeong Chul; Park, Jae Il

    1995-01-01

    All patients who will Undergo irradiation of the oral cavity cancer will need dental before and during Radiotherapy. The extent of the region and the presence of numerous critical normal tissues(mucosa, gingiva, teeth and the alveolar ridge, alveolar bony structure, etc) in the oral cavity area, injury to which could result in serious functional impairment. Therefore I evaluate the Usefulness of custom-made intraoral shielding device before and during Radiotherapy in oral cavity cancer. Materials and Methods (1): Manufacture process of Custom-made intraoral shielding device Containing Cerroband. A. Acquisition of impression B. Matrix Constitution C. Separation by Separator D. Sprinkle on method E. Trimming F. Spacing G. Fill with Cerroband Materials and Methods (2):A. Preannealing B. TLD Set up C. Annealing D. TLD Reading Results = Therefore dosimetric characteristics in oral cavity by TLD Compared to isodose curve dose distribution Ipsilateral oral mucosa, Contralateral oral mucosa, alveolar ridge, tongue, dose was reduced by intraoral shielding device containing Cerroband technique Compared to isodose plan. The custom-made intra-oral shielding device containing Cerroband was useful in reducing the Contralateral oral mucosa dose and Volume irradiated.

  17. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  18. General Information about Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as those found in the following jobs: Furniture-making. Sawmill work. Woodworking (carpentry). Shoemaking. Metal-plating. ... cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells ...

  19. Opium usage as an etiologic factor of oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmpa, Ebrahim; Saedi, Babak; Motiee-langroudi, Maziar; Garajei, Ata; Hoseinpor, Sareh; Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of opium in causing oral cancer. Eighty patients and 80 selected matched controls who were referred to the ear-nose-throat department of an academic hospital were included in this study between October 2008 and September 2010. In addition to demographic data, information regarding alcohol, tobacco, and opium use was documented in the subjects. Finally, the effect of each risk factor was assessed. There was no significant difference in patient demographics between the 2 groups. Smoking (P = 0.042) and poor oral hygiene (P = 0.016) significantly correlated with cancer. Finally, opium addiction showed a significant relationship with oral cavity cancer with an odds ratio of 4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-13.6). Opium use is among the possible risk factors for oral cancer.

  20. An orthodontic device for retaining implanted radioactive sources during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuko, Noriko; Katsura, Kouji; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Sato, Katsurou; Kawana, Masahiro; Nonomura, Naobumi

    2000-01-01

    An orthodontic retainer was devised to keeping implanted radioactive sources in position and improve the quality of life during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity. The retainer was used in 3 patients with oral cancer, one with cancer of the hard palate, one with cancer of the soft palate, and one with cancer of the floor of mouth, during brachytherapy using 198 Au grains and 137 Cs needles. These patients could speak freely. One with cancer of the hard palate could drink water and ingest semi-liquid food during treatment instead of nasal tube feeding. The plaster dental model obtained while making the retainer proved to be useful for training radiation oncologists. (author)

  1. Surgical treatment of aspergilloma grafted in hydatid cyst cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El Hammoumi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aspergilloma is a saprophytic infection that colonizes pre-existing cavities in the lung. These cavities are caused by tuberculosis, bronchiectasis, lung cancer and other pulmonary diseases. Development of aspergilloma in the residual cavities after pulmonary hydatid cyst surgery is rarely described in terms of coexistence of the two conditions. We describe 3 cases of pulmonary aspergilloma grafted in a residual cavity of cystectomy for hydatid disease. Resumo: Aspergiloma é uma infecção saprófita que coloniza cavidades pré-existentes no pulmão. Estas cavidades são causadas por tuberculose, bronquiectasias, cancro do pulmão e outras doenças pulmonares. O desenvolvimento de aspergiloma em cavidades residuais, após cirurgia pulmonar de quisto hidático, raramente é descrito em termos de coexistência das duas condições. Descrevemos 3 casos de enxerto de aspergiloma pulmonar numa cavidade residual de cistectomia para doença hidática. Keywords: Hydatid cyst, Aspergilloma, Surgery, Capitonnage, Palavras-chave: Quisto hidático, Aspergiloma, Cirurgia, Capitonagem

  2. Radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, paranasal sinuses and larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolyszewski, J.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present the principles of radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, paranasal sinuses and larynx, according to the experience of the Institute of Oncology in Krakow. The text was designed primarily for the radiotherapists involved in the treatment of those neoplasms, and may be used as an auxiliary textbook for those preparing for the examination in radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Use of the ROC model for optimalization in radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Pt. 2. Cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Zajusz, A.; Rota, L.

    1993-01-01

    The ROC model is used to estimate optimal radiation treatment for cancer of the oral cavity. For 210 patients with cancer of the oral cavity iso-utility curves and k values were determined for various tumors stages and overall treatment times. Optimal k value decreases from 0.792 to 0.584 when overall treatment time is prolonged from 35 to 49 days. It may suggest that the planning of extra dose to balance the effect of extension of overall treatment time does not really improve therapeutic gain. (author)

  4. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Genetics of Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase ... is based on the type of nonmelanoma skin cancer or other skin condition diagnosed: Basal cell carcinoma Enlarge Basal cell ...

  5. Cancer treatment - preventing infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation - preventing infection; Bone marrow transplant - preventing infection; Cancer treatment - immunosuppression ... this is a short-lived side effect of cancer treatment. Your provider may give you medicines to help ...

  6. Dormancy activation mechanism of oral cavity cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xin; Zhao, Baohong; Shang, Dehao; Zhong, Ming; Deng, Chunfu; Jia, Xinshan

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are targeted primarily at rapidly proliferating cancer cells and are unable to eliminate cancer stem cells in the G0 phase. Thus, these treatments cannot prevent the recurrence and metastasis of cancer. Understanding the mechanisms by which cancer stem cells are maintained in the dormant G0 phase, and how they become active is key to developing new cancer therapies. The current study found that the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil, acting on the oral squamous cell carcinoma KB cell line, selectively killed proliferating cells while sparing cells in the G0 phase. Bisulfite sequencing PCR showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter led to the expression of Sox2. This then resulted in the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage and suggested that the transformation of cancer stem cells from the G0 phase to the division stage is closely related to an epigenetic modification of the cell.

  7. Cancer of the oral cavity- a growing concern in the Micronesia: a case report from the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Sangita; Bhandary, Prahlad

    2003-03-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is of growing concern worldwide. In the Micronesia, there has been a recent increase in use of betel nut and tobacco chewing in addition to already existing problem of smoking and alcohol drinking. These deleterious habits have further added the risk for development of oral cancers in the Marshall Islands. The oral cancers have good prognosis, which is directly related to the early diagnosis and treatment. Advanced staged cancers need mutilating surgery in addition to radiotherapy and carry high mortality rate. The epidemiology, etiology and recent approaches in the management of oral cavity cancer has been discussed along with a case report of advanced cancer of the floor of the mouth from the Marshall Islands.

  8. Current aspects in reconstructive surgery for nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtin, V. I.; Novikov, V. A.; Gjunter, V. E.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Ryabova, A. I.; Sirkashev, V. A.; Surkova, P. V.; Vasilev, R. V.; Menkova, E. N.

    2017-09-01

    Tumors of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses present a challenge to treat them. A combination of surgery and radiation therapy can improve treatment outcomes in 49-56% [1, 2] of the patients with locally advanced nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer. The midface reconstruction poses a formidable challenge to the reconstructive surgeon due to the region's complex skeletal and soft-tissue anatomy. The rehabilitation program including the reconstruction of the resected orbital walls using the porous and mesh implants from titanium nickelid (TiNi) was developed at the Cancer Research institute jointly with the Research Institute of Medical Materials. The technique was proven effective, allowing the natural position of the eye and visual function to be preserved in 90% [1-3] of the patients. A long period of reparative processes and risk of developing inflammation in the implant area, as well as the need to decrease length of surgery, contributed to the development of a novel approach to repairing the midface bone structures using the implant based on the microporous wire and TiNi mesh. Eighteen patients with nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer were treated using the combined thin implants. The novel technique allowed the time of the implant installation to be reduced to 5-10 min. The structure of the implant contributed to prevention of inflammatory processes in 97% [1, 2] of cases. Thus, the natural position of the eyeball and visual function were preserved in 100% [1, 3, 4] of patients. The use of the TiNi implants in reconstructive surgery for patients with nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer led to reduced time of surgery and rehabilitation, increased level of social adaptation of patients and improved cosmetic and functional results.

  9. Cancer treatment - early menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premature menopause; Ovarian insufficiency - cancer ... Cancer treatments that can cause early menopause include: Surgery. Having both ovaries removed causes menopause to happen right away. If you are age 50 or younger, your provider may ...

  10. High-dose-rate brachytherapy using molds for oral cavity cancer. The technique and its limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Yokoe, Yoshihiko; Nagata, Yasushi; Okajima, Kaoru; Nishida, Mitsuo; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    With the availability of a high-dose-rate (HDR) remote afterloading device, a Phase I/II protocol was initiated at our institution to assess the toxicity and efficacy of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy, using molds, in the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity. Eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity were treated by the technique. The primary sites of the tumors were the buccal mucosa, oral floor, and gingiva. Two of the buccal mucosal cancers were located in the retromolar trigon. For each patient, a customized mold was fabricated, in which two to four afterloading catheters were placed for an 192 Ir HDR source. Four to seven fractions of 3-4 Gy, 5 mm below the mold surface, were given following external radiation therapy of 40-60 Gy/ 2 Gy. The total dose of HDR brachytherapy ranged from 16 to 28Gy. Although a good initial complete response rate of 7/8 (88%) was achieved, there was local recurrence in four of these seven patients. Both of the retromolar trigon tumors showed marginal recurrence. No serious (e.g., ulcer or bone exposure) late radiation damage has been observed thus far in the follow up period of 15-57 months. High-dose-rate brachytherapy using the mold technique seems a safe and useful method for selected early and superficial oral cavity cancer. However, it is not indicated for thick tumors and/or tumors located in the retromolar trigon. (author)

  11. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What are my ... and neck cancer. For updated information on new cancer treatments that are available, you should discuss these issues ...

  12. Cancer treatment: what's ahead?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, T.

    2005-01-01

    Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are standard modalities for cancer treatment. Biological therapy (immunotherapy, biotherapy, or biological response modifier therapy) is a comparatively novel addition to this armamentarium. Biological therapies use the body's immune system, either directly or indirectly, to fight cancer or to lessen the side effects that may be caused by some cancer treatments. Biological therapeutic agents include interferons, interleukins, colony-simulating factors, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, gene therapy, and nonspecific immunomodulating agents. A promising form of cancer treatment is immunotherapy. Immunotherapy for cancer is essentially the stimulation of the immune system through a variety of reagents such as vaccines, infusion of T-cells, or cytokines. These reagents act through one of several mechanisms including stimulating the anti-tumour response, decreasing suppressor mechanisms, altering tumour cells to increase their immunogenicity and making them more susceptible to immunologic defenses, and improving tolerance to cytotoxic agents or radiotherapy. This review describes some novel approaches in the immunotherapy in cancer. (author)

  13. Epidemiology of oral cavity cancer in taiwan with emphasis on the role of betel nut chewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Jen, Yee-Min; Wang, Bill-B; Lee, Jih-Chin; Kang, Bor-Hwang

    2005-01-01

    This article reports the epidemiological characteristics and the possible contributing etiology of oral cavity cancer in Taiwan. Data on oral cavity cancer from the period between 1986 and 1997 were compiled from the Taiwan Cancer Registry Annual Report. The amount of average annual consumption per person of cigarettes, alcohol and betel nut were extracted from the Annual Report of Taiwan Tobacco and Wine Monopoly Bureau and the Agriculture Counsel of Taiwan. The incidence of oral cavity cancer increased annually. Both the total and male incidence have increased substantially since 1993. Regarding the peak incidence, most cases were seen in the sixth to eighth decades of life. Multiple regression models indicated that 86.2% variation in the incidence of oral cavity cancer was explained by the annual average betel nut consumption per person. These results imply that those who chew betel nut belong to a high-risk group and require special consideration and attention regarding health education and health promotion.

  14. Treatment of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronetskij, I.B.

    1990-01-01

    Peculiarities of thyroid cancer, producing direct influence on selection of treatment procedure are enumerated. It is shown that surgical treatment is the determining way of treatment, which is supplemented with hormonotherapy in case of differentiated forms of the tumor. In case of anaplasia cancer, sarcomas, propagation of tumor beyond the limits of the organ, inoperable processes, treatment of recurrences and functional inactivity of bone metastases the remote control gamma-therapy should be performed. Therapy by radioactive iodine is shown for the treatment of remote iodine-concentrating metastases for devitalization of residual thyroid tissue after thyroidectomy

  15. Oral Cavity, Pharyngeal, and Laryngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about factors that may influence the risk of developing oral cavity, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers and about approaches that may help in the prevention of these diseases.

  16. Clinical evidence of field cancerization in patients with oral cavity cancer in a betel quid chewing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Wallace, Christopher G; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsao, Chung-Kan; Chen, I-How; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2014-08-01

    We sought to investigate whether there is evidence of field cancerization in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) enrolled in a betel quid chewing area. We also assessed whether betel quid chewing is an independent risk factor for field cancerization in OSCC patients. We retrospectively examined the records of 1570 OSCC patients who underwent radical tumor resection between 1996 and 2011. A total of 1243 study participants (79%) had a positive history of betel quid chewing before surgery. Of the 767 patients treated with surgery alone, 599 (78%) were preoperative chewers, whereas a history of preoperative betel quid chewing was identified in 644 (80%) of the 803 patients who received adjuvant therapy. The 5-year control, survival, and second primary tumors (SPTs) rates served as the main outcome measures. Regardless of the treatment modality, more than 70% of the SPTs were located in the oral cavity or soft palate. Despite a similar risk profile in terms of tumor depth, lymph node metastasis, and pathological margin status, preoperative chewers showed a significantly higher incidence of 5-year SPTs and local recurrences compared with non-chewers. Moreover, multivariate analysis demonstrated that preoperative betel quid chewing was an independent prognostic factor for 5-year local control and SPTs occurrence rates. Our results demonstrate that preoperative betel quid chewers had a higher incidence of local recurrence and SPTs than non-chewers, suggesting that field cancerization may occur in OSCC patients with a history of betel quid chewing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Encounters in cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine

    2014-01-01

    Based on extensive ethnographic material from in-depth interviews with Danish cancer patients after treatment, this study analyzes their stories to explore how interactions with the physician configures and situates a need for rehabilitation. We identify three themes in the illness stories: (1...... by this encounter. The significance of the social encounters in cancer treatment is elucidated through this analysis, and we demonstrate how the need for recognition of the complex effects of cancer on one's life is central to counter experiences of objectification and dehumanization....

  18. Incidental bone scan findings in oral cavity in patients with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez G, Patricia; Salvatierra R, Guillermo; Garcia, Arlene; Morales, Rosanna; Cano, Roque; Ortiz L, Jesus; Sotelo R, Silvia; Bustamante, Cesar

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of the present work, done in the Nuclear medicine Center IPEN-INEN, was to identify as incidental findings, increased inflammatory uptake in oral cavity in routine bone scintigraphies for neoplasic diseases control. A descriptive and retrospective study was performed studying bone scans from patients with cancer, that came to the Nuclear Medicine Center in 2003 and revising records of those who had inflammatory uptake in the oral cavity. It is concluded that, in cancer patients these findings are underestimated. Prospective research should be needed in order to determine the frequency of inflammatory oral cavity pathology detected in bone scintigraphies. (author)

  19. Multidose Stereotactic Radiosurgery (9 Gy × 3) of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Treatment of Large Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: gminniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Esposito, Vincenzo [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Salvati, Maurizio [Department of Neurological Sciences, Scientific Institute IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Neurosurgery Unit, Umberto I Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Raco, Antonino [Neurosurgery Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Bozzao, Alessandro [Neuroradiology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy); Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo [Radiation Oncology Unit, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University “Sapienza,” Rome (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes with linear accelerator-based multidose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to large postoperative resection cavities in patients with large brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 to May 2012, 101 patients with a single brain metastasis were treated with surgery and multidose SRS (9 Gy × 3) for large resection cavities (>3 cm). The target volume was the resection cavity with the inclusion of a 2-mm margin. The median cavity volume was 17.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 12.6-35.7 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was local control. Secondary endpoints were survival and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 6-44 months), the 1-year and 2-year actuarial survival rates were 69% and 34%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 93% and 84%, with respective incidences of new distant brain metastases of 50% and 66%. Local control was similar for radiosensitive (non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer) and radioresistant (melanoma and renal cell cancer) brain metastases. On multivariate Cox analysis stable extracranial disease, breast cancer histology, and Karnofsky performance status >70 were associated with significant survival benefit. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 9 patients (9%), being symptomatic in 5 patients (5%). Conclusions: Adjuvant multidose SRS to resection cavity represents an effective treatment option that achieves excellent local control and defers the use of whole-brain radiation therapy in selected patients with large brain metastases.

  20. Integrative medicine for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000932.htm Integrative medicine for cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... help relieve common side effects of cancer or cancer treatment, such as fatigue, anxiety, pain, and nausea. Some ...

  1. Treatment of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity, Oropharynx and Hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luukkaa, Marjaana; Minn, Heikki; Aitasalo, Kalle; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kulmala, Jarmo; Pyrhoenen, Seppo; Grenman, Reidar

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of full-dose preoperative radiation therapy (RT) in head and neck cancer presenting in the oral cavity, oro- and hypopharynx, within a single university hospital district. During a seven-year period, 1989 to 1995, 174 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity (OC, 70% of all patients), oropharynx (OP, 15%) and hypopharynx (HP, 15%) were referred to Turku University Central Hospital. All patients were seen by a tumor board consisting of an ENT (ear-nose-throat) head and neck surgeon, a radiation oncologist and a dentist. Potentially curative treatment was given to 142 patients. Of these, 88 (62%) had preoperative RT, 6 (4%) postoperative RT, 34 (24%) definitive RT and 14 patients (10%) were treated with surgery only. The radiation dose was S50 Gy, averagely 64 Gy. The major endpoints of the study were local control, overall survival and major complications of the combined treatment. The 5-year relative survival rate (RSR) was 40% for all, and 43% for patients treated with curative intent. For these, the local control at 5 years was 60%; the disease-specific 5-year survival rate was 65% for the patients with lingual SCC, 45% for those with other oral tumor localizations, 64% for the oropharynx patients and 47% for those with tumor in their hypopharynx, while it was 55% for all patients. The preoperative radiotherapy was fairly well tolerated. Ten (7%) of the patients treated with curative intent suffered major complications, and four patients had evidence of osteoradionecrosis. With the exception of patients with early SCC the outcome remains rather poor in this group of cancer patients who often have marked co-morbidity. In our opinion, preoperative radiotherapy to a dose of 62-64 Gy can safely be given, and remains a feasible means to treat patients with oral, oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer

  2. Treatment of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity, Oropharynx and Hypopharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luukkaa, Marjaana; Minn, Heikki; Aitasalo, Kalle; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kulmala, Jarmo; Pyrhoenen, Seppo; Grenman, Reidar [Turku Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Depts. of Oncology and Radiotherapy

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and feasibility of full-dose preoperative radiation therapy (RT) in head and neck cancer presenting in the oral cavity, oro- and hypopharynx, within a single university hospital district. During a seven-year period, 1989 to 1995, 174 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity (OC, 70% of all patients), oropharynx (OP, 15%) and hypopharynx (HP, 15%) were referred to Turku University Central Hospital. All patients were seen by a tumor board consisting of an ENT (ear-nose-throat) head and neck surgeon, a radiation oncologist and a dentist. Potentially curative treatment was given to 142 patients. Of these, 88 (62%) had preoperative RT, 6 (4%) postoperative RT, 34 (24%) definitive RT and 14 patients (10%) were treated with surgery only. The radiation dose was S50 Gy, averagely 64 Gy. The major endpoints of the study were local control, overall survival and major complications of the combined treatment. The 5-year relative survival rate (RSR) was 40% for all, and 43% for patients treated with curative intent. For these, the local control at 5 years was 60%; the disease-specific 5-year survival rate was 65% for the patients with lingual SCC, 45% for those with other oral tumor localizations, 64% for the oropharynx patients and 47% for those with tumor in their hypopharynx, while it was 55% for all patients. The preoperative radiotherapy was fairly well tolerated. Ten (7%) of the patients treated with curative intent suffered major complications, and four patients had evidence of osteoradionecrosis. With the exception of patients with early SCC the outcome remains rather poor in this group of cancer patients who often have marked co-morbidity. In our opinion, preoperative radiotherapy to a dose of 62-64 Gy can safely be given, and remains a feasible means to treat patients with oral, oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer.

  3. Nanotechnology in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironidou-Tzouveleki, Maria; Imprialos, Konstantinos; Kintsakis, Athanasios

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current evolutions on nanotechnology and its applications on cancer theragnostics.Rapid advances and emerging technologies in nanotechnology are having a profound impact on cancer treatment. Applications of nanotechnology, which include liposomes, nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, nanocantilever, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots have significantly revolutionized cancer theragnostics. From a pharmaceutical viewpoint, it is critical that the biodistribution of active agents has to be controlled as much as possible. This aspect is vital in order to assure the proper efficiency and safety of the anticancer agents. These biocompatible nanocomposites provide specific biochemical interactions with receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells. With passive or active targeting strategies, an increased intracellular concentration of drugs can be achieved in cancer cells , while normal cells are being protected from the drug simultaneously. Thus, nanotechnology restricts the extent of the adverse effects of the anticancer therapy. Treatment for metastatic breast cancer, sarcoma in AIDS patients, ovarian and lung cancer is already on market or under final phases of many clinical trials, showing remarkable results. As nanotechnology is perfected, side effects due to normal cell damage will decrease, leading to better results and lengthening patient's survival.

  4. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000827.htm Cancer treatment - dealing with pain To use the sharing features ... test, can cause pain. Treatment. Many types of cancer treatments can cause pain, including chemotherapy , radiation , and surgery. ...

  5. Early preventive exercises versus usual care does not seem to reduce trismus in patients treated with radiotherapy for cancer in the oral cavity or oropharynx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdal, Nina; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose. In head and neck cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy, we investigated the benefi ts and harms of an early exercise regime on trismus. Material and methods. Patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy were centrally randomised to exercises 5 – 6 times ...... outcomes. Conclusions. In patients with cancer in the oral cavity or oropharynx, early supervised exercises combined with selfcare treatment focusing on mobility exercises to reduce...

  6. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenberg, Eduardo E

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of cancer. At least nine case reports regarding the use of ayahuasca in the treatment of prostate, brain, ovarian, uterine, stomach, breast, and colon cancers were found. Several of these were considered improvements, one case was considered worse, and one case was rated as difficult to evaluate. A theoretical model is presented which explains these effects at the cellular, molecular, and psychosocial levels. Particular attention is given to ayahuasca's pharmacological effects through the activity of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at intracellular sigma-1 receptors. The effects of other components of ayahuasca, such as harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline, are also considered. The proposed model, based on the molecular and cellular biology of ayahuasca's known active components and the available clinical reports, suggests that these accounts may have consistent biological underpinnings. Further study of ayahuasca's possible antitumor effects is important because cancer patients continue to seek out this traditional medicine. Consequently, based on the social and anthropological observations of the use of this brew, suggestions are provided for further research into the safety and efficacy of ayahuasca as a possible medicinal aid in the treatment of cancer.

  7. In-vivo autofluorescence diagnosis of the cancer of oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumder, S.K.; Ghosh, N.; Mohanty, S.K.; Gupta, P.K.

    2000-01-01

    The results of an in-vivo study carried out on 25 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity are reported. Spectra from different sites of the oral cavity were recorded using a N 2 laser based portable fluorimeter developed in-house. The spectral data acquisition was computer controlled. On an average, 5 spectra from the SCC tissue sites and 4 spectra from the visually normal tissue sites were recorded.The autofluorescence spectra was recorded from different cancerous and normal sites of the oral cavity of a patient

  8. Free cancer cell detection in peritoneal cavity in gastric cancer patients by RT-PCR for CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Inn; Moon, Nan Mo; Paik, Nam Sun; Choi, Dong Wook; Bang, Ho Yun; Hong, Seok Il

    1997-12-01

    Authors applied RT-PCR assay to detecting CEA expressing free cancer cells in peritoneal cavity of 114 gastric cancer patients to find an indication for prophylactic treatment to prevent peritoneal recurrence. Sixty-three of 114 cases were positive for RT-PCR, of which 16 cases were positive for cytologic examination and 47 cases were negative. Forty-nine of 51 cases who were negative for RT-PCR were negative for cytologic examination. Positivity for RT-PCR according to the depth of invasion were as follows : two (28.6 %) of seven cases whose cancer invaded mucosal or submucosal layer were positive. Ten (45.5 %) of 22 cases whose cancer invaded muscular or subserosal layer were positive. Forty-one (57.7 %) of 71 serosa involved cases were positive. Eleven (78.6 %) of cases who had grossly perioneal seedings were positive (p=0.026). However, all of 7 EGC cases, 19 of 22 cases whose cancer invaded to muscle layer or to subserosa were negative for cytologic examination, and eight of 13 cases who had had peritoneal seedings were positive. Positivity for RT-PCR according to cell differentiation were as follows: forty-two (61.8 %) of 68 cases who cancer were poorly differentiated type were positive. (p=0.163) Serum level of CEA of RT-PCR positive group and that of negative group were not statistically different. It was revealed that RT-PCR was more sensitive than cytologic examination in detecting free tumor cells, especially in pm, ss and serosa positive cancers, so if further study with more cases and longer follow-up is performed, its role as prognostic factor and an indication of prophylactic therapy will be clarified. (author). 22 refs., 5 tabs

  9. Free cancer cell detection in peritoneal cavity in gastric cancer patients by RT-PCR for CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Inn; Moon, Nan Mo; Paik, Nam Sun; Choi, Dong Wook; Bang, Ho Yun; Hong, Seok Il [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Authors applied RT-PCR assay to detecting CEA expressing free cancer cells in peritoneal cavity of 114 gastric cancer patients to find an indication for prophylactic treatment to prevent peritoneal recurrence. Sixty-three of 114 cases were positive for RT-PCR, of which 16 cases were positive for cytologic examination and 47 cases were negative. Forty-nine of 51 cases who were negative for RT-PCR were negative for cytologic examination. Positivity for RT-PCR according to the depth of invasion were as follows : two (28.6 %) of seven cases whose cancer invaded mucosal or submucosal layer were positive. Ten (45.5 %) of 22 cases whose cancer invaded muscular or subserosal layer were positive. Forty-one (57.7 %) of 71 serosa involved cases were positive. Eleven (78.6 %) of cases who had grossly perioneal seedings were positive (p=0.026). However, all of 7 EGC cases, 19 of 22 cases whose cancer invaded to muscle layer or to subserosa were negative for cytologic examination, and eight of 13 cases who had had peritoneal seedings were positive. Positivity for RT-PCR according to cell differentiation were as follows: forty-two (61.8 %) of 68 cases who cancer were poorly differentiated type were positive. (p=0.163) Serum level of CEA of RT-PCR positive group and that of negative group were not statistically different. It was revealed that RT-PCR was more sensitive than cytologic examination in detecting free tumor cells, especially in pm, ss and serosa positive cancers, so if further study with more cases and longer follow-up is performed, its role as prognostic factor and an indication of prophylactic therapy will be clarified. (author). 22 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thotakura, Vijaya [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  11. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1–3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  12. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-07-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses.

  13. The use of acrylic resin oral prosthesis in radiation therapy of oral cavity and paranasal sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Oral, K.; Aramamy, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    In radiation therapy of cancer of the oral cavity and the paranasal sinuses, the extent to which the tissues of the oral cavity are included in the radiation treatment portals will determine the severity of the oral discomfort during treatment. This will affect the nutritional status of the patients, and may eventually affect the total dose of radiation which the patients can receive for treatment of their cancers. In cooperation with the Maxillofacial Prosthetic Department, an acrylic resin oral prosthesis was developed. This prosthesis is easy to use and can be made for each individual patient within 24 hours. It allows for maximum sparing of the normal tissues in the oral cavity and can be modified for shielding of backscattered electrons from heavy metals in the teeth. We have also found that acrylic resin extensions can be built onto the posterior edge of post-maxillectomy obturators; this extension can be used as a carrier for radioactive sources to deliver radiation to deep seated tumor modules in the paranasal sinuses

  14. Diagnostics and treatment of 1.3 GHz Nb cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamashevich, Yegor

    2017-01-01

    The European XFEL and the International Linear Collider are based on superconducting rf cavities. In order to reach the theoretical gradient limits of the superconducting cavities it is necessary to increase the mechanical quality and chemical composition of the inner surface as well as to understand the reason for performance limitations. This work is based on the diagnosis of over 100 XFEL and HiGrade cavities whose performance was limited by several factors: field emission on dust or surface defects, low-field thermal breakdown caused by the defects, Q-slope etc. It was found that some defects were produced during the mechanical production of the cavity and were not removed by electro-chemical polishing, a standard processing technique of the inner cavity surface. On the other hand, some of the defects were produced during the electro-chemical polishing process as the surface initially had imperfections or inclusions of foreign material. One of the opportunities to overcome the aforementioned drawbacks is to replace the ''bulk'' electro-chemical polishing process by mechanical centrifugal barrel polishing. The parameters of the surface after each polishing step were studied using small samples, so called coupons. An undersurface layer was investigated using metallographic techniques and cross sectioning. The influence of centrifugal polishing on the specific parameters of a 9-cell cavity (field flatness, eccentricity etc.) was investigated. As a result, a single-step centrifugal barrel polishing process followed by a standard ''light'' electropolishing was proposed for industrial application. Although the performance-limiting mechanisms are understood in general, the origin of the quench of the cavity is often unclear. To determine the quench locations, a localisation tool for thermal breakdown using the ''second sound'' in superfluid helium has been used. All components of this tool were improved to increase the accuracy of the measurements. A new program code

  15. Diagnostics and treatment of 1.3 GHz Nb cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamashevich, Yegor

    2017-01-15

    The European XFEL and the International Linear Collider are based on superconducting rf cavities. In order to reach the theoretical gradient limits of the superconducting cavities it is necessary to increase the mechanical quality and chemical composition of the inner surface as well as to understand the reason for performance limitations. This work is based on the diagnosis of over 100 XFEL and HiGrade cavities whose performance was limited by several factors: field emission on dust or surface defects, low-field thermal breakdown caused by the defects, Q-slope etc. It was found that some defects were produced during the mechanical production of the cavity and were not removed by electro-chemical polishing, a standard processing technique of the inner cavity surface. On the other hand, some of the defects were produced during the electro-chemical polishing process as the surface initially had imperfections or inclusions of foreign material. One of the opportunities to overcome the aforementioned drawbacks is to replace the ''bulk'' electro-chemical polishing process by mechanical centrifugal barrel polishing. The parameters of the surface after each polishing step were studied using small samples, so called coupons. An undersurface layer was investigated using metallographic techniques and cross sectioning. The influence of centrifugal polishing on the specific parameters of a 9-cell cavity (field flatness, eccentricity etc.) was investigated. As a result, a single-step centrifugal barrel polishing process followed by a standard ''light'' electropolishing was proposed for industrial application. Although the performance-limiting mechanisms are understood in general, the origin of the quench of the cavity is often unclear. To determine the quench locations, a localisation tool for thermal breakdown using the ''second sound'' in superfluid helium has been used. All components of this tool were improved to

  16. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version Treatment ... are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer. Different types of treatments are available ...

  18. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000032.htm Dry mouth during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some cancer treatments and medicines can cause dry mouth. Symptoms you ...

  19. Safe drinking during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000060.htm Drinking water safely during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. During and right after your cancer treatment, your body may not be able to protect ...

  20. Precision Medicine in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision medicine helps doctors select cancer treatments that are most likely to help patients based on a genetic understanding of their disease. Learn about the promise of precision medicine and the role it plays in cancer treatment.

  1. Knowledge and risk perception of oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer among non-medical university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osazuwa-Peters, Nosayaba; Tutlam, Nhial T

    2016-01-28

    To assess non-medical university students' knowledge and perceived risk of developing oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among non-medical students of a private Midwestern university in the United States in May 2012. Questionnaire assessed demographic information and contained 21 previously validated questions regarding knowledge and perceived risk of developing oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer. Knowledge scale was categorized into low and high. Risk level was estimated based on smoking, drinking, and sexual habits. Bivariate associations between continuous and categorical variables were assessed using Pearson correlation and Chi-square tests, respectively. The response rate was 87% (100 out of 115 students approached). Eighty-one percent (81%) had low oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer knowledge; and only 2% perceived that their oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer risk was high. Risk perception was negatively correlated with age at sexual debut, r (64) = -0.26, p = 0.037; one-way ANOVA showed a marginally significant association between risk perception and number of sexual partners, F(4, 60) = 2.48, p = 0.05. There was no significant association between knowledge and perception of risk; however, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer knowledge was significantly associated with frequency of prevention of STDs (p risk perception is low among this student population. Since oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer incidence is increasingly shifting towards younger adults, interventions must be tailored to this group in order to improve prevention and control.

  2. Alternative Cancer Treatments: 10 Options to Consider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative cancer treatments: 10 options to consider Alternative cancer treatments can't cure your cancer, but they may provide some ... that may help them, including complementary and alternative cancer treatments. If cancer makes you feel as if you ...

  3. Combined endovascular and surgical treatment of melanoma of the nasal cavity: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, A.; Delgado, F.; Ramos, M.; Bravo, F.

    2000-01-01

    Melanoma of the nasal cavity is a rare tumor with a worse prognosis than cutaneous melanoma. It usually presents as nasal obstruction and/or epistaxis. The observation of a pigmented mass in the nasal cavity is highly suggestive of this lesion. Computed tomography shows a mass with nonspecific features. In magnetic resonance studies, it has a characteristics signal consisting of hyperintensity of T1-weighted images and hypointensity on T2-weighted images, depending on the amount of melanin. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. We present a case of melanoma of the nasal cavity in which endovascular embolization of the tumor was performed prior to surgical treatment. (Author) 11 refs

  4. Ayahuasca and cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo E Schenberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Comprehensively review the evidence regarding the use of ayahuasca, an Amerindian medicine traditionally used to treat many different illnesses and diseases, to treat some types of cancer. Methods: An in-depth review of the literature was conducted using PubMed, books, institutional magazines, conferences and online texts in nonprofessional sources regarding the biomedical knowledge about ayahuasca in general with a specific focus in its possible relations to the treatment of cancer. Results: At least nine case reports regarding the use of ayahuasca in the treatment of prostate, brain, ovarian, uterine, stomach, breast, and colon cancers were found. Several of these were considered improvements, one case was considered worse, and one case was rated as difficult to evaluate. A theoretical model is presented which explains these effects at the cellular, molecular, and psychosocial levels. Particular attention is given to ayahuasca’s pharmacological effects through the activity of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at intracellular sigma-1 receptors. The effects of other components of ayahuasca, such as harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline, are also considered. Conclusion: The proposed model, based on the molecular and cellular biology of ayahuasca’s known active components and the available clinical reports, suggests that these accounts may have consistent biological underpinnings. Further study of ayahuasca’s possible antitumor effects is important because cancer patients continue to seek out this traditional medicine. Consequently, based on the social and anthropological observations of the use of this brew, suggestions are provided for further research into the safety and efficacy of ayahuasca as a possible medicinal aid in the treatment of cancer.

  5. Comparison of different combinations of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with cancer of oral cavity and pharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachmar, T.B.

    1999-01-01

    The study involved 341 cases. The use of simultaneous chemoradiotherapy increases total regression of the malignant process by 10% and prolongs survival by 14% in patients with advanced cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. Neo adjuvant therapy combined with radiotherapy vs radiotherapy alone increases the frequency of total regression by 9% and prolongs the survival by 15% in the patients with cancer of the oral cavity and throat (IV stage, male patients, the tumor located in the oral cavity and oropharynx)

  6. Screening for Oral Cavity Cancer: A 1-year Experience of a Regional Hospital in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, T H; Yuan, C H; Chen, R F

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the risk factors affecting precancerous lesions, and cancer of oral cavity, and to assess efficacy of visual screening for oral mucosal lesions. The medical records of patients older than 30 years of age with history of habitual cigarette smoking or betel quid chewing that received screening for oral mucosal lesions between January 2012 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients' age, gender, risk factors, screening findings, and histopathology results of biopsy were included for further analysis. A total of 1341 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 1080 males and 261 females ranging from 30 to 96 years of age, with a mean age of 53.9±13.6 years. After screening, 226 (16.9%) were found to be positive of oral lesions. Among these 226 patients, 69 (30.5%) underwent biopsy under local anesthesia, and the histopathology showed malignancy in 13 (5.8%). All of the confirmed malignant cases were squamous cell carcinoma. Among them, 12 received further staging examination and one was lost to follow-up resulting in unknown stage. The early stage oral cavity cancer (stage I and II) accounted for 84.6% (11/13). The detection rate of early stage oral cavity cancer in our study was reasonable. Therefore, visual screening for oral cavity cancer is recommended for patients with habitual cigarette smoking or betel quid chewing.

  7. Cancer Terms: After Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  8. Brain cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruszow, S.

    1998-01-01

    As soon as 1936 an American physicist proposed to treat certain forms of cancer by using the nuclear reaction: n + 10 B → 7 Li + 4 He where the alpha particles produced could destroy the DNA of surrounding cells. From 1951 to 1961 62 patients underwent this treatment for brain cancer. The results were unsatisfactory: the neutrons were not energetic enough to enter brain tissues deeply and were accompanied by strongly damaging gamma radiation. In Netherlands an installation using the high flux reactor of Petten has been set up. A highly focused neutron beam of about 10 keV with reduced gamma radiation is produced. The first step is to determine the limit exposure and the maximal permissible concentration of boron. (A.C.)

  9. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (∼120 °C) and high (∼800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ∼1 × 10(-5) Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ∼2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  10. Endodontic treatment of dens evaginatus by performing a splint guided access cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Álvarez, Jesús; Rico-Romano, Cristina; Lobo-Galindo, Ana Belén; Zubizarreta-Macho, Álvaro

    2017-11-12

    Dens evaginatus (DE) is described as an unusual dental malformation. Tooth structure variations attached to this anatomical disturbance complicates the performance of a conservative access cavity for a conventional root canal treatment. Author's purpose is to describe the treatment of a type V DE by using splits as guides to perform access cavity. This clinical case shows a root canal treatment of a type V DE diagnosed by using a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Access cavity was planned through an osseointegrated implant planning software and guided by a stereolithographied split. After endodontic treatment, tooth was sculpted for placing a veneer, processed by a chair-side system in a single session. CBCT is an effective method for obtaining internal anatomical information of teeth with anatomical malformations. The osseointegrated implant planning software is an effective method for planning root canal treatment and designing stereolithograped splits (for performing minimally invasive access cavities). Stereolithographed splints allow performing a guided and conservative access cavity of teeth affected by dental malformations whereas digital technology allows us to esthetically reconstruct a tooth in a single session. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Sites of origin of oral cavity cancer in nonsmokers vs smokers: possible evidence of dental trauma carcinogenesis and its importance compared with human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Brendan J; Zammit, Andrew P; Lewandowski, Andrew W; Bashford, Julia J; Dragovic, Adrian S; Perry, Emily J; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Perry, Christopher F L

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high and possibly rising incidence of mouth squamous cell carcinoma in nonsmokers, especially women, without obvious cause has been noted by previous authors. Is chronic dental trauma and irritation a carcinogen, and what is its importance compared with human papillomavirus (HPV) oropharyngeal cancer in nonsmokers? To determine whether oral cavity cancers occurred more commonly at sites of dental trauma and how the position of these cancers varied between nonsmokers lacking major identified carcinogens and smokers. If these cancers occurred more frequently at sites of chronic trauma, especially in nonsmokers, it would suggest chronic dental trauma as a possible carcinogen. A retrospective analysis of 881 patients with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancers seen through a tertiary referral hospital between 2001 and 2011 was performed. Patient medical records were analyzed to determine the location of the tumor within the oral cavity and oropharynx and how it relates to patient demographics, smoking and alcohol histories, and comorbidities. Dental histories were also sought, including use of dentures. Nonsmokers comprised 87 of 390 patients with mouth cancer (22%) and 48 of 334 patients with oropharyngeal cancer (14%). Female nonsmoking patients included 53 with oral cancer (61%) but only 12 with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (25%). Oral cancers occurred on the lateral tongue, a potential site of chronic dental trauma, in 57 nonsmokers (66%) compared with 107 smokers/ex-smokers (33%) (P Oral cavity cancers occur predominantly at sites of potential dental and denture trauma, especially in nonsmokers without other risk factors. Recognizing teeth irritation as a potential carcinogen would have an impact on prevention and treatment strategies.

  12. Sentinel lymph nodes in cancer of the oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Christensen, Rikke Kølby; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2007-01-01

    when compared with (B) step-sectioning and immunostaining of the entire sentinel lymph node at 250 microM levels. METHODS: Forty patients with T1/T2 cN0 oral cancer were enrolled. Three patients were excluded. In one patient no sentinel lymph node was identified. The remaining two had unidentified...

  13. Fabrication, Treatment and Testing of a 1.6 Cell Photo-injector Cavity for HZB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, P.; Kamps, T.; Knobloch, J.; Kugeler, O.; Neumann, A.; Nietubyc, R.; Sekutowicz, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Forschungszentrum Dresden (FZD) and JLab we have fabricated and tested after appropriate surface treatment a 1.5 cell, 1300 MHz RRR niobium photo-injector cavity to be used in a demonstration test at BESSY*. Following a baseline test at JLab, the cavity received a lead spot coating of ∼ 8 mm diameter deposited with a cathode arc at the Soltan Institute on the endplate made from large grain niobium. It had been demonstrated in earlier tests with a DESY built 1.5 cell cavity - the original design - that a lead spot of this size can be a good electron source, when irradiated with a laser light of 213 nm. In the initial test with the lead spot we could measure a peak surface electric field of ∼ 29 MV/m; after a second surface treatment, carried out to improve the cavity performance, but which was not done with sufficient precaution, the lead spot was destroyed and the cavity had to be coated a second time. This contribution reports about the experiences and results obtained with this cavity.

  14. The HIE-ISOLDE Superconducting Cavities: Surface Treatment and Niobium Thin Film Coating

    CERN Document Server

    Lanza, G; Ferreira, L M A; Gustafsson, A E; Pasini, M; Trilhe, P; Palmieri, V

    2010-01-01

    CERN has designed and prepared new facilities for the surface treatment and niobium sputter coating of the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting cavities. We describe here the design choices, as well as the results of the first surface treatments and test coatings.

  15. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  16. Cancer of Oral Cavity Abutting the Mandible; Predictors of Loco-regional Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, T.K.; Hussein, H.A.; Mebeed, A.H.; El Sebai, H.I.; Sami, I.; Farahat, I.G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the causes of Loco-regional failure in 51 patients with tumors of the oral cavity abutting the mandible. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study (27 patients were operated upon in the retrospective section and 24 patients in the prospective section of the study) was done in the department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, from January 2003 to January 2008. Fifty-one patients, with oral cavity cancerous lesions abutting the mandible, were operated upon by segmental mandibulectomy en-bloc with primary tumor resection in addition to modified radical or selective neck dissection according to the status of the cervical lymph nodes. Results: During a median follow-up of 2 years, 29 patients (56.8%) had local recurrences, the incidence of nodal recurrence after neck dissection was detected in 4 patients (7.8%). On multivariate analysis, tumor depth, tumor grade, oral mucosa, soft tissue and bone surgical margins in addition to metastatic lymphadenopathy were independent prognostic factors of loco-regional failure and disease-free survival. Conclusion: Oral cavity cancers abutting the mandible should be treated with great caution by a multidisciplinary oncology team (resection and reconstruction surgeons) as it has a very aggressive biologic behavior. Negative intraoperative pathological margins should be attempted since this is the critical point for patients with cancers abutting the mandible? Further research on the biologic margin and genetic study is required

  17. Results of radiotherapy for cancer of head and neck region, 2. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimura, Noriharu; Shinzato, Jintetsu; Watanabe, Keikichi; Habu, Kenjiro; Hirayama, Haruyuki

    1988-04-01

    From 1967 through 1985, 86 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses and 6 patients with cancer of the nasal cavity (excluding sarcoma) were treated by irradiation at the Department of Radiology, Kumamoto National Hospital. The mean age was 60.7. The rate of men to women was 1.2 : 1. The results were as follows ; 1) Fifty-nine patients (51 cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma, 4 of ethmoid sinus carcinoma, and 4 of cancer of the nasal cavity) were treated with antrostomy followed by radiotherapy and regional arterial infusion of 5-fluorouracil alone or a combination of 5-fluorouracil and bleomycin. In 11 cases of these, salvage with total maxillectomy was performed and 10 % of which were controlled for more than five years. In 9 cases of these, no case was salvaged with radiotherapy. An overall five-year survival rate was 32 %. 2) The survival rate of the postoperative irradiation (11 cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma, 1 of cancer of the nasal cavity) was 42 % at 2 and 4 years after the operations. 3) Twelve patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (11 cases of maxillary sinus carcinoma, 1 of ethmoid sinus carcinoma) survived more than five years. All of them were irradiated curatively with doses more than 40 Gy. In our series, there was no difference in long-term survival between 5-fluorouracil alone and a combination of 5-fluorouracil and bleomycin.

  18. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, J.T.; Million, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are diverse. Successful treatment depends on accurate delineation of tumor extent via careful physical examination and roentgenographic workup. Treatment selection is based on these findings as well as on the general condition and age of the patient and tumor histology. Surgery, irradiation, and combined therapy all have a role and are selected to produce the best cure rate with an acceptable functional and cosmetic result. These tumors occur in proximity to a number of vital structures, and a variety of severe complications can occur secondary to treatment. While these complications cannot be entirely avoided, they are best kept to a minimum by careful treatment planning and cooperation among the otolaryngologist, radiation therapist, and ophthalmologist

  19. Hyperdosed radiotherapy in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machidon, Vasile; Jovmir, Vasile; Stanislav, Anastasia; Scurtu, Elena; Gazibar, Valeria; Lungu, Viorica

    2010-01-01

    The results of 328 patients with metastasizing breast cancer (BCM) are presented in the article. The distant metastases development in 4,5 % from the lot, which received the neoadjuvant treatment, is a high assurance in argumentation of preoperative hyperdosed X-ray therapy in breast cancer treatment. 15,8% from 100% - that is the significance of hyper dosed X-ray therapy versus classic X-ray therapy used preoperative in case of metastasizing breast cancer. The obtained data can not deny the efficacy of hyperdosed X-ray therapy in preoperative treatment of breast cancer. The hyperdosed X-ray therapy in the present moment remains current in the treatment of breast cancer and different localized cancers. (authors)

  20. [Improvement of treatment of inflammatory diseases in oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, L A; Shul'diakov, A A; Khlamova, O G; Romantsov, M G

    2011-01-01

    In order to determine the anti-pathogenic clinical efficacy of cycloferon liniment in the combined treatment of herpetic stomatitis and periodontitis, medical examination and treatment of these disorders have been carried out in a group of 80 patients. It is established that the use of cycloferon liniment in the combined treatment of herpetic stomatitis and periodontitis decreases the infectious load in parodontal recess, reduces the manifestations of local inflammation, normalizes the immunity indices, and decreases the level of endogenous intoxication, which ensures the acceleration of recuperation processes and lowers the frequency of recurrences.

  1. STOMATOLOGIC ASPECTS IN THERAPY OF LOCALLY DISTRIBUTED CANCER OF ORAL CAVITY MUCUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Matyakin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the investigation: to improve prophylaxis of dental complications during the therapy in the patients with locally distributed cancer of oral cavity mucus.Materials. Results of sanation of oral cavity in 305 patients with cancer of oral and pharyngeal area are analyzed.Results. The best results are noted in the patients given surgical sanation before chemo-radial therapy. The most number of complications is observed when teeth were extracted after chemical therapy in the period of radial therapy at summary focal dose above 20 Gy as well as in the late periods after radial therapy.Conclusion. A complex of preventive measures with using haemostatic sponge with canamycin in such patients decreases the number of complications and the terms of healing of alveoli of extracted teeth.

  2. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  3. Cryosurgery in Cancer Treatment: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research ... Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & ...

  4. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane-Knudsen, V; Jørgensen, K E; Hansen, O

    1998-01-01

    %; the disease-specific survival throughout the period was 48%. Primary irradiation followed by maxillectomy was widely used in the first half of the period. Treatment in the last part was changed to primary lateral rhinotomy with post-operative irradiation whenever possible. Twelve maxillectomies were performed...

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MORPHOLOGY OF CANCER OF ORAL CAVITY AND BORDER OF LIPS IN KABARDINO-BALKARIA DURING 1990–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tkhakakhov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelium of an oral cavity and red border of lips – the most frequent source of malignant new growths of the head and neck. In article the structure, prevalence, tendencies of incidence and morphology of cancer tumors of a mucous membrane of an oral cavity and a border of lips among residents of Kabardino-Balkaria for the period are studied 1990–2014.  Material of a research were annual statements Oncologic Dispensary State Healthcare Institution of the Ministry of Health of Kabardino-Balkaria, archival biopsy and postoperative material Pathoanatomical Bureau State Healthcare Institution of the Ministry of Health of Kabardino-Balkaria. The intensive (rough and standardized values on a sex, age and geographical zones, annual average rates of a surplus/decrease of incidence with use of the international standard of age distribution are calculated. Standardizationis carried out by a direct method. It is established that in Kabardino-Balkaria unlike the Russian indicators there is a reduction (and considerable frequencies of cancer tumors of an oral cavity especially among female population. At the same time they are registered 4 times more among men, is 1.4 times more often at city dwellers, than at rural. At a carcinoma of a border of lips even more rapid fall of incidence on rates of a decrease exceeding the all-Russian indicators is observed. The male population is surprised 3 times more often women’s here, and the number for the first time of the revealed patients in rural and mountainous areas of Kabardino-Balkaria by 1.6 times exceeds incidence respectively among citizens and the population of steppe and forest-steppe zones. Cancer cases of a cavity prevail in age groups of 50–59  and 60–69  years, and in case of a carcinoma of a border of lips – at senile age (70 years and are more senior. The vast majority of cancer of oral localization (94 % and all cases of a carcinoma of a border of lips on a histologic structure

  6. Exhaled breath and oral cavity VOCs as potential biomarkers in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, M; Gonzalez-Soto, J; Pereiro, R; de Vicente, J C; Sanz-Medel, A

    2017-03-01

    Corporal mechanisms attributed to cancer, such as oxidative stress or the action of cytochrome P450 enzymes, seem to be responsible for the generation of a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that could be used as non-invasive diagnosis biomarkers. The present work presents an attempt to use VOCs from exhaled breath and oral cavity air as biomarkers for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. A total of 52 breath samples were collected (in 3 L Tedlar bags) from 26 OSCC patients and 26 cancer-free controls. The samples were analyzed using solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection. Different statistical strategies (e.g., Icoshift, SIMCA, LDA, etc) were used to classify the analytical data. Results revealed that compounds such as undecane, dodecane, decanal, benzaldehyde, 3,7-dimethyl undecane, 4,5-dimethyl nonane, 1-octene, and hexadecane had relevance as possible biomarkers for OSCC. LDA classification with these compounds showed well-defined clusters for patients and controls (non-smokers and smokers). In addition to breath analysis, preliminary studies were carried out to evaluate the possibility of lesion-surrounded air (analyzed OSCC tumors are in the oral cavity) as a source of biomarkers. The oral cavity location of the squamous cell carcinoma tumors constitutes an opportunity to non-invasively collect the air surrounding the lesion. Small quantities (20 ml) of air collected in the oral cavity were analyzed using the above methodology. Results showed that aldehydes present in the oral cavity might constitute potential OSCC biomarkers.

  7. Fertility effects of cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Donald E; Hacker, Neville

    2003-01-01

    Cancer sufferers are a subfertile group, and most treatments have the potential to adversely affect gonadal function. As cancer treatment becomes more effective and survival rates improve there are more cancer survivors in the reproductive age group for whom parenting is an important consideration. This article outlines the effects on fertility of cancer treatments and techniques to minimise the risk of infertility. The overall prospects for younger cancer sufferers to either retain their fertility or have genetic offspring is now better than ever before, due to advances in assisted reproductive technology, the appropriate use of fertility sparing surgery and other techniques to reduce the toxicity of therapy on the reproductive organs. These advances raise new moral and ethical concerns that must be considered before advising cancer sufferers of the options for preserving reproductive capacity.

  8. Oral cavity changes following treatment of oncologic patients with tumors of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubenov, T.; Vasilev, V.; Boneva, I.

    1982-01-01

    Changes mainly in the soft tissue structures of the oral cavity (salivary glands and mucosa, following ionizing radiation treatment of tumors of the head and neck), were studied. The relationship between the morphologic characteristics of the lesions and the dose and, on the other hand, the correlation with the clinical symptoms are discussed. (authors)

  9. Buccal mucosal cancer patient who failed to recover taste acuity after partial oral cavity irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Fukushima, Shoko; Furuhashi, Satoru; Yoshinobu, Takashi; Takahashi, Motoichiro; Miyake, Masahiko; Kawamori, Jiro; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    We report a patient who suffered from prolonged loss of taste acuity after partial oral cavity irradiation. The electric taste threshold (ETT) of each point in the oral cavity was measured with an electric gustometer to evaluate quantitative local taste acuity. A subjective total taste acuity (STTA) scale was used to evaluate subjective total taste acuity. A 61-year-old male patient with right buccal mucosal cancer underwent radiation therapy more than 11 years ago, and has suffered from loss of taste acuity since then. He received electron beam irradiation to part of the oral cavity and right upper neck, mainly the right buccal mucosa near the retromolar trigone and a metastatic right submandibular node. He did not receive irradiation to the anterior portion of the tongue or left side of the posterior portion of the tongue. His ETT scores for each point were equal to or greater than 26, and his STTA score was grade 3. The present case implies that radiation damage to part of the oral cavity can cause the loss of subjective total taste acuity. (author)

  10. Buccal mucosal cancer patient who failed to recover taste acuity after partial oral cavity irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Tsutomu; Fukushima, Shoko; Furuhashi, Satoru; Yoshinobu, Takashi; Takahashi, Motoichiro [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Surugadai Hospital; Miyake, Masahiko [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Dentistry; Kawamori, Jiro; Tanaka, Yoshiaki [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-10-01

    We report a patient who suffered from prolonged loss of taste acuity after partial oral cavity irradiation. The electric taste threshold (ETT) of each point in the oral cavity was measured with an electric gustometer to evaluate quantitative local taste acuity. A subjective total taste acuity (STTA) scale was used to evaluate subjective total taste acuity. A 61-year-old male patient with right buccal mucosal cancer underwent radiation therapy more than 11 years ago, and has suffered from loss of taste acuity since then. He received electron beam irradiation to part of the oral cavity and right upper neck, mainly the right buccal mucosa near the retromolar trigone and a metastatic right submandibular node. He did not receive irradiation to the anterior portion of the tongue or left side of the posterior portion of the tongue. His ETT scores for each point were equal to or greater than 26, and his STTA score was grade 3. The present case implies that radiation damage to part of the oral cavity can cause the loss of subjective total taste acuity. (author)

  11. [Calculus formation in the prostatic cavity after transurethral resection of the prostate: causes, treatment and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhi-Feng; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Cheng, Wen; Zhou, Wen-Quan; Ge, Jing-Ping; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Gao, Jian-Ping

    2012-05-01

    To study the causes, clinical manifestations, treatment and prevention of calculus that develops in the prostatic cavity after transurethral resection of the prostate. We reported 11 cases of calculus that developed in the prostatic cavity after transurethral resection or transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate. The patients complained of repeated symptoms of frequent micturition, urgent micturition and urodynia after operation, accompanied with urinary tract infection and some with urinary obstruction, which failed to respond to anti-infective therapies. Cystoscopy revealed calculi in the prostatic cavity, with eschar, sphacelus, uneven wound surface and small diverticula in some cases. After diagnosis, 1 case was treated by holmium laser lithotripsy and a second transurethral resection of the prostate, while the other 10 had the calculi removed under the cystoscope, followed by 1 -2 weeks of anti-infective therapy. After treatment, all the 11 cases showed normal results of routine urinalysis, and no more symptoms of frequent micturition, urgent micturition and urodynia. Three- to six-month follow-up found no bladder irritation symptoms and urinary tract infection. Repeated symptoms of frequent micturition, urgent micturition, urodynia and urinary tract infection after transurethral resection of the prostate should be considered as the indicators of calculus in the prostatic cavity, which can be confirmed by cystoscopy. It can be treated by lithotripsy or removal of the calculus under the cystoscope, or even a second transurethral resection of the prostate. For its prevention, excessive electric coagulation and uneven wound surface should be avoided and anti-infection treatment is needed.

  12. Oral Cavity and Pharynx Cancer Incidence Trends by Subsite in the United States: Changing Gender Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Morris Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate oral cavity and pharynx cancer (OCPC patterns by gender. Methods. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program data for 71,446 cases diagnosed during 1975–2008 to classify OCPC by anatomic subsite as potentially HPV-related or not, with oral tongue cancer considered a separate category. Results. Total OCPC rates among men were 2–4 times those among women. Among whites, total OCPC rates rose in the younger age groups due to substantial increases in successive birth cohorts for HPV-related cancers, more rapid among men than women, and oral tongue cancers, more rapid among women than men. Among blacks, total OCPC rates declined among cohorts born since 1930 reflecting the strong downward trends for HPV-unrelated sites. Among Hispanics and Asians, HPV-unrelated cancer rates generally declined, and oral tongue cancer rates appeared to be converging among young men and women. Conclusions. Decreases in total OCPC incidence reflect reductions in smoking and alcohol drinking. Rising HPV-related cancers among white men may reflect changing sexual practices. Reasons for the increasing young oral tongue cancer rates are unknown, but the narrowing of the gender differences provides a clue.

  13. Optimisation of colorectal cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Colette Bernadine Maria-Theresia van den

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although there have been several improvements in screening, staging, and treatment in the past decades, survival differences remain. For example among certain subgroups of patients, such as elderly patients and patients with

  14. Electronic Cigarette: Role in the Primary Prevention of Oral Cavity Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Franco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Cigarette smoke has been identified as the main cause of oral cavity carcinoma. Recently, the electronic cigarette, a battery-operated device, was developed to help smokers stop their tobacco addiction. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of electronic cigarettes and to establish the possible role of such device in the primary prevention of oral cavity cancer. Subjects and Methods This study included 65 subjects who were divided into three groups (smokers, e-cigarette smokers, and nonsmokers. All subjects were submitted to cytologic examination by scraping of oral mucosa. The slides were microscopically evaluated through a micronucleus assay test. Results The prevalence of micronuclei was significantly decreased in the e-cigarette smoker group. There were no statistically significant differences in micronuclei distribution according to the type of cigarette, gender, and age. Conclusions The use of electronic cigarettes seems to be safe for oral cells and should be suggested as an aid to smoking cessation.

  15. Electronic Cigarette: Role in the Primary Prevention of Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Teresa; Trapasso, Serena; Puzzo, Lidia; Allegra, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke has been identified as the main cause of oral cavity carcinoma. Recently, the electronic cigarette, a battery-operated device, was developed to help smokers stop their tobacco addiction. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of electronic cigarettes and to establish the possible role of such device in the primary prevention of oral cavity cancer. This study included 65 subjects who were divided into three groups (smokers, e-cigarette smokers, and nonsmokers). All subjects were submitted to cytologic examination by scraping of oral mucosa. The slides were microscopically evaluated through a micronucleus assay test. The prevalence of micronuclei was significantly decreased in the e-cigarette smoker group. There were no statistically significant differences in micronuclei distribution according to the type of cigarette, gender, and age. The use of electronic cigarettes seems to be safe for oral cells and should be suggested as an aid to smoking cessation.

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above the waist. Tiny tubules in the kidneys filter and clean the blood . They take out waste ... to bladder cancer. Being exposed to paints, dyes, metals, or petroleum products in the workplace. Past treatment ...

  17. Failure pattern and salvage treatment after radical treatment of head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Anja; Grau, Cai; Overgaard, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that head and neck cancer (HNC) patients benefit from specialized follow-up (FU), as this strategy ensures timely detection of relapses for successful salvage treatment. This was done by evaluation of the pattern of failure, the temporal...... recordings of recurrent disease in 567 patients with primary tumors of the larynx, pharynx, oral cavity, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses and salivary glands. A review of medical records was performed in order to update and supplement the database. Results Failures of the 567 patients were primarily in T...

  18. Development of Vertical Buffered Electropolishing for Its Post-Treatment Technology on 1.5 GHz Niobium SRF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Song; Lu Xiang-Yang; Lin Lin; Zhao Kui; Wu, A. T.; Rimmer, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the latest research development of vertical buffered electropolishing on its post-treatment procedure as well as the effects of several major post-treatment techniques for buffered electropolishing (BEP) processed 1.5 GHz niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. With the established post-treatment procedure, an accelerating gradient of 28.4 MV/m is obtained on a single cell cavity of the cebaf shape. This is the best result in the history of BEP development. The cavity is limited by quench with a high quality factor over 1.2 × 10 10 at the quench point. Analyses from optical inspection and temperature-mapping show that the quench should be originated from the pits that were already present on the cavity before this BEP treatment. All of these factors indicate that this procedure will have a great potential to produce better results if cavities without intrinsic performance limiting imperfections are used. (nuclear physics)

  19. Eribulin in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Swami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Halichondrin B is a complex, natural, polyether macrolide derived from marine sponges. Eribulin is a structurally-simplified, synthetic, macrocyclic ketone analogue of Halichondrin B. Eribulin was approved by United States Food and Drug Administration in 2010 as a third-line therapy for metastatic breast cancer patients who have previously been treated with an anthracycline and a taxane. It has a unique microtubule dynamics inhibitory action. Phase III studies have either been completed or are currently ongoing in breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and non-small cell lung cancer. Phase I and II studies in multiple cancers and various combinations are currently ongoing. This article reviews the available information on eribulin with respect to its clinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, mechanism of action, metabolism, preclinical studies, and with special focus on clinical trials.

  20. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Treatment Genetics of Kidney Cancer Research Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Renal Cell Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Renal ...

  2. Complaints reported by patients with cancer of oral cavity, submitted to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergamasco, Mariana; Miranda, Renata Puccinelli de

    2006-01-01

    The oral cavity is of fundamental importance to the speech, chewing, deglutition, suction and salivation functions. When an illness like cancer develops in this region, radiation therapy is very important, but can cause many sequels to the affected functions and structures of the Oral Motor System, especially to chewing, deglutition and speech. In such cases, the phonoaudiology support as part of a multidisciplinary staff can help providing esthetic and functional rehabilitation as well as social re-integration for a better quality of life of these patients. (author)

  3. [Treatment of testicular cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Boyle, Helen; Culine, Stéphane; Fizazi, Karim; Fléchon, Aude; Massard, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Germ-cell tumours (GCTs) are the most common type of cancer in young men. Since the late 1970s, disseminated GCT have been a paradigm for curable metastatic cancer and metastatic GCTs are highly curable with cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by surgical resection of residual masses. Patients' prognosis is currently assessed using the International Germ-Cell Consensus Classification (IGCCC) and used to adapt the burden of chemotherapy. Approximately 20% of patients still do not achieve cure after first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and need salvage chemotherapy (high dose or standard dose chemotherapy). Clinical stage I testicular cancer is the most common presentation and different strategies are proposed: adjuvant therapies, surgery or surveillance. During the last three decades, clinical trials and strong international collaborations lead to the development of a consensus in the management of GCTs.

  4. Major complications of radiotherapy in cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx. A 10 year retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.L.; Lindberg, R.D.; Lane, E.; Goepfert, H.

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the late effects and associated morbidity of radiotherapy on normal tissue, patients with squamous carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx were retrospectively reviewed. Between 1964 and 1975, 569 patients with cancer of the floor of the mouth, oral tongue, tonsil, and retromolar trigone region of the anterior faucial pillar had their primary lesions treated by radiotherapy alone for cure. One hundred twenty-eight of the patients were evaluable for this study. Bone and soft tissue morbidity were graded according to the late radiation scoring scheme of the radiation therapy oncology group of the European Organization on Research and Treatment of Cancer, tallying only grade 4 changes. Patients were further classified according to site of tumor, age, sex, tumor stage, histologic grade, and dental status--none of which had a positive correlation with complications. Of 31 evaluable patients with cancer of the floor of the mouth (median follow-up 136 months), 71 percent (22 of 31 patients) had at least one complication involving bone (osteonecrosis, pathologic fracture) or mucus membrane (ulcer). Sixty-one percent (25 of 41 patients) with primary cancer of the oral tongue had grade 4 sequelae (median follow-up 112 months). In 26 patients with cancer of the tonsil, 13 (50 percent) had grade 4 sequelae (median follow-up 113 months). This included 11 patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of osteonecrosis, 6 of whom required mandibulectomy. Patients with cancer of the retromolar trigone region of the anterior faucial pillar fared the best (median follow-up 122 months). Late sequelae were noted in 40 percent (12 of 30 patients). The morbidity attendant to cure by radiotherapy included at least one significant complication of bone or soft tissue in 40 to 70 percent of the patients, depending on the location of the primary tumor. There was also a positive correlation with dose of radiation received

  5. Antimatter cancer treatment

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Noorden, Richard

    2006-01-01

    "The idea that antimatter beams could treat cancer might seem ridiculous. But researchers working at Cerns particle accelerator laboratory in Geneva don't think so. They have just reported a successful first experiment into the biological effects of antiprotons radiation on living cells."

  6. Dosimetric properties of a novel brachytherapy balloon applicator for the treatment of malignant brain-tumor resection-cavity margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, James F.; Williams, Jeffery A.; Stubbs, James B.; Patrick, Timothy J.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: This paper characterizes the dosimetric properties of a novel balloon brachytherapy applicator for the treatment of the tissue surrounding the resection cavity of a malignant brain tumor. Methods and Materials: The applicator consists of an inflatable silicone balloon reservoir attached to a positionable catheter that is intraoperatively implanted into the resection cavity and postoperatively filled with a liquid radionuclide solution. A simple dosimetric model, valid in homogeneous media and based on results from Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations, was used to determine the dosimetric characteristics of spherical geometry balloons filled with photon-emitting radionuclide solutions. Fractional depth-dose (FDD) profiles, along with activity densities, and total activities needed to achieve specified dose rates were studied as a function of photon energy and source-containment geometry. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated to compare idealized balloon-applicator treatments to conventional 125 I seed volume implants. Results: For achievable activity densities and total activities, classical low dose rate (LDR) treatments of residual disease at distances of up to 1 cm from the resection cavity wall are possible with balloon applicators having radii between 0.5 cm and 2.5 cm. The dose penetration of these applicators increases approximately linearly with balloon radius. The FDD profile can be made significantly more or less penetrating by combining selection of radionuclide with source-geometry manipulation. Comparisons with 125 I seed-implant DVHs show that the applicator can provide a more conformal therapy with no target tissue underdosing, less target tissue overdosing, and no healthy tissue ''hot spots;'' however, more healthy tissue volume receives a dose of the prescribed dosage or less. Conclusions: This device, when filled with 125 I solution, is suitable for classical LDR treatments and may be preferable to 125 I interstitial

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy for advanced and/or recurrent cancers in the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Shimahara, Masashi; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Nagata, Kenji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2006-01-01

    This preliminary study of 5 patients with advanced and/or recurrent cancer in the oral cavity was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The patients received therapy with the 10 B-carrier p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) with or without borocaptate sodium (BSH) and irradiation thereafter with epithermal neutrons. All underwent 18 F-BPA PET studies before receiving BNCT to determine the accumulation ratios of BPA in tumor and normal tissues. The tumor mass was decreased in size and at minimum a transient partial response was achieved in all cases, though rapid tumor re-growth was observed in 2. Although tentative clinical responses and improvements in quality of life were recognized, obliteration of the tumor was not obtained in any of the cases. Additional studies are required to determine the utility and indication of BNCT for oral cancer. (author)

  9. Recent Trends in Oral Cavity Cancer Research Support in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fribley, A M; Svider, P F; Warner, B M; Garshott, D M; Raza, S N; Kirkwood, K L

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to characterize oral cavity cancer (OCC) funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with a secondary aim of comparing NIH support provided to OCC and other malignancies. NIH awards supporting OCC inquiry from 2000 to 2014 were accessed from the NIH RePORTER database. These data were used to evaluate temporal trends and the role of human papilloma virus and to determine the academic training and professional profiles of the principal investigators. Comparison of 2014 funding levels with other malignancies was also performed, controlling for incidence. Overall funding totals decreased considerably after 2009. Funding administered through the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) was 6.5 times greater than dollars awarded by the National Cancer Institute in 2000. During the period evaluated, NIDCR support decreased in most years, while National Cancer Institute support increased and approached NIDCR funding levels. Funding for human papilloma virus-related projects gradually rose, from 3.4% of dollars in 2000 to 2004 to 6.2% from 2010 to 2014 ( P < 0.05). A majority of principal investigators had a PhD omnia solus (57%), and 13% possessed dual PhD/clinical degrees. Among clinicians with specialty training, otolaryngologists and oral/maxillofacial pathologists garnered the most funding. OCC had a 2014 funding:incidence ratio of $785, much lower than for other malignancies. There has been increased volatility in funding support in recent years possibly due to budget cuts and sequestration. The National Cancer Institute has played an increasingly important role in supporting OCC research, concomitant with decreasing NIDCR support. Our findings suggest that OCC is underfunded relative to other non-oral cavity malignancies, indicating a need to increase the focus on rectifying the disparity.

  10. The oral cavity microbiota: between health, oral disease, and cancers of the aerodigestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, Pierre; Matamoros, Sébastien; Montassier, Emmanuel; Le Vacon, Françoise; Potel, Gilles; Soueidan, Assem; Jordana, Fabienne; de La Cochetière, Marie-France

    2017-06-01

    Many studies show that the human microbiome plays a critical role in the chronic pathologies of obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. More recently, the interaction between cancer and the microbiome has been highlighted. Most studies have focused on the gut microbiota because it represents the most extensive bacterial community, and the body of evidence correlating it with gut syndromes is increasing. However, in the strict sense, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract begins in the oral cavity, and special attention should be paid to the specific flora of this cavity. This study reviewed the current knowledge about the various microbial ecosystems of the upper part of the GI tract and discussed their potential link to carcinogenesis. The overall composition of the microbial communities, as well as the presence or absence of "key species", in relation to carcinogenesis is addressed. Alterations in the oral microbiota can potentially be used to predict the risk of cancer. Molecular advances and the further monitoring of the microbiota will increase our understanding of the role of the microbiota in carcinogenesis and open new perspectives for future therapeutic and prophylactic modalities.

  11. The role of the computed tomography in head and neck cancer: Comparison of CT staging with clinical staging in oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Yul; Han, Man Chung

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-six patients (24 with oral cavity or oropharynx cancers and 12 larynx cancers) were prospectively examined with computed tomography (CT) to determine its value in staging the primary tumor and to compare with the clinical staging. The CT staging agreed with the clinical staging in 50% (12/24) of the oral cavity or oropharynx cancers and in 67% (8/12) of the larynx cancers. The CT upgraded the clinical staging in 29% (7/24) of the oral cavity or oropharynx tumors and in 33% (4/12) of the larynx cancers, whereas the CT downgrade the clinical staging in 21% (5/24) of the oral cavity or oropharynx cancers. There is no downgrade on CT in larynx cancer. The post-surgical confirmation was not made in most of the cases. The possible causes of disagreement between the CT and the clinical staging, and the diagnostic value of the CT in evaluation of the primary tumor in oral cavity, oropharynx and larynx were discussed

  12. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product ... and should not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos ...

  13. [Preventive dentistry 9. Non-Restorative Cavity Treatment: advanced insight or controversial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruythuysen, R J M; van Strijp, A J P

    2018-01-01

    Non-Restorative Cavity Treatment (NRCT) is not as popular in paediatric dentistry as it should be. Substantial quantitative and qualitative evidence concerning the treatment has now been published that testifies to the success of the treatment. Some healthcare providers apply the method successfully, while others have no trust in this non-invasive cavity treatment and continue to favour the restoration of carious lesions. Reasons given for this are, among others, that NRCT is too bothersome, the patient's (or the patient's parents') compliance is low and the reimbursement is inadequate. Children, however, benefit from oral healthcare providers who take the position that a child has a right to an etiological treatment that addresses the source of the caries process and that NRCT offers a uniquely viable treatment option for this purpose. This approach fits within the parameters established by professional ethics and the law. Apart from oral healthcare providers, all agencies involved in the profession and beyond have the moral and social obligation to do justice to the implied question of the child regarding this shift in oral healthcare.

  14. Unproven methods in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, S P

    1993-07-01

    The nature-based and nontoxic image makes application of unproven methods in oncology attractive in contrast to application of a mechanized scientific medicine. The application frequency of these treatments ranges from 10% to greater than 60%. Increasingly, the promoters try to create a scientific impression through a pseudologic cancer theory, a harmless diagnostic test, and a holistic treatment of every cancer. Of the big variety of unproven methods, which are summarized in 11 groups in this review, the following are discussed: anthroposophic and other mistletoe preparations; homeopathy; Maharishi Ayur-Veda; unproven anticancer diets; orthomolecular medicine, including ascorbic acid; and methods supposedly stimulating unspecific and specific defense mechanisms. In conclusion, physicians should beware of and have knowledge of currently used unproven cancer treatments for epidemiologic, social, economic, and scientific reasons.

  15. Microwaves for breast cancer treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Abdelhamid Elkayal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is potentially an effective method for the treatment of cancer, especially breast cancer tumors. One of the most attractive attributes of hyperthermia is the possibility of providing therapeutic benefit noninvasively, minimizing side effects. To be effective, a hyperthermia treatment must selectively heat the cancerous tissue, elevating the temperature in the tumor without exposing healthy tissue to excessive temperature elevations. In this paper, a suggested simple model of Annular Phased Array (APA using eight half wavelength linear dipoles is presented. New software (COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS is used to calculate the temperature distribution inside a model of a three layered breast (skin, breast tissue, and tumor. In addition, the effect of changing the amplitude and phases of the array elements on the temperature distributions and the conditions on the values of the phases are demonstrated in order to achieve the objective of hyperthermia for breast tumor treatment.

  16. Comparisons of hybrid radiosity-diffusion model and diffusion equation for bioluminescence tomography in cavity cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Qu, Xiaochao; Hu, Hao; Liang, Jimin; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been successfully applied to the detection and therapeutic evaluation of solid cancers. However, the existing BLT reconstruction algorithms are not accurate enough for cavity cancer detection because of neglecting the void problem. Motivated by the ability of the hybrid radiosity-diffusion model (HRDM) in describing the light propagation in cavity organs, an HRDM-based BLT reconstruction algorithm was provided for the specific problem of cavity cancer detection. HRDM has been applied to optical tomography but is limited to simple and regular geometries because of the complexity in coupling the boundary between the scattering and void region. In the provided algorithm, HRDM was first applied to three-dimensional complicated and irregular geometries and then employed as the forward light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. Combining HRDM with the sparse reconstruction strategy, the cavity cancer cells labeled with bioluminescent probes can be more accurately reconstructed. Compared with the diffusion equation based reconstruction algorithm, the essentiality and superiority of the HRDM-based algorithm were demonstrated with simulation, phantom and animal studies. An in vivo gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse experiment was conducted, whose results revealed the ability and feasibility of the HRDM-based algorithm in the biomedical application of gastric cancer detection.

  17. Risk factors for cancer of the oral cavity and oro-pharynx in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote, L F; Herrero, R; Reyes, R M; Vaccarella, S; Anta, J L; Ferbeye, L; Muñoz, N; Franceschi, S

    2001-07-06

    In terms of worldwide levels, Cuba has an intermediate incidence of cancer of the oral cavity and oro-pharynx. We studied 200 cases of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx, of whom 57 women (median age = 64) and 200 hospital controls, frequency matched with cases by age and sex, in relation to smoking and drinking history, intake of 25 foods or food groups, indicators of oral hygiene and sexual activity, and history of sexually transmitted diseases. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained from unconditional multiple logistic regressions and adjusted for age, sex, area of residence, education, and smoking and drinking habits. In the multivariate model, high educational level and white-collar occupation, but not white race, were associated with halving of oral cancer risk. Smoking > or =30 cigarettes per day showed an OR of 20.8 (95% CI: 8.9-48.3), similar to smoking > or =4 cigars daily (OR = 20.5). Drinking > or = 70 alcoholic drinks per week showed an OR of 5.7 (95% CI: 1.8-18.5). Hard liquors were by far the largest source of alcohol. Increased risk was associated with the highest tertile of intake for maize (OR = 1.9), meat (OR = 2.2) and ham and salami (OR = 2.0), whereas high fruit intake was associated with significantly decreased risk (OR = 0.4). Among indicators of dental care, number of missing teeth and poor general oral condition at oral inspection showed ORs of 2.7 and 2.6, respectively. Number of sexual partners, marriages or contacts with prostitutes, practice of oral sex and history of various sexually transmitted diseases, including genital warts, were not associated with oral cancer risk. 82% of oral cancer cases in Cuba were attributable to tobacco smoking, 19% to smoking cigars or pipe only. The fractions attributable to alcohol drinking (7%) and low fruit intake (11%) were more modest. Thus, decreases in cigarette and cigar smoking are at present the key to oral cancer prevention in Cuba. Copyright 2001 Cancer Research

  18. Up-to-date opportunities of cervical lymph nodes ultrasound investigation in patients, suffering from oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Alymov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Incidence of oral cancer in Russia is 4.52 and mortality – 2.44. Head and neck cancer is characterized by the high risk of development of metastases in regional lymph nodes. Lymph nodes status exerts influence on the treatment plan and appears to be the major predictive factor. Regional metastases result into two-fold decrease of five-year survival. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes is of prime importance. Objective. The aim of this manuscript was to illustrate and summarize publications devoted to modern methods of ultrasound evaluation of cervical lymph node status in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Results. Numerous studies have demonstrated, that standard ultrasound investigation (in B-mode is characterized by high sensitivity and specificity (specificity varies from 71.0 to 96.4 %, and specificity – from 46.6 to 91.0 %, according to different studies. In addition, ultrasound efficiency exceeds that of CT. Accuracy of ultrasound as the method of cervical lymph node investigation has increased after implementation of such methods, as elastography and elastometry (this techniques allow to achieve sensitivity of 98.1 % and specificity of 100 %. 

  19. Current Challenges in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Guedes, Cristiano; Ponce, Santiago; Ferrer, Irene; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we highlight the current concepts and discuss some of the current challenges and future prospects in cancer therapy. We frequently use the example of lung cancer. We conducted a nonsystematic PubMed search, selecting the most comprehensive and relevant research articles, clinical trials, translational papers, and review articles on precision oncology and immuno-oncology. Papers were prioritized and selected based on their originality and potential clinical applicability. Two major revolutions have changed cancer treatment paradigms in the past few years: targeting actionable alterations in oncogene-driven cancers and immuno-oncology. Important challenges are still ongoing in both fields of cancer therapy. On the one hand, druggable genomic alterations are diverse and represent only small subsets of patients in certain tumor types, which limits testing their clinical impact in biomarker-driven clinical trials. Next-generation sequencing technologies are increasingly being implemented for molecular prescreening in clinical research, but issues regarding clinical interpretation of large genomic data make their wide clinical use difficult. Further, dealing with tumor heterogeneity and acquired resistance is probably the main limitation for the success of precision oncology. On the other hand, long-term survival benefits with immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-programmed death cell protein-1/programmed death cell ligand-1[PD-1/L1] and anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 monoclonal antibodies) are restricted to a minority of patients, and no predictive markers are yet robustly validated that could help us recognize these subsets and optimize treatment delivery and selection. To achieve long-term survival benefits, drug combinations targeting several molecular alterations or cancer hallmarks might be needed. This will probably be one of the most challenging but promising precision cancer treatment strategies in the future. Targeting single molecular

  20. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following rare disorders that are inherited (passed down from parent to child): Familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome . Treatment with radiation therapy may increase the risk of ...

  1. Treatment of patients with clinically lymph node-negative squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Won-II; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Park, Charn-II; Kim, Kwang-Hyun; Sung, Myoung-Whun; Kim, Myung-Jin; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Choi, Jin-Yong

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate treatment outcome and to determine optimal treatment strategy for patients with clinically lymph node-negative (N0) oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Two hundred and twenty-seven patients with oral cavity SCC received radiotherapy with curative intent. We retrospectively analyzed 69 patients with clinically N0 disease. Forty-three patients were treated with surgery followed by radiotherapy (S+EBRT) and 26 with radiotherapy alone (EBRT). The median doses administered were 63.0 Gy for S+EBRT and 70.2 Gy for EBRT. The rates of occult metastasis were 60% for T1, 69% for T2, 100% for T3 and 39% for T4, respectively, among patients who underwent neck dissection. A contralateral occult metastasis occurred only in two patients. The median follow-up was 39 months (range, 6-170 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local control (LC) and regional control (RC) rates for all patients were 56, 50, 66 and 79%, respectively. The 5-year OS, DFS, LC and RC rates were 67/39% (P<0.01), 66/24% (P<0.01), 87/30% (P<0.01) and 73/89% (P=0.11) for S+EBRT/EBRT, respectively. The risk for occult neck metastasis is high in patients with oral cavity SCC; therefore, elective neck treatment should be considered. Excellent RC for subclinical disease can be achieved with radiotherapy alone. However, external beam radiotherapy alone to primary tumor resulted in poor LC and combined treatment with surgery and radiotherapy appeared to be a better treatment strategy. (author)

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Colon Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... only hormone therapy after a hysterectomy . Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Aromatase inhibitors . Less exposure of breast ...

  5. CT Accuracy of Extrinsic Tongue Muscle Invasion in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, J C; Baugnon, K L; Lacayo, E A; Hudgins, P A; Patel, M R; Magliocca, K R; Corey, A S; El-Deiry, M; Wadsworth, J T; Beitler, J J; Saba, N F; Liu, Y; Aiken, A H

    2017-02-01

    Extrinsic tongue muscle invasion in oral cavity cancer upstages the primary tumor to a T4a. Despite this American Joint Committee on Cancer staging criterion, no studies have investigated the accuracy or prognostic importance of radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion, the feasibility of standardizing extrinsic tongue muscle invasion reporting, or the degree of agreement across different disciplines: radiology, surgery, and pathology. The purpose of this study was to assess the agreement among radiology, surgery, and pathology for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion and to determine the imaging features most predictive of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion with surgical/pathologic confirmation. Thirty-three patients with untreated primary oral cavity cancer were included. Two head and neck radiologists, 3 otolaryngologists, and 1 pathologist prospectively evaluated extrinsic tongue muscle invasion. Fourteen of 33 patients had radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion; however, only 8 extrinsic tongue muscle invasions were confirmed intraoperatively. Pathologists were unable to determine extrinsic tongue muscle invasion in post-formalin-fixed samples. Radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion had 100% sensitivity, 76% specificity, 57% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value with concurrent surgical-pathologic evaluation of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion as the criterion standard. On further evaluation, the imaging characteristic most consistent with surgical-pathologic evaluation positive for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion was masslike enhancement. Evaluation of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion is a subjective finding for all 3 disciplines. For radiology, masslike enhancement of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion most consistently corresponded to concurrent surgery/pathology evaluation positive for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion. Intraoperative surgical and pathologic evaluation should be encouraged to verify radiologic extrinsic tongue

  6. Critical Appraisal of Nasolabial Flap for Reconstruction of Oral Cavity Defects in Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mebed, A.; Hussein, H.A.; Saber, T.Kh.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Re-evaluation of nasolabial flap in lip and oral cavity reconstruction and role of each of its variants in reconstructing various intermediate size defects was addressed. Patients and Methods: Case-series study was con-ducted in National Cancer Institute, Cairo University over the period from July 2005 - January 2009 which included 23 patients with clinically T-l N0, T-2 N0 invasive squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and the vermilion border of the lower lip. Immediately after surgical excision, one stage reconstruction of the defect was done using a type of nasolabial flap. All patients were followed and the median follow-up period was 7.5 month. Results: Twelve patients with the lower lip carcinoma and 11 patients with the carcinoma of buccal mucosa underwent surgical excision under frozen section control. 19 fasciocutaneous nasolabial flap and 4 facial artery musculomucosal flaps were used for reconstruction. Minor wound complications occurred in 2 flaps and one patient required secondary suture. Flap viability was reliable and was not affected by performance of a synchronous neck dissection. Functional results were satisfactory, cosmetic results were good in most of the patients and excellent when facial artery musculomucosal flap was used. Conclusion: The nasolabial flap is a reliable and minimally traumatic local flap for one stage reconstruction of medium size defects in the oral cavity. The abundant blood supply allowed its modification in order to cover larger defects or to obtain better cosmetic results. This versatility makes it more widely used thus minimizing the use of local tongue flaps and split thickness grafts for covering these medium size defects in cases of buccal mucosa cancer or affecting the other lip or commissure in cases of lip cancer. It has a high viability rate, low complication rate; it is quick and easy to perform in addition to its satisfactory functional and cosmetic results.

  7. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment.

  8. Investigation of the treatment results of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and clinical necessity of long-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Nobuhiro; Kirita, Tadaaki; Imai, Yuichiro; Yamanaka, Yasutsugu; Aoki, Kumiko

    2011-01-01

    It has been considered that oral cancer is cured if more than five years pass without recurrence or metastasis after the initial treatment. Treatment results are usually evaluated as a 5-year survival rate, but we sometimes find recurrence more than five years after the initial treatment. We retrospectively investigated treatment results by long-term follow-up of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity after radical surgery, and analyzed the relation between the period of follow-up and the time to recurrence. One hundred and sixteen patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity were enrolled between November 1994 and October 2004 in this study. Seventy-six patients were Stage III and 40 were stage IV, and the mean age of this cohort was 63.0 years. All patients received radical surgery with or without preoperative chemoradiotherapy and were followed for a minimum of 5 years. Overall actuarial survival of all patients was 77.8% at 10 years. The 10-year cumulative local and regional recurrence rates were 20.1% and 12.9%, respectively. The actuarial loco-regional recurrence rate was the highest within 2 years after initial treatment at 19.0%, and was seen in 3.4% even after 5 years. These results showed that it is necessary to follow-up patients with advanced oral cancer even beyond 5 years after the initial treatment because there was delayed loco-regional recurrence in 3.4%. (author)

  9. Clinico pathological presentation of tongue cancers and early cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najeeb, T.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze clinico pathological presentation of tongue cancers and to calculate survival rates (SR) with disease free survival rates (DFSR) and recurrence rates (RR) in different treatment modalities and to compare the results of surgery alone and radiotherapy alone in stage I and stage II disease and to calculate better option of treatment in early tongue cancers. Design: A longitudinal study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad (PIMS) from January 1987 to June 1998. Patients and Methods: Case histories of 67 patients were collected from departmental record. Clinical data included age at diagnosis, gender of patient, location of tumor, presenting symptoms and their duration, biopsy report, predominant histological pattern of tumor, nodal status, stage of tumor, treatment modality employed, tumor recurrence, metastasis and survival rates with disease-free survival rates after 2 years' follow-up. Results: Among 67 patients there were 31 males and 36 females. Mean age was 50 years (range 20 - 80 years). Sixty seven patients with primary cancer of tongue constituted 38.8% of oral cavity cancers during period of 1987 - 1998 in PIMS. Smoking, poor oro dental hygiene (POOH) and betel nuts chewing were the main risk factors. Odynophagia and painful ulcers on lateral border of tongue were the main clinical symptoms with average duration of 7 months. Regional lymph nodes were palpable in 32.8%, 5.5% was in stage I, 35.8% in stage II, 29.8% in stage III, and 28.3% was in stage IV. No patient was found to have distant metastasis. Histopathology in 94% of cases was squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recurrence and survival rates were determined in 49 patients. Average time of recurrence was 12.5 months. Recurrence was 100% loco regional (LR). It was 85.7% in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone, 42.1% in patients treated with surgery alone and 31.2% in patients

  10. The incidence and mortality of lip and oral cavity cancer and its relationship to the 2012 Human Development Index of Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Tiyuri; Abdollah Mohammadian-Hafshejani; Elham Iziy; Hamidreza Sadeghi Gandomani; Hamid Salehiniya

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Lip and oral cavity cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in Asia and considered to be a major public health problem due to the low survival rate. Because of the importance of access to information about this cancer (including incidence, mortality rate and relation to socioeconomic indicators), this study aims at investigating the incidence and mortality of lip and oral cavity cancer and its relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) of Asia (from 2012). Meth...

  11. Durvalumab Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Oral Cavity or Oropharynx Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-20

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage I Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage I Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  12. Eradication of colon cancer cells before tumour formation in the peritoneal cavity of mice treated with intraperitoneal Re-186 radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuya, S.; Hiramatsu, T.; Michigishi, T.

    2006-01-01

    A treatment adjuvant to surgical resection of the primary lesion has been proven to be beneficial in improving the prognosis of patients with high risks of peritoneal dissemination of colon cancer. This study was performed to determine the comparative efficacy of intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using Re-186 or I-131 labeled murine antibodies in the extermination of cancer cells. A murine anti-colorectal IgG1, A7 monoclonal antibody, was radio-labeled either with I-131 (by the chloramine-T method) or Re-186 (by the MAG3 pre-chelated method). A total number of 16 mice were subjected to RIT with Re-186 A7 (N=8) or I-131 A7 (N=8) at equitoxic doses in Balb/c bu/nu mice 10 min after intraperitoneal injection of LS180 human colon cancer cells. A third group of mice were subjected to chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil at 30 mg/kg for 4 consecutive days following the intraperitoneal injection of the same LS180 human colon cancer cells. There were 19 mice in the control group who were not subjected to any form of therapy. The results revealed that the mean survival of mice in the control (N-19), I-131 A7 RIT (N=8) and Chemotherapy (N=6) groups were 33.8 ± 1.0, 80.1 ± 2.5 and 49.3 ± 5.3 days respectively. The eight mice who were subjected to Re-186 A7 RIT showed much better survival compared to the other groups. Two of the eight mice from this group died at 105 and 111 days following Re-186 A7 RIT. Other six mice were sacrificed at 172 days, and autopsy revealed no macroscopic peritoneal tumor growth. Based on this pilot study we concluded that individual tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity would be effectively exterminated by intraperitoneal RIT with Re-186 A7. (author)

  13. Discovery – Methotrexate: Chemotherapy Treatment for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the 1950s, treatment for the majority of cancers was limited to either surgery or the use of radiation. The discovery of the use of methotrexate in curing a rare cancer marked the first time a cancer had been cured. This led to the development of many of today’s common cancer treatments.

  14. Evaluation of radiotherapy and combined therapy in cancer of the mucous membrane of the nasal auxillary sinuses and cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisevich, N.V.; Bajmakanova, S.Sh.; Rakhmetova, A.U.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 patients with cancer of the mucous membrane of the nasal auxillary sinuses and cavity were considered to give a comparative evaluations of the effect of treatment on delayed results and life span of the dead patients. No considerable influence of the treatment methods on delayed results and life span has been found (the difference is statistically insignificant). However good correlation has been found with the degree of tumor dissemination. The 5-year survival period in Stage 2 is 72-80%, in Stages 3, 4 17-25%. The effect of the fractionated dose technique has been studied in 113 patients, Stages 3 and 4, who were given radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. The correlation of the 5-year survival with the tumor stage, has also been established: in Stage 3, 14-20%, in Stage 4 6-10%. In the analysis of life span of the dead patients similar dependence on the treatment methods and dose fractionated technique has been obtained [ru

  15. Breast cancer: Diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariel, I.M.; Clearly, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This is a publication about the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer with an appeal for unified reporting of end results. Nine chapters cover historical reviews, risk factors, pathology-receptors-immunology, detection and diagnosis, treatment of the potentially curable patient, and treatment of the patient with advanced disease. The three concluding chapters discuss reconstruction, special clinical situations, and support for the patient. The role of radiation therapy is presented well. The current status of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and combined therapies is also addressed by authoritative authors

  16. Utilization of Dexaltin ointment to radiation stomatitis in patients with cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhashi, Yasushi; Abe, Masaki; Ueda, Noboru

    1981-01-01

    Dexaltin ointment (sodium polyactylic acid, containing 0.1% dexamethasone) was used to the patients with stomatitis induced by radiotherapy. Fifteen patients with cancer of the oral cavity, aged from 44 to 77, were exposed to 60 Co γ-rays or electron beams, with the irradiation dose of 2400 to 9000 rad. About 60 g of the ointment was pasted for mean period of 6.6 weeks after meals, before sleep, and whenever the patients wanted. Therapeutic effect was observed in every case and in 87% of the case the pain at meals was decreased. The ointment adhered mostly for 1 - 2 hrs and in some cases, more than 3 hrs. No adverse reaction was observed. Therefore it was suggested that Dexaltin was a promising ointment to the radiation stomatitis. (Nakanishi, T.)

  17. Coping with Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search English Español Coping With Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment KidsHealth / For Parents / Coping With Cosmetic Effects of Cancer Treatment What's in this article? Hair Loss Skin Problems ...

  18. Cisplatin superior to carboplatin in adjuvant radiochemotherapy for locally advanced cancers of the oropharynx and oral cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D. [Univ. of Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ulbricht, T.; Hakim, S.G. [Univ. of Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Maxillofacial Surgery; Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-01-15

    The optimal radiochemotherapy regimen for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is controversial. In most cases, platin-based chemotherapy regimens are used. However, uncertainty exists whether cisplatin or carboplatin is the better choice. This retrospective study compared radiochemotherapy with either cisplatin or carboplatin in patients with locally advanced SCC of the oropharynx and oral cavity. Patients and methods Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two courses of cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and days 29 - 33; n = 65) or two courses of carboplatin (AUC 1.5 on days 1-5 and days 29 - 33; n = 41). Both regimens were retrospectively compared for locoregional control (LRC), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Thirteen additional potential prognostic factors were evaluated including age, gender, ECOG performance status, tumor site, histologic grade, T/N category, AJCC stage, year of treatment, extent of resection, interval between surgery and RT, completion of chemotherapy, and radiotherapy breaks. Results The 3-year LRC rates were 85% in the cisplatin group and 62% in the carboplatin group, respectively (p = 0.004). The 3-year OS rates were 78% and 51%, respectively (p = 0.001). Acute toxicity (mucositis, skin toxicity, nausea/vomiting, renal toxicity, hematologic toxicity) and late toxicity (xerostomia, neck fibrosis, skin toxicity, lymph edema) rates were not significantly different between the two groups. On multivariate analysis, better LRC was significantly associated with cisplatin (p < 0.001), an ECOG performance status of 0-1 (p = 0.001), and an interval between surgery and RT of {<=} 6 weeks (p = 0.001). Improved OS was significantly associated with cisplatin (p < 0.001) and completion of chemotherapy (p = 0.002). Conclusion For adjuvant radiochemotherapy of patients with locally advanced cancer of the oropharynx and oral cavity, cisplatin appears preferable to carboplatin as it resulted in better outcomes without increased

  19. Communicative skills in treatmenting cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchay, Sanaullah

    2007-01-01

    Communication within oncology is a core clinical skill but one in which few oncologists or specialist cancer nurses have received much formal training. Inadequate communication may cause much distress for patients and their families, who often want considerably more information than is usually provided. Many patients leave consultations unsure about the diagnosis and prognosis, confused about the meaning of--and need for-further diagnostic tests, unclear about the management plan and uncertain about the true therapeutic intent of treatment. Additionally, communication difficulties may impede the recruitment of patients to clinical trials, delaying the introduction of efficacious new treatments into clinics

  20. Fertility after breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasum, Miro; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija; Peddi, Parvin F; Orešković, Slavko; Johnson, Rebecca H

    2014-02-01

    In many countries of the developed world, there is an increasing trend toward delay in childbearing from 30 to 40 years of age for various reasons. This is unfortunately concordant with an increasing incidence of breast cancer in women who have not yet completed their family. The current choice for premenopausal women with breast cancer is adjuvant therapy which includes cytotoxic chemotherapy, ovarian ablation (by surgery, irradiation, or chemical ovarian suppression), anti-estrogen therapy, or any combination of these. Although the use of adjuvant therapies with cytotoxic drugs can significantly reduce mortality, it raises issues of the long-term toxicity, such as induction of an early menopause and fertility impairment. The risk of infertility is a potential hardship to be faced by the patients following treatment of breast cancer. The offspring of patients who became pregnant after completion of chemotherapy have shown no adverse effects and congenital anomalies from the treatment, but sometimes high rates of abortion (29%) and premature deliveries with low birth weight (40%) have been demonstrated. Therefore, the issue of recent cytotoxic treatment remains controversial and further research is required to define a "safety period" between cessation of treatment and pregnancy. Preservation of fertility in breast cancer survivors of reproductive age has become an important issue regarding the quality of life. Currently, there are several potential options, including all available assisted technologies, such as in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer, in vitro maturation, oocyte and embryo cryopreservation, and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Because increased estrogen levels are thought to be potentially risky in breast cancer patients, recently developed ovarian stimulation protocols with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and tamoxifen appear to provide safe stimulation with endogenous estrogen. Embryo cryopreservation seems to be the most established

  1. A preliminary study on sentinel lymph node biopsy. Feasibility and predictive ability in oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Kamada, Hideo; Ninomiya, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsumasa; Sakurai, Tsutomu; Oriuchi, Noboru; Furuya, Nobuhiko

    2004-01-01

    The main factor that affects the prognosis of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) is regional lymph node metastases. For this reason, the accurate evaluation of neck metastases is required for neck management. This study investigates the sentinel lymph node identification and the accuracy of the histopathology of the sentinel lymph node in patients with HNC. Eleven patients with histologically proven oral squamous cell carcinoma accessible to radiocolloid injection were enrolled in this study. Using both lymphoscintigraphy and a handheld gamma probe, the sentinel lymph node could be identified in all 11 patients. Subsequently, the sentinel lymph nodes and the neck dissection specimen were examined for lymph node involvement due to tumor. The histopathology of sentinel lymph nodes was consistent with the pathological N classification in all 11 patients. Furthermore, the histopathology of sentinel lymph nodes was superior to physical examination, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The results of this study indicate that sentinel lymph node identification is technically feasible and predicts cervical metastases in patients with oral cavity cancer. This may be a useful diagnostic technique for identifying lymph node disease in staging lymph node dissection. (author)

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Resected Oral Cavity Cancer and Simultaneous Second Primary Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ta Liao

    Full Text Available Simultaneous second primary tumors (SSPT are not uncommon in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC living in areas where the habit of betel quid chewing is widespread. We sought to identify the main prognostic factors in OSCC patients with SSPT and incorporate them into a risk stratification scheme.A total of 1822 consecutive patients with primary OSCC treated between January 1996 and February 2014 were analyzed for the presence of SSPT. The 18-month and 5-year overall survival (OS rates served as the main outcome measures.Of the 1822 patients, 77 (4% were found to have SSPT (i.e, two malignancies identified within one month of each other. The 18-month and 5-year OS rates in patients without SSPT and with SSPT were 82% and 69%, and 72% and 53%, respectively (p = 0.0063. Patients with SSPT were further divided into patients with either esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (eso-HCC subgroup, n = 8 and other tumors (NO eso-HCC subgroup, n = 69. After multivariate analysis, neck nodal extracapsular spread (ECS, n = 18 and the presence of eso-HCC were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 18-month OS rates of SSPT patients with both eso-HCC and ECS (n = 5 vs. the remaining patients (n = 72 were 0% and 78%, respectively (p < 0.0001.OSCC patients with neck nodal ECS and esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma as SSPT have a dismal short-term prognosis.

  3. Cancer Survivors: Managing Your Emotions After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devise your own plan for coping with your emotions. Have an open mind and try different strategies to find out what works best for you. Coping with fear of recurrence. Cancer.Net. ... side effects of cancer treatment. Cancer.Net. http://www.cancer. ...

  4. Treatment of intractable cancer by radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1981-07-01

    Intraoperative irradiation, thermotherapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and neutron brachytherapy were used for locally advanced cancer and value and limitations of these therapies were discussed. Intraoperative irradiation was mainly used for cancers of the gastro-intestinal tract. In stage I gastric cancers, no difference in the five-year survival rates was found between the groups with and without intraoperative irradiation. In gastric cancers of stage II or more, intraoperative irradiation had a favourable effect. Thermotherapy was applied to superficial radio-resistant cancer by the use of a thermal system of microwave- and radio-frequency heating. This treatment induced disappearance of approximately 50% of tumor. For the treatment with hypoxic cell sensitizer, studies of phase I and II with Misonidazole were conducted; from these results, the protocol was made for phase III study of esophagus cancer, lung cancer, head and neck cancer, uterus cancer, and brain cancer. Brachytherapy using /sup 252/Cf was also developed for locally advanced cancer.

  5. Response of avian bark foragers and cavity nesters to regeneration treatments in the oak-hickory forest of Northern Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang Yong; Callie Jo Schweitzer; Adrian A. Lesak

    2006-01-01

    We examined bark-foraging and cavity-nesting birds’ use of upland hardwood habitat altered through a shelterwood regeneration experiment on the mid-Cumberland Plateau of northern Alabama. The five regeneration treatments were 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent basal area retention. The 75 percent retention treatment was accomplished by stem-injecting herbicide into mostly...

  6. Quantification of tumor morphology via 3D histology: application to oral cavity cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Scott; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Tomaszewski, John

    2016-03-01

    Traditional histopathology quantifies disease through the study of glass slides, i.e. two-dimensional samples that are representative of the overall process. We hypothesize that 3D reconstruction can enhance our understanding of histopathologic interpretations. To test this hypothesis, we perform a pilot study of the risk model for oral cavity cancer (OCC), which stratifies patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk for locoregional disease-free survival. Classification is based on study of hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) stained tissues sampled from the resection specimens. In this model, the Worst Pattern of Invasion (WPOI) is assessed, representing specific architectural features at the interface between cancer and non-cancer tissue. Currently, assessment of WPOI is based on 2D sections of tissue, representing complex 3D structures of tumor growth. We believe that by reconstructing a 3D model of tumor growth and quantifying the tumor-host interface, we can obtain important diagnostic information that is difficult to assess in 2D. Therefore, we introduce a pilot study framework for visualizing tissue architecture and morphology in 3D from serial sections of histopathology. This framework can be used to enhance predictive models for diseases where severity is determined by 3D biological structure. In this work we utilize serial H and E-stained OCC resections obtained from 7 patients exhibiting WPOI-3 (low risk of recurrence) through WPOI-5 (high risk of recurrence). A supervised classifier automatically generates a map of tumor regions on each slide, which are then co-registered using an elastic deformation algorithm. A smooth 3D model of the tumor region is generated from the registered maps, which is suitable for quantitative tumor interface morphology feature extraction. We report our preliminary models created with this system and suggest further enhancements to traditional histology scoring mechanisms that take spatial architecture into consideration.

  7. Prostate Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  9. Bladder Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  10. Kidney Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  11. [Oligometastasized colorectal cancer-modern treatment strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnebösel, M; Lambertz, A; Dejong, K; Neumann, U P

    2018-06-05

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer in UICC stage IV has been improved in the last decades by improvements in interdisciplinary treatment. Treatment strategies for oligometastasized colorectal cancer are developing more and more into an individualized treatment. An overview of the current literature of modern treatment concepts in oligometastasized colorectal cancer UICC stage IV is given. Surgery still has the supreme mandate in resectable colorectal liver metastases, as neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment strategies to not provide any benefits for these patients. In marginal or non-resectable stages systemic treatment is superior in these patients depending on the prognostic parameters. Also in curative settings local treatment options should be considered as a reasonable additive tool. An interesting treatment approach for isolated liver metastases and non-resectable colorectal cancer is liver transplantation. Irrespective of new developments in treatment strategies for metastasized colorectal cancer, resection of colorectal liver metastases remains the gold standard whenever possible.

  12. Cancer cachexia, mechanism and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tomoyoshi; Terracina, Krista P; Raza, Ali; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that half of all patients with cancer eventually develop a syndrome of cachexia, with anorexia and a progressive loss of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle mass. Cancer cachexia is characterized by systemic inflammation, negative protein and energy balance, and an involuntary loss of lean body mass. It is an insidious syndrome that not only has a dramatic impact on patient quality of life, but also is associated with poor responses to chemotherapy and decreased survival. Cachexia is still largely an underestimated and untreated condition, despite the fact that multiple mechanisms are reported to be involved in its development, with a number of cytokines postulated to play a role in the etiology of the persistent catabolic state. Existing therapies for cachexia, including orexigenic appetite stimulants, focus on palliation of symptoms and reduction of the distress of patients and families rather than prolongation of life. Recent therapies for the cachectic syndrome involve a multidisciplinary approach. Combination therapy with diet modification and/or exercise has been added to novel pharmaceutical agents, such as Megestrol acetate, medroxyprogesterone, ghrelin, omega-3-fatty acid among others. These agents are reported to have improved survival rates as well as quality of life. In this review, we will discuss the emerging understanding of the mechanisms of cancer cachexia, the current treatment options including multidisciplinary combination therapies, as well an update on new and ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25897346

  13. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  14. Ten-year results of accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiation with concomitant boost to the lumpectomy cavity after conserving surgery for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cante, Domenico; Petrucci, Edoardo; Sciacero, Piera; Piva, Cristina; Ferrario, Silvia; Bagnera, Silvia; Patania, Sebastiano; Mondini, Guido; Pasquino, Massimo; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Vellani, Giorgio; La Porta, Maria Rosa; Franco, Pierfrancesco

    2017-09-01

    Accelerated hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is considered a standard therapeutic option for early breast cancer (EBC) in the postoperative setting after breast conservation (BCS). A boost to the lumpectomy cavity may further increase local control. We herein report on the 10-year results of a series of EBC patients treated after BCS with hypofractionated WBRT with a concomitant photon boost to the surgical bed over 4 weeks. Between 2005 and 2007, 178 EBC patients were treated with a basic course of radiotherapy consisting of 45 Gy to the whole breast in 20 fractions (2.25 Gy daily) with an additional boost dose of 0.25 Gy delivered concomitantly to the lumpectomy cavity, for an additional dose of 5 Gy. Median follow-up period was 117 months. At 10-year, overall, cancer-specific, disease-free survival and local control were 92.2% (95% CI 88.7-93.4%), 99.2% (95% CI 96.7-99.7%), 95.5% (95% CI 91.2-97.2%) and 97.3% (95% CI 94.5-98.9%), respectively. Only eight patients recurred. Four in-breast recurrences, two axillary node relapses and two metastatic localizations were observed. Fourteen patients died during the observation period due to other causes while breast cancer-related deaths were eight. At last follow-up, ≥G2 fibrosis and telangiectasia were seen in 7% and 5% of patients. No major lung and heart toxicities were observed. Cosmetic results were excellent/good in 87.8% of patients and fair/poor in 12.2%. Hypofractionated WBRT with concomitant boost to the lumpectomy cavity after BCS in EBC led to consistent clinical results at 10 years. Hence, it can be considered a valid treatment option in this setting.

  15. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Suresh Ghadyalpatil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC, colorectal cancer (CRC, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, esophageal cancer (EC, and pancreatic cancer (PC. Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist , these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes.The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs need focussed

  16. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil Suresh; Supriya, Chopra; Prachi, Patil; Ashwin, Dsouza; Avanish, Saklani

    2016-01-01

    GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC), colorectal cancer (CRC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), esophageal cancer (EC), and pancreatic cancer (PC). Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist, these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes. The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach) to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs) need focussed attention

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer is found early. Signs and symptoms of cervical cancer include vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by cervical cancer or by other conditions . Check with your ...

  18. Clinical effectiveness, toxicity, and failure patterns of helical tomotherapy for postoperative oral cavity cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh CH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1–3 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,4 Li-Ying Wang,5 Li-Jen Liao,6 Yu-Chin Lin,7 Ying-Shiung Kuo,8 Wu-Chia Lo,6 Chien-Fu Tseng,8 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Hsiu-Ling Chou,9,10 Yen-Ping Hsieh,11 Le-Jung Wu,1 Yu-Jen Chen3,12–14 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, 2Department of Medicine, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, 5School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 6Department of Otolaryngology, 7Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, 8Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, 9Department of Nursing, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, 10Department of Nursing, Oriental Institute of Technology, Taipei, 11Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, 12Department of Radiation Oncology, 13Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 14Graduate Institute of Sport Coaching Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: The outcome of postoperative high- and intermediate-risk oral cavity cancer (OCC patients receiving helical tomotherapy (HT remains limited. Materials and methods: Between November 2006 and November 2012, 53 postoperative high- and intermediate-risk OCC patients treated with HT were enrolled. Results: The 4-year locoregional, local, and regional control rates were 66%, 76.4%, and 94.3%, respectively. The 4-year locoregional control rates of oral tongue and buccal mucosa cancer were 88.3% and 37.1%, respectively (P=0.012. Eleven (20.8% patients experienced locoregional failure. In-field failure occurred in six of 53 (11.3% in the primary area and three of 53 (5.7% in the regional lymph-node area. No marginal failure was noted. Two of 53 (3.8% experienced out-of-field failure. The rates of grade 3 dermatitis

  19. Impact of underlying diabetes and presence of lung cavities on treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, A; Hagiwara, E; Hamai, J; Taguri, M; Terauchi, Y

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the effects of diabetes and the presence of lung cavities on treatment outcomes in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We conducted a retrospective review of the clinical records of all consecutive patients admitted to the Kanagawa Cardiovascular and Respiratory Centre with the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. The study outcomes examined were time to sputum culture conversion and percentage of patients with sputum culture conversion by the time 2 months of treatment, and these outcomes were compared between patients with and without diabetes. Of the 260 patients enrolled in the study, 69 were diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus, while the remaining 191 did not have diabetes. The percentage of patients with cavities was higher in the patients with diabetes (71.0%) than in those without (45.5%; P = 0.0003). The time to sputum culture conversion was significantly longer in the patients with diabetes than in those without (P = 0.0005), and the percentage of patients with a positive sputum culture at 2 months was higher in the patients with diabetes (43.5%) than in those without (18.8%; P = 0.0001). Multivariate analyses revealed that the presence/absence of lung cavities was a more important determinant of treatment outcomes than the presence/absence of diabetes. The presence of lung cavities was found to be a more important determinant of the treatment outcomes than that of diabetes per se in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  20. Screening for Breast Cancer: Staging and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Staging and Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... oncology nurse and a registered dietitian. Read More "Screening For Breast Cancer" Articles #BeBrave: A life-saving test / Breast Cancer ...

  1. Progress in Rectal Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Wim P.

    2012-01-01

    The dramatic improvement in local control of rectal cancer observed during the last decades is to be attributed to attention to surgical technique and to the introduction of neoadjuvant therapy regimens. Nevertheless, systemic relapse remains frequent and is currently insufficiently addressed. Intensification of neoadjuvant therapy by incorporating chemotherapy with or without targeted agents before the start of (chemo)radiation or during the waiting period to surgery may present an opportunity to improve overall survival. An increasing number of patients can nowadays undergo sphincter preserving surgery. In selected patients, local excision or even a “wait and see” approach may be feasible following active neoadjuvant therapy. Molecular and genetic biomarkers as well as innovative imaging techniques may in the future allow better selection of patients for this treatment option. Controversy persists concerning the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy and/or targeted therapy after neoadjuvant regimens. The currently available evidence suggests that in complete pathological responders long-term outcome is excellent and adjuvant therapy may be omitted. The results of ongoing trials will help to establish the ideal tailored approach in resectable rectal cancer. PMID:22970381

  2. Trends in oral cavity, pharyngeal, oesophageal and gastric cancer mortality rates in Spain, 1952-2006: an age-period-cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane-Mato, Daniel; Aragonés, Nuria; Ferreras, Eva; García-Pérez, Javier; Cervantes-Amat, Marta; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2014-04-11

    Although oral cavity, pharyngeal, oesophageal and gastric cancers share some risk factors, no comparative analysis of mortality rate trends in these illnesses has been undertaken in Spain. This study aimed to evaluate the independent effects of age, death period and birth cohort on the mortality rates of these tumours. Specific and age-adjusted mortality rates by tumour and sex were analysed. Age-period-cohort log-linear models were fitted separately for each tumour and sex, and segmented regression models were used to detect changes in period- and cohort-effect curvatures. Among men, the period-effect curvatures for oral cavity/pharyngeal and oesophageal cancers displayed a mortality trend that rose until 1995 and then declined. Among women, oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer mortality increased throughout the study period whereas oesophageal cancer mortality decreased after 1970. Stomach cancer mortality decreased in both sexes from 1965 onwards. Lastly, the cohort-effect curvature showed a certain degree of similarity for all three tumours in both sexes, which was greater among oral cavity, pharyngeal and oesophageal cancers, with a change point in evidence, after which risk of death increased in cohorts born from the 1910-1920s onwards and decreased among the 1950-1960 cohorts and successive generations. This latter feature was likewise observed for stomach cancer. While the similarities of the cohort effects in oral cavity/pharyngeal, oesophageal and gastric tumours support the implication of shared risk factors, the more marked changes in cohort-effect curvature for oral cavity/pharyngeal and oesophageal cancer could be due to the greater influence of some risk factors in their aetiology, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. The increase in oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer mortality in women deserves further study.

  3. [Treatments for Pancreatic Cancer with Oligometastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Junji

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer, adenocarcinoma, generally rapidly progresses, and if a metastatic lesion is detected, chemotherapy is applied even in solitary metastasis. However, surgical resection for solitary metastasis have been reported to achieve long survival in some pancreatic cancer patients. In a prospective study of surgery for hepatic and lymph node oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer, long survival of 5 years or more was reported around 10%. Furthermore, longer survival and fewer rerecurrence were achieved with surgery in lung metastasis than in liver metastasis and loco-regional recurrence. Although there has been no establishment of concept or no consensus of treatment strategy for oligometastasis in pancreatic cancer, some patients with pancreatic cancer have long disease-free survival by surgery for oligometastasis. A population of pancreatic cancer patients who have benefits of surgery for oligometastasis should be identified, and it is necessary to establish treatments for oligometastasis as standard treatments in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Facing Forward Series: Life After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment Coping with your feelings Going back to work and relating with friends and coworkers Show this booklet to the people who are close to you so they understand what life is like after cancer treatment. Take it with ...

  5. Targeting cancer cells using 3-bromopyruvate for selective cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam H Baghdadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer treatment deserves more research efforts despite intensive conventional treatment modalities for many types of malignancies. Metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy receive a lot of global research efforts. The current advances in cancer biology may improve targeting the critical metabolic differences that distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. Cancer cells are highly glycolytic for energy production, exhibit the Warburg effect, establish aggressive acidic microenvironment, maintain cancer stem cells, exhibit resistance to chemotherapy, have low antioxidant systems but different ΔΨm (delta psi, mitochondrial transmembrane potential, express P-glycoprotein for multidrug resistance, upregulate glucose transporters and monocarboxylate transporters and are under high steady-state reactive oxygen species conditions. Normal cells differ in all these aspects. Lactate produced through the Warburg effect helps cancer metastasis. Targeting glycolysis reactions for energy production in cancer cells seems promising in decreasing the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. 3-bromopyruvate makes use of cancer biology in treating cancer cells, cancer stem cells and preventing metastasis in human cancer as discussed in this review. Updated advances are analyzed here, which include research analysis of background, experience, readings in the field of cancer biology, oncology and biochemistry.

  6. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical and practical substantiation of dose fractionation regimes in radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The indications and contraindications to radiotherapy, radiation reactions and complications resulting from the treatment process are considered. The preparation of patients to the application of chemoradiation treatment methods is described. The recommentations for the improvement of immediate and delayed results of treatment of esophagus cancer patients are given. 99 refs.; 15 figs

  7. Botulinum Toxin A for Oral Cavity Cancer Patients: In Microsurgical Patients BTX Injections in Major Salivary Glands Temporarily Reduce Salivary Production and the Risk of Local Complications Related to Saliva Stagnation

    OpenAIRE

    Corradino, Bartolo; Lorenzo, Sara Di; Moschella, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In patients suffering from oral cavity cancer surgical treatment is complex because it is necessary to remove carcinoma and lymph node metastasis (through a radical unilateral or bilateral neck dissection) and to reconstruct the affected area by means of free flaps. The saliva stagnation in the post-operative period is a risk factor with regard to local complications. Minor complications related to saliva stagnation (such as tissue maceration and wound dehiscence) could become major complicat...

  8. The conservative treatment of the breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami, L.

    1982-01-01

    Despite major achievements in the medical field, the survival rate of patients with breast cancer has not changed over the last 50 years. Certain treatments once taken as definitive are now being reviewed. The therapeutic evolution of breast cancer is studied and emphasis is given to new treatment modalities, particularly the conservative ones. (Author) [pt

  9. Radiation and chemoradiation treatment of esophagus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhigaliev, N.; Kusherbaev, S.; Abdrakhmanov, Zh.

    1988-01-01

    Indications and contraindications for radiation treatment of esophagus cancer are presented. The role of chemoradiation among esophagus cancer treatment methods is determined.Thechnical, dosimetric and clinical data are sequently delivered. Preparation of a patient for chemoradiation is described. Recommendations on their most efficient use are given

  10. Lymph node ratio predicts the benefit of post-operative radiotherapy in oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, Damien; Gluck, Iris; Pfeffer, M. Raphael; Symon, Zvi; Lawrence, Yaacov R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The standard treatment for non-metastatic oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) is surgical resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy (PORT) with/without chemotherapy in high risk patients. Given the substantial toxicity of PORT we assessed lymph node ratio (LNR) as a predictor of PORT benefit. Design: By using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, we analyzed all node positive OCSCC patients diagnosed between 1988 and 2007 who underwent neck dissection. LNR was categorized into three groups: <6%, 6–12.5% and >12.5%. Results: In 3091 subjects identified, median survival was 32, 25 and 16 months for LNR Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. On multivariate analysis, survival was associated with age, race, grade, tumor size, nodal stage, extra-capsular extension, use of PORT and LNR. When stratified by LNR group, PORT was associated with a survival benefit only in Group 3 (LNR > 12.5%): 2 year survival 25% vs 37%. No benefit to PORT was seen when the LNR ⩽ 12.5%: 2 year survival 51% vs 54%. Conclusion: A low LNR is associated with extended survival in LN positive OCSCC. The survival benefit associated with PORT in this disease appears to be limited to those with a LNR > 12.5%. Validation is required prior to the clinical implementation of our findings

  11. Pathogenic characteristics of Candida albicans isolated from oral cavities of denture wearers and cancer patients wearing oral prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothibe, J V; Patel, M

    2017-09-01

    Candida albicans cause opportunistic infections including oral candidiasis in immunocompromised patients. It has an ability to cause infection due to its virulence factors. This study investigated the pathogenic characteristics of C. albicans isolated from the oral cavities of healthy subjects and two vulnerable groups, denture wearers and cancer patients wearing oral prostheses. Oral rinse samples were collected and cultured for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of Candida. Twenty strains of C. albicans isolated from the healthy individuals and denture wearers and, 14 strains isolated from the cancer patients were selected and their pathogenic characteristics were measured. The results of the study groups were compared using a Scheffe test for pairwise comparison and a chi square test. Denture wearer and cancer patients with prostheses carried significantly higher number (p production were significantly higher in the strains from denture wearers. In addition, high number of isolates from the denture wearers produced phospholipase and proteinase (85% and 80% respectively) compared to the strains from normal subjects (25% and 60% respectively). Only the germ tube formation and adherence ability were significantly higher in the strains from the cancer patients with prostheses (p = 0.05 and p oral cavity and prostheses is important in the prevention of colonization of Candida and the development of oral candidiasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child or being exposed to radiation from an atomic bomb. The cancer may occur as soon as 5 years ... thyroid cancer, drugs may be given to prevent the body from making thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), a hormone that can ...

  13. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  14. Fertility preservation during cancer treatment: clinical guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A; Oktay, Kutluk

    2014-01-01

    The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer today will become long-term survivors. The threat to fertility that cancer treatments pose to young patients cannot be prevented in many cases, and thus research into methods for fertility preservation is developing, aiming at offering cancer patients the ability to have biologically related children in the future. This paper discusses the current status of fertility preservation methods when infertility risks are related to surgical oncologic treatments, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Several scientific groups and societies have developed consensus documents and guidelines for fertility preservation. Decisions about fertility and imminent potentially gonadotoxic therapies must be made rapidly. Timely and complete information on the impact of cancer treatment on fertility and fertility preservation options should be presented to all patients when a cancer treatment is planned. PMID:24623991

  15. Treatment of the pain caused by cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masao

    1979-01-01

    Relief of pain caused by cancerous invasion is one of the most important role of radiotherapy. Telecobalt has improved the palliative effects for cancer pain, because of its sufficient depth dose. Supervoltage x-ray generated from Linac has expanded indications of treatment for cancer pain by the shortening of treatment time due to high dose rate. Intraoperative electron beam therapy is useful in the case of carcinoma of the pancreas suffering severe pain. Fast neutron therapy is clearly more effective than supervoltage x-ray for pain caused by the invasion of radioresistant cancer. Pelvic angiography is useful for diagnosis of pain focus caused by illiac lymph node metastasis. (author)

  16. Epidemiology, incidence and mortality of oral cavity and lips cancer and their relationship with the human development index in the world

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Ramezani Siakholak; Mahshid Ghoncheh; Reza Pakzad; Hamidreza Sadeghi Gandomani; Fereshteh Ghorat; Hamid Salehiniya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: According to the importance of knowledge about incidence and mortality of oral cavity and lip cancer in health planning, this study was performed with the aim of investigating the incidence and mortality rate of oral cavity and lip cancer and its relation with the Human Development Index in the world in 2012. Methods: The study was conducted based on data from the world data of cancer and the World Bank (including the HDI and its components). Data about the age-specific inc...

  17. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injektor Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Eremeev, G V; Kneisel, P; Stirbet, M; Turlington, L

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac [1]. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning; the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing [2] was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test were carried out at TJNAF’s production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (Ø10 mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects a...

  18. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injector Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, A.; Murcek, P.; Teichert, J.; Xiang, R.; Eremeev, G. V.; Kneisel, P.; Stirbet, M.; Turlington, L.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning, the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test was carried out at TJNAF's production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (O-slash10mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects appeared in the least accessible cathode cell. This contribution reports about our experiences, initial results and the on-going diagnostic work to understand and fix the problems

  19. Cardiac risks in multimodal breast cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Almost all breast cancer patients receive one or more adjuvant treatments consisting of tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, LHRH-antogonists, chemotherapy, trastuzumab, and radiotherapy. These treatments have been shown to considerably improve overall survival. As a result, long term survival for 15 and more years is achieved in more than two thirds of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Therefore, more interest in short and long term risks of adjuvant treatments has been arisen. The focus of this article is the long term cardiac risks of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients and possible interactions with chemotherapy and trastuzumab. (orig.)

  20. Resting-state fMRI study of acute migraine treatment with kinetic oscillation stimulation in nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie-Qiang Li

    2016-01-01

    The result of this study confirms the efficacy of KOS treatment for relieving acute migraine symptoms and reducing attack frequency. Resting-state fMRI measurements demonstrate that migraine is associated with aberrant intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory systems. KOS in the nasal cavity gives rise to the adjustment of the intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory networks and restores the physiological homeostasis in the autonomic nervous system.

  1. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know what to expect after treatment ends. Emotional effects of treatment The last day of treatment It is normal to have different feelings, emotions and fears after treatment ends. Not everyone feels ...

  2. Early breast cancer: diagnosis, treatment and survivorship.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meade, Elizabeth

    2013-01-11

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer and globally remains a major public health concern. The diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer continues to develop. Diagnosis is now more precise, surgery is less mutilating and women now have the option of breast conserving therapy with better cosmesis, and without sacrificing survival. Radiotherapy is more targeted and the selection of patients for adjuvant chemotherapy is based not only on prognostic and predictive factors, but also on newer molecular profiling that will ensure that chemotherapy is given to the patients who need and respond to it. These developments all provide a more tailored approach to the treatment of breast cancer. Management now involves a multidisciplinary team approach in order to provide the highest standard of care for patients throughout their cancer journey from diagnosis through treatment and into follow-up care.

  3. Development of cancer treatment guidelines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Krystyna Kiel

    2011-05-26

    May 26, 2011 ... KEYWORDS. Cancer;. Therapy;. Guidelines. Contents. 1. Why develop guidelines? ... Widely available guideline resources in cancer care. ... The use of guidelines in medicine has a long history. Many .... She has a negative family history. ... The patient has 1 cm grade 3 infiltrating ductal carcinoma.

  4. Treatment-associated leukemia following testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travis, LB; Andersson, M; Gospodarowicz, M; van Leeuwen, FE; Bergfeldt, K; Lynch, CF; Curtis, RE; Kohler, BA; Wiklund, T; Storm, H; Holowaty, E; Hall, P; Pukkala, E; Sleijfer, DT; Clarke, EA; Boice, JD; Stovall, M; Gilbert, E

    2000-01-01

    Background: Men with testicular cancer are at an increased risk of leukemia, but the relationship to prior treatments is not well characterized. The purpose of our study was to describe the risk of leukemia following radiotherapy and chemotherapy for testicular cancer. Methods: Within a

  5. Diagnostic and treatment manual of urological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz y Mino, Milton; Tafur, Fausto; Cornejo, Francisco; Gaibor, Jose; Bueno, Cesar; Basantes, Amparito

    2004-01-01

    This book compiles different opinions about researches, diagnosis, methods, procedures and treatment of urological cancer, which will be useful for physicians and specialists of this illness. This manual is well structured in eight chapters with references, illustrations, figures and tables about neoplasms of kidney, urinary tract, urogenital system. This document is a bibliographic revision about ecuadorian experience in urological cancer

  6. [Practice guideline 'Prostate cancer: diagnosis and treatment'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijke, T.M. de; Battermann, J.J.; Moorselaar, R.J.A. van; Jong, I.J. de; Visser, A.P.; Burgers, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    --A national, multidisciplinary practice guideline was developed concerning diagnosis and treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Because of the lack of sufficient scientific evidence at this moment no practice guideline on screening is included. --The diagnosis of prostate cancer is made by

  7. STATIN CONTAINING COMPOSITIONS FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Metselaar, J.M.; Storm, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising statin, and especially to the use of such compositions in the treatment of cancer or in the inhibition of cancer growth. More specifically, the invention relates to a method for targeting a statin to tumor tissue.

  8. TRAILs towards improved cervical cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, John

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a life threatening disease occurring world-wide, but affecting especially women in developing countries. Standard treatment for cevical cancer varies per FIGO stage and patient related factors. In general patients with non bulky (<4 cm) FIGO stage IB and IIA are treated with a

  9. Microleakage in conservative cavities varying the preparation method and surface treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Abdallah Atoui

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess microleakage in conservative class V cavities prepared with aluminum-oxide air abrasion or turbine and restored with self-etching or etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Forty premolars were randomly assigned to 4 groups (I and II: air abrasion; III and IV: turbine and class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces. Conditioning approaches were: groups I/III - 37% phosphoric acid; groups II/IV - self-priming etchant (Tyrian-SPE. Cavities were restored with One Step Plus/Filtek Z250. After finishing, specimens were thermocycled, immersed in 50% silver nitrate, and serially sectioned. Microleakage at the occlusal and cervical interfaces was measured in mm and calculated by a software. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05. RESULTS: Marginal seal provided by air abrasion was similar to high-speed handpiece, except for group I. There was SIGNIFICANT difference between enamel and dentin/cementum margins for to group I and II: air abrasion. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system promoted a better marginal seal. At enamel and dentin/cementum margins, the highest microleakage values were found in cavities treated with the self-etching adhesive system. At dentin/cementum margins, high-speed handpiece preparations associated with etch-and-rinse system provided the least dye penetration. CONCLUSION: Marginal seal of cavities prepared with aluminum-oxide air abrasion was different from that of conventionally prepared cavities, and the etch-and-rinse system promoted higher marginal seal at both enamel and dentin margins.

  10. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kococik, Z.; Kococik, M.

    2007-01-01

    The suggested classifications of locally recurrent rectal cancer are based on the presence of symptoms and the degree of tumour fixation to the pelvic wall, or, otherwise, account for factor T in the TMN system. Although the results of rectal cancer treatment have improved, which may be attributed to total meso rectal excision and application of perioperative radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy, the ratio of cases of locally recurrent rectal cancer still amount from several to over a dozen percent. Among the available diagnostic methods for detecting locally recurrent rectal cancer after anterior rectal resection, endorectal sonography is of special importance. In the estimation of prognostic factors the lack of vascular invasion in recurrent cancer and the long period between the treatment of primary rectal cancer and the development of recurrence are a sign of good prognosis, while pain prior to recurrence treatment and male sex diminish the chances for cure. Locally recurrent rectal cancer impairs the patient's quality of life in all measurable aspects, but even after complete recovery we observe severe disturbances of sexual activity in most patients, and a number of patients require hygiene pads or suffer from chronic pain. Local recurrence of rectal cancer is more commonly qualified for excision after surgical treatment only, than after preoperative radiotherapy. The probability of total recurrent rectal cancer excision increases when the patient is younger, the primary tumours was less advanced and the first operation was sphincter-sparing surgery. Progress in the surgical treatment of recurrent rectal cancer was brought on by the introduction of the composite musculocutaneous flap to compensate the loss of perineal tissue. The application of intraoperative radiotherapy improves treatment results of recurrent rectal cancer, however at the cost of more frequent, serious postoperative complications and intense pain. In inoperable cases high dose regional

  11. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... above the waist. Tiny tubules in the kidneys filter and clean the blood . They take out waste ... to bladder cancer. Being exposed to paints, dyes, metals, or petroleum products in the workplace. Past treatment ...

  12. Systemic treatment of breast cancer in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szegheoova, O.

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is increasing due to trend of postponing child-bearing to later age. Breast cancer diagnosed during lactation has different biologic behaviour and worse prognosis than when diagnosed during pregnancy. Pregnancy does not constitute a negative prognostic factor per se for outcomes of breast cancer in pregnancy, therefore breast cancer should be treated while containing pregnancy. Pregnancy should not delay treatment. Therapy should follow standard procedures as closely as possible, though with different timing of treatment modalities. Experienced multidisciplinary team is crucial for achieving good treatment results and involvement of an informed patient in decision-making is a must. Properly managed treatment during pregnancy does not carry detrimental effect on development and well-being of children. (author)

  13. Cabozantinib for Initial Treatment of Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    FDA has approved cabozantinib (Cabometyx®) as an initial treatment for patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. The approval adds another tyrosine kinase inhibitor to the available options for patients with advanced kidney cancer.

  14. Treatment of advanced breast cancer. An experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnoni, G; Corcione, S; Api, P

    1984-01-01

    The Authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotherapy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  15. Radiation Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, W. Y.; Suh, C. O.; Kim, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    63 patients who were irradiated with a goal of long term control among 101 patients with esophageal cancer seen during an 11 years period between Jan, 1970 and Dec, 1980 at Yonsei Cancer Center in Seoul, Korea have retrospectively analysed. 52(82.5%) among the 63 patients were confirmed to have epidermoid carcinoma in the histology. The actuarial 3 and 5 years survival rates of 17 cased of T1, esophageal cancer were 24.7% and 20.8%. Statistically, there was no significant difference in survival rate according to tumor location (p>0.05)

  16. Targeted treatments for cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta-Zaragoza O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Peralta-Zaragoza,1 Víctor Hugo Bermúdez-Morales,1 Carlos Pérez-Plasencia,2,3 Jonathan Salazar-León,1 Claudia Gómez-Cerón,1 Vicente Madrid-Marina11Direction of Chronic Infections and Cancer, Research Center in Infection Diseases, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México; 2Oncogenomics Laboratory, National Cancer Institute of Mexico, Tlalpan, México; 3Biomedicine Unit, FES-Iztacala UNAM, México City, MéxicoAbstract: Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide and the development of new diagnosis, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80%–95% of women with early stage cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent decades, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and expressed in most cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Other efforts have been focused on antitumor immunotherapy strategies. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, perturbation of antitumor immune response, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, in this review article we discuss potential targets for the treatment of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, with special attention to immunotherapy approaches, clinical trials, siRNA molecules, and their implications as gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer development.Keywords: Cervical cancer, clinical trials, gene therapy, HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, siRNAs

  17. Sentinel node localisation using pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy and intraoperative gamma probe in early oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikram, M.; Akhtar, S.; Junaid, M.; Dhari, T.; Zaman, M.U.; Hussain, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node localisation using pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy and intra-operative gamma probe radio localisation in Pakistani patients suffering from early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Methods: The prospective case series was conducted between September 2007 and April 2010 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised patients with T1 and T2 oral cavity cancer with clinically and radiologically negative neck. Pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy was performed one day before surgery and intra-operative gamma probe was used to detect sentinel node. Final histo-pathological evaluation was taken as the gold standard. Results: The study comprised 42 patients: 32(76%) males and 10(24%) females. The primary tumour site was buccal mucosa in 25 (60%) patients, and tongue in 17 (40%). Sentinel lymph node was detected in 38 (90%) patients. On final histopathological identification, 7 (17%) patients had cancer in the neck nodes. In all patients with metastasis, sentinel lymph node technique correctly identified the involved neck level. None of the patients revealed metastasis in non-sentinel lymph nodes. Conclusion:Evidence suggested the use of sentinel node biopsy in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  18. Comparison of Selected Protein Levels in Tumour and Surgical Margin in a Group of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelczyk, Joanna Katarzyna; Gołąbek, Karolina; Cuber, Piotr; Krakowczyk, Łukasz; Owczarek, Aleksander Jerzy; Fronczek, Martyna; Choręża, Piotr; Hudziec, Edyta; Ostrowska, Zofia

    2017-08-01

    Oral cavity cancer belongs to head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma group. The purpose of the study was to assess the levels of certain proteins in a tumour and surgical margin in a group of patients with oral cavity cancer. The levels of DAPK1, MGMT, CDH1, SFRP1, SFRP2, RORA, TIMP3, p16, APC and RASSF1 proteins were measured by ELISA in tissue homogenates. The protein levels of DAPK1, MGMT, CDH1, SFRP2 and RASSF1 were significantly higher in tumour tissue than in the margin, contrary to TIMP3 which was lower in the tumour itself. DAPK1 level in the tumour was significantly higher in females than in males, the MGMT and p16 levels were lower in the tumours with lymph node metastasis (N1 + N2) than in N0 samples. The CDH1 expression was higher in a group with smoking habits, whereas TIMP3 was lower in this group. Changes in the levels of proteins in tumour and surgical margin may be either reflective of tumour occurrence and development, or they might be also responsible for the progress and reoccurrence of the disease. Levels of the studied proteins might be good prognostic factors; however, further studies are required.

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Penile Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Vulvar Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Gastric Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  5. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors induce apoptosis in oral cavity cancer cells by increased expression of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-Su; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Kim, Jin Kook; Baek, Seung Joon; Eling, Thomas E.; Lee, Won Jae; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Lee, Jeung Gweon; Lee, Joo-Hwan; Yoo, Jong-Bum

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated whether NAG-1 is induced in oral cavity cancer cells by various NSAIDs and if apoptosis induced by NSAIDs can be linked directly with the induction of NAG-1. NAG-1 expression was increased by diclofenac, aceclofenac, indomethacin, ibuprofen, and sulindac sulfide, in the order of NAG-1 induction, but not by acetaminophen, piroxicam or NS-398. Diclofenac was the most effective NAG-1 inducer. Incubation with diclofenac inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. The expression of NAG-1 was observed in advance of the induction of apoptosis. Conditioned medium from NAG-1-overexpressing Drosophila cells inhibited SCC 1483 cells proliferation and induced apoptosis. In summary, some NSAIDs induce NAG-1 expression in oral cavity cancer cells and the induced NAG-1 protein appears to mediate apoptosis. Therefore, NSAIDs may be considered as a possible chemopreventive agent against oral cavity cancer

  6. ENDOSCOPIC TECHNOLOGIES IN EARLY RECTAL CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Samsonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mesorectal excision is the “golden standard” of surgical treatment for rectal cancer. Development of endoscopic technologies allowed to implement the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in early rectal cancer treatment, decrease morbidity and mortality, improve functional outcome and quality of life. Oncological safety of this method is still a subject for discussion due to lack of lymph node harvest. Endoscopic operations for early rectal cancer are being actively implemented in daily practice, but lack of experience does not allow to include this method in national clinical prac-tice guidelines.

  7. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieli-Conwright CM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Dieli-Conwright, Breanna Z Orozco Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, Women's Health and Exercise Laboratory, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength, negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass, increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, exercise, physical well-being

  8. Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment of bladder cancer depends on the stage of the cancer. Treatment options include different types of surgery (transurethral resection, radical and partial cystectomy, and urinary diversion), radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy. Learn more about how bladder cancer is treated.

  9. Pathological and Biological Aspects of Colorectal Cancer Treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, M.J.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    Pathological and biological aspects of colorectal cancer treatment. This thesis describes several pathological and biological aspects of colorectal cancer treatment. Different patient populations were investigated including patients with mobile rectal cancer enrolled in the Dutch TME trial, patients

  10. Prostatic sarcoma after treatment of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Andrew G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between radiation exposure for treatment of cancer and occurrence of a second primary cancer at the irradiated site is well known. This phenomenon is however rare in prostate. Case presentation A 75-year-old farmer was treated for rectal cancer with preoperative 45 Gy of radiotherapy and abdominoperineal resection. Four years later he developed symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction and acute urinary retention. He underwent a transurethral resection of the prostate. Histological examination of the removed prostate tissue and immunohistochemistry revealed it to be a poorly differentiated sarcoma. Conclusion We believe this to be the first reported case of radiation-induced sarcoma following radiotherapy treatment for rectal cancer. Since radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the contemporary treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma, it is relevant to be aware of the potential long-term carcinogenic complications of radiotherapy of the pelvis.

  11. Spices for Prevention and Treatment of Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-08-12

    Spices have been widely used as food flavorings and folk medicines for thousands of years. Numerous studies have documented the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of spices, which might be related to prevention and treatment of several cancers, including lung, liver, breast, stomach, colorectum, cervix, and prostate cancers. Several spices are potential sources for prevention and treatment of cancers, such as Curcuma longa (tumeric), Nigella sativa (black cumin), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Allium sativum (garlic), Crocus sativus (saffron), Piper nigrum (black pepper) and Capsicum annum (chili pepper), which contained several important bioactive compounds, such as curcumin, thymoquinone, piperine and capsaicin. The main mechanisms of action include inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, migration and invasion of tumors, and sensitizing tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarized recent studies on some spices for prevention and treatment of cancers, and special attention was paid to bioactive components and mechanisms of action.

  12. Early prostate cancer: particularities of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, F.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction of prostate cancer screening using PSA leads to a disproportional increase of cancer incidence. Most of those tumors are small and indolent in behavior. When diagnosed, they are usually managed by radical treatment modalities despite the growth of serious adverse events of such therapy. Active surveillance appears to be an alternative treatment approach for the majority of those patients. Author stresses on the particularities of the prostate cancer diagnosed in the PSA era. Show the importance of patient stratification and the utility of the use of nomograms in clinical praxis. The clinical importance of treatment choices based on life expectancy of patient, concomitant diseases on one side and cancer biological behavior in the other side is discussed. Critically discuss the new approach of radiation with proton beams advertising that it remains an experimental therapeutic choice. (author)

  13. Spices for Prevention and Treatment of Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Yue; Li, Ya; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Sha; Li, Hua-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Spices have been widely used as food flavorings and folk medicines for thousands of years. Numerous studies have documented the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of spices, which might be related to prevention and treatment of several cancers, including lung, liver, breast, stomach, colorectum, cervix, and prostate cancers. Several spices are potential sources for prevention and treatment of cancers, such as Curcuma longa (tumeric), Nigella sativa (black cumin), Zingiber officinale (ginger), Allium sativum (garlic), Crocus sativus (saffron), Piper nigrum (black pepper) and Capsicum annum (chili pepper), which contained several important bioactive compounds, such as curcumin, thymoquinone, piperine and capsaicin. The main mechanisms of action include inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, migration and invasion of tumors, and sensitizing tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This review summarized recent studies on some spices for prevention and treatment of cancers, and special attention was paid to bioactive components and mechanisms of action. PMID:27529277

  14. Morphological evaluation of cavity preparation surface after duraphat and Er:YAG laser treatment by scanning electronic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Luciane Borelli

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of dental surface using different lasers to prevent dental caries has been studied for several on last years. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the morphological changes on dentin surface from pulpal wall of cavity preparations performed by high-speed drill, treated with 2,26% fluoride varnish (Duraphat) and Er:YAG laser, and then submitted after receiving or not to EDTA 15% treatment. Twenty Class V cavities were performed on ten humans molars. The specimens were randomly divided in to 4 groups: group 1- treatment with Duraphat followed by Er:YAG laser irradiation (120 mJ/ 4 Hz); group 2: Er:YAG laser irradiation, same parameters, followed by Duraphat treatment; group 3- same group 1 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min); group 4 - same as group 2 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min). The specimens were processed for SEM analysis. The micrographs showed that Duraphat treatment promoted morphological changes on dentin, closing dentinal tubules; the specimens treated by Duraphat and Er:YAG laser and immersed in EDTA (group 3) showed homogeneous surface, closed and protected dentinal tubules, maintenance of the fluoride varnish on the dentin surface and around the dentinal tubules, showing feasible and efficiency of these therapies the feasibility.(author)

  15. Radiation-induced malignant melanoma following radiation treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity - a case report and review of literature -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Ju; Yang, Koang Mo; Suh, Hyun Suk

    1998-01-01

    Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity is rare, accounting for 1 to 8% of all malignant melanomas. The overall prognosis remains poor despite the available treatments such as radical surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy due to failure in early detection and tendency in early metastasis. The etiology of mucosal malignant melanoma remains unkown. However, there are few cases of malignant melanoma of the oral cavity reported in the literature, which might be related to preexisting melanosis and radiation treatment. A case with malignant melanoma developed on the same site after 6 years following irradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity is reported in this article

  16. Combined endovascular and surgical treatment of melanoma of the nasal cavity: a case report; Melanoma de fosas nasales. Tratamiento combinado endovascular y quirurgico. A proposito de un caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, A.; Delgado, F.; Ramos, M.; Bravo, F. [Hospital Universitario Reina Sofia. Cordoba (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Melanoma of the nasal cavity is a rare tumor with a worse prognosis than cutaneous melanoma. It usually presents as nasal obstruction and/or epistaxis. The observation of a pigmented mass in the nasal cavity is highly suggestive of this lesion. Computed tomography shows a mass with nonspecific features. In magnetic resonance studies, it has a characteristics signal consisting of hyperintensity of T1-weighted images and hypointensity on T2-weighted images, depending on the amount of melanin. The treatment of choice is surgical resection. We present a case of melanoma of the nasal cavity in which endovascular embolization of the tumor was performed prior to surgical treatment. (Author) 11 refs.

  17. Treatments for esophageal cancer. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common form of cancer worldwide. The treatments for esophageal cancer depend on its etiology. For mucosal cancer, endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection are standard, while for locally advanced cancer, esophagectomy remains the mainstay. The three most common techniques for thoracic esophagectomy are the transhiatal approach, the Ivor Lewis esophagectomy (right thoracotomy and laparotomy), and the McKeown technique (right thoracotomy followed by laparotomy and neck incision with cervical anastomosis). Surgery for carcinoma of the cervical esophagus requires an extensive procedure with laryngectomy in many cases. When the tumor is more advanced, neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is added. The theoretical advantages of adding chemotherapy to the treatment of esophageal cancer are potential tumor down-staging prior to surgery, as well as targeting micrometastases and, thus, decreasing the risk of distant metastasis. Cisplatin- and 5-fluorouracil-based regimes are used worldwide. Chemoradiotherapy is the standard for unresectable esophageal cancer and could also be considered as an option for resectable tumors. For patients who are medically or technically inoperable, concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be the standard of care. Although neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery or salvage surgery after definitive chemoradiotherapy is a practical treatment; judicious patient selection is crucial. It is important to have a thorough understanding of these therapeutic modalities to assist in this endeavor. (author)

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Vaginal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on the ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect the prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on the ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  20. Clinical treatment planning in gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Damsker, J.I.; Karlsson, U.L.; Amendola, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment planning in gynecologic cancer is a complicated and difficult procedure. It requires an adequate preoperative assessment of the true extent of the patient's disease process and oftentimes this can be achieved not only by conventional studies but must employ surgical exploratory techniques in order to truly define the extent of the disease. However, with contemporary sophisticated treatment planning techniques that are now available in most contemporary departments of radiation oncology, radiation therapy is reemerging as an important and major treatment technique in the management of patients with gynecologic cancer

  1. Carbon Nanomaterials for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Casais-Molina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, breast cancer is considered as a health problem worldwide. Furthermore, current treatments neither are capable of stopping its propagation and/or recurrence nor are specific for cancer cells. Therefore, side effects on healthy tissues and cells are common. An increase in the efficiency of treatments, along with a reduction in their toxicity, is desirable to improve the life quality of patients affected by breast cancer. Nanotechnology offers new alternatives for the design and synthesis of nanomaterials that can be used in the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer and has now become a very promising tool for its use against this disease. Among the wide variety of nanomaterials, the scientific community is particularly interested in carbon nanomaterials (fullerenes, nanotubes, and graphene due to their physical properties, versatile chemical functionalization, and biocompatibility. Recent scientific evidence shows the potential uses of carbon nanomaterials as therapeutic agents, systems for selective and controlled drug release, and contrast agents for diagnosing and locating tumors. This generates new possibilities for the development of innovative systems to treat breast cancer and can be used to detect this disease at much earlier stages. Thus, applications of carbon nanomaterials in breast cancer treatment are discussed in this article.

  2. Plasma treatment of bulk niobium surface for superconducting rf cavities: Optimization of the experimental conditions on flat samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rašković

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Accelerator performance, in particular the average accelerating field and the cavity quality factor, depends on the physical and chemical characteristics of the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity surface. Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate nonsuperconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region and to remove the mechanically damaged surface layer, which improves the surface roughness. Here we show that the plasma treatment of bulk niobium (Nb presents an alternative surface preparation method to the commonly used buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing methods. We have optimized the experimental conditions in the microwave glow discharge system and their influence on the Nb removal rate on flat samples. We have achieved an etching rate of 1.7  μm/min⁡ using only 3% chlorine in the reactive mixture. Combining a fast etching step with a moderate one, we have improved the surface roughness without exposing the sample surface to the environment. We intend to apply the optimized experimental conditions to the preparation of single cell cavities, pursuing the improvement of their rf performance.

  3. MARKETING STUDIES OF LOCAL MARKET OF DRUGS WHICH ARE APPLIED FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF ORAL CAVITY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Tsarakhov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomatological market has actively developed recent years. Domestic experts received an access to contemporary technologies of dental diseases treatment in the world. This conditioned the appearance of new drugs and parapharmaceutical products applied in dental practice on the pharmaceutical market. In this connection, study of these drugs market, their price policy, demand and supply. Assortment of parapharmaceutical products applied in dental practice for oral cavity hygiene is represented mainly by liquid forms, such as mouth rinse, balms, elixirs, and a special place is occupied by toothpastes. Their assortment amounts to more than 700 types. Drugs, applied in dental practice are represented by the following groups: anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiallergenic, anesthetics, drugs which stimulate tissues regeneration, fluoric drugs. The purpose of this study was the analysis of regional pharmaceutical market assortment, which offers parapharmaceutical goods and drugs for prevention and treatment of oral cavity diseases to the stomatological establishments. Pharmaceutical market of the Republic of North Ossetia – Alania is represented by a wide range of drugs for dental diseases treatment. This group is represented in the assortment of practically all distributors. The drugs for dental diseases treatment is not only supplied by domestic producers but also go from pharmaceutical companies of 29 foreign countries, which influences positively on the state of drug therapy of paradontum in the region.

  4. The influence of chemical treatments on the superconducting properties of technical niobium materials and their effect on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S B; Sahni, V C; Myneni, G R

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a study of superconducting response in the niobium materials used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient (>25 MV m -1 ) superconducting radio frequency (SC-RF) cavities. These results clearly show that the typical surface chemical treatment deployed during the fabrication of SC-RF cavities affects the superconducting properties of pure niobium materials. Such SC-RF cavities operating at 2 K are often found to show anomalous RF losses, causing either a strong degradation of the quality factor or a thermal breakdown for cavity magnetic fields between 1 and 1.5 kOe. The results of our study suggest a correlation between the field for the first flux-line penetration in these chemically treated technical niobium materials and the reported onset field of anomalous losses in the SC-RF cavities.

  5. The influence of chemical treatments on the superconducting properties of technical niobium materials and their effect on the performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. B.; Myneni, G. R.; Sahni, V. C.

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of a study of superconducting response in the niobium materials used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient (>25 MV m-1) superconducting radio frequency (SC-RF) cavities. These results clearly show that the typical surface chemical treatment deployed during the fabrication of SC-RF cavities affects the superconducting properties of pure niobium materials. Such SC-RF cavities operating at 2 K are often found to show anomalous RF losses, causing either a strong degradation of the quality factor or a thermal breakdown for cavity magnetic fields between 1 and 1.5 kOe. The results of our study suggest a correlation between the field for the first flux-line penetration in these chemically treated technical niobium materials and the reported onset field of anomalous losses in the SC-RF cavities.

  6. Treatment Options by Stage (Endometrial Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... cancer cells have places where hormones can attach ( receptors ), drugs , surgery, or radiation therapy is used to ...

  7. Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... paranasal sinus cancer. The nasal cavity is the space just behind the nose where air passes on ... want to learn whether the new treatment is safe, effective, and possibly better than the standard treatment. ...

  8. Nanotechnology Cancer Therapy and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanotechnology offers the means to target therapies directly and selectively to cancerous cells and neoplasms. With these tools, clinicians can safely and effectively deliver chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and the next generation of immuno- and gene therapies to the tumor. Futhermore, surgical resection of tumors can be guided and enhanced by way of nanotechnology tools. Find out how nanotechnology will offer the next generation of our therapeutic arsenal to the patient.

  9. Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene

    2003-01-01

    The biological and physical rationale for hadron therapy is well understood by the research community, but hadron therapy is not well established in mainstream medicine. This talk will describe the biological advantage of neutron therapy and the dose distribution advantage of proton therapy, followed by a discussion of the challenges to be met before hadron therapy can play a significant role in treating cancer. A proposal for a new research-oriented hadron clinic will be presented.

  10. Gastric cancer: epidemiology, prevention, classification, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitarz R

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert Sitarz,1–3 Małgorzata Skierucha,1,2 Jerzy Mielko,1 G Johan A Offerhaus,3 Ryszard Maciejewski,2 Wojciech P Polkowski1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 2Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world, the epidemiology of which has changed within last decades. A trend of steady decline in gastric cancer incidence rates is the effect of the increased standards of hygiene, conscious nutrition, and Helicobacter pylori eradication, which together constitute primary prevention. Avoidance of gastric cancer remains a priority. However, patients with higher risk should be screened for early detection and chemoprevention. Surgical resection enhanced by standardized lymphadenectomy remains the gold standard in gastric cancer therapy. This review briefly summarizes the most important aspects of gastric cancers, which include epidemiology, risk factors, classification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. The paper is mostly addressed to physicians who are interested in updating the state of art concerning gastric carcinoma from easily accessible and credible source. Keywords: gastric cancer, epidemiology, classification, risk factors, treatment

  11. Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anal cancer is uncommon, but often curable with treatment. Treatments include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. Get detailed information about anal cancer including risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  12. Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment of liver cancer in adults depends on the stage. Treatment options include hepatectomy, liver transplant, ablation, electroporation therapy (EPT), embolization therapy, targeted therapy, and/or radiation therapy. Learn more about treatment for the different stages of liver cancer.

  13. Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Alemany

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic use of viruses against cancer has been revived during the last two decades. Oncolytic viruses replicate and spread inside tumors, amplifying their cytotoxicity and simultaneously reversing the tumor immune suppression. Among different viruses, recombinant adenoviruses designed to replicate selectively in tumor cells have been clinically tested by intratumoral or systemic administration. Limited efficacy has been associated to poor tumor targeting, intratumoral spread, and virocentric immune responses. A deeper understanding of these three barriers will be required to design more effective oncolytic adenoviruses that, alone or combined with chemotherapy or immunotherapy, may become tools for oncologists.

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Parathyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following rare disorders that are inherited (passed down from parent to child): Familial isolated hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome . Treatment with radiation therapy may increase the risk of ...

  15. Indications, techniques and results of postoperative brachytherapy in cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernot, M.; Aletti, P.; Carolus, J.M.; Marquis, I.; Hoffstetter, S.; Maaloul, F.; Peiffert, D.; Lapeyre, M.; Luporsi, E.; Marchal, C.; Noeel, A.; Bey, P.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/objective: We tried to reduce the number of local recurrences after surgery and external beam irradiation (EBI) in carcinoma of the oral cavity, when margins were positive or close. Material and methods: From 1980 to 1992, we treated 97 cases of carcinomas of the oral cavity by postoperative brachytherapy. Surgery was combined with EBI+brachytherapy in 51 cases and with brachytherapy alone in 46 cases. We treated 29 T1, 34 T2, 30 T3T4 and four Tx (73% were N0 at first examination and 23% had positive nodes). The type of surgery is analysed. Brachytherapy was performed in one or two planes along the surgical scar. If the mandibular rim was resected, especially when the tongue or the remaining floor were sutured to the internal face of the inferior lip or to the buccal mucosa, the bridge technique was used. To decrease the dose to the inferior part of the mandible, the bridge was modified thanks to experimental dosimetry. Results: At 5 years, the local control (LC) is 89%, the locoregional control (LRC) 82%, the specific survival (SS) 74% and the overall survival (OS) 67%. Complications: We noted 19% of grade 1 (minor), 12% of grade 2 (moderate) and 6% of grade 3 (major) complications. Conclusion: Compared with the results of the literature, we think that postoperative brachytherapy can improve classical radiosurgical results in selected cases with a risk of local recurrence

  16. Radiotherapic treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, J.R.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    Patients under treatment exclusively by radiations are studied when a linear accelerator is used as a source, and 6.000 rad are supplied into the tumour area. The survival of the patients is observed during 12 months, using local control criteria, metastases evaluations as well as patients' tolerance to this kind of treatment. The results are consider good is compared with those found in the specialized literature [pt

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Rectal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... back). Tests include the following: Estrogen and progesterone receptor test : A test to measure the amount of ...

  19. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... back). Tests include the following: Estrogen and progesterone receptor test : A test to measure the amount of ...

  20. Treatment Options (by Stage) for Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cancer Types Recurrent Cancer Common Cancer Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer ... VEGF inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors . Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy: EGFRs are proteins found on ...

  1. A study of the treatment of oral multiple primary cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takayuki; Kamata, Shin-etsu; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The subjects were 30 multiple primary cancers (out of 2,169 oral squamous cell carcinoma including lip cancers), which were treated at the Division of Head and Neck, Cancer Institute Hospital. Seven synchronous carcinomas and 23 metachronous cases were seen. The most common site of the primary cancer was the tongue. Surgical treatment was performed for the first treatment in 5 cases of the 7 synchronous cancers. On the other hand, radical treatment was performed in 11 cases of the 23 metachronous cancers. Fourteen of the 18 cases were treated by surgical treatment and controlled. It is suggested that surgical treatment is the most effective for oral multiple primary cancers. (author)

  2. Patient Related Factors Associated with Delayed Reporting in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akram

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study provide guidance towards interventions to reduce patient delay. Interventions should target the rural, older age group and lower socioeconomic population for educating them and to change their psychosocial behavior for oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

  3. Drug Repositioning for Effective Prostate Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turanli, Beste; Grøtli, Morten; Boren, Jan; Nielsen, Jens; Uhlen, Mathias; Arga, Kazim Y; Mardinoglu, Adil

    2018-01-01

    Drug repositioning has gained attention from both academia and pharmaceutical companies as an auxiliary process to conventional drug discovery. Chemotherapeutic agents have notorious adverse effects that drastically reduce the life quality of cancer patients so drug repositioning is a promising strategy to identify non-cancer drugs which have anti-cancer activity as well as tolerable adverse effects for human health. There are various strategies for discovery and validation of repurposed drugs. In this review, 25 repurposed drug candidates are presented as result of different strategies, 15 of which are already under clinical investigation for treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). To date, zoledronic acid is the only repurposed, clinically used, and approved non-cancer drug for PCa. Anti-cancer activities of existing drugs presented in this review cover diverse and also known mechanisms such as inhibition of mTOR and VEGFR2 signaling, inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling, COX and selective COX-2 inhibition, NF-κB inhibition, Wnt/β-Catenin pathway inhibition, DNMT1 inhibition, and GSK-3β inhibition. In addition to monotherapy option, combination therapy with current anti-cancer drugs may also increase drug efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Thus, drug repositioning may become a key approach for drug discovery in terms of time- and cost-efficiency comparing to conventional drug discovery and development process.

  4. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We...... then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients...... with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any...

  5. Comprehensible knowledge model creation for cancer treatment decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Hussain, Maqbool; Ali Khan, Wajahat; Ali, Taqdir; Lee, Sungyoung; Huh, Eui-Nam; Farooq Ahmad, Hafiz; Jamshed, Arif; Iqbal, Hassan; Irfan, Muhammad; Abbas Hydari, Manzar

    2017-03-01

    A wealth of clinical data exists in clinical documents in the form of electronic health records (EHRs). This data can be used for developing knowledge-based recommendation systems that can assist clinicians in clinical decision making and education. One of the big hurdles in developing such systems is the lack of automated mechanisms for knowledge acquisition to enable and educate clinicians in informed decision making. An automated knowledge acquisition methodology with a comprehensible knowledge model for cancer treatment (CKM-CT) is proposed. With the CKM-CT, clinical data are acquired automatically from documents. Quality of data is ensured by correcting errors and transforming various formats into a standard data format. Data preprocessing involves dimensionality reduction and missing value imputation. Predictive algorithm selection is performed on the basis of the ranking score of the weighted sum model. The knowledge builder prepares knowledge for knowledge-based services: clinical decisions and education support. Data is acquired from 13,788 head and neck cancer (HNC) documents for 3447 patients, including 1526 patients of the oral cavity site. In the data quality task, 160 staging values are corrected. In the preprocessing task, 20 attributes and 106 records are eliminated from the dataset. The Classification and Regression Trees (CRT) algorithm is selected and provides 69.0% classification accuracy in predicting HNC treatment plans, consisting of 11 decision paths that yield 11 decision rules. Our proposed methodology, CKM-CT, is helpful to find hidden knowledge in clinical documents. In CKM-CT, the prediction models are developed to assist and educate clinicians for informed decision making. The proposed methodology is generalizable to apply to data of other domains such as breast cancer with a similar objective to assist clinicians in decision making and education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  7. Gallbladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Types of treatment for gallbladder cancer include surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Treatment of gallbladder cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, cannot be removed by surgery, or has come back after treatment is often within a clinical trial. Find out about treatment options for gallbladder cancer.

  8. Cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Kure, Elin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NORDIC-VII study is a randomised phase III trial of cetuximab plus continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) vs FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The present report presents an updated and final survival...

  9. Review of hormonal treatment of breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-28

    Jul 28, 2011 ... Although tamoxifen is the established drug for hormonal treatment of breast cancer, cases of .... This is a growth factor protein which is over‑expressed in different types of .... These groups of drugs act as receptor binding competitors of estrogens and ... Mechanism of Action of Selective Estrogen. Receptor ...

  10. [Treatment of elderly patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paaschburg, B.; Pedersen, A.; Tuxen, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    The latest investigations have been searched in order to present new guidelines for the treatment of elderly patients with primary breast cancer. It is concluded that breast-conserving surgery should be offered as well as the sentinel node technique. Axillary lymph node dissection is not necessary...

  11. Neurocognitive Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Robert W.; Haser, Jennifer K.

    2006-01-01

    We review research on the neuropsychological effects that central nervous system (CNS) cancer treatments have on the cognitive abilities of children and adolescents. The authors focus on the two most common malignancies of childhood: leukemias and brain tumors. The literature review is structured so as to separate out earlier studies, generally…

  12. Medicinal plants in the treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad M. Zlatić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a review of highly developed medicinal usages of plants in the treatment of cancer. In the last decades, the cancer treatment has been included in this range of plant use, due to plant active substances. Active substances or secondary metabolites are generally known for their widespread application. When it comes to the cancer treatment, these substances affect the uncontrolled cell division. Therefore, the plants which are the source of these substances are proved to be irreplaceable in this field of medicine. This paper deals with some of the most significant plants well known for their multiple aspects of beneficial medicinal influence. The group of the plants described is comprised of the following species: Taxus brevifolia (Taxaceae, Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae, Podophyllum peltatum (Berberidaceae, Camptotheca accuminata (Cornaceae, and Cephalotaxus harringtonia (Cephalotaxaceae. The comprehensive description of the plants in this paper includes the morphological characteristics, the features and the representation of the molecular structures of active substances, the particular influence that these active substances have and the general importance of the substances as seen from the aspect of cancer treatment mostly with reference to the impacts on cell cycle.

  13. Tailoring endocrine treatment for early breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontein, Duveken Berthe Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes several important aspects of adjuvant endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with endocrine-sensitive, early-stage breast cancer. In our ongoing efforts to tailor treatment so as to provide the best possible care to each of our patients, we studied the influence of various

  14. Intense neutron sources for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the development of small, solid-target, pulsed neutron sources for nuclear weapons applications. The feasibility of using this type of neutron source for cancer treatment is discussed. Plans for fabrication and testing of such a source is briefly described

  15. Dosimetry studies during breast cancer radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M. O. M.

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies indicated that breast cancer is wildly spread especially in women as compared to men. It is increased after an age of thirty five years in women so it is important to study the effect of exposure to the radiation on the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer. In this work the scattered doses for the intact breast during the treatment of the breast suffering from cancer were measured and also the probability of inducing cancer in it is also discussed. The study was performed for a group of patients composed of twenty five females. Also the backscattered doses to the intact breast were measured for thirteen female patients. During the treatment using gamma rays from Co-60 source the two tangential fields (lateral and medial) were selected for the measurements. The results of exposure to gamma radiation for the lateral and medial fields showed that the mean scattered and backscattered doses to the intact breast were (241.26 cGY,47.49 cGY) and (371.6 cGY,385.4 cGY), respectively. Beside that the somatic risk of induced cancer to the intact breast was found to be (6 .1X10 -3 ,1.2X10 -3 ) and (9.29X10 -3 , 9.63X10 -3 ), respectively. From the results obtained it was concluded that the intact breast received small amounts of radiation doses which may lead to breast cancer for the healthy breast. The recommendations from the present study are to take care of radiation protection to the patient, and also to take care of the patient treatment conditions like temperature, pressure and humidity during the radiation exposure.(Author)

  16. Cobalt-60 in the treatment of cancer-future scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastri, K.V.S.; Patil, B.N.; Kohli, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of cancer using radiation is established method. Cobalt-60 is the workhorse of cancer treatment from the beginning. Later linear accelerators with more accessories were developed and are now used for the advanced treatments like IMRT, IGRT etc. Gammaknife, Gyroknife and supergamma machines using 60 Co have also taken roots for the treatment of cancer. The use of 60 Co in the treatment of cancer is expected to continue for some more time to come. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the efficacy of palliative irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned intervals of patients with advanced cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolyszewski, J.; Reinfuss, M.

    1988-01-01

    200 patients, previously not treated, with advanced highly differentiated cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx have been palliatively irradiated in the Oncology Center in Cracow in the years 1976-1985. Megavoltage irradiation with fractionated doses 4-5 Gy up to the dose of 20 Gy to the tumor with 4-5 fractions during 4-7 days has been applied. 64 patients received 20 Gy as simple dose, in 65 cases such dose has been repeated after month. 71 patients have been irradiated for the third time with similar dose after another 1 month interval. Partial regression of 25-50% of the tumor volume has been obtained after the first series of irradiation in 19% of patients and more than 50% in 28% of patients, complete regression in 4% of patients. 15,5% of the total number of patients survived 1 year since the initiation of the irradiation, 5% without symptoms of the neoplasm. Worse prognosis is connected with major advancement of the tumor (T 4 , N 2 ), poor general condition, cachexia and alcohol addition. Absence of improvement after the first series of irradiations indicates the non-effectiveness of the treatment. Palliative treatment by irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned interval is a safe and efficacious method. 1 fig., 6 tabs., 14 refs. (author)

  18. [Complications of surgical stage of treatment in patients with cancer of cervix uteri stage IIB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanivs'ka, A Ie

    2013-11-01

    The results of treatment of 127 patients, suffering cervix uteri cancer stage IIB in period of 1998 - 2012 yrs, were analyzed. Complications of surgical stage of the combined treatment have had occurred in 40.9% patients, including 40.5% patients, to whom neoadjuvant chemotherapy was conducted and in 41.5%--radiation therapy (RTH). The main postoperative complications--retroperitoneal lymphatic cysts--were revealed in 35.4% patients. The factors, raising the risk of postoperative complications occurrence, are following: the primary tumor spreading, metastatic affection of lymphatic nodes of pelvic cavity, preoperative conduction of RTH or chemotherapy.

  19. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-01-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression

  20. Gastrointestinal cancer after treatment of Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdwell, Sandra H.; Hancock, Steven L.; Varghese, Anna; Cox, Richard S.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the risk of gastrointestinal cancer following Hodgkin's disease treatment according to age at treatment, type of treatment, and anatomic sites. Methods and Materials: Cases were identified from the records of 2,441 patients treated for Hodgkin's disease between 1961 and 1994. Follow-up averaged 10.9 years, representing 26,590 person-years of observation. Relative risks (RR) for gastrointestinal cancer incidence and mortality were computed by comparison with expected annualized rates for a general population matched for age, sex, and race. Results: Gastrointestinal cancers developed in 25 patients. The incidence RR was 2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5-3.5] and mortality RR was 3.8 (CI, 2.4-4.7). Sites associated with significantly increased risks included the stomach [RR 7.3 (CI, 3.4-13.8)], small intestine [RR 11.6 (CI, 1.9-38.3)], and pancreas [RR 3.5 (CI, 1.1-8.5)]. Risk was significantly elevated after combined modality therapy, RR 3.9 (CI, 2.2-5.6). The risk after radiotherapy alone was 2.0 (CI, 1.0-3.4), not a statistically significant elevation. The RR for gastrointestinal cancer was greatest after treatment at young age and decreased with advancing age. It was significantly elevated within 10 years after treatment [RR 2.0 (CI, 1.1-3.5)] and increased further after 20 years [RR 6.1 (CI, 2.5-12.7)]. Risk assessed by attained age paralleled risk according to age at treatment. Fifteen cases of gastrointestinal cancers arose within the irradiation fields. Conclusion: Patients treated for Hodgkin's disease are at modestly increased risk for secondary gastrointestinal cancer, especially after combined modality therapy and treatment at a young age. Risk was highest more than 20 years after treatment, but was significantly elevated within 10 years. Gastrointestinal sites with increased risk included the stomach, pancreas, and small intestine

  1. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and

  2. Nonsurgical treatment for cancer using radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    The number of people who are dying from cancer has been increasing in association with population aging. Radiation therapy is now one of the three major cancer treatment methods, along with surgery and chemotherapy. People used to consider radiation therapy only as a ''noninvasive cancer treatment''; however, with the ceaseless effort by medical experts and corporations, different radiation therapy types and techniques including the latest technical advances have come out one after another, and the improvements in radiation therapies have provided treatments that are not only less traumatizing to patients but also as effective and therapeutic as surgery in certain body regions. The importance of radiation therapy has become and will become even greater in the society with more elderly cancer patients who do not have the physical strength to undergo surgery. In this article, the history of radiation therapy, rapidly developed high-precision radiation therapy techniques, and unsolved issues are discussed, and then, ''MHI vero4DRT'', which is the high-precision image-guided radiation therapy equipment developed for solving such issues, is introduced. (author)

  3. Choosing a doctor and hospital for your cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... htm Choosing a doctor and hospital for your cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. When you seek cancer treatment, you want to find the best care possible. ...

  4. Childhood Nasopharyngeal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood nasopharyngeal cancer treatment options include chemotherapy, external and internal radiation therapy, surgery, and immunotherapy (interferon). Learn more about the risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, and treatment of childhood nasopharyngeal cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  5. Eating Hints: Before, During, and After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports Eating Hints: Before, during, and after Cancer Treatment Eating Hints is for people who are having or are about to have cancer treatment. Family and friends may also want to read ...

  6. Childhood Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood thyroid cancer treatment usually includes surgery and may include radioactive iodine therapy, targeted therapy, and hormone replacement therapy. Learn more about the diagnosis and treatment of childhood thyroid cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  7. Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric cancer treatment options depend on extent of disease and may include radical surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy. Get detailed information about the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of newly diagnosed and recurrent gastric cancer in this clinician summary.

  8. Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric (stomach) cancer treatment can include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, chemoradiation, and targeted therapy. Learn more about the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of newly diagnosed and recurrent gastric cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  9. Adjuvant Therapy: Treatment to Keep Cancer from Returning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... significant side effects, and these treatments don't benefit everyone. Types of cancer treatment that are used as adjuvant therapy include: Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy uses drugs to kill cancer cells throughout ...

  10. Comparison of oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell cancer incidence and trends in New Zealand and Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, J Mark; Youlden, Danny R; Chelimo, Carol; Ioannides, Sally J; Baade, Peter D

    2014-02-01

    Increases in the incidence of squamous cell oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) have been reported from some countries, but have not been assessed in Australia or New Zealand. This study examines trends for squamous cell OPC and squamous cell oral cavity cancer (OCC) in two similarly sized populations, New Zealand and Queensland, Australia. Incidence data for 1982-2010 were obtained from the respective population-based cancer registries for squamous cell OPC and OCC, by subsite, sex, and age. Time trends and annual percentage changes (APCs) were assessed by joinpoint regression. The incidence rates of squamous cell OPC in males in New Zealand since 2005 and Queensland since 2006 have increased rapidly, with APCs of 11.9% and 10.6% respectively. The trends were greatest at ages 50-69 and followed more gradual increases previously. In females, rates increased by 2.1% per year in New Zealand from 1982, but by only 0.9% (not significant) in Queensland. In contrast, incidence rates for OCC decreased by 1.2% per year in males in Queensland since 1982, but remained stable for females in Queensland and for both sexes in New Zealand. Overall, incidence rates for both OCC and OPC were substantially higher in Queensland than in New Zealand. In males in both areas, OPC incidence is now higher than that of OCC. Incidence rates of squamous cell OPC have increased rapidly in men, while rates of OCC have been stable or reducing, showing distinct etiologies. This has both clinical and public health importance, including implications for the extension of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination to males. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The oral cavity microbiota: between health, oral disease, and cancers of the aerodigestive tract.

    OpenAIRE

    Le Bars, Pierre; Matamoros, Sébastien; Montassier, Emmanuel; Le Vacon, Françoise; Potel, Gilles; Soueidan, Assem; Jordana, Fabienne; de La Cochetière, Marie-France

    2017-01-01

    Many studies show that the human microbiome plays a critical role in the chronic pathologies of obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. More recently, the interaction between cancer and the microbiome has been highlighted. Most studies have focused on the gut microbiota because it represents the most extensive bacterial community, and the body of evidence correlating it with gut syndromes is increasing. However, in the strict sense, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract begins in the or...

  12. Contribution of the sentinel lymph node detection in oral cavity and oropharynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comte, F.; Barge, M.L.; Chevalier, J.; Rossi, M.; Zanca, M.; Alovisetti, C.; Garrel, R.; Guerrier, B.; Costes, V.

    2004-01-01

    The histopathological features of lymph nodes removal in head and neck cancer bring major prognostic information. Molecular biology or immuno histological techniques allow a far better detection sensitivity while underlining micrometastases. However, due to the great number of removed lymph nodes, an exhaustive histological analysis is impossible and an efficient targeting is desirable. The aim of this study was to establish the feasibility of the gamma probe directed biopsy of the sentinel lymph node in oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. Up to date, 13 patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancers (T1pNO) were included. The sentinel lymph node was detected during surgery and selectively resected before traditional neck lymph dissection. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) was detected in 92 % of patients. In one case, the immunohistochemical analysis of the SLN showed a micro-metastatic involvement while the classical histological analysis remained negative.The preliminary analysis of our study attests the SLN radio-localization efficiency in head and neck cancers and allows the systematic detection of micro-metastatic involvement. The pursuit of this study will continue to confirm these results from a larger population and to precise the prognostic value of the micro-metastatic stage. (author)

  13. Active home-based cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordonaro S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sebastiano Bordonaro Fabio Raiti, Annamaria Di Mari, Calogera Lopiano, Fabrizio Romano, Vitalinda Pumo, Sebastiano Rametta Giuliano, Margherita Iacono, Eleonora Lanteri, Elena Puzzo, Sebastiano Spada, Paolo TralongoUOC Medical Oncology, RAO, ASP 8 Siracusa, ItalyBackground: Active home-based treatment represents a new model of health care. Chronic treatment requires continuous access to facilities that provide cancer care, with considerable effort, particularly economic, on the part of patients and caregivers. Oral chemotherapy could be limited as a consequence of poor compliance and adherence, especially by elderly patients.Methods: We selected 30 cancer patients referred to our department and treated with oral therapy (capecitabine, vinorelbine, imatinib, sunitinib, sorafenib, temozolomide, ibandronate. This pilot study of oral therapy in the patient’s home was undertaken by a doctor and two nurses with experience in clinical oncology. The instruments used were clinical diaries recording home visits, hospital visits, need for caregiver support, and a questionnaire specially developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC, known as the QLQ-C30 version 2.0, concerning the acceptability of oral treatment from the patient’s perspective.Results: This program decreased the need to access cancer facilities by 98.1%, promoted better quality of life for patients, as reflected in increased EORTC QLQ-C30 scores over time, allowing for greater adherence to oral treatment as a result of control of drug administration outside the hospital. This model has allowed treatment of patients with difficult access to care (elderly, disabled or otherwise needed caregivers that in the project represent the majority (78% of these.Conclusions: This model of active home care improves quality of life and adherence with oral therapy, reduces the need to visit the hospital, and consequently decreases the number of lost hours of work on

  14. Outcome Analysis of Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer and Extracapsular Spread in Neck Lymph Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Kang, Chung-Jan; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Extracapsular spread (ECS) in neck lymph nodes is a major adverse prognostic factor in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We conducted a retrospective analysis of prognostic factors in this patient group and tried to identify a subset of patients with a worse prognosis suitable for more aggressive therapeutic interventions. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 255 OSCC patients with ECS in neck nodes and without evidence of distant metastasis. All participants were followed-up for at least 2 years or censored at last follow-up. The 5-year rates of control, distant metastasis, and survival were the main outcome measures. Results: Level IV/V lymph node metastases and tumor depth ≥12 mm were independent predictors of 5-year survival and identified three prognostic groups. In the low-risk group (no level IV/V metastases and tumor depth <12 mm), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 60%, 66%, and 50%, respectively. In the intermediate-risk group (no level IV/V metastases and tumor depth ≥12 mm), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 39%, 41%, and 28%, respectively. In the high-risk group (evidence of level IV/V metastases), the 5-year disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates were 14%, 12%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusions: Among OSCC patients with ECS, those with level IV/V metastases appear to have the worst prognosis followed by without level IV/V metastases and tumor depth ≥12 mm. An aggressive therapeutic approach may be suitable for intermediate- and high-risk patients.

  15. Multimodal treatment for resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Takiguchi, Shuji; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2011-01-01

    Surgical resection has been traditionally the mainstay of treatment for localized esophageal cancers. However, survival after surgery alone for advanced esophageal cancer is not satisfactory. In Japan, the development of multimodal therapy for esophageal cancers has centered mainly on systemic chemotherapy plus surgery to control distant metastasis. Based on the results of the recent Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) 9907 study, preoperative chemotherapy (consisting of 5-fluorouracil (FU) and cisplatin) followed by surgery has emerged as the standard treatment. In Western countries, where chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery has been mainly explored for patients with resectable esophageal cancers, two large controlled trials that evaluated the effectiveness of preoperative chemotherapy reported conflicting results. However, a recent meta-analysis reported significant survival benefits for preoperative chemotherapy in patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. We need to find new effective preoperative chemotherapeutic regimens, including molecular target agents, with response rates higher than that of the conventional chemotherapy of 5-FU and cisplatin. However, we also must compare the survival benefits of preoperative chemotherapy with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  16. Engineered T cells for pancreatic cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katari, Usha L; Keirnan, Jacqueline M; Worth, Anna C; Hodges, Sally E; Leen, Ann M; Fisher, William E; Vera, Juan F

    2011-01-01

    Objective Conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy produce marginal survival benefits in pancreatic cancer, underscoring the need for novel therapies. The aim of this study is to develop an adoptive T cell transfer approach to target tumours expressing prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a tumour-associated antigen that is frequently expressed by pancreatic cancer cells. Methods Expression of PSCA on cell lines and primary tumour samples was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Healthy donor- and patient-derived T cells were isolated, activated in vitro using CD3/CD28, and transduced with a retroviral vector encoding a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting PSCA. The ability of these cells to kill tumour cells was analysed by chromium-51 (Cr51) release. Results Prostate stem cell antigen was expressed on >70% of the primary tumour samples screened. Activated, CAR-modified T cells could be readily generated in clinically relevant numbers and were specifically able to kill PSCA-expressing pancreatic cancer cell lines with no non-specific killing of PSCA-negative target cells, thus indicating the potential efficacy and safety of this approach. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen is frequently expressed on pancreatic cancer cells and can be targeted for immune-mediated destruction using CAR-modified, adoptively transferred T cells. The safety and efficacy of this approach indicate that it deserves further study and may represent a promising novel treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:21843265

  17. The biology and treatment of oligometastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Diane K; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2015-04-20

    Clinical reports of limited and treatable cancer metastases, a disease state that exists in a transitional zone between localized and widespread systemic disease, were noted on occasion historically and are now termed oligometastasis. The ramification of a diagnosis of oligometastasis is a change in treatment paradigm, i.e. if the primary cancer site (if still present) is controlled, or resected, and the metastatic sites are ablated (surgically or with radiation), a prolonged disease-free interval, and perhaps even cure, may be achieved. Contemporary molecular diagnostics are edging closer to being able to determine where an individual metastatic deposit is within the continuum of malignancy. Preclinical models are on the outset of laying the groundwork for understanding the oligometastatic state. Meanwhile, in the clinic, patients are increasingly being designated as having oligometastatic disease and being treated owing to improved diagnostic imaging, novel treatment options with the potential to provide either direct or bridging therapy, and progressively broad definitions of oligometastasis.

  18. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasi, Olivier; Fontenot, Jonas D; Fields, Robert S; Gibbons, John P; Hogstrom, Kenneth R

    2011-01-01

    To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study

  19. Neoadjuvant Treatment in Rectal Cancer: Actual Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garajová, Ingrid; Di Girolamo, Stefania; de Rosa, Francesco; Corbelli, Jody; Agostini, Valentina; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become a standard treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. The clinical stages II (cT3-4, N0, M0) and III (cT1-4, N+, M0) according to International Union Against Cancer (IUCC) are concerned. It can reduce tumor volume and subsequently lead to an increase in complete resections (R0 resections), shows less toxicity, and improves local control rate. The aim of this review is to summarize actual approaches, main problems, and discrepancies in the treatment of locally advanced rectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:22295206

  20. Development of low-cost devices for image-guided photodynamic therapy treatment of oral cancer in global health settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Rudd, Grant; Daly, Liam; Hempstead, Joshua; Liu, Yiran; Khan, Amjad P.; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Thomas, Richard; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Cuckov, Filip; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based modality that shows promise for adaptation and implementation as a cancer treatment technology in resource-limited settings. In this context PDT is particularly well suited for treatment of pre-cancer and early stage malignancy of the oral cavity, that present a major global health challenge, but for which light delivery can be achieved without major infrastructure requirements. In recent reports we demonstrated that a prototype low-cost batterypowered 635nm LED light source for ALA-PpIX PDT achieves tumoricidal efficacy in vitro and vivo, comparable to a commercial turn-key laser source. Here, building on these reports, we describe the further development of a prototype PDT device to enable intraoral light delivery, designed for ALA- PDT treatment of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral cavity. We evaluate light delivery via fiber bundles and customized 3D printed light applicators for flexible delivery to lesions of varying size and position within the oral cavity. We also briefly address performance requirements (output power, stability, and light delivery) and present validation of the device for ALA-PDT treatment in monolayer squamous carcinoma cell cultures.

  1. Investigation of treatment strategy for advanced cancer according to treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Kecheng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of pancreatic cancer diagnoses are made at the advanced stage and when metastasis has already occurred, and the 1- and 5-year survival rates are extremely low. Cemcitabine remains the most frequently applied treatment option, yet the most effective chemotherapeutic agents and combinations with multiple agents and/or radiotherapy only marginally improve patient survival and may even establish an environment conducive to cancer cells with stem cell-like characteristics. An alternative treatment modality, cryoablation, is available and has been applied at our institute to patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer since 2001. In this article, we present our collective experience with patient outcome using cryoablation, alone or combined with other treatment modalities such as brachytherapy (125iodine seed implantation. The overall outcomes have been encouraging, suggesting that comprehensive therapy including cryoablation may prolong the survival of patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, and we are achieving particular success with a novel combination of percutaneous cryoablation, cancer microvascular intervention with 125iodine seed implantation, and combined immunotherapy (3C applied using an individualized patient strategy (P. The 1- through 10-year survival rates of 145 patients treated with the so-called “3C+P model” are presented in support of this new strategy as a promising new treatment for advanced and metastatic cancer

  2. Cancer Cachexia: Cause, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Todd W

    2017-10-01

    Patients with cancer frequently experience unintended weight loss due to gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction caused by the malignancy or treatment of the malignancy. However, others may present with weight loss related to other symptoms not clearly associated with identifiable GI dysfunction such as anorexia and early satiety. Cancer cachexia (CC) is a multifactorial syndrome that is generally characterized by ongoing loss of skeletal muscle mass with or without fat loss, often accompanied by anorexia, weakness, and fatigue. CC is associated with poor tolerance of antitumor treatments, reduced quality of life (QOL), and negative impact on survival. Symptoms associated with CC are thought to be caused in part by tumor-induced changes in host metabolism that result in systemic inflammation and abnormal neurohormonal responses. Unfortunately, there is no single standard treatment for CC. Nutrition consequences of oncologic treatments should be identified early with nutrition screening and assessment. Pharmacologic agents directed at improving appetite and countering metabolic abnormalities that cause inefficient nutrient utilization are currently the foundation for treating CC. Multiple agents have been investigated for their effects on weight, muscle wasting, and QOL. However, few are commercially available for use. Considerations for choosing the most appropriate treatment include effect on appetite, weight, QOL, risk of adverse effects, and cost and availability of the agent.

  3. Effects of radiation and α-tocopherol on saliva flow rate, amylase activity, total protein and electrolyte levels in oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present study was to evaluate early and late effects of radiation and a-tocopherol on the secretion rate of saliva and on selected saliva salivary parameters in oral cavity cancer patients. Patients & Methods: Eighty-nine histologically confirmed oral cavity cancer patients (OCC were enrolled in the study. Resting whole saliva was collected before, during and at the end of the radiation therapy (RT and simultaneous supplementation with α - tocopherol to the radiation treated patients (RT + AT. Results: Salivary flow rate, pH, amylase activity, total protein, sodium and potassium were analyzed. Increased pH, potassium and decreased flow rate, amylase activity, protein content and sodium were observed in 6 weeks of radiation treated patients when compared to OCC patients. A significant improvement of those parameters was observed on α - tocopherol supplementation in RT + AT patients. Conclusion: Supplementation with α - tocopherol improves the salivary flow rate thereby, maintains salivary parameters.

  4. Adjuvant intravenous methotrexate or definitive radiotherapy alone for advanced squamous cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, supraglottic larynx or hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazekas, J.T.; Sommer, C.; Kramer, S.

    1980-01-01

    Three hundred twenty-six patients with advanced head and neck cancers were randomized to receive definitive radiotherapy alone while 312 similar patients first received intravenous Methotrexate. No significant bias was demonstrated between the two patient populations. The number of annual deaths among the two randomized categories was essentially equal during the first 5 years. Nearly one-half occurred in the first year (146 for radiation alone and 143 in the chemotherapy plus irradiation groups). Median metastasis-free survival was between 12 to 13 months in both categories. The unadjusted 5 year survivals were in the 11 to 22% range for oral cavity, oropharynx, and supraglottic larynx and 3 to 9% for hypopharynx primaries. Although several variables did exert an impact upon survival, primary (T) and lymph node (N) stage seem to be of paramount importance and Methotrexate of minor consideration. Median and 5-year survivals within the various anatomic regions were consistently better when Methotrexate was given. However, these improvements were minimal and depended upon whether comparisons were performed on adjusted or unadjusted survival figures. In view of the modest benefits attained by using this Methotrexate regimen the authors suggest that other adjuvant programs be investigated and that this schedule not be adopted for routine clinical usage

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Oncology overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiological diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Biopsy and cytology in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Pathology and morphology of pancreatic cancer; Staging and prognosis of pancreatic cancer; Biological and immunological markers in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer; Drug therapy of pancreatic cancer; Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer; Selected studies on the epidemiology of pancreatic cancer; Clinical correlates and syndromes associated with pancreatic neoplasia

  6. Cholelithiasis after treatment for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, H.; Schell, M.; Pui, C.H. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The authors evaluated the risk of development of cholelithiasis in 6050 patients treated at a single hospital for various childhood cancers with different therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, and bone marrow transplantation, from 1963 to 1989. Patients with underlying chronic hemolytic anemia or preexisting gallstones were excluded. Nine female and seven male patients with a median age of 12.4 years (range, 1.2 to 22.8 years) at diagnosis of primary cancer had gallstones develop 3 months to 17.3 years (median, 3.1 years) after therapy was initiated. Cumulative risks of 0.42% at 10 years and 1.03% at 18 years after diagnosis substantially exceed those reported for the general population of this age group. Treatment-related factors significantly associated with an increased risk of cholelithiasis were ileal conduit, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery, and abdominal radiation therapy (relative risks and 95% confidence intervals = 61.6 (27.9-135.9), 23.0 (9.8-54.1), 15.1 (7.1-32.2), and 7.4 (3.2-17.0), respectively). There was no correlation with the type of cancer, nor was the frequency of conventional predisposing features (e.g., family history, obesity, use of oral contraceptives, and pregnancy) any higher among the affected patients in this study than in the general population. Patients with cancer who have risk factors identified here should be monitored for the development of gallstones.

  7. Cholelithiasis after treatment for childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, H.; Schell, M.; Pui, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors evaluated the risk of development of cholelithiasis in 6050 patients treated at a single hospital for various childhood cancers with different therapeutic modalities, including chemotherapy, surgery, radiation therapy, and bone marrow transplantation, from 1963 to 1989. Patients with underlying chronic hemolytic anemia or preexisting gallstones were excluded. Nine female and seven male patients with a median age of 12.4 years (range, 1.2 to 22.8 years) at diagnosis of primary cancer had gallstones develop 3 months to 17.3 years (median, 3.1 years) after therapy was initiated. Cumulative risks of 0.42% at 10 years and 1.03% at 18 years after diagnosis substantially exceed those reported for the general population of this age group. Treatment-related factors significantly associated with an increased risk of cholelithiasis were ileal conduit, parenteral nutrition, abdominal surgery, and abdominal radiation therapy (relative risks and 95% confidence intervals = 61.6 [27.9-135.9], 23.0 [9.8-54.1], 15.1 [7.1-32.2], and 7.4 [3.2-17.0], respectively). There was no correlation with the type of cancer, nor was the frequency of conventional predisposing features (e.g., family history, obesity, use of oral contraceptives, and pregnancy) any higher among the affected patients in this study than in the general population. Patients with cancer who have risk factors identified here should be monitored for the development of gallstones

  8. The effect of oral habits in the oral cavity of children and its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirina Gartika

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral habits include habit which is continuously done and has the potential to cause defects in teeth and perioral tissues. Some of the oral habits are finger/thumb sucking, lip sucking/biting, nail biting, bruxism, abnormal swallowing and mouth breathing. The etiology of oral habits includes the disharmonious relationship between parents and children, dissatisfaction in oral phase, premature weaning, emotional disturbance, anomaly, and diseases. Oral habits will influence the development of occlusion and perioral structures in children in the growing and development process. The treatment of oral habits can be done with or without appliances. The non-appliance treatment consists of psychological approach, medical approach and myofunctional therapy while the appliance treatment will include the use of orthodontic appliances.

  9. Multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Kanji; Iida, Atsushi; Fujita, Takashi; Kobayashi, Taizo; Shinmoto, Syuichi; Hirose, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akio; Yoshida, Masanori

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve in prognosis and quality of life (QOL), the multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers were performed. Bypass surgery was carried out for unresectable pancreatic cancer with intraoperative irradiation (IOR). After surgery, patients were treated with the combination of CDDP (25 mg) and MMC (4 mg) administration, intravenously continuous injection of 5-FU (250 mg for 24 hours), external radiation by the high voltage X-ray (1.5 Gy per irradiation, 4 times a week, and during hyperthermia 3 Gy per irradiation) and hyperthermia using the Thermotron RF-8 warmer. Six out of 13 patients received hyperthermia at over 40degC, were obtained PR, and their survival periods were 22, 21, 19, 18, 11 and 8 months and they could return to work. For all patients with pain, the symptom was abolished or reduced. The survival periods in cases of the multimodal treatment were longer than those of only bypass-surgery or of the resective cases with the curability C. The multimodal treatment combined with radiation, hyperthermia and surgery is more useful for the removal of pain and the improvement of QOL, and also expected the improvement of the prognosis than pancreatectomy. And hyperthermia has an important role on the effect of this treatment. (K.H.)

  10. Multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Kanji; Iida, Atsushi; Fujita, Takashi; Kobayashi, Taizo; Shinmoto, Syuichi; Hirose, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akio; Yoshida, Masanori [Fukui Medical School, Matsuoka (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    In order to improve in prognosis and quality of life (QOL), the multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers were performed. Bypass surgery was carried out for unresectable pancreatic cancer with intraoperative irradiation (IOR). After surgery, patients were treated with the combination of CDDP (25 mg) and MMC (4 mg) administration, intravenously continuous injection of 5-FU (250 mg for 24 hours), external radiation by the high voltage X-ray (1.5 Gy per irradiation, 4 times a week, and during hyperthermia 3 Gy per irradiation) and hyperthermia using the Thermotron RF-8 warmer. Six out of 13 patients received hyperthermia at over 40degC, were obtained PR, and their survival periods were 22, 21, 19, 18, 11 and 8 months and they could return to work. For all patients with pain, the symptom was abolished or reduced. The survival periods in cases of the multimodal treatment were longer than those of only bypass-surgery or of the resective cases with the curability C. The multimodal treatment combined with radiation, hyperthermia and surgery is more useful for the removal of pain and the improvement of QOL, and also expected the improvement of the prognosis than pancreatectomy. And hyperthermia has an important role on the effect of this treatment. (K.H.)

  11. Esthesioneuroblastoma of the nasal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollen, Tyler R; Morris, Christopher G; Kirwan, Jessica M; Amdur, Robert J; Werning, John W; Vaysberg, Mikhail; Mendenhall, William M

    2015-06-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon cancer of the nasal cavity. We describe the outcomes for 26 patients treated with curative intent with photon radiotherapy (RT) at the University of Florida. Between May 1972 and June 2007, 26 patients received RT for previously untreated esthesioneuroblastoma of the nasal cavity. Sixteen patients were males and 10 were females with a median age of 55 years (range, 3 to 82 y). The modified Kadish stage distribution was: B, 7 patients; C, 17 patients; and D, 2 patients. Treatment modalities included the following: definitive RT, 5 patients; preoperative RT, 2 patients; and postoperative RT after resection, 19 patients. Elective neck irradiation (ENI) was performed in 17 (71%) of 24 N0 patients. Rates of local control, cause-specific survival, and absolute overall survival at 5 years were 79%, 72%, and 69%, respectively. Overall survival among patients treated with definitive RT was 20% at 5 years, compared with 81% among those who underwent surgery and adjuvant RT (P=0.01). One (6%) of 17 patients who received ENI developed a recurrence in the neck and was successfully salvaged. Ultimate neck control was 100% at 5 years for patients who received ENI versus 69% among those not receiving ENI (P=0.0173). Resection combined with adjuvant RT is more effective than surgery or RT alone in the treatment of esthesioneuroblastoma. ENI reduces the risk of regional relapse in patients with Kadish stage B and C cancers.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doihara, Hiroyoshi; Taira, Naruhito

    2008-01-01

    This paper explains the outline of the present diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer essentially based on its therapeutic guideline by the Japan Breast Cancer Society (2005) and on authors' experiences. The diagnosis item contains the medical interview of patients, observatory and palpating examinations, mammography (for this, Japan-Breast Imaging Recording and Data System), ultrasonography (guideline for sonographic diagnosis of mammary gland, 2004), fine needle aspiration (FNA) or aspiration biopsy cytology, bases of triple test (palpation, mammography and FNA) for the cancer diagnosis, core needle biopsy, and mammotome biopsy of non-palpable calcified lesion. The treatment item contains the surgery involving conservation, sentinel lymph node biopsy (for this, lymphoscintigraphy with Tc-phytate is illustrated), radiofrequency ablation, adjuvant chemotherapy essentially using anthracycline and taxane, endocrinological therapy using tamoxifen, LH-RH analogues and aromatase inhibitors, and molecular target therapy with HER2 monoclonal antibody like trastuzumab. Recent progress of systemic therapy with medicals is remarkable, and the educational promotion of experts and medicare circumstances are concluded to be important. (R.T.)

  13. Theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas Lee

    The main focus of this research was to evaluate the ability of a novel multifunctional nanoparticle to mediate drug delivery and enable a non-invasive approach to measure drug release kinetics in situ for the treatment of cancer. These goals were approached by developing a nanoparticle consisting of an inorganic core (i.e. gadolinium sulfoxide doped with europium ions or carbon nanotubes). This was coated with an external amphiphilic polymer shell comprised of a biodegradable polyester (i.e. poly(lactide) or poly(glycolide)), and poly(ethylene glycol) block copolymer. In this system, the inorganic core mediates the imaging aspect, the relatively hydrophobic polyester encapsulates hydrophobic anti-cancer drugs, and poly(ethylene glycol) stabilizes the nanoparticle in an aqueous environment. The synthesis of this nanoparticle drug delivery system utilized a simple one-pot room temperature ring-opening polymerization that neglected the use of potentially toxic catalysts and reduced the number of washing steps. This functionalization approach could be applied across a number of inorganic nanoparticle platforms. Coating inorganic nanoparticles with biodegradable polymer was shown to decrease in vitro and in vivo toxicity. Nanoparticles could be further coated with multiple polymer layers to better control drug release characteristics. Finally, loading polymer coated radioluminescent nanoparticles with photoactive drugs enabled a mechanism for measuring drug concentration in situ. The work presented here represents a step forward to developing theranostic nanoparticles that can improve the treatment of cancer.

  14. HAMLET treatment delays bladder cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Hou, Yuchuan; Svensson, Majlis; Holmqvist, Bo; Svanborg, Catharina

    2010-04-01

    HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that kills different types of cancer cells. Recently we observed a rapid reduction in human bladder cancer size after intravesical HAMLET treatment. In this study we evaluated the therapeutic effect of HAMLET in the mouse MB49 bladder carcinoma model. Bladder tumors were established by intravesical injection of MB49 cells into poly L-lysine treated bladders of C57BL/6 mice. Treatment groups received repeat intravesical HAMLET instillations and controls received alpha-lactalbumin or phosphate buffer. Effects of HAMLET on tumor size and putative apoptotic effects were analyzed in bladder tissue sections. Whole body imaging was used to study HAMLET distribution in tumor bearing mice compared to healthy bladder tissue. HAMLET caused a dose dependent decrease in MB49 cell viability in vitro. Five intravesical HAMLET instillations significantly decreased tumor size and delayed development in vivo compared to controls. TUNEL staining revealed selective apoptotic effects in tumor areas but not in adjacent healthy bladder tissue. On in vivo imaging Alexa-HAMLET was retained for more than 24 hours in the bladder of tumor bearing mice but not in tumor-free bladders or in tumor bearing mice that received Alexa-alpha-lactalbumin. Results show that HAMLET is active as a tumoricidal agent and suggest that topical HAMLET administration may delay bladder cancer development. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multifunctional materials for bone cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques C

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Catarina Marques,1 José MF Ferreira,1 Ecaterina Andronescu,2 Denisa Ficai,2 Maria Sonmez,3 Anton Ficai21Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, Centre for Research in Ceramics and Composite Materials, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal; 2Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Material Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania; 3National Research and Development Institute for Textiles and Leather, Bucharest, RomaniaAbstract: The purpose of this review is to present the most recent findings in bone tissue engineering. Special attention is given to multifunctional materials based on collagen and collagen–hydroxyapatite composites used for skin and bone cancer treatments. The multifunctionality of these materials was obtained by adding to the base regenerative grafts proper components, such as ferrites (magnetite being the most important representative, cytostatics (cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, methotrexate, paclitaxel, doxorubicin, silver nanoparticles, antibiotics (anthracyclines, geldanamycin, and/or analgesics (ibuprofen, fentanyl. The suitability of complex systems for the intended applications was systematically analyzed. The developmental possibilities of multifunctional materials with regenerative and curative roles (antitumoral as well as pain management in the field of skin and bone cancer treatment are discussed. It is worth mentioning that better materials are likely to be developed by combining conventional and unconventional experimental strategies.Keywords: bone graft, cancer, collagen, magnetite, cytostatics, silver

  16. Stomach cancer risk after treatment for hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morton, Lindsay M; Dores, Graça M; Curtis, Rochelle E

    2013-01-01

    Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear.......Treatment-related stomach cancer is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among the growing number of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, but risks associated with specific HL treatments are unclear....

  17. Method of Abdominal Cavity Postoperative Infiltrates Treatment in Children with Appendiceal Peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Melnichenko, M. G.; Antoniuk, V. V.; Tkachenko, L. P.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of postoperative abdominal infiltrates in children operated on appendicular peritonitis with the use of antibiotics and physical factors on the abdominal region according to the utility model includes two stages. The first stage involves regional antibacterial electrophoresis and therapeutic antibacterial microclysters. The second stage includes the impact of diadynamic therapy in infiltration projection and NSAIDs as rectal suppositories.

  18. Nausea and Vomiting Caused by Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  19. Lymphedema as a Cancer Treatment Side Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  20. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... infectious complications (n = 170; HR 0.6 (95 per cent c.i. 0.4 to 0.9), P = 0.01). In multivariate analysis of patients who had a curative resection, including Dukes' stage, age, gender, tumour location, blood transfusion, postoperative infectious complications and treatment, ranitidine still had...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  1. Hyoid Displacement in Post-Treatment Cancer Patients: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Yihe; Yang, Zhenyu; Perlman, Adrienne L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia after head and neck cancer treatment is a health care issue; in some cases, the cause of death is not cancer but, rather, the passage of food or liquid into the lungs. Hyoid displacement is known to be important to safe swallowing function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate hyoid displacement after cancer treatment.…

  2. Quality of Life of Head and Neck Cancer Patients Receiving Cancer Specific Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gonsalves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Head and neck cancer (HNC remains a considerable challenge to both patient and health care provider as the disease can have profound effect on Quality of life (QOL. Aims and Objectives: To assess the QOL and performance status of HNC patients, to find relation between domains of QOL and to find association between QOL and demographic and disease variables. Settings and Design: The study was conducted at Manipal group of hospitals, Manipal and Mangalore, using descriptive survey design. Material and Methods: The study comprised of 89 samples with all stages of HNC. Patients primarily diagnosed with HNC and undergoing disease specific treatment were included in the study. Tool on demographic, disease variables and quality of life were developed and content validity was established. Reliability of the tool was established. Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS scale was used to assess performance status. Corelational analysis was done to find relation between the domains of QOL. Association was found between the quality of life and demographic and disease variables. Results: Majority (83% of the participants were males, 39% had cancer arising from oral cavity, and 35% each were in cancer stage III and IV. Quality of life was poor among 30% of the subjects and 65% had KPS scores<80 %. There was moderate positive relation between the domains of QOL and a positive correlation between the QOL and performance status. No statistically significant association was found between QOL and disease and demographic variables. Conclusion: Physical, psychological, social and spiritual domains of QOL and functional status are affected in patients with HNC. The impact on one domain area of well being, significantly affects the other domain of QOL and there is relationship between the performance status and QOL

  3. Study of thermally-induced optical bistability and the role of surface treatments in Si-based mid-infrared photonic crystal cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Raji; Bulu, Irfan; Leijssen, Rick; Lončar, Marko

    2011-11-21

    We report the observation of optical bistability in Si-based photonic crystal cavities operating around 4.5 µm. Time domain measurements indicate that the source of this optical bistability is thermal, with a time constant on the order of 5 µs. Quality (Q) factor improvement is shown by the use of surface treatments (wet processes and annealing), resulting in a significant increase in Q-factor, which in our best devices is on the order of ~45,000 at 4.48 µm. After annealing in a N(2) environment, optical bistability is no longer seen in our cavities. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of superficial esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Prat, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    Endoscopy allows for the screening, early diagnosis, treatment and follow up of superficial esophageal cancer. Endoscopic submucosal dissection has become the gold standard for the resection of superficial squamous cell neoplasia. Combinations of endoscopic mucosal resection and radiofrequency ablation are the mainstay of the management of Barrett's associated neoplasia. However, protruded, non-lifting or large lesions may be better managed by endoscopic submucosal dissection. Novel ablation tools, such as argon plasma coagulation with submucosal lifting and cryoablation balloons, are being developed for the treatment of residual Barrett's esophagus, since iatrogenic strictures still hamper the development of extensive circumferential resections in the esophagus. Optimal surveillance modalities after endoscopic resection are still to be determined. The assessment of the risk of lymph-node metastases, as well as of the need for additional treatments based on qualitative and quantitative histological criteria, balanced to the patient's condition, requires a dedicated multidisciplinary team decision process. The need for trained endoscopists, expert pathologists and surgeons, and specialized multidisciplinary meetings underlines the role of expert centers in the management of superficial esophageal cancer.

  5. Under-treatment of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Alysa

    2010-03-01

    Cancer pain remains inadequately treated, despite internationally accepted management guidelines and a myriad of treatment options. Risk factors for undertreatment are reviewed, along with possible explanations. Recent studies documenting the scope of the problem as well as investigating solutions are discussed with clinical-practice recommendations outlined. Women over 65 years of age representative of a cultural minority, with earlier stage disease, cared for at home, and with high-school education or less are at highest risk of having uncontrolled cancer pain. Optimal treatment is impeded by patients' maladaptive beliefs, nonadherence, underreporting or miscommunication with caregivers; from a healthcare provider perspective, it may be due to inadequate assessment, documentation, knowledge, and communication. Emerging data support the vital influence of lay caregivers on appropriate pain management. Although home-education programs may decrease pain and improve quality of life, there are also less intensive approaches deliverable by individuals to holistically address pain. Prospective study of barriers to both delivery and receipt of adequate pain management is needed, as the majority of published literature is based on survey studies. Treatment must be individualized based on clinical circumstances and patient wishes, with the goal of maximizing function and quality of life.

  6. Cancer Drug Development: New Targets for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt

    1996-01-01

    There is often a considerable lapse of time between the definition of what causes a disease in the laboratory and the development of successful therapy. However, the history of medicine teaches us that the need to understand the scientific basis of disease before the discovery of new treatments is both essential and inevitable. During the middle of the 19th century, the work of the great German pathologist, Rudolf Virchow, defined disease as having an anatomic or histologic basis. In the clinic, this scientific perspective would lead to increasingly effective and, often, increasingly aggressive surgical approaches to disease. Later in the 19th century, Koch's discovery of the tubercle bacillus (a discovery Virchow disbelieved and publication of which he thwarted, since he hypothesized that cancer, not microbes, caused consumption!), would define a microbiological basis for disease. With bacteria defined as a major cause of human suffering, the stage was set for the development of the discovery of effective antibiotics. In the early 20th century, the pioneering work of Banting, Best and others would show that disease can also have an endocrine or metabolic basis. This new body of scientific knowledge would lead not only to the specific discovery of insulin as an effective treatment for diabetes but also to a more general understanding of the role of hormones, vitamins and co-factors in human health and disease. Basic medical research and its successful translation into effective treatments has fundamentally altered the cause of human death. In the developed world, where access to the benefit of this work is available, infectious disease is not the problem it was in the days of Pasteur, Metchnikoff and Ehrlich. As we approach the millennium, science is now teaching us that diseases, particularly cancer, can have a molecular or genetic basis. Can successful application of this new knowledge be far behind? We are already seeing the application of this new knowledge in

  7. Treatment Results of Postoperative Radiotherapy on Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Coexistence of Multiple Minor Risk Factors Results in Higher Recurrence Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Kang-Hsing; Wang, Hung-Ming; Kang, Chung-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment results of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). Materials and Methods: This study included 302 OSCC patients who were treated by radical surgery and PORT. Indications for PORT include Stage III or IV OSCC according to the 2002 criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer, the presence of perineural invasion or lymphatic invasion, the depth of tumor invasion, or a close surgical margin. Patients with major risk factors, such as multiple nodal metastases, a positive surgical margin, or extracapsular spreading, were excluded. The prescribed dose of PORT ranged from 59.4 to 66.6Gy (median, 63Gy). Results: The 3-year overall and recurrence-free survival rates were 73% and 70%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that differentiation, perineural invasion, lymphatic invasion, bone invasion, location (hard palate and retromolar trigone), invasion depths ≥10mm, and margin distances ≤4mm were significant prognostic factors. The presence of multiple significant factors of univariate analysis correlated with disease recurrence. The 3-year recurrence-free survival rates were 82%, 76%, and 45% for patients with no risk factors, one or two risk factors, and three or more risk factors, respectively. After multivariate analysis, the number of risk factors and lymphatic invasion were significant prognostic factors. Conclusion: PORT may be an adequate adjuvant therapy for OSCC patients with one or two risk factors of recurrence. The presence of multiple risk factors and lymphatic invasion correlated with poor prognosis, and more aggressive treatment may need to be considered.

  8. Hybrid Theranostic Platforms for Cancer Nanomedical Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Julfakyan, Khachatur

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is a leading case of mortality worldwide. Governments spent multibillion expenses on treatment and palliative care of diseased people. Despite these generous funding and intensive research with aim to find a cure or efficient treatment for cancer, until now there is a lack in selective cancer management strategies. Conventional treatment strategies for cancer, such as surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy don’t have selectivity toward cancer – the property of discrimination of healthy organs and tissues from the diseased site. Chemotherapy is very challenging as the difference between effective and lethal doses is very minuscule in most cases. Moreover, devastating side effects dramatically changes the quality of life for cancer patients. To address these issues two main strategies are intensively utilized in chemistry: (I) the design and synthesis of novel anticancer organic compounds with higher selectivity and low toxicity profiles and the second, design and preparation of biocompatible nanocarriers for imaging and anticancer compound selective delivery nanomedicine. The following dissertation combines the above two strategies as bellows: First project is related to the design and synthetic route development toward novel nature-inspired group of heterocyclic compounds – iso-Phidianidines. The second project focused on design, preparation and evaluation of hybrid theranostics (therapeutic and diagnostic in a single entity). Chapter 1 is a general background review of the major topics that will be discussed in this dissertation. The first efficient and high-yielding synthetic route toward iso-phidianidines, containing regioisomeric form of 1,2,4-oxadiazole linked to the indole via methylene bridge is reported in Chapter 2. In vitro test of the synthesized library of iso-phidianidines revealed micromolar range of cytotoxicity toward human cervical cancer cell line. Structure activity relationship revealed the importance of

  9. Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common types of skin cancer. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, staging, and treatment for skin cancer.

  10. Cancer treatment: fertility and sexual side effects in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer treatment: fertility and sexual side effects in women To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bladder cancer Types of Sexual Side Effects For women, the most common sexual side effects include: Loss ...

  11. No Appetite? How to Get Nutrition during Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than to eat something. During illness, treatment or recovery, your need for calories and protein may be ... patient-education/eating-hints. Accessed Jan. 5, 2015. Nutrition in cancer care (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. http:// ...

  12. Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral cancer occurs in men and women and can spread quickly to lymph nodes near the urethra. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, staging, and treatment for urethral cancer.

  13. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parathyroid cancer is very rare and is usually treated with surgery. Learn about the diagnosis, risk and genetic factors, staging, treatment, and management of parathyroid cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  14. Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood liver cancer treatment options include surgery, watchful waiting, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, ablation therapy, and antiviral therapy. Learn more about newly diagnosed and recurrent childhood liver cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  15. Endometrial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endometrial cancer is usually diagnosed at an early stage and can be treated with surgery. Learn about the symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis, staging, and treatment for early- and advanced-stage endometrial cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  16. Follow-up Medical Care After Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Questions to Ask About Cancer Research Follow-Up Medical Care Once you’re done with cancer treatment, ...

  17. Dietary Supplements and Cancer Treatment: A Risky Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some patients with cancer turn to dietary supplements advertised as having anticancer effects or being supportive of general health. But these biologically active compounds may interact dangerously with chemotherapy, radiation, or other cancer treatments.

  18. Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer treatment commonly includes various combinations of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormone therapy. Prognosis and selection of therapy is influenced by clinical and pathology features. Get detailed information about breast cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  19. Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer treatment depends on several factors and can include combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, hormone, and targeted therapy. Learn more about how breast cancer is diagnosed and treated in this expert-reviewed summary.

  20. Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Breast Cancer in Men: Treatments and Genetic Counseling Share Tweet ... knowledge for others with this disease,” Prowell says. Breast Cancer Symptoms for Men Each year, about 2,000 ...

  1. Breast Cancer: Treatment, Outcomes, and Cost-Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McClellan, Mark

    2000-01-01

    ...) use Medicare data, linked SEER cancer registry data, and claims data from large firms to analyze trends in diagnosis rates and staging, treatment, expenditures, and outcomes for Americans with breast cancer; and (3...

  2. Treatment of recurrences in head and neck cancers occurring in irradiated site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernot, M.

    1994-01-01

    We'll consider as recurrences the elevate relapses occurring at least six months after the first treatment end. The recurrences however frequent it is, is bad codified and everybody does what he can in the presence of a relapse. The number of retreated lesions should be in inverse proportion of the efficiency of the initial treatment. The surgery made large progresses during these last 15 years. The external radiotherapy is seldom a very good treatment indication of head and neck cancer recurrences in previously irradiated site. Iridium 192 wires may be used as implantations with low dose rate. For the cavity proper of mouth, we have counted 159 relapses at the level of the sole primary tumour. The tonsil neoplasms are often treated by a sole external irradiation or in association with curietherapy. For a larynx neoplasm the ideal starting treatment is that one which allows to cure the tumour while protecting the speaking and the swallowing. 83 refs

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Linking Exercise to Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Gehl, Julie; Christensen, Jesper F.

    2018-01-01

    The benefits of exercise training for cancer patients are becoming increasingly evident. Physical exercise has been shown to reduce cancer incidence and inhibit tumor growth. Here we provide the status of the current molecular understanding of the effect of exercise on cancer. We propose...... that exercise has a role in controlling cancer progression through a direct effect on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of anti-cancer treatment efficacy. These findings have wide-ranging societal implications......, as this understanding may lead to changes in cancer treatment strategies. Hojman et al. discuss the role of exercise in controlling cancer progression through direct effects on tumor-intrinsic factors, interplay with whole-body exercise effects, alleviation of cancer-related adverse events, and improvement of cancer...

  4. Disparities in Prostate Cancer Treatment Modality and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    producing hormones) 1 0 10 11 B8f. Watchful waiting (no treatment, wait and see if your prostate cancer grows) 1 0 10 11 B8g. Cryotherapy (process...your prostate cancer grows) 7 Cryotherapy (process to freeze and destroy prostate tissue) 8 Chemotherapy (use of anti- cancer drugs) 9 Any other...and attitudes concerning prostate cancer and preventative measures. Prostate Cancer Questionnaire IRB1012# – Version 3 08/01/08 33 Now, I

  5. Breast cancer treatment by nanophotolysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiq, Muhammad Gul Bahar

    2018-06-01

    In this work, gold nanoparticles irradiated with nanosecond short pulse laser for breast cancer treatment is studied theoretically. Nanophotolysis is involved for selective damaging of breast cancer cells. Results shows that laser fluence of 1.5 J/cm2 interact with gold nanoparticles and generates a maximum number of ions. Laser light in the visible region interacts with the gold foil. At 700 nm, 12 × 1012 ions are produced for the laser intensity of 8.89 × 107 W/cm2. Slow increase in the Coulomb explosion pressure from 0.6 × 106 Pa to 2 × 106 Pa is observed for a cluster size of range 10 nm to 20 nm. Penetration of nanobullets in tumor increases with the increase of temperature from 39.83 °C to 62.20 °C. Number of cell damaged increases by increasing the number of ions (6 × 1016 cells are damaged by 9.59 × 1020 gold ions). Findings are compared with the other experimental results and are found in excellent agreement. It is concluded from current work that nanophotolysis therapy is may be useful in future for selective damaging of breast cancer cells.

  6. Atezolizumab for the treatment of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Debora; Pelizzari, Giacomo; Vitale, Maria Grazia; Lisanti, Camilla; Cinausero, Marika; Iacono, Donatella; Puglisi, Fabio

    2018-04-24

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer diagnosed among women. The development of new personalized therapeutic strategies has reshaped the landscape in this field. However, BC is still the first cause of death among women. Interestingly, several preclinical studies and some clinical evidences are focused their attention on the role of immune system and immunotherapy on cancer control, also in BC. Areas covered: Usually, BC has been considered a not immunogenic tumor for its low mutational load. However, recent studies have evidenced that some subtypes, triple negative and HER-2 positive BC, are "hot" tumors, thus more immunogenic. Moreover, the presence of immune infiltrate is positively associated with favorable prognosis. Therefore, the use of immune-checkpoint inhibitors seems to be an encouraging treatment option also in BC. Among these drugs, atezolizumab is an anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody with a particular structure that reduce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against T cells, increasing quantitatively and qualitatively the effective response. Expert opinion: The use of immunotherapy is a promising option for BC. However, at the same time it still raises many doubts. Surely, the research and the validation of immune biomarkers can permit to identify patients who more benefit from these drugs. Moreover, additional studies should evaluate as to induce immunogenicity in cold tumors. Then again, the understanding of mechanism of primary and acquired resistance can help the development of novel strategies to enhance effector response, overcoming these resistances.

  7. Upper limb lymphedema after breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Salah, H.; Bahri, M.; Jbali, B.; Daoud, J.; Guermazi, M.; Frikha, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To study the frequency and risk factors for upper limb lymphedema through a series of patients treated for breast cancer. Patients and methods. - It is a retrospective study about 222 patients treated for breast cancer during the period between February 1993 and December 2003 in Sfax hospitals. Average age was 51 years (27-92 years). Tumour was T2 in 59% of cases. All patients had surgery with lymph node dissection. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most frequent histological type (80% of cases), with predominant SBR II grade (62%). The mean number of removed lymph nodes was 12 (2-33). Axillary lymph node metastasis was detected in 124 patients. Radiotherapy was delivered in 200 patients, including axillary irradiation in 30 cases. The mean follow-up was 68 months (12-120). Results. - Lymphedema appeared in 23% of cases (51 patients), 14 months after surgery (mean period). Lymphedema affected the brachium in 17% of cases, the forearm in 12% of cases and all upper limb in 71% of cases. Fifty percent of patients had rehabilitation. However, improvement of lymphedema was obtained in 18 cases. Parameters predicting lymphedema were studied. Significant risk factors were obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. The type of surgery, axillary irradiation and shoulder abduction deficit did not predict lymphedema. Conclusion. - Lymphedema of the arm is a frequent consequence of breast cancer treatment. The risk of lymphedema is correlated with obesity, infection and a number of removed lymph node above 10. (authors)

  8. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  9. Preclinical therapeutic potential of a nitrosylating agent in the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Giri

    Full Text Available This study examines the role of s-nitrosylation in the growth of ovarian cancer using cell culture based and in vivo approaches. Using the nitrosylating agent, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO, a physiological nitric oxide molecule, we show that GSNO treatment inhibited proliferation of chemoresponsive and chemoresistant ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, C200, SKVO3, ID8, OVCAR3, OVCAR4, OVCAR5, OVCAR7, OVCAR8, OVCAR10, PE01 and PE04 in a dose dependent manner. GSNO treatment abrogated growth factor (HB-EGF induced signal transduction including phosphorylation of Akt, p42/44 and STAT3, which are known to play critical roles in ovarian cancer growth and progression. To examine the therapeutic potential of GSNO in vivo, nude mice bearing intra-peritoneal xenografts of human A2780 ovarian carcinoma cell line (2 × 10(6 were orally administered GSNO at the dose of 1 mg/kg body weight. Daily oral administration of GSNO significantly attenuated tumor mass (p<0.001 in the peritoneal cavity compared to vehicle (phosphate buffered saline treated group at 4 weeks. GSNO also potentiated cisplatin mediated tumor toxicity in an A2780 ovarian carcinoma nude mouse model. GSNO's nitrosylating ability was reflected in the induced nitrosylation of various known proteins including NFκB p65, Akt and EGFR. As a novel finding, we observed that GSNO also induced nitrosylation with inverse relationship at tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of STAT3, an established player in chemoresistance and cell proliferation in ovarian cancer and in cancer in general. Overall, our study underlines the significance of S-nitrosylation of key cancer promoting proteins in modulating ovarian cancer and proposes the therapeutic potential of nitrosylating agents (like GSNO for the treatment of ovarian cancer alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs.

  10. Cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Kure, Elin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NORDIC-VII study is a randomised phase III trial of cetuximab plus continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) vs FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The present report presents an updated and final survival...... population). RAS was mutated in 46% and BRAF in 12% of the tumours. RAS and BRAF, if mutated, were negative prognostic factors. The updated analyses confirmed the finding of the primary report that cetuximab did not provide any additional benefit when added to FLOX in patients with RAS/BRAF wild-type tumours......, neither on progression-free nor overall survival. However, the outcomes in a subset of patients, which, after the first eight treatment cycles, received cetuximab alone, suggested a beneficial effect of cetuximab monotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Adding cetuximab to Nordic FLOX did not provide any clinical...

  11. Irradiation techniques for the breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varon T, C.F.; Rojas C, E.L.

    2007-01-01

    The radiotherapy is a cancer treatment way based on the radiation employment. It acts on the tumor, destroying the wicked cells and impeding that this it grows and reproduce. With the radiotherapy the probability of cure of some types of cancer; among them the one of breast, it increases. The investigations in oncology have allowed to develop new technologies with which is possible, for example, to locate the tumors accurately and to adapt the irradiation fields to their form. This has allowed to improve the treatments since it can destroy the tumor applying an intense radiation dose without producing irreversible damages to other organs and healthy tissues of the body. In the underdeveloped countries or in development as Mexico, and almost all those of Latin America, it is not still possible to have several of these technologies in the main oncological centers of the country by their high cost. It is expected that their cost go lowering and that its going to develop technologies more cheap so that they can be applied in more general way to the population that suffers of this suffering. (Author)

  12. Trends of lip, oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers in Australia 1982–2008: overall good news but with rising rates in the oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyawardana, Anura; Johnson, Newell W

    2013-01-01

    Considerable global variation in the incidence of lip, of oral cavity and of pharyngeal cancers exists. Whilst this reflects regional or population differences in risk, interpretation is uncertain due to heterogeneity of definitions of sites and of sub-sites within this anatomically diverse region. For Australia, limited data on sub-sites have been published. This study examines age-standardised incidence trends and demography from 1982 to 2008, the latest data available. Numbers of cases within ICD10:C00-C14 were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, recorded by sex, age, and sub-site. Raw data were re-analysed to calculate crude, age-specific and age-standardised incidence using Segi’s world-standard population. Time-trends were analysed using Joinpoint regression. Lip, Oral Cavity and Pharyngeal (excluding nasopharynx) cancers, considered together, show a biphasic trend: in men rising 0.9% pa from 1982 to 1992, and declining 1.6% pa between 1992 and 2008. For females: rises of 2.0% pa 1982–1997; declines of 2.8% pa 1997–2008. Lip cancer is declining especially significantly. When the Oropharynx is considered separately, steadily increasing trends of 1.2% pa for men and 0.8% pa for women were observed from 1982 to 2008. Although overall rates of lip/oral/oropharyngeal cancer are declining in Australia, these are still high. This study revealed steady increases in cancers of the oropharynx, beginning in the late 1990s. Continued efforts to reduce the burden of these cancers are needed, focused on reduction of the traditional risk factors of alcohol and tobacco, and with special emphasis on the possible role of human papillomavirus and sexual hygiene for cancers of the oropharynx

  13. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  14. Anal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anal cancer is often curable with treatment. Major prognostic factors are site, size, and nodal status. Treatments include radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. Get detailed information for anal cancer risk factors, classification, staging, prognosis, and treatment in this summary for clinicians.

  15. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  16. Cost trend analysis of initial cancer treatment in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Yun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the high cost of initial cancer care, that is, care in the first year after diagnosis, limited information is available for specific categories of cancer-related costs, especially costs for specific services. This study purposed to identify causes of change in cancer treatment costs over time and to perform trend analyses of the percentage of cancer patients who had received a specific treatment type and the mean cost of care for patients who had received that treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis of trends in initial treatment costs focused on cancer-related surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and treatments other than active treatments. For each cancer-specific trend, slopes were calculated for regression models with 95% confidence intervals. Analyses of patients diagnosed in 2007 showed that the National Health Insurance (NHI system paid, on average, $10,780 for initial care of a gastric cancer patient and $10,681 for initial care of a lung cancer patient, which were inflation-adjusted increases of $6,234 and $5,522, respectively, over the 1996 care costs. During the same interval, the mean NHI payment for initial care for the five specific cancers increased significantly (p<0.05. Hospitalization costs comprised the largest portion of payments for all cancers. During 1996-2007, the use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy significantly increased in all cancer types (p<0.05. In 2007, NHI payments for initial care for these five cancers exceeded $12 billion, and gastric and lung cancers accounted for the largest share. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In addition to the growing number of NHI beneficiaries with cancer, treatment costs and the percentage of patients who undergo treatment are growing. Therefore, the NHI must accurately predict the economic burden of new chemotherapy agents and radiation therapies and may need to develop programs for stratifying patients according to their potential benefit

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Cervical Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer is found early. Signs and symptoms of cervical cancer include vaginal bleeding and pelvic pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by cervical cancer or by other conditions . Check with your ...

  18. Paradigm shift in cancer treatment: Cancer treatment as a metabolic disease – fusion of Eastern and Western medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reo Hamaguchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Current standard therapies for cancer, including surgery, anti-cancer drugs, and radiotherapy, are thought to contribute to the improvement in the survival rates of cancer patients. However, such standard therapies have 3 major problems: in advanced cancers, it is unlikely that standard cancer treatments will cure the disease; adverse side effects that accompany standard cancer treatments put many patients in distress; and a large amount of medical expenditure is required for new and expensive anti-cancer drugs. These problems may be viewed as a result of establishing treatments without any consideration regarding the root cause of the cancer. Otto Warburg suggested that particular changes in the energy metabolism of cells, which are associated with a shortage of oxygen, are the root cause of cancer. Cancer cells have unique metabolic characteristics, and thus we believe that it is important to treat cancer as a metabolic disease. More specifically, not only is it important to suppress cancer cell metabolism, but it is also important to improve the chronic inflammation that is associated with the development and progression of cancer, and to support the functions of immune cells. This type of view of cancer treatment coincides with the principles of Chinese medicine, which has a history of 4000 years, such as “fuzheng quxie” and “zhibing qiuben”, which can assist in the establishment of cancer treatments for patients. In this article, we discuss cancer treatments from the view of cancer as a metabolic disease and their association with Chinese medicine, and introduce some clinical cases along with a review of the literature.

  19. Differences in incidence and survival of oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers between Germany and the United States depend on the HPV-association of the cancer site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, L; Buttmann-Schweiger, N; Listl, S; Ressing, M; Holleczek, B; Katalinic, A; Luttmann, S; Kraywinkel, K; Brenner, H

    2018-01-01

    The epidemiology of squamous cell oral cavity and pharyngeal cancers (OCPC) has changed rapidly during the last years, possibly due to an increase of human papilloma virus (HPV) positive tumors and successes in tobacco prevention. Here, we compare incidence and survival of OCPC by HPV-relation of the site in Germany and the United States (US). Age-standardized and age-specific incidence and 5-year relative survival was estimated using data from population-based cancer registries in Germany and the US Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 13 database. Incidence was estimated for each year between 1999 and 2013. Relative survival for 2002-2005, 2006-2009, and 2010-2013 was estimated using period analysis. The datasets included 52,787 and 48,861 cases with OCPC diagnosis between 1997 and 2013 in Germany and the US. Incidence was much higher in Germany compared to the US for HPV-unrelated OCPC and more recently also for HPV-related OCPC in women. Five-year relative survival differences between Germany and the US were small for HPV-unrelated OCPC. For HPV-related OCPC, men had higher survival in the US (62.1%) than in Germany (45.4%) in 2010-2013. These differences increased over time and were largest in younger patients and stage IV disease without metastasis. In contrast, women had comparable survival for HPV-related OCPC in both countries. Strong survival differences between Germany and the US were observed for HPV-related OCPC in men, which might be explained by differences in HPV-attributable proportions. Close monitoring of the epidemiology of OCPC in each country is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metachronous Lung Cancer: Clinical Characteristics and Effects of Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzechonek, Adam; Błasiak, Piotr; Muszczyńska-Bernhard, Beata; Pawełczyk, Konrad; Pniewski, Grzegorz; Ornat, Maciej; Grzegrzółka, Jędrzej; Brzecka, Anna

    2018-01-01

    The occurrence of a second lung tumor after surgical removal of lung cancer usually indicates a lung cancer metastasis, but sometimes a new lesion proves to be a new primary lung cancer, i.e., metachronous lung cancer. The goal of the present study was to conduct a clinical evaluation of patients with metachronous lung cancer and lung cancer metastasis, and to compare the early and distant outcomes of surgical treatment in both cancer types. There were 26 age-matched patients with lung cancer metastases and 23 patients with metachronous lung cancers, who underwent a second lung cancer resection. We evaluated the histological type of a resected cancer, the extent of thoracosurgery, the frequency of early postoperative complications, and the probability of 5-year survival after the second operation. The findings were that metachronous lung cancer was adenocarcinoma in 52% of patients, with a different histopathological pattern from that of the primary lung cancer in 74% of patients. In both cancer groups, mechanical resections were the most common surgery type (76% of all cases), with anatomical resections such as segmentectomy, lobectomy, or pneumectomy being much rarer conducted. The incidence of early postoperative complications in metachronous lung cancer and lung cancer metastasis (30% vs. 31%, respectively) and the probability of 5-year survival after resection of either cancer tumor (60.7% vs. 50.9%, respectively) were comparable. In conclusion, patients undergoing primary lung cancer surgery require a long-term follow-up due to the risk of metastatic or metachronous lung cancer. The likelihood of metachronous lung cancer and pulmonary lung cancer metastases, the incidence of postoperative complications, and the probability of 5-year survival after resection of metachronous lung cancer or lung cancer metastasis are similar.

  1. Managing work and cancer treatment: Experiences among survivors of hematological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Maria D; Siminoff, Laura A

    2018-04-16

    The current study was performed to characterize the employment status of survivors of hematological cancer who have an informal caregiver from the time of diagnosis through the first 6 months of treatment. Using a mixed methods approach, semistructured interviews with survivors of hematological cancer were conducted within 6 months of the initiation of cancer treatment. Interviews assessed cancer treatment status, barriers and facilitators to employment, financial and insurance status, and relationship with the primary caregiver. These results are part of a longitudinal study of cancer survivors and informal caregivers. A total of 171 patients were enrolled. Within 6 months of beginning cancer treatments, approximately 35% were no longer employed. Reasons to remain employed included financial need, employee benefits, and a sense of purpose and normalcy. Employer accommodations and supportive colleagues facilitated continued employment. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that having a higher household income, a desire to work, nonphysical job tasks, and congruent survivor-caregiver communication were associated with greater odds of remaining employed. Within 6 months of initiating cancer treatment, the majority of survivors of hematological cancer had maintained employment. Because of the limitations imposed by the physical stress of cancer treatments, as well as the need to maintain employment to continue receiving employee benefits to cover such treatments, survivors of hematological cancer likely would benefit from employment accommodations that are sensitive to their unique needs. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  2. Conservative treatment of premature rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The largest radical resections in rectal cancer with significant morbidity and mortality (Urinary dysfunction, sexual dysfunction, permanent colostomy, etc.), on certain occasions and with high selectivity, they can be avoided with the implementation of local resections. Our intention is to assess the results of conservative treatment of rectal cancer early. Material and Methods: Between 01.01.89 and 31.12.09 14 consecutive patients were treated carriers rectal adenocarcinoma who had never received prior cancer treatment and a second simultaneous showed no neoplasia. The age of the patients presented a range between 44 and 72 years with a mean of 60.4 years; sex similarly partitioned and according to ECOG performance status was 0≤2. All patients were operated through a anal resection of which 4 were performed a submucosal tumor excision (T1) and 10 excision was entire rectal wall and tumor invaded the muscularis propria (T2). For this one type of surgery patients were selected the following criteria: tumor ≤6 cm. the anal verge, size ≤3 cm., GH I-II, vegetative, mobile, and T1-2, N0 by EER. After intervention, the pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed that 4 patients GH III, lymphovascular invasion and / or peri neural, or close surgical margins (+) (≤3 mm.) And T3, so underwent Miles operation (March 1 T1 and T2). Subsequently the rest of the patients (10) underwent concomitant radio chemotherapy. Radiation therapy was similar all using megavoltage photons (CO-60, 18mV) to the entire pelvic volume in a normofraccionamiento to complete 50.40 Gy (1.8 Gy / 28) using multiple fields (box technique). Chemotherapy was prepared 5FU + LV in the first patient (4), in following (4) was used 5FU continuous infusion (1st and 5th week) and the remaining (2) Capecitabine. Follow up was complete. Results: In our sample we extract local failure was 4 (29%), distant failure 3 (20%) and two local and distant failures (14%) so it follows that

  3. Population attributable risks of oral cavity cancer to behavioral and medical risk factors in France: results of a large population-based case-control study, the ICARE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoï, Loredana; Menvielle, Gwenn; Cyr, Diane; Lapôtre-Ledoux, Bénédicte; Stücker, Isabelle; Luce, Danièle

    2015-10-31

    Population attributable risks (PARs) are useful tool to estimate the burden of risk factors in cancer incidence. Few studies estimated the PARs of oral cavity cancer to tobacco smoking alone, alcohol drinking alone and their joint consumption but none performed analysis stratified by subsite, gender or age. Among the suspected risk factors of oral cavity cancer, only PAR to a family history of head and neck cancer was reported in two studies. The purpose of this study was to estimate in France the PARs of oral cavity cancer to several recognized and suspected risk factors, overall and by subsite, gender and age. We analysed data from 689 oral cavity cancer cases and 3481 controls included in a population-based case-control study, the ICARE study. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs), PARs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The PARs were 0.3% (95% CI -3.9%; +3.9%) for alcohol alone, 12.7% (6.9%-18.0%) for tobacco alone and 69.9% (64.4%-74.7%) for their joint consumption. PAR to combined alcohol and tobacco consumption was 74% (66.5%-79.9%) in men and 45.4% (32.7%-55.6%) in women. Among suspected risk factors, body mass index 2 years before the interview role of combined tobacco and alcohol consumption in the oral cavity cancer burden in France and gives an indication of the proportion of cases attributable to other risk factors. Most of oral cavity cancers are attributable to concurrent smoking and drinking and would be potentially preventable through smoking or drinking cessation. If the majority of cases are explained by recognized or suspected risk factors in men, a substantial number of cancers in women are probably due to still unexplored factors that remain to be clarified by future studies.

  4. Vinflunine in the treatment of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bachner

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mark Bachner, Maria De Santis3rd Medical Department – Center for Oncology and Hematology, Kaiser Franz Josef-Spital der Stadt Wien, and Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute for Applied Cancer Research Vienna (LBI-ACR VIEnna, Cluster Translational Oncology, Kaiser Franz Josef-Spital der Stadt Wien, and Applied Cancer Research – Institution for Translational Research Vienna (ACR-ITR VIEnna/CEADDP, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Vinflunine (VFL is a third-generation bifluorinated semi-synthetic vinca alkaloid obtained by superacidic chemistry from its parent compound, vinorelbine. As with the other vinca alkaloids, the main antineoplastic effects of VFL arise from its interaction with tubulin, the major component of microtubules in mitotic spindles. In contrast to other vinca alkaloids, VFL shows some distinctive properties in terms of tubulin binding, possibly explaining its superior antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo compared with vinorelbine as well as its excellent safety profile. In transitional cell carcinoma (TCC, two single-agent phase II trials were performed testing VFL in platinum-pretreated patients, showing moderate response rates and promising disease control rates. Therefore, the first phase III trial in modern times for second-line TCC of the urothelium was designed in order to further investigate the activity of VFL. First results were presented at the 2008 ASCO conference. VFL appears to be a possible treatment option for patients with TCC progressing after first-line platinum-containing chemotherapy.Keywords: vinflunine, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder, bladder cancer, chemotherapy, second-line chemotherapy

  5. Breast cancer patients' presentation for oncological treatment: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Breast cancer patients are presenting at advanced stages for oncological treatment in Nigeria and World Health Organization predicted developing countries' breast cancer incidence and mortality to increase by year 2020. Methods: Prospective observational hospital based study that enrolled breast cancer ...

  6. Evaluation and management of side effects of breast cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhout, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases. Adjuvant systemic therapies such as chemotherapy, immunotherapy and endocrine therapy play an important role in the treatment of breast cancer. These therapies reduce the risk of relapse of breast cancer and increase cure rates. However,

  7. Bleeding complications during anticoagulant treatment in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    Patients with cancer have an increased risk of bleeding complications, of which some are fatal. This risk is influenced by chemotherapy, cancer type and stage, thrombocytopenia, renal function, and previous bleeding. Since many cancer patients receive anticoagulant treatment for prophylaxis or

  8. Seroma indicates increased risk of lymphedema following breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Jørgensen, Mads Gustaf; Haugaard, Karen

    2017-01-01

    in one of the largest retrospective cohort studies. Material and methods We included all patients with unilateral breast cancer treated in the period of 2008-2014. Data regarding treatment and breast cancer characteristics were retrieved from the national breast cancer registry. Data regarding lymphedema...

  9. Colorectal Cancer: Late Presentation and Outcome of Treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Colorectal cancer remains a major health problem especially in developed countries where it ranks as the third most common cause of cancer in both men and women. Though incidence of colorectal cancer is low in Nigeria and other developing countries, outcome of treatment remains poor due largely to late ...

  10. Gastric cancer diagnosis and treatment guidelines 2008: Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Uganda most cancers to the exception of bladder and penis are increasing in incidence. The incidence of cancer of stomach is 5.6/100,000 from 0.8/100,000 in the 1960s a seven fold increase.The purpose of this guideline document is to highlight the salient points in gastric cancer diagnosis and treatment in the ...

  11. Hepatic toxicity resulting from cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Theodore S.; Robertson, John M.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Jirtle, Randy L.; Ensminger, William D.; Fajardo, Luis F.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), often called radiation hepatitis, is a syndrome characterized by the development of anicteric ascites approximately 2 weeks to 4 months after hepatic irradiation. There has been a renewed interest in hepatic irradiation because of two significant advances in cancer treatment: three dimensional radiation therapy treatment planning and bone marrow transplantation using total body irradiation. RILD resulting from liver radiation can usually be distinguished clinically from that resulting from the preparative regime associated with bone marrow transplantation. However, both syndromes demonstrate the same pathological lesion: veno-occlusive disease. Recent evidence suggests that elevated transforming growth factor β levels may play a role in the development of veno-occlusive disease. Three dimensional treatment planning offers the potential to determine the radiation dose and volume dependence of RILD, permitting the safe delivery of high doses of radiation to parts of the liver. The chief therapy for RILD is diuretics, although some advocate steroids for severe cases. The characteristics of RILD permit the development of a grading system modeled after the NCI Acute Common Toxicity Criteria, which incorporates standard criteria of hepatic dysfunction

  12. Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi mushroom) for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xingzhong; Ruiz Beguerie, Julieta; Sze, Daniel Man-Yeun; Chan, Godfrey C F

    2016-04-05

    Ganoderma lucidum is a natural medicine that is widely used and recommended by Asian physicians and naturopaths for its supporting effects on immune system. Laboratory research and a handful of preclinical trials have suggested that G. lucidum carries promising anticancer and immunomodulatory properties. The popularity of taking G. lucidum as an alternative medicine has been increasing in cancer patients. However, there is no systematic review that has been conducted to evaluate the actual benefits of G. lucidum in cancer treatment. To evaluate the clinical effects of G. lucidum on long-term survival, tumour response, host immune functions and quality of life in cancer patients, as well as adverse events associated with its use. We searched an extensive set of databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, NIH, AMED, CBM, CNKI, CMCC and VIP Information/Chinese Scientific Journals Database was searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in October 2011. Other strategies used were scanning the references of articles retrieved, handsearching of the International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms and contact with herbal medicine experts and manufacturers of G. lucidum. For this update we updated the searches in February 2016. To be eligible for being included in this review, studies had to be RCTs comparing the efficacy of G. lucidum medications to active or placebo control in patients with cancer that had been diagnosed by pathology. All types and stages of cancer were eligible for inclusion. Trials were not restricted on the basis of language. Five RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Two independent review authors assessed the methodological quality of individual trials. Common primary outcomes were tumour response evaluated according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, immune function parameters such as natural killer (NK)-cell activity and T-lymphocyte co

  13. Symptom monitoring in treatment of cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Wanxia; Lin Miao; Lü Ye; Yang Biao; Yao Cong; Liu Juan; Wang Wenru

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine self-reported symptoms by the patients receiving cancer therapy, and find out the symptoms that should be coped with and managed during the treatment. Methods A pilot study was conducted on self-reported symptoms on 185 patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for different cancers. The Therapy-Related Symptoms Checklist (TRSC) was used. Results Severe symptoms on the TRSC subscales: loss of appetite,feeling sluggish, weight loss, nausea and hair loss, were reported by the patients. The frequently reported symptoms by those on chemotherapy were nausea, feeling sluggish, weight loss, vomiting, and taste change. The frequently reported symptoms by those on radiotherapy were feeling sluggish, weight loss, loss of appetite, difficult sleeping, and changing taste. The symptoms of loss of appetite, feeling sluggish, weight loss, hair loss, and nausea were both frequently reported by those on radiotherapy and those on chemotherapy. Conclusion Symptom monitoring may be facilitated by TRSC, based on the severity and frequency of reported symptoms, more patients and caregivers could know which symptoms should be preferential interventions.

  14. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dhakal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q_{0} values of the order of 2×10^{10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B_{p} of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q_{0} value of (5±1×10^{10} at 2.0 K and B_{p}=90  mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  15. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, P.; Ciovati, G.; Myneni, G. R.; Gray, K. E.; Groll, N.; Maheshwari, P.; McRae, D. M.; Pike, R.; Proslier, T.; Stevie, F.; Walsh, R. P.; Yang, Q.; Zasadzinzki, J.

    2013-04-01

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800-1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q0 values of the order of 2×1010 at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (Bp) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q0 value of (5±1)×1010 at 2.0 K and Bp=90mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  16. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, P.; Ciovati, G.; Myneni, G. R.; Gray, K. E.; Groll, N.; Maheshwari, P.; McRae, D. M.; Pike, R.; Proslier, T.; Stevie, F.; Walsh, R. P.; Yang, Q.; Zasadzinzki, J.

    2013-04-01

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q{sub 0} values of the order of 2×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B{sub p}) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q{sub 0} value of (5±1)×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and B{sub p}=90mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  17. [Cancer treatment in Skane and in Sjaelland. Do differences concerning examination and treatment explain reduced survival among Danish cancer patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Lena; Landberg, T.

    2001-01-01

    if differences in the diagnostic workup and treatment can explain some of this variation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Aspects of the diagnostic workup and treatment of the above mentioned four cancer types are examined using data from cancer registry analyses and official reports. These data are seen in the context...... of counts of trained personnel and equipment in cancer diagnostics and treatment in the two countries. RESULTS: With regard to lung and breast cancer, the data seem to indicate that Danish patients are diagnosed later, and that Denmark lags behind in treatment capacity. With regard to rectal cancer......, the data seem to indicate that concentrating operations in fewer hospitals, and improvements in operation technique have been introduced earlier in Sweden than in Denmark. With regard to prostate cancer, however, the data seem to indicate that many more indolent cases that do not need treatment...

  18. Conservation irradiation in the treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, S.L.; Chiminazzo Junior, H.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques of treatment and cosmetic results of 130 patients with breast cancer are presented. All patients received conservative treatment, with lumpectomy and radiotherapy at Centro de Oncologia Campinas. (M.A.C.) [pt

  19. Uterine/Endometrial Cancer: Working with Your Treatment Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Your Treatment Team Treatment Surgery Surgical Staging Pathology of Ovarian Cancer Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Hormone Therapy ... 20, 2016 January 17, 2017 February 21, 2017 March 22, 2017 April 18, 2017 May 16, 2017 ...

  20. Hybrid Theranostic Platforms for Cancer Nanomedical Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Julfakyan, Khachatur

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this dissertation (Chapter 3) discusses the rational design, wet protocol synthesis and complete characterization of the novel hybrid material – polydopamine coated iron-cobalt nanocubes (PDFCs). This material was loaded with anticancer model drug doxorubicin in one step procedure (PDFC-DOX) and the resulting drug-delivery vehicle was found to be successfully internalized by cervical cancer cells. The cytotoxicity test demonstrated inhibition of 50% of the cells at the concentration of 30μg/ml for PDFC-DOX. Moreover, the release was highly attenuated and pH-sensitive in acidic range. PDFC was also modified with fluorescein leading to green fluorescent nanoparticles PDFC-FITC, which demonstrated excellent intracellular molecular imaging property. PDFCs with one of the highest magnetic saturation among the materials used in biomedicine (226 emu/g based on core) showed the absence of any cytotoxicity in vitro and excellent MRI contrasting property (r2=186.44 mMs-1, higher than commercial contrast agents Ferridex® and Clio®), both in vitro and in vivo on mice. They were cleared out from the mice bodies in month without affecting their health. Due to the high density of core (8.3 g/cm3) they demonstrated ability to be contrast materials also for X-Ray CT diagnostic modality, increasing the tumor detection and visualization probability in combination with MRI. In addition to it’s diagnostic and drug-delivery modalities, PDFC was evaluated also for microwave-induced cytotoxicity as a novel concept in cancer treatment. As low as 10 μg/ml concentration of PDFCs in human cervical cancer cells caused extensive death above 73% upon exposure to 2,45 GHz of microwaves for one minute. Laser irradiation (808 nm, 15 minutes) of cancer cells with internalized PDFCs caused cell death above 60%. The specific absorption rate of PDFCs at 470 MHz frequency and 20 mT of the alternating magnetic field power was 180 W/g, which is nearly 100 W higher than for

  1. Novel Approaches to the Treatment of Cancer in London UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Black

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An intensive and in-depth two-day conference providing an advanced level updateKEY TOPICS TO BE COVERED:New paradigms for targeted therapiesNew anti-cancer agents ~ industry viewpointNovel approaches to the treatment of breast cancer, melanoma and pancreatic cancerDrug development and precision radiotherapyEuropean drug development initiativesMarket access to novel cancer drugsRegulatory issues in marketing authorisation of anti-cancer productsGene and cell therapies and trial endpointsDeveloping cancer vaccinesCLICK HERE for more information 

  2. Risk factors associated with treatment refusal in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Won Na; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Han, Yeji; Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Su Hwan; Ryu, Yon Ju; Lee, Jin Hwa; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yookyung; Chang, Jung Hyun

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is increasing with longer life expectancy. Refusal of active treatment for cancer is prone to cause patients to experience more severe symptoms and shorten survival. The purpose of this study was to define the factors related to refusal or abandonment of active therapy in lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 617 patients from medical records from 2010 to 2014. Two groups were formed: 149 patients who refused anti-cancer treatment and allowed only palliative care were classified into the non-treatment group, while the remaining 468 who received anti-cancer treatment were classified into the treatment group. The groups differed significantly in age, employment, relationship status, number of offspring, educational status, body mass index, presence of chest and systemic symptoms, Charlson Comorbidity Index, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score, and tumor node metastasis stage ( P refusal of cancer treatment. Individual factors, such as old age, low educational status, low weight, and poor performance status can influence refusal of cancer treatment in patients with lung cancer, and should be considered prior to consultation with patients. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Complaints reported by patients with cancer of oral cavity, submitted to radiotherapy; Queixas apresentadas pelos pacientes submetidos a radioterapia de cavidade oral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamasco, Mariana; Miranda, Renata Puccinelli de [Centro Universitario de Araraquara - UNIARA, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mari_bergamasco@yahoo.com.br

    2006-01-15

    The oral cavity is of fundamental importance to the speech, chewing, deglutition, suction and salivation functions. When an illness like cancer develops in this region, radiation therapy is very important, but can cause many sequels to the affected functions and structures of the Oral Motor System, especially to chewing, deglutition and speech. In such cases, the phonoaudiology support as part of a multidisciplinary staff can help providing esthetic and functional rehabilitation as well as social re-integration for a better quality of life of these patients. (author)

  4. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist

  5. Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2013-01-01

    of the individual patient ’ s needs, values and experiences is key to developing the environment to support the patient quality of life. The present study holds implications for practice to inform design of future hospital environments for cancer treatment. The study points to the importance for being attentive...... these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a fl ow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients ’ sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital space...... to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home. Discussion. Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition...

  6. Breast cancer treatment: historical review and current approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakowski, A.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution and development of opinions on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer since Galen to present time is presented. The concept of breast cancer as a local disease has been replaced by the understanding of its systemic character. On this background described are the methods of surgical treatment beginning from early - supraradical, to present -conservative approaches. The ''milestones'' in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer of the last 40 years are presented. Current methods of breast cancer management include correct diagnosis (clinical examination, mammography, ultrasound, fine needle aspiration biopsy), TNM staging, adequate loco-regional therapy, systemic therapy, rehabilitation, reconstruction and careful follow-up. (author)

  7. Cancer Treatment Measures – PPS-Exempt Cancer Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Prospective Payment System (PPS)-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting (PCHQR) Program currently uses three cancer specific measures. The resulting PPS-Exempt...

  8. Investigation of skin cancer treatment efficiency by raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. S.; Kim, D. W. [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    From the successful perform of the molecular structures of various kinds of human skin cancer. We can predict the types of cancer when a small abnormal change change occurs on skin by raman spectrum. When we applied the cancer causing chemicals, bezopyrene, to nude mouse, it did not develop to cancer. But we had radiated UV light after developed to skin cancer in a few days. We can deduce the development of human skin cancer from the result of nude mouse skin cancer, because the two skin are structurally very similar to each other. From the results of own research we could conform the UV light is essential for the development of skin cancer. The results of own research can be directly apply to early detection and proper treatment of skin cancer in hospital. 32 refs., 40 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  9. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome : Improving outcome with lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, M. D. N. L.; Nuver, J.; Lefrandt, J. D.; Vrieling, A. H.; Gietema, J. A.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but

  10. Preoperative distress predicts persistent pain after breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Mathias Kvist; Mertz, Birgitte Goldschmidt; Bidstrup, Pernille Envold Hansen

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Persistent pain after breast cancer treatment (PPBCT) affects 25% to 60% of breast cancer survivors and is recognized as a clinical problem, with 10% to 15% reporting moderate to severe pain several years after treatment. Psychological comorbidity is known to influence pain perception...

  11. Effects of Cancer Treatment on Fertility (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Effects of Cancer Treatment on Fertility KidsHealth / For Parents / Effects of Cancer Treatment on ...

  12. Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male breast cancer treatment may include surgery with or without radiation therapy, chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, and/or HER2-directed therapy. Get detailed information about the diagnosis and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent male breast cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  13. Thyroid cancer treatment : Long-term effects and new developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hesselink, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is increasingly common. This is especially the case for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which has a favorable prognosis. Treatment consists of surgical removal of the thyroid gland, radioiodine treatment, and life-long administration of relatively high doses of thyroid hormone.

  14. Classification of treatment-related mortality in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Sarah; Pole, Jason D; Gibson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Treatment-related mortality is an important outcome in paediatric cancer clinical trials. An international group of experts in supportive care in paediatric cancer developed a consensus-based definition of treatment-related mortality and a cause-of-death attribution system. The reliability and va...

  15. Persistent pain and sensory disturbances after treatment for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Mathias Kvist; Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Gärtner, Rune

    2013-01-01

    To examine the development of persistent pain after treatment for breast cancer and to examine risk factors associated with continuing pain.......To examine the development of persistent pain after treatment for breast cancer and to examine risk factors associated with continuing pain....

  16. Does radiation dose to the salivary glands and oral cavity predict patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva in head and neck cancer patients treated with curative radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellema, Anke Petra; Doornaert, Patricia; Slotman, Ben J.; Rene Leemans, C.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the association between the mean salivary gland and oral cavity dose, with patient-rated moderate and severe xerostomia and sticky saliva. Patients and methods: One hundred and fifty-seven patients treated with bilateral irradiation for head and neck cancer were included. The parotid and submandibular glands and the oral cavity were delineated on plannings-CT scans. At baseline and 6 and 12 months self-reported xerostomia and sticky saliva were assessed using the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 questionnaire. Results: At 6 months a significant association between the mean parotid (MD par ) and mean submandibular dose (MD subm ) and xerostomia was observed (OR-MD par : 1.17; P=0.002 and OR-MD subm : 1.08; P=0.02). Between MD par and MD subm , a significant interaction term was present. No significant association was found with the oral cavity dose. Xerostomia was reversible depending on MD par and MD subm . Considering Sticky saliva, a significant association was found at 6 and 12 months with MD subm (OR: 1.03; P par and MD subm influence the risk of xerostomia in irradiated patients at 6 months. This probability as a function of the mean parotid dose significantly depended on the mean dose in the submandibular glands. Sticky saliva mainly depends on MD subm

  17. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible: Risk Factors related of the treatment of 321 cases of carcinoma of the oral cavity and the oropharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calais, G.; Reynaud-Bougnoux, A.; Le Floch, O.

    1988-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN), a severe complication of radiation treatment of oral cavity and oropharynx carcinomas, should be prevented. We observed the complication in 23 among the 321 patients we treated (7% occurence rate). Therefore we looked for factors associated with a higher incidence of ORN. Among risk factors was the use of interstitial implant alone or associated to an external irradiation, and high fractional dose above 3 Gy per fraction (13,26 and 14% incidence rate of ORN, respectively). Another risk factor was the association of a surgery with bone resection and irradiation (12% incidence rate of ORN). Incidence of ORN was 17% in the carcinomas of oral cavity versus 6% in oropharynx carcinomas. However, when the treatment modalities were identical (external irradiation alone) there was no difference with respect to the necrosis risk between oral cavity and oropharynx (8% and 6% incidence rate). Size of the tumor, dental status (total extractions or conservative treatment with fluoridation), use of an induction chemotherapy) did not modify the incidence of ORN. Then we conducted that interstitial radiation therapy associated to external irradiation or high fractional dose radiotherapy and surgery with bone resection before irradiation are the main causes of ORN [fr

  18. Immunotherapy Expands Lung Cancer Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a large clinical trial show combining the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) with chemotherapy helped some patients with advanced cancer live longer. As this Cancer Currents post explains, the results will immediately affect patient care.

  19. When your cancer treatment stops working

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... humor into your life. Watch funny movies, read comic strips or humorous books, and try to see ... with advanced cancer. www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/advancedcancer.pdf . Updated May 2014. Accessed October 12, ...

  20. A neutron irradiator applied to cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Andrade, Ana P. de

    2000-01-01

    Cancer and the way of treating it with neutron capture therapy are addressed. This paper discusses also the type of neutron facilities used to treat cancer around the world, as follow: discrete neutron sources, accelerators, and nuclear reactors. The major features of an epithermal neutron irradiation facility applied to BNCT treatment are addressed. The main goal is to give another choice of neutron irradiators to be set in a hospital. The irradiation facility embeds a set of 252 Cf neutron source coupled with a homogeneous mixture of uranium-zirconium hydride alloy containing 8.4 wt % uranium enriched to 20% U 235 . The facility delivers an epithermal neutron beam with low background of fast neutron and gamma rays. The N particle transport code (MCNP-4A) has been used during the simulation in order to achieve the desired configurations and to estimate the multiplication factor, k eff . The present facility loaded with 30 mg of 252 Cf neutron source generates an external beam with an intensity of 10 7 n/cm 2 .s on the spectrum of 4 eV to 40 KeV. The 252 Cf - facility coupled with fissile material was able to amplify the epithermal flux to 10 8 n/cm 2 .s, maintaining the figure-of-merits represented by the ratios of the fast dose and gamma dose in air per epithermal neutron flux closed to those values presented by BMRR, MITR-II and Petten Reactor. The medical irradiation facility loaded with 252 Cf- 235 U can be a choice for BNCT. (author)

  1. [Treatment Strategy for Liver Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer - Including Treatment for Oligometastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeo; Nakamura, Takatoshi; Yamanashi, Takahiro; Miura, Hirohisa; Tsutsui, Atsuko; Shimazu, Masashi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2017-10-01

    The mainstay of treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer is surgery. Therefore, colorectal cancer metastasis is distinctive, compared to other cancer types in which chemotherapy is the main treatment. Initially, Japan experienced medical druglag compared with western countries. However, the use of oxaliplatin for unresectable recurrent metastatic colorectal cancer became available in Japan, as well as in western countries, in 2005. We have since shifted chemotherapeutic regimens from monotherapy to combination therapy with molecular targeted agents. The combination therapy has rapidly become a standard therapy for unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer, and prognosis has dramatically increased for patients with this condition. Herein, we describe the treatment of liver metastasis of colorectal cancer, and surgery and adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy options for resectable cancer. Furthermore, we focus on conversion therapy for unresectable cancer.

  2. Metabolic syndrome induced by anticancer treatment in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Hee Won; Yoo, Jae Ho

    2017-06-01

    The number of childhood cancer survivors is increasing as survival rates improve. However, complications after treatment have not received much attention, particularly metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome comprises central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance, and cancer survivors have higher risks of cardiovascular events compared with the general population. The mechanism by which cancer treatment induces metabolic syndrome is unclear. However, its pathophysiology can be categorized based on the cancer treatment type administered. Brain surgery or radiotherapy may induce metabolic syndrome by damaging the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, which may induce pituitary hormone deficiencies. Local therapy administered to particular endocrine organs directly damages the organs and causes hormone deficiencies, which induce obesity and dyslipidemia leading to metabolic syndrome. Chemotherapeutic agents interfere with cell generation and growth, damage the vascular endothelial cells, and increase the cardiovascular risk. Moreover, chemotherapeutic agents induce oxidative stress, which also induces metabolic syndrome. Physical inactivity caused by cancer treatment or the cancer itself, dietary restrictions, and the frequent use of antibiotics may also be risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Since childhood cancer survivors with metabolic syndrome have higher risks of cardiovascular events at an earlier age, early interventions should be considered. The optimal timing of interventions and drug use has not been established, but lifestyle modifications and exercise interventions that begin during cancer treatment might be beneficial and tailored education and interventions that account for individual patients' circumstances are needed. This review evaluates the recent literature that describes metabolic syndrome in cancer survivors, with a focus on its pathophysiology.

  3. Issues in cervical cancer incidence and treatment in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Mark H; Phaëton, Rébécca

    2010-09-01

    Cervical disease burden continues to be especially high in HIV-infected women, even in the era of effective antiretroviral medications. This review discusses the multiple issues surrounding HIV-associated cervical cancer. Also, the unique treatment-related issues in HIV-associated cervical cancer are addressed. The incidence of invasive cervical cancer has remained stable in industrialized nations; however, it is only estimated in developing countries secondary to a relative lack of data collection and registries. Trends in HIV-associated cervical cancer have changed in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. Recent molecular pathways suggest that the natural progression of human papillomavirus infection, the causal agent in all cervical cancers, may be related to immune system dysfunction as well as HIV/human papillomavirus synergistic mechanisms. When highly active retroviral therapies are used, invasive cervical cancer treatments are impacted by concomitant drug toxicities that could potentially limit therapeutic benefit of either HAART or the standard of care treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer, concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The significance and care of the patient with invasive cervical cancer is becoming a geographically relevant phenomenon such that it may be time to re-address the global definition. Further studies in treatment issues and drug-drug interactions with cervical cancer treatments in the setting of HIV are paramount.

  4. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major clinical problem in current breast cancer treatment. Therefore, biomarkers and new treatment options for antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer are needed. In this study, we investigated whether antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer cell lines have increased...... sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant...... to the antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression...

  5. Research Progress of Exosomes in Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo ZOU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As the leading cause of morbidity and cancer related-death worldwide, lung cancer has a serious threat to human health. Exosomes are nanoscale lipid membrane vesicles derived from multivesicles, which containing active biomolecules including proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and etc. Exosomes play important roles in lung cancer initiation and progression by promoting the formation of tumor microenvironment, enhancing tumor invasive and metastasis capability, leading to immunosuppression and resistance to chemoradiotherapy, and also have the application value in early diagnosis and treatment. This review summarizes the research progress of exosomes in tumor initiation and progression, and its roles in diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer.

  6. Adjuvant Treatment for Older Women with Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Trevor A; Williams, Grant R; Bushan, Sita; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Nyrop, Kirsten A; Jones, Ellen L; Muss, Hyman B

    2016-01-01

    Older women experience a large share of breast cancer incidence and death. With the projected rise in the number of older cancer patients, adjuvant chemo-, radiation and endocrine therapy management will become a key component of breast cancer treatment in older women. Many factors influence adjuvant treatment decisions including patient preferences, life expectancy and tumor biology. Geriatric assessment predicts important outcomes, identifies key deficits, and can aid in the decision making process. This review utilizes clinical vignettes to illustrate core principles in adjuvant management of breast cancer in older women and suggests an approach incorporating life expectancy and geriatric assessment. PMID:26767315

  7. Adverse drug events in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Anna; Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Adverse reactions to medications are common and may have a variety of clinical presentations in the oral cavity. Targeted therapies and the new biologic agents have revolutionized the treatment of cancers, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory and rheumatologic diseases but have also been associated with adverse events in the oral cavity. Some examples include osteonecrosis, seen with not only bisphosphonates but also antiangiogenic agents, and the distinctive ulcers caused by mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. As newer therapeutic agents are approved, it is likely that more adverse drug events will be encountered. This review describes the most common clinical presentations of oral mucosal reactions to medications, namely, xerostomia, lichenoid reactions, ulcers, bullous disorders, pigmentation, fibrovascular hyperplasia, white lesions, dysesthesia, osteonecrosis, infection, angioedema, and malignancy. Oral health care providers should be familiar with such events, as they will encounter them in their practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. New Breast Cancer Treatment Approved | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast Cancer Treatment Approved Follow us New Breast Cancer Treatment Approved Photo: Wikimedia Commons IN THE NEWS - Breast ... Food and Drug Administration approved a new breast cancer treatment that aims to reduce the risk of the ...

  9. Long-term Morbidity of Testicular Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Chunkit; Fossa, Sophie D; Williams, Annalynn; Travis, Lois B

    2015-08-01

    Second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity and ototoxicity, pulmonary complications, hypogonadism, and nephrotoxicity are potentially life-threatening long-term complications of testicular cancer and its therapy. This article describes the pathogenesis, risks, and management of these late effects experienced by long-term testicular cancer survivors, who are defined as individuals who are disease free 5 years or more after primary treatment. Testicular cancer survivors should follow applicable national guidelines for cancer screening and management of cardiovascular disease risk factors. In addition, health care providers should capitalize on the time of cancer diagnosis as a teachable moment to introduce and promote lifestyle changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Early intensive rehabilitation after oral cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bschorer, Maximilian; Schneider, Daniel; Hennig, Matthias; Frank, Bernd; Schön, Gerhard; Heiland, Max; Bschorer, Reinhard

    2018-06-01

    The treatment of oral cancer requires an effective rehabilitation strategy such as an early intensive rehabilitation (EIR) program. The medical records and data of 41 patients who participated in an EIR program and 20 control group patients were analyzed. These patients all underwent surgical resection of the primary tumor followed by microsurgical reconstruction using free flaps. The length of stay (LOS) at the acute care hospital was compared between the two groups. Four indexes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the EIR program. EIR patients stayed an average of 11.6 fewer days at the acute care hospital. All indexes showed significant improvements (p < 0.001). The Barthel Index (BI) and the Early Intensive Rehabilitation Barthel Index (EIR-BI) improved by 36.0 and 103.6 points, respectively. At discharge, the Bogenhausener Dysphagia Score (BODS) had improved to a score of 11.0 compared to the 13.9 at admission. EIR patients had a Work Ability Index (WAI) score of 25.7. Length of stay at the acute care hospital can be reduced using early intensive rehabilitation if patients are transferred to an intensive rehabilitation clinic early. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Micelles As Delivery System for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Aysen

    2017-01-01

    Micelles are nanoparticles formed by the self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers in certain solvents above concentrations called critical micelle concentration (CMC). Micelles are used in different fields like food, cosmetics, medicine, etc. These nanosized delivery systems are under spotlight in the recent years with new achievements in terms of their in vivo stability, ability to protect entrapped drug, release kinetics, ease of cellular penetration and thereby increased therapeutic efficacy. Drug loaded micelles can be prepared by dialysis, oil-in-water method, solid dispersion, freezing, spray drying, etc. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the research on micelles (in vitro, in vivo and clinical) as delivery system for cancer treatment. Passive targeting is one route for accumulation of nanosized micellar drug formulations. Many research groups from both academia and industry focus on developing new strategies for improving the therapeutic efficacy of micellar systems (active targeting to the tumor site, designing multidrug delivery systems for overcoming multidrug resistance or micelles formed by prodrug conjugates, etc). There is only one micellar drug formulation in South Korea that has reached clinical practice. However, there are many untargeted anticancer drug loaded micellar formulations in clinical trials, which have potential for use in clinics. Many more products are expected to be on the market in the near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Periodontal disease with treatment reduces subsequent cancer risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ing-Ming; Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lee, Chun-Feng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between routine treatment of periodontal disease (PD) and the subsequent risks for cancers in Taiwan. Study participants were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance (NHI) system database. The PD with a routine treatment cohort contained 38 902 patients. For each treatment cohort participant, two age- and sex-matched comparison (control) cohort participants were randomly selected. Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the effects of PD with treatment on the subsequent risk of cancer. The overall risk of developing cancer was significantly lower in the treatment cohort than in the patients without treatment (adjusted Hazard ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.68-0.76). The risks of developing most gastrointestinal tract, lung, gynecological and brain malignancies were significantly lower in the treatment cohort than in the comparison cohort. In contrast, the risks of prostate and thyroid cancers were significantly higher in the treatment cohort than in the comparison cohort. Our findings suggest that PD with treatment is associated with a significantly reduced overall risk of cancer and reduced risks of certain types of cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Financial Burden of Cancer Drug Treatment in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Fadia; Khuri, Fadlo R; Adib, Salim M; Karam, Rita; Harb, Hilda; Awar, May; Zalloua, Pierre; Ammar, Walid

    2016-01-01

    The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) in Lebanon provides cancer drugs free of charge for uninsured patients who account for more than half the total caseload. Other categories of cancer care are subsidized under more stringent eligibility criteria. MOPH's large database offers an excellent opportunity to analyze the cost of cancer treatment in Lebanon. Using utilization and spending data accumulated at MOPH during 20082013, the cost to the public budget of cancer drugs was assessed per case and per drug type. The average annual cost of cancer drugs was 6,475$ per patient. Total cancer drug costs were highest for breast cancer, followed by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and NonHodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), which together represented 74% of total MOPH cancer drug expenditure. The annual average cancer drug cost per case was highest for CML ($31,037), followed by NHL ($11,566). Trastuzumab represented 26% and Imatinib 15% of total MOPH cancer drug expenditure over six years. Sustained increase in cancer drug cost threatens the sustainability of MOPH coverage, so crucial for socially vulnerable citizens. To enhance the bargaining position with pharmaceutical firms for drug cost containment in a small market like Lebanon, drug price comparisons with neighboring countries which have already obtained lower prices may succeed in lowering drug costs.

  14. Screening for second primary lung cancer after treatment of laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritoe, Savitri C; Krabbe, Paul F M; Jansen, Margriet M G; Festen, Jan; Joosten, Frank B M; Kaanders, J Hans A M; van den Hoogen, Frank J A; Verbeek, André L M; Marres, Henri A M

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: As a result of smoking, patients who have received curative treatment for laryngeal cancer run a high risk of developing lung cancer. Therefore, these patients enter a screening program that aims to detect lung cancer at an asymptomatic stage. The study evaluated whether

  15. Screening for second primary lung cancer after treatment of laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritoe, Savitri C; Krabbe, Paul F M; Jansen, Margriet M G; Festen, Jan; Joosten, Frank B M; Kaanders, J Hans A M; van den Hoogen, Frank J A; Verbeek, André L M; Marres, Henri A M

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: As a result of smoking, patients who have received curative treatment for laryngeal cancer run a high risk of developing lung cancer. Therefore, these patients enter a screening program that aims to detect lung cancer at an asymptomatic stage. The study evaluated whether

  16. Barriers to information provision regarding breast cancer and its treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Enns, Heather J; Woodgate, Roberta L; Chochinov, Harvey M

    2017-10-01

    Women with breast cancer require information about their cancer and its treatment during the process of treatment decision-making, yet it is unclear if there are barriers to information support. This study explores the experience of making treatment decisions in breast cancer, paying particular attention to the barriers experienced to the provision of information. Using a grounded theory methodology, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 women with invasive breast cancer exploring the experience of treatment decision-making. Data was organized using ATLAS.ti software and analyzed using constant comparisons. Analysis of the data showed that barriers to cancer and treatment information include intrapersonal and interpersonal communication challenges (emotional distress, patient-provider communication, "making it personal," access to information) which reside at different levels of the breast cancer experience (individual, dyad, group, organization). A model is provided to depict this experience. Women want information about their cancer and its treatment and experience barriers to information provision at various levels. Satisfactory information provision cannot occur without addressing barriers at every level. Utilizing interprofessional models of care may minimize existing barriers to information provision and empower patients to make satisfying treatment decisions that are consistent with their individual wishes.

  17. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with significant functional impairment. In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia is described as cardiac cachexia. The cardiac alterations may be due to underlying heart disease, the cancer itself, or problems initiated by the cancer treatment and, unfortunately, remains largely underappreciated by clinicians and basic scientists. Despite recent major advances in the treatment of cancer, little progress has been made in the treatment of cardiac cachexia in cancer, and much of this is due to lack of information regarding the mechanisms. This review focuses on the cardiac atrophy associated with cancer cachexia, describing some of the known mechanisms and discussing the current and future therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. Above all else, improved awareness of the condition and an increased focus on identification of mechanisms and therapeutic targets will facilitate the eventual development of an effective treatment for cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  19. Cancer-related fatigue: Mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment, and may persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and may be a risk factor for reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in cancer patients has been well characterized, and there is growing understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation has emerged as a key biological pathway for cancer-related fatigue, with studies documenting links between markers of inflammation and fatigue before, during, and particularly after treatment. There is considerable variability in the experience of cancer-related fatigue that is not explained by disease- or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors may play an important role in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have begun to identify genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors for cancer-related fatigue. Given the multi-factorial nature of cancer-related fatigue, a variety of intervention approaches have been examined in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. Although there is currently no gold standard for treating fatigue, several of these approaches have shown beneficial effects and can be recommended to patients. This report provides a state of the science review of mechanisms, risk factors, and interventions for cancer-related fatigue, with a focus on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients. PMID:25113839

  20. Functional results after treatment for rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Jossing Emmertsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With improving survival of rectal cancer, functional outcome has become in- creasingly important. Following sphincter-preserving resection many patients suffer from severe bowel dysfunction with an impact on quality of life (QoL – referred to as low ante- rior resection syndrome (LARS. Study objective: To provide an overview of the current knowledge of LARS regarding symp- tomatology, occurrence, risk factors, pathophysiology, evaluation instruments and treat- ment options. Results: LARS is characterized by urgency, frequent bowel movements, emptying difficulties and incontinence, and occurs in up to 50-75% of patients on a long-term basis. Known risk factors are low anastomosis, use of radiotherapy, direct nerve injury and straight anasto- mosis. The pathophysiology seems to be multifactorial, with elements of anatomical, sen- sory and motility dysfunction. Use of validated instruments for evaluation of LARS is es- sential. Currently, there is a lack of evidence for treatment of LARS. Yet, transanal irrigation and sacral nerve stimulation are promising. Conclusion: LARS is a common problem following sphincter-preserving resection. All pa- tients should be informed about the risk of LARS before surgery, and routinely be screened for LARS postoperatively. Patients with severe LARS should be offered treatment in order to improve QoL. Future focus should be on the possibilities of non-resectional treatment in order to prevent LARS. Resumo: Introdução: Com o aumento da sobrevida após câncer retal, o resultado funcional se tornou cada vez mais importante. Após ressecção com preservação do esfíncter, muitos pacientes sofrem de disfunção intestinal com um impacto sobre a qualidade de vida (QdV – denomi- nada síndrome da ressecção anterior baixa (LARS. Objetivo do estudo: Fornecer uma visão geral do conhecimento atual da LARS com relação à sintomatologia, à ocorrência, aos fatores de risco, à fisiopatologia, aos

  1. Permanent LDR implants in treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronek, J.; Kanikowski, M.; Chichel, A.; Zwierzchowski, G.

    2009-01-01

    Low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) is a radiation method known for several years in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The main idea of this method is to implant small radioactive seeds directly into the prostate gland. LDR brachytherapy is applied as a monotherapy and also used along with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a boost. In most cases it is used as a sole radical treatment modality, but not as a palliative treatment. The application of permanent seed implants is a curative treatment alternative in patients with organ- confined cancer, without extracapsular extension of the tumour. This technique is particularly popular in the United States. In Europe, however, high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is more popular in early-stage prostate cancer treatment (as a boost). The aim of this publication is to describe methods, indications, complications and selected results of prostate cancer LDR brachytherapy. (authors)

  2. Improvement of cavity performance in the Saclay/Cornell/DESY's SC cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kako, E.; Noguchi, S.; Ono, M.

    2000-01-01

    Development of 1.3 GHz Nb superconducting cavities for TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) has been carried out with international collaboration. Three Saclay single-cell cavities, one Cornell two-cell cavity and one DESY nine-cell cavity were sent to KEK in order to compare the cavity performance. These cavities were tested at KEK after the following surface treatment: 1) high pressure rinsing, HPR, 2) chemical polishing and HPR, 3) electropolishing and HPR. The test results, especially, improvement of the cavity performance due to electropolishing are reported in this paper. (author)

  3. Clinical research on cancer treatment with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Eriko; Koyama, Kazuyuki; Morita, Kozo

    1993-01-01

    There are two purposes of using combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of cancers. One is to suppress distant metastasis, especially micrometastasis; the other is to improve localized control. As a trial of the utility of the former, systemic chemotherapy with CDDP and 5 FU was given successively with radiotherapy to treat nasopharyngeal cancer. The survival rate was significantly improved compared with historical control cases. The main reason for this effectiveness was the improvement of localized control. The suppression of distant metastasis is the subject of future research. As a trial of the utility of the latter, a super-selective intraarterial chemotherapy with CBDCA combined with radiotherapy was used to head and neck localized progressive cancers. The control of localized cancer was remarkably effective. This treatment is considered to be especially suitable for locally advanced tongue cancer and cancer of the root of the tongue. (author)

  4. Palbociclib: A new hope in the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, R Priyadharsini

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer being one of the common cancers has high morbidity and mortality. Despite the conventional treatment, the burden of the disease increases year after year. There is a need for newer drugs that target the different mechanisms in the pathogenesis. The interaction of cyclins with cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) plays a major role in the abnormal cell cycle in cancer and it is considered to be an important target. Palbociclib is a CDK inhibitor currently approved for the treatment of breast cancer. The preclinical studies with breast cancer lines were sensitive to palbociclib and the clinical trials phase I, phase II (PALOMA 1), and phase III (PALOMA 2, 3, PENTELOPE, PEARL) showed that the drug was efficacious when combined other conventional drugs for breast cancer. Palbociclib was also been tested in various other germ cell tumors, melanoma, multiple myeloma, glioblastoma multiforme etc., The major adverse effect of the drug includes hematological toxicity mainly neutropenia, gastrointestinal adverse effects.

  5. Some Aspects Of Adjuvant Treatment Of Colorectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlavata, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe and in North America. Cornerstone of the treatment of localized colorectal cancer is surgical resection followed by chemotherapy or radio-chemotherapy in indicated cases. For patients with Stage III colon cancer recent data have shown efficacy through the combining fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with oxaliplatin into adjuvant treatment program. For patients with Stage II colon cancer, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy remains controversial, but may be appropriate in a subset of individuals at high risk for disease recurrence. Current randomized clinical trials in the adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer are examining the value of adding agents known to be active in metastatic disease, including those that modify specific molecular targets. (author)

  6. FDG PET/CT Is Superior to Enhanced CT in Detecting Recurrent Subcentimeter Lesions in the Abdominopelvic Cavity in Colorectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hai Jeon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Jin [Asan Medical Center, Univ. of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    This study aims to compare the performance of contrast enhanced computed tomography (CeCT) and 18 F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) in detecting small tumor implants and metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) in the abdominopelvic cavity in patients with colorectal cancer. We enrolled 16 patients who were clinically suspected of experiencing a recurrences (6 male, 10 female; mean age 61{+-}14 years). All subjects underwent CeCT and PET/CT, and the performance of these methods was compared with regard to detecting recurrences. The final diagnosis of a recurrence was made clinically. CeCT identified 38 lesions in 12 patients, all of which were detected by PET/CT. PET/CT found 27 additional lesions in 8 patients, comprising 9 seeding nodules (2 in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen and 7 in the pelvic cavity) and 18 LNs (2 celiac, 2 paraaortic, 2 hepatic hilar, 11 common iliac, 1 external iliac). Most additional lesions were located in the pelvic cavity (approximately 78% of seeding nodules that were detected solely by PET/CT was significantly higher compared with the CeCT and PET/CT confirmed nodules (5.5{+-}4.2 vs. 2.9{+-}2.5, p=0.03). The seeding nodules that were detected only by PET/CT were significantly smaller than the CeCT and PET/CT confirmed nodules (long axis:1.0{+-}0.3cm vs. 2.0{+-}1.1cm, p=0.001; short axis: 0.8{+-}0.3cm vs. 1.7{+-}0.9cm, p=0.001). Similarly, PET/CT only detected LNs were significantly smaller than CeCT and PET/CT identified LNs (0.7{+-}0.1cm vs. 2.3{+-}1.2cm, p<0.0001). PET/CT is superior to CeCT in detecting seeding nodules and metastatic LNs in patients with recurrent colorectal cancer. Specifically, PET/CT detects subcentimeter lesions in anatomically deformed pelvic cavities.

  7. Factors related to treatment refusal in Taiwanese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ting-Yu; Wang, Chao-Hui; Lin, Yu-Fen; Chou, Shu-Lan; Wang, Ching-Ting; Juang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Yung-Chang; Lin, Mei-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates for cancer have increased dramatically in the recent 30 years in Taiwan. However, not all patients receive treatment. Treatment refusal might impair patient survival and life quality. In order to improve this situation, we proposed this study to evaluate factors that are related to refusal of treatment in cancer patients via a cancer case manager system. This study analysed data from a case management system during the period from 2010 to 2012 at a medical center in Northern Taiwan. We enrolled a total of 14,974 patients who were diagnosed with cancer. Using the PRECEDE Model as a framework, we conducted logistic regression analysis to identify independent variables that are significantly associated with refusal of therapy in cancer patients. A multivariate logistic regression model was also applied to estimate adjusted the odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). A total of 253 patients (1.69%) refused treatment. The multivariate logistic regression result showed that the high risk factors for refusal of treatment in cancer patient included: concerns about adverse effects (prefuse treatment have poor survival. The present study provides evidence of factors that are related to refusal of therapy and might be helpful for further application and improvement of cancer care.

  8. Combination cancer treatment through photothermally controlled release of selenous acid from gold nanocages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Haoyan; Huo, Da; Zhu, Chunlei; Shen, Song; Wang, Wenxia; Li, Haoxuan; Zhu, Zhihong; Xia, Younan

    2018-04-03

    Selenite, one of the inorganic forms of selenium, is emerging as an attractive chemotherapeutic agent owing to its selectivity in eradicating cancer cells. Here we demonstrate a new formulation of nanomedicine based on selenous acid, which is mixed with lauric acid (a phase-change material with a melting point around 43 °C) and then loaded into the cavities of Au nanocages. The Au nanocages can serve as a carrier during cell endocytosis and then as a photothermal agent to melt the lauric acid upon the irradiation with a near-infrared laser, triggering the swift release of selenous acid. The photothermal and chemo therapies can also work synergistically, leading to enhanced destruction of cancer cells relative to normal cells. Our systematic study suggests that the impaired mitochondrial function arising from the ROS generated through combination treatment is responsible for the cell death. This study offers an appealing candidate that holds great promise for synergistic cancer treatment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Late effects of treatment of cancer in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Antonelli, R.; Fine, W.; Li, F.P.; Sallan, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-six children were diagnosed with cancer in infancy, followed for at lest 5 years, and assessed for late effects of disease and therapy. One child subsequently died from respiratory failure and 3 died from second primary cancers. Another patient survived second primary cancers of the skin. The high frequency of new cancers (4 observed, 0.09 expected) was attributable to host susceptibility factors and treatment effects. Kyphoscoliosis was diagnosed in 44 patients, 40 of whom had received radiotherapy to the spine. Other patients had neurologic deficits, pulmonary fibrosis, hypoplastic breasts, bowel adhesions, thyroid nodules, musculoskeletal defects, and liver fibrosis associated with tumor therapy. Sequelae of cancer were more common after treatment in infancy than in later childhood. Improved treatments and knowledge of natural history can reduce adverse effects of therapy

  10. Risk of skin cancer following tamoxifen treatment in more than 16,000 breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Præstegaard, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Andersson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women with breast cancer are at increased risk of developing skin cancer. Little is known about how tamoxifen affects this risk. We aimed to investigate whether tamoxifen treatment following breast cancer is associated with skin cancer. Methods: A cohort consisting of 44,589 women...... diagnosed with breast cancer during 1977–2007 from the nationwide clinical database of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group, was followed for a primary skin cancer [basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or melanoma] in the Danish Cancer Registry supplemented by data on BCC and SCC...... from the Danish Pathology Register. We investigated incidence of skin cancer among 16,214 women treated with tamoxifen compared to 28,375 women not treated with tamoxifen by calculating incidence rate ratios (IRRs) in Cox regression models. Results: Tamoxifen users were followed for a median of 2...

  11. Accessory Meningeal Arterial Supply to the Posterior Nasal Cavity: Another Reason for Failed Endovascular Treatment of Epistaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, I.C.; Santos, C. Dos

    2003-01-01

    A patient with intractable posterior epistaxis was treated with embolization of the ipsilateral sphenopalatine and facial arteries and contralateral sphenopalatine artery. She continued to bleed despite a seemingly adequate embolization procedure. A second angiogram revealed a significant collateral blood supply to the posterior nasal cavity from the accessory meningeal artery not identified during the first procedure. This was then embolized with no further epistaxis encountered. This case demonstrates yet another collateral arterial pathway that might account for a failed embolization

  12. Treatment Extends Survival for Women with Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received gemcitabine (Gemzar®) both as part of initial treatment and as part of therapy following primary treatment had improved survival compared with patients whose treatment did not include gemcitabine, according to findings presented at the 2009 ASCO meeting in Orlando.

  13. [Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. In 2012 one million thirty six thousand cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed all over the world, two hundred fifty three thousand cases were diagnosed in China (accounted for 18.6%). China has the largest number of new cases of colorectal cancer in the world. Colorectal cancer has becoming a serious threat of Chinese residents' health. In 2010, the National Ministry of Health organized colorectal cancer expertise of the Chinese Medical Association to write the "Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer" (2010edition), and publish it publicly. In recent years, the National Health and Family Planning Commission has organized experts to revised the protocol 2 times: the first time in 2015, the second time in 2017. The revised part of "Chinese Protocol of Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Cancer" (2017 edition) involves new progress in the field of imaging examination, pathological evaluation, surgery, chemotherpy and radiotherapy. The 2017 edition of the protocol not only referred to the contents of the international guidelines, but also combined with the specific national conditions and clinical practice in China, and also included many evidence-based clinical data in China recently. The 2017 edition of the protocol would further promote the standardization of diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer in China, improve the survival and prognosis of patients, and benefit millions of patients with colorectal cancer and their families.

  14. Phase 2 Neoadjuvant Treatment Intensification Trials in Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teo, Mark T W; McParland, Lucy; Appelt, Ane L

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Multiple phase 2 trials of neoadjuvant treatment intensification in locally advanced rectal cancer have reported promising efficacy signals, but these have not translated into improved cancer outcomes in phase 3 trials. Improvements in phase 2 trial design are needed to reduce these fals...

  15. Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood liver cancer has two major histologic subgroups: hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Less common histologies are undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver, infantile choriocarcinoma, and vascular liver tumors. Get detailed information about newly diagnosed and recurrent childhood liver cancers including tumor biology, presentation, prognosis, staging, and treatment in this summary for clinicians.

  16. Childhood Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood thyroid cancer usually presents as a thyroid mass with or without painless cervical adenopathy. It may occur as part of a tumor predisposition syndrome such as multiple endocrine neoplasia or DICER1 syndrome. Get detailed information about the risk factors, histopathology, molecular features, presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of papillary, follicular, and medullary thyroid cancer in this summary for clinicians.

  17. Biomedical Engineering 2008. New methods for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanninen, J.; Koskelainen, A.; Ilmoniemi, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    The report consists of 11 student papers presented in 2008 at the Seminar on Biomedical Engineering at Helsinki University of Technology (Finland). The topics of the seminar included: cancer risk factors and diagnosis, radiation therapy, boron neutron capture treatment (BNCT), chemotherapy, cooling and heating therapy, immunotherapy, angiogenesis inhibition approaches, gene therapy and ablation therapy of liver cancer

  18. Review of hormonal treatment of breast cancer | Abdulkareem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This critical review focuses on the role of steroid hormones and their receptors in the development and treatment of breast cancer, with special reference to estrogen receptors, as well as mechanisms of receptor.ligand interactions, response or resistance to hormonal therapy against breast cancer, in conjunction with other ...

  19. Gastric cancer : staging, treatment, and surgical quality assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, Johannes Leen

    2012-01-01

    Research described in this thesis focuses on several aspects of gastric cancer care: staging and prognostication, multimodality treatment, and surgical quality assurance. PART I - STAGING AND PROGNOSTICATION Cancer staging is one of the fundamental activities in oncology.6,7 For over 50 years, the

  20. Clinical confrontation results of diagnostics and treatment of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter of book authors investigated the clinical confrontation results of diagnostics and treatment of skin cancer. They noted that diagnostic of skin cancer have to foresee the determination morphologic implements and degree of malignancy tumorous process why in general depend prognosis of illness

  1. New treatment modalities and pharmacologic refinements for metatstatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Smorenburg (Carolien)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis the results of clinical studies with new chemotherapeutic agents and pharmacokinetic studies on taxanes in breast cancer patients are reported. In metastatic breast cancer, endocrine and cytotoxic treatment often result in objective tumor responses, associated with

  2. Delays in presentation and treatment of breast cancer in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the delays and define the causes of delay in presentation and treatment of breast cancer patients inEnugu,Nigeria. Across-sectional survey of breast cancer patients using a semi structured questionnaire. SurgicalOncology unit,University ofNigeriaTeachingHospitalEnugu, (UNTH-E),Nigeria. 164 consecutively ...

  3. The guidelines for diagnostics and treatment of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inciura, A.; Juozaityte, E.

    2004-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women. The purpose of this article is to analyze the main diagnostic and treatment strategies for all stages and recurrences of cervical cancer. The article reviews the epidemiological situation, clinical features, diagnostic procedures for detection of this tumor and for evaluation of the dissemination of the disease, staging criteria, TNM (Tumor, Nodes, Metastases) and FIGO (Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique) classification, as well as treatment and prognosis. Surgical treatment (radical type II or III hysterectomy and Iymphadenectomy) for early stage I and IIA cervical cancer is the main treatment method. Delivery of adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy or concomitant chemoradiation depends on the prognostic factors (tumor penetration to cervical tissues, Iymphovascular invasion, tumor invasion to paracervical tissues, and surgical margins). For treatment of more advanced stages of cervical cancer (IIB, IIIA, IIIB, IVA) concomitant chemoradiation: external beam radiotherapy with chemotherapy and brachytherapy is used. Description of the treatment guidelines for each stage of cervical cancer is given in this article. These guidelines are useful for good treatment practice. (author)

  4. Epigenetics application in the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb-de la Rosa, Alfredo; Acker, Matthew; Kumar, Raj A; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2015-10-01

    Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the Western world. Patients with bladder cancer require close monitoring, which may include frequent cystoscopy and urine cytology. Such monitoring results in significant health care cost. The application of epigenetics may allow for a risk adapted approach and more cost-effective method of monitoring. A number of epigenetic changes have been described for many cancer sites, including the urinary bladder. In this review, we discuss the use of epigenetics in bladder cancer and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A comprehensive search of the English medical literature was conducted in PubMed using the terms microRNA regulation, DNA methylation, histone modification and bladder cancer. The most important epigenetic changes include DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA regulation. Both DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation have been associated with higher rate of cancer. The association of epigenetic changes with bladder cancer has led to the research of its diagnostic and prognostic implications as well as to the development of novel drugs to target these changes with the aim of achieving a survival benefit. Recently, epigenetics has been shown to play a much greater role than previously anticipated in the initiation and propagation of many tumors. The use of epigenetics for the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer is an evolving and promising field. The possibility of reversing epigenetic changes may facilitate additional cancer treatment options in the future.

  5. Cancer immunogenomic approach to neoantigen discovery in a checkpoint blockade responsive murine model of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolkind, Paul; Przybylski, Dariusz; Marjanovic, Nemanja; Nguyen, Lan; Lin, Tianxiang; Johanns, Tanner; Alexandrov, Anton; Zhou, Liye; Allen, Clint T.; Miceli, Alexander P.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Artyomov, Maxim; Dunn, Gavin P.; Uppaluri, Ravindra

    2018-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are an ideal immunotherapy target due to their high mutation burden and frequent infiltration with lymphocytes. Preclinical models to investigate targeted and combination therapies as well as defining biomarkers to guide treatment represent an important need in the field. Immunogenomics approaches have illuminated the role of mutation-derived tumor neoantigens as potential biomarkers of response to checkpoint blockade as well as representing therapeutic vaccines. Here, we aimed to define a platform for checkpoint and other immunotherapy studies using syngeneic HNSCC cell line models (MOC2 and MOC22), and evaluated the association between mutation burden, predicted neoantigen landscape, infiltrating T cell populations and responsiveness of tumors to anti-PD1 therapy. We defined dramatic hematopoietic cell transcriptomic alterations in the MOC22 anti-PD1 responsive model in both tumor and draining lymph nodes. Using a cancer immunogenomics pipeline and validation with ELISPOT and tetramer analysis, we identified the H-2Kb-restricted ICAM1P315L (mICAM1) as a neoantigen in MOC22. Finally, we demonstrated that mICAM1 vaccination was able to protect against MOC22 tumor development defining mICAM1 as a bona fide neoantigen. Together these data define a pre-clinical HNSCC model system that provides a foundation for future investigations into combination and novel therapeutics. PMID:29423108

  6. Value of radiotherapy in the treatment ovarium cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, J.R.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    Thirty-one cases ovarium cancer are studied in different clinical stages and different histological kinds, which were submited to a radiotherapic treatment by the 'moving trip' and 'open field' techniques [pt

  7. For Some Breast Cancers, New Drug May Be Treatment Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from an international clinical trial suggest that women with metastatic, HER2-positive breast cancer that is no longer responding to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) may soon have a new treatment option.

  8. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HCT-15 cells caused condensation of DNA and induced apoptosis in a concentration- ... Conclusion: Capecitabine treatment causes inhibition of colon cancer growth via the mitochondrial ... fluoropyrimidine aimed to selectively transfer 5-.

  9. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The parathyroid glands are four pea-sized organs found in the neck near the thyroid gland. Find out about risk and genetic factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, staging, and treatment for parathyroid cancer.

  10. Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  11. Choices: An Interactive Decision Support Program for Breast Cancer Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pierce, Penny Fay

    1998-01-01

    This project is developing a computer-assisted prototype of an individualized decision support system, called Choices, to assist women newly diagnosed with breast cancer in making stressful treatment...

  12. Treatment of the prostate cancer with high dose rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro; Torres Silva, Felipe

    2002-01-01

    The prostate cancer treatment in early stages is controversial. The high dose rate brachytherapy has been used like monotherapy or boost with external beam radiotherapy in advanced disease. This paper describes the technique and the advantages over other modalities

  13. Experience about the treatment of advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Api, P; Corcione, S; Magnoni, G

    1985-01-01

    The authors report their experience about the efficacy of the association surgery-radiotherapy-polichemotheraphy, in the treatment of advanced breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of this association in the survival rate.

  14. Cancer-related fatigue--mechanisms, risk factors, and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E

    2014-10-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common adverse effects of cancer that might persist for years after treatment completion in otherwise healthy survivors. Cancer-related fatigue causes disruption in all aspects of quality of life and might be a risk factor of reduced survival. The prevalence and course of fatigue in patients with cancer have been well characterized and there is growing understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms. Inflammation seems to have a key role in fatigue before, during, and after cancer-treatment. However, there is a considerable variability in the presentation of cancer-related fatigue, much of which is not explained by disease-related or treatment-related characteristics, suggesting that host factors might be important in the development and persistence of this symptom. Indeed, longitudinal studies have identified genetic, biological, psychosocial, and behavioural risk factors associated with cancer-related fatigue. Although no current gold-standard treatment for fatigue is available, a variety of intervention approaches have shown beneficial effects in randomized controlled trials, including physical activity, psychosocial, mind-body, and pharmacological treatments. This Review describes the mechanisms, risk factors, and possible interventions for cancer-related fatigue, focusing on recent longitudinal studies and randomized trials that have targeted fatigued patients.

  15. RNA Vaccine: novel approach for cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    L K Dwivedi; Prateeksha Goswami; Kanika Bhalla

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is still an unsolved puzzle and a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. Today, about one in every thousand people is dying due to cancer. No effective agent has yet been found which can cure cancer in its metastatic stage. However, attempts in the shape of chemotherapy, immunotherapy and vaccines are made worldwide to find a remedy through a proper regimen. In continuation, tumor specific mRNA has been introduced as part of vaccines in recent days. It is mostly used in t...

  16. Theranostic nanomedicine for cancer detection and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen; Fu, Peter P; Yu, Hongtao; Ray, Paresh C

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA according to the American Cancer Society. In the past 5 years, "theranostic nanomedicine", for both therapeutics and imaging, has shown to be "the right drug for the right patient at the right moment" to manage deadly cancers. This review article presents an overview of recent developments, mainly from the authors' laboratories, along with potential medical applications for theranostic nanomedicine including basic concepts and critical properties. Finally, we outline the future research direction and possible challenges for theranostic nanomedicine research. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Cancer Stem Cells – New Approach to Cancerogenensis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Mačingová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there is an increasing evidence supporting the theory of cancer stem cells not only in leukemia but also in solid cancer. To date, the existence of cancer stem cells has been proven in acute and chronic myeloid leukemia, in breast cancer, in brain tumors, in lung cancer and gastrointestinal tumors. This review is focusing on the recent discovery of stem cells in leukemia, human brain tumors and breast cancer. A small population of cells in the tumor (less than 1 % shows the potential to give rise to the tumor and its growth. These cells have a substantial characteristic of stem cells – ability for self-renewal without loss of proliferation capacity with each cell division. Furthermore they are immortal, rather resistant to treatment and express typical markers of stem cells. The origin of these resident cancer stem cells is not clear. Whether the cancer stem cells originate from normal stem cells in consequence of genetic and epigenetic changes and/or redifferentiation from somatic tumor cells to the stem-like cells remains to be investigated. We propose the idea of the relation between normal tissue stem cells and cancer stem cells and their populations – progenitor cells. Based on this we highlight one of the major characteristic of stem cell – plasticity, which is equally important in the physiological regeneration process as well as carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we consider the microenvironment as a limiting factor for tumor genesis in AML, breast cancer and brain tumors. Thus the biological properties of cancer stem cells are just beginning to be revealed, the continuation of these studies should lead to the development of cancer stem cells target therapies for cancer treatment.

  18. Availability of stage at diagnosis, cancer treatment delay and compliance with cancer guidelines as cancer registry indicators for cancer care in Europe: Results of EUROCHIP-3 survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Kwast, A.; Gavin, A.; Baili, P.; Otter, R.

    2013-01-01

    EUROCHIP (European Cancer Health Indicators Project) focuses on understanding inequalities in the cancer burden, care and survival by the indicators “stage at diagnosis,” “cancer treatment delay” and “compliance with cancer guidelines” as the most important indicators. Our study aims at providing

  19. Concerns on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shen-ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Breast cancer is one of the neoplasms that have greatest negative psychological impact on the sufferers. Although China is among the low morbidity country of breast cancer, its yearly increasing rate in China is 1%-2% higher than the average rate of the word.1 Due to its largest population in the word, China tops the world in its breast cancer cases but general medical care for the patients still lags behind the developed countries. These issues are related to the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in China.

  20. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Vulvar Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  3. Treatment Options by Stage (Penile Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Prostate Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  7. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  8. Treatment Options by Stage (Gastric Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... such as the liver or lymph nodes . Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  9. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment options ... or in other parts of the body. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  10. [Analysis of the causes of cancer negligence and low survival in the patients with malignant neoplasms of ENT and oral cavity in the city of Moscow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdvizhkov, A M; Kozhanov, L G; Shatskaia, N Kh; Belov, E N

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the causes of late detection of malignant neoplasms of ENT and oral cavity and low survival of the patents with these tumours in Moscow. The secondary objective was to elaborate the organizational measures for reducing the level of negligence and mortality from these malignancies among the city population. It was shown that the main cause behind the negligence is the late application of the patients for the medical assistance. Next in importance are asymptomatic clinical course of the disease in the absence of the pathognomonic and early signs of malignant neoplasms, a combination of several pathologies, imperfection of medical knowledge, and the poor resolving power of the modern methods. It is emphasized that the lack of vigilance against cancer among the practicing health providers is one of the main causes of medical errors. A few ways to address the problem of negligence with respect to malignant neoplasms of ENT and oral cavity in Moscow are proposed.

  11. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should talk to their doctor before ... gov Accessibility Digital Government Strategy Open Government Federal Trade Commission Headquarters: 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Washington, DC ...

  12. Effects of Presurgical Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, men diagnosed with androgen-sensitive prostate cancer with intermediate- or high-risk features will be examined with mpMRI, undergo targeted biopsies, and be treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy.

  13. Ways of improvement of treatment of esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochegarov, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the results of treatment of 344 patients with cancer of the thoracic part of the esophagus was performed. Out of those, 104 received surgical and combined treatment and 240 (inoperable cancer) were given radiotherapy alone or in cOmbination with local hyperthermia, general chemotherapy or intratumoral iontophoresis of chemotherapeutic agents. The operation after Dobromyslov-Torek proved to be insufficient in most of surgical cases because there were metastatic lesions below the diaphragm. Local hyperthermia potentiated the effect of radiation treatment. The early results of treatment improved after intratumoral sarcolysin ionophoresis was used in conjunction with radiation therapy

  14. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  15. The Prime Cause and Treatment of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Somayeh Zaminpira; Somayeh Zaminpira

    2017-01-01

    This meta-analysis research has gone through more than 200 studies from 1934 to 2016 to find the differences and similarities in cancer cells, mostly the cause. The most important difference between normal cells and cancer cells is how they respire. Normal cells use the sophisticated process of respiration to efficiently turn any kind of nutrient that is fat, carbohydrate or protein into high amounts of energy in the form of ATP. This process requires oxygen and breaks food down completely in...

  16. Colon Cancer After Acute Diverticulitis Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Kwang Hoon; Han, Koon Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Je Hoon; Choi, Kyu Un; Han, Myung Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Cheon, Gab Jin

    2013-01-01

    Diverticulitis is the most common clinical complication of diverticular disease, affecting 10-25% of the patients with diverticula. The prevalences of diverticulitis and colon cancer tend to increase with age and are higher in industrialized countries. Consequently, diverticulitis and colon cancer have been reported to have similar epidemiological characteristics. However, the relationship between these diseases remains controversial, as is the performance of routine colonoscopy after an epis...

  17. Gastric Cancer: Current Status of Diagnosis and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of death from malignant disease worldwide and most frequently discovered in advanced stages. Because curative surgery is regarded as the only option for cure, early detection of resectable gastric cancer is extremely important for good patient outcomes. Therefore, noninvasive diagnostic modalities such as evolutionary endoscopy and positron emission tomography are utilized as screening tools for gastric cancer. To date, early gastric cancer is being treated using minimally invasive methods such as endoscopic treatment and laparoscopic surgery, while in advanced cancer it is necessary to consider multimodality treatment including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Because of the results of large clinical trials, surgery with extended lymphadenectomy could not be recommended as a standard therapy for advanced gastric cancer. Recent clinical trials had shown survival benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after curative resection compared with surgery alone. In addition, recent advances of molecular targeted agents would play an important role as one of the modalities for advanced gastric cancer. In this review, we summarize the current status of diagnostic technology and treatment for gastric cancer

  18. Waiting times for diagnosis and treatment of head and neck cancer in Denmark in 2010 compared to 1992 and 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, N M; Christensen, A; Alanin, M C

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Significant tumour progression was observed during waiting time for treatment of head and neck cancer. To reduce waiting times, a Danish national policy of fast track accelerated clinical pathways was introduced in 2007. This study describes changes in waiting time and the pot......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Significant tumour progression was observed during waiting time for treatment of head and neck cancer. To reduce waiting times, a Danish national policy of fast track accelerated clinical pathways was introduced in 2007. This study describes changes in waiting time...... and the potential influence of fast track by comparing waiting times in 2010 to 2002 and 1992. METHODS: Charts of all new patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx at the five Danish head and neck oncology centres from January to April 2010 (n=253) were reviewed...

  19. Simulation of lung cancer treatment with equivalent dose calculation and analysis of the dose distribution profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhofer, J. L.; Marques L, J.; Da Silva, A. X.; Dos Reis J, J. P.; Da Silva J, W. F. R.; Arruda C, S. C.; Monteiro de S, E.; Santos B, D. V.

    2017-10-01

    Actually, lung cancer is one of the most lethal types, due to the disease in the majority of the cases asymptomatic in the early stages, being the detection of the pathology in advanced stage, with tumor considerable volume. Dosimetry analysis of healthy organs under real conditions is not feasible. Therefore, computational simulations are used to auxiliary in dose verification in organs of patients submitted to radiotherapy. The goal of this study is to calculate the equivalent dose, due to photons, in surrounding in healthy organs of a patient submitted to radiotherapy for lung cancer, through computational modeling. The simulation was performed using the MCNPX code (Version, 2006], Rex and Regina phantom [ICRP 110, 2008], radiotherapy room, Siemens Oncor Expression accelerator operating at 6 MV and treatment protocol adopted at the Inca (National Cancer Institute, Brazil). The results obtained, considering the dose due to photons for both phantom indicate that organs located inside the thoracic cavity received higher dose, being the bronchi, heart and esophagus more affected, due to the anatomical positioning. Clinical data describe the development of bronchiolitis, esophagitis, and cardiomyopathies with decreased cardiopulmonary function as one of the major effects of lung cancer treatment. In the Regina phantom, the second largest dose was in the region of the breasts with 615,73 mSv / Gy, while in the Rex 514,06 mSv / Gy, event related to the difference of anatomical structure of the organ. Through the t mesh command, a qualitative analysis was performed between the dose deposition profile of the planning system and the simulated treatment, with a similar profile of the dose distribution being verified along the patients body. (Author)

  20. Cancer and treatment effects on job task performance for gynecological cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachreiner, Nancy M; Shanley, Ryan; Ghebre, Rahel G

    2013-01-01

    Over 91,000 new cases of gynecological cancers are expected to be diagnosed in 2013 in the US alone. As cancer detection technology and treatment options improve, the number of working-age cancer survivors continues to grow. To describe US gynecological cancer survivors' perceptions of the effects of cancer and treatment on their job tasks. 104 adult gynecological cancer survivors who were working at the time of their cancer diagnosis, treated at a University-based women's health clinic, diagnosed in the previous 24 months, and spoke English. Women completed written surveys to describe their work experiences following diagnosis. Clinical characteristics were obtained through medical record review. Descriptive statistics and cross tabulations were performed to describe characteristics and associations. Fifteen percent of women had chemotherapy and radiation treatment; 48% had only chemotherapy, 9% only radiation therapy, and 28% had neither. Survivors described the frequency of performing seven job tasks, such as 'intense concentration', 'analyzing data', and 'lifting heavy loads.' Women who had undergone radiation treatment were more likely to indicate limitations for physical tasks; women undergoing chemotherapy were more likely to report limitations in more analytic tasks. Only 29% of women noted an employer-based policy facilitated their return-to-work process. Cancer and treatment have important effects on job performance and may vary by type of treatment. Employer-based policies focusing on improved communication and work accommodations may improve the return to work process.