WorldWideScience

Sample records for caveolin-1-mediated post-transcriptional regulation

  1. Circadian rhythms and post-transcriptional regulation in higher plants

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    Andres eRomanowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock of plants allows them to cope with daily changes in their environment. This is accomplished by the rhythmic regulation of gene expression, in a process that involves many regulatory steps. One of the key steps involved at the RNA level is post-transcriptional regulation, which ensures a correct control on the different amounts and types of mRNA that will ultimately define the current physiological state of the plant cell. Recent advances in the study of the processes of regulation of pre-mRNA processing, RNA turn-over and surveillance, regulation of translation, function of lncRNAs, biogenesis and function of small RNAs and the development of bioinformatics tools have helped to vastly expand our understanding of how this regulatory step performs its role. In this work we review the current progress in circadian regulation at the post-transcriptional level research in plants. It is the continuous interaction of all the information flow control post-transcriptional processes that allow a plant to precisely time and predict daily environmental changes.

  2. Post-transcriptional regulation in budding yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang; Neiman, Aaron M

    2016-05-01

    The precise regulation of gene expression is essential for developmental processes in eukaryotic organisms. As an important post-transcriptional regulatory point, translational control is complementary to transcriptional regulation. Sporulation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process controlled by a well-studied transcriptional cascade that drives the cell through the events of DNA replication, meiotic chromosome segregation, and spore assembly. Recent studies have revealed that as cells begin the meiotic divisions, translational regulation of gene expression fine tunes this transcriptional cascade. The significance and mechanisms of this translational regulation are beginning to emerge. These studies may also provide insights into translational regulation in germ cell development of multicellular organisms. PMID:26613728

  3. Role of Sam68 in Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation

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    Flora Sánchez-Jiménez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The STAR family of proteins links signaling pathways to various aspects of post-transcriptional regulation and processing of RNAs. Sam68 belongs to this class of heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein particle K (hnRNP K homology (KH single domain-containing family of RNA-binding proteins that also contains some domains predicted to bind critical components in signal transduction pathways. In response to phosphorylation and other post-transcriptional modifications, Sam68 has been shown to have the ability to link signal transduction pathways to downstream effects regulating RNA metabolism, including transcription, alternative splicing or RNA transport. In addition to its function as a docking protein in some signaling pathways, this prototypic STAR protein has been identified to have a nuclear localization and to take part in the formation of both nuclear and cytosolic multi-molecular complexes such as Sam68 nuclear bodies and stress granules. Coupling with other proteins and RNA targets, Sam68 may play a role in the regulation of differential expression and mRNA processing and translation according to internal and external signals, thus mediating important physiological functions, such as cell death, proliferation or cell differentiation.

  4. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP–RNA complexes known as “riboclusters.” These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation of cytokine mRNA controls the initiation and resolution of inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Mino, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are critical mediators of inflammation and host defense. Cytokine production is regulated during transcription and post-transcription. Post-transcriptional regulation modifies mRNA stability and translation, allowing for the rapid and flexible control of gene expression, which is important for coordinating the initiation and resolution of inflammation. We review here a variety of post-transcriptional control mechanisms that regulate inflammation and discuss how these mechanisms are ...

  6. Post-transcriptional gene regulation in the biology and virulence of Candida albicans.

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    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Traven, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, remodelling of gene expression drives host adaptation and virulence. Recent studies revealed that in addition to transcription, post-transcriptional mRNA control plays important roles in virulence-related pathways. Hyphal morphogenesis, biofilm formation, stress responses, antifungal drug susceptibility and virulence in animal models require post-transcriptional regulators. This includes RNA binding proteins that control mRNA localization, decay and translation, as well as the cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathway. Comprehensive understanding of how modulation of gene expression networks drives C. albicans virulence will necessitate integration of our knowledge on transcriptional and post-transcriptional mRNA control. PMID:26999710

  7. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional regulation of genes involved in FTDP-17

    OpenAIRE

    Fontana, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non coding RNAs of 18-25 nt, capable of regulating mRNA translation and gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Alteration of miRNAs expression is often associated with human diseases, such as cancers and neurodegenerative pathologies. The main objective of this study is an analysis of the post-transcriptional regulation played by miRNAs of two important genes, MAPT and GRN, involved in Frontotemporal Dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP...

  8. DMPD: Post-transcriptional regulation of proinflammatory proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15075353 Post-transcriptional regulation of proinflammatory proteins. Anderson P, P...hillips K, Stoecklin G, Kedersha N. J Leukoc Biol. 2004 Jul;76(1):42-7. Epub 2004 Apr 1. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Post-tran...scriptional regulation of proinflammatory proteins. PubmedID 15075353 Title Post-tran

  9. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  10. Post-transcriptional regulation of connexin43 in H-Ras-transformed cells.

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    Mustapha Kandouz

    Full Text Available Connexin43 (Cx43 expression is lost in cancer cells and many studies have reported that Cx43 is a tumor suppressor gene. Paradoxically, in a cellular NIH3T3 model, we have previously shown that Ha-Ras-mediated oncogenic transformation results in increased Cx43 expression. Although the examination of transcriptional regulation revealed essential regulatory elements, it could not solve this paradox. Here we studied post-transcriptional regulation of Cx43 expression in cancer using the same model in search of novel gene regulatory elements. Upon Ras transformation, both Cx43 mRNA stability and translation efficiency were increased. We investigated the role of Cx43 mRNA 3' and 5'Untranslated regions (UTRs and found an opposing effect; a 5'UTR-driven positive regulation is observed in Ras-transformed cells (NIH-3T3(Ras, while the 3'UTR is active only in normal NIH-3T3(Neo cells and completely silenced in NIH-3T3(Ras cells. Most importantly, we identified a previously unknown regulatory element within the 3'UTR, named S1516, which accounts for this 3'UTR-mediated regulation. We also examined the effect of other oncogenes and found that Ras- and Src-transformed cells show a different Cx43 UTRs post-transcriptional regulation than ErbB2-transformed cells, suggesting distinct regulatory pathways. Next, we detected different patterns of S1516 RNA-protein complexes in NIH-3T3(Neo compared to NIH-3T3(Ras cells. A proteomic approach identified most of the S1516-binding proteins as factors involved in post-transcriptional regulation. Building on our new findings, we propose a model to explain the discrepancy between the Cx43 expression in Ras-transformed NIH3T3 cells and the data in clinical specimens.

  11. PTRcombiner: mining combinatorial regulation of gene expression from post-transcriptional interaction maps

    OpenAIRE

    Corrado, Gianluca; Tebaldi, Toma; Bertamini, Giulio; Costa, Fabrizio; Quattrone, Alessandro; Viero, Gabriella; Passerini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background The progress in mapping RNA-protein and RNA-RNA interactions at the transcriptome-wide level paves the way to decipher possible combinatorial patterns embedded in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Results Here we propose an innovative computational tool to extract clusters of mRNA trans-acting co-regulators (RNA binding proteins and non-coding RNAs) from pairwise interaction annotations. In addition the tool allows to analyze the binding site similarity of co-regu...

  12. Complex autoregulation of the post-transcriptional regulator RsmA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Pierre, Fabrice; Perreault, Jonathan; Déziel, Eric

    2015-09-01

    RsmA is a post-transcriptional RNA-binding protein that acts as a pleiotropic global regulator of mRNAs in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Upon binding to its target, RsmA impedes the translation of the mRNA by the ribosome. The RsmA regulon affects over 500 genes, many of which have been identified as important in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. Whilst the regulatory function of RsmA is relatively well characterized, the genetic regulation of rsmA itself at the transcriptional and translational levels remains poorly understood. Here, we show that RsmA is capable of self-regulation through an unorthodox mechanism. This regulation occurs via direct interaction of the protein with an RsmA-binding site located in the early portion of its coding sequence. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of such an unusual regulation in pseudomonads. PMID:26297258

  13. LARP1 post-transcriptionally regulates mTOR and contributes to cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, M; Hopkins, T G; Michael, T; Abd-Latip, N; Weir, J; Aboagye, E; Mauri, F; Jameson, C; Sturge, J; Gabra, H; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; Curry, E; Blagden, S P

    2015-09-24

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) bind to and post-transcriptionally regulate the stability of mRNAs. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) is a conserved RBP that interacts with poly-A-binding protein and is known to regulate 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract (TOP) mRNA translation. Here, we show that LARP1 is complexed to 3000 mRNAs enriched for cancer pathways. A prominent member of the LARP1 interactome is mTOR whose mRNA transcript is stabilized by LARP1. At a functional level, we show that LARP1 promotes cell migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that LARP1 expression is elevated in epithelial cancers such as cervical and non-small cell lung cancers, where its expression correlates with disease progression and adverse prognosis, respectively. We therefore conclude that, through the post-transcriptional regulation of genes such as mTOR within cancer pathways, LARP1 contributes to cancer progression. PMID:25531318

  14. Intrinsic noise in post-transcriptional gene regulation by small non-coding RNA.

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    Jia, Ya; Liu, Wangheng; Li, Anbang; Yang, Lijian; Zhan, Xuan

    2009-07-01

    Small non-coding RNA (sRNA) plays very important role in the post transcriptional regulation in various organisms. In complex regulatory networks, highly significant relative fluctuations in RNAs copy numbers can not be neglected due to very small copy number of individual RNA molecules. Here we consider two simple regulation schemes, where one is single target gene regulated by a sRNA and the other is two target mRNAs (mRNA(R) and mRNA(T)) regulated by one sRNA. The Fano factor (a measure of the relative size of the internal fluctuations) formulae of RNA molecules in the post transcriptional regulation are theoretically derived by using of the Langevin theory. For single target gene regulated by a sRNA, it is shown that the intrinsic noise of both mRNA and sRNA approaches the bare Poissonian limit in the regimen of both target RNA silencing and surviving. However, the strong anti-correlation between the fluctuations of two components result in a large intrinsic fluctuations in the level of RNA molecules in the regimen of crossover. For two target mRNAs regulated by one sRNA, in the regimen of crossover, it is found that, with the increasing of transcription rate of target mRNA(T), the maximal intrinsic fluctuation of RNA molecules is shifted from sRNA to target mRNA(R), and then to target mRNA(T). The intrinsic noise intensity of target mRNA(R) is determined by both the transcriptional rate of itself and that of sRNA, and independent of the transcriptional rate of the other target mRNA(T). PMID:19403234

  15. Coordinated Evolution of Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation for Mitochondrial Functions in Yeast Strains.

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    Sun, Xuepeng; Wang, Zhe; Guo, Xiaoxian; Li, Hongye; Gu, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    Evolution of gene regulation has been proposed to play an important role in environmental adaptation. Exploring mechanisms underlying coordinated evolutionary changes at various levels of gene regulation could shed new light on how organism adapt in nature. In this study, we focused on regulatory differences between a laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4742 and a pathogenic S. cerevisiae strain, YJM789. The two strains diverge in many features, including growth rate, morphology, high temperature tolerance, and pathogenicity. Our RNA-Seq and ribosomal footprint profiling data showed that gene expression differences are pervasive, and genes functioning in mitochondria are mostly divergent between the two strains at both transcriptional and translational levels. Combining functional genomics data from other yeast strains, we further demonstrated that significant divergence of expression for genes functioning in the electron transport chain (ETC) was likely caused by differential expression of a transcriptional factor, HAP4, and that post-transcriptional regulation mediated by an RNA-binding protein, PUF3, likely led to expression divergence for genes involved in mitochondrial translation. We also explored mito-nuclear interactions via mitochondrial DNA replacement between strains. Although the two mitochondrial genomes harbor substantial sequence divergence, neither growth nor gene expression were affected by mitochondrial DNA replacement in both fermentative and respiratory growth media, indicating compatible mitochondrial and nuclear genomes between these two strains in the tested conditions. Collectively, we used mitochondrial functions as an example to demonstrate for the first time that evolution at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels could lead to coordinated regulatory changes underlying strain specific functional variations. PMID:27077367

  16. Post-transcriptional regulation in the myo1Δ mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Akamine Pearl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae myosin type II-deficient (myo1Δ strains remain viable and divide, despite the absence of a cytokinetic ring, by activation of the PKC1-dependent cell wall integrity pathway (CWIP. Since the myo1Δ transcriptional fingerprint is a subset of the CWIP fingerprint, the myo1Δ strain may provide a simplified paradigm for cell wall stress survival. Results To explore the post-transcriptional regulation of the myo1Δ stress response, 1,301 differentially regulated ribosome-bound mRNAs were identified by microarray analysis of which 204 were co-regulated by transcription and translation. Four categories of mRNA were significantly affected - protein biosynthesis, metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and unknown functions. Nine genes of the 20 CWIP fingerprint genes were post-transcriptionally regulated. Down and up regulation of selected ribosomal protein and cell wall biosynthesis mRNAs was validated by their distribution in polysomes from wild type and myo1Δ strains. Western blot analysis revealed accumulation of the phosphorylated form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α-P and a reduction in the steady state levels of the translation initiation factor eIF4Gp in myo1Δ strains. Deletion of GCN2 in myo1Δ abolished eIF2αp phosphorylation, and showed a severe growth defect. The presence of P-bodies in myo1Δ strains suggests that the process of mRNA sequestration is active, however, the three representative down regulated RP mRNAs, RPS8A, RPL3 and RPL7B were present at equivalent levels in Dcp2p-mCh-positive immunoprecipitated fractions from myo1Δ and wild type cells. These same RP mRNAs were also selectively co-precipitated with eIF2α-P in myo1Δ strains. Conclusions Quantitative analysis of ribosome-associated mRNAs and their polyribosome distributions suggests selective regulation of mRNA translation efficiency in myo1Δ strains. Inhibition of translation initiation factor eIF2α (e

  17. Cis-acting elements in its 3' UTR mediate post-transcriptional regulation of KRAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minlee; Kogan, Nicole; Slack, Frank J

    2016-03-15

    Multiple RNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation through recognition motifs in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of their target genes. The KRAS gene encodes a key signaling protein, and its messenger RNA (mRNA) contains an exceptionally long 3' UTR; this suggests that it may be subject to a highly complex set of regulatory processes. However, 3' UTR-dependent regulation of KRAS expression has not been explored in detail. Using extensive deletion and mutational analyses combined with luciferase reporter assays, we have identified inhibitory and stabilizing cis-acting regions within the KRAS 3' UTR that may interact with miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins, such as HuR. Particularly, we have identified an AU-rich 49-nt fragment in the KRAS 3' UTR that is required for KRAS 3' UTR reporter repression. This element contains a miR-185 complementary element, and we show that overexpression of miR-185 represses endogenous KRAS mRNA and protein in vitro. In addition, we have identified another 49-nt fragment that is required to promote KRAS 3' UTR reporter expression. These findings indicate that multiple cis-regulatory motifs in the 3' UTR of KRAS finely modulate its expression, and sequence alterations within a binding motif may disrupt the precise functions of trans-regulatory factors, potentially leading to aberrant KRAS expression. PMID:26930719

  18. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  19. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death

  20. Post-transcriptional down regulation of ICAM-1 in feto-placental endothelium in GDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pérez, Francisca Isidora; Hiden, Ursula; Gauster, Martin; Lang, Ingrid; Konya, Viktoria; Heinemann, Akos; Lögl, Jelena; Saffery, Richard; Desoye, Gernot; Cvitic, Silvija

    2016-03-01

    Maternal gestational diabetes (GDM) is associated with hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinemia in the fetal circulation which consequently may induce endothelial dysfunction in the feto-placental vasculature. In fact, feto-placental vasculature reveals various morphological changes in response to GDM. The cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin promote attachment and trans-endothelial migration of leukocytes, and are up regulated in inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, we hypothesized that the GDM environment upregulates ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin in the feto-placental endothelium. We isolated primary feto-placental endothelial cells (fpEC) after normal (n=18) and GDM pregnancy (n=11) and analyzed mRNA (RT-qPCR) and protein expression (Immunoblot) of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin. While other CAMs were unchanged on mRNA and protein levels, ICAM-1 protein was decreased by GDM. Further analysis revealed also a decrease in the release of soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1), whose levels correlated negatively with maternal BMI. We conclude that this reduction of ICAM-1 protein species is the result of post-translational regulation, since ICAM-1 mRNA expression was unchanged. In fact, miRNAs targeting ICAM-1 were upregulated in GDM fpEC. Immunohistochemistry showed weaker ICAM-1 staining in the placental endothelium after GDM pregnancies, and demonstrated ICAM-1 binding partners CD11a and CD18 expressed on leukocytes in fetal circulation and on placental tissue macrophages. This study identified reduction of ICAM-1 protein in fpEC in GDM pregnancy, which was regulated post-transcriptionally. Low ICAM-1 protein production may represent a protective, placenta-specific mechanism to avoid leukocyte transmigration into the placenta in response to GDM. PMID:26761204

  1. Involvement of the post-transcriptional regulator Hfq in Yersinia pestis virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Geng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of plague, which is transmitted primarily between fleas and mammals and is spread to humans through the bite of an infected flea or contact with afflicted animals. Hfq is proposed to be a global post-transcriptional regulator that acts by mediating interactions between many regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs and their mRNA targets. Sequence comparisons revealed that Y. pestis appears to produce a functional homologue of E. coli Hfq. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Phenotype comparisons using in vitro assays demonstrated that Y. pestis Hfq was involved in resistance to H(2O(2, heat and polymyxin B and contributed to growth under nutrient-limiting conditions. The role of Hfq in Y. pestis virulence was also assessed using macrophage and mouse infection models, and the gene expression affected by Hfq was determined using microarray-based transcriptome and real time PCR analysis. The macrophage infection assay showed that the Y. pestis hfq deletion strain did not have any significant difference in its ability to associate with J774A.1 macrophage cells. However, hfq deletion appeared to significantly impair the ability of Y. pestis to resist phagocytosis and survive within macrophages at the initial stage of infection. Furthermore, the hfq deletion strain was highly attenuated in mice after subcutaneous or intravenous injection. Transcriptome analysis supported the results concerning the attenuated phenotype of the hfq mutant and showed that the deletion of the hfq gene resulted in significant alterations in mRNA abundance of 243 genes in more than 13 functional classes, about 23% of which are known or hypothesized to be involved in stress resistance and virulence. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Hfq is a key regulator involved in Y. pestis stress resistance, intracellular survival and pathogenesis. It appears that Hfq acts by controlling the expression of many virulence- and

  2. Cis-acting elements in its 3′ UTR mediate post-transcriptional regulation of KRAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minlee; Kogan, Nicole; Slack, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple RNA-binding proteins and non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), are involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation through recognition motifs in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of their target genes. The KRAS gene encodes a key signaling protein, and its messenger RNA (mRNA) contains an exceptionally long 3′ UTR; this suggests that it may be subject to a highly complex set of regulatory processes. However, 3′ UTR-dependent regulation of KRAS expression has not been explored in detail. Using extensive deletion and mutational analyses combined with luciferase reporter assays, we have identified inhibitory and stabilizing cis-acting regions within the KRAS 3′ UTR that may interact with miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins, such as HuR. Particularly, we have identified an AU-rich 49-nt fragment in the KRAS 3′ UTR that is required for KRAS 3′ UTR reporter repression. This element contains a miR-185 complementary element, and we show that overexpression of miR-185 represses endogenous KRAS mRNA and protein in vitro. In addition, we have identified another 49-nt fragment that is required to promote KRAS 3′ UTR reporter expression. These findings indicate that multiple cis-regulatory motifs in the 3′ UTR of KRAS finely modulate its expression, and sequence alterations within a binding motif may disrupt the precise functions of trans-regulatory factors, potentially leading to aberrant KRAS expression. PMID:26930719

  3. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of c-myc expression during the differentiation of murine erythroleukemia Friend cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Mechti, N; Piechaczyk, M; Blanchard, J. M.; Marty, L.; Bonnieu, A; Jeanteur, P; Lebleu, B

    1986-01-01

    c-myc RNA rapidly decreases to barely detectable levels in Friend erythroleukemia cells induced to differentiate upon the addition of dimethylsulfoxide. We show here that c-myc gene is down-regulated both at the transcriptional level presumably by a block in the elongation of primary transcripts and at the post-transcriptional level by an increase in the degradation of its mRNA.

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of meiotic genes by a nuclear RNA silencing complex

    OpenAIRE

    Egan, Emily D.; Braun, Craig R.; Gygi, Steven P.; Moazed, Danesh

    2014-01-01

    The authors define a multiprotein nuclear RNA silencing (NURS) complex that mediates silencing of meiotic genes during vegetative growth in the fission yeast S. pombe. Meiotic gene silencing occurs post-transcriptionally through recruitment of the exosome complex to promote RNA degradation. Extensive interaction analysis and functional characterizations link the NURS complex to specific RNA-binding and processing proteins and also chromatin modification machinery.

  5. Modulation of the cytoplasmic functions of mammalian post-transcriptional regulatory proteins by methylation and acetylation: a key layer of regulation waiting to be uncovered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blee, Tajekesa K P; Gray, Nicola K; Brook, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Post-transcriptional control of gene expression is critical for normal cellular function and viability and many of the proteins that mediate post-transcriptional control are themselves subject to regulation by post-translational modification (PTM), e.g. phosphorylation. However, proteome-wide studies are revealing new complexities in the PTM status of mammalian proteins, in particular large numbers of novel methylated and acetylated residues are being identified. Here we review studied examples of methylation/acetylation-dependent regulation of post-transcriptional regulatory protein (PTRP) function and present collated PTM data that points to the huge potential for regulation of mRNA fate by these PTMs. PMID:26614674

  6. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of Sprouty1, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darimipourain, M; Wang, S; Ittmann, M; Kwabi-Addo, B

    2011-12-01

    Sprouty1 (Spry1) is a negative regulator of fibroblast growth factor signaling with a potential tumor suppressor function in prostate cancer (PCa). Spry1 is downregulated in human PCa, and Spry1 expression can markedly inhibit PCa proliferation in vitro. We have reported DNA methylation as a mechanism for controlling Spry1 expression. However, promoter methylation does not seem to explain gene silencing in all PCa cases studied to suggest other mechanisms of gene inactivation, such as alterations in trans-acting factors and/or post-transcriptional activity may be responsible for the decreased expression in those cases. Binding sites for Wilm's tumor (WT1) transcription factors EGR1, EGR3 and WTE are highly conserved between the mouse and human Spry1 promoter regions, suggesting an evolutionary conserved mechanism(s) involving WT1 and EGR in Spry1 regulation. Spry1 mRNA contains multiple microRNA (miRNA) binding sites in its 3'UTR region suggesting post-transcriptional control. We demonstrate that Spry1 is a target for miR-21-mediated gene silencing. miRNA-based therapeutic approaches to treat cancer are emerging. Spry1 is highly regulated by miRNAs and could potentially be an excellent candidate for such approaches. PMID:21826097

  7. A hairpin within YAP mRNA 3'UTR functions in regulation at post-transcription level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuen; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Feng, Guoxing; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Xiao, Zelin; Lu, Zhanping; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    The central dogma of gene expression is that DNA is transcribed into messenger RNAs, which in turn serve as the template for protein synthesis. Recently, it has been reported that mRNAs display regulatory roles that rely on their ability to compete for microRNA binding, independent of their protein-coding function. However, the regulatory mechanism of mRNAs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that a hairpin within YAP mRNA 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) functions in regulation at post-transcription level through generating endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs). Bioinformatics analysis for secondary structure showed that YAP mRNA displayed a hairpin structure (termed standard hairpin, S-hairpin) within its 3'UTR. Surprisingly, we observed that the overexpression of S-hairpin derived from YAP 3'UTR (YAP-sh) increased the luciferase reporter activities of transcriptional factor NF-κB and AP-1 in 293T cells. Moreover, we identified that a fragment from YAP-sh, an esiRNA, was able to target mRNA 3'UTR of NF2 (a member of Hippo-signaling pathway) and YAP mRNA 3'UTR itself in hepatoma cells. Thus, we conclude that the YAP-sh within YAP mRNA 3'UTR may serve as a novel regulatory element, which functions in regulation at post-transcription level. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of mRNAs in regulatory function. PMID:25727017

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of dopamine D1 receptor expression in caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobón, Krishna E; Catuzzi, Jennifer E; Cote, Samantha R; Sonaike, Adenike; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2015-07-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is centrally involved in mediating the effects of cocaine and is essential for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Changes in D1 receptor expression have been reported in various models of cocaine addiction; however, the mechanisms that mediate these changes in D1 receptor expression are not well understood. Using preadolescent drd1a-EGFP mice and a binge cocaine treatment protocol we demonstrate that the D1 receptor is post-transcriptionally regulated in the caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized animal. While cocaine-sensitized mice express high levels of steady-state D1 receptor mRNA, the expression of D1 receptor protein is not elevated. We determined that the post-transcriptional regulation of D1 receptor mRNA is rapidly attenuated and D1 receptor protein levels increase within 30 min when the sensitized mice are challenged with cocaine. The rapid increase in D1 receptor protein levels requires de novo protein synthesis and correlates with the cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity in the cocaine-sensitized mice. The increase in D1 receptor protein levels in the caudate-putamen inversely correlated with the levels of microRNA 142-3p and 382, both of which regulate D1 receptor protein expression. The levels of these two microRNAs decreased significantly within 5 min of cocaine challenge in sensitized mice. The results provide novel insights into the previously unknown rapid kinetics of D1 receptor protein expression which occurs in a time scale that is comparable to the expression of immediate early genes. Furthermore, the results suggest a potential novel role for inherently labile microRNAs in regulating the rapid expression of D1 receptor protein in cocaine-sensitized animals. PMID:25900179

  9. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  10. A hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR functions in regulation at post-transcription level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuen; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Feng, Guoxing; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Xiao, Zelin; Lu, Zhanping [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Cancer Research, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ye, Lihong [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: zhangxd@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Cancer Research, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-04-03

    The central dogma of gene expression is that DNA is transcribed into messenger RNAs, which in turn serve as the template for protein synthesis. Recently, it has been reported that mRNAs display regulatory roles that rely on their ability to compete for microRNA binding, independent of their protein-coding function. However, the regulatory mechanism of mRNAs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that a hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) functions in regulation at post-transcription level through generating endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs). Bioinformatics analysis for secondary structure showed that YAP mRNA displayed a hairpin structure (termed standard hairpin, S-hairpin) within its 3′UTR. Surprisingly, we observed that the overexpression of S-hairpin derived from YAP 3′UTR (YAP-sh) increased the luciferase reporter activities of transcriptional factor NF-κB and AP-1 in 293T cells. Moreover, we identified that a fragment from YAP-sh, an esiRNA, was able to target mRNA 3′UTR of NF2 (a member of Hippo-signaling pathway) and YAP mRNA 3′UTR itself in hepatoma cells. Thus, we conclude that the YAP-sh within YAP mRNA 3′UTR may serve as a novel regulatory element, which functions in regulation at post-transcription level. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of mRNAs in regulatory function. - Highlights: • An S-hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR possesses regulatory function. • YAP-sh acts as a regulatory element for YAP at post-transcription level. • YAP-sh-3p20, an esiRNA derived from YAP-sh, targets mRNAs of YAP and NF2. • YAP-sh-3p20 depresses the proliferation of HepG2 cells in vitro.

  11. A hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR functions in regulation at post-transcription level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central dogma of gene expression is that DNA is transcribed into messenger RNAs, which in turn serve as the template for protein synthesis. Recently, it has been reported that mRNAs display regulatory roles that rely on their ability to compete for microRNA binding, independent of their protein-coding function. However, the regulatory mechanism of mRNAs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that a hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) functions in regulation at post-transcription level through generating endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs). Bioinformatics analysis for secondary structure showed that YAP mRNA displayed a hairpin structure (termed standard hairpin, S-hairpin) within its 3′UTR. Surprisingly, we observed that the overexpression of S-hairpin derived from YAP 3′UTR (YAP-sh) increased the luciferase reporter activities of transcriptional factor NF-κB and AP-1 in 293T cells. Moreover, we identified that a fragment from YAP-sh, an esiRNA, was able to target mRNA 3′UTR of NF2 (a member of Hippo-signaling pathway) and YAP mRNA 3′UTR itself in hepatoma cells. Thus, we conclude that the YAP-sh within YAP mRNA 3′UTR may serve as a novel regulatory element, which functions in regulation at post-transcription level. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of mRNAs in regulatory function. - Highlights: • An S-hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR possesses regulatory function. • YAP-sh acts as a regulatory element for YAP at post-transcription level. • YAP-sh-3p20, an esiRNA derived from YAP-sh, targets mRNAs of YAP and NF2. • YAP-sh-3p20 depresses the proliferation of HepG2 cells in vitro

  12. A post-transcriptional mechanism regulates calpastatin expression in bovine skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattrass, G S; Cafe, L M; McIntyre, B L; Gardner, G E; McGilchrist, P; Robinson, D L; Wang, Y H; Pethick, D W; Greenwood, P L

    2014-02-01

    the abundance of an alternative polyadenylated variant of the CAST transcript, terminated at the proximal polyadenylation site, provides a unique insight into the potential involvement of a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism which may influence protein expression levels in bovine skeletal muscle. PMID:24664555

  13. Effect of BRAFV600E mutation on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in a papillary thyroid carcinoma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenther Simone M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are a group of non-coding single stranded RNAs measuring approximately 22 nucleotides in length that have been found to control cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. They negatively regulate target genes and have recently been implicated in tumourigenesis. Furthermore, miRNA expression profiling correlates with various cancers, with these genes thought to act as both tumour suppressors and oncogenes. Recently, a point mutation in the BRAF gene leading to a V600E substitution has been identified as the most common genetic change in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC occurring in 29–69% of cases. This mutation leads to aberrant MAPK activation that is implicated in tumourigenesis. Aim The aim of this study was to identify the effect that BRAF oncogene has on post-transcriptional regulation in PTC by using microRNA analysis. Results A unique miRNA expression signature differentiated between PTC cell lines with BRAF mutations and a normal thyroid cell line. 15 miRNAs were found to be upregulated and 23 miRNAs were downregulated. Several of these up/down regulated miRNAs may be involved in PTC pathogenesis. miRNA profiling will assist in the elucidation of disease pathogenesis and identification biomarkers and targets.

  14. Post-transcriptional regulation of ethylene perception and signaling in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaller, George Eric

    2014-03-19

    The simple gas ethylene functions as an endogenous regulator of plant growth and development, and modulates such energy relevant processes as photosynthesis and biomass accumulation. Ethylene is perceived in the plant Arabidopsis by a five-member family of receptors related to bacterial histidine kinases. Our data support a general model in which the receptors exist as parts of larger protein complexes. Our goals have been to (1) characterize physical interactions among members of the signaling complex; (2) the role of histidine-kinase transphosphorylation in signaling by the complex; and (3) the role of a novel family of proteins that regulate signal output by the receptors.

  15. Post-Transcriptional Regulation by the Csr Global Regulatory System in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazushi; 鈴木, 一史

    2007-01-01

    In many species of bacteria, the Csr (carbon storage regulator) global regulatory system coordinates the expression of various genes. In Escherichia coli, the central component of this system, CsrA, is a RNA-binding protein. The CsrA is a homodimer and binds to leader segments of target mRNAs, affecting their translation and stability. CsrA activity is regulated by two small non-coding RNAs, CsrB and CsrC. These RNAs contain multiple CsrA-binding sequences and act by sequestering CsrA. In thi...

  16. The Anopheles gambiae cE5, a tight- and fast-binding thrombin inhibitor with post-transcriptionally regulated salivary-restricted expression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ronca, R.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Lombardo, F.; Rizzo, C.; Currà, C.; Ponzi, M.; Fiorentino, G.; Ribeiro, J.M.C.; Arcà, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 9 (2012), s. 610-620. ISSN 0965-1748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/12/2409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Anopheles * Salivary protein * Anti-thrombin * Anophelin * Hematophagy * Post-transcriptional regulation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2012

  17. Species-Dependent Post-Transcriptional Regulation of NOS1 by FMRP in the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Kenneth Y.; Lam, Mandy M. S.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Dube, Umber; Shim, Sungbo; Rašin, Mladen-Roko; Sousa, André M. M.; Fertuzinhos, Sofia; Chen, Jie-Guang; Arellano, Jon I.; Chan, Daniel W.; Pletikos, Mihovil; Vasung, Lana; Rowitch, David H.; Huang, Eric J.; Schwartz, Michael L.; Willemsen, Rob; Oostra, Ben A.; Rakic, Pasko; Heffer, Marija; Kostović, Ivica; Judaš, Milos; Šestan, Nenad

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading monogenic cause of intellectual disability and autism, results from loss of function of the RNA-binding protein FMRP. Here we show that FMRP regulates the translation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) in the developing human neocortex. Whereas NOS1 mRNA is ubiquitously expressed, NOS1 protein is transiently co-expressed with FMRP during early synaptogenesis in layer- and region-specific subpopulations of pyramidal neurons. These include mid-fetal layer 5 subcortically projecting neurons arranged into alternating columns in the prospective Broca’s area and orofacial motor cortex. Human NOS1 translation is activated by FMRP via interactions with coding region binding motifs absent from mouse Nos1 mRNA, which is expressed in mouse pyramidal neurons, but not efficiently translated. Correspondingly, neocortical NOS1 protein levels are severely reduced in developing human FXS cases but not FMRP-deficient mice. Thus, alterations in FMRP post-transcriptional regulation of NOS1 in developing neocortical circuits may contribute to cognitive dysfunction in FXS. PMID:22579290

  18. RNA N6-methyladenosine methylation in post-transcriptional gene expression regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yanan; Liu, Jianzhao; He, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most prevalent and internal modification that occurs in the messenger RNAs (mRNA) of most eukaryotes, although its functional relevance remained a mystery for decades. This modification is installed by the m6A methylation “writers” and can be reversed by demethylases that serve as “erasers.” In this review, we mainly summarize recent progress in the study of the m6A mRNA methylation machineries across eukaryotes and discuss their newly uncovered biological functions. The broad roles of m6A in regulating cell fates and embryonic development highlight the existence of another layer of epigenetic regulation at the RNA level, where mRNA is subjected to chemical modifications that affect protein expression. PMID:26159994

  19. Post-transcriptional regulation on a global scale: form and function of Csr/Rsm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Tony; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Babitzke, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Originally described as a repressor of gene expression in the stationary phase of growth, CsrA (RsmA) regulates primary and secondary metabolic pathways, biofilm formation, motility, virulence circuitry of pathogens, quorum sensing and stress response systems by binding to conserved sequences in its target mRNAs and altering their translation and/or turnover. While the binding of CsrA to RNA is understood at an atomic level, new mechanisms of gene activation and repression by this protein are still emerging. In the γ-proteobacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) use molecular mimicry to sequester multiple CsrA dimers away from mRNA. In contrast, the FliW protein of Bacillus subtilis inhibits CsrA activity by binding to this protein, thereby establishing a checkpoint in flagellum morphogenesis. Turnover of CsrB and CsrC sRNAs in Escherichia coli requires a specificity protein of the GGDEF-EAL domain superfamily, CsrD, in addition to the housekeeping nucleases RNase E and PNPase. The Csr system of E. coli contains extensive autoregulatory circuitry, which governs the expression and activity of CsrA. Interaction of the Csr system with transcriptional regulatory networks results in a variety of complex response patterns. This minireview will highlight basic principles and new insights into the workings of these complex eubacterial regulatory systems. PMID:22672726

  20. Isoforms of elongation factor eEF1A may be differently regulated at post-transcriptional level in breast cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vislovukh A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A exists as two 98 % homologous isoforms: eEF1A1 (A1 and eEF1A2 (A2 which are tissue and development specific. Despite high homology in an open reading frame (ORF region, mRNAs coding for eEF1A1 and eEF1A2 are different in their untranslated regions (UTR, suggesting a possibility of their dissimilar post-transcriptional regulation. Aim. To analyze the existence of cis-acting motifs in the UTRs of EEF1A1/A2 mRNAs, to confirm the possibility of post-transcriptional control of eEF1A1 and eEF1A2 expression. Methods. An ensemble of bioinformatic methods was applied to predict regulatory motifs in the UTRs of EEF1A1/A2 mRNAs. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was employed to detect post-transcriptional regulation of eEF1A1/A2 expression. Results. Numerous regulatory motifs in the UTR of EEF1A1/A2 mRNAs were found bioinformatically. The experimental evidence was obtained for the existence of negative regulation of EEF1A1 and positive regulation of EEF1A2 mRNA in the model of breast cancer development. Conclusions. EEF1A1 and EEF1A2 mRNAs contain distinct motifs in the UTRs and are differently regulated in cancer suggesting the possibility of their control by different cellular signals.

  1. Responsiveness of Trichomonas vaginalis to iron concentrations: evidence for a post-transcriptional iron regulation by an IRE/IRP-like system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Romero, J C; Arroyo, R

    2009-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis has high iron-dependency, favoring its growth and multiplication in culture. Iron also regulates some of the trichomonal virulence properties by yet unknown mechanisms. Iron is an essential but potentially toxic metal for the majority of organisms. Thus, its concentration must be tightly regulated within the cell. In mammals, the iron homeostasis is mainly regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a well known mechanism mediated by the binding of iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) to hairpin-loop structures, dubbed iron-responsive elements (IREs), localized in the untranslated regions (UTRs) of target mRNAs. The knowledge of iron regulation in T. vaginalis is still very limited. An iron-responsive promoter and other regulatory elements in the 5'-UTR of the ap65-1 gene were identified as a mechanism for the positive transcriptional regulation of trichomonad genes by iron. Recently, two IRE-like hairpin-loop structures in mRNAs of differentially iron-regulated TVCP4 and TVCP12 cysteine proteinases, as well as IRP-like trichomonad proteins were identified in T. vaginalis, suggesting the existence in this protozoan of a post-transcriptional iron regulatory mechanism by an IRE/IRP-like system. The responsiveness of T. vaginalis to distinct iron concentrations was examined here. Also, the comparison of the atypical IRE-like sequences of T. vaginalis with the consensus IRE and other putative IRE sequences present in parasite and bacteria mRNAs suggest that these trichomonad IRE-like sequences might be the ancestral forms of the RNA stem-loop structures of the IRE/IRP system. PMID:19539055

  2. Deep sequencing analysis of small noncoding RNA and mRNA targets of the global post-transcriptional regulator, Hfq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sittka, A; Lucchini, S; Papenfort, K;

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput pyrosequencing (HTPS) technology now allow a thorough analysis of RNA bound to cellular proteins, and, therefore, of post-transcriptional regulons. We used HTPS to discover the Salmonella RNAs that are targeted by the common bacterial Sm-like protein, Hfq. Initial...... transcriptomic analysis revealed that Hfq controls the expression of almost a fifth of all Salmonella genes, including several horizontally acquired pathogenicity islands (SPI-1, -2, -4, -5), two sigma factor regulons, and the flagellar gene cascade. Subsequent HTPS analysis of 350,000 cDNAs, derived from RNA co......-immunoprecipitation (coIP) with epitope-tagged Hfq or control coIP, identified 727 mRNAs that are Hfq-bound in vivo. The cDNA analysis discovered new, small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) and more than doubled the number of sRNAs known to be expressed in Salmonella to 64; about half of these are associated with Hfq. Our analysis...

  3. DoRiNA 2.0--upgrading the doRiNA database of RNA interactions in post-transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blin, Kai; Dieterich, Christoph; Wurmus, Ricardo; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Landthaler, Markus; Akalin, Altuna

    2015-01-01

    The expression of almost all genes in animals is subject to post-transcriptional regulation by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). The interactions between both RBPs and miRNAs with mRNA can be mapped on a whole-transcriptome level using experimental and computational techniques established in the past years. The combined action of RBPs and miRNAs is thought to form a post-transcriptional regulatory code. Here we present doRiNA 2.0, available at http://dorina.mdc-berlin.de. In this highly improved new version, we have completely reworked the user interface and expanded the database to improve the usability of the website. Taking into account user feedback over the past years, the input forms for both the simple and the combinatorial search function have been streamlined and combined into a single web page that will also display the search results. Especially, custom uploads is one of the key new features in doRiNA 2.0. To enable the inclusion of doRiNA into third-party analysis pipelines, all operations are accessible via a REST API. Alternatively, local installations can be queried using a Python API. Both the web application and the APIs are available under an OSI-approved Open Source license that allows research and commercial access and re-use. PMID:25416797

  4. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of retrotransposons IAP and MuERV-L affect pluripotency of mice ES cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintado Belen

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mouse, culture of embryonic stem (ES cells may decrease their pluripotency and give rise to foetal abnormalities in recipient embryos. These abnormalities are frequently associated with both, chromosome abnormalities or epigenetic alteration of imprinting genes; however, little is known about the epigenetic stability of endogenous retrotransposable elements (REs. In our laboratory, we came across a R1 ES cell line, which at passage 27, lost the ability of germline transmission and started inducing the kinky tail phenotype in all chimeric animals produced with it. Methods In order to investigate whether this phenotype was associated with chromosome alteration, inadvertent differentiation, or epigenetic modification, we characterized and compared this R1 ES cell line at passage 27 with an early passage and with a second ES cell line C57/CBAF1 generated in our laboratory. We assessed: i karyotype; ii expression of pluripotent and differentiation markers, iii mRNA transcription by qRT-PCR of two REs, intracisternal-A particle (IAP and murine endogenous-retrovirus-L (MuERV-L, and iv methylation of IAP and MuERV-L. Results The R1 ES cell at passage 27, presented normal morphology, karyotype, and expression of genetic markers characteristic of pluripotent; however, it was detected an altered mRNA transcription of sense and antisense RNA strands of both REs, concomitantly with an altered methylation pattern for the IAP element but not for MuERV-L. These results indicate that besides methylation, other post-transcriptional processes are involved in gene silencing of some REs; and that culture of ES cells may decrease their pluripotency by producing inadvertent alterations in the expression of REs without significantly affecting the morphology, chromosome structure, and expression of pluripotent or differentiation markers. Conclusion Inadvertent REs instability may have important consequences for the use of ES cells in

  5. Regulating a Post-Transcriptional Regulator: Protein Phosphorylation, Degradation and Translational Blockage in Control of the Trypanosome Stress-Response RNA-Binding Protein ZC3H11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Minia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle of the mammalian pathogen Trypanosoma brucei involves commuting between two markedly different environments: the homeothermic mammalian host and the poikilothermic invertebrate vector. The ability to resist temperature and other stresses is essential for trypanosome survival. Trypanosome gene expression is mainly post-transcriptional, but must nevertheless be adjusted in response to environmental cues, including host-specific physical and chemical stresses. We investigate here the control of ZC3H11, a CCCH zinc finger protein which stabilizes stress response mRNAs. ZC3H11 protein levels increase at least 10-fold when trypanosomes are stressed by heat shock, proteasome inhibitors, ethanol, arsenite, and low doses of puromycin, but not by various other stresses. We found that increases in protein stability and translation efficiency both contribute to ZC3H11 accumulation. ZC3H11 is an in vitro substrate for casein kinase 1 isoform 2 (CK1.2, and results from CK1.2 depletion and other experiments suggest that phosphorylation of ZC3H11 can promote its instability in vivo. Results from sucrose density centrifugation indicate that under normal culture conditions translation initiation on the ZC3H11 mRNA is repressed, but after suitable stresses the ZC3H11 mRNA moves to heavy polysomes. The ZC3H11 3'-UTR is sufficient for translation suppression and a region of 71 nucleotides is required for the regulation. Since the control works in both bloodstream forms, where ZC3H11 translation is repressed at 37°C, and in procyclic forms, where ZC3H11 translation is activated at 37°C, we predict that this regulatory RNA sequence is targeted by repressive trans acting factor that is released upon stress.

  6. Regulating a Post-Transcriptional Regulator: Protein Phosphorylation, Degradation and Translational Blockage in Control of the Trypanosome Stress-Response RNA-Binding Protein ZC3H11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minia, Igor; Clayton, Christine

    2016-03-01

    The life cycle of the mammalian pathogen Trypanosoma brucei involves commuting between two markedly different environments: the homeothermic mammalian host and the poikilothermic invertebrate vector. The ability to resist temperature and other stresses is essential for trypanosome survival. Trypanosome gene expression is mainly post-transcriptional, but must nevertheless be adjusted in response to environmental cues, including host-specific physical and chemical stresses. We investigate here the control of ZC3H11, a CCCH zinc finger protein which stabilizes stress response mRNAs. ZC3H11 protein levels increase at least 10-fold when trypanosomes are stressed by heat shock, proteasome inhibitors, ethanol, arsenite, and low doses of puromycin, but not by various other stresses. We found that increases in protein stability and translation efficiency both contribute to ZC3H11 accumulation. ZC3H11 is an in vitro substrate for casein kinase 1 isoform 2 (CK1.2), and results from CK1.2 depletion and other experiments suggest that phosphorylation of ZC3H11 can promote its instability in vivo. Results from sucrose density centrifugation indicate that under normal culture conditions translation initiation on the ZC3H11 mRNA is repressed, but after suitable stresses the ZC3H11 mRNA moves to heavy polysomes. The ZC3H11 3'-UTR is sufficient for translation suppression and a region of 71 nucleotides is required for the regulation. Since the control works in both bloodstream forms, where ZC3H11 translation is repressed at 37°C, and in procyclic forms, where ZC3H11 translation is activated at 37°C, we predict that this regulatory RNA sequence is targeted by repressive trans acting factor that is released upon stress. PMID:27002830

  7. Regulating a Post-Transcriptional Regulator: Protein Phosphorylation, Degradation and Translational Blockage in Control of the Trypanosome Stress-Response RNA-Binding Protein ZC3H11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minia, Igor; Clayton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The life cycle of the mammalian pathogen Trypanosoma brucei involves commuting between two markedly different environments: the homeothermic mammalian host and the poikilothermic invertebrate vector. The ability to resist temperature and other stresses is essential for trypanosome survival. Trypanosome gene expression is mainly post-transcriptional, but must nevertheless be adjusted in response to environmental cues, including host-specific physical and chemical stresses. We investigate here the control of ZC3H11, a CCCH zinc finger protein which stabilizes stress response mRNAs. ZC3H11 protein levels increase at least 10-fold when trypanosomes are stressed by heat shock, proteasome inhibitors, ethanol, arsenite, and low doses of puromycin, but not by various other stresses. We found that increases in protein stability and translation efficiency both contribute to ZC3H11 accumulation. ZC3H11 is an in vitro substrate for casein kinase 1 isoform 2 (CK1.2), and results from CK1.2 depletion and other experiments suggest that phosphorylation of ZC3H11 can promote its instability in vivo. Results from sucrose density centrifugation indicate that under normal culture conditions translation initiation on the ZC3H11 mRNA is repressed, but after suitable stresses the ZC3H11 mRNA moves to heavy polysomes. The ZC3H11 3'-UTR is sufficient for translation suppression and a region of 71 nucleotides is required for the regulation. Since the control works in both bloodstream forms, where ZC3H11 translation is repressed at 37°C, and in procyclic forms, where ZC3H11 translation is activated at 37°C, we predict that this regulatory RNA sequence is targeted by repressive trans acting factor that is released upon stress. PMID:27002830

  8. Up-regulation of thromboxane A2 receptor expression by lipid soluble smoking particles through post-transcriptional mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yaping; Edvinsson, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    /ml for 24h) resulted in markedly elevated contractile responses to the Tx analog U46619, compared with the control DMSO. There was no increase in TP receptor mRNA expression, while the protein expression was significantly enhanced. This up-regulation was not affected by a general transcriptional...... pathways are not involved in TP receptor up-regulation. Study on TP receptor mRNA stability showed that during organ culture, the TP receptor mRNA was stable in both DMSO and DSP group, but the latter elicited a tendency to stabilize the TP receptor mRNA at higher level. Thus, post...

  9. Arabidopsis OR proteins are the major post-transcriptional regulators of phytoene synthase in mediating carotenoid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are indispensable natural pigments to plants and humans. Phytoene synthase (PSY), the rate-limiting enzyme in carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, and ORANGE (OR), a regulator of chromoplast differentiation and enhancer of carotenoid biosynthesis, represent two key proteins that control caro...

  10. Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection on post-transcriptional regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazawa Haruna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontal disease is suggested to increase the risk of atherothrombotic disease by inducing dyslipidemia. Recently, we demonstrated that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9, which is known to play a critical role in the regulation of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol levels, is elevated in periodontitis patients. However, the underlying mechanisms of elevation of PCSK9 in periodontitis patients are largely unknown. Here, we explored whether Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative periodontopathic bacterium, -induced inflammatory response regulates serum PCSK9 and cholesterol levels using animal models. Methods We infected C57BL/6 mice intraperitoneally with Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative strain of periodontopathic bacteria, and evaluated serum PCSK9 levels and the serum lipid profile. PCSK9 and LDL receptor (LDLR gene and protein expression, as well as liver X receptors (Lxrs, inducible degrader of the LDLR (Idol, and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor (Srebf2 gene expression, were examined in the liver. Results P. gingivalis infection induced a significant elevation of serum PCSK9 levels and a concomitant elevation of total and LDL cholesterol compared with sham-infected mice. The LDL cholesterol levels were significantly correlated with PCSK9 levels. Expression of the Pcsk9, Ldlr, and Srebf2 genes was upregulated in the livers of the P. gingivalis-infected mice compared with the sham-infected mice. Although Pcsk9 gene expression is known to be positively regulated by sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP2 (human homologue of Srebf2, whereas Srebf2 is negatively regulated by cholesterol, the elevated expression of Srebf2 found in the infected mice is thought to be mediated by P. gingivalis infection. Conclusions P. gingivalis infection upregulates PCSK9 production via upregulation of Srebf2, independent of cholesterol levels. Further studies

  11. Post-transcriptional regulation through the HO 3′-UTR by Mpt5, a yeast homolog of Pumilio and FBF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadauchi, Tomofumi; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Herskowitz, Ira; Irie, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) and Caenorhabditis elegans FBF bind to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of their target mRNAs and repress translation. Pum and FBF are members of a large and evolutionarily conserved protein family, the Puf family, found in Drosophila, C.elegans, humans and yeasts. Budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has five proteins with conserved Puf motifs: Mpt5/Uth4, Ygl014w, Yll013c, Jsn1 and Ypr042c. Here we report that Mpt5 negatively regulates expression of the HO gene. Loss of MPT5 increased expression of reporter genes integrated into the ho locus, whereas overexpression of MPT5 decreased expression. Repression required the 3′-UTR of HO, which contains a tetranucleotide, UUGU, also found in the binding sites of Pum and FBF. Mutation of UUGU to UACU in the HO 3′-UTR abolished Mpt5-mediated repression. Studies using a three-hybrid assay for RNA binding indicate that Mpt5 binds to the 3′-UTR of HO mRNA containing a UUGU sequence but not a UACU sequence. These observations suggest that the yeast Puf homolog, Mpt5, negatively regulates HO expression post- transcriptionally. PMID:11157761

  12. Translatome profiling in dormant and nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds highlights post-transcriptional regulation of germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layat, Elodie; Leymarie, Juliette; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Caius, José; Langlade, Nicolas; Bailly, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    Seed dormancy, which blocks germination in apparently favourable conditions, is a key regulatory control point of plant population establishment. As germination requires de novo translation, its regulation by dormancy is likely to be related to the association of individual transcripts to polysomes. Here, the polysome-associated mRNAs, that is, the translatome, were fractionated and characterized with microarrays in dormant and nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus) embryos during their imbibition at 10°C, a temperature preventing germination of dormant embryos. Profiling of mRNAs in polysomal complexes revealed that the translatome differs between germinating and nongerminating embryos. Association of transcripts with polysomes reached a maximum after 15 h of imbibition; at this time-point 194 polysome-associated transcripts were specifically found in nondormant embryos and 47 in dormant embryos only. The proteins corresponding to the polysomal mRNAs in nondormant embryos appeared to be very pertinent for germination and were involved mainly in transport, regulation of transcription or cell wall modifications. This work demonstrates that seed germination results from a timely regulated and selective recruitment of mRNAs to polysomes, thus opening novel fields of investigation for the understanding of this developmental process. PMID:25157915

  13. Glutamate, Ornithine, Arginine, Proline, and Polyamine Metabolic Interactions: The Pathway Is Regulated at the Post-Transcriptional Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rajtilak; Barchi, Boubker; Turlapati, Swathi A.; Gagne, Maegan; Minocha, Rakesh; Long, Stephanie; Minocha, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of glutamate into ornithine, arginine, proline, and polyamines is a major network of nitrogen-metabolizing pathways in plants, which also produces intermediates like nitric oxide, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) that play critical roles in plant development and stress. While the accumulations of intermediates and the products of this network depend primarily on nitrogen assimilation, the overall regulation of the interacting sub-pathways is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that diversion of ornithine into polyamine biosynthesis (by transgenic approach) not only plays a role in regulating its own biosynthesis from glutamate but also affects arginine and proline biosynthesis. Using two high putrescine producing lines of Arabidopsis thaliana (containing a transgenic mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene), we studied the: (1) effects of exogenous supply of carbon and nitrogen on polyamines and pools of soluble amino acids; and, (2) expression of genes encoding key enzymes in the interactive pathways of arginine, proline and GABA biosynthesis as well as the catabolism of polyamines. Our findings suggest that: (1) the overall conversion of glutamate to arginine and polyamines is enhanced by increased utilization of ornithine for polyamine biosynthesis by the transgene product; (2) proline and arginine biosynthesis are regulated independently of polyamines and GABA biosynthesis; (3) the expression of most genes (28 that were studied) that encode enzymes of the interacting sub-pathways of arginine and GABA biosynthesis does not change even though overall biosynthesis of Orn from glutamate is increased several fold; and (4) increased polyamine biosynthesis results in increased assimilation of both nitrogen and carbon by the cells. PMID:26909083

  14. The L1TD1 Protein Interactome Reveals the Importance of Post-transcriptional Regulation in Human Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheswara Reddy Emani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The RNA-binding protein L1TD1 is one of the most specific and abundant proteins in pluripotent stem cells and is essential for the maintenance of pluripotency in human cells. Here, we identify the protein interaction network of L1TD1 in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and provide insights into the interactome network constructed in human pluripotent cells. Our data reveal that L1TD1 has an important role in RNA splicing, translation, protein traffic, and degradation. L1TD1 interacts with multiple stem-cell-specific proteins, many of which are still uncharacterized in the context of development. Further, we show that L1TD1 is a part of the pluripotency interactome network of OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG, bridging nuclear and cytoplasmic regulation and highlighting the importance of RNA biology in pluripotency.

  15. MicroRNA-373 (miR-373) post-transcriptionally regulates large tumor suppressor, homolog 2 (LATS2) and stimulates proliferation in human esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LATS2 is a member of the LATS tumor suppressor family. It has been implicated in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of LATS2 has been reported in human esophageal cancer. But, the LATS2 gene expression and its regulatory mechanism in esophageal cancer remain unclear. The present study has shown that LATS2 protein expression was mediated by miR-373 at the post-transcriptional level and inversely correlated with miR-373 amounts in esophageal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the direct inhibition of LATS2 protein was mediated by miR-373 and manipulated the expression of miR-373 to affect esophageal cancer cells growth. Moreover, this correlation was supported by data collected ex vivo, in which esophageal cancer tissues from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients were analyzed. Finally, by miRNA microarray analysis, four miRNAs including miR-373 were over-expressed in ESCC samples. Our findings reveal that miR-373 would be a potential oncogene and it participates in the carcinogenesis of human esophageal cancer by suppressing LATS2 expression.

  16. Bioinformatic tools for studying post-transcriptional gene regulation : The UAlbany TUTR collection and other informatic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Francis; Zaleski, Christopher; George, Ajish D; Stenson, Erin K; Ricciardi, Adele; Tenenbaum, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    The untranslated regions (UTRs) of many mRNAs contain sequence and structural motifs that are used to regulate the stability, localization, and translatability of the mRNA. It should be possible to discover previously unidentified RNA regulatory motifs by examining many related nucleotide sequences, which are assumed to contain a common motif. This is a general practice for discovery of DNA-based sequence-based patterns, in which alignment tools are heavily exploited. However, because of the complexity of sequential and structural components of RNA-based motifs, simple-alignment tools are frequently inadequate. The consensus sequences they find frequently have the potential for significant variability at any given position and are only loosely characterized. The development of RNA-motif discovery tools that infer and integrate structural information into motif discovery is both necessary and expedient. Here, we provide a selected list of existing web-accessible algorithms for the discovery of RNA motifs, which, although not exhaustive, represents the current state of the art. To facilitate the development, evaluation, and training of new software programs that identify RNA motifs, we created the UAlbany training UTR (TUTR) database, which is a collection of validated sets of sequences containing experimentally defined regulatory motifs. Presently, eleven training sets have been generated with associated indexes and "answer sets" provided that identify where the previously characterized RNA motif [the iron responsive element (IRE), AU-rich class-2 element (ARE), selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS), etc.] resides in each sequence. The UAlbany TUTR collection is a shared resource that is available to researchers for software development and as a research aid. PMID:18369974

  17. Transcriptional, post-transcriptional and chromatin-associated regulation of pri-miRNAs, pre-miRNAs and moRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Chirag; Coolen, Marion; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Cussigh, Delphine; Mydel, Piotr; Steen, Vidar M; Carninci, Piero; Andersen, Jesper B; Bally-Cuif, Laure; Müller, Ferenc; Lenhard, Boris

    2016-04-20

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a major role in the post-transcriptional regulation of target genes, especially in development and differentiation. Our understanding about the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes is limited by inadequate annotation of primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts. Here, we used CAGE-seq and RNA-seq to provide genome-wide identification of the pri-miRNA core promoter repertoire and its dynamic usage during zebrafish embryogenesis. We assigned pri-miRNA promoters to 152 precursor-miRNAs (pre-miRNAs), the majority of which were supported by promoter associated post-translational histone modifications (H3K4me3, H2A.Z) and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) occupancy. We validated seven miR-9 pri-miRNAs byin situhybridization and showed similar expression patterns as mature miR-9. In addition, processing of an alternative intronic promoter ofmiR-9-5was validated by 5' RACE PCR. Developmental profiling revealed a subset of pri-miRNAs that are maternally inherited. Moreover, we show that promoter-associated H3K4me3, H2A.Z and RNAPII marks are not only present at pri-miRNA promoters but are also specifically enriched at pre-miRNAs, suggesting chromatin level regulation of pre-miRNAs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CAGE-seq also detects 3'-end processing of pre-miRNAs on Drosha cleavage site that correlates with miRNA-offset RNAs (moRNAs) production and provides a new tool for detecting Drosha processing events and predicting pre-miRNA processing by a genome-wide assay. PMID:26673698

  18. AthaMap, integrating transcriptional and post-transcriptional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülow, Lorenz; Engelmann, Stefan; Schindler, Martin; Hehl, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for the whole Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap has now been extended to include data on post-transcriptional regulation. A total of 403,173 genomic positions of small RNAs have been mapped in the A. thaliana genome. These identify 5772 putative post-transcriptionally regulated target genes. AthaMap tools have been modified to improve the identification of common TFBS in co-regulated genes by subtracting post-transcriptionally regulated genes from such analyses. Furthermore, AthaMap was updated to the TAIR7 genome annotation, a graphic display of gene analysis results was implemented, and the TFBS data content was increased. AthaMap is freely available at http://www.athamap.de/. PMID:18842622

  19. Post-transcriptional regulation of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by the cytosolic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Ingrid; Nowag, Sebastian; Koch, Kathrin; Hubrich, Thomas; Bollmann, Franziska; Henke, Jenny; Schmitz, Katja; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Affinity purification using the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA identified the cytosolic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) as a protein interacting with the human iNOS 3'-UTR. Downregulation of PABP expression by RNA interference resulted in a marked reduction of cytokine-induced iNOS mRNA expression without changes in the expression of mRNAs coding for the major subunit of the RNA polymerase II (Pol 2A) or β2-microglobuline (β2M). Along with the mRNA also iNOS protein expression was reduced by siPABP-treatment, whereas in the same cells protein expression of STAT-1α, NF-κB p65, or GAPDH was not altered. Reporter gene analyses showed no change of the inducibility of the human 16kb iNOS promoter in siPABP cells. In contrast, the siPABP-mediated decline of iNOS expression correlated with a reduction in the stability of the iNOS mRNA. As the stability of the Pol 2A and β2M mRNA was not changed, siPABP-treatment seems to have a specific effect on iNOS mRNA decay. UV-crosslinking experiments revealed that PABP interacts with one binding site in the 5'-UTR and two different binding sites in the 3'-UTR of the human iNOS mRNA. Mutation or deletion of the binding site in the 5'-UTR but not in the 3'-UTR reduced luciferase expression in DLD-1 cells transfected with iNOS-5'-UTR or iNOS-3'-UTR luciferase reporter constructs. In summary, our data demonstrate that PABP by binding to specific sequence elements in the 5'-UTR post-transcriptionally enhances human iNOS mRNA stability and thereby iNOS expression. PMID:23711718

  20. Periplasmic Flagellar Export Apparatus Protein, FliH, Is Involved in Post-Transcriptional Regulation of FlaB, Motility and Virulence of the Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia hermsii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyard, Cyril; Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Dahlstrom, Eric; Sturdevant, Daniel; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Martens, Craig; Hayes, Stanley F.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hansen, Bryan T.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2013-01-01

    Spirochetes are bacteria characterized in part by rotating periplasmic flagella that impart their helical or flat-wave morphology and motility. While most other bacteria rely on a transcriptional cascade to regulate the expression of motility genes, spirochetes employ post-transcriptional mechanism(s) that are only partially known. In the present study, we characterize a spontaneous non-motile mutant of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii that was straight, non-motile and deficient in periplasmic flagella. We used next generation DNA sequencing of the mutant’s genome, which when compared to the wild-type genome identified a 142 bp deletion in the chromosomal gene encoding the flagellar export apparatus protein FliH. Immunoblot and transcription analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was linked to the posttranscriptional deficiency in the synthesis of the major periplasmic flagellar filament core protein FlaB. Despite the lack of FlaB, the amount of FlaA produced by the fliH mutant was similar to the wild-type level. The turnover of the residual pool of FlaB produced by the fliH mutant was comparable to the wild-type spirochete. The non-motile mutant was not infectious in mice and its inoculation did not induce an antibody response. Trans-complementation of the mutant with an intact fliH gene restored the synthesis of FlaB, a normal morphology, motility and infectivity in mice. Therefore, we propose that the flagellar export apparatus protein regulates motility of B. hermsii at the post-transcriptional level by influencing the synthesis of FlaB. PMID:24009690

  1. Periplasmic flagellar export apparatus protein, FliH, is involved in post-transcriptional regulation of FlaB, motility and virulence of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Guyard

    Full Text Available Spirochetes are bacteria characterized in part by rotating periplasmic flagella that impart their helical or flat-wave morphology and motility. While most other bacteria rely on a transcriptional cascade to regulate the expression of motility genes, spirochetes employ post-transcriptional mechanism(s that are only partially known. In the present study, we characterize a spontaneous non-motile mutant of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii that was straight, non-motile and deficient in periplasmic flagella. We used next generation DNA sequencing of the mutant's genome, which when compared to the wild-type genome identified a 142 bp deletion in the chromosomal gene encoding the flagellar export apparatus protein FliH. Immunoblot and transcription analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was linked to the posttranscriptional deficiency in the synthesis of the major periplasmic flagellar filament core protein FlaB. Despite the lack of FlaB, the amount of FlaA produced by the fliH mutant was similar to the wild-type level. The turnover of the residual pool of FlaB produced by the fliH mutant was comparable to the wild-type spirochete. The non-motile mutant was not infectious in mice and its inoculation did not induce an antibody response. Trans-complementation of the mutant with an intact fliH gene restored the synthesis of FlaB, a normal morphology, motility and infectivity in mice. Therefore, we propose that the flagellar export apparatus protein regulates motility of B. hermsii at the post-transcriptional level by influencing the synthesis of FlaB.

  2. Post-Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Antigen Processing Machinery (APM) Components and HLA-I in Cervical Cancers from Uighur Women

    OpenAIRE

    HASIM, AYSHAMGUL; Abudula, Mangnishahan; Aimiduo, Reshalaiti; Ma, Jun-Qi; JIAO, Zhen; Akula, Gulzareye; Wang, Ting; ABUDULA, ABULIZI

    2012-01-01

    Normal function of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) and antigen processing machinery (APM) proteins is required for T cell-mediated anti-tumor or antiviral immunity, whereas the tumor survival indicates a failure of the host in immune surveillance associated with the dysfunction in antigen presentation, mainly due to the deregulation in HLA-I and APM expression or function. The posttranscriptional regulation of HLA-I and APM expression may associate with epigenetic modifications in can...

  3. The Role of the 3' Untranslated Region in the Post-Transcriptional Regulation of KLF6 Gene Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diab, Thoria; Hanoun, Naima [INSERM UMR 1037, Toulouse 31432 (France); Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse 31000 (France); Bureau, Christophe; Christol, Camille [INSERM UMR 1037, Toulouse 31432 (France); Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse 31000 (France); Department of Hepatology, Toulouse University Hospital Centre, Toulouse 31409 (France); Buscail, Louis [INSERM UMR 1037, Toulouse 31432 (France); Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse 31000 (France); Department of Gastroenterology, Toulouse University Hospital Centre, Toulouse 31409 (France); Cordelier, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.cordelier@inserm.fr; Torrisani, Jérôme [INSERM UMR 1037, Toulouse 31432 (France); Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse 31000 (France)

    2013-12-19

    KLF6 is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues and regulates many pathways such as differentiation, development, cellular proliferation, growth-related signal transduction, and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that KLF6 expression is altered during liver carcinogenesis. More importantly, KLF6 invalidation results in cell cycle progression inhibition and apoptosis of liver cancer cells. On the other hand, enforced expression of KLF6 variant 2 (SV2) induces cancer cell death by apoptosis. Thus, we and others demonstrated that KLF6 and its splicing variants play a critical role in liver cancer. However, little is known on the mechanisms governing KLF6 expression in HCC. In the present work, we asked whether the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of the KLF6 mRNA may be responsible for regulation of KLF6 expression in HCC. We found that KLF6 mRNA stability was altered in liver-derived cell lines as compared to cervical cancer-derived cell lines and human embryonic fibroblasts. Interestingly, KLF6 mRNA was highly unstable in liver cancer-derived cell lines as compared to normal hepatocytes. We next cloned the KLF6 mRNA 3'UTR into luciferase-expressing vectors and found that gene expression and activity were strongly impaired in all liver-derived cell lines tested. In addition, we found that most the KLF6 3'UTR destabilisation activity resides between nt 1,835 and nt 2,615 of the KLF6 gene. Taken together, we provide the first steps towards better understanding of the regulation of KLF6 expression in HCC. Further work is needed to identify the factors that bind to KLF6 3'UTR to regulate its expression in liver cancer-derived cell lines.

  4. The Role of the 3' Untranslated Region in the Post-Transcriptional Regulation of KLF6 Gene Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KLF6 is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues and regulates many pathways such as differentiation, development, cellular proliferation, growth-related signal transduction, and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that KLF6 expression is altered during liver carcinogenesis. More importantly, KLF6 invalidation results in cell cycle progression inhibition and apoptosis of liver cancer cells. On the other hand, enforced expression of KLF6 variant 2 (SV2) induces cancer cell death by apoptosis. Thus, we and others demonstrated that KLF6 and its splicing variants play a critical role in liver cancer. However, little is known on the mechanisms governing KLF6 expression in HCC. In the present work, we asked whether the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of the KLF6 mRNA may be responsible for regulation of KLF6 expression in HCC. We found that KLF6 mRNA stability was altered in liver-derived cell lines as compared to cervical cancer-derived cell lines and human embryonic fibroblasts. Interestingly, KLF6 mRNA was highly unstable in liver cancer-derived cell lines as compared to normal hepatocytes. We next cloned the KLF6 mRNA 3'UTR into luciferase-expressing vectors and found that gene expression and activity were strongly impaired in all liver-derived cell lines tested. In addition, we found that most the KLF6 3'UTR destabilisation activity resides between nt 1,835 and nt 2,615 of the KLF6 gene. Taken together, we provide the first steps towards better understanding of the regulation of KLF6 expression in HCC. Further work is needed to identify the factors that bind to KLF6 3'UTR to regulate its expression in liver cancer-derived cell lines

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation through the HO 3′-UTR by Mpt5, a yeast homolog of Pumilio and FBF

    OpenAIRE

    Tadauchi, Tomofumi; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Herskowitz, Ira; Irie, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) and Caenorhabditis elegans FBF bind to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of their target mRNAs and repress translation. Pum and FBF are members of a large and evolutionarily conserved protein family, the Puf family, found in Drosophila, C.elegans, humans and yeasts. Budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has five proteins with conserved Puf motifs: Mpt5/Uth4, Ygl014w, Yll013c, Jsn1 and Ypr042c. Here we report that Mpt5 negatively regulates expression of the HO gen...

  6. Transcriptional, post-transcriptional and chromatin-associated regulation of pri-miRNAs, pre-miRNAs and moRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nepal, Chirag; Coolen, Marion; Hadzhiev, Yavor;

    2015-01-01

    -translational histone modifications (H3K4me3, H2A.Z) and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) occupancy. We validated seven miR-9 pri-miRNAs by in situ hybridization and showed similar expression patterns as mature miR-9. In addition, processing of an alternative intronic promoter of miR-9-5 was validated by 5' RACE PCR....... Developmental profiling revealed a subset of pri-miRNAs that are maternally inherited. Moreover, we show that promoter-associated H3K4me3, H2A.Z and RNAPII marks are not only present at pri-miRNA promoters but are also specifically enriched at pre-miRNAs, suggesting chromatin level regulation of pre...

  7. GNAI1 Suppresses Tumor Cell Migration and Invasion and is Post-Transcriptionally Regulated by Mir-320a/c/d in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the role and regulation of guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(i), α-1 subunit (GNAI1) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Expression of GNAI1 in HCC samples was determined by qRT–PCR and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Huh-7 and SNU-387 cells stably expressing GNAI1 were established by the infection of lentivirus transducing unit containing GNAI1. siRNA against GNAI1 was transfected into SMMC-7721 cells to knock down the GNAI1 expression in HCC cells. Mir-320a/c/d mimics were transfected into SMMC-7721 and SK-Hep-1 cells and the expression of GNAI1 was determined by Western blot. The migration and invasion of Huh-7, SNU-387, SK-Hep-1 and SMMC-7721 cells were investigated by Transwell assays. The GNAI1 protein was significantly downregulated in HCC samples without changes in its mRNA levels. GNAI1 could inhibit the migration and invasion of HCC cells in vitro. Further investigations indicated that GNAI1 was a target of miR-320a/c/d in HCC cells. Transwell assays demonstrated that these microRNAs could promote the migratory ability and invasivesess of HCC cells in vitro. GNAI1 is downregulated in HCC and inhibits the migration and invasion of HCC cells. This study is the first to investigate the role of GNAI1 in cancer. Regulation of GNAI1 by miR-320a/c/d indicates new therapeutic avenues for targeting HCC metastasis

  8. Post-transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of antigen processing machinery (APM components and HLA-I in cervical cancers from Uighur women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayshamgul Hasim

    Full Text Available Normal function of human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I and antigen processing machinery (APM proteins is required for T cell-mediated anti-tumor or antiviral immunity, whereas the tumor survival indicates a failure of the host in immune surveillance associated with the dysfunction in antigen presentation, mainly due to the deregulation in HLA-I and APM expression or function. The posttranscriptional regulation of HLA-I and APM expression may associate with epigenetic modifications in cancer development which was not described so far. Here we showed that the development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC in Uighur women was accompanied with the partial or total loss of protein expression of HLA-I, ß2-m and APM components, including the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1/2, low molecular mass protein (LMP2, LMP7, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1(ERAP1, chaperone molecules include calreticulin (CLR, calnexin (CNX and ERp57, and this was proved again by analysis of transcription of the same genes in addition to three genes HLA-A, B and C coding for HLA-I. By bisulfite sequencing approach, we identified target CpG islands methylated at the gene promoter region of TAP1, TAP2, LMP7, tapasin and ERp57 in cervical carcinoma cells. Further analysis of CpG site specific methylation of these genes in cases of CSCC and CIN demonstrated an inverse correlation of altered CpG island methylation of TAP1, LMP7, and ERp57 with changes in protein expression. Moreover, promoter methylation of these genes was significantly higher in cases positive for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16 than negative ones. Our results suggested that epigenetic modifications are responsible for the aberrant expression of certain HLA-I and APM genes, and may help to understand unrevealed mechanisms of tumor escape from immune surveillance in cervical carcinogenesis.

  9. 运动性骨骼肌线粒体生物合成的转录及转录后调节%Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Regulation of Exercise-induced Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻伯海; 朱立艳; 余洲

    2011-01-01

    One of the most dramatic phenotypic alterations in adults occurs in mitochondria in response to exercise or chronic contractile activity.Contractile activity-induced mitochondrial adaptations in muscle are highly specific,and dependent upon the type of exercise(i.e.resistance versus endurance),as well as its frequency,intensity and duration.Changes in mitochondrial biogenesis produced by exercise are a result of multiple molecular events.The multiple transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways are operative in exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.In skeletal muscle,exercise can play a significant role in accelerating the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis,which can serve to attenuate the possible mitochondrial dysfunction that arises during aging and conditions of muscle disuse,thereby improving work performance and the quality of life.%运动或长期运动可引起线粒体的表型发生改变。运动性骨骼肌线粒体的适应具有高度特异性,取决于训练类型(力量或耐力)以及训练的频率、强度和持续时间。运动诱导线粒体的生物合成是多分子事件相互作用的结果。转录及转录后调节在运动诱导线粒体的生物合成起着重要的作用。运动可促进骨骼肌线粒体的生物合成,减缓由于年龄或不运动引起线粒体功能失调,从而提高工作能力和生活的质量。

  10. SchA-p85-FAK complex dictates isoform-specific activation of Akt2 and subsequent PCBP1-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of TGFβ-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human lung cancer cell line A549.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xinying; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yuxia; Teng, Guigen; Wang, Yong; Zang, Xuefeng; Wang, Kaifei; Zhang, Jinghui; Xu, Yali; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Lei

    2014-08-01

    A post-transcriptional pathway by which TGF-β modulates expression of specific proteins, Disabled-2 (Dab2) and Interleukin-like EMT Inducer (ILEI), inherent to epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in murine epithelial cells through Akt2-mediated phosphorylation of poly r(C) binding protein (PCBP1), has been previously elucidated. The aims of the current study were to determine if the same mechanism is operative in the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, A549, and to delineate the underlying mechanism. Steady-state transcript and protein expression levels of Dab2 and ILEI were examined in A549 cells treated with TGF-β for up to 48 h. Induction of translational de-repression in this model was quantified by polysomal fractionation followed by qRT-PCR. The underlying mechanism of isoform-specific activation of Akt2 was elucidated through a combination of co-immunoprecipitation studies. TGF-β induced EMT in A549 cells concomitant with translational upregulation of Dab2 and ILEI proteins through isoform-specific activation of Akt2 followed by phosphorylation of PCBP1 at serine-43. Our experiments further elucidated that the adaptor protein SchA is phosphorylated at tyrosine residues following TGF-β treatment, which initiated a signaling cascade resulting in the sequential recruitment of p85 subunit of PI3K and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The SchA-FAK-p85 complex subsequently selectively recruited and activated Akt2, not Akt1. Inhibition of the p85 subunit through phosphorylated 1257 peptide completely attenuated EMT in these cells. We have defined the underlying mechanism responsible for isoform-specific recruitment and activation of Akt2, not Akt1, during TGF-β-mediated EMT in A549 cells. Inhibition of the formation of this complex thus represents an important and novel therapeutic target in metastatic lung carcinoma. PMID:24819169

  11. AURA 2: Empowering discovery of post-transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassi, Erik; Re, Angela; Leo, Sara; Tebaldi, Toma; Pasini, Luigi; Peroni, Daniele; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation (PTR) of gene expression is now recognized as a major determinant of cell phenotypes. The recent availability of methods to map protein-RNA interactions in entire transcriptomes such as RIP, CLIP and their variants, together with global polysomal and ribosome profiling techniques, are driving the exponential accumulation of vast amounts of data on mRNA contacts in cells, and of corresponding predictions of PTR events. However, this exceptional quantity of information cannot be exploited at its best to reconstruct potential PTR networks, as it still lies scattered throughout several databases and in isolated reports of single interactions. To address this issue, we developed the second and vastly enhanced version of the Atlas of UTR Regulatory Activity (AURA 2), a meta-database centered on mapping interaction of trans-factors with human and mouse UTRs. AURA 2 includes experimentally demonstrated binding sites for RBPs, ncRNAs, thousands of cis-elements, variations, RNA epigenetics data and more. Its user-friendly interface offers various data-mining features including co-regulation search, network generation and regulatory enrichment testing. Gene expression profiles for many tissues and cell lines can be also combined with these analyses to display only the interactions possible in the system under study. AURA 2 aims at becoming a valuable toolbox for PTR studies and at tracing the road for how PTR network-building tools should be designed. AURA 2 is available at http://aura.science.unitn.it. PMID:26779400

  12. Establishment of a TGFβ-induced post-transcriptional EMT gene signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George S Hussey

    Full Text Available A major challenge in the clinical management of human cancers is to accurately stratify patients according to risk and likelihood of a favorable response. Stratification is confounded by significant phenotypic heterogeneity in some tumor types, often without obvious criteria for subdivision. Despite intensive transcriptional array analyses, the identity and validation of cancer specific 'signature genes' remains elusive, partially because the transcriptome does not mirror the proteome. The simplification associated with transcriptomic profiling does not take into consideration changes in the relative expression among transcripts that arise due to post-transcriptional regulatory events. We have previously shown that TGFβ post-transcriptionally regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT by causing increased expression of two transcripts, Dab2 and ILEI, by modulating hnRNP E1 phosphorylation. Using a genome-wide combinatorial approach involving expression profiling and RIP-Chip analysis, we have identified a cohort of translationally regulated mRNAs that are induced during TGFβ-mediated EMT. Coordinated translational regulation by hnRNP E1 constitutes a post-transcriptional regulon inhibiting the expression of related EMT-facilitating genes, thus enabling the cell to rapidly and coordinately regulate multiple EMT-facilitating genes.

  13. High SINE RNA Expression Correlates with Post-Transcriptional Downregulation of BRCA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bosco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs are non-autonomous retrotransposons that comprise a large fraction of the human genome. SINEs are demethylated in human disease, but whether SINEs become transcriptionally induced and how the resulting transcripts may affect the expression of protein coding genes is unknown. Here, we show that downregulation of the mRNA of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 is associated with increased transcription of SINEs and production of sense and antisense SINE small RNAs. We find that BRCA1 mRNA is post-transcriptionally down-regulated in a Dicer and Drosha dependent manner and that expression of a SINE inverted repeat with sequence identity to a BRCA1 intron is sufficient for downregulation of BRCA1 mRNA. These observations suggest that transcriptional activation of SINEs could contribute to a novel mechanism of RNA mediated post-transcriptional silencing of human genes.

  14. Role of HuR and p38MAPK in ultraviolet B-induced post-transcriptional regulation of COX-2 expression in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernau, Niklas S; Fugmann, Dominik; Leyendecker, Martin; Reimann, Kerstin; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Galban, Stefanie; Ale-Agha, Niloofar; Krutmann, Jean; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2010-02-01

    COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) is a pivotal player in inflammatory processes, and ultraviolet radiation is a known stimulus for COX-2 expression in skin cells. Here, an induction of COX-2 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes was observed only upon exposure of cells to UVB (280-320 nm) but not to UVA radiation (320-400 nm), as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Prostaglandin E(2) levels were elevated in cell culture supernatants of HaCaT cells exposed to UVB. COX-2 mRNA stability was dramatically increased by UVB irradiation. Both the stabilization of COX-2 mRNA and the enhancement of COX-2 steady-state mRNA and protein levels caused by UVB were prevented both by inhibition and small interfering RNA-induced depletion of p38(MAPK), a kinase strongly activated upon exposure to UVB, suggesting p38(MAPK)-dependent mRNA stabilization as a mechanism of UVB-induced COX-2 expression. A dramatic decrease in COX-2 expression induced by UVB was elicited by small interfering RNA-based depletion of a stress-responsive mRNA stabilizing protein regulated by p38(MAPK), i.e. HuR; UVB-induced elevation of COX-2 mRNA and protein levels coincided with an accumulation of HuR in the cytoplasm and was attenuated in cells depleted of HuR. Moreover, UVB-induced generation of prostaglandin E(2) by HaCaT cells was blunted by HuR depletion, suggesting that stress kinases (such as p38(MAPK)) as well as HuR are excellent targets for approaches aiming at interfering with induction of COX-2 expression by UVB. PMID:19917608

  15. Role of HuR and p38MAPK in Ultraviolet B-induced Post-transcriptional Regulation of COX-2 Expression in the Human Keratinocyte Cell Line HaCaT*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernau, Niklas S.; Fugmann, Dominik; Leyendecker, Martin; Reimann, Kerstin; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Galban, Stefanie; Ale-Agha, Niloofar; Krutmann, Jean; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2010-01-01

    COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) is a pivotal player in inflammatory processes, and ultraviolet radiation is a known stimulus for COX-2 expression in skin cells. Here, an induction of COX-2 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes was observed only upon exposure of cells to UVB (280–320 nm) but not to UVA radiation (320–400 nm), as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Prostaglandin E2 levels were elevated in cell culture supernatants of HaCaT cells exposed to UVB. COX-2 mRNA stability was dramatically increased by UVB irradiation. Both the stabilization of COX-2 mRNA and the enhancement of COX-2 steady-state mRNA and protein levels caused by UVB were prevented both by inhibition and small interfering RNA-induced depletion of p38MAPK, a kinase strongly activated upon exposure to UVB, suggesting p38MAPK-dependent mRNA stabilization as a mechanism of UVB-induced COX-2 expression. A dramatic decrease in COX-2 expression induced by UVB was elicited by small interfering RNA-based depletion of a stress-responsive mRNA stabilizing protein regulated by p38MAPK, i.e. HuR; UVB-induced elevation of COX-2 mRNA and protein levels coincided with an accumulation of HuR in the cytoplasm and was attenuated in cells depleted of HuR. Moreover, UVB-induced generation of prostaglandin E2 by HaCaT cells was blunted by HuR depletion, suggesting that stress kinases (such as p38MAPK) as well as HuR are excellent targets for approaches aiming at interfering with induction of COX-2 expression by UVB. PMID:19917608

  16. Eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation mediates fetal hemoglobin induction through a post-transcriptional mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Cynthia K.; Lowrey, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing eIF2α phosphorylation increases fetal hemoglobin in human primary erythroid progenitors via a post-transcriptional mechanism.Combining pharmacologic agents that use transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms additively induces fetal hemoglobin.

  17. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of eEF1A2 expression during myoblast diffrerentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vislovukh A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal development, the switch of the expression from isoform A1 to the isoform A2 of eukaryotic translation elongation factor (eEF1A is observed in neuronal and muscle tissues. The switch of the expression is a vital fundamental process, as mutant mice, with the partial EEF1A2 deletion dies on the 28th day after birth. Mechanism of the inhibition of A1 and stimulation of A2 expression during the first days of postnatal development is unknown. The existence of potential miRNA binding sites in the 3’UTR of mRNAs encoding the isoforms assumes a post-transcriptional control of abovementioned phenomenon. Aim. To check the possibility of post-transcriptional regulation of the isoforms A1 and A2 expression during differentiation of the human immortalized myoblasts cell line LHCN. Methods. The level of gene expression was quantified by qPCR, the existence of post-transcriptional regulation was demonstrated with Dual-Luciferase® Reporter Assay. Results. Using immortalized human myoblasts cell line LHCN, the induction of isoform A2 of eEF1 during differentiation of myoblasts was shown. The existence of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of the abovementioned process was confirmed. Downregulation of mir-661 and mir-744 that have binding sites in the 3’ UTR of EEF1A2 mRNA, during differentiation suggests a potential role of microRNAs in the eEF1A2 induction during myoblast differentiation. Conclusions. Induction of A2 isoform of eEF1 during differentiation of myoblasts occurs on transcriptional and post-transcriptional level.

  18. Regulatory elements involved in the post-transcriptional control of stage-specific gene expression in Trypanosoma cruzi: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R Araújo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, exhibits unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes, RNA editing and trans-splicing. In the absence of mechanism controlling transcription initiation, organized subsets of T. cruzi genes must be post-transcriptionally co-regulated in response to extracellular signals. The mechanisms that regulate stage-specific gene expression in this parasite have become much clearer through sequencing its whole genome as well as performing various proteomic and microarray analyses, which have demonstrated that at least half of the T. cruzi genes are differentially regulated during its life cycle. In this review, we attempt to highlight the recent advances in characterising cis and trans-acting elements in the T. cruzi genome that are involved in its post-transcriptional regulatory machinery.

  19. The post-transcriptional regulatory system CSR controls the balance of metabolic pools in upper glycolysis of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Manon; Ropers, Delphine; Letisse, Fabien; Laguerre, Sandrine; Portais, Jean-Charles; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Enjalbert, Brice

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic control in Escherichia coli is a complex process involving multilevel regulatory systems but the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation is uncertain. The post-transcriptional factor CsrA is stated as being the only regulator essential for the use of glycolytic substrates. A dozen enzymes in the central carbon metabolism (CCM) have been reported as potentially controlled by CsrA, but its impact on the CCM functioning has not been demonstrated. Here, a multiscale analysis was performed in a wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant attenuated for CsrA (including growth parameters, gene expression levels, metabolite pools, abundance of enzymes and fluxes). Data integration and regulation analysis showed a coordinated control of the expression of glycolytic enzymes. This also revealed the imbalance of metabolite pools in the csrA mutant upper glycolysis, before the phosphofructokinase PfkA step. This imbalance is associated with a glucose-phosphate stress. Restoring PfkA activity in the csrA mutant strain suppressed this stress and increased the mutant growth rate on glucose. Thus, the carbon storage regulator system is essential for the effective functioning of the upper glycolysis mainly through its control of PfkA. This work demonstrates the pivotal role of post-transcriptional regulation to shape the carbon metabolism. PMID:26833659

  20. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe

  1. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smialowska, Agata, E-mail: smialowskaa@gmail.com [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Kylsten, Per [School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Swoboda, Peter [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: Karl.Ekwall@ki.se [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  2. Post-transcriptional regulation of dual-specificity phosphatase-1 by RNA-binding protein HuR T118 in heat shock%HuR蛋白118位苏氨酸对热应激状态下的双特异性磷酸酶1的转录后调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张传丽; 罗海华; 姜勇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the post-transcriptional regulation of dual-specificity phosphatase-1 (DUSP1) by the RNA-binding protein HuR in heat shock. Methods The recombinant plasmids carrying wild-type (WT) HuR or its mutants at threonine 118 were constructed and transiently transfected into NIH 3T3 cells via liposome, and the changes in the expressions of DUSP1 mRNA and protein were detected by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results Heat shock caused significantly enhanced phosphorylation of HuR at the residue T118. In 3T3 cells transfected with the plasmids carrying wild-type HuR for its over-expression showed significantly up-regulated DUSP1 mRNA and protein expressions at 24 h after transfection. Over-expression of HuR(T118A) down-regulated DUSP1 mRNA and protein expressions in cells challenged with heat shock, while HuR(T118E) over-expression significantly increased DISP1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. After heat shock, HuR(WT) translocated from the cell nucleus to the cytoplasm to form particles. HuR(T118E) was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm before heat shock and formed particles after heat shock. HuR(T118A) did not undergo such translocation in response to heat shock challenge. Conclusion HuR regulates DUSP1 mRNA and protein expression at the post-transcriptional level to increase its expression after heat shock by enhancing the phosphorylation HuR T118.%目的:探讨RNA结合蛋白HuR 118位苏氨酸对热应激状态下的双特异性磷酸酶1(DUSP1)转录后调控机制。方法构建HuR 118位苏氨酸突变体真核表达质粒,并用脂质体转染NIH 3T3细胞,Real-time PCR检测其对DUSP1 mRNA水平的影响, Western blotting检测其对DUSP1蛋白表达的效应。结果(1)小鼠HuR不同突变体真核表达载体质粒构建成功;(2)热休克刺激后,HuR T118磷酸化明显增强;(3)过表达HuR(WT)与HuR(T118E),经过热休克刺激后,DUSP1 mRNA水平

  3. Dual roles of DNA repair enzymes in RNA biology/post-transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohhodina, Jekaterina; Harkin, D Paul; Savage, Kienan I

    2016-09-01

    Despite consistent research into the molecular principles of the DNA damage repair pathway for almost two decades, it has only recently been found that RNA metabolism is very tightly related to this pathway, and the two ancient biochemical mechanisms act in alliance to maintain cellular genomic integrity. The close links between these pathways are well exemplified by examining the base excision repair pathway, which is now well known for dual roles of many of its members in DNA repair and RNA surveillance, including APE1, SMUG1, and PARP1. With additional links between these pathways steadily emerging, this review aims to provide a summary of the emerging roles for DNA repair proteins in the post-transcriptional regulation of RNAs. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:604-619. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1353 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27126972

  4. Post-transcriptional Stabilization of Ucp1 mRNA Protects Mice from Diet-Induced Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Akinori Takahashi; Shungo Adachi; Masahiro Morita; Miho Tokumasu; Tohru Natsume; Toru Suzuki; Tadashi Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) contributes to thermogenesis, and its expression is regulated at the transcriptional level. Here, we show that Ucp1 expression is also regulated post-transcriptionally. In inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), Ucp1 level decreases concomitantly with increases in Cnot7 and its interacting partner Tob. HFD-fed mice lacking Cnot7 and Tob express elevated levels of Ucp1 mRNA in iWAT and are resistant to diet-induced obesity. Ucp1 mRNA ...

  5. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J.C. Gosline

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq, we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  6. Post-Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression in Mouse Early Embryo Development: A View from the Tip of the Iceberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Sette

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization is a very complex biological process that requires the perfect cooperation between two highly specialized cells: the male and female gametes. The oocyte provides the physical space where this process takes place, most of the energetic need, and half of the genetic contribution. The spermatozoon mostly contributes the other half of the chromosomes and it is specialized to reach and to penetrate the oocyte. Notably, the mouse oocyte and early embryo are transcriptionally inactive. Hence, they fully depend on the maternal mRNAs and proteins stored during oocyte maturation to drive the onset of development. The new embryo develops autonomously around the four-cell stage, when maternal supplies are exhausted and the zygotic genome is activated in mice. This oocyte-to-embryo transition needs an efficient and tightly regulated translation of the maternally-inherited mRNAs, which likely contributes to embryonic genome activation. Full understanding of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in early embryos is crucial to understand the reprogramming of the embryonic genome, it might help driving reprogramming of stem cells in vitro and will likely improve in vitro culturing of mammalian embryos for assisted reproduction. Nevertheless, the knowledge of the mechanism(s underlying this fundamental step in embryogenesis is still scarce, especially if compared to other model organisms. We will review here the current knowledge on the post-transcriptional control of gene expression in mouse early embryos and discuss some of the unanswered questions concerning this fascinating field of biology.

  7. Post-transcriptional control of the mammalian circadian clock: implications for health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-06-01

    Many aspects of human physiology and behavior display rhythmicity with a period of approximately 24 h. Rhythmic changes are controlled by an endogenous time keeper, the circadian clock, and include sleep-wake cycles, physical and mental performance capability, blood pressure, and body temperature. Consequently, many diseases, such as metabolic, sleep, autoimmune and mental disorders and cancer, are connected to the circadian rhythm. The development of therapies that take circadian biology into account is thus a promising strategy to improve treatments of diverse disorders, ranging from allergic syndromes to cancer. Circadian alteration of body functions and behavior are, at the molecular level, controlled and mediated by widespread changes in gene expression that happen in anticipation of predictably changing requirements during the day. At the core of the molecular clockwork is a well-studied transcription-translation negative feedback loop. However, evidence is emerging that additional post-transcriptional, RNA-based mechanisms are required to maintain proper clock function. Here, we will discuss recent work implicating regulated mRNA stability, translation and alternative splicing in the control of the mammalian circadian clock, and its role in health and disease. PMID:27108448

  8. Organization and post-transcriptional processing of focal adhesion kinase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enslen Hervé

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase critical for processes ranging from embryo development to cancer progression. Although isoforms with specific molecular and functional properties have been characterized in rodents and chicken, the organization of FAK gene throughout phylogeny and its potential to generate multiple isoforms are not well understood. Here, we study the phylogeny of FAK, the organization of its gene, and its post-transcriptional processing in rodents and human. Results A single orthologue of FAK and the related PYK2 was found in non-vertebrate species. Gene duplication probably occurred in deuterostomes after the echinoderma embranchment, leading to the evolution of PYK2 with distinct properties. The amino acid sequence of FAK and PYK2 is conserved in their functional domains but not in their linker regions, with the absence of autophosphorylation site in C. elegans. Comparison of mouse and human FAK genes revealed the existence of multiple combinations of conserved and non-conserved 5'-untranslated exons in FAK transcripts suggesting a complex regulation of their expression. Four alternatively spliced coding exons (13, 14, 16, and 31, previously described in rodents, are highly conserved in vertebrates. Cis-regulatory elements known to regulate alternative splicing were found in conserved alternative exons of FAK or in the flanking introns. In contrast, other reported human variant exons were restricted to Homo sapiens, and, in some cases, other primates. Several of these non-conserved exons may correspond to transposable elements. The inclusion of conserved alternative exons was examined by RT-PCR in mouse and human brain during development. Inclusion of exons 14 and 16 peaked at the end of embryonic life, whereas inclusion of exon 13 increased steadily until adulthood. Study of various tissues showed that inclusion of these exons also occurred, independently from each other, in a

  9. Post-transcriptional Boolean computation by combining aptazymes controlling mRNA translation initiation and tRNA activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauser, Benedikt; Saragliadis, Athanasios; Ausländer, Simon; Wieland, Markus; Berthold, Michael R; Hartig, Jörg S

    2012-09-01

    In cellular systems environmental and metabolic signals are integrated for the conditional control of gene expression. On the other hand, artificial manipulation of gene expression is of high interest for metabolic and genetic engineering. Especially the reprogramming of gene expression patterns to orchestrate cellular responses in a predictable fashion is considered to be of great importance. Here we introduce a highly modular RNA-based system for performing Boolean logic computation at a post-transcriptional level in Escherichia coli. We have previously shown that artificial riboswitches can be constructed by utilizing ligand-dependent Hammerhead ribozymes (aptazymes). Employing RNA self-cleavage as the expression platform-mechanism of an artificial riboswitch has the advantage that it can be applied to control several classes of RNAs such as mRNAs, tRNAs, and rRNAs. Due to the highly modular and orthogonal nature of these switches it is possible to combine aptazyme regulation of activating a suppressor tRNA with the regulation of mRNA translation initiation. The different RNA classes can be controlled individually by using distinct aptamers for individual RNA switches. Boolean logic devices are assembled by combining such switches in order to act on the expression of a single mRNA. In order to demonstrate the high modularity, a series of two-input Boolean logic operators were constructed. For this purpose, we expanded our aptazyme toolbox with switches comprising novel behaviours with respect to the small molecule triggers thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and theophylline. Then, individual switches were combined to yield AND, NOR, and ANDNOT gates. This study demonstrates that post-transcriptional aptazyme-based switches represent versatile tools for engineering advanced genetic devices and circuits without the need for regulatory protein cofactors. PMID:22777205

  10. Post-transcriptional protein modification of Gata4%Gata4转录后蛋白共价修饰

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞立玮

    2012-01-01

    Gata4是心脏发育重要的转录因子,其转录活性和DNA亲和力受转录后蛋白共价修饰的调节,并影响下游目的基因和相关转录因子表达,胚胎干细胞分化,心肌细胞生长和心脏发育.该文总结Gata4转录后蛋白共价修饰对其转录活性的影响,寻找其与心脏发育和先天性心脏病( congenital heart disease,CHD)的关系.结果发现乙酰化、磷酸化、SUMO化使其转录活性和DNA亲和力升高,下游基因表达上升,促进胚胎干细胞分化等呈正性调节;去乙酰化和甲基化下调Gata4转录活性,呈负性调节.因此,Gata4蛋白共价修饰对研究先天性心脏病及其他一些心脏疾病有重要的临床意义.%Gata4 is an important transcription factor in heart development. Gata4 post-transcriptional protein modification regulates transcriptional activity and DNA binding, which in turn affects expression of downstream genes and transcription factors, differentiation of embryonic stem cells and cardiogenesis. This article summarizes the effect of post-transcriptional protein modification on transcriptional activity of Gata4 and the relationship between this effect and congenital heart disease. It was shown that acetylation, phosphorylation and SUMOylation upregulate transcriptiona) activity, DNA binding, downstream gene expression and embryonic stem cell differentiation. On the other hand, methylation and deacetylation downregulate Gata4 transcriptional activity. Post-transcriptional protein modification of Gata4 is very important in clinical research on congenital and other heart diseases.

  11. Post-transcriptional repair of a split heat shock protein 90 gene by mRNA trans-splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Roy, Nainita; Hehl, Adrian B; Tatu, Utpal

    2011-03-01

    Heat shock protein 90 participates in diverse biological processes ranging from protein folding, cell cycle, signal transduction and development to evolution in all eukaryotes. It is also critically involved in regulating growth of protozoa such as Dictyostelium discoideum, Leishmania donovani, Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma evansi. Selective inhibition of Hsp90 has also been explored as an intervention strategy against important human diseases such as cancer, malaria, or trypanosomiasis. Giardia lamblia, a simple protozoan parasite of humans and animals, is an important cause of diarrheal disease with significant morbidity and some mortality in tropical countries. Here we show that the G. lamblia cytosolic hsp90 (glhsp90) is split in two similar sized fragments located 777 kb apart on the same scaffold. Intrigued by this unique arrangement, which appears to be specific for the Giardiinae, we have investigated the biosynthesis of GlHsp90. We used genome sequencing to confirm the split nature of the giardial hsp90. However, a specific antibody raised against the peptide detected a product with a mass of about 80 kDa, suggesting a post-transcriptional rescue of the genomic defect. We show evidence for the joining of the two independent Hsp90 transcripts in-trans to one long mature mRNA presumably by RNA splicing. The splicing junction carries hallmarks of classical cis-spliced introns, suggesting that the regular cis-splicing machinery may be sufficient for repair of the open reading frame. A complementary 26-nt sequence in the "intron" regions adjacent to the splice sites may assist in positioning the two pre-mRNAs for processing. This is the first example of post-transcriptional rescue of a split gene by trans-splicing. PMID:21209094

  12. Post-transcriptional Repair of a Split Heat Shock Protein 90 Gene by mRNA trans-Splicing*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Roy, Nainita; Hehl, Adrian B.; Tatu, Utpal

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 participates in diverse biological processes ranging from protein folding, cell cycle, signal transduction and development to evolution in all eukaryotes. It is also critically involved in regulating growth of protozoa such as Dictyostelium discoideum, Leishmania donovani, Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma evansi. Selective inhibition of Hsp90 has also been explored as an intervention strategy against important human diseases such as cancer, malaria, or trypanosomiasis. Giardia lamblia, a simple protozoan parasite of humans and animals, is an important cause of diarrheal disease with significant morbidity and some mortality in tropical countries. Here we show that the G. lamblia cytosolic hsp90 (glhsp90) is split in two similar sized fragments located 777 kb apart on the same scaffold. Intrigued by this unique arrangement, which appears to be specific for the Giardiinae, we have investigated the biosynthesis of GlHsp90. We used genome sequencing to confirm the split nature of the giardial hsp90. However, a specific antibody raised against the peptide detected a product with a mass of about 80 kDa, suggesting a post-transcriptional rescue of the genomic defect. We show evidence for the joining of the two independent Hsp90 transcripts in-trans to one long mature mRNA presumably by RNA splicing. The splicing junction carries hallmarks of classical cis-spliced introns, suggesting that the regular cis-splicing machinery may be sufficient for repair of the open reading frame. A complementary 26-nt sequence in the “intron” regions adjacent to the splice sites may assist in positioning the two pre-mRNAs for processing. This is the first example of post-transcriptional rescue of a split gene by trans-splicing. PMID:21209094

  13. Post-transcriptional Silencing and Functional Characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Homolog of Human Surf1

    OpenAIRE

    Zordan, Mauro A.; Cisotto, Paola; Benna, Clara; Agostino, Alessandro; Rizzo, Giorgia; Piccin, Alberto; Pegoraro, Mirko; Sandrelli, Federica; Perini, Giuliana; Tognon, Giuseppe; De Caro, Raffaele; Peron, Samantha; Kronniè, Truus te; Megighian, Aram; REGGIANI, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in Surf1, a human gene involved in the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), cause Leigh syndrome, the most common infantile mitochondrial encephalopathy, characterized by a specific COX deficiency. We report the generation and characterization of functional knockdown (KD) lines for Surf1 in Drosophila. KD was produced by post-transcriptional silencing employing a transgene encoding a dsRNA fragment of the Drosophila homolog of human Surf1, activated by the UAS transcriptional act...

  14. Post-transcriptional gene silencing signal could move rapidly and bidirectionally in grafted Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming; JIANG Shiling; WANG Youqun; LIU Guoqin

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), one of the newly found ways for post-transcriptional gene silencing, has been widely used to investigate gene functions through transgenic methods for introducing an RNA silencing signal into plants. In the present study, we constructed a dexamethazone (DEX)-inducible RNAi binary vector harboring a specific sequence fragment (168-bp) homologous to KatB and KatC, two kinesin isoform genes of Arabidopsis, which were proved to result in the post-transcriptional gene silencing of KatB and KatC in DEX-induced transgenic plants. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis on transgenic homozygous Arabidopsis (termed as RNAi-type plants) showed that DEX inducement causes KatB and KatC mRNA degradation. With a simplified method, Arabidopsis grafting was effectively performed between RNAi-type and wild-type lines. The target gene mRNA levels were tested based on semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Our results demonstrateed that DEX-induced gene silencing signals could result in a reduction in KatB and KatC mRNA in the wild-type rootstocks or scions, indicating that silencing signals of RNAi could be transmitted bidirectionally across the graft junction whether RNAi-plants were scions or stocks. In contrast to the previously reported results on grafted tobacco, the transmission of post- transcriptional gene silencing signals caused by RNAi in grafted Arabidopsis is more effective than that in tobacco.

  15. A novel post-transcriptional splicing form of the acute T cell leukemia proto-oncogene Lmo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Lmo2 is a T cell leukemia-related proto-oncogene, which belongs to the LIM protein family. Previous work has established its key role in yolk sac erythropoiesis and adult hematopoiesis, and it is also necessary for regulating angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that this gene encodes a protein of 158 amino acids, consisting of two tandem cysteine-rich LIM domains, but the detailed mechanism of its transcriptional regulation remains to be elucidated. To further investigate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of Lmo2, we combined SMART PCR technology with 5′RACE and found a novel post-transcriptional splicing form of Lmo2 in adult human kidney. This alternative transcript contains only two exons, encoding a smaller protein of 151 amino acids. Interestingly, it shares the same reading frame as the original Lmo2, but differs in 7 amino acids at the N-terminus. A genomic DNA fragment (from ?294 nts to +180 nts) containing the putative promoter region has been inserted into the luciferase reporter gene vector pGL3-basic and showed stable promoter activity when transfected into COS7. RT-PCR analysis revealed that this variant transcript was expressed widely in human tissues and cell lines, suggesting its potential basic functional importance.

  16. RNase L Attenuates Mitogen-stimulated Gene Expression via Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Mechanisms to Limit the Proliferative Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E.; Li, Xiao-Ling; Ezelle, Heather J.; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Blackshear, Perry J.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Hassel, Bret A.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular response to mitogens is tightly regulated via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to rapidly induce genes that promote proliferation and efficiently attenuate their expression to prevent malignant growth. RNase L is an endoribonuclease that mediates diverse antiproliferative activities, and tristetraprolin (TTP) is a mitogen-induced RNA-binding protein that directs the decay of proliferation-stimulatory mRNAs. In light of their roles as endogenous proliferative constraints, we examined the mechanisms and functional interactions of RNase L and TTP to attenuate a mitogenic response. Mitogen stimulation of RNase L-deficient cells significantly increased TTP transcription and the induction of other mitogen-induced mRNAs. This regulation corresponded with elevated expression of serum-response factor (SRF), a master regulator of mitogen-induced transcription. RNase L destabilized the SRF transcript and formed a complex with SRF mRNA in cells providing a mechanism by which RNase L down-regulates SRF-induced genes. TTP and RNase L proteins interacted in cells suggesting that RNase L is directed to cleave TTP-bound RNAs as a mechanism of substrate specificity. Consistent with their concerted function in RNA turnover, the absence of either RNase L or TTP stabilized SRF mRNA, and a subset of established TTP targets was also regulated by RNase L. RNase L deficiency enhanced mitogen-induced proliferation demonstrating its functional role in limiting the mitogenic response. Our findings support a model of feedback regulation in which RNase L and TTP target SRF mRNA and SRF-induced transcripts. Accordingly, meta-analysis revealed an enrichment of RNase L and TTP targets among SRF-regulated genes suggesting that the RNase L/TTP axis represents a viable target to inhibit SRF-driven proliferation in neoplastic diseases. PMID:25301952

  17. RNase L attenuates mitogen-stimulated gene expression via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to limit the proliferative response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Laun, Sarah E; Li, Xiao-Ling; Ezelle, Heather J; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Blackshear, Perry J; Wilson, Gerald M; Hassel, Bret A

    2014-11-28

    The cellular response to mitogens is tightly regulated via transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to rapidly induce genes that promote proliferation and efficiently attenuate their expression to prevent malignant growth. RNase L is an endoribonuclease that mediates diverse antiproliferative activities, and tristetraprolin (TTP) is a mitogen-induced RNA-binding protein that directs the decay of proliferation-stimulatory mRNAs. In light of their roles as endogenous proliferative constraints, we examined the mechanisms and functional interactions of RNase L and TTP to attenuate a mitogenic response. Mitogen stimulation of RNase L-deficient cells significantly increased TTP transcription and the induction of other mitogen-induced mRNAs. This regulation corresponded with elevated expression of serum-response factor (SRF), a master regulator of mitogen-induced transcription. RNase L destabilized the SRF transcript and formed a complex with SRF mRNA in cells providing a mechanism by which RNase L down-regulates SRF-induced genes. TTP and RNase L proteins interacted in cells suggesting that RNase L is directed to cleave TTP-bound RNAs as a mechanism of substrate specificity. Consistent with their concerted function in RNA turnover, the absence of either RNase L or TTP stabilized SRF mRNA, and a subset of established TTP targets was also regulated by RNase L. RNase L deficiency enhanced mitogen-induced proliferation demonstrating its functional role in limiting the mitogenic response. Our findings support a model of feedback regulation in which RNase L and TTP target SRF mRNA and SRF-induced transcripts. Accordingly, meta-analysis revealed an enrichment of RNase L and TTP targets among SRF-regulated genes suggesting that the RNase L/TTP axis represents a viable target to inhibit SRF-driven proliferation in neoplastic diseases. PMID:25301952

  18. Post-Transcriptional Coordination of the Arabidopsis Iron Deficiency Response is Partially Dependent on the E3 Ligases RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, I-Chun; Tsai, Huei-Hsuan; Cheng, Ya-Tan; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Buckhout, Thomas J; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Acclimation to changing environmental conditions is mediated by proteins, the abundance of which is carefully tuned by an elaborate interplay of DNA-templated and post-transcriptional processes. To dissect the mechanisms that control and mediate cellular iron homeostasis, we conducted quantitative high-resolution iTRAQ proteomics and microarray-based transcriptomic profiling of iron-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana plants. A total of 13,706 and 12,124 proteins was identified with a quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in roots and leaves, respectively. This deep proteomic coverage allowed accurate estimates of post-transcriptional regulation in response to iron deficiency. Similarly regulated transcripts were detected in only 13% (roots) and 11% (leaves) of the 886 proteins that differentially accumulated between iron-sufficient and iron-deficient plants, indicating that the majority of the iron-responsive proteins was post-transcriptionally regulated. Mutants harboring defects in the RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1)(1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2) showed a pleiotropic phenotype that resembled iron-deficient plants with reduced trichome density and the formation of branched root hairs. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of rglg1 rglg2 double mutants revealed that the functional RGLG protein is required for the regulation of a large set of iron-responsive proteins including the coordinated expression of ribosomal proteins. This integrative analysis provides a detailed catalog of post-transcriptionally regulated proteins and allows the concept of a chiefly transcriptionally regulated iron deficiency response to be revisited. Protein data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002126. PMID:26253232

  19. Post-transcriptional control of nuclear-encoded cytochrome oxidase subunits in Trypanosoma brucei: evidence for genome-wide conservation of life-cycle stage-specific regulatory elements

    OpenAIRE

    Mayho, Matthew; Fenn, Katelyn; Craddy, Paul; Crosthwaite, Susan; Matthews, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Trypanosomes represent an excellent model for the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression because their genome is organized into polycistronic transcription units. However, few signals governing developmental stage-specific expression have been identified, with there being no compelling evidence for widespread conservation of regulatory motifs. As a tool to search for common regulatory sequences we have used the nuclear-encoded components of the cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex of ...

  20. Post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA associated with DJ-1 in Sporadic Parkinson disease

    OpenAIRE

    Blackinton, Jeff; Kumaran, Ravindran; van der Brug, Marcel P.; Ahmad, Rili; Olson, Lars; Galter, Dagmar; Lees, Andrew; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Cookson, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in DJ-1 lead to a monogenic form of early onset recessive parkinsonism. DJ-1 can respond to oxidative stress, which has been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD). We have recently reported that DJ-1 interacts with mRNA in an oxidation dependent manner. Here, we confirm interaction of DJ-1 and RNA in human brain using immunoprecipitation followed by quantitative real time PCR. We confirmed previous reports that DJ-1 is more oxidized in cortex...

  1. A structurally plastic ribonucleoprotein complex mediates post-transcriptional gene regulation in HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Jason D; Booth, David S; Frankel, Alan D

    2016-07-01

    HIV replication requires the nuclear export of essential, intron-containing viral RNAs. To facilitate export, HIV encodes the viral accessory protein Rev which binds unspliced and partially spliced viral RNAs and creates a ribonucleoprotein complex that recruits the cellular Chromosome maintenance factor 1 export machinery. Exporting RNAs in this manner bypasses the necessity for complete splicing as a prerequisite for mRNA export, and allows intron-containing RNAs to reach the cytoplasm intact for translation and virus packaging. Recent structural studies have revealed that this entire complex exhibits remarkable plasticity at many levels of organization, including RNA folding, protein-RNA recognition, multimer formation, and host factor recruitment. In this review, we explore each aspect of plasticity from structural, functional, and possible therapeutic viewpoints. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:470-486. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1342 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26929078

  2. Aedes aegypti midgut early trypsin is post-transcriptionally regulated by blood feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriega, F G; Pennington, J E; Barillas-Mury, C; Wang, X Y; Wells, M A

    1996-02-01

    Early trypsin is a female-specific protease present in the Aedes aegypti midgut during the first hours after ingestion of a blood meal. Early trypsin gene expression was studied by Northern blot analysis. The early trypsin mRNA, absent in larvae, pupae and newly emerged females, reaches detectable levels at 24 h post-emergence and attains a maximum level at an adult age of 4-7 days. After the first week there is a decrease in the steady-state level of the transcript, but it remains readily detectable for up to a month after emergence. Despite the high levels of early trypsin mRNA present in the midgut of the unfed female, translation of the early trypsin mRNA occurs only after a blood or a protein meal. Early trypsin mRNA levels rapidly decrease during the first 24 h after feeding, but the steady-state level of the transcript rises again at the end of the blood digestion cycle (60 h), as the mosquito prepares for a second blood meal. PMID:8630532

  3. Elongation factor P mediates a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Roy, Hervé; Ibba, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens detect and integrate multiple environmental signals to coordinate appropriate changes in gene expression including the selective expression of virulence factors, changes to metabolism and the activation of stress response systems. Mutations that abolish the ability of the...... lysine residue in the translation factor elongation factor P (EF-P). Strains in which EF-P is unmodified due to the absence of PoxA or YjeK are attenuated for virulence and display highly pleiotropic phenotypes, including hypersusceptibility to a wide range of unrelated antimicrobial compounds. Work from...... pathogen to respond to external cues are typically attenuating. Here we discuss our recent discovery of a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for Salmonella virulence and stress resistance. The enzymes PoxA and YjeK coordinately attach a unique beta-amino acid onto a highly conserved...

  4. Nuclear-encoded factors involved in post-transcriptional processing and modification of mitochondrial tRNAs in human disease

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Christopher A.; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) encodes 22 tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) that are necessary for the intraorganellar translation of the 13 mtDNA-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Maturation of mt-tRNAs involves 5′ and 3′ nucleolytic excision from precursor RNAs, as well as extensive post-transcriptional modifications. Recent data suggest that over 7% of all mt-tRNA residues in mammals undergo post-transcriptional modification, with over 30 different modified mt-tRNA ...

  5. Global Epitranscriptomics Profiling of RNA Post-Transcriptional Modifications as an Effective Tool for Investigating the Epitranscriptomics of Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Rebecca E; Pazos, Manuel A; Curcio, M Joan; Fabris, Daniele

    2016-03-01

    The simultaneous detection of all the post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) that decorate cellular RNA can provide comprehensive information on the effects of changing environmental conditions on the entire epitranscriptome. To capture this type of information, we performed the analysis of ribonucleotide mixtures produced by hydrolysis of total RNA extracts from S. cerevisiae that was grown under hyperosmotic and heat shock conditions. Their global PTM profiles clearly indicated that the cellular responses to these types of stresses involved profound changes in the production of specific PTMs. The observed changes involved not only up-/down-regulation of typical PTMs, but also the outright induction of new ones that were absent under normal conditions, or the elimination of others that were normally present. Pointing toward the broad involvement of different classes of RNAs, many of the newly observed PTMs differed from those engaged in the known tRNA-based mechanism of translational recoding, which is induced by oxidative stress. Some of the expression effects were stress-specific, whereas others were not, thus suggesting that RNA PTMs may perform multifaceted activities in stress response, which are subjected to distinctive regulatory pathways. To explore their signaling networks, we implemented a strategy based on the systematic deletion of genes that connect established response genes with PTM biogenetic enzymes in a putative interactomic map. The results clearly identified PTMs that were under direct HOG control, a well-known protein kinase pathway involved in stress response in eukaryotes. Activation of this signaling pathway has been shown to result in the stabilization of numerous mRNAs and the induction of selected lncRNAs involved in chromatin remodeling. The fact that PTMs are capable of altering the activity of the parent RNAs suggest their possible participation in feedback mechanisms aimed at modulating the regulatory functions of such RNAs. This

  6. Post-transcriptional silencing of flavonol synthase mRNA in tobacco leads to fruits with arrested seed set.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Mahajan

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are synthesized by phenylpropanoid pathway. They are known to participate in large number of physiological and biochemical processes in plants. Parthenocarpy and male sterility has earlier been reported by silencing chalcone synthase (CHS encoding gene. Silencing of CHS has blocked the synthesis of most of useful flavonoids including flavan-3-ols and flavonols. Also, these studies could not identify whether parthenocarpy/male sterility were due to lack of flavan-3-ols or flavonols or both. Flavonol synthase (FLS is an important enzyme of flavonoid pathway that catalyzes the formation of flavonols. In this article, we propose a novel strategy towards the generation of seedless or less-seeded fruits by downregulation of flavonol biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS of FLS encoding mRNA. The FLS silenced lines were observed for 20-80% reduction in FLS encoding gene expression and 25-93% reduction in flavonol (quercetin content. Interestingly, these FLS silenced tobacco lines also showed reduction in their anthocyanidins content. While the content of flavan-3-ols (catechin, epi-catechin and epi-gallocatechin was found to be increased in FLS silenced lines. The delayed flowering in FLS silenced lines could be due to decrease in level of indole acetic acid (IAA at apical region of their shoots. Furthermore, the pollen germination was hampered and pollens were unable to produce functional pollen tube in FLS silenced tobacco lines. Pods of FLS silenced lines contained significantly less number of seeds. The in vitro and in vivo studies where 1 µM quercetin was supplied to germination media, documented the restoration of normal pollen germination and pollen tube growth. This finding identified the role of flavonols particularly quercetin in pollen germination as well as in the regulation of plant fertility. Results also suggest a novel approach towards generation of seedless

  7. Post-transcriptional silencing of flavonol synthase mRNA in tobacco leads to fruits with arrested seed set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Monika; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Flavonoids are synthesized by phenylpropanoid pathway. They are known to participate in large number of physiological and biochemical processes in plants. Parthenocarpy and male sterility has earlier been reported by silencing chalcone synthase (CHS) encoding gene. Silencing of CHS has blocked the synthesis of most of useful flavonoids including flavan-3-ols and flavonols. Also, these studies could not identify whether parthenocarpy/male sterility were due to lack of flavan-3-ols or flavonols or both. Flavonol synthase (FLS) is an important enzyme of flavonoid pathway that catalyzes the formation of flavonols. In this article, we propose a novel strategy towards the generation of seedless or less-seeded fruits by downregulation of flavonol biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of FLS encoding mRNA. The FLS silenced lines were observed for 20-80% reduction in FLS encoding gene expression and 25-93% reduction in flavonol (quercetin) content. Interestingly, these FLS silenced tobacco lines also showed reduction in their anthocyanidins content. While the content of flavan-3-ols (catechin, epi-catechin and epi-gallocatechin) was found to be increased in FLS silenced lines. The delayed flowering in FLS silenced lines could be due to decrease in level of indole acetic acid (IAA) at apical region of their shoots. Furthermore, the pollen germination was hampered and pollens were unable to produce functional pollen tube in FLS silenced tobacco lines. Pods of FLS silenced lines contained significantly less number of seeds. The in vitro and in vivo studies where 1 µM quercetin was supplied to germination media, documented the restoration of normal pollen germination and pollen tube growth. This finding identified the role of flavonols particularly quercetin in pollen germination as well as in the regulation of plant fertility. Results also suggest a novel approach towards generation of seedless

  8. Preliminary identification and analysis of point mutations corre-lated with response to interferon-α in hepatitis B virus post-transcriptional regulatory elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Tong-jing; LUO Kang-xian; HOU Jin-lin

    2005-01-01

    Background It is still unclear whether viral genetic variability influences response to interferon(IFN)-α treatment. Recent reports suggest that IFN-α effects may be associated with hepatitis B virus(HBV) post-transcriptional regulation. This study was designed to explore the heterogeneity of HBV post-transcriptional regulatory elements (HPRE) and the relationship between the diversity of HPRE and the response to IFN-α treatment. Methods The HPRE sequences from 31 Chinese patients infected with HBV were determined by directly sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product, and comparing them to those from Caucasian patients. Subsequently, eukaryotic expression vectors containing HPRE at various points were constructed and transfected into HepG2 cells, which were then exposed to recombinant human cytokines. Results The T to C point mutation at nt 1504 and the C to T (G) at nt 1508 in HPRE were found in 21 and 19 patients with chronic hepatitis B, respectively; the C to T point mutation at nt 1509 was found in 17 patients. These point mutations did not exist in the HPRE of the Caucasian patients. The activity of the CAT gene obviously increased in the case of T to C point mutation at nt 1504, but did not change in the case of the C to T (G) mutations at nt 1508 and 1509. The activity of the CAT gene at these point mutations of HPRE could be inhibited by IFN-α/γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α except for the point mutations at nt 1508 of HPRE which may escape the suppression role of IFN-α on HPRE. Conclusions There are point mutations between the HPRE of Chinese and Caucasian HBV patients, which might be correlated with response to IFN-α. The variation of HPRE might affect the function of HPRE and influence the regulative function of IFN-α other than that of IFN-γ or TNF-α on HPRE.

  9. Post-transcriptional silencing and functional characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of human Surf1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordan, Mauro A; Cisotto, Paola; Benna, Clara; Agostino, Alessandro; Rizzo, Giorgia; Piccin, Alberto; Pegoraro, Mirko; Sandrelli, Federica; Perini, Giuliana; Tognon, Giuseppe; De Caro, Raffaele; Peron, Samantha; Kronniè, Truus Te; Megighian, Aram; Reggiani, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Costa, Rodolfo

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in Surf1, a human gene involved in the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), cause Leigh syndrome, the most common infantile mitochondrial encephalopathy, characterized by a specific COX deficiency. We report the generation and characterization of functional knockdown (KD) lines for Surf1 in Drosophila. KD was produced by post-transcriptional silencing employing a transgene encoding a dsRNA fragment of the Drosophila homolog of human Surf1, activated by the UAS transcriptional activator. Two alternative drivers, Actin5C-GAL4 or elav-GAL4, were used to induce silencing ubiquitously or in the CNS, respectively. Actin5C-GAL4 KD produced 100% egg-to-adult lethality. Most individuals died as larvae, which were sluggish and small. The few larvae reaching the pupal stage died as early imagos. Electron microscopy of larval muscles showed severely altered mitochondria. elav-GAL4-driven KD individuals developed to adulthood, although cephalic sections revealed low COX-specific activity. Behavioral and electrophysiological abnormalities were detected, including reduced photoresponsiveness in KD larvae using either driver, reduced locomotor speed in Actin5C-GAL4 KD larvae, and impaired optomotor response as well as abnormal electroretinograms in elav-GAL4 KD flies. These results indicate important functions for SURF1 specifically related to COX activity and suggest a crucial role of mitochondrial energy pathways in organogenesis and CNS development and function. PMID:16172499

  10. Leigh syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster: morphological and biochemical characterization of Surf1 post-transcriptional silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da-Rè, Caterina; von Stockum, Sophia; Biscontin, Alberto; Millino, Caterina; Cisotto, Paola; Zordan, Mauro A; Zeviani, Massimo; Bernardi, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Costa, Rodolfo

    2014-10-17

    Leigh Syndrome (LS) is the most common early-onset, progressive mitochondrial encephalopathy usually leading to early death. The single most prevalent cause of LS is occurrence of mutations in the SURF1 gene, and LS(Surf1) patients show a ubiquitous and specific decrease in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase, COX). SURF1 encodes an inner membrane mitochondrial protein involved in COX assembly. We established a Drosophila melanogaster model of LS based on the post-transcriptional silencing of CG9943, the Drosophila homolog of SURF1. Knockdown of Surf1 was induced ubiquitously in larvae and adults, which led to lethality; in the mesodermal derivatives, which led to pupal lethality; or in the central nervous system, which allowed survival. A biochemical characterization was carried out in knockdown individuals, which revealed that larvae unexpectedly displayed defects in all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and in the F-ATP synthase, while adults had a COX-selective impairment. Silencing of Surf1 expression in Drosophila S2R(+) cells led to selective loss of COX activity associated with decreased oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve. We conclude that Surf1 is essential for COX activity and mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster, thus providing a new tool that may help clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of LS. PMID:25164807

  11. Post-transcriptional block in oxytocin gene expression within the seminiferous tubules of the bovine testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungefroren, H; Davidoff, M; Ivell, R

    1994-01-01

    Northern blot hybridization showed that bovine and sheep testis, unlike testes from other mammals, contain moderate levels of an apparently normal oxytocin gene transcript. In situ hybridization localized this mRNA to within the seminiferous tubules, possibly in the Sertoli cells. Conflicting with this result, immunohistochemistry showed that both oxytocin and the syngeneic neurophysin I epitopes are both clearly restricted to the Leydig cells, being expressed here at a low level. Since illegitimate transcription from spurious start sites can lead to a lack of translation product, the integrity of the major ruminant testicular transcripts of the oxytocin gene was checked using differential hybridization. RNase protection and multiple polymerase chain reaction assays. All tests showed the transcripts to have a normal, translatable composition and to be transcribed from the conventional 5' initiation site. Therefore, the block in oxytocin gene expression within the tubules is probably due to a lesion at the post-transcriptional level. The low level peptide expression in the Leydig cells can probably be attributed to the presence of functional transcripts in these cells, which are below the level of significant detection for the in situ hybridization assay. PMID:8138753

  12. The cystic-fibrosis-associated ΔF508 mutation confers post-transcriptional destabilization on the C. elegans ABC transporter PGP-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping He

    2012-11-01

    Membrane proteins make up ∼30% of the proteome. During the early stages of maturation, this class of proteins can experience localized misfolding in distinct cellular compartments, such as the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum (ER lumen and ER membrane. ER quality control (ERQC mechanisms monitor folding and determine whether a membrane protein is appropriately folded or is misfolded and warrants degradation. ERQC plays crucial roles in human diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, in which deletion of a single amino acid (F508 results in the misfolding and degradation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR Cl– channel. We introduced the ΔF508 mutation into Caenorhabditis elegans PGP-3, a 12-transmembrane ABC transporter with 15% identity to CFTR. When expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, PGP-3wt was stable and efficiently trafficked to the apical plasma membrane through a COPII-dependent mechanism. However, PGP-3ΔF508 was post-transcriptionally destabilized, resulting in reduced total and apical membrane protein levels. Genetic or physiological activation of the osmotic stress response pathway, which causes accumulation of the chemical chaperone glycerol, stabilized PGP-3ΔF508. Efficient degradation of PGP-3ΔF508 required the function of several C. elegans ER-associated degradation (ERAD homologs, suggesting that destabilization occurs through an ERAD-type mechanism. Our studies show that the ΔF508 mutation causes post-transcriptional destabilization and degradation of PGP-3 in C. elegans epithelial cells. This model, combined with the power of C. elegans genetics, provides a new opportunity to genetically dissect metazoan ERQC.

  13. A single transgene locus triggers both transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing through double-stranded RNA production

    OpenAIRE

    Mourrain, Philippe; Blokland, van, R.; Kooter, Jan; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2007-01-01

    Silencing of a target locus by an unlinked silencing locus can result from transcription inhibition (transcriptional gene silencing; TGS) or mRNA degradation (post-transcriptional gene silencing; PTGS), owing to the production of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) corresponding to promoter or transcribed sequences, respectively. The involvement of distinct cellular components in each process suggests that dsRNA-induced TGS and PTGS likely result from the diversification of an ancient common mechanis...

  14. Identification of novel microRNAs in post-transcriptional control of Nrf2 expression and redox homeostasis in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhanan Narasimhan

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/NFE2L2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor plays a critical role in adaptation to cellular stress and affords cellular defense by initiating transcription of antioxidative and detoxification genes. While a protein can be regulated at multiple levels, control of Nrf2 has been largely studied at post-translational regulation points by Keap1. Importantly, post-transcriptional/translational based regulation of Nrf2 is less understood and to date there are no reports on such mechanisms in neuronal systems. In this context, studies involving the role of microRNAs (miRs which are normally considered as fine tuning regulators of protein production through translation repression and/or post-transcriptional alterations, are in place. In the current study, based on in-silico analysis followed by immunoblotting and real time analysis, we have identified and validated for the first time that human NFE2L2 could be targeted by miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells. Co-transfection studies with individual miR mimics along with either WT 3' UTR of human Nrf2 or mutated miRNA targeting seed sequence within Nrf2 3' UTR, demonstrated that Nrf2 is a direct regulatory target of these miRs. In addition, ectopic expression of miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 affected Nrf2 mRNA abundance and nucleo-cytoplasmic concentration of Nrf2 in a Keap1 independent manner resulting in inefficient transactivating ability of Nrf2. Furthermore, forced expression of miRs diminished GCLC and GSR expression resulting in alteration of Nrf2 dependent redox homeostasis. Finally, bioinformatics based miRNA-disease network analysis (MDN along with extended computational network analysis of Nrf2 associated pathologic processes suggests that if in a particular cellular scenario where any of these miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 either individually or as a group is altered, it could affect Nrf2 thus triggering and

  15. Tobacco streak virus (strain dahlia) suppresses post-transcriptional gene silencing of flavone synthase II in black dahlia cultivars and causes a drastic flower color change.

    OpenAIRE

    Deguchi, Ayumi; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Doi, Motoaki; Ohno, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco streak virus suppressed post-transcriptional gene silencing and caused a flower color change in black dahlias, which supported the role of cyanidin-based anthocyanins for black flower appearance. Black flower color of dahlia (Dahlia variabilis) has been attributed, in part, to the high accumulation of cyanidin-based anthocyanins that occurs when flavone synthesis is reduced because of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of flavone synthase II (DvFNS). There are also purple-flow...

  16. SSR markers in transcripts of genes linked to post-transcriptional and transcriptional regulatory functions during vegetative and reproductive development of Elaeis guineensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tranbarger Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. is a perennial monocotyledonous tropical crop species that is now the world's number one source of edible vegetable oil, and the richest dietary source of provitamin A. While new elite genotypes from traditional breeding programs provide steady yield increases, the long selection cycle (10-12 years and the large areas required to cultivate oil palm make genetic improvement slow and labor intensive. Molecular breeding programs have the potential to make significant impacts on the rate of genetic improvement but the limited molecular resources, in particular the lack of molecular markers for agronomic traits of interest, restrict the application of molecular breeding schemes for oil palm. Results In the current study, 6,103 non-redundant ESTs derived from cDNA libraries of developing vegetative and reproductive tissues were annotated and searched for simple sequence repeats (SSRs. Primer pairs from sequences flanking 289 EST-SSRs were tested to detect polymorphisms in elite breeding parents and their crosses. 230 of these amplified PCR products, 88 of which were polymorphic within the breeding material tested. A detailed analysis and annotation of the EST-SSRs revealed the locations of the polymorphisms within the transcripts, and that the main functional category was related to transcription and post-transcriptional regulation. Indeed, SSR polymorphisms were found in sequences encoding AP2-like, bZIP, zinc finger, MADS-box, and NAC-like transcription factors in addition to other transcriptional regulatory proteins and several RNA interacting proteins. Conclusions The identification of new EST-SSRs that detect polymorphisms in elite breeding material provides tools for molecular breeding strategies. The identification of SSRs within transcripts, in particular those that encode proteins involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, will allow insight into the functional

  17. Role of a redox-based methylation switch in mRNA life cycle ( pre- & post- transcriptional maturation and protein turnover : Implications in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALAV SUCHIN TRIVEDI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, as well as due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions. Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic. This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition and behavior. Thus a regulatory switch, controlling the lifespan, maturation and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at 1.The pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA (pre-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and 2. the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins (RNP and RNA binding proteins (RNABP in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione antioxidant levels, the redox status of neurons might be the central regulatory switch for methylation

  18. Post-transcriptional control by bacteriophage T4: mRNA decay and inhibition of translation initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Eric S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over 50 years of biological research with bacteriophage T4 includes notable discoveries in post-transcriptional control, including the genetic code, mRNA, and tRNA; the very foundations of molecular biology. In this review we compile the past 10 - 15 year literature on RNA-protein interactions with T4 and some of its related phages, with particular focus on advances in mRNA decay and processing, and on translational repression. Binding of T4 proteins RegB, RegA, gp32 and gp43 to their cognate target RNAs has been characterized. For several of these, further study is needed for an atomic-level perspective, where resolved structures of RNA-protein complexes are awaiting investigation. Other features of post-transcriptional control are also summarized. These include: RNA structure at translation initiation regions that either inhibit or promote translation initiation; programmed translational bypassing, where T4 orchestrates ribosome bypass of a 50 nucleotide mRNA sequence; phage exclusion systems that involve T4-mediated activation of a latent endoribonuclease (PrrC and cofactor-assisted activation of EF-Tu proteolysis (Gol-Lit; and potentially important findings on ADP-ribosylation (by Alt and Mod enzymes of ribosome-associated proteins that might broadly impact protein synthesis in the infected cell. Many of these problems can continue to be addressed with T4, whereas the growing database of T4-related phage genome sequences provides new resources and potentially new phage-host systems to extend the work into a broader biological, evolutionary context.

  19. Post-transcriptional control of negative acute phase genes by transforming growth factor beta.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrone, G; Cortese, R; Sorrentino, V

    1989-01-01

    During the acute phase (AP) reaction the expression of a series of liver-specific genes coding for secretory proteins is either stimulated or suppressed by different cytokines released by activated monocytes. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a cytokine that, first identified for its ability to regulate cellular growth, has been gradually recognized to modulate several other functions. We have investigated the effect of TGF-beta on the expression of acute phase genes in liver cell...

  20. Mir-184 post-transcriptionally regulates SOX7 expression and promotes cell proliferation in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng-Gang Wu

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common human malignancies and the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The development and progression of HCC is a complicated process, involving the deregulation of multiple genes that are essential to cell biological processes. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs have been suggested to be closely associated with tumorigenesis. Our study showed that miR-184 is upregulated in HCC cell lines and tissues. Overexpression of miR-184 in HCC cells increased cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, and cell cycle progression, whereas inhibition of miR-184 reduced cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, and cell cycle progression. Additionally, we identified SOX7 as a direct target of miR-184. Ectopic expression of miR-184 led to downregulation of the SOX7 protein, resulting in upregulation of c-Myc, Cyclin D1, and phosphorylation of Rb. Our findings suggested that miR-184 represents a potential onco-miR and plays an important role in HCC progression by suppressing SOX7 expression.

  1. Folding Free Energies of 5'-UTRs Impact Post-Transcriptional Regulation on a Genomic Scale in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Using high-throughput technologies, abundances and other features of genes and proteins have been measured on a genome-wide scale in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast, secondary structure in 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNA has only been investigated for a limited number of genes. Here, the aim is to study genome-wide regulatory effects of mRNA 5'-UTR folding free energies. We performed computations of secondary structures in 5'-UTRs and their folding free energies for all verified genes in S. cerevisiae. We found significant correlations between folding free energies of 5'-UTRs and various transcript features measured in genome-wide studies of yeast. In particular, mRNAs with weakly folded 5'-UTRs have higher translation rates, higher abundances of the corresponding proteins, longer half-lives, and higher numbers of transcripts, and are upregulated after heat shock. Furthermore, 5'-UTRs have significantly higher folding free energies than other genomic regions and randomized sequences. We also found a positive correlation between transcript half-life and ribosome occupancy that is more pronounced for short-lived transcripts, which supports a picture of competition between translation and degradation. Among the genes with strongly folded 5'-UTRs, there is a huge overrepresentation of uncharacterized open reading frames. Based on our analysis, we conclude that (i there is a widespread bias for 5'-UTRs to be weakly folded, (ii folding free energies of 5'-UTRs are correlated with mRNA translation and turnover on a genomic scale, and (iii transcripts with strongly folded 5'-UTRs are often rare and hard to find experimentally.

  2. A novel post-transcriptional role for ubiquitin in the differential regulation of MHC class I allotypes ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, Florencia; Lehner, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    By providing ligands for Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes (CTL) as well as Natural Killer (NK) cells, the HLA-A/B/C MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) play a central role in both innate and adaptive immunity. In addition to CTL-mediated recognition of MHC-peptide complexes, cell surface expression of MHC-I is closely monitored by NK cells, whose killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors encode activatory and inhibitory receptors with specificity for MHC-I. How the cell surface expression of MHC-I is tightl...

  3. Dissecting the expression relationships between RNA-binding proteins and their cognate targets in eukaryotic post-transcriptional regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Sneha; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal in orchestrating several steps in the metabolism of RNA in eukaryotes thereby controlling an extensive network of RBP-RNA interactions. Here, we employed CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation)-seq datasets for 60 human RBPs and RIP-ChIP (RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray) data for 69 yeast RBPs to construct a network of genome-wide RBP- target RNA interactions for each RBP. We show in humans that majority (~78%) of the RBPs are strongly associated with their target transcripts at transcript level while ~95% of the studied RBPs were also found to be strongly associated with expression levels of target transcripts when protein expression levels of RBPs were employed. At transcript level, RBP - RNA interaction data for the yeast genome, exhibited a strong association for 63% of the RBPs, confirming the association to be conserved across large phylogenetic distances. Analysis to uncover the features contributing to these associations revealed the number of target transcripts and length of the selected protein-coding transcript of an RBP at the transcript level while intensity of the CLIP signal, number of RNA-Binding domains, location of the binding site on the transcript, to be significant at the protein level. Our analysis will contribute to improved modelling and prediction of post-transcriptional networks.

  4. Dissecting the expression relationships between RNA-binding proteins and their cognate targets in eukaryotic post-transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Sneha; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal in orchestrating several steps in the metabolism of RNA in eukaryotes thereby controlling an extensive network of RBP-RNA interactions. Here, we employed CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation)-seq datasets for 60 human RBPs and RIP-ChIP (RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray) data for 69 yeast RBPs to construct a network of genome-wide RBP- target RNA interactions for each RBP. We show in humans that majority (~78%) of the RBPs are strongly associated with their target transcripts at transcript level while ~95% of the studied RBPs were also found to be strongly associated with expression levels of target transcripts when protein expression levels of RBPs were employed. At transcript level, RBP - RNA interaction data for the yeast genome, exhibited a strong association for 63% of the RBPs, confirming the association to be conserved across large phylogenetic distances. Analysis to uncover the features contributing to these associations revealed the number of target transcripts and length of the selected protein-coding transcript of an RBP at the transcript level while intensity of the CLIP signal, number of RNA-Binding domains, location of the binding site on the transcript, to be significant at the protein level. Our analysis will contribute to improved modelling and prediction of post-transcriptional networks. PMID:27161996

  5. Role of a redox-based methylation switch in mRNA life cycle (pre- and post-transcriptional maturation) and protein turnover: implications in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Malav S; Deth, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, and due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions (Turrigiano and Nelson, 2004). Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia, etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic; Cajigas et al., 2010). This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation, and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition, and behavior (Cajigas et al., 2010). Thus a regulatory switch, which controls the lifespan, maturation, and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at (1) the pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and (2) the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins and RNA binding proteins in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione anti-oxidant levels (Lertratanangkoon et al., 1997), the redox status of

  6. Tristetraprolin expression and microRNA-mediated regulation during simian immunodeficiency virus infection of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jonathan; Sisk, Jeanne M; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E.; Kenneth W. Witwer

    2013-01-01

    Background The RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) participates in normal post-transcriptional control of cytokine and chemokine gene expression, dysregulation of which contributes to the HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of TTP has been described, including regulation by microRNA-29a. In the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) model of HIV CNS disease, control of cytokine/chemokine expression coincides with the end of acute pha...

  7. Post-transcriptional mechanisms of regulation of AMPA receptors : regulation of GluA1 expression by the contactin associated protein 1

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Dominique Moreira

    2011-01-01

    No sistema nervoso central, a maior parte da neurotransmissão excitatória é mediada por receptores de glutamato do tipo AMPA que possuem papéis fundamentais na plasticidade sináptica, o fenómeno celular na base de processos de aprendizagem e memória. Modificações no tráfego destes receptores e na sua inserção ao nível das sinapses, bem como na estabilidade do RNA mensageiro das subunidades dos receptores ou no seu decaimento, são cruciais para induzir alterações de longo prazo ...

  8. Graft-transmitted siRNA signal from the root induces visual manifestation of endogenous post-transcriptional gene silencing in the scion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kasai

    Full Text Available In plants, post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS spreads systemically, being transmitted from the silenced stock to the scion expressing the corresponding transgene. It has been reported that a graft-transmitted siRNA signal can also induce PTGS of an endogenous gene, but this was done by top-grafting using silenced stock. In the present study involving grafting of Nicotiana benthamiana, we found that PTGS of an endogenous gene, glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase (GSA, which acts as a visible marker of RNAi via inhibition of chlorophyll synthesis, was manifested along the veins of newly developed leaves in the wild-type scion by the siRNA signal synthesized only in companion cells of the rootstock.

  9. Alternative splicing mechanisms orchestrating post-transcriptional gene expression: intron retention and the intron-rich genome of apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunghi, Matteo; Spano, Furio; Magini, Alessandro; Emiliani, Carla; Carruthers, Vern B; Di Cristina, Manlio

    2016-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium species have complex life cycles that include multiple hosts and differentiation through several morphologically distinct stages requiring marked changes in gene expression. This review highlights emerging evidence implicating regulation of mRNA splicing as a mechanism to prime these parasites for rapid gene expression upon differentiation. We summarize the most important insights in alternative splicing including its role in regulating gene expression by decreasing mRNA abundance via 'Regulated Unproductive Splicing and Translation'. As a related but less well-understood mechanism, we discuss also our recent work suggesting a role for intron retention for precluding translation of stage specific isoforms of T. gondii glycolytic enzymes. We additionally provide new evidence that intron retention might be a widespread mechanism during parasite differentiation. Supporting this notion, recent genome-wide analysis of Toxoplasma and Plasmodium suggests intron retention is more pervasive than heretofore thought. These findings parallel recent emergence of intron retention being more prevalent in mammals than previously believed, thereby adding to the established roles in plants, fungi and unicellular eukaryotes. Deeper mechanistic studies of intron retention will provide important insight into its role in regulating gene expression in apicomplexan parasites and more general in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26194054

  10. Coordinated Expression of Tristetraprolin Post-Transcriptionally Attenuates Mitogenic Induction of the Oncogenic Ser/Thr Kinase Pim-1

    OpenAIRE

    Dig B Mahat; Brennan-Laun, Sarah E.; Fialcowitz-White, Elizabeth J.; Kishor, Aparna; Ross, Christina R.; Pozharskaya, Tatyana; Rawn, J. David; Blackshear, Perry J.; Hassel, Bret A.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2012-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1 directs selected signaling events that promote cell growth and survival and is overexpressed in diverse human cancers. Pim-1 expression is tightly controlled through multiple mechanisms, including regulation of mRNA turnover. In several cultured cell models, mitogenic stimulation rapidly induced and stabilized PIM1 mRNA, however, vigorous destabilization 4–6 hours later helped restore basal expression levels. Acceleration of PIM1 mRNA turnover coincided with ...

  11. The Csr/Rsm system of Yersinia and related pathogens: a post-transcriptional strategy for managing virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Böhme, Katja; Dersch, Petra

    2012-04-01

    This review emphasizes the function and regulation of the Csr regulatory system in the human enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and compares its features with the homologous Csr/Rsm systems of related pathogens. The Csr/Rsm systems of eubacteria form a complex regulatory network in which redundant non-translated Csr/Rsm-RNAs bind the RNA-binding protein CsrA/RsmA, thereby preventing its interaction with mRNA targets. The Csr system is controlled by the BarA/UvrY-type of two-component sensor-regulator systems. Apart from that, common or pathogen-specific regulators control the abundance of the Csr components. The coordinate control of virulence factors and infection-linked physiological traits by the Csr/Rsm systems helps the pathogens to adapt individually to rapidly changing conditions to which they are exposed during the different stages of an infection. As Csr/Rsm function is relevant for full virulence, it represents a target suitable for antimicrobial drug development. PMID:22336760

  12. The Csr/Rsm system of Yersinia and related pathogens: A post-transcriptional strategy for managing virulence.

    OpenAIRE

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Böhme, Katja; Dersch, Petra

    2012-01-01

    This review emphasizes the function and regulation of the Csr regulatory system in the human enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and compares its features with the homologous Csr/Rsm systems of related pathogens. The Csr/Rsm systems of eubacteria form a complex regulatory network in which redundant non-translated Csr/Rsm-RNAs bind the RNA-binding protein CsrA/RsmA, thereby preventing its interaction with mRNA targets. The Csr system is controlled by the BarA/UvrY-type of two-component ...

  13. Coordinated expression of tristetraprolin post-transcriptionally attenuates mitogenic induction of the oncogenic Ser/Thr kinase Pim-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dig B Mahat

    Full Text Available The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1 directs selected signaling events that promote cell growth and survival and is overexpressed in diverse human cancers. Pim-1 expression is tightly controlled through multiple mechanisms, including regulation of mRNA turnover. In several cultured cell models, mitogenic stimulation rapidly induced and stabilized PIM1 mRNA, however, vigorous destabilization 4-6 hours later helped restore basal expression levels. Acceleration of PIM1 mRNA turnover coincided with accumulation of tristetraprolin (TTP, an mRNA-destabilizing protein that targets transcripts containing AU-rich elements. TTP binds PIM1 mRNA in cells, and suppresses its expression by accelerating mRNA decay. Reporter mRNA decay assays localized the TTP-regulated mRNA decay element to a discrete AU-rich sequence in the distal 3'-untranslated region that binds TTP. These data suggest that coordinated stimulation of TTP and PIM1 expression limits the magnitude and duration of PIM1 mRNA accumulation by accelerating its degradation as TTP protein levels increase. Consistent with this model, PIM1 and TTP mRNA levels were well correlated across selected human tissue panels, and PIM1 mRNA was induced to significantly higher levels in mitogen-stimulated fibroblasts from TTP-deficient mice. Together, these data support a model whereby induction of TTP mediates a negative feedback circuit to limit expression of selected mitogen-activated genes.

  14. MicroRNA regulation of Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Lund, Anders H

    2012-01-01

    progress has recently contributed to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the autophagy machinery, yet several gaps remain in our knowledge of this process. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) established a new paradigm of post-transcriptional gene regulation and during the past decade these...

  15. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets ("HuR mRNA regulons") encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27582706

  16. A novel post-transcriptional splicing form of the acute T cell leukemia proto-oncogene Lmo2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Tianhui; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Feuerstein, R., Wang, X., Song, D. et al., The LIM/double zinc-finger motif: A novel protein dimerization domain, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1994, 91: 10655-10659.[2]Schmeichel, K. L., Beckerle, M. C., The LIM domain is a modular protein-binding interface, Cell, 1994, 79: 211-219.[3]Boehm, T., Foroni, L., Kaneko, Y. et al., The rhombotin family of cystein-rich LIM-domain oncogenes: distinct members are involved in T-cell translocations to human chromosome 11p15 and 11p13, Pro. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1991, 88: 4367-4371.[4]Royer-Pokora, B., Uschi, L., Ludwig, W. D. et al., TTG-2,a new gene encoding a cysteine-rich protein with LIM motif, is overexpressed in acute T-cell leukaemia with the t(11;14)(p13;q11), Oncogene, 1991, 6: 1887-1893.[5]Warren, A. J., Colledge, W. H., Carlton, M. B. et al., The oncogenic cysteine-rich LIM domain protein Rbtn2 is essential for erythroid development, Cell, 1994, 78: 45-57.[6]Visvader, J. E., Mao, X. H., Fujuwara, Y. et al., The LIM-domain binding protein Ldb1 and its partner LMO2 act as negative regulators of erythroid differentiation, Pro. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1997, 94: 13707-13712 .[7]Yamada, Y., Warren, A. J., Dobson, C. et al., The T cell leukemia LIM protein Lmo2 is necessary for adult mouse hematopoiesis, Pro. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1998, 95: 3890-3895.[8]Yamada, Y., Pannell, R., Alan, F. et al., The oncogenic LIM-only transcription factor Lmo2 regulates angiogenesis but not vasculogenesis in mice, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 2000, 97: 320-324.[9]Royer-Pokora, B., Rogers, M., Zhu, T. H. et al., The TTG-2/RBTN-2 T cell oncogene encodes two alternative transcripts from two promoters: the distal promoter is removed by most 11p13 translocations in acute T cell leukaemia's (T-ALL), Oncogene, 1995, 10: 1353-1360.[10]Carninci, P., Nishiyama, Y., Westover, A. et al., Thermostabilization and thermo-activation of thermolabile enzymes by trehalose and its application for the synthesis of full

  17. Host-induced post-transcriptional hairpin RNA-mediated gene silencing of vital fungal genes confers efficient resistance against Fusarium wilt in banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghag, Siddhesh B; Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2014-06-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), is among the most destructive diseases of banana (Musa spp.). Because no credible control measures are available, development of resistant cultivars through genetic engineering is the only option. We investigated whether intron hairpin RNA (ihpRNA)-mediated expression of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeted against vital fungal genes (velvet and Fusarium transcription factor 1) in transgenic banana could achieve effective resistance against Foc. Partial sequences of these two genes were assembled as ihpRNAs in suitable binary vectors (ihpRNA-VEL and ihpRNA-FTF1) and transformed into embryogenic cell suspensions of banana cv. Rasthali by Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Eleven transformed lines derived from ihpRNA-VEL and twelve lines derived from ihpRNA-FTF1 were found to be free of external and internal symptoms of Foc after 6-week-long greenhouse bioassays. The five selected transgenic lines for each construct continued to resist Foc at 8 months postinoculation. Presence of specific siRNAs derived from the two ihpRNAs in transgenic banana plants was confirmed by Northern blotting and Illumina sequencing of small RNAs derived from the transgenic banana plants. The present study represents an important effort in proving that host-induced post-transcriptional ihpRNA-mediated gene silencing of vital fungal genes can confer efficient resistance against debilitating pathogens in crop plants. PMID:24476152

  18. Post-transcriptional silencing of the SGE1 gene induced by a dsRNA hairpin in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp cubense, the causal agent of Panama disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, J S; Angelo, P C S; Cruz, J C; Santos, J M M; Sousa, N R; Silva, G F

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp cubense (Foc), the causal agent of Panama disease, is responsible for economic losses in banana crops worldwide. The identification of genes that effectively act on pathogenicity and/or virulence may contribute to the development of different strategies for disease control and the production of resistant plants. The objective of the current study was to analyze the importance of SGE1 gene expression in Foc virulence through post-transcriptional silencing using a double-stranded RNA hairpin. Thirteen transformants were selected based on different morphological characteristics, and sporulation in these transformants was significantly reduced by approximately 95% (P < 0.05) compared to that of the wild-type strain. The relative SGE1 expression levels in the transformant strains were reduced by 27 to 47% compared to those in the wild-type strain. A pathogenicity analysis revealed that the transformants were able to reach the rhizomes and pseudostems of the inoculated banana plants. However, the transformants induced initial disease symptoms in the banana plants approximately 10 days later than that by the wild-type Foc, and initial disease symptoms persisted even at 45 days after inoculation. These results indicate that the SGE1 gene is directly involved in the virulence of Foc. Therefore, SGE1 may be a potential candidate for host-induced gene silencing in banana plants. PMID:27173186

  19. MicroRNA-17-5p post-transcriptionally regulates p21 expression in irradiated betel quid chewing-related oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, S.Y. [Taipei Medical Univ., Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology; HungKuang Univ., Taichung (China). Dept. of Biotechnology; Lin, K.C. [Taipei Medical Univ., Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Chiou, J.F. [Taipei Medical Univ., Taipei (China). Dept. of Radiology; Taipei Medical Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Taipei Medical Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Hospice and Palliative Center; Taipei Medical Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Cancer Center; Jeng, S.C. [Taipei Medical Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Cheng, W.H.; Chang, C.I. [Taipei Medical Univ., Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Hemato-Ongology; Lin, W.C. [Taipei Medical Univ., Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Thoracic Surgery; Wu, L.L. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Ophthalmology; Lee, H.L. [Taipei Medical Univ., Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology; Chen, R.J. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital and National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    2013-08-15

    Background and purpose: Betel nut chewing is associated with oral cavity cancer in Taiwan. OC3 is an oral carcinoma cell line that was established from cells collected from a long-term betel nut chewer who does not smoke. After we found that microRNA-17-5p (miR-17-5p) is induced in OC3 cells, we used this cell line to examine the biological role(s) of this microRNA in response to exposure to ionizing radiation. Materials and methods: A combined SYBR green-based real-time PCR and oligonucleotide ligation assay was used to examine the expression of the miR-17 polycistron in irradiated OC3 cells. The roles of miR-17-5p and p21 were evaluated with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ODN) that were designed and used to inhibit their expression. Expression of the p21 protein was evaluated by Western blotting. The clonogenic assay and annexin V staining were used to evaluate cell survival and apoptosis, respectively. Cells in which miR-17-5p was stably knocked down were used to create ectopic xenografts to evaluate in vivo the role of miR-17-5p. Results: A radiation dose of 5 Gy significantly increased miR-17-5p expression in irradiated OC3 cells. Inhibition of miR-17-5p expression enhanced the radiosensitivity of the OC3 cells. We found that miR-17-5p downregulates radiation-induced p21 expression in OC3 cells and, by using a tumor xenograft model, it was found that p21 plays a critical role in increasing the radiosensitivity of OC3 cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: miR-17-5p is induced in irradiated OC3 cells and it downregulates p21 protein expression, contributing to the radioresistance of OC3 cells. (orig.)

  20. MicroRNA-17-5p post-transcriptionally regulates p21 expression in irradiated betel quid chewing-related oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Betel nut chewing is associated with oral cavity cancer in Taiwan. OC3 is an oral carcinoma cell line that was established from cells collected from a long-term betel nut chewer who does not smoke. After we found that microRNA-17-5p (miR-17-5p) is induced in OC3 cells, we used this cell line to examine the biological role(s) of this microRNA in response to exposure to ionizing radiation. Materials and methods: A combined SYBR green-based real-time PCR and oligonucleotide ligation assay was used to examine the expression of the miR-17 polycistron in irradiated OC3 cells. The roles of miR-17-5p and p21 were evaluated with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ODN) that were designed and used to inhibit their expression. Expression of the p21 protein was evaluated by Western blotting. The clonogenic assay and annexin V staining were used to evaluate cell survival and apoptosis, respectively. Cells in which miR-17-5p was stably knocked down were used to create ectopic xenografts to evaluate in vivo the role of miR-17-5p. Results: A radiation dose of 5 Gy significantly increased miR-17-5p expression in irradiated OC3 cells. Inhibition of miR-17-5p expression enhanced the radiosensitivity of the OC3 cells. We found that miR-17-5p downregulates radiation-induced p21 expression in OC3 cells and, by using a tumor xenograft model, it was found that p21 plays a critical role in increasing the radiosensitivity of OC3 cells in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: miR-17-5p is induced in irradiated OC3 cells and it downregulates p21 protein expression, contributing to the radioresistance of OC3 cells. (orig.)

  1. 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)-5,6-Dihydrouridine is one of two novel post-transcriptional modifications in tRNALys(UUU) from Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Español, Yaiza; Giessing, Anders M B;

    2011-01-01

    tRNA is the most heavily modified of all RNA types, with typically 10-20% of the residues being post-transcriptionally altered. Unravelling the modification pattern of a tRNA is a challenging task; there are 92 currently known tRNA modifications [1], many of which are chemically similar....... Furthermore, the tRNA has to be investigated with single-nucleotide resolution in order to ensure complete mapping of all modifications. In the present work, we characterized tRNA(Lys) (UUU) from Trypanosoma brucei, and provide a complete overview of its post-transcriptional modifications. The first step was...... MALDI-TOF MS of two independent digests of the tRNA, with RNase A and RNase T1, respectively. This revealed digestion products harbouring mass-changing modifications. Next, the modifications were mapped at the nucleotide level in the RNase products by tandem MS. Comparison with the sequence of the...

  2. MicroRNA Regulation of Lipid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Flowers, Elena; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA are structural components of an epigenetic mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation of messenger RNA translation. Recently, there is significant interest in the application of microRNA as a blood-based biomarker of underlying physiologic conditions, and the therapeutic administration of microRNA inhibitors and mimics. The purpose of this review is to describe the current body of knowledge on microRNA regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism, and to introduce the role of m...

  3. Alternative Splicing Regulation During C. elegans Development: Splicing Factors as Regulated Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Barberan-Soler; Zahler, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates protein diversity and allows for post-transcriptional gene regulation. Estimates suggest that 10% of the genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative splicing. We constructed a splicing-sensitive microarray to detect alternative splicing for 352 cassette exons and tested for changes in alternative splicing of these genes during development. We found that the microarray data predicted that 62/352 (approximately 18%) of the alternative splicing events studi...

  4. Widespread context dependency of microRNA-mediated regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Florian; Haas, Jürgen; Lieber, Diana; Malterer, Georg; Jaskiewicz, Lukasz; Zavolan, Mihaela; Dölken, Lars; Zimmer, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    Gene expression is regulated in a context-dependent, cell-type-specific manner. Condition-specific transcription is dependent on the presence of transcription factors (TFs) that can activate or inhibit its target genes (global context). Additional factors, such as chromatin structure, histone, or DNA modifications, also influence the activity of individual target genes (individual context). The role of the global and individual context for post-transcriptional regulation has not systematically been investigated on a large scale and is poorly understood. Here we show that global and individual context dependency is a pervasive feature of microRNA-mediated regulation. Our comprehensive and highly consistent data set from several high-throughput technologies (PAR-CLIP, RIP-chip, 4sU-tagging, and SILAC) provides strong evidence that context-dependent microRNA target sites (CDTS) are as frequent and functionally relevant as constitutive target sites (CTS). Furthermore, we found the global context to be insufficient to explain the CDTS, and that flanking sequence motifs provide individual context that is an equally important factor. Our results demonstrate that, similar to TF-mediated regulation, global and individual context dependency are prevalent in microRNA-mediated gene regulation, implying a much more complex post-transcriptional regulatory network than is currently known. The necessary tools to unravel post-transcriptional regulations and mechanisms need to be much more involved, and much more data will be needed for particular cell types and cellular conditions in order to understand microRNA-mediated regulation and the context-dependent post-transcriptional regulatory network. PMID:24668909

  5. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Esquerré; Marie Bouvier; Catherine Turlan; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Laurence Girbal; Muriel Cocaign-Bousquet

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype...

  6. Isolation and Identification of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing-Related Micro-RNAs by Functionalized Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-I.; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Li, Keng-Hui; Huang, Ying-Chih; Lu, Chia-Wei; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Su, Ya-Wen; Tseng, Ling-Wei; Tseng, Kun-Chang; Lin, Chi-Yun; Chen, Chii-Dong; Lin, Shih-Shun; Chen, Yit-Tsong

    2015-11-01

    Many transcribed RNAs are non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), which bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNAs to regulate the translation efficacy. Therefore, identifying the miRNAs expressed in cells/organisms aids in understanding genetic control in cells/organisms. In this report, we determined the binding of oligonucleotides to a receptor-modified silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) by monitoring the changes in conductance of the SiNW-FET. We first modified a SiNW-FET with a DNA probe to directly and selectively detect the complementary miRNA in cell lysates. This SiNW-FET device has 7-fold higher sensitivity than reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in detecting the corresponding miRNA. Next, we anchored viral p19 proteins, which bind the double-strand small RNAs (ds-sRNAs), on the SiNW-FET. By perfusing the device with synthesized ds-sRNAs of different pairing statuses, the dissociation constants revealed that the nucleotides at the 3‧-overhangs and pairings at the terminus are important for the interactions. After perfusing the total RNA mixture extracted from Nicotiana benthamiana across the device, this device could enrich the ds-sRNAs for sequence analysis. Finally, this bionanoelectronic SiNW-FET, which is able to isolate and identify the interacting protein-RNA, adds an additional tool in genomic technology for the future study of direct biomolecular interactions.

  7. Intragenomic matching reveals a huge potential for miRNA-mediated regulation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Jacobsen, Anders; Nygaard, Sanne;

    2007-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators, but the extent of this regulation is uncertain, both with regard to the number of miRNA genes and their targets. Using an algorithm based on intragenomic matching of potential miRNAs and their targets coupled with support vector ma...... conditions, while others can readily be recruited when organisms diverge and adapt to new niches....

  8. Experimental evolution with a global regulator mutant in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Seyll, Ethel

    2014-01-01

    CsrA is a global regulator and the main player of the carbon storage regulator (Csr) network, a well- conserved regulatory network in the bacterial world. CsrA is involved in regulation of many physiological processes, including pathways of central carbon metabolism, biofilm formation, motility and virulence in pathogenic species. CsrA acts at the post-transcriptional level by binding specific sequences on its target mRNAs, leading to mRNA destabilization or stabilization. The majority of stu...

  9. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Fields Joshua A; Thompson Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previou...

  10. Sodium-Dependent Phosphate Uptake in the Jejunum Is Post-Transcriptionally Regulated in Pigs Fed a Low-Phosphorus Diet and Is Independent of Dietary Calcium Concentration1

    OpenAIRE

    Saddoris, Kari L.; Fleet, James C.; Radcliffe, John S.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, severe dietary P restriction increases active phosphate absorption by the intestine. However, it remains unknown if moderate dietary P restriction has a similar effect. Weanling pigs (n = 32; body weight 7.4 ± 0.55 kg) were used in a 2 × 2 factorial design and fed dietary available P (aP) concentrations of 0.23 or 0.40% and Ca concentrations of 0.58 or 1.00% for 14 d. Diets were formulated on an aP basis instead of a total P basis, because pigs are unable to absorb phytate-P prese...

  11. Role of HuR and p38MAPK in Ultraviolet B-induced Post-transcriptional Regulation of COX-2 Expression in the Human Keratinocyte Cell Line HaCaT*

    OpenAIRE

    Fernau, Niklas S.; Fugmann, Dominik; Leyendecker, Martin; Reimann, Kerstin; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Galban, Stefanie; Ale-Agha, Niloofar; Krutmann, Jean; Klotz, Lars-Oliver

    2009-01-01

    COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) is a pivotal player in inflammatory processes, and ultraviolet radiation is a known stimulus for COX-2 expression in skin cells. Here, an induction of COX-2 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes was observed only upon exposure of cells to UVB (280–320 nm) but not to UVA radiation (320–400 nm), as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Prostaglandin E2 levels were elevated in cell culture supernatants of HaCaT cells exposed to UVB. COX-2 mRNA...

  12. Fip1 regulates mRNA alternative polyadenylation to promote stem cell self-renewal

    OpenAIRE

    Lackford, Brad; Yao, Chengguo; Charles, Georgette M.; Weng, Lingjie; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Choi, Eun-A; Xie, Xiaohui; Wan, Ji; Xing, Yi; Freudenberg, Johannes M.; Yang, Pengyi; Jothi, Raja; Hu, Guang; Shi, Yongsheng

    2014-01-01

    mRNA alternative polyadenylation (APA) plays a critical role in post-transcriptional gene control and is highly regulated during development and disease. However, the regulatory mechanisms and functional consequences of APA remain poorly understood. Here, we show that an mRNA 3′ processing factor, Fip1, is essential for embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and somatic cell reprogramming. Fip1 promotes stem cell maintenance, in part, by activating the ESC-specific APA profiles to ensure the ...

  13. Role of the RNA-binding Protein Tristetraprolin in Glucocorticoid-mediated Gene Regulation1

    OpenAIRE

    Ishmael, Faoud T.; Fang, Xi; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Atasoy, Ulus; Rigby, William F C; Gorospe, Myriam; Cheadle, Chris; Stellato, Cristiana

    2008-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy. Modulation of post-transcriptional regulation (PTR) of gene expression by GCs is a relevant yet poorly characterized mechanism of their action. The RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) plays a central role in PTR by binding to AU-rich elements in the 3’untranslated region of proinflammatory transcripts and accelerating their decay. We found that GCs induce TTP expression in primary and immortalized human bronchial epith...

  14. Stability of the LATS2 Tumor Suppressor Gene Is Regulated by Tristetraprolin*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun Hee; Vo, Mai-Tram; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Lee, Unn Hwa; Kim, Chae Won; Kim, Hong Kyeung; Ko, Myoung Seok; Lee, Won Hyuck; Cha, Seung Joo; Min, Young Joo; Choi, Dae Hwa; Suh, Ho Seok; Lee, Byung Ju; Park, Jeong Woo; Cho, Wha Ja

    2010-01-01

    LATS2 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the control of cell growth and the cell cycle. Here, we investigated the post-transcriptional regulation of LATS2 expression by tristetraprolin (TTP). Our results show that the expression level of LATS2 is inversely correlated with TTP expression in human cancer cell lines. Overexpression of TTP reduced the expression level of LATS2. Conversely, treatment with small interfering RNA against TTP increased the expression level of LATS2 through stabi...

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Macrophage Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Amit Rahat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and Macrophages (Mo/Mϕ exhibit great plasticity, as they can shift between different modes of activation and, driven by their immediate microenvironment, perform divergent functions. These include, among others, patrolling their surroundings and maintaining homeostasis (resident Mo/Mϕ, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells (classically activated or M1 Mo/Mϕ, orchestrating wound healing (alternatively activated or M2 Mo/Mϕ, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response (resolution Mϕ. Hypoxia is an important factor in the Mϕ microenvironment, is prevalent in many physiological and pathological conditions, and is interdependent with the inflammatory response. Although Mo/Mϕ have been studied in hypoxia, the mechanisms by which hypoxia influences the different modes of their activation, and how it regulates the shift between them, remain unclear. Here we review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that mediate this hypoxic regulation of Mϕ activation. Much is known about the hypoxic transcriptional regulatory network, which includes the master regulators HIF-1 and NF-κB, as well as other transcription factors (e.g. AP-1, Erg-1, but we also highlight the role of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. These mechanisms mediate hypoxic induction of Mϕ pro-angiogenic mediators, suppress M1 Mϕ by post-transcriptionally inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators, and help shift the classically activated Mϕ into an activation state which approximate the alternatively activated or resolution Mϕ.

  16. MR-02A GENOME-WIDE miRNA SCREEN REVEALED MIR-603 AS A MGMT-REGULATING miRNA IN GLIOBLASTOMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Kushwaha, Deepa; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Ng, Kimberly; Steed, Tyler; Nguyen, Thien; Futalan, Diahnn; Akers, Johnny; Tao, Jiang; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Carter, Bob; Chen, Clark

    2014-01-01

    MGMT expression is a critical determinant for therapeutic resistance to DNA alkylating agents. We previously demonstrated that MGMT expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-181d and other miRNAs. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Candidate miRNAs were further tested for inverse correlation with MGMT expression in clinical specimens. We identified 15 candidate miRNAs. Comparison of these candidates to those predicted computational algorith...

  17. PUMILIO-2 Is Involved in the Positive Regulation of Cellular Proliferation in Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shigunov, Patrícia; Sotelo-Silveira, Jose; Kuligovski, Crisciele; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo; Rebelatto, Carmen K.; Moutinho, José A.; Brofman, Paulo S.; Krieger, Marco A; Goldenberg, Samuel; Munroe, David; Correa, Alejandro; Dallagiovanna, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells can either differentiate into more specialized cells or undergo self-renewal. Several lines of evidence from different organisms suggest that these processes depend on the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The presence of the PUF [Pumilio/FBF (fem-3 binding factor)] domain defines a conserved family of RNA binding proteins involved in repressing gene expression. It has been suggested that a conserved function of PUF proteins is to repress differentiation and susta...

  18. Oncogenic pathways and myrna: effects on messenger's turnover, regulation by synthetic oligo ribonucleotides and therapeutic applications in experimental settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project has been focusing on molecular mechanisms determining the rate of RNA degradation eventually important to regulate gene expression and phenotype at post transcription level. Exogenous synthetic oligonucleotides targeting the relevant domains of b- RNA degradation could stabilize the transcript, efficiently enhance gene expression and alter the cellular phenotype accordingly. The experimental model was the bcl2 RNA (b-RNA), its molecular mechanisms of degradation and the functional effects of turnover modifications by exogenous means

  19. Ultraconserved elements are associated with homeostatic control of splicing regulators by alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Julie Z.; Grate, Leslie; Donohue, John Paul; Preston, Christine; Nobida, Naomi; O’Brien, Georgeann; Shiue, Lily; Clark, Tyson A.; Blume, John E; Ares, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Many alternative splicing events create RNAs with premature stop codons, suggesting that alternative splicing coupled with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD) may regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. We tested this idea in mice by blocking NMD and measuring changes in isoform representation using splicing-sensitive microarrays. We found a striking class of highly conserved stop codon-containing exons whose inclusion renders the transcript sensitive to NMD. A genomic search for additi...

  20. Properties and kinetics of microRNA regulation through canonical seed sites

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jerry S.; Revilla, Arra C; Guerrero, Michael; Abygail M Gumbayan; Zeller, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a fundamental class of small RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation; however, the mechanism by which microRNAs regulate their gene targets in animals remains poorly understood. Practically, a mechanistic understanding of microRNA binding and regulation is crucial for the rational design of microRNA-based vectors for RNA interference. In this report, we focus on the largest known class of microRNA targets, the canonical seed targets, and explore the factors involve...

  1. Heme regulates the expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of chimaeric genes containing 5'-flanking soybean leghemoglobin sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A; Villadsen, IS

    1986-01-01

    The TM1 yeast mutant was transformed with a 2 micron-derived plasmid (YEp24) which carries a chimaeric gene containing the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene fused to the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions of the soybean leghemoglobin (Lb) c3 gene. Expression of the chimaeric...... CAT gene is controlled specifically by heme at a post-transcriptional level, most likely by regulating the efficiencies of translation. Expression of another chimaeric gene consisting of the neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) gene fused to only the 5'-flanking region of the Lbc3 gene is regulated by...

  2. UPF2 is a critical regulator of liver development, function and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoren, Lina A; Nørgaard, Gitte A; Weischenfeldt, Joachim;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a post-transcriptional RNA surveillance process that facilitates the recognition and destruction of mRNAs bearing premature terminations codons (PTCs). Such PTC-containing (PTC+) mRNAs may arise from different processes, including erroneous...... processing and expression of pseudogenes, but also from more regulated events such as alternative splicing coupled NMD (AS-NMD). Thus, the NMD pathway serves both as a silencer of genomic noise and a regulator of gene expression. Given the early embryonic lethality in NMD deficient mice, uncovering the full...

  3. Synthetic RNAs for gene regulation: design principles and computational tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Laganà

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies, but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA, artificial microRNA (a-miR and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches.

  4. Synthetic RNAs for Gene Regulation: Design Principles and Computational Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganà, Alessandro; Shasha, Dennis; Croce, Carlo Maria

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis, and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA), short-hairpin RNA (shRNA), artificial microRNA (a-miR), and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches. PMID:25566532

  5. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Whisenant, Thomas C.; Peralta, Eigen R.; Aarreberg, Lauren D.; Gao, Nina J.; Head, Steven R; Phillip Ordoukhanian; Jamie R Williamson; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing act...

  6. Mitochondrial dynamics, quality control and miRNA regulation in skeletal muscle: implications for obesity and related metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlmans, Dennis; Houzelle, Alexandre; Schrauwen, Patrick; Hoeks, Joris

    2016-06-01

    The western dietary habits and sedentary lifestyle largely contributes to the growing epidemic of obesity. Mitochondria are at the front line of cellular energy homoeostasis and are implicated in the pathophysiology of obesity and obesity-related metabolic disease. In recent years, novel aspects in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism, such as mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial protein quality control and post-transcriptional regulation of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins, have emerged. In this review, we discuss the recent findings concerning the dysregulation of these processes in skeletal muscle in obesogenic conditions. PMID:27129097

  7. Final report: FASEB Summer Research Conference on ''Post-transcriptional control of gene expression: Effectors of mRNA decay'' [agenda and attendees list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maquat, Lynne

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this meeting was to provide an interactive forum for scientists working on prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decay. A special seminar presented by a leader in the field of mRNA decay in S. cerevisiae focused on what is known and what needs to be determined, not only for yeast but for other organisms. The large attendance (110 participants) reflects the awareness that mRNA decay is a key player in gene regulation in a way that is affected by the many steps that precede mRNA formation. Sessions were held on the following topics: mRNA transport and mRNP; multicomponent eukaryotic nucleases; nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and nonsense-associated altered splicing; Cis-acting sequences/Trans-acting factors of mRNA decay; translational accuracy; multicomponent bacterial nucleases; interplay between mRNA polyadenylation, translation and decay in prokaryotes and prokaryotic organelles; and RNA interference and other RNA mediators of gene expression. In addition to the talks and two poster sessions, there were three round tables: (1) Does translation occur in the nucleus? (2) Differences and similarities in the mechanisms of mRNA decay in different eukaryotes, and (3) RNA surveillance in bacteria?

  8. Mechanism of T cell regulation by microRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding single-stranded RNAs that can modulate target gene expression at post-transcriptional level and participate in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. T cells have important functions in acquired immune response; miRNAs regulate this immune response by targeting the mRNAs of genes involved in T cell development, proliferation, differentiation, and function. For instance, miR-181 family members function in progression by targeting Bcl2 and CD69, among others. MiR-17 to miR-92 clusters function by binding to CREB1, PTEN, and Bim. Considering that the suppression of T cell-mediated immune responses against tumor cells is involved in cancer progression, we should investigate the mechanism by which miRNA regulates T cells to develop new approaches for cancer treatment

  9. Towards an understanding of miRNA regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Ilsø

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are well-known regulators of gene expression. They function post-transcriptionally by binding to complementary sites within the 3´UTR of target mRNAs, which mediates translational repression and destabilization. However, miRNA expression itself is also subjected to regulation. Here, we...... report a new method to investigate and potentially characterize the pri-miRNA transcript. Overexpression of a transdominant Drosha mutant, which is unable to cleave its substrate, enables stabilization of the pri-miRNA transcript. Drosha mutant immunoprecipitation from the nuclear compartment is...... performed followed by high-throughput sequencing (nuclear Drosha Mt2 RIPseq). This method allows for the detection of global pri-miRNA signature and also provides a method to potentially identify new Drosha substrates. Furthermore, data on the identification of a novel endogenous circular RNA sponge (ciRS-7...

  10. Micro-RNA: A New Kind of Gene Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Dan; HU Lan

    2006-01-01

    A group of small RNA molecules, distinct from but related to siRNAs (small interference RNAs) have been identified in a variety of organisms. These small RNAs, called microRNAs (miRNAs), are endogenously encoded approximately 20-24 nt long single-stranded RNAs. They are generally expressed in a highly tissue- or developmental-stage-specific fashion and are post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression in animals and plants. This article summarizes the character, mechanism and analysis method about miRNAs. The current view that miRNAs represent a newly discovered, hidden layer of gene regulation has resulted in high interest among researchers in the discovery of miRNAs, their targets, expression mechanism of action and analysis methods.

  11. MicroRNAs as regulators in plant metal toxicity response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Mendoza-Soto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal toxicity is a major stress affecting crop production. This includes metals that are essential for plants (copper, iron, zinc, manganese, and non-essential metals (cadmium, aluminum, cobalt, mercury. A primary common effect of high concentrations of metals such as aluminum, cooper, cadmium or mercury, is root growth inhibition. Metal toxicity triggers the accumulation of reactive oxygen species leading to damage of lipids, proteins and DNA. The plants response to metal toxicity involves several biological processes that require fine and precise regulation at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are 21 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. A miRNA, incorporated into a RNA induced silencing complex, promotes cleavage of its target mRNA that is recognized by an almost perfect base complementarity. In plants miRNA regulation has been involved in development and also in biotic and abiotic stress responses. We review novel advances in identifying miRNAs related to metal toxicity responses and their potential role according to their targets. Most of the targets for plant metal-responsive miRNAs are transcription factors. Information about metal-responsive miRNAs in different plants points to important regulatory roles of miR319, miR390, miR393 and miR398. The target of miR319 is the TCP transcription factor, implicated in growth control. MiR390 exerts its action through the biogenesis of trans-acting small interference RNAs that, in turn, regulate auxin responsive factors. MiR393 targets the auxin receptors TIR1/AFBs and a bHLH transcription factor. Increasing evidence points to the crucial role of miR398 and its targets Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases in the control of the oxidative stress generated after high metal copper or iron exposure.

  12. Regulation of miR394 in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (FOC) Infection in Garlic (Allium sativum L)

    OpenAIRE

    Chand, Subodh K.; Nanda, Satyabrata; Joshi, Raj K.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of post-transcriptional regulators that negatively regulate gene expression through target mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition and play important roles in plant development and stress response. In the present study, six conserved miRNAs from garlic (Allium sativum L.) were analyzed to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (FOC) infection. Stem-loop RT-PCR revealed that miR394 is significantly induced in gar...

  13. The RNA binding protein CsrA controls c-di-GMP metabolism by directly regulating the expression of GGDEF proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas, Kristina; Edwards, Adrianne N.; Simm, Roger; Romeo, Tony; Römling, Ute; Melefors, Öjar

    2008-01-01

    The carbon storage regulator CsrA is an RNA binding protein that controls carbon metabolism, biofilm formation and motility in various eubacteria. Nevertheless, in Escherichia coli only five target mRNAs have been shown to be directly regulated by CsrA at the post-transcriptional level. Here we identified two new direct targets for CsrA, ycdT and ydeH, both of which encode proteins with GGDEF domains. A csrA mutation caused mRNA levels of ycdT and ydeH to increase more than 10-fold. RNA mobil...

  14. Regulation of the p27Kip1 tumor suppressor by miR-221 and miR-222 promotes cancer cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    le Sage, Carlos; Nagel, Remco; Egan, David A.; Schrier, Mariette; Mesman, Elly; Mangiola, Annunziato; Anile, Corrado; Maira, Giulio; Mercatelli, Neri; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Agami, Reuven

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent post-transcriptional regulators of protein coding genes. Patterns of misexpression of miRNAs in cancer suggest key functions of miRNAs in tumorigenesis. However, current bioinformatics tools do not entirely support the identification and characterization of the mode of action of such miRNAs. Here, we used a novel functional genetic approach and identified miR-221 and miR-222 (miR-221&222) as potent regulators of p27Kip1, a cell cycle inhibitor and tumor suppresso...

  15. G-patch domain and KOW motifs-containing protein, GPKOW; a nuclear RNA-binding protein regulated by protein kinase A

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: Post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNA takes place in several steps and requires involvement of a number of RNA-binding proteins. How pre-mRNA processing is regulated is in large enigmatic. The catalytic (C) subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) is a serine/threonine kinase, which regulates numerous cellular processes including pre-mRNA splicing. Despite that a significant fraction of the C subunit is found in splicing factor compartments in the nucleus, there are no indications ...

  16. The space of enzyme regulation in HeLa cells can be inferred from its intracellular metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Christian; Muñoz-Gonzalez, Felipe; Encarnación, Sergio; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo

    2016-01-01

    During the transition from a healthy state to a cancerous one, cells alter their metabolism to increase proliferation. The underlying metabolic alterations may be caused by a variety of different regulatory events on the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level whose identification contributes to the rational design of therapeutic targets. We present a mechanistic strategy capable of inferring enzymatic regulation from intracellular metabolome measurements that is independent of the actual mechanism of regulation. Here, enzyme activities are expressed by the space of all feasible kinetic constants (k-cone) such that the alteration between two phenotypes is given by their corresponding kinetic spaces. Deriving an expression for the transformation of the healthy to the cancer k-cone we identified putative regulated enzymes between the HeLa and HaCaT cell lines. We show that only a few enzymatic activities change between those two cell lines and that this regulation does not depend on gene transcription but is instead post-transcriptional. Here, we identify phosphofructokinase as the major driver of proliferation in HeLa cells and suggest an optional regulatory program, associated with oxidative stress, that affects the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway. PMID:27335086

  17. Transition of Plasmodium sporozoites into liver stage-like forms is regulated by the RNA binding protein Pumilio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Santos, Carina S S; Braks, Joanna; Prudêncio, Miguel; Carret, Céline; Gomes, Ana Rita; Pain, Arnab; Feltwell, Theresa; Khan, Shahid; Waters, Andrew; Janse, Chris; Mair, Gunnar R; Mota, Maria M

    2011-05-01

    Many eukaryotic developmental and cell fate decisions that are effected post-transcriptionally involve RNA binding proteins as regulators of translation of key mRNAs. In malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), the development of round, non-motile and replicating exo-erythrocytic liver stage forms from slender, motile and cell-cycle arrested sporozoites is believed to depend on environmental changes experienced during the transmission of the parasite from the mosquito vector to the vertebrate host. Here we identify a Plasmodium member of the RNA binding protein family PUF as a key regulator of this transformation. In the absence of Pumilio-2 (Puf2) sporozoites initiate EEF development inside mosquito salivary glands independently of the normal transmission-associated environmental cues. Puf2- sporozoites exhibit genome-wide transcriptional changes that result in loss of gliding motility, cell traversal ability and reduction in infectivity, and, moreover, trigger metamorphosis typical of early Plasmodium intra-hepatic development. These data demonstrate that Puf2 is a key player in regulating sporozoite developmental control, and imply that transformation of salivary gland-resident sporozoites into liver stage-like parasites is regulated by a post-transcriptional mechanism. PMID:21625527

  18. Transition of Plasmodium sporozoites into liver stage-like forms is regulated by the RNA binding protein Pumilio

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes-Santos, Carina S. S.

    2011-05-19

    Many eukaryotic developmental and cell fate decisions that are effected post-transcriptionally involve RNA binding proteins as regulators of translation of key mRNAs. In malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), the development of round, non-motile and replicating exo-erythrocytic liver stage forms from slender, motile and cell-cycle arrested sporozoites is believed to depend on environmental changes experienced during the transmission of the parasite from the mosquito vector to the vertebrate host. Here we identify a Plasmodium member of the RNA binding protein family PUF as a key regulator of this transformation. In the absence of Pumilio-2 (Puf2) sporozoites initiate EEF development inside mosquito salivary glands independently of the normal transmission-associated environmental cues. Puf2- sporozoites exhibit genome-wide transcriptional changes that result in loss of gliding motility, cell traversal ability and reduction in infectivity, and, moreover, trigger metamorphosis typical of early Plasmodium intra-hepatic development. These data demonstrate that Puf2 is a key player in regulating sporozoite developmental control, and imply that transformation of salivary gland-resident sporozoites into liver stage-like parasites is regulated by a post-transcriptional mechanism. 2011 Gomes-Santos et al.

  19. The emerging role of microRNA in regulation of endotoxin tolerance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Edel M

    2012-05-01

    Endotoxin tolerance is a phenomenon where cells show reduced responsiveness toward repeated endotoxin stimulation. Regulation of tolerance occurs at multiple levels of the cell signaling cascade, and many of these levels are potentially regulated by miRNA, which are a class of small RNA that bind to mRNA to down-regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Roles have been identified for miR-146a, miR-221, miR-579, miR-125b, miR-155, let-7e, and miR-98 in regulating the TLR4 signaling pathway during the development of endotoxin tolerance at receptor, signaling pathway, and gene transcription and translational levels. miRNA represent exciting, new potential targets in attempts to exogenously modulate development of endotoxin tolerance.

  20. ADRENERGIC RESPONSES TO STRESS: TRANSCRIPTIONAL AND POST-TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Dona L.; Tai, T. C.; Wong-Faull, David C.; Claycomb, Robert; Kvetnansky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Stress effects on adrenergic responses in rats were examined in adrenal medulla, the primary source of circulating epinephrine (Epi). Irrespective of duration, immobilization (IMMO) increased adrenal corticosterone to the same extent. In contrast, epinephrine changed little, suggesting that Epi synthesis replenishes adrenal pools and sustains circulating levels for the heightened alertness and physiological changes required of the "flight or fight" response. IMMO also induced the epinephrine-...

  1. MicroRNAs: regulators of oncogenesis and stemness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papagiannakopoulos Thales

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs are essential post-transcriptional regulators that determine cell identity and fate. Aberrant expression of miRNAs can lead to diseases, including cancer. Expression of many miRNAs in the de-differentiated brain tumor cancer stem cells resembles that of neural stem cells. In this issue of BMC Medicine, Silber et al provide evidence of the expression of such miRNAs and their potential to mediate differentiation in both stem cell populations. In this commentary, we discuss the known functions of miRNAs in cancer and stem cells, their therapeutic potential and how the findings of Silber et al provide insight into the role of miR-124/miR-137 dysregulation in glioblastomas.

  2. MicroRNAs as regulators of cutaneous wound healing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wing-Fu Lai; Parco M Siu

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, and have displayed important roles in areas spanning from embryonic development to skin physiology. Despite this, till now little is known about the significance of miRNAs in cutaneous wound healing. In this mini-review, we discuss the existing evidence on the roles of miRNAs in physiological processes relevant to cutaneous wound healing, followed by a highlight of the prospects and challenges of future development of miRNA-based wound therapies. With existing technologies of nucleic acid transfer and miRNA modulation, it is anticipated that once the roles of miRNAs in wound healing have been clarified, there will be a vast new vista of opportunities brought up for development of miRNA-targeted therapies for wound care.

  3. Regulation of Rubisco gene expression in C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, James O; Mure, Christopher M; Yerramsetty, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) incorporates inorganic carbon into an organic form, making this chloroplastic enzyme one of the most essential factors for all life on earth. Despite its central role in photosynthesis, research into regulation of the chloroplast rbcL and nuclear RbcS genes that encode this enzyme has lagged behind other plant gene systems. A major characteristic of kranz-type C4 plants is the accumulation of Rubisco only within chloroplasts of internalized bundle sheath cells that surround the leaf vascular centers. In plants that utilize the less common single cell C4 system, Rubisco accumulates only within one type of dimorphic chloroplasts localized to a specific region of leaf chlorenchyma cells. Understanding regulatory processes that restrict Rubisco gene expression to only one cell type or chloroplast type is a major focus of C4 research. Regulatory steps may include transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational processes. PMID:27026038

  4. Regulation of capsule in Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Thomas, Jennifer; Stephens, David S

    2016-09-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, a devastating pathogen exclusive to humans, expresses capsular polysaccharides that are the major meningococcal virulence determinants and the basis for successful meningococcal vaccines. With rare exceptions, the expression of capsule (serogroups A, B, C, W, X, Y) is required for systemic invasive meningococcal disease. Changes in capsule expression or structure (e.g. hypo- or hyper-encapsulation, capsule "switching", acetylation) can influence immunologic diagnostic assays or lead to immune escape. The loss or down-regulation of capsule is also critical in meningococcal biology facilitating meningococcal attachment, microcolony formation and the carriage state at human mucosal surfaces. Encapsulated meningococci contain a cps locus with promoters located in an intergenic region between the biosynthesis and the conserved capsule transport operons. The cps intergenic region is transcriptionally regulated (and thus the amount of capsule expressed) by IS element insertion, by a two-component system, MisR/MisS and through sequence changes that result in post-transcriptional RNA thermoregulation. Reversible on-off phase variation of capsule expression is controlled by slipped strand mispairing of homo-polymeric tracts and by precise insertion and excision of IS elements (e.g. IS1301) in the biosynthesis operon. Capsule structure can be altered by phase-variable expression of capsular polymer modification enzymes or "switched" through transformation and homologous recombination of different polymerases. Understanding the complex regulation of meningococcal capsule has important implications for meningococcal biology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, current and future vaccine development and vaccine strategies. PMID:26089023

  5. Identification of lung cancer miRNA-miRNA co-regulation networks through a progressive data refining approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Renhua; Catchpoole, Daniel R; Kennedy, Paul J; Li, Jinyan

    2015-09-01

    Co-regulations of miRNAs have been much less studied than the research on regulations between miRNAs and their target genes, although these two problems are equally important for understanding the entire mechanisms of complex post-transcriptional regulations. The difficulty to construct a miRNA-miRNA co-regulation network lies in how to determine reliable miRNA pairs from various resources of data related to the same disease such as expression levels, gene ontology (GO) databases, and protein-protein interactions. Here we take a novel integrative approach to the discovery of miRNA-miRNA co-regulation networks. This approach can progressively refine the various types of data and the computational analysis results. Applied to three lung cancer miRNA expression data sets of different subtypes, our method has identified a miRNA-miRNA co-regulation network and co-regulating functional modules common to lung cancer. An example of these functional modules consists of genes SMAD2, ACVR1B, ACVR2A and ACVR2B. This module is synergistically regulated by let-7a/b/c/f, is enriched in the same GO category, and has a close proximity in the protein interaction network. We also find that the co-regulation network is scale free and that lung cancer related miRNAs have more synergism in the network. According to our literature survey and database validation, many of these results are biologically meaningful for understanding the mechanism of the complex post-transcriptional regulations in lung cancer. PMID:26026830

  6. Nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleolin is a multi-functional protein that is located to the nucleolus. In tissue culture cells, the stability of nucleolin is related to the proliferation status of the cell. During development, rat cardiomyocytes proliferate actively with increases in the mass of the heart being due to both hyperplasia and hypertrophy. The timing of this shift in the phenotype of the myocyte from one capable of undergoing hyperplasia to one that can grow only by hypertrophy occurs within 4 days of post-natal development. Thus, cardiomyocytes are an ideal model system in which to study the regulation of nucleolin during growth in vivo. Using Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR (TaqMan) we found that the amount of nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation during the development of the cardiomyocyte. However, in cells which had exited the cell cycle and were subsequently given a hypertrophic stimulus, nucleolin was regulated post-transcriptionally

  7. Regulation of mitochondrial DNA copy number during spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, A; Larsson, N G

    2000-07-01

    The nuclear genome is physically compacted during spermatogenesis by replacing histones with protamines and transition proteins. This altered nuclear protein context may make gene regulation at the transcriptional level less efficient and could explain why post-transcriptional regulation is prominent in haploid male germ cells. Mitochondria and mitochondrial (mt) DNA are maternally inherited, whereas the transmission of paternal mtDNA is blocked in mammals. The paternal mtDNA enters the oocyte but is no longer detectable in the preimplantation embryo. Several mechanisms could be responsible for preventing the transmission of paternal mtDNA, including the down-regulation of mtDNA copy number during spermatogenesis, specific elimination of paternal mitochondria in fertilized oocytes, and the suspension of mtDNA replication in the fertilized oocyte. It is the first of these that is the subject of the present review. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA, or Tfam) is a key regulator of mtDNA copy number in mammals. Germ cell-specific Tfam transcript isoforms are expressed during spermatogenesis in mice and humans. These alternative Tfam transcript isoforms have a structure that could prevent protein translation; their expression coincides with down-regulation of the mitochondrial Tfam protein values. We propose that this down-regulation of mitochondrial Tfam protein levels in turn down-regulates mtDNA copy number during mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:11041516

  8. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafzi, Atefeh; Kazan, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation. PMID:27186987

  9. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain nissle 1917

    OpenAIRE

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrede, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the c...

  10. Tristetraprolin Regulates Interleukin-6 Expression Through p38 MAPK-Dependent Affinity Changes with mRNA 3′ Untranslated Region

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Wenpu; LIU Min; D'Silva, Nisha J.; Kirkwood, Keith L.

    2011-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is a well-characterized, zinc finger-containing, RNA-binding protein. TTP targets tumor necrosis factor α for degradation via the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR). Although AU-rich elements (AREs) in the 3′UTR of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA dictate mRNA degradation, the role of TTP in the post-transcriptional regulation of IL-6 gene expression is unclear. Here we used TTP-deficient mice to test the hypothesis that IL-6 expression is influenced by TTP. Genetic and siRNA-media...

  11. Regulation of Human RNase-L by the miR-29 Family Reveals a Novel Oncogenic Role in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Teresa Y.; Ezelle, Heather J.; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Lapidus, Rena G.; Scheibner, Kara A.; Hassel, Bret A.

    2013-01-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase-L is the terminal component of an interferon-regulated RNA decay pathway known as the 2′-5′-oligoadenylate (2–5A) system, whose established functions include antimicrobial and tumor suppressive activities. RNase-L activity requires binding of the small molecule 2–5A, leading to RNase-L dimerization and cleavage of single-stranded RNA. RNase-L expression is controlled post-transcriptionally by its 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR), which exerts a strong negative effect...

  12. MicroRNA, SND1, and alterations in translational regulation in colon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by microRNA (miRNA) has recently attracted major interest in relation to its involvement in cancer development. miRNA is a member of small non-coding RNA, consists of 22-24 nucleotides and regulates expression of target mRNA species in a post-transcriptional manner by being incorporated with RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Staphylococcal nuclease homology domain containing 1 (SND1), a component of RISC, is frequently up-regulated in human colon cancers and also chemically induced colon cancers in animals. We here showed that SDN1 is involved in miRNA-mediated gene suppression and overexpression of SND1 in colon cancer cells causes down-regulation of APC without altering APC mRNA levels. As for the miRNA expression profile in human colon cancer, miR-34a was among the list of down-regulated miRNA. Expression of miR-34a is tightly regulated by p53, and ectopic expression of miR-34a in colon cancer cells causes remarkable reduction of cell proliferation and induces senescence-like phenotypes. MiR-34a also participates in the positive feedback loop of the p53 tumor suppressor network. This circuitry mechanism for p53 activation is of interest in understanding the tumor suppressive function of miR-34a in colon carcinogenesis. miRNA should also be considered as novel anti-cancer agents in tumor suppressive therapeutic applications.

  13. Down-Regulation of Gene Expression by RNA-Induced Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travella, Silvia; Keller, Beat

    Down-regulation of endogenous genes via post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a key to the characterization of gene function in plants. Many RNA-based silencing mechanisms such as post-transcriptional gene silencing, co-suppression, quelling, and RNA interference (RNAi) have been discovered among species of different kingdoms (plants, fungi, and animals). One of the most interesting discoveries was RNAi, a sequence-specific gene-silencing mechanism initiated by the introduction of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), homologous in sequence to the silenced gene, which triggers degradation of mRNA. Infection of plants with modified viruses can also induce RNA silencing and is referred to as virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In contrast to insertional mutagenesis, these emerging new reverse genetic approaches represent a powerful tool for exploring gene function and for manipulating gene expression experimentally in cereal species such as barley and wheat. We examined how RNAi and VIGS have been used to assess gene function in barley and wheat, including molecular mechanisms involved in the process and available methodological elements, such as vectors, inoculation procedures, and analysis of silenced phenotypes.

  14. Analysis of cDNAs and Genomic DNA of Snake Venom CTL-like Proteins Revealed An Extraordinary Post-transcriptional Processing Event%蛇毒C型凝集素类蛋白cDNA与基因组DNA序列分析显示特别的转录后加工

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    查向东; 周立志; 黄河胜; 刘兢; 徐康森

    2004-01-01

    为研究蛇毒C型凝集素类蛋白的快速进化机制和结构功能关系,使用PCR技术扩增了若干编码C型凝集素类蛋白β链的cDNA分子以及agkisasin β的基因组DNA,并将这些扩增产物进行克隆和测序.对测序结果与试验过程中的具体条件进行了因果关系分析,并且进行点阵图比较和多序列比对.结果表明,可能存在"转录后同源重组"等转录后的事件,在蛇毒C型凝集素类蛋白的多样性上起着重要的作用.对于解释基因数目与蛋白质数目的差异这一后基因组时代的重要问题,具有一定的参考价值.首次报告蛇毒C型凝集素类蛋白的基因组DNA序列,其中未发现有内含子.%To better understand the accelerated evolution of snake venom C-type lectin-like proteins (CTL-like proteins) and to investigate the structure-function relationships, PCR was conducted to amplify cDNAs coding for the β chains of snake venom CTL-like proteins and the genomic DNA of agkisasin β. The reaction products were cloned and sequenced. The causal relationships between the sequences and the experimental conditions were established. Dot plot analysis and multiple alignments were also performed. The results suggested the existence of a post-transcriptional processing event that was essentially homologous recombination at the RNA level, which might play an important role in the diversity of snake venom CTL-like proteins. This inference would provide a novel perspective for explaining a challenging problem of the post-genomic era: the discrepancy between the limited number of genes and the large collection of cDNAs, which was most prominent with regard to certain snake venom proteins. The genomic DNA of a snake venom C-type lectin-like protein was elucidated and no introns were found in the coding region.

  15. Deciphering the components that coordinately regulate virulence factors of the soft rot pathogen Dickeya dadantii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaogang; Zeng, Quan; Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M; Sundin, George W; Hutchins, William; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial soft rot pathogen Dickeya dadantii utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress host defense responses, and secretes pectate lyase (Pel) to disintegrate the plant cell wall. A transposon mutagenesis fluorescence-activated cell sorting screen was used to identify mutants with altered promoter activities of the T3SS pilus gene hrpA. Several insertion mutations, resulting in changes in hrpA expression, were mapped to a new locus, opgGH, which encodes the gene cluster responsible for osmoregulated periplasmic glucan (OPG) synthesis proteins. Our data showed that OPG was involved in T3SS and Pel regulation by altering the expression of the regulatory small RNA RsmB. Through genome searching, the mechanism of two novel regulatory components, the RcsCD-RcsB phosphorelay and CsrD on OPG and the rsmB gene, was further investigated. The Rcs phosphorelay and OPG inversely regulated rsmB at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, respectively. CsrD exhibited dual functionality in T3SS and Pel regulation by manipulating levels of RsmB RNA and cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP). CsrD positively regulated the promoter activity of the rsmB gene but negatively controlled RsmB RNA at the post-transcriptional level via OpgGH. In addition, CsrD contains both GGDEF and EAL domains but acted as a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. When the expression of the csrD gene was induced, CsrD regulated T3SS expression and Pel production through controlling intracellular c-di-GMP levels. PMID:25180688

  16. Regulation of gene expression in neuronal tissue by RNA interference and editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venø, Morten Trillingsgaard

    No tissue in the mammalian organism is more complex than the brain. This complexity is in part the result of precise timing and interplay of a large number mechanisms modulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. Fine-tuning mechanisms such as A-to-I editing of RNA transcripts and regulation...... mediated by microRNAs are crucial for the correct function of the mammalian brain. We are addressing A-to-I editing and regulation by microRNAs with spatio-temporal resolution in the embryonic porcine brain by Solexa sequencing of microRNAs and 454 sequencing of edited neuronal messenger RNAs, resulting in......RNAs, causing these transgenic mice to be less prone to cocaine addictive behavior. Another study demonstrated that abolishing the expression of histone methylases, GLP and G9a, increases the expression level of a large number of miRNAs. A possible feed-back mechanism is suggested, since a subset of these mi...

  17. Global analysis of neuronal phosphoproteome regulation by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Yu

    Full Text Available Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs are major components of the extracellular matrix which mediate inhibition of axonal regeneration after injury to the central nervous system (CNS. Several neuronal receptors for CSPGs have recently been identified; however, the signaling pathways by which CSPGs restrict axonal growth are still largely unknown. In this study, we applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the global changes in protein phosphorylation induced by CSPGs in primary neurons. In combination with isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ labeling, strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX fractionation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC and LC-MS/MS, we identified and quantified 2214 unique phosphopeptides corresponding to 1118 phosphoproteins, with 118 changing significantly in abundance with CSPG treatment. The proteins that were regulated by CSPGs included key components of synaptic vesicle trafficking, axon guidance mediated by semaphorins, integrin signaling, cadherin signaling and EGF receptor signaling pathways. A significant number of the regulated proteins are cytoskeletal and related proteins that have been implicated in regulating neurite growth. Another highly represented protein category regulated by CSPGs is nucleic acid binding proteins involved in RNA post-transcriptional regulation. Together, by screening the overall phosphoproteome changes induced by CSPGs, this data expand our understanding of CSPG signaling, which provides new insights into development of strategies for overcoming CSPG inhibition and promoting axonal regeneration after CNS injury.

  18. WT1 interacts with the splicing protein RBM4 and regulates its ability to modulate alternative splicing in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilm's tumor protein 1 (WT1), a protein implicated in various cancers and developmental disorders, consists of two major isoforms: WT1(-KTS), a transcription factor, and WT1(+KTS), a post-transcriptional regulator that binds to RNA and can interact with splicing components. Here we show that WT1 interacts with the novel splicing regulator RBM4. Each protein was found to colocalize in nuclear speckles and to cosediment with supraspliceosomes in glycerol gradients. RBM4 conferred dose-dependent and cell-specific regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs transcribed from several reporter genes. We found that overexpressed WT1(+KTS) abrogated this effect of RBM4 on splice-site selection, whereas WT1(-KTS) did not. We conclude that the (+KTS) form of WT1 is able to inhibit the effect of RBM4 on alternative splicing

  19. Regulation of MiR-124, Let-7d, and MiR-181a in the accumbens affects the expression, extinction, and reinstatement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekar, Vijay; Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Molecular adaptations underlying drug seeking and relapse remain largely unknown. Studies highlight post-transcriptional modifications mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) in addiction and other neurological disorders. We have previously shown that chronic cocaine suppresses miR-124 and let-7d and induces the expression of miR-181a in mesolimbic pathway. To further address the role and target gene regulation network of these miRNAs in vivo in cocaine addiction, we developed lentiviral vector (LV)-e...

  20. Identification of MyD88 as a novel target of miR-155, involved in negative regulation of Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Xiao, Bin; Liu, Zhen; Li, Na; Zhu, En-Dong; Li, Bo-Sheng; Xie, Qing-Hua; Zhuang, Yuan; Zou, Quan-Ming; Mao, Xu-Hu

    2010-04-16

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) has been implicated as a central regulator of the immune system. We have previously reported that miR-155 negatively regulates Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation, but the molecular mechanism of miR-155 regulating the inflammation is not fully clear. Here, we identified myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88) as a target gene of miR-155, and found that miR-155 decreased MyD88 expression at the protein but not the mRNA message level, suggesting that the miR-155-mediated inhibition is a post-transcriptional event. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-155 led to significantly reduced IL-8 production induced by H. pylori infection. Thus, we have demonstrated that miR-155 can negatively regulate inflammation by targeting a key adaptor molecule MyD88 in inflammatory pathways. PMID:20219467

  1. Epigenetic regulation in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pranoti Mandrekar

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by steatosis or fat deposition in the liver and inflammation, which leads to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Induction of target genes without involving changes in DNA sequence seems to contribute greatly to liver injury. Chromatin modifications including alterations in histones and DNA, as well as post-transcriptional changes collectively referred to as epigenetic effects are altered by alcohol. Recent studies have pointed to a significant role for epigenetic mechanisms at the nucleosomal level influencing gene expression and disease outcome in ALD. Specifically, epigenetic alterations by alcohol include histone modifications such as changes in acetylation and phosphorylation, hypomethylation of DNA, and alterations in miRNAs. These modifications can be induced by alcohol-induced oxidative stress that results in altered recruitment of transcriptional machinery and abnormal gene expression. Delineating these mechanisms in initiation and progression of ALD is becoming a major area of interest. This review summarizes key epigenetic mechanisms that are dysregulated by alcohol in the liver. Alterations by alcohol in histone and DNA modifications, enzymes related to histone acetylation such as histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetylases and sirtuins, and methylation enzymes such as DNA methyltransferases are discussed. Chromatin modifications and miRNA alterations that result in immune cell dysfunction contributing to inflammatory cytokine production in ALD is reviewed. Finally, the role of alcohol-mediated oxidative stress in epigenetic regulation in ALD is described. A better understanding of these mechanisms is crucial for designing novel epigenetic based therapies to ameliorate ALD.

  2. Theoretical studies on sRNA-mediated regulation in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiao-Xue; Xu, Liu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Small RNA(sRNA)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation differs from protein-mediated regulation. Through base-pairing, sRNA can regulate the target mRNA in a catalytic or stoichiometric manner. Some theoretical models were built for comparison of the protein-mediated and sRNA-mediated modes in the steady-state behaviors and noise properties. Many experiments demonstrated that a single sRNA can regulate several mRNAs, which causes crosstalk between the targets. Here, we focus on some models in which two target mRNAs are silenced by the same sRNA to discuss their crosstalk features. Additionally, the sequence-function relationship of sRNA and its role in the kinetic process of base-pairing have been highlighted in model building. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11274320), the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y4KF171CJ1), the National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scholar of China (Grant No. 11304115), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M541282).

  3. Quantifying negative feedback regulation by micro-RNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation by pairing with target mRNAs to repress protein production. It has been shown that over one-third of human genes are targeted by miRNA. Although hundreds of miRNAs have been identified in mammalian genomes, the function of miRNA-based repression in the context of gene regulation networks still remains unclear. In this study, we explore the functional roles of feedback regulation by miRNAs. In a model where repression of translation occurs by sequestration of mRNA by miRNA, we find that miRNA and mRNA levels are anti-correlated, resulting in larger fluctuation in protein levels than theoretically expected assuming no correlation between miRNA and mRNA levels. If miRNA repression is due to a catalytic suppression of translation rates, we analytically show that the protein fluctuations can be strongly repressed with miRNA regulation. We also discuss how either of these modes may be relevant for cell function

  4. Mcl-1 Ubiquitination: Unique Regulation of an Essential Survival Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mojsa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family that is essential for the survival of multiple cell lineages and that is highly amplified in human cancer. Under physiological conditions, Mcl-1 expression is tightly regulated at multiple levels, involving transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes. Ubiquitination of Mcl-1, that targets it for proteasomal degradation, allows for rapid elimination of the protein and triggering of cell death, in response to various cellular events. In the last decade, a number of studies have elucidated different pathways controlling Mcl-1 ubiquitination and degradation. Four different E3 ubiquitin-ligases (e.g., Mule, SCFβ-TrCP, SCFFbw7 and Trim17 and one deubiquitinase (e.g., USP9X, that respectively mediate and oppose Mcl-1 ubiquitination, have been formerly identified. The interaction between Mule and Mcl-1 can be modulated by other Bcl-2 family proteins, while recognition of Mcl-1 by the other E3 ubiquitin-ligases and deubiquitinase is influenced by phosphorylation of specific residues in Mcl-1. The protein kinases and E3 ubiquitin-ligases that are involved in the regulation of Mcl-1 stability vary depending on the cellular context, highlighting the complexity and pivotal role of Mcl-1 regulation. In this review, we attempt to recapitulate progress in understanding Mcl-1 regulation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  5. Hepatic drug transporters and nuclear receptors: Regulation by therapeutic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The canalicular membrane represents the excretory pole of hepatocytes. Bile is an important route of elimina-tion of potentially toxic endo- and xenobiotics (including drugs and toxins), mediated by the major canalicular transporters: multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1, ABCB1), also known as P-glycoprotein, multidrug re-sistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2). Their activities depend on regulation of expression and proper localization at the canalicular membrane, as regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional events, re-spectively. At transcriptional level, specific nuclear re-ceptors (NR)s modulated by ligands, co-activators and co-repressors, mediate the physiological requirements of these transporters. This complex system is also re-sponsible for alterations occurring in specific liver pa-thologies. We briefly describe the major Class Ⅱ NRs, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and their role in regulating expression of multidrug resistance proteins. Several therapeutic agents regulate the expression of relevant drug trans-porters through activation/inactivation of these NRs. We provide some representative examples of the action of therapeutic agents modulating liver drug transporters, which in addition, involve CAR or PXR as mediators.

  6. Translation regulation gets its 'omics' moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuersten, Scott; Radek, Agnes; Vogel, Christine; Penalva, Luiz O F

    2013-01-01

    The fate of cellular RNA is largely determined by complex networks of protein-RNA interactions through ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Despite their relatively short half-life, transcripts associate with many different proteins that process, modify, translate, and degrade the RNA. Following biogenesis some mRNPs are immediately directed to translation and produce proteins, but many are diverted and regulated by processes including miRNA-mediated mechanisms, transport and localization, as well as turnover. Because of this complex interplay estimates of steady-state expression by methods such as RNAseq alone cannot capture critical aspects of cellular fate, environmental response, tumorigenesis, or gene expression regulation. More selective and integrative tools are needed to measure protein-RNA complexes and the regulatory processes involved. One focus area is measurements of the transcriptome associated with ribosomes and translation. These so-called polysome or ribosome profiling techniques can evaluate translation efficiency as well as the interplay between translation initiation, elongation, and termination-subject areas not well understood at a systems biology level. Ribosome profiling is a highly promising technique that provides mRNA positional information of ribosome occupancy, potentially bridging the gap between gene expression (i.e., RNAseq and microarray analysis) and protein quantification (i.e., mass spectrometry). In combination with methods such as RNA immunoprecipitation, miRNA profiling, or proteomics, we obtain a fresh view of global post-transcriptional and translational gene regulation. In addition, these techniques also provide new insight into new regulatory elements, such as alternative open reading frames, and translation regulation under different conditions. PMID:23677826

  7. Differential trypanosome surface coat regulation by a CCCH protein that co-associates with procyclin mRNA cis-elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pegine Walrad

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The genome of Trypanosoma brucei is unusual in being regulated almost entirely at the post-transcriptional level. In terms of regulation, the best-studied genes are procyclins, which encode a family of major surface GPI-anchored glycoproteins (EP1, EP2, EP3, GPEET that show differential expression in the parasite's tsetse-fly vector. Although procyclin mRNA cis-regulatory sequences have provided the paradigm for post-transcriptional control in kinetoplastid parasites, trans-acting regulators of procyclin mRNAs are unidentified, despite intensive effort over 15 years. Here we identify the developmental regulator, TbZFP3, a CCCH-class predicted RNA binding protein, as an isoform-specific regulator of Procyclin surface coat expression in trypanosomes. We demonstrate (i that endogenous TbZFP3 shows sequence-specific co-precipitation of EP1 and GPEET, but not EP2 and EP3, procyclin mRNA isoforms, (ii that ectopic overexpression of TbZFP3 does not perturb the mRNA abundance of procyclin transcripts, but rather that (iii their protein expression is regulated in an isoform-specific manner, as evidenced by mass spectrometric analysis of the Procyclin expression signature in the transgenic cell lines. The TbZFP3 mRNA-protein complex (TbZFP3mRNP is identified as a trans-regulator of differential surface protein expression in trypanosomes. Moreover, its sequence-specific interactions with procyclin mRNAs are compatible with long-established predictions for Procyclin regulation. Combined with the known association of TbZFP3 with the translational apparatus, this study provides a long-sought missing link between surface protein cis-regulatory signals and the gene expression machinery in trypanosomes.

  8. MicroRNAs: not ‘fine-tuners’ but key regulators of neuronal development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory eDavis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are a class of short non-coding RNAs that operate as prominent post-transcriptional regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. miRNAs are abundantly expressed in the brain of most animals and exert diverse roles. The anatomical and functional complexity of brain requires the precise coordination of multi-layered gene regulatory networks. The flexibility, speed and reversibility of miRNA function provide precise temporal and spatial gene regulatory capabilities that are crucial for the correct functioning of the brain. Studies have shown that the underlying molecular mechanisms controlled by miRNAs in the nervous systems of invertebrate and vertebrate models are remarkably conserved in humans. We endeavour to provide insight into the roles of miRNAs in the nervous systems of these model organisms and discuss how such information may be used to inform regarding diseases of the human brain.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Hepcidin Revealed by Hepcidin Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for human life, but toxic if present in excess. To avoid iron overload and maintain iron homeostasis, all cells are able to regulate their iron content through the post-transcriptional control of iron genes operated by the cytosolic iron regulatory proteins that interact with iron responsive elements on iron gene mRNA. At the systemic level, iron homeostasis is regulated by the liver peptide hepcidin. Disruption of these regulatory loops leads to genetic diseases characterized by iron deficiency (iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia or iron overload (hemochromatosis. Alterations of the same systems are also found in acquired disorders, such as iron-loading anemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and anemia of chronic diseases (ACD associated with common inflammatory conditions. In ACD, iron is present in the body, but maldistributed, being deficient for erythropoiesis, but sequestered in macrophages. Studies of the hepcidin regulation by iron and inflammatory cytokines are revealing new pathways that might become targets of new therapeutic intervention in iron disorders.

  10. Involvement of RNA-binding protein Hfq in the osmotic-response regulation of invE gene expression in Shigella sonnei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihama Akira

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of Type III secretion system (TTSS in Shigella is regulated in response to changes in environmental osmolarity and temperature. Temperature-dependent regulation of virF, the master regulator of TTSS synthesis, is believed to occur at the transcriptional level. We recently demonstrated, however, that TTSS synthesis also involves post-transcriptional regulation of the synthesis of InvE, a target of virF and key regulator of TTSS synthesis. The mRNA levels of invE (virB are stable at 37°C, but mRNA stability markedly decreases at low temperatures where the TTSS synthesis is tightly repressed. Deletion of hfq, which encodes an RNA chaperone in Gram-negative bacteria, results in the restoration of expression of invE and other TTSS genes at low temperature due to an increase in the stability of invE mRNA. To date, the molecular details of the regulation of TTSS expression in response to osmotic pressure are not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism of regulation of TTSS by osmotic pressure. Results Transcription of virF, which encodes the master regulator of TTSS expression, was partially repressed under low osmotic conditions. Several lines of evidence indicated that osmolarity-dependent changes in TTSS synthesis are controlled at the post-transcriptional level, through the regulation of InvE synthesis. First, the expression InvE protein was tightly repressed under low osmotic growth conditions, even though invE mRNA transcripts were readily detectable. Second, under low osmotic conditions, invE mRNA was rapidly degraded, whereas deletion of hfq, which encodes an RNA chaperone, resulted in increased invE mRNA stability and the production of InvE protein. Third, the binding of purified Hfq in vitro to invE RNA was stronger in low-salt buffer, as assessed by gel-shift analysis and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore analysis. Conclusion Osmolarity-dependent changes in TTSS synthesis in Shigella

  11. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  12. Translational regulation of acetylcholinesterase by the RNA-binding protein Pumilio-2 at the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Emilio; Rossi, Susana G; Darr, Andrew; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Rotundo, Richard L

    2011-10-21

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is highly expressed at sites of nerve-muscle contact where it is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation is incomplete, but they appear to involve both translational and post-translational events as well. Here, we show that Pumilio-2 (PUM2), an RNA binding translational repressor, is highly localized at the neuromuscular junction where AChE mRNA concentrates. Immunoprecipitation of muscle cell extracts with a PUM2 specific antibody precipitated AChE mRNA, suggesting that PUM2 binds to the AChE transcripts in a complex. Gel shift assays using a bacterially expressed PUM2 RNA binding domain showed specific binding using wild type AChE 3'-UTR RNA segment that was abrogated by mutation of the consensus recognition site. Transfecting skeletal muscle cells with shRNAs specific for PUM2 up-regulated AChE expression, whereas overexpression of PUM2 decreased AChE activity. We conclude that PUM2 binds to AChE mRNA and regulates AChE expression translationally at the neuromuscular synapse. Finally, we found that PUM2 is regulated by the motor nerve suggesting a trans-synaptic mechanism for locally regulating translation of specific proteins involved in modulating synaptic transmission, analogous to CNS synapses. PMID:21865157

  13. Translational Regulation of Acetylcholinesterase by the RNA-binding Protein Pumilio-2 at the Neuromuscular Synapse*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Emilio; Rossi, Susana G.; Darr, Andrew; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Rotundo, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is highly expressed at sites of nerve-muscle contact where it is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation is incomplete, but they appear to involve both translational and post-translational events as well. Here, we show that Pumilio-2 (PUM2), an RNA binding translational repressor, is highly localized at the neuromuscular junction where AChE mRNA concentrates. Immunoprecipitation of muscle cell extracts with a PUM2 specific antibody precipitated AChE mRNA, suggesting that PUM2 binds to the AChE transcripts in a complex. Gel shift assays using a bacterially expressed PUM2 RNA binding domain showed specific binding using wild type AChE 3′-UTR RNA segment that was abrogated by mutation of the consensus recognition site. Transfecting skeletal muscle cells with shRNAs specific for PUM2 up-regulated AChE expression, whereas overexpression of PUM2 decreased AChE activity. We conclude that PUM2 binds to AChE mRNA and regulates AChE expression translationally at the neuromuscular synapse. Finally, we found that PUM2 is regulated by the motor nerve suggesting a trans-synaptic mechanism for locally regulating translation of specific proteins involved in modulating synaptic transmission, analogous to CNS synapses. PMID:21865157

  14. MicroRNAs: Key Regulators in the Central Nervous System and Their Implication in Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Cao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, well-conserved noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been demonstrated to regulate a lot of biological pathways and cellular functions. Many miRNAs are dynamically regulated during central nervous system (CNS development and are spatially expressed in adult brain indicating their essential roles in neural development and function. In addition, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysfunction of miRNAs contributes to neurological diseases. These observations, together with their gene regulation property, implicated miRNAs to be the key regulators in the complex genetic network of the CNS. In this review, we first focus on the ways through which miRNAs exert the regulatory function and how miRNAs are regulated in the CNS. We then summarize recent findings that highlight the versatile roles of miRNAs in normal CNS physiology and their association with several types of neurological diseases. Subsequently we discuss the limitations of miRNAs research based on current studies as well as the potential therapeutic applications and challenges of miRNAs in neurological disorders. We endeavor to provide an updated description of the regulatory roles of miRNAs in normal CNS functions and pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  15. Regulation of Cell Proliferation and Migration by miR-203 via GAS41/miR-10b Axis in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dhananjaya; Mukhopadhyay, Debasmita; Ramaiah, M. Janaki; Sarma, Pranjal; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal

    2016-01-01

    Glioma amplified sequence 41(GAS41) is a potent transcription factor that play a crucial role in cell proliferation and survival. In glioblastoma, the expression of GAS41 at both transcriptional and post transcriptional level needs to be tightly maintained in response to cellular signals. Micro RNAs (miRNA) are small non coding RNA that act as important regulators for modulating the expression of various target genes. Studies have shown that several miRNAs play role in the post-transcriptional regulation of GAS41. Here we identified GAS41 as a novel target for endogenous miR-203 and demonstrate an inverse correlation of miR-203 expression with GAS41 in glioma cell lines (HNGC2 and U87). Over expression of miR-203 negatively regulates GAS41 expression in U87 and HNGC2 cell lines. Moreover, miR-203 restrained miR-10b action by suppressing GAS41. GAS41 is essential for repressing p53 in tumor suppressor pathway during cell proliferation. Enforced expression of GAS41 produced contradictory effect on miR-203 but was able to enhance p53 tumor suppressor pathway associated protein. It was also found that miR-203 maintains the stability of p53 as knock down of p53 expression using siRNA resulted in down regulation of pri-miR and mature miR-203 expression. Conversely reconstitution of miR-203 expression induced apoptosis and inhibited migratory property of glioma cells. Taken together, we show that miR-203 is a key negative regulator of GAS41 and acts as tumor suppressor microRNA in glioma. PMID:27467502

  16. A non-coding RNA promotes bacterial persistence and decreases virulence by regulating a regulator in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Romilly

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus produces a high number of RNAs for which the functions are poorly understood. Several non-coding RNAs carry a C-rich sequence suggesting that they regulate mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. We demonstrate that the Sigma B-dependent RsaA RNA represses the synthesis of the global transcriptional regulator MgrA by forming an imperfect duplex with the Shine and Dalgarno sequence and a loop-loop interaction within the coding region of the target mRNA. These two recognition sites are required for translation repression. Consequently, RsaA causes enhanced production of biofilm and a decreased synthesis of capsule formation in several strain backgrounds. These phenotypes led to a decreased protection of S. aureus against opsonophagocytic killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes compared to the mutant strains lacking RsaA. Mice animal models showed that RsaA attenuates the severity of acute systemic infections and enhances chronic catheter infection. RsaA takes part in a regulatory network that contributes to the complex interactions of S. aureus with the host immune system to moderate invasiveness and favour chronic infections. It is the first example of a conserved small RNA in S. aureus functioning as a virulence suppressor of acute infections. Because S. aureus is essentially a human commensal, we propose that RsaA has been positively selected through evolution to support commensalism and saprophytic interactions with the host.

  17. MicroRNA-450a-3p represses cell proliferation and regulates embryo development by regulating Bub1 expression in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Luo

    Full Text Available Bub1 is a critical component of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC and closely linked to cell proliferation and differentiation. We previously found that spontaneous abortion embryos contained a low level of Bub1 protein but normal mRNA level, while the knockdown of Bub1 leads to abnormal numerical chromosomes in embryonic cells. Here, we investigated the mechanism through which governs the post-transcriptional regulation of Bub1 protein expression level. We first conducted bioinformatics analysis and identified eight putative miRNAs that may target Bub1. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-450a-3p can directly regulate Bub1 by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of Bub1 mRNA. We found that the overexpression of miR-450a-3p in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells down-regulated Bub1 protein level, repressed cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and restricted most cells in G1 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, when the fertilized eggs were microinjected with miR-450a-3p mimics, the cleavage of zygotes was effectively suppressed. Our results strongly suggest that an abnormally decreased Bub1 level regulated by miRNAs may be implicated in the pathogenesis of spontaneous miscarriage. Therefore, the blockade of miR-450a-3p may be explored as a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing spontaneous miscarriages.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Muscle Fiber Composition Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Nadia A.

    1999-01-01

    upstream targets for the effects of weightlessness. In the past year we have determined that the expression of E Proteins is restricted to specific fiber types by post-transcriptional mechanisms. By far, the most prevalent mechanism of cellular control for achieving post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is selective proteolysis -through the ubiquitin -proteasome pathway. Steady-state levels of HEB message are similar in all fast and slow skeletal muscle fiber types, yet the protein is restricted to Type IIX fibers. HEB appears to be a nodal point for regulating fiber-specific transcription, as expression of the transcription factor is regulated at the post-transcriptional level. It is not clear at present whether the regulation is at the level of protein synthesis or degradation. We are now poised to evaluate the biological role of ubiquitination in fiber specific-gene expression by controlling the post-transcriptional expression of E Proteins. The use of metabolic labelling and pharmacological inhibitors of the ubiquitin pathway will be used to identify the mode of regulation of the Type IIX expression pattern. The potential role of specific kinases in effecting the restriction of HEB expression will be examined by using both inhibitors and activators. The results of these studies will provide the necessary information to evaluate the biological role of E proteins in controlling fiber type transitions, and in potentially attenuating the atrophic effects of microgravity conditions. We have also recently shown that ectopic expression of the HEB protein transactivates the Type IIX-specific skeletal a-actin reporter. The 218 bp skeletal a-actin promoter drives transgene expression solely in mature Type IIX fibers. A mouse also carrying the transgene MLCI/HEB (which ectopically expresses the E Protein HEB in Type IIB fibers) forces expression of the skeletal a-actin reporter gene in Type IIB fibers. We can now dissect the composition of this fiber-specific cis

  19. Regulation of Pancreatic Beta Cell Stimulus-Secretion Coupling by microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L. S. Esguerra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased blood glucose after a meal is countered by the subsequent increased release of the hypoglycemic hormone insulin from the pancreatic beta cells. The cascade of molecular events encompassing the initial sensing and transport of glucose into the beta cell, culminating with the exocytosis of the insulin large dense core granules (LDCVs is termed “stimulus-secretion coupling.” Impairment in any of the relevant processes leads to insufficient insulin release, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The fate of the beta cell, when exposed to environmental triggers of the disease, is determined by the possibility to adapt to the new situation by regulation of gene expression. As established factors of post-transcriptional regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs are well-recognized mediators of beta cell plasticity and adaptation. Here, we put focus on the importance of comprehending the transcriptional regulation of miRNAs, and how miRNAs are implicated in stimulus-secretion coupling, specifically those influencing the late stages of insulin secretion. We suggest that efficient beta cell adaptation requires an optimal balance between transcriptional regulation of miRNAs themselves, and miRNA-dependent gene regulation. The increased knowledge of the beta cell transcriptional network inclusive of non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs is essential in identifying novel targets for the treatment of T2D.

  20. MicroRNA-24 Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation via Targeting T-Cell Factor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigong Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been reported to have diverse biological roles in regulating many biological processes, including osteogenic differentiation. In the present study, we identified that miR-24 was a critical regulator during osteogenic differentiation. We found that overexpression of miR-24 significantly inhibited osteogenic differentiation, which decreased alkaline phosphatase activity, matrix mineralization and the expression of osteogenic differentiation markers. In contrast, inhibition of miR-24 exhibited an opposite effect. Furthermore, we delineated that miR-24 regulates post-transcriptionals of T-cell factor-1 (Tcf-1 via targeting the 3'-untranslated region (UTR of Tcf-1 mRNA. MiR-24 was further found to regulate the protein expression of Tcf-1 in the murine osteoprogenitors cells and bone mesenchymal stem cells. Additionally, the positive effect of miR-24 suppression on osteoblast differentiation was apparently abrogated by Tcf-1 silencing. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-24 participates in osteogenic differentiation by targeting and regulating Tcf-1 expression in osteoblastic cells.

  1. Working together: combinatorial regulation by microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Yitzhak; Balaga, Ohad; Linial, Michal

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) negatively regulate gene expression level of mRNA post-transcriptionally. Deep sequencing and large-scale screening methods have yielded about 1,500 miRNA sequences in human. Each miRNA contains a seed sequence that is required, but not sufficient, for the correct matching with its targets. Recent technological advances make it possible to capture the miRNAs with their cognate mRNAs at the RISC complex. These experiments have revealed thousands of validated mRNA-miRNA pairing events. In the context of human stem cells, 90% of the identified transcripts appear to be paired with at least two different miRNAs.In this chapter, we present a comprehensive outline for a combinatorial regulation mode by miRNAs. Initially, we summarize the computational and experimental evidence that support a combined effect of multiple miRNAs. Then, we describe miRror2.0, a platform specifically convened to consider the likelihood of miRNAs cooperativity in view of the targets, tissues and cell lines. We show that results from miRror2.0 can be further refined by an iterative procedure, calls Psi-miRror that gauges the robustness of the regulation. We illustrate the combinatorial regulation projected onto graphs of human pathways and show that these pathways are amenable to disruption by a small set of miRNAs. Finally, we propose that miRNA combinatorial regulation is an attractive regulatory strategy not only at the level of single target, but also at the level of pathways and cellular homeostasis. The joint operation of miRNAs is a powerful means to overcome the low specificity inherent in each individual miRNA. PMID:23377980

  2. Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Remodeling and Its Impacts in Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Franz E

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics describes mechanisms which control gene expression and cellular processes without changing the DNA sequence. The main mechanisms in epigenetics are DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). DNA methylation modifies the function of the DNA and correlates with gene silencing. Histone modifications including acetylation/deacetylation and phosphorylation act in diverse biological processes such as transcriptional activation/inactivation and DNA repair. Non-coding RNAs play a large part in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in addition to their roles at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Osteoporosis is the most common skeletal disorder, characterized by compromised bone strength and bone micro-architectural deterioration that predisposes the bones to an increased risk of fracture. It is most often caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not sufficiently compensated by a corresponding increase in bone formation. Nowadays it is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder and there are genetic risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Here we review emerging evidence that epigenetics contributes to the machinery that can alter DNA structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during physiological and pathological bone remodeling. PMID:27598138

  3. Competing Endogenous RNA: The Key to Posttranscriptional Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rituparno Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Competing endogenous RNA, ceRNA, vie with messenger RNAs (mRNAs for microRNAs (miRNAs with shared miRNAs responses elements (MREs and act as modulator of miRNA by influencing the available level of miRNA. It has recently been discovered that, apart from protein-coding ceRNAs, pseudogenes, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs, and circular RNAs act as miRNA “sponges” by sharing common MRE, inhibiting normal miRNA targeting activity on mRNA. These MRE sharing elements form the posttranscriptional ceRNA network to regulate mRNA expression. ceRNAs are widely implicated in many biological processes. Recent studies have identified ceRNAs associated with a number of diseases including cancer. This brief review focuses on the molecular mechanism of ceRNA as part of the complex post-transcriptional regulatory circuit in cell and the impact of ceRNAs in development and disease.

  4. Market, Regulation, Market, Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Galland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the European Regulatory system which was settled both for opening the Single Market for products and ensuring the consumers' safety. It claims that the New Approach and Standardization, and the Global Approach to conformity assessment, which suppressed the last technical...... barriers to trade in Europe, realized the free movement of products by organizing progressively several orders of markets and regulation. Based on historical and institutional documents, on technical publications, and on interviews, this article relates how the European Commission and the Member States had...... alternatively recourse to markets and to regulations, at the three main levels of the New Approach Directives implementation. The article focuses also more specifically on the Medical Devices sector, not only because this New Approach sector has long been controversial in Europe, and has recently been concerned...

  5. miR-200a-3p regulates TLR1 expression in bacterial challenged miiuy croaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjin; Xu, Guoliang; Han, Jingjing; Xu, Tianjun

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are highly conserved, small non-coding RNAs which post-transcriptionally regulate various biological processes by repressing mRNA translation or degradating mRNA. It has been demonstrated that miRNAs play crucial roles in regulating the immune system. In this study, we explored the potential roles of miR-200a-3p in regulating TLR signaling pathway in miiuy croaker. Bioinformatics analysis showed that miiuy croaker TLR1 (mmiTLR1) was a putative target of miR-200a-3p. Negative expression profiles in spleen of Vibrio anguillarum challenged miiuy croaker and in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated miiuy croaker leukocytes further validated the prediction. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the dual-luciferase reporter fused to the 3'UTR of wild type mmiTLR1 cotransfected with miR-200a-3p mimics exhibited a reduction in luciferase activity compared with the controls. All of the present data provide direct evidence that miR-200a-3p is involved in TLR1 expression modulation in miiuy croaker, which will offer a basis for better understanding of miRNA regulation in fish TLR signaling pathways. PMID:27288848

  6. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  7. PECA: a novel statistical tool for deconvoluting time-dependent gene expression regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Guoshou; Vogel, Christine; Ghosh, Debashis; Kim, Sinae; Choi, Hyungwon

    2014-01-01

    Protein expression varies as a result of intricate regulation of synthesis and degradation of messenger RNAs (mRNA) and proteins. Studies of dynamic regulation typically rely on time-course data sets of mRNA and protein expression, yet there are no statistical methods that integrate these multiomics data and deconvolute individual regulatory processes of gene expression control underlying the observed concentration changes. To address this challenge, we developed Protein Expression Control Analysis (PECA), a method to quantitatively dissect protein expression variation into the contributions of mRNA synthesis/degradation and protein synthesis/degradation, termed RNA-level and protein-level regulation respectively. PECA computes the rate ratios of synthesis versus degradation as the statistical summary of expression control during a given time interval at each molecular level and computes the probability that the rate ratio changed between adjacent time intervals, indicating regulation change at the time point. Along with the associated false-discovery rates, PECA gives the complete description of dynamic expression control, that is, which proteins were up- or down-regulated at each molecular level and each time point. Using PECA, we analyzed two yeast data sets monitoring the cellular response to hyperosmotic and oxidative stress. The rate ratio profiles reported by PECA highlighted a large magnitude of RNA-level up-regulation of stress response genes in the early response and concordant protein-level regulation with time delay. However, the contributions of RNA- and protein-level regulation and their temporal patterns were different between the two data sets. We also observed several cases where protein-level regulation counterbalanced transcriptomic changes in the early stress response to maintain the stability of protein concentrations, suggesting that proteostasis is a proteome-wide phenomenon mediated by post-transcriptional regulation. PMID:24229407

  8. Alternative splicing regulation during C. elegans development: splicing factors as regulated targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Barberan-Soler

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates protein diversity and allows for post-transcriptional gene regulation. Estimates suggest that 10% of the genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative splicing. We constructed a splicing-sensitive microarray to detect alternative splicing for 352 cassette exons and tested for changes in alternative splicing of these genes during development. We found that the microarray data predicted that 62/352 (approximately 18% of the alternative splicing events studied show a strong change in the relative levels of the spliced isoforms (>4-fold during development. Confirmation of the microarray data by RT-PCR was obtained for 70% of randomly selected genes tested. Among the genes with the most developmentally regulated alternatively splicing was the hnRNP F/H splicing factor homolog, W02D3.11 - now named hrpf-1. For the cassette exon of hrpf-1, the inclusion isoform comprises 65% of hrpf-1 steady state messages in embryos but only 0.1% in the first larval stage. This dramatic change in the alternative splicing of an alternative splicing factor suggests a complex cascade of splicing regulation during development. We analyzed splicing in embryos from a strain with a mutation in the splicing factor sym-2, another hnRNP F/H homolog. We found that approximately half of the genes with large alternative splicing changes between the embryo and L1 stages are regulated by sym-2 in embryos. An analysis of the role of nonsense-mediated decay in regulating steady-state alternative mRNA isoforms was performed. We found that 8% of the 352 events studied have alternative isoforms whose relative steady-state levels in embryos change more than 4-fold in a nonsense-mediated decay mutant, including hrpf-1. Strikingly, 53% of these alternative splicing events that are affected by NMD in our experiment are not obvious substrates for NMD based on the presence of premature termination codons. This suggests that the targeting of splicing factors

  9. A novel cytoprotective function for the DNA repair protein Ku in regulating p53 mRNA translation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamaa, Assala; Le Bras, Morgane; Skuli, Nicolas; Britton, Sébastien; Frit, Philippe; Calsou, Patrick; Prats, Hervé; Cammas, Anne; Millevoi, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Ku heterodimer is a DNA binding protein with a prominent role in DNA repair. Here, we investigate whether and how Ku impacts the DNA damage response by acting as a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. We show that Ku represses p53 protein synthesis and p53-mediated apoptosis by binding to a bulged stem-loop structure within the p53 5' UTR However, Ku-mediated translational repression of the p53 mRNA is relieved after genotoxic stress. The underlying mechanism involves Ku acetylation which disrupts Ku-p53 mRNA interactions. These results suggest that Ku-mediated repression of p53 mRNA translation constitutes a novel mechanism linking DNA repair and mRNA translation. PMID:26964895

  10. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis During Fruit Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lado, Joanna; Zacarías, Lorenzo; Rodrigo, María Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are recognized as the main pigments in most fruit crops, providing colours that range from yellow and pink to deep orange and red. Moreover, the edible portion of widely consumed fruits or their derived products represent a major dietary source of carotenoids for animals and humans. Therefore, these pigments are crucial compounds contributing to fruit aesthetic and nutritional quality but may also have protecting and ecophysiological functions in coloured fruits. Among plant organs, fruits display one of the most heterogeneous carotenoids patterns in terms of diversity and abundance. In this chapter a comprehensive list of the carotenoid content and profile in the most commonly cultivated fleshy fruits is reported. The proposed fruit classification systems attending to carotenoid composition are revised and discussed. The regulation of carotenoids in fruits can be rather complex due to the dramatic changes in content and composition during ripening, which are also dependent on the fruit tissue and the developmental stage. In addition, carotenoid accumulation is a dynamic process, associated with the development of chromoplasts during ripening. As a general rule, carotenoid accumulation is highly controlled at the transcriptional level of the structural and accessory proteins of the biosynthetic and degradation pathways, but other mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modifications or the development of sink structures have been recently revealed as crucial factors in determining the levels and stability of these pigments. In this chapter common key metabolic reactions regulating carotenoid composition in fruit tissues are described in addition to others that are restricted to certain species and generate unique carotenoids patterns. The existence of fruit-specific isoforms for key steps such as the phytoene synthase, lycopene β-cyclases or catabolic carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases has allowed an independent regulation of the pathway in fruit tissues

  11. miRNA-target prediction based on transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara Toyofumi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are tiny endogenous RNAs that have been discovered in animals and plants, and direct the post-transcriptional regulation of target mRNAs for degradation or translational repression via binding to the 3'UTRs and the coding exons. To gain insight into the biological role of miRNAs, it is essential to identify the full repertoire of mRNA targets (target genes. A number of computer programs have been developed for miRNA-target prediction. These programs essentially focus on potential binding sites in 3'UTRs, which are recognized by miRNAs according to specific base-pairing rules. Results Here, we introduce a novel method for miRNA-target prediction that is entirely independent of existing approaches. The method is based on the hypothesis that transcription of a miRNA and its target genes tend to be co-regulated by common transcription factors. This hypothesis predicts the frequent occurrence of common cis-elements between promoters of a miRNA and its target genes. That is, our proposed method first identifies putative cis-elements in a promoter of a given miRNA, and then identifies genes that contain common putative cis-elements in their promoters. In this paper, we show that a significant number of common cis-elements occur in ~28% of experimentally supported human miRNA-target data. Moreover, we show that the prediction of human miRNA-targets based on our method is statistically significant. Further, we discuss the random incidence of common cis-elements, their consensus sequences, and the advantages and disadvantages of our method. Conclusions This is the first report indicating prevalence of transcriptional regulation of a miRNA and its target genes by common transcription factors and the predictive ability of miRNA-targets based on this property.

  12. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non-cell autonomous effects on gene regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different classes of small RNAs (sRNAs refine the expression of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes by directing protein partners to complementary nucleic acids, where they mediate gene silencing. Plants encode a unique class of sRNAs, called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate protein-coding transcripts, as do microRNAs (miRNAs, and both sRNA classes control development through their targets. TasiRNA biogenesis requires multiple components of the siRNA pathway and also miRNAs. But while 21mer siRNAs originating from transgenes can mediate silencing across several cell layers, miRNA action seems spatially restricted to the producing or closely surrounding cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have previously described the isolation of a genetrap reporter line for TAS3a, the major locus producing AUXIN RESPONS FACTOR (ARF-regulating tasiRNAs in the Arabidopsis shoot. Its activity is limited to the adaxial (upper side of leaf primordia, thus spatially isolated from ARF-activities, which are located in the abaxial (lower side. We show here by in situ hybridization and reporter fusions that the silencing activities of ARF-regulating tasiRNAs are indeed manifested non-cell autonomously to spatially control ARF activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous tasiRNAs are thus mediators of a mobile developmental signal and might provide effective gene silencing at a distance beyond the reach of most miRNAs.

  13. Transcriptional regulation mechanism mediated by miRNA-DNA•DNA triplex structure stabilized by Argonaute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano-Garibay, Julia D; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2014-11-01

    Transcription regulation depends on interactions between repressor or activator proteins with promoter sequences, while post-transcriptional regulation typically relies on microRNA (miRNA) interaction with sequences in 5' and 3'-Untranslated regions (UTRs) of messenger RNA (mRNA). However, several pieces of evidence suggest that miRNA:Argonaute (AGO) complexes may also suppress transcription through RNA interference (RNAi) components and epigenetic mechanisms. However, recent observations suggest that miRNA-induced transcriptional silencing could be exerted by an unknown mechanism independent of chromatin modifiers. The RNA-DNA•DNA triplex structure has emerged as an important RNA tertiary motif in which successive non-canonical base pairs form between a DNA-DNA duplex and a third strand. Frequently, promoters have Purine (PU)-rich tracts, and some Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) targeting these regulatory regions have been shown to inhibit transcription selectively. Here, we summarize observations suggesting that miRNAs exert regulation over promoter regions through miRNA-DNA•DNA triplex structure formation stabilized by AGO proteins which represents a plausible model of RNA-mediated Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). PMID:25086339

  14. Differential expression of speckled POZ protein, SPOP: Putative regulation by miR-145

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chiu-Jung Huang; Hsing-Yu Chen; Wan-Yi Lin; Kongbung Choo

    2014-06-01

    The speckle POZ protein, SPOP, is an adaptor of the Cul3-based ubiquitination process, and has been implicated in the carcinogenesis process. Despite recent elucidation of biological functions, regulation of SPOP gene expression has not been reported. In this study, the mRNA levels of the mouse SPOP (mSPOP) gene were first shown to vary noticeably in different tissues. However, the SPOP protein was detected in high abundance only in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and seminiferous tubule of the testis, echoing previous reports of involvement of ubiquitination in neuron cells and in spermatogenesis. In other mouse tissues and human cancer cell lines analysed, only low SPOP protein levels were detected. The 3′-untranslated regions of both the mSPOP and human SPOP transcripts harbor a conserved putative miR-145 binding site (BS). In some tissues and cell lines, miR-145 and SPOP protein levels were in an inverse relationship suggesting miR-145 regulation. Luciferase assays of deletion and point mutation constructs of the miR-145 BS, and miR-145 induction by serum starvation that resulted in reduced endogenous SPOP levels provided further evidence that miR-145 is likely involved in post-transcriptional regulation of SPOP expression in selected tissues, and possibly with the participation of other miRNA species.

  15. Trm9-Catalyzed tRNA Modifications Regulate Global Protein Expression by Codon-Biased Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Deng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs have long been recognized to play crucial roles in regulating the rate and fidelity of translation. However, the extent to which they determine global protein production remains poorly understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to show a direct link between wobble uridine 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5 and 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2 modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9 in tRNAArg(UCU and tRNAGlu(UUC and selective translation of proteins from genes enriched with their cognate codons. Controlling for bias in protein expression and alternations in mRNA expression, we find that loss of Trm9 selectively impairs expression of proteins from genes enriched with AGA and GAA codons under both normal and stress conditions. Moreover, we show that AGA and GAA codons occur with high frequency in clusters along the transcripts, which may play a role in modulating translation. Consistent with these results, proteins subject to enhanced ribosome pausing in yeast lacking mcm5U and mcm5s2U are more likely to be down-regulated and contain a larger number of AGA/GAA clusters. Together, these results suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications play a significant role in regulating protein expression within the cell.

  16. The Effect of Growth Hormone Administration on the Regulation of Mitochondrial Apoptosis in-Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Keane

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH would show any significant effects on the expression of apoptosis regulating proteins in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Additionally, the potential for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by miRNA was assessed in two cellular compartments, the cytosol and the mitochondria. Ten male subjects were subcutaneously injected with either rhGH (1 mg or saline (0.9% for seven consecutive days in a double-blinded fashion. Blood sampling was undertaken prior to treatment administration and over a period of three weeks following treatment cessation. Bcl-2 and Bak gene and protein expression levels were measured in PBMCs, while attention was also directed to the expression of miR-181a and miR-125b, known translational inhibitors of Bcl-2 and Bak respectively. Results showed that rhGH significantly decreased Bak protein concentrations compared to placebo samples for up to 8 days post treatment. While cytosolic miRNA expression was not found to be significantly affected by rhGH, measurement of the expression of miR-125b in mitochondrial fractions showed a significant down-regulation eight days post-rhGH administration. These findings suggest that rhGH induces short-term anti-apoptotic effects which may be partially mediated through a novel pathway that alters the concentration of mitochondrially-associated miRNAs.

  17. Aberrant regulation of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in human malignant tumors and its effects on the hallmarks of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianzhen; Wang, Guangyu; Hao, Dapeng; Liu, Xi; Wang, Dong; Ning, Ning; Li, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are two of the most important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, and their aberrant expression contributes to the development of human malignancies. Let-7, one of the most well-known tumor suppressors, is frequently down-regulated in a variety of human cancers. The RBP LIN28A/LIN28B, a direct target of the let-7 family of miRNAs, is an inhibitor of let-7 biogenesis and is frequently up-regulated in cancers. Aberrant regulation of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in human malignant tumors is reportedly involved in cancer development, contributing to cellular proliferation, cell death resistance, angiogenesis, metastasis, metabolism reprogramming, tumor-associated inflammation, genome instability, acquiring immortality and evading immune destruction. In this review, we summarized the mechanisms of LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop aberrant regulation in human cancer and discussed the roles and potential mechanisms of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in regulating the hallmarks of cancer. The crosstalk between LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop and certain oncogenes (such as MYC, RAS, PI3K/AKT, NF-κB and β-catenin) in regulating hallmarks of cancer has also been discussed. PMID:26123544

  18. miR-29b regulates cell proliferation and invasion in human ovarian clear cell carcinoma by targeting Lysyl oxidase (LOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancer, reflecting its chemoresistance and frequent late diagnosis, and suggesting that a more effective treatment approach is needed. Lysyl oxidase (LOX is involved in important biological processes such as gene regulation, cell signaling and cell motility, its deregulation contributing to tumor formation and development. Although it is known that LOX is involved in proliferation, migration and invasion in several types of tumors, studies of LOX in ovarian cancers are scarce. To explore the molecular regulation mechanisms in ovarian cancer tumorigenesis, the expression change and the function of LOX was confirmed in ovarian tissues and cells, which suggested that LOX is a tumor suppressor gene. To further understand how LOX expression is regulated in ovarian cancer, microRNAs(miRNAs were considered because of their role in post-transcriptional regulation of many genes. Recent work has described differential expression of mature miRNAs in human cancers. Bioinformatics prediction which was used to find the appropriate miRNA regulating LOX, revealed that miR-29b regulates LOX protein level via its binding site on the 3'UTR of LOX mRNAin ES-2 cells, a human ovarian clear cell carcinoma cell line. miR-29b knockdown inhibited proliferation and invasion in ES-2 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that influencing LOX regulation bychanging the level of miR-29b expression could provide a novel potential approachfor treating human ovarian clear cell carcinoma.

  19. MiR-146 and miR-125 in the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Mi; Kim, Tae Sung; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2016-06-01

    Innate immune responses are primary, relatively limited, and specific responses to numerous pathogens and toxic molecules. Protein expression involved in these innate responses must be tightly regulated at both transcriptional level and post-transcriptional level to avoid the development of excessive inflammation that can be potentially harmful to the host. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs (~22 nucleotides [nts]) that participate in the regulation of numerous physiological responses by targeting specific messenger RNAs to suppress their translation. Recent work has shown that several negative regulators of transcription including microRNAs play important roles in inhibiting the exacerbation of inflammatory responses and in the maintenance of immunological homeostasis. This emerging research area will provide new insights on how microRNAs regulate innate immune signaling. It might show that dysregulation of microRNA synthesis is associated with the pathogenesis of inflammatory and infectious diseases. In this review, we focused on miR-146 and miR-125 and described the roles these miRNAs in modulating innate immune signaling. These microRNAs can control inflammatory responses and the outcomes of pathogenic infections. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 311-318]. PMID:26996343

  20. Biosynthesis of the antifungal haterumalide, oocydin A, in Serratia, and its regulation by quorum sensing, RpoS and Hfq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilla, Miguel A; Leeper, Finian J; Salmond, George P C

    2015-08-01

    Polyketides represent an important class of bioactive natural products with a broad range of biological activities. We identified recently a large trans-acyltransferase (AT) polyketide synthase gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and antitumor haterumalide, oocydin A (ooc). Using genome sequencing and comparative genomics, we show that the ooc gene cluster is widespread within biocontrol and phytopathogenic strains of the enterobacteria, Serratia and Dickeya. The analysis of in frame deletion mutants confirmed the role of a hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase cassette, three flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes, a free-standing acyl carrier protein and two hypothetical proteins in oocydin A biosynthesis. The requirement of the three trans-acting AT domains for the biosynthesis of the macrolide was also demonstrated. Expression of the ooc gene cluster was shown to be positively regulated by an N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing system, but operating in a strain-dependent manner. At a post-transcriptional level, the RNA chaperone, Hfq, plays a key role in oocydin A biosynthesis. The Hfq-dependent regulation is partially mediated by the stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS, which was also shown to positively regulate the synthesis of the macrolide. Our results reveal differential regulation of the divergently transcribed ooc transcriptional units, highlighting the complexity of oocydin A production. PMID:25753587

  1. Genetic interaction of two abscisic acid signaling regulators, HY5 and FIERY1, in mediating lateral root formation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Root architecture is continuously shaped in a manner that helps plants to better adapt to the environment. Gene regulation at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels largely controls this environmental response. Recently, RNA silencing has emerged as an important player in gene regulation and is involved in many aspects of plant development, including lateral root formation. In a recent study, we found that FIERY1, a bifunctional abiotic stress and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling regulator and an endogenous RNA silencing suppressor, mediates auxin response during lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. We proposed that FRY1 regulates lateral root development through its activity on adenosine 3,5-bisphosphate (PAP), a strong inhibitor of exoribonucleases (XRNs). Interestingly, some of the phenotypes of fry1, such as enhanced response to light in repressing hypocotyl elongation and hypersensitivity to ABA in lateral root growth, are opposite to those of another light- and ABA-signaling mutant, hy5. Here we analyzed the hy5 fry1 double mutant for root and hypocotyl growth. We found that the hy5 mutation can suppress the enhanced light sensitivity in fry1 hypocotyl elongation and restore the lateral root formation. The genetic interaction between HY5 and FRY1 indicates that HY5 and FRY1 may act in overlapping pathways that mediate light signaling and lateral root development. © 2011 Landes Bioscience.

  2. MicroRNA Regulation of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajaguru, P; Sudhakar Gandhi, P S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), is a very common condition associated with critically ill patients, which causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective therapeutic strategies for clinical ALI/ARDS are not available. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding molecules have emerged as a major area of biomedical research as they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes, including ALI/ARDS. In this context, this present review summarizes a large body of evidence implicating miRNAs and their target molecules in ALI/ARDS originating largely from studies using animal and cell culture model systems of ALI/ARDS. We have also focused on the involvement of miRNAs in macrophage polarization, which play a critical role in regulating the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Finally, the possible future directions that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS are also reviewed. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2097-2106, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26790856

  3. Oligomerization of rice granule-bound starch synthase 1 modulates its activity regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, De-Rui; Huang, Wei-Xue; Cai, Xiu-Ling

    2013-09-01

    Granule-bound starch synthase 1 (GBSS1) is responsible for amylose synthesis in cereals, and this enzyme is regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In this study, we show that GBSS1 from Oryza sativa L. (OsGBSS1) can form oligomers in rice endosperm, and oligomerized OsGBSS1 exhibits much higher specific enzymatic activity than the monomer. A monomer-oligomer transition equilibrium for OsGBSS1 occurs in the endosperm during development. Redox potential is a key factor affecting the oligomer percentage as well as the enzymatic activity of OsGBSS1. Adenosine diphosphate glucose, the direct donor of glucose, also impacts OsGBSS1 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. OsGBSS1 oligomerization is influenced by phosphorylation status, which was strongly enhanced by Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and ATP treatment and was sharply weakened by protein phosphatase (PPase) treatment. The activity of OsGBSS1 affects the ratio of amylose to amylopectin and therefore the eating quality of rice. Understanding the regulation of OsGBSS1 activity may lead to the improvement of rice eating quality. PMID:23849121

  4. SOX9-regulated cell plasticity in colorectal metastasis is attenuated by rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Lopez, Lidia; Aldaz, Paula; Arevalo, Sara; Aldaregia, Juncal; Egaña, Larraitz; Bujanda, Luis; Cheung, Martin; Sampron, Nicolas; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes a hierarchical organization of tumors, in which stem-like cells sustain tumors and drive metastasis. The molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition of CSCs and metastatic traits are not well understood. SOX9 is a transcription factor linked to stem cell maintenance and commonly overexpressed in solid cancers including colorectal cancer. In this study, we show that SOX9 levels are higher in metastatic (SW620) than in primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) derived from the same patient. This elevated expression correlated with enhanced self-renewal activity. By gain and loss-of-function studies in SW480 and SW620 cells respectively, we reveal that SOX9 levels modulate tumorsphere formation and self-renewal ability in vitro and tumor initiation in vivo. Moreover, SOX9 regulates migration and invasion and triggers the transition between epithelial and mesenchymal states. These activities are partially dependent on SOX9 post-transcriptional modifications. Importantly, treatment with rapamycin inhibits self-renewal and tumor growth in a SOX9-dependent manner. These results identify a functional role for SOX9 in regulating colorectal cancer cell plasticity and metastasis, and provide a strong rationale for a rapamycin-based therapeutic strategy. PMID:27571710

  5. Relationships between cell cycle regulator gene copy numbers and protein expression levels in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Chino

    Full Text Available We previously determined the copy number limits of overexpression for cell division cycle (cdc regulatory genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the "genetic tug-of-war" (gTOW method. In this study, we measured the levels of tandem affinity purification (TAP-tagged target proteins when their copy numbers are increased in gTOW. Twenty analyzed genes showed roughly linear correlations between increased protein levels and gene copy numbers, which suggested a general lack of compensation for gene dosage in S. pombe. Cdc16 and Sid2 protein levels but not their mRNA levels were much lower than that expected by their copy numbers, which suggested the existence of a post-transcriptional down regulation of these genes. The cyclin Cig1 protein level and its mRNA level were much higher than that expected by its copy numbers, which suggested a positive feedback mechanism for its expression. A higher Cdc10 protein level and its mRNA level, probably due to cloning its gene into a plasmid, indicated that Cdc10 regulation was more robust than that previously predicted.

  6. Relationships between cell cycle regulator gene copy numbers and protein expression levels in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Ayako; Makanae, Koji; Moriya, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    We previously determined the copy number limits of overexpression for cell division cycle (cdc) regulatory genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the "genetic tug-of-war" (gTOW) method. In this study, we measured the levels of tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged target proteins when their copy numbers are increased in gTOW. Twenty analyzed genes showed roughly linear correlations between increased protein levels and gene copy numbers, which suggested a general lack of compensation for gene dosage in S. pombe. Cdc16 and Sid2 protein levels but not their mRNA levels were much lower than that expected by their copy numbers, which suggested the existence of a post-transcriptional down regulation of these genes. The cyclin Cig1 protein level and its mRNA level were much higher than that expected by its copy numbers, which suggested a positive feedback mechanism for its expression. A higher Cdc10 protein level and its mRNA level, probably due to cloning its gene into a plasmid, indicated that Cdc10 regulation was more robust than that previously predicted. PMID:24019917

  7. Phosphorylated CpxR restricts production of the RovA global regulator in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfa Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RovA is a global transcriptional regulator of gene expression in pathogenic Yersinia. RovA levels are kept in check by a sophisticated layering of distinct transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. In the enteropathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis, we have previously reported that the extracytoplasmic stress sensing CpxA-CpxR two-component regulatory system modulates rovA expression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we characterized CpxR phosphorylation (CpxR∼P in vitro, and determined that phosphorylation was necessary for CpxR to efficiently bind to the PCR-amplified upstream regulatory region of rovA. The precise CpxR∼P binding site was mapped by a nuclease protection assay and directed mutagenesis confirmed that in vivo binding to the rovA promoter inhibits transcription. Reduced RovA production was most pronounced following CpxR∼P accumulation in the Yersinia cytoplasm during chronic Cpx pathway activation and by the indiscriminate phosphodonor action of acetyl phosphate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cpx pathway activation restricts levels of the RovA global regulator. The regulatory influence of CpxR∼P must therefore extend well beyond periplasmic quality control in the Yersinia envelope, to include genes involved in environmental survival and pathogenicity.

  8. Deep sequencing reveals unique small RNA repertoire that is regulated during head regeneration in Hydra magnipapillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Srikar; Nair, Aparna; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Poduval, Deepak; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Ghanekar, Yashoda

    2013-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs, piRNAs and endo-siRNAs fine-tune gene expression through post-transcriptional regulation, modulating important processes in development, differentiation, homeostasis and regeneration. Using deep sequencing, we have profiled small non-coding RNAs in Hydra magnipapillata and investigated changes in small RNA expression pattern during head regeneration. Our results reveal a unique repertoire of small RNAs in hydra. We have identified 126 miRNA loci; 123 of these miRNAs are unique to hydra. Less than 50% are conserved across two different strains of Hydra vulgaris tested in this study, indicating a highly diverse nature of hydra miRNAs in contrast to bilaterian miRNAs. We also identified siRNAs derived from precursors with perfect stem-loop structure and that arise from inverted repeats. piRNAs were the most abundant small RNAs in hydra, mapping to transposable elements, the annotated transcriptome and unique non-coding regions on the genome. piRNAs that map to transposable elements and the annotated transcriptome display a ping-pong signature. Further, we have identified several miRNAs and piRNAs whose expression is regulated during hydra head regeneration. Our study defines different classes of small RNAs in this cnidarian model system, which may play a role in orchestrating gene expression essential for hydra regeneration. PMID:23166307

  9. Mechanisms regulating c-met overexpression in liver-metastatic B16-LS9 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, G; Ren, Y; Lorenzoni, P; Zarnegar, R; Burger, M M; Rusciano, D

    2001-01-01

    Liver selected B16-LS9 melanoma cells show a dramatic overexpression of the proto-oncogene c-met, the cellular receptor for hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. As a consequence, c-met becomes constitutively active, and the cells become more responsive to hepatocyte growth factor stimulation. We have investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating c-met expression in both the parental line B16-F1, which has low expression levels, and the liver-specific B16-LS9, overexpressing c-met. Overexpression is observed at the protein and mRNA levels, however without further evidence of gene amplification or rearrangement. c-met promoter activity was higher in B16-LS9 than B16-F1 cells, and also a nuclear run-off showed higher transcription levels in B16-LS9 cells. Moreover, we found that c-met mRNA had a longer half-life in B16-LS9 cells, thus indicating also the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms. Finally, we found evidence that autonomous activation of the melanocortin receptor-1 (MCR-1) is at least partially responsible for c-met upregulation in B16-LS9 cells, since treatment of the cells with a potent MSH antagonist (the agouti peptide) has strong down-regulatory effects. PMID:11255230

  10. Inhibitory effect of carnosine on interleukin-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells through translational regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Dong Ok; Satsu, Hideo; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Totsuka, Mamoru; Shimizu, Makoto

    2008-05-01

    The enhanced intestinal production of pro-inflammatory cytokines leads to inflammation and carcinogenesis, and therefore its down-regulation by nutrients could represent a promising therapeutic approach. We found for the first time that the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in intestinal epithelial cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide or TNF-alpha was suppressed in the presence of carnosine (beta-Ala-His), a dietary dipeptide. Interestingly, carnosine had no influence on the stimulus-induced IL-8 mRNA expression, although the intracellular production and secretion of IL-8 were significantly inhibited by carnosine. The inhibitory effect of carnosine on the IL-8 secretion differed from that of other histidine-containing dipeptides like Gly-His, Ala-His, and anserine (beta-Ala-1-methyl-His), which inhibited both the hydrogen peroxide-induced secretion and mRNA expression of IL-8. These observations indicate that carnosine inhibited IL-8 secretion along a unique pathway, in which IL-8 production was suppressed at a post-transcriptional level, for instance, translation. The hypothesis that carnosine inhibited the translation of IL-8 mRNA is supported by the finding that the phosphorylation of eIF4E, an initiation factor, in stimulated Caco-2 cells was inhibited by carnosine. These results suggest that carnosine is a novel type of anti-inflammatory agent that down-regulates the inflammatory response in intestinal epithelial cells by a unique mechanism. PMID:18397832

  11. A Csr-type regulatory system, including small non-coding RNAs, regulates the global virulence regulator RovA of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis through RovM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Böhme, Katja; Rohde, Manfred; Dersch, Petra

    2008-06-01

    The MarR-type regulator RovA controls expression of virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in response to environmental signals. Using a genetic strategy to discover components that influence rovA expression, we identified new regulatory factors with homology to components of the carbon storage regulator system (Csr). We showed that overexpression of a CsrB- or a CsrC-type RNA activates rovA, whereas a CsrA-like protein represses RovA synthesis. We further demonstrate that influence of the Csr system on rovA is indirect and occurs through control of the LysR regulator RovM, which inhibits rovA transcription. The CsrA protein had also a major influence on the motility of Yersinia, which was independent of RovM. The CsrB and CsrC RNAs are differentially expressed in Yersinia. CsrC is highly induced in complex but not in minimal media, indicating that medium-dependent rovM expression is mediated through CsrC. CsrB synthesis is generally very low. However, overexpression of the response regulator UvrY was found to activate CsrB production, which in turn represses CsrC synthesis independent of the growth medium. In summary, the post-transcriptional Csr-type components were shown to be key regulators in the co-ordinated environmental control of physiological processes and virulence factors, which are crucial for the initiation of Yersinia infections. PMID:18430141

  12. An Interferon Regulated MicroRNA Provides Broad Cell-Intrinsic Antiviral Immunity through Multihit Host-Directed Targeting of the Sterol Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kevin A; Hsieh, Wei Yuan; Forster, Thorsten; Blanc, Mathieu; Lu, Hongjin; Crick, Peter J; Yutuc, Eylan; Watterson, Steven; Martin, Kimberly; Griffiths, Samantha J; Enright, Anton J; Yamamoto, Mami; Pradeepa, Madapura M; Lennox, Kimberly A; Behlke, Mark A; Talbot, Simon; Haas, Jürgen; Dölken, Lars; Griffiths, William J; Wang, Yuqin; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2016-03-01

    In invertebrates, small interfering RNAs are at the vanguard of cell-autonomous antiviral immunity. In contrast, antiviral mechanisms initiated by interferon (IFN) signaling predominate in mammals. Whilst mammalian IFN-induced miRNA are known to inhibit specific viruses, it is not known whether host-directed microRNAs, downstream of IFN-signaling, have a role in mediating broad antiviral resistance. By performing an integrative, systematic, global analysis of RNA turnover utilizing 4-thiouridine labeling of newly transcribed RNA and pri/pre-miRNA in IFN-activated macrophages, we identify a new post-transcriptional viral defense mechanism mediated by miR-342-5p. On the basis of ChIP and site-directed promoter mutagenesis experiments, we find the synthesis of miR-342-5p is coupled to the antiviral IFN response via the IFN-induced transcription factor, IRF1. Strikingly, we find miR-342-5p targets mevalonate-sterol biosynthesis using a multihit mechanism suppressing the pathway at different functional levels: transcriptionally via SREBF2, post-transcriptionally via miR-33, and enzymatically via IDI1 and SC4MOL. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics and enzymatic assays demonstrate the targeting mechanisms reduce intermediate sterol pathway metabolites and total cholesterol in macrophages. These results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. The sterol pathway is known to be an integral part of the macrophage IFN antiviral response, and we show that miR-342-5p exerts broad antiviral effects against multiple, unrelated pathogenic viruses such Cytomegalovirus and Influenza A (H1N1). Metabolic rescue experiments confirm the specificity of these effects and demonstrate that unrelated viruses have differential mevalonate and sterol pathway requirements for their replication. This study, therefore, advances the general concept of broad antiviral defense through multihit targeting of a single host pathway. PMID:26938778

  13. Cross-Regulation between the phz1 and phz2 Operons Maintain a Balanced Level of Phenazine Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinna Cui

    Full Text Available Gene duplication often provides selective advantages for the survival of microorganisms in adapting to varying environmental conditions. P. aeruginosa PAO1 possesses two seven-gene operons [phz1 (phzA1B1C1D1E1F1G1 and phz2 (phzA2B2C2D2E2F2G2] that are involved in the biosynthesis of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and its derivatives. Although the two operons are highly homologous and their functions are well known, it is unclear how the two phz operons coordinate their expressions to maintain the phenazine biosynthesis. By constructing single and double deletion mutants of the two phz operons, we found that the phz1-deletion mutant produced the same or less amount of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin in GA medium than the phz2-knockout mutant while the phz1-phz2 double knockout mutant did not produce any phenazines. By generating phzA1 and phzA2 translational and transcriptional fusions with a truncated lacZ reporter, we found that the expression of the phz1 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and did not alter at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz2 operon. Surprisingly, the expression the phz2 operon increased significantly at the post-transcriptional level and only moderately at the transcriptional level in the absence of the phz1 operon. Our findings suggested that a complex cross-regulation existed between the phz1 and phz2 operons. By mediating the upregulation of one phz operon expression while the other was deleted, this crosstalk would maintain the homeostatic balance of phenazine biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  14. An Interferon Regulated MicroRNA Provides Broad Cell-Intrinsic Antiviral Immunity through Multihit Host-Directed Targeting of the Sterol Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Robertson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In invertebrates, small interfering RNAs are at the vanguard of cell-autonomous antiviral immunity. In contrast, antiviral mechanisms initiated by interferon (IFN signaling predominate in mammals. Whilst mammalian IFN-induced miRNA are known to inhibit specific viruses, it is not known whether host-directed microRNAs, downstream of IFN-signaling, have a role in mediating broad antiviral resistance. By performing an integrative, systematic, global analysis of RNA turnover utilizing 4-thiouridine labeling of newly transcribed RNA and pri/pre-miRNA in IFN-activated macrophages, we identify a new post-transcriptional viral defense mechanism mediated by miR-342-5p. On the basis of ChIP and site-directed promoter mutagenesis experiments, we find the synthesis of miR-342-5p is coupled to the antiviral IFN response via the IFN-induced transcription factor, IRF1. Strikingly, we find miR-342-5p targets mevalonate-sterol biosynthesis using a multihit mechanism suppressing the pathway at different functional levels: transcriptionally via SREBF2, post-transcriptionally via miR-33, and enzymatically via IDI1 and SC4MOL. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics and enzymatic assays demonstrate the targeting mechanisms reduce intermediate sterol pathway metabolites and total cholesterol in macrophages. These results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. The sterol pathway is known to be an integral part of the macrophage IFN antiviral response, and we show that miR-342-5p exerts broad antiviral effects against multiple, unrelated pathogenic viruses such Cytomegalovirus and Influenza A (H1N1. Metabolic rescue experiments confirm the specificity of these effects and demonstrate that unrelated viruses have differential mevalonate and sterol pathway requirements for their replication. This study, therefore, advances the general concept of broad antiviral defense through multihit targeting of a single host pathway.

  15. Pumilio facilitates miRNA regulation of the E2F3 oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Wayne O; Tschöp, Katrin; Herr, Anabel; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Dyson, Nicholas J

    2012-02-15

    E2F transcription factors are important regulators of cell proliferation and are frequently dysregulated in human malignancies. To identify novel regulators of E2F function, we used Drosophila as a model system to screen for mutations that modify phenotypes caused by reduced levels of dE2F1. This screen identified components of the Pumilio translational repressor complex (Pumilio, Nanos, and Brain tumor) as suppressors of dE2F1-RNAi phenotypes. Subsequent experiments provided evidence that Pumilio complexes repress dE2F1 levels and that this mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation is conserved in human cells. The human Pumilio homologs Pum 1 and Pum 2 repress the translation of E2F3 by binding to the E2F3 3' untranslated region (UTR) and also enhance the activity of multiple E2F3 targeting microRNAs (miRNAs). E2F3 is an oncogene with strong proliferative potential and is regularly dysregulated or overexpressed in cancer. Interestingly, Pumilio/miRNA-mediated regulation of E2F3 is circumvented in cancer cells in several different ways. Bladder carcinomas selectively down-regulate miRNAs that cooperate with Pumilio to target E2F3, and multiple tumor cell lines shorten the 3' end of the E2F3 mRNA, removing the Pumilio regulatory elements. These studies suggest that Pumilio-miRNA repression of E2F3 translation provides an important level of E2F regulation that is frequently abrogated in cancer cells. PMID:22345517

  16. dPORE-miRNA: Polymorphic regulation of microRNA genes

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2011-02-04

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA molecules that act as post-transcriptional regulators and affect the regulation of protein-coding genes. Mostly transcribed by PolII, miRNA genes are regulated at the transcriptional level similarly to protein-coding genes. In this study we focus on human miRNAs. These miRNAs are involved in a variety of pathways and can affect many diseases. Our interest is on possible deregulation of the transcription initiation of the miRNA encoding genes, which is facilitated by variations in the genomic sequence of transcriptional control regions (promoters). Methodology: Our aim is to provide an online resource to facilitate the investigation of the potential effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on miRNA gene regulation. We analyzed SNPs overlapped with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in promoters of miRNA genes. We also accounted for the creation of novel TFBSs due to polymorphisms not present in the reference genome. The resulting changes in the original TFBSs and potential creation of new TFBSs were incorporated into the Dragon Database of Polymorphic Regulation of miRNA genes (dPORE-miRNA). Conclusions: The dPORE-miRNA database enables researchers to explore potential effects of SNPs on the regulation of miRNAs. dPORE-miRNA can be interrogated with regards to: a/miRNAs (their targets, or involvement in diseases, or biological pathways), b/SNPs, or c/transcription factors. dPORE-miRNA can be accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dpore and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/dpore/. Its use is free for academic and non-profit users. © 2011 Schmeier et al.

  17. Involvement of cyclin K posttranscriptional regulation in the formation of Artemia diapause cysts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artemia eggs tend to develop ovoviviparously to yield nauplius larvae in good rearing conditions; while under adverse situations, they tend to develop oviparously and encysted diapause embryos are formed instead. However, the intrinsic mechanisms regulating this process are not well understood. PRINCIPAL FINDING: This study has characterized the function of cyclin K, a regulatory subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb in the two different developmental pathways of Artemia. In the diapause-destined embryo, Western blots showed that the cyclin K protein was down-regulated as the embryo entered dormancy and reverted to relatively high levels of expression once development resumed, consistent with the fluctuations in phosphorylation of position 2 serines (Ser2 in the C-terminal domain (CTD of the largest subunit (Rpb1 of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II. Interestingly, the cyclin K transcript levels remained constant during this process. In vitro translation data indicated that the template activity of cyclin K mRNA stored in the postdiapause cyst was repressed. In addition, in vivo knockdown of cyclin K in developing embryos by RNA interference eliminated phosphorylation of the CTD Ser2 of RNAP II and induced apoptosis by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK survival signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these findings reveal a role for cyclin K in regulating RNAP II activity during diapause embryo development, which involves the post-transcriptional regulation of cyclin K. In addition, a further role was identified for cyclin K in regulating the control of cell survival during embryogenesis through ERK signaling pathways.

  18. miRNA in the regulation of skeletal muscle adaptation to acute endurance exercise in C57Bl/6J male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Safdar

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are evolutionarily conserved small non-coding RNA species involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. In vitro studies have identified a small number of skeletal muscle-specific miRNAs which play a crucial role in myoblast proliferation and differentiation. In skeletal muscle, an acute bout of endurance exercise results in the up-regulation of transcriptional networks that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, and skeletal muscle remodelling. The purpose of this study was to assess the expressional profile of targeted miRNA species following an acute bout of endurance exercise and to determine relationships with previously established endurance exercise responsive transcriptional networks. C57Bl/6J wild-type male mice (N = 7/group were randomly assigned to either sedentary or forced-endurance exercise (treadmill run @ 15 m/min for 90 min group. The endurance exercise group was sacrificed three hours following a single bout of exercise. The expression of miR- 181, 1, 133, 23, and 107, all of which have been predicted to regulate transcription factors and co-activators involved in the adaptive response to exercise, was measured in quadriceps femoris muscle. Endurance exercise significantly increased the expression of miR-181, miR-1, and miR-107 by 37%, 40%, and 56%, respectively, and reduced miR-23 expression by 84% (Pregulator of PGC-1alpha was consistent with increased expression of PGC-1alpha mRNA and protein along with several downstream targets of PGC-1alpha including ALAS, CS, and cytochrome c mRNA. PDK4 protein content remains unaltered despite an increase in its putative negative regulator, miR-107, and PDK4 mRNA expression. mRNA expression of miRNA processing machinery (Drosha, Dicer, and DGCR8 remained unchanged. We conclude that miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional

  19. Regulation of Aicda expression and AID activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in a B cell differentiation stage-specific fashion and is essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). CSR and SHM play a central role in the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. AID displays a mutagenic activity by catalyzing targeted deamination of deoxycytidine (dC) residues in DNA resulting in dU:dG mismatches, which are processed into point-mutations in SHM or double-strand breaks (DSBs) in CSR. Although AID specifically targets the Ig gene loci (IgH, Igκ and Igλ), it can also home into a wide array of non-Ig genes in B-and non-B-cell backgrounds. Aberrant expression of AID is associated with multiple diseases such as allergy, inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. In autoimmune systemic lupus erythematosus, dysregulated AID expression underpins increased CSR, SHM and autoantibody production. As a potent mutator, AID is under stringent transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation. AID is also regulated in its targeting and enzymatic function. In resting naïve or memory B cells, AID transcripts and protein are undetectable. These, however, are readily and significantly up-regulated in B cells induced to undergo CSR and/or SHM. Transcription factors, such as HoxC4 and NF-κB, which are up-regulated in a B cell lineage-and/or differentiation stage-specific manner, regulate the induction of AID. HoxC4 induces AID expression by directly binding to the AID gene promoter through an evolutionarily conserved 5'-ATTT-3' motif. HoxC4 is induced by the same stimuli that induce AID and CSR. It is further up-regulated by estrogen through three estrogen responsive elements in its promoter region. The targeting of AID to switch (S) regions is mediated by 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, which specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats that are exist at high frequency in S region cores. Like HoxC4, 14-3-3 adaptors are induced

  20. Telomerase Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Cifuentes-Rojas, Catherine; Dorothy E Shippen

    2011-01-01

    The intimate connection between telomerase regulation and human disease is now well established. The molecular basis for telomerase regulation is highly complex and entails multiple layers of control. While the major target of enzyme regulation is the catalytic subunit TERT, the RNA subunit of telomerase is also implicated in telomerase control. In addition, alterations in gene dosage and alternative isoforms of core telomerase components have been described. Finally, telomerase localization,...

  1. Radiation regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The five main areas of radiation regulation considered are radiation exposure in the mining of uranium and other minerals, exposure in the use of uranium in nuclear reactors, risks in the transport of radioactive materials and hazards associated with the disposal of used materials. In Australia these problems are regulated by mines departments, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and radiation control branches in state health departments. Each of these instutional areas of regulation is examined

  2. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching. PMID:2787158

  3. Glucose-Regulated Phosphorylation of the PUF Protein Puf3 Regulates the Translational Fate of Its Bound mRNAs and Association with RNA Granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Der Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available PUF proteins are post-transcriptional regulators that bind to the 3′ UTRs of mRNA transcripts. Herein, we show how a yeast PUF protein, Puf3p, responds to glucose availability to switch the fate of its bound transcripts that encode proteins required for mitochondrial biogenesis. Upon glucose depletion, Puf3p becomes heavily phosphorylated within its N-terminal region of low complexity, associates with polysomes, and promotes translation of its target mRNAs. Such nutrient-responsive phosphorylation toggles the activity of Puf3p to promote either degradation or translation of these mRNAs according to the needs of the cell. Moreover, activation of translation of pre-existing mRNAs might enable rapid adjustment to environmental changes without the need for de novo transcription. Strikingly, a Puf3p phosphomutant no longer promotes translation but becomes trapped in intracellular foci in an mRNA-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that the inability to properly resolve Puf3p-containing RNA-protein granules via a phosphorylation-based mechanism might be toxic to a cell.

  4. Complex Regulation of Plant Phosphate Transporters and the Gap between Molecular Mechanisms and Practical Application: What Is Missing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mian; Chen, Aiqun; Sun, Shubin; Xu, Guohua

    2016-03-01

    It has been almost 25 years since the first report of the gene encoding a high-affinity phosphate transporter (PT), PHO84, in yeast. Since then, an increasing number of yeast PHO84 homologs as well as other genes encoding proteins with phosphate (Pi) transport activities have been identified and functionally characterized in diverse plant species. Great progress has been made also in deciphering the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of the abundance and/or activity of these genes and their products. The regulatory genes affect plant Pi homeostasis commonly through direct or indirect regulation of the abundance of PTs at different levels. However, little has been achieved in the use of PTs for developing genetically modified crops with high phosphorus use efficiency (PUE). This might be a consequence of overemphasizing Pi uptake from the rhizosphere and lack of knowledge about the roles of PTs in Pi transport and recycling within the plant that are required to optimize PUE. Here, we mainly focused on the genes encoding proteins with Pi transport activities and the emerging understanding of their regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels. In addition, we propose potential strategies for effective use of PTs in improving plant growth and development. PMID:26714050

  5. MicroRNA-130b targets Fmr1 and regulates embryonic neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We found that the 3′ UTR of the Fmr1 mRNA is a target of miR-130b. •MiR-130b suppresses the expression of Fmr1 in mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters the proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters fate specification of mouse embryonic stem cell. -- Abstract: Fragile X syndrome, one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, is caused by expansion of the CGG repeat in the 5′-untranslated region of the X-linked Fmr1 gene, which results in transcriptional silencing and loss of expression of its encoded protein FMRP. The loss of FMRP increases proliferation and alters fate specification in adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs). However, little is known about Fmr1 mRNA regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In the present study, we report that miR-130b regulated Fmr1 expression by directly targeting its 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR). Up-regulation of miR-130b in mouse embryonic neural progenitor cells (eNPCs) decreased Fmr1 expression, markedly increased eNPC proliferation and altered the differentiation tendency of eNPCs, suggesting that antagonizing miR-130b may be a new therapeutic entry point for treating Fragile X syndrome

  6. MicroRNA-130b targets Fmr1 and regulates embryonic neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Zhang, Kunshan [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Yanlu; Wang, Junbang; Cui, Yaru [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Li, Siguang, E-mail: siguangli@163.com [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell Center, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Luo, Yuping, E-mail: luoyuping@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, College of Life Sciences and Food Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •We found that the 3′ UTR of the Fmr1 mRNA is a target of miR-130b. •MiR-130b suppresses the expression of Fmr1 in mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters the proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cell. •MiR-130b alters fate specification of mouse embryonic stem cell. -- Abstract: Fragile X syndrome, one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, is caused by expansion of the CGG repeat in the 5′-untranslated region of the X-linked Fmr1 gene, which results in transcriptional silencing and loss of expression of its encoded protein FMRP. The loss of FMRP increases proliferation and alters fate specification in adult neural progenitor cells (aNPCs). However, little is known about Fmr1 mRNA regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In the present study, we report that miR-130b regulated Fmr1 expression by directly targeting its 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR). Up-regulation of miR-130b in mouse embryonic neural progenitor cells (eNPCs) decreased Fmr1 expression, markedly increased eNPC proliferation and altered the differentiation tendency of eNPCs, suggesting that antagonizing miR-130b may be a new therapeutic entry point for treating Fragile X syndrome.

  7. The Hippo Pathway Targets Rae1 to Regulate Mitosis and Organ Size and to Feed Back to Regulate Upstream Components Merlin, Hippo, and Warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, Maryam; Hsiao, Kuangfu; Jenny, Andreas; Pfleger, Cathie M

    2016-08-01

    Hippo signaling acts as a master regulatory pathway controlling growth, proliferation, and apoptosis and also ensures that variations in proliferation do not alter organ size. How the pathway coordinates restricting proliferation with organ size control remains a major unanswered question. Here we identify Rae1 as a highly-conserved target of the Hippo Pathway integrating proliferation and organ size. Genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila cells and tissues and in mammalian cells indicate that Hippo signaling promotes Rae1 degradation downstream of Warts/Lats. In proliferating cells, Rae1 loss restricts cyclin B levels and organ size while Rae1 over-expression increases cyclin B levels and organ size, similar to Hippo Pathway over-activation or loss-of-function, respectively. Importantly, Rae1 regulation by the Hippo Pathway is crucial for its regulation of cyclin B and organ size; reducing Rae1 blocks cyclin B accumulation and suppresses overgrowth caused by Hippo Pathway loss. Surprisingly, in addition to suppressing overgrowth, reducing Rae1 also compromises survival of epithelial tissue overgrowing due to loss of Hippo signaling leading to a tissue "synthetic lethality" phenotype. Excitingly, Rae1 plays a highly conserved role to reduce the levels and activity of the Yki/YAP oncogene. Rae1 increases activation of the core kinases Hippo and Warts and plays a post-transcriptional role to increase the protein levels of the Merlin, Hippo, and Warts components of the pathway; therefore, in addition to Rae1 coordinating organ size regulation with proliferative control, we propose that Rae1 also acts in a feedback circuit to regulate pathway homeostasis. PMID:27494403

  8. The Hippo Pathway Targets Rae1 to Regulate Mitosis and Organ Size and to Feed Back to Regulate Upstream Components Merlin, Hippo, and Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Andreas; Pfleger, Cathie M.

    2016-01-01

    Hippo signaling acts as a master regulatory pathway controlling growth, proliferation, and apoptosis and also ensures that variations in proliferation do not alter organ size. How the pathway coordinates restricting proliferation with organ size control remains a major unanswered question. Here we identify Rae1 as a highly-conserved target of the Hippo Pathway integrating proliferation and organ size. Genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila cells and tissues and in mammalian cells indicate that Hippo signaling promotes Rae1 degradation downstream of Warts/Lats. In proliferating cells, Rae1 loss restricts cyclin B levels and organ size while Rae1 over-expression increases cyclin B levels and organ size, similar to Hippo Pathway over-activation or loss-of-function, respectively. Importantly, Rae1 regulation by the Hippo Pathway is crucial for its regulation of cyclin B and organ size; reducing Rae1 blocks cyclin B accumulation and suppresses overgrowth caused by Hippo Pathway loss. Surprisingly, in addition to suppressing overgrowth, reducing Rae1 also compromises survival of epithelial tissue overgrowing due to loss of Hippo signaling leading to a tissue “synthetic lethality” phenotype. Excitingly, Rae1 plays a highly conserved role to reduce the levels and activity of the Yki/YAP oncogene. Rae1 increases activation of the core kinases Hippo and Warts and plays a post-transcriptional role to increase the protein levels of the Merlin, Hippo, and Warts components of the pathway; therefore, in addition to Rae1 coordinating organ size regulation with proliferative control, we propose that Rae1 also acts in a feedback circuit to regulate pathway homeostasis. PMID:27494403

  9. A circadian clock-regulated toggle switch explains AtGRP7 and AtGRP8 oscillations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schmal

    Full Text Available The circadian clock controls many physiological processes in higher plants and causes a large fraction of the genome to be expressed with a 24h rhythm. The transcripts encoding the RNA-binding proteins AtGRP7 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glycine Rich Protein 7 and AtGRP8 oscillate with evening peaks. The circadian clock components CCA1 and LHY negatively affect AtGRP7 expression at the level of transcription. AtGRP7 and AtGRP8, in turn, negatively auto-regulate and reciprocally cross-regulate post-transcriptionally: high protein levels promote the generation of an alternative splice form that is rapidly degraded. This clock-regulated feedback loop has been proposed to act as a molecular slave oscillator in clock output. While mathematical models describing the circadian core oscillator in Arabidopsis thaliana were introduced recently, we propose here the first model of a circadian slave oscillator. We define the slave oscillator in terms of ordinary differential equations and identify the model's parameters by an optimization procedure based on experimental results. The model successfully reproduces the pertinent experimental findings such as waveforms, phases, and half-lives of the time-dependent concentrations. Furthermore, we obtain insights into possible mechanisms underlying the observed experimental dynamics: the negative auto-regulation and reciprocal cross-regulation via alternative splicing could be responsible for the sharply peaking waveforms of the AtGRP7 and AtGRP8 mRNA. Moreover, our results suggest that the AtGRP8 transcript oscillations are subordinated to those of AtGRP7 due to a higher impact of AtGRP7 protein on alternative splicing of its own and of the AtGRP8 pre-mRNA compared to the impact of AtGRP8 protein. Importantly, a bifurcation analysis provides theoretical evidence that the slave oscillator could be a toggle switch, arising from the reciprocal cross-regulation at the post-transcriptional level. In view of this

  10. Post-transcriptional suppression of gene expression in Xenopus embryos by small interfering RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yuan; Ching, Yick-Pang; Kok, Kin Hang; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2002-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) induces gene-specific silencing in organisms from fungi to animals, a phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi). RNAi represents an evolutionarily conserved system to protect against aberrant expression of genes and a powerful tool for gene manipulation. Despite reports that RNAi can be induced in vertebrates, severe sequence-non-specific effects of long dsRNA have been documented in various systems. It has recently been shown in cultured mammalian cells that sma...

  11. Post-transcriptional gene silencing is involved in resistance of transgenic papayas to Papaya Ringspot Virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruanjan, P.; Kertbundit, Sunee; Juříček, Miloslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2007), s. 517-520. ISSN 0006-3134 Grant ostatní: BIOTEC, NASDA(TH) BT-B-06-PG-14-4503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : Carica papaya * reverse transcription PCR * COAT PROTEIN GENE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2007

  12. Regulation of dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum

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    ChristianeDahl

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum, thiosulfate oxidation is strictly dependent on the presence of three periplasmic Sox proteins encoded by the soxBXAK and soxYZ genes. It is also well documented that proteins encoded in the dsr (dissimilatory sulfite reductase operon, dsrABEFHCMKLJOPNRS, are essential for the oxidation of sulfur that is stored intracellularly as an obligatory intermediate during the oxidation of thiosulfate and sulfide. Until recently, detailed knowledge about the regulation of the sox genes was not available. We started to fill this gap and show that these genes are expressed on a low constitutive level in A. vinosum in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds. Thiosulfate and possibly sulfide lead to an induction of sox gene transcription. Additional translational regulation was not apparent. Regulation of soxXAK is probably performed by a two-component system consisting of a multisensor histidine kinase and a regulator with proposed di-guanylate cyclase activity. Previous work already provided some information about regulation of the dsr genes encoding the second important sulfur-oxidizing enzyme system in the purple sulfur bacterium. The expression of most dsr genes was found to be at a low basal level in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds and enhanced in the presence of sulfide. In the present work, we focused on the role of DsrS, a protein encoded by the last gene of the dsr locus in A. vinosum. Transcriptional and translational gene fusion experiments suggest a participation of DsrS in the post-transcriptional control of the dsr operon. Characterization of an A. vinosum ΔdsrS mutant showed that the monomeric cytoplasmic 41.1 kDa protein DsrS is important though not essential for the oxidation of sulfur stored in the intracellular sulfur globules.

  13. Temperature-induced regulation of RpoS by a small RNA in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybecker, Meghan C; Samuels, D Scott

    2007-05-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoS (sigma38 or sigmaS) plays a central role in the reciprocal regulation of the virulence-associated major outer surface proteins OspC and OspA in Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete. Temperature is one of the key environmental signals controlling RpoS, but the molecular mechanism by which the signal is transduced remains unknown. Herein, we identify and describe a small non-coding RNA, DsrABb, that regulates the temperature-induced increase in RpoS. A novel 5' end of the rpoS mRNA was identified and DsrABb has the potential to extensively base-pair with the upstream region of this rpoS transcript. We demonstrate that B. burgdorferi strains lacking DsrABb do not upregulate RpoS and OspC in response to an increase in temperature, but do regulate RpoS and OspC in response to changes in pH and cell density. Analyses of the rpoS and ospC steady-state mRNA levels in the dsrABb mutant indicate that DsrABb regulates RpoS post-transcriptionally. The 5' and 3' ends of DsrABb were mapped, demonstrating that at least four species exist with sizes ranging from 213 to 352 nucleotides. We hypothesize that DsrABb binds to the upstream region of the rpoS mRNA and stimulates translation by releasing the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and start site from a stable secondary structure. Therefore, we postulate that DsrABb is a molecular thermometer regulating RpoS in Borrelia burgdorferi. PMID:17501929

  14. In vitro selection of mutants: Inducible gene regulation for salt tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulation of differentially expressed genes in plants may be involved in inducing tolerance to stress. Isogenic salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant alfalfa lines were investigated for molecular differences in their response to salt. The genes, which are differentially induced by salt in the salt-tolerant alfalfa cells and are also regulated by salt at the whole plant level, were cloned. Both transcriptional and post- transcriptional mechanisms influenced salt-induced product accumulation in the salt-tolerant alfalfa. The salt-tolerant plants doubled proline concentration rapidly in roots, while salt-sensitive plants showed a delayed response. To understand the regulatory system in the salt-tolerant alfalfa, two genes that are expressed in roots were studied. Alfin1 encodes a zinc-finger type putative DNA transcription factor conserved in alfalfa, rice and Arabidopsis, and MsPRP2 encodes a protein that serves as a cell wall- membrane linker in roots. Recombinant Alfin1 protein was selected, amplified, cloned and its consensus sequence was identified. The recombinant Alfin1 also bound specifically to fragments of the MsPRP2 promoter in vitro, containing the Alfin1 binding consensus sequence. The results show unambiguously binding specificity of Alfin1 DNA, supporting its role in gene regulation. Alfin1 function was tested in transformed alfalfa in vivo by over-expressing Alfin1 from 35S CaMV promoter. The transgenic plants appeared normal. However, plants harboring the anti-sense construct did not grow well in soil, indicating that Alfin1 expression was essential. Alfin1 over-expression in transgenic alfalfa led to enhanced levels of MsPRP2 transcript accumulation, demonstrating that Alfin1 functioned in vivo in gene regulation. Since MsPRP2 gene is also induced by salt, it is likely that Alfin1 is an important transcription factor for gene regulation in salt-tolerant alfalfa, and an excellent target for manipulation to improve salt tolerance. (author)

  15. NOISE REGULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Voican; Constantin Stanescu

    2012-01-01

    Noise regulation includes statutes or guidelines relating to sound transmission established by national, state or provincial and municipal levels of government. After the watershed passage of the United States Noise Control Act of 1972, other local and state governments passed further regulations. Although the UK and Japan enacted national laws in 1960 and 1967 respectively, these laws were not at all comprehensive or fully enforceable as to address generally rising ambient noise, enforceable...

  16. Role of gonadotropin regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/Ddx25 on polysomal associated mRNAs in mouse testis.

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    Chon-Hwa Tsai-Morris

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin Regulated Testicular RNA Helicase (GRTH/Ddx25 is a testis-specific multifunctional RNA helicase and an essential post-transcriptional regulator of spermatogenesis. GRTH transports relevant mRNAs from nucleus to cytoplasmic sites of meiotic and haploid germ cells and associates with actively translating polyribosomes. It is also a negative regulator of steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. To obtain a genome-wide perspective of GRTH regulated genes, in particularly those associated with polyribosomes, microarray differential gene expression analysis was performed using polysome-bound RNA isolated from testes of wild type (WT and GRTH KO mice. 792 genes among the entire mouse genome were found to be polysomal GRTH-linked in WT. Among these 186 were down-regulated and 7 up-regulated genes in GRTH null mice. A similar analysis was performed using total RNA extracted from purified germ cell populations to address GRTH action in individual target cells. The down-regulation of known genes concerned with spermatogenesis at polysomal sites in GRTH KO and their association with GRTH in WT coupled with early findings of minor or unchanged total mRNAs and abolition of their protein expression in KO underscore the relevance of GRTH in translation. Ingenuity pathway analysis predicted association of GRTH bound polysome genes with the ubiquitin-proteasome-heat shock protein signaling network pathway and NFκB/TP53/TGFB1 signaling networks were derived from the differentially expressed gene analysis. This study has revealed known and unexplored factors in the genome and regulatory pathways underlying GRTH action in male reproduction.

  17. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, David J; Heinen, Christian; Schramm, Frederic D; Thüring, Marietta; Aakre, Christopher D; Murray, Sean M; Laub, Michael T; Jonas, Kristina

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs. PMID:26134530

  18. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs.

  19. Thiamine synthesis regulates the fermentation mechanisms in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Motoyuki; Masuo, Shunsuke; Itoh, Eriko; Zhou, Shengmin; Kato, Masashi; Takaya, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is a critical cofactor and its biosynthesis is under the control of TPP availability. Here we disrupted a predicted thiA gene of the fungus Aspergillus nidulans and demonstrated that it is essential for synthesizing cellular thiamine. The thiamine riboswitch is a post-transcriptional mechanism for TPP to repress gene expression and it is located on A. nidulans thiA pre-messenger RNA. The thiA riboswitch was not fully derepressed under thiamine-limited conditions, and fully derepressed under environmental stressors. Upon exposure to hypoxic stress, the fungus accumulated more ThiA and NmtA proteins, and more thiamine than under aerobic conditions. The thiA gene was required for the fungus to upregulate hypoxic branched-chain amino acids and ethanol fermentation that involve enzymes containing TPP. These findings indicate that hypoxia modulates thiA expression through the thiamine riboswitch, and alters cellular fermentation mechanisms by regulating the activity of the TPP enzymes. PMID:26967817

  20. N6-methyladenosine of HIV-1 RNA regulates viral infection and HIV-1 Gag protein expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumuru, Nagaraja; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Lu, Wuxun; Lu, Zhike; He, Chuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The internal N6-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of eukaryotic nuclear RNA controls post-transcriptional gene expression, which is regulated by methyltransferases (writers), demethylases (erasers), and m6A-binding proteins (readers) in cells. The YTH domain family proteins (YTHDF1–3) bind to m6A-modified cellular RNAs and affect RNA metabolism and processing. Here, we show that YTHDF1–3 proteins recognize m6A-modified HIV-1 RNA and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell lines and primary CD4+ T-cells. We further mapped the YTHDF1–3 binding sites in HIV-1 RNA from infected cells. We found that the overexpression of YTHDF proteins in cells inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly by decreasing HIV-1 reverse transcription, while knockdown of YTHDF1–3 in cells had the opposite effects. Moreover, silencing the m6A writers decreased HIV-1 Gag protein expression in virus-producing cells, while silencing the m6A erasers increased Gag expression. Our findings suggest an important role of m6A modification of HIV-1 RNA in viral infection and HIV-1 protein synthesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15528.001 PMID:27371828

  1. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A Regulates the Secretion of Different Angiogenic Factors in Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezzetti, Daniela; Gallo, Marianna; Roma, Cristin; D'Alessio, Amelia; Maiello, Monica R; Bevilacqua, Simona; Normanno, Nicola; De Luca, Antonella

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is one of the main mediators of angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Recently, it has been described an autocrine feed-forward loop in NSCLC cells in which tumor-derived VEGFA promoted the secretion of VEGFA itself, amplifying the proangiogenic signal. In order to investigate the role of VEGFA in lung cancer progression, we assessed the effects of recombinant VEGFA on proliferation, migration, and secretion of other angiogenic factors in A549, H1975, and HCC827 NSCLC cell lines. We found that VEGFA did not affect NSCLC cell proliferation and migration. On the other hand, we demonstrated that VEGFA not only produced a strong and persistent increase of VEGFA itself but also significantly induced the secretion of a variety of angiogenic factors, including follistatin (FST), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin (IL)-8, leptin (LEP), platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), and platelet-derived growth factor bb (PDGF-BB). PI3K/AKT, RAS/ERK, and STAT3 signalling pathways were found to mediate the effects of VEGFA in NSCLC cell lines. We also observed that VEGFA regulation mainly occurred at post-transcriptional level and that NSCLC cells expressed different isoforms of VEGFA. Collectively, our data suggested that VEGFA contributes to lung cancer progression by inducing a network of angiogenic factors, which might offer potential for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26542886

  2. HIV-1 matrix dependent membrane targeting is regulated by Gag mRNA trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jin

    Full Text Available Retroviral Gag polyproteins are necessary and sufficient for virus budding. Productive HIV-1 Gag assembly takes place at the plasma membrane. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which thousands of Gag molecules are targeted to the plasma membrane. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC assay, we recently reported that the cellular sites and efficiency of HIV-1 Gag assembly depend on the precise pathway of Gag mRNA export from the nucleus, known to be mediated by Rev. Here we describe an assembly deficiency in human cells for HIV Gag whose expression depends on hepatitis B virus (HBV post-transcriptional regulatory element (PRE mediated-mRNA nuclear export. PRE-dependent HIV Gag expressed well in human cells, but assembled with slower kinetics, accumulated intracellularly, and failed to associate with a lipid raft compartment where the wild-type Rev-dependent HIV-1 Gag efficiently assembles. Surprisingly, assembly and budding of PRE-dependent HIV Gag in human cells could be rescued in trans by co-expression of Rev-dependent Gag that provides correct membrane targeting signals, or in cis by replacing HIV matrix (MA with other membrane targeting domains. Taken together, our results demonstrate deficient membrane targeting of PRE-dependent HIV-1 Gag and suggest that HIV MA function is regulated by the trafficking pathway of the encoding mRNA.

  3. The BEACH Domain Protein SPIRRIG Is Essential for Arabidopsis Salt Stress Tolerance and Functions as a Regulator of Transcript Stabilization and Localization.

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    Alexandra Steffens

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the highly conserved class of BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs have been established as broad facilitators of protein-protein interactions and membrane dynamics in the context of human diseases like albinism, bleeding diathesis, impaired cellular immunity, cancer predisposition, and neurological dysfunctions. Also, the Arabidopsis thaliana BDCP SPIRRIG (SPI is important for membrane integrity, as spi mutants exhibit split vacuoles. In this work, we report a novel molecular function of the BDCP SPI in ribonucleoprotein particle formation. We show that SPI interacts with the P-body core component DECAPPING PROTEIN 1 (DCP1, associates to mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies, and regulates their assembly upon salt stress. The finding that spi mutants exhibit salt hypersensitivity suggests that the local function of SPI at P-bodies is of biological relevance. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed qualitative differences in the salt stress-regulated transcriptional response of Col-0 and spi. We show that SPI regulates the salt stress-dependent post-transcriptional stabilization, cytoplasmic agglomeration, and localization to P-bodies of a subset of salt stress-regulated mRNAs. Finally, we show that the PH-BEACH domains of SPI and its human homolog FAN (Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase activation interact with DCP1 isoforms from plants, mammals, and yeast, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of an association of BDCPs and P-bodies.

  4. The miR9863 family regulates distinct Mla alleles in barley to attenuate NLR receptor-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling.

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    Jie Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC, nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh. How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at post-transcriptional level is not clear. The microRNA family, miR9863, comprises four members that differentially regulate distinct Mla alleles in barley. We show that miR9863 members guide the cleavage of Mla1 transcripts in barley, and block or reduce the accumulation of MLA1 protein in the heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana expression system. Regulation specificity is determined by variation in a unique single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP in mature miR9863 family members and two SNPs in the Mla miR9863-binding site that separates these alleles into three groups. Further, we demonstrate that 22-nt miR9863s trigger the biogenesis of 21-nt phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs and together these sRNAs form a feed-forward regulation network for repressing the expression of group I Mla alleles. Overexpression of miR9863 members specifically attenuates MLA1, but not MLA10-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling. We propose a key role of the miR9863 family in dampening immune response signaling triggered by a group of MLA immune receptors in barley.

  5. Dual role of RsmA in the coordinated regulation of expression of virulence genes in Pectobacterium wasabiae strain SCC3193.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Liis; Frolova, Jekaterina; Põllumaa, Lee; Mäe, Andres

    2015-11-01

    The CsrA/RsmA family of post-transcriptional regulators in bacteria is involved in regulating many cellular processes, including pathogenesis. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified an RsmA binding motif, A(N)GGA, in the Shine-Dalgarno regions of 901 genes. Among these genes with the predicted RsmA binding motif, 358 were regulated by RsmA according to our previously published gene expression profiling analysis (WT vs rsmA negative mutant; Kõiv et al., 2013). A small subset of the predicted targets known to be important as virulence factors was selected for experimental validation. RNA footprint analyses demonstrated that RsmA binds specifically to the ANGGA motif in the 5'UTR sequences of celV1, pehA, pelB, pel2 and prtW. RsmA-dependent regulation of these five genes was examined in vivo using plasmid-borne translational and transcriptional fusions with a reporter gusA gene. They were all affected negatively by RsmA. However, we demonstrated that whereas the overall effect of RsmA on celV1 and prtW was determined on both the translational and transcriptional level, expression of pectinolytic enzyme genes (pehA, pel2 and pelB) was affected mainly on the level of transcription in tested conditions. In summary, these data indicate that RsmA controls virulence by integration of its regulatory activities at various levels. PMID:26306750

  6. The BEACH Domain Protein SPIRRIG Is Essential for Arabidopsis Salt Stress Tolerance and Functions as a Regulator of Transcript Stabilization and Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Alexandra; Bräutigam, Andrea; Jakoby, Marc; Hülskamp, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Members of the highly conserved class of BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs) have been established as broad facilitators of protein-protein interactions and membrane dynamics in the context of human diseases like albinism, bleeding diathesis, impaired cellular immunity, cancer predisposition, and neurological dysfunctions. Also, the Arabidopsis thaliana BDCP SPIRRIG (SPI) is important for membrane integrity, as spi mutants exhibit split vacuoles. In this work, we report a novel molecular function of the BDCP SPI in ribonucleoprotein particle formation. We show that SPI interacts with the P-body core component DECAPPING PROTEIN 1 (DCP1), associates to mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies), and regulates their assembly upon salt stress. The finding that spi mutants exhibit salt hypersensitivity suggests that the local function of SPI at P-bodies is of biological relevance. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed qualitative differences in the salt stress-regulated transcriptional response of Col-0 and spi. We show that SPI regulates the salt stress-dependent post-transcriptional stabilization, cytoplasmic agglomeration, and localization to P-bodies of a subset of salt stress-regulated mRNAs. Finally, we show that the PH-BEACH domains of SPI and its human homolog FAN (Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase activation) interact with DCP1 isoforms from plants, mammals, and yeast, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of an association of BDCPs and P-bodies. PMID:26133670

  7. Sex-different and growth hormone-regulated expression of microRNA in rat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tollet-Egnell Petra

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs playing an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. We have previously shown that hepatic transcript profiles are different between males and females; that some of these differences are under the regulation of growth hormone (GH; and that mild starvation diminishes some of the differences. In this study, we tested if hepatic miRNAs are regulated in a similar manner. Results Using microarrays, miRNA screening was performed to identify sex-dependent miRNAs in rat liver. Out of 324 unique probes on the array, 254 were expressed in the liver and eight (3% of 254 of those were found to be different between the sexes. Among the eight putative sex-different miRNAs, only one female-predominant miRNA (miR-29b was confirmed using quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, 1 week of continuous GH-treatment in male rats reduced the levels of miR-451 and miR-29b, whereas mild starvation (12 hours raised the levels of miR-451, miR-122a and miR-29b in both sexes. The biggest effects were obtained on miR-29b with GH-treatment. Conclusion We conclude that hepatic miRNA levels depend on the hormonal and nutritional status of the animal and show that miR-29b is a female-predominant and GH-regulated miRNA in rat liver.

  8. Alteration of microRNAs regulated by c-Myc in Burkitt lymphoma.

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    Anna Onnis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkitt lymphoma (BL is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma, with a characteristic clinical presentation, morphology and immunophenotype. Over the past years, the typical translocation t(8;14 and its variants have been considered the molecular hallmark of this tumor. However, BL cases with no detectable MYC rearrangement have been identified. Intriguingly, these cases express MYC at levels comparable with cases carrying the translocation. In normal cells c-Myc expression is tightly regulated through a complex feedback loop mechanism. In cancer, MYC is often dysregulated, commonly due to genomic abnormalities. It has recently emerged that this phenomenon may rely on an alteration of post-transcriptional regulation mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs, whose functional alterations are associated with neoplastic transformation. It is also emerging that c-Myc modulates miRNA expression, revealing an intriguing crosstalk between c-Myc and miRNAs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigated the expression of miRNAs possibly regulated by c-Myc in BL cases positive or negative for the translocation. A common trend of miRNA expression, with the exception of hsa-miR-9*, was observed in all of the cases. Intriguingly, down-regulation of this miRNA seems to specifically identify a particular subset of BL cases, lacking MYC translocation. Here, we provided evidence that hsa-miR-9-1 gene is heavily methylated in those cases. Finally, we showed that hsa-miR-9* is able to modulate E2F1 and c-Myc expression. CONCLUSIONS: Particularly, this study identifies hsa-miR-9* as potentially relevant for malignant transformation in BL cases with no detectable MYC translocation. Deregulation of hsa-miR-9* may therefore be useful as a diagnostic tool, suggesting it as a promising novel candidate for tumor cell marker.

  9. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  10. A novel pathway regulates memory and plasticity via SIRT1 and miR-134

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Mao, Ying-Wei; Gräff, Johannes; Guan, Ji-Song; Pan, Ling; Mak, Gloria; Kim, Dohoon; Su, Susan C.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2010-01-01

    The NAD-dependent deacetylase Sir2 was initially identified as a mediator of replicative lifespan in budding yeast and was subsequently shown to modulate longevity in worms and flies1,2. Its mammalian homologue, SIRT1, appears to have evolved complex systemic roles in cardiac function, DNA repair, and genomic stability. Recent studies suggest a functional relevance of SIRT1 in normal brain physiology and neurological disorders. However, it is unknown if SIRT1 plays a role in higher-order brain functions. We report that SIRT1 modulates synaptic plasticity and memory formation via a microRNA-mediated mechanism. Activation of SIRT1 enhances, while its loss-of-function impairs, synaptic plasticity. Surprisingly, these effects were mediated via post-transcriptional regulation of CREB expression by a brain-specific microRNA, miR-134. SIRT1 normally functions to limit expression of miR-134 via a repressor complex containing the transcription factor YY1, and unchecked miR-134 expression following SIRT1 deficiency results in the down-regulated expression of CREB and BDNF, thereby impairing synaptic plasticity. These findings demonstrate a novel role for SIRT1 in cognition and a previously unknown microRNA-based mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates these processes. Furthermore, these results describe a separate branch of SIRT1 signaling, in which SIRT1 has a direct role in regulating normal brain function in a manner that is disparate from its cell survival functions, demonstrating its value as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:20622856

  11. Scavenger receptor class B member 1 protein: hepatic regulation and its effects on lipids, reverse cholesterol transport, and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent AP

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthony P Kent, Ioannis M StylianouDepartment of Medicine and Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SR-BI, also known as SCARB1 is the primary receptor for the selective uptake of cholesterol from high-density lipoprotein (HDL. SR-BI is present in several key tissues; however, its presence and function in the liver is deemed the most relevant for protection against atherosclerosis. Cholesterol is transferred from HDL via SR-BI to the liver, which ultimately results in the excretion of cholesterol via bile and feces in what is known as the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Much of our knowledge of SR-BI hepatic function and regulation is derived from mouse models and in vitro characterization. Multiple independent regulatory mechanisms of SR-BI have been discovered that operate at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In this review we summarize the critical discoveries relating to hepatic SR-BI cholesterol metabolism, atherosclerosis, and regulation of SR-BI, as well as alternative functions that may indirectly affect atherosclerosis.Keywords: SR-BI, SCARB1, lipids, atherosclerosis, CAD, mouse models

  12. NORM regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  13. Interaction with diurnal and circadian regulation results in dynamic metabolic and transcriptional changes during cold acclimation in Arabidopsis.

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    Carmen Espinoza

    Full Text Available In plants, there is a large overlap between cold and circadian regulated genes and in Arabidopsis, we have shown that cold (4°C affects the expression of clock oscillator genes. However, a broader insight into the significance of diurnal and/or circadian regulation of cold responses, particularly for metabolic pathways, and their physiological relevance is lacking. Here, we performed an integrated analysis of transcripts and primary metabolites using microarrays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As expected, expression of diurnally regulated genes was massively affected during cold acclimation. Our data indicate that disruption of clock function at the transcriptional level extends to metabolic regulation. About 80% of metabolites that showed diurnal cycles maintained these during cold treatment. In particular, maltose content showed a massive night-specific increase in the cold. However, under free-running conditions, maltose was the only metabolite that maintained any oscillations in the cold. Furthermore, although starch accumulates during cold acclimation we show it is still degraded at night, indicating significance beyond the previously demonstrated role of maltose and starch breakdown in the initial phase of cold acclimation. Levels of some conventional cold induced metabolites, such as γ-aminobutyric acid, galactinol, raffinose and putrescine, exhibited diurnal and circadian oscillations and transcripts encoding their biosynthetic enzymes often also cycled and preceded their cold-induction, in agreement with transcriptional regulation. However, the accumulation of other cold-responsive metabolites, for instance homoserine, methionine and maltose, did not have consistent transcriptional regulation, implying that metabolic reconfiguration involves complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. These data demonstrate the importance of understanding cold acclimation in the correct day-night context, and are further

  14. The Rare Codon AGA Is Involved in Regulation of Pyoluteorin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qing; Philmus, Benjamin; Hesse, Cedar; Kohen, Max; Chang, Jeff H.; Loper, Joyce E.

    2016-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 can colonize root and seed surfaces of many plants, protecting them from infection by plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. The capacity to suppress disease is attributed to Pf-5's production of a large spectrum of antibiotics, which is controlled by complex regulatory circuits operating at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In this study, we analyzed the genomic sequence of Pf-5 for codon usage patterns and observed that the six rarest codons in the genome are present in all seven known antibiotic biosynthesis gene clusters. In particular, there is an abundance of rare codons in pltR, which encodes a member of the LysR transcriptional regulator family that controls the expression of pyoluteorin biosynthetic genes. To test the hypothesis that rare codons in pltR influence pyoluteorin production, we generated a derivative of Pf-5 in which 23 types of rare codons in pltR were substituted with synonymous preferred codons. The resultant mutant produced pyoluteorin at levels 15 times higher than that of the wild-type Pf-5. Accordingly, the promoter activity of the pyoluteorin biosynthetic gene pltL was 20 times higher in the codon-modified stain than in the wild-type. pltR has six AGA codons, which is the rarest codon in the Pf-5 genome. Substitution of all six AGA codons with preferred Arg codons resulted in a variant of pltR that conferred increased pyoluteorin production and pltL promoter activity. Furthermore, overexpression of tRNAUCUArg, the cognate tRNA for the AGA codon, significantly increased pyoluteorin production by Pf-5. A bias in codon usage has been linked to the regulation of many phenotypes in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, to our knowledge, this is the first example of the role of a rare codon in the regulation of antibiotic production by a Gram-negative bacterium. PMID:27148187

  15. Regulation of tyrosinase expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul-Hassan, K; Walmsley, R; Tombran-Tink, J; Boulton, M

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regulation of tyrosinase gene expression and activity in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The tyrosinase promoter (Ty.prom) region (400 bp) was PCR amplified and cloned into a modified mammalian expression vector (pcDNA3.1) upstream of a firefly luciferase (Luc) cDNA and was designated 'pcDNA3.1-Ty.prom.Luc'. The plasmid was co-transfected into RPE cells with a second mammalian expression plasmid (pRL-TK) containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter region upstream of Renilla Luc in a protocol designated the 'dual luciferase assay' (DLA). After co-transfection, cells were treated with a range of potential melanogenic agents; basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), methyl methane sulphonate, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, verapamil, phorbol myristate acetate, cholera toxin (CT), pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF), and L-tyrosine. The expression of tyrosinase promoter and enzymatic activities were determined 48 hr post-transfection using the DLA and DOPA oxidase assays, respectively. Tyrosinase activity could not be detected in RPE cells with any of the treatments. Tyrosinase promoter activity was significantly up-regulated in RPE cells treated with bFGF, PEDF, verapamil, CT and tyrosine compared with control cells. In conclusion, the tyrosinase gene is not only expressed but can be regulated in response to different chemicals in cultured human RPE cells. However, it appears that RPE cells in culture lack a post-transcriptional and/or translational modification point(s), which are necessary for tyrosinase enzymic activity. PMID:11153695

  16. Identification of a chemical inhibitor for nuclear speckle formation: Implications for the function of nuclear speckles in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We identified tubercidin as a compound inducing aberrant formation of the speckles. • Tubercidin causes delocalization of poly (A)+RNAs from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin induces dispersion of splicing factors from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin affects alternative pre-mRNA splicing. • Nuclear speckles play a role in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. - Abstract: Nuclear speckles are subnuclear structures enriched with RNA processing factors and poly (A)+ RNAs comprising mRNAs and poly (A)+ non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Nuclear speckles are thought to be involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, such as pre-mRNA splicing. By screening 3585 culture extracts of actinomycetes with in situ hybridization using an oligo dT probe, we identified tubercidin, an analogue of adenosine, as an inhibitor of speckle formation, which induces the delocalization of poly (A)+ RNA and dispersion of splicing factor SRSF1/SF2 from nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Treatment with tubercidin also decreased steady-state MALAT1 long ncRNA, thought to be involved in the retention of SRSF1/SF2 in nuclear speckles. In addition, we found that tubercidin treatment promoted exon skipping in the alternative splicing of Clk1 pre-mRNA. These results suggest that nuclear speckles play a role in modulating the concentration of splicing factors in the nucleoplasm to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing

  17. Post-developmental microRNA expression is required for normal physiology, and regulates aging in parallel to insulin/IGF-1 signaling in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrbach, Nicolas J; Castro, Cecilia; Murfitt, Kenneth J; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Griffin, Julian L; Miska, Eric A

    2012-12-01

    Regulation of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) is essential for normal development, but the roles of miRNAs in the physiology of adult animals are poorly understood. We have isolated a conditional allele of DGCR8/pash-1, which allows reversible and rapid inactivation of miRNA synthesis in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. This is a powerful new tool that allows dissection of post-developmental miRNA functions. We demonstrate that continuous synthesis of miRNAs is dispensable for cellular viability but critical for the physiology of adult animals. Loss of miRNA synthesis in the adult reduces lifespan and results in rapid aging. The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway is a critical determinant of lifespan, and is modulated by miRNAs. We find that although miRNA expression is required for some mechanisms of lifespan extension, it is not essential for the longevity of animals lacking insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Further, misregulated insulin/IGF-1 signaling cannot account for the reduced lifespan caused by disruption of miRNA synthesis. We show that miRNAs act in parallel with insulin/IGF-1 signaling to regulate a shared set of downstream genes important for physiological processes that determine lifespan. We conclude that coordinated transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression promotes longevity. PMID:23097426

  18. Identification of a chemical inhibitor for nuclear speckle formation: Implications for the function of nuclear speckles in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurogi, Yutaro; Matsuo, Yota; Mihara, Yuki; Yagi, Hiroaki; Shigaki-Miyamoto, Kaya; Toyota, Syukichi; Azuma, Yuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Igarashi, Masayuki [Laboratory of Disease Biology, Institute of Microbial Chemistry, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan); Tani, Tokio, E-mail: ttani@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We identified tubercidin as a compound inducing aberrant formation of the speckles. • Tubercidin causes delocalization of poly (A){sup +}RNAs from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin induces dispersion of splicing factors from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin affects alternative pre-mRNA splicing. • Nuclear speckles play a role in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. - Abstract: Nuclear speckles are subnuclear structures enriched with RNA processing factors and poly (A){sup +} RNAs comprising mRNAs and poly (A){sup +} non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Nuclear speckles are thought to be involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, such as pre-mRNA splicing. By screening 3585 culture extracts of actinomycetes with in situ hybridization using an oligo dT probe, we identified tubercidin, an analogue of adenosine, as an inhibitor of speckle formation, which induces the delocalization of poly (A){sup +} RNA and dispersion of splicing factor SRSF1/SF2 from nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Treatment with tubercidin also decreased steady-state MALAT1 long ncRNA, thought to be involved in the retention of SRSF1/SF2 in nuclear speckles. In addition, we found that tubercidin treatment promoted exon skipping in the alternative splicing of Clk1 pre-mRNA. These results suggest that nuclear speckles play a role in modulating the concentration of splicing factors in the nucleoplasm to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

  19. MiR-128b is down-regulated in gastric cancer and negatively regulates tumour cell viability by targeting PDK1/Akt/NF-κB axis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ling Zhang; Jun Lei; Zi-Ling Fang; Jian-Ping Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most prevalent type of cancer worldwide, which is usually caused by the interaction between environmental and genetic factors, or epigenetic aspects. Referring to the non-coding RNAs, miR-128b has been reported to be associated with many tumour cases, and exerts distinct functions in different types of cancers. However, the function of miR-128b in GC onset and progression largely remains unknown. In the present study, we found that miR-128b expression was down-regulated in tissues from 18 GC patients and 3 carcinoma cell lines. In turn, over-expression of miR-128b suppressed GC cell proliferation, invasion and promoted apoptosis. Moreover, miR-128b was predicted to bind the 3'UTR of PDK1 gene using bioinformatic target-screening tools. Accordingly, ectopic expression of miR-128b inhibited the PDK1 expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and furthermore, the expression of gene tailed by the 3′UTR of PDK1 gene was significantly decreased in a dualluciferase reporter assay, suggesting that PDK1 was a direct target of miR-128b in GC cells. In the conditon of miR-128b over-expression, we also observed spontaneous inactivation of the Akt/NF-κB signalling, implying PDK1 was a potential regulator of this pathway. In conclusion, our study shed some novel light on miR-128b-PDK1/Akt/NF-κB axis on GC progression.

  20. miR-19a: an effective regulator of SOCS3 and enhancer of JAK-STAT signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aideen S Collins

    Full Text Available Suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS proteins are classic inhibitors of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT pathway. Many cytokines and pathogenic mediators induce expression of SOCS, which act in a negative feedback loop to inhibit further signal transduction. SOCS mRNA expression is regulated by DNA binding of STAT proteins, however, their post-transcriptional regulation is poorly understood. microRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that bind to complementary sequences on target mRNAs, often silencing gene expression. miR-19a has been shown to regulate SOCS1 expression during mutiple myeloma and be induced by the anti-viral cytokine interferon-(IFN-α, suggesting a role in the regulation of the JAK-STAT pathway. This study aimed to identify targets of miR-19a in the JAK-STAT pathway and elucidate the functional consequences. Bioinformatic analysis identified highly conserved 3'UTR miR-19a target sequences in several JAK-STAT associated genes, including SOCS1, SOCS3, SOCS5 and Cullin (Cul 5. Functional studies revealed that miR-19a significantly decreased SOCS3 mRNA and protein, while a miR-19a antagomir specifically reversed its inhibitory effect. Furthermore, miR-19a-mediated reduction of SOCS3 enhanced IFN-α and interleukin (IL-6 signal transduction through STAT3. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which miR-19a may augment JAK-STAT signal transduction via control of SOCS3 expression and are fundamental to the understanding of inflammatory regulation.

  1. miR-208-3p promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion through regulating ARID2 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. miRNA dysregulation plays a causal role in cancer progression. In this study, miR-208-3p was highly expressed and directly repressed ARID2 expression. As a result, ARID2 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was decreased. In vitro, miR-208-3p down-regulation and ARID2 over-expression elicited similar inhibitory effects on HCC cell proliferation and invasion. In vivo test results revealed that miR-208-3p down-regulation inhibited HCC tumorigenesis in Hep3B cells. Moreover, ARID2 was possibly a downstream element of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFβ1)/miR-208-3p/ARID2 regulatory pathway. These findings suggested that miR-208-3p up-regulation is associated with HCC cell progression and may provide a new target for liver cancer treatment. - Highlights: • miR-208-3p was highly expressed and directly repressed the expression of ARID2 in HCC. • miR-208-3p contributed to HCC cell progression both in vitro and in vivo. • Over-expression of ARID2 inhibited the HCC cell proliferation and invasion. • Restoration of ARID2 partly reversed the the effect of miR-208-3p down-regulation on HCC cells. • Newly regulatory pathway: miR-208-3p mediated the repression of ARID2 by TGFβ1 in HCC cells

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the grape cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene CYP736B expression in response to Xylella fastidiosa infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker M Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP mediate synthesis and metabolism of many physiologically important primary and secondary compounds that are related to plant defense against a range of pathogenic microbes and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to Xylella fastidiosa (Xf infection, we investigated expression and regulatory mechanisms of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene in both disease resistant and susceptible grapevines. Results Cloning of genomic DNA and cDNA revealed that the CYP736B gene was composed of two exons and one intron with GT as a donor site and AG as an acceptor site. CYP736B transcript was up-regulated in PD-resistant plants and down-regulated in PD-susceptible plants 6 weeks after Xf inoculation. However, CYP736B expression was very low in stem tissues at all evaluated time points. 5'RACE and 3'RACE sequence analyses revealed that there were three candidate transcription start sites (TSS in the upstream region and three candidate polyadenylation (PolyA sites in the downstream region of CYP736B. Usage frequencies of each transcription initiation site and each polyadenylation site varied depending on plant genotype, developmental stage, tissue, and treatment. These results demonstrate that expression of CYP736B is regulated developmentally and in response to Xf infection at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Multiple transcription start and polyadenylation sites contribute to regulation of CYP736B expression. Conclusions This report provides evidence that the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene is involved in defense response at a specific stage of Xf infection in grapevines; multiple transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites exist for CYP736B in grapevine; and coordinative and selective use of transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites play an important role in regulation of CYP736B expression

  3. miR-208-3p promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion through regulating ARID2 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Peng; Wu, Dingguo; You, Yu; Sun, Jing; Lu, Lele; Tan, Jiaxing; Bie, Ping, E-mail: bieping2010@163.com

    2015-08-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. miRNA dysregulation plays a causal role in cancer progression. In this study, miR-208-3p was highly expressed and directly repressed ARID2 expression. As a result, ARID2 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was decreased. In vitro, miR-208-3p down-regulation and ARID2 over-expression elicited similar inhibitory effects on HCC cell proliferation and invasion. In vivo test results revealed that miR-208-3p down-regulation inhibited HCC tumorigenesis in Hep3B cells. Moreover, ARID2 was possibly a downstream element of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFβ1)/miR-208-3p/ARID2 regulatory pathway. These findings suggested that miR-208-3p up-regulation is associated with HCC cell progression and may provide a new target for liver cancer treatment. - Highlights: • miR-208-3p was highly expressed and directly repressed the expression of ARID2 in HCC. • miR-208-3p contributed to HCC cell progression both in vitro and in vivo. • Over-expression of ARID2 inhibited the HCC cell proliferation and invasion. • Restoration of ARID2 partly reversed the the effect of miR-208-3p down-regulation on HCC cells. • Newly regulatory pathway: miR-208-3p mediated the repression of ARID2 by TGFβ1 in HCC cells.

  4. RegulatING chromatin regulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satpathy, Shankha; Nabbi, Arash; Riabowol, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The five human ING genes encode at least 15 splicing isoforms, most of which affect cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis through their ability to alter gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms. Since their discovery in 1996, ING proteins have been classified as type II tumour suppressors on...... the basis of reports describing their down-regulation and mislocalization in a variety of cancer types. In addition to their regulation by transcriptional mechanisms, understanding the range of PTMs (post-translational modifications) of INGs is important in understanding how ING functions are fine...... stresses. We also describe the ING PTMs that have been identified by several unbiased MS-based PTM enrichment techniques and subsequent proteomic analysis. Among the ING PTMs identified to date, a subset has been characterized for their biological significance and have been shown to affect processes...

  5. Regulation of copper homeostasis and biotic interactions by microRNA 398b in common bean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Naya

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are recognized as important post-transcriptional regulators in plants. Information about the roles of miRNAs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., an agronomically important legume, is yet scant. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the conserved miRNA: miR398b and its target Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase 1 (CSD1 in common bean. We experimentally validated a novel miR398 target: the stress up-regulated Nodulin 19 (Nod19. Expression analysis of miR398b and target genes -CSD1 and Nod19- in bean roots, nodules and leaves, indicated their role in copper (Cu homeostasis. In bean plants under Cu toxicity miR398b was decreased and Nod19 and CSD1, that participates in reactive oxygen species (ROS detoxification, were up-regulated. The opposite regulation was observed in Cu deficient bean plants; lower levels of CSD1 would allow Cu delivery to essential Cu-containing proteins. Composite common bean plants with transgenic roots over-expressing miR398 showed ca. 20-fold higher mature miR398b and almost negligible target transcript levels as well as increased anthocyanin content and expression of Cu-stress responsive genes, when subjected to Cu deficiency. The down-regulation of miR398b with the consequent up-regulation of its targets was observed in common bean roots during the oxidative burst resulting from short-time exposure to high Cu. A similar response occurred at early stage of bean roots inoculated with Rhizobium tropici, where an increase in ROS was observed. In addition, the miR398b down-regulation and an increase in CSD1 and Nod19 were observed in bean leaves challenged with Sclerotinia scleortiorum fungal pathogen. Transient over-expression of miR398b in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves infected with S. sclerotiorum resulted in enhanced fungal lesions. We conclude that the miR398b-mediated up-regulation of CSD and Nod19 is relevant for common bean plants to cope with oxidative stress generated in abiotic and biotic

  6. Nuclear regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, 112 nuclear power plants, 22 facilities that support these plants, 54 reactors used in research, and approximately 23,000 organizations hold licenses from either the Nuclear Regulator Commission or various states to use radioactive material; other facilities are operated by various government agencies. Eventually most of these facilities will be decommissioned, which involves removing the radioactive material and terminating the license. NRC needs to ensure that licensees appropriately decontaminate their facilities because, under current regulations, NRC cannot specifically require additional cleanup once it terminates a license. This paper presents a GAO report on NRC's decommissioning procedures. In two of eight cases GAO reviewed, NRC fully or partially released sites for unrestricted use where radioactive contamination was higher than its guidelines allowed; in the other cases, NRC's information was inadequate or incomplete. Further, NRC lacks information on the types and amounts of radioactive waste buried on-site. At five sites reviewed by GAO, groundwater has been found to be contaminated by radioactive waste

  7. Linking Α to Ω: diverse and dynamic RNA-based mechanisms to regulate gene expression by 5'-to-3' communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Communication between the 5' and 3' ends of a eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA) or viral genomic RNA is a ubiquitous and important strategy used to regulate gene expression. Although the canonical interaction between initiation factor proteins at the 5' end of an mRNA and proteins bound to the polyadenylate tail at the 3' end is well known, in fact there are many other strategies used in diverse ways. These strategies can involve "non-canonical" proteins, RNA structures, and direct RNA-RNA base-pairing between distal elements to achieve 5'-to-3' communication. Likewise, the communication induced by these interactions influences a variety of processes linked to the use and fate of the RNA that contains them. Recent studies are revealing how dynamic these interactions are, possibly changing in response to cellular conditions or to link various phases of the mRNA's life, from translation to decay. Thus, 5'-to-3' communication is about more than just making a closed circle; the RNA elements and associated proteins are key players in controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:27610229

  8. HuR-Regulated mRNAs Associated with Nuclear hnRNP A1-RNP Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolia Guialis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional regulatory networks are dependent on the interplay of many RNA-binding proteins having a major role in mRNA processing events in mammals. We have been interested in the concerted action of the two RNA-binding proteins hnRNP A1 and HuR, both stable components of immunoselected hnRNP complexes and having a major nuclear localization. Specifically, we present here the application of the RNA-immunoprecipitation (RIP-Chip technology to identify a population of nuclear transcripts associated with hnRNP A1-RNPs as isolated from the nuclear extract of either HuR WT or HuR-depleted (KO mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells. The outcome of this analysis was a list of target genes regulated via HuR for their association (either increased or reduced with the nuclear hnRNP A1-RNP complexes. Real time PCR analysis was applied to validate a selected number of nuclear mRNA transcripts, as well as to identify pre-spliced transcripts (in addition to their mature mRNA counterpart within the isolated nuclear hnRNP A1-RNPs. The differentially enriched mRNAs were found to belong to GO categories relevant to biological processes anticipated for hnRNP A1 and HuR (such as transport, transcription, translation, apoptosis and cell cycle indicating their concerted function in mRNA metabolism.

  9. MicroRNAs in Breastmilk and the Lactating Breast: Potential Immunoprotectors and Developmental Regulators for the Infant and the Mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alsaweed

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human milk (HM is the optimal source of nutrition, protection and developmental programming for infants. It is species-specific and consists of various bioactive components, including microRNAs, small non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. microRNAs are both intra- and extra-cellular and are present in body fluids of humans and animals. Of these body fluids, HM appears to be one of the richest sources of microRNA, which are highly conserved in its different fractions, with milk cells containing more microRNAs than milk lipids, followed by skim milk. Potential effects of exogenous food-derived microRNAs on gene expression have been demonstrated, together with the stability of milk-derived microRNAs in the gastrointestinal tract. Taken together, these strongly support the notion that milk microRNAs enter the systemic circulation of the HM fed infant and exert tissue-specific immunoprotective and developmental functions. This has initiated intensive research on the origin, fate and functional significance of milk microRNAs. Importantly, recent studies have provided evidence of endogenous synthesis of HM microRNA within the human lactating mammary epithelium. These findings will now form the basis for investigations of the role of microRNA in the epigenetic control of normal and aberrant mammary development, and particularly lactation performance.

  10. Altered regulation of ELAVL1/HuR in HLA-B27-expressing U937 monocytic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S Sahlberg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of HLA-B27 expression in the regulation of RNA binding protein (RBP Embryonic Lethal Abnormal Vision (ELAV L1/Human antigen R (HuR expression in Salmonella-infected or LPS-stimulated human monocytic cells, since HuR is a critical regulator of the post-transcriptional fate of many genes (e.g. TNFα important in inflammatory response. METHODS: U937 monocytic cells were stably transfected with pSV2neo resistant vector (mock, wild type HLA-B27, or mutated HLA-B27 with amino acid substitutions in the B pocket. Cells were differentiated, infected with Salmonella enteritidis or stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. The expression levels of HuR protein and cleavage products (CP1 and CP2 were detected by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Specific inhibitors were used to study the role of PKR and p38 in HuR expression and generation of CPs. TNFα and IL-10 secretion after p38 and PKR inhibition were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Full length HuR is overexpressed and HuR cleavage is disturbed in U937 monocytic cells expressing HLA-B27 heavy chains (HC. Increased full length HuR expression, disturbed cleavage and reduced dependence on PKR after infection correlate with the expression of glutamic acid 45 in the B pocket that is linked to the misfolding of HLA-B27. CONCLUSION: Results show that the expression of HLA-B27 HCs modulates the intracellular environment of U937 monocyte/macrophages by altering HuR regulation. This phenomenon is at least partly dependent on the misfolding feature of the B27 molecule. Since HuR is an important regulator of multiple genes involved in inflammatory response observations offer an explanation how HLA-B27 may modulate inflammatory response.

  11. Phosphorylation regulates human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a pathogenic complex deltaretrovirus, which is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In addition to the structural and enzymatic viral gene products, HTLV-1 encodes the positive regulatory proteins Tax and Rex along with viral accessory proteins. Tax and Rex proteins orchestrate the timely expression of viral genes important in viral replication and cellular transformation. Rex is a nucleolar-localizing shuttling protein that acts post-transcriptionally by binding and facilitating the export of the unspliced and incompletely spliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. HTLV-1 Rex (Rex-1 is a phosphoprotein and general protein kinase inhibition correlates with reduced function. Therefore, it has been proposed that Rex-1 function may be regulated through site-specific phosphorylation. Results We conducted a phosphoryl mapping of Rex-1 over-expressed in transfected 293 T cells using a combination of affinity purification and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We achieved 100% physical coverage of the Rex-1 polypeptide and identified five novel phosphorylation sites at Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-97, and Ser-106. We also confirmed evidence of two previously identified residues, Ser-70 and Thr-174, but found no evidence of phosphorylation at Ser-177. The functional significance of these phosphorylation events was evaluated using a Rex reporter assay and site-directed mutational analysis. Our results indicate that phosphorylation at Ser-97 and Thr-174 is critical for Rex-1 function. Conclusion We have mapped completely the site-specific phosphorylation of Rex-1 identifying a total of seven residues; Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-70, Ser-97, Ser-106, and Thr-174. Overall, this work is the first to completely map the phosphorylation sites in Rex-1 and provides important insight into

  12. Emerging Perspectives on the Mechanisms,Regulation, and Distribution of Light Color Acclimation in Cyanobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrian Gutu; David M. Kehoe

    2012-01-01

    Chromatic acclimation (CA) provides many cyanobacteria with the ability to tailor the properties of their lightharvesting antennae to the spectral distribution of ambient light.CA was originally discovered as a result of its dramatic cellular phenotype in red and green light.However,discoveries over the past decade have revealed that many pairs of light colors,ranging from blue to infrared,can trigger CA responses.The capacity to undergo CA is widespread geographically,occurs in most habitats around the world,and is found within all major cyanobacterial groups.In addition,many other cellular activities have been found to be under CA control,resulting in distinct physiological and morphological states for cells under different light-color conditions.Several types of CA appear to be the result of convergent evolution,where different strategies are used to achieve the final goal of optimizing light-harvesting antenna composition to maximize photon capture.The regulation of CA has been found to occur primarily at the level of RNA abundance.The CA-regulatory pathways uncovered thus far are two-component systems that use phytochrome-class photoreceptors with sensor-kinase domains to control response regulators that function as transcription factors.However,there is also at least one CAregulatory pathway that operates at the post-transcriptional level.It is becoming increasingly clear that large numbers of cyanobacterial species have the capacity to acclimate to a wide variety of light colors through the use of a range of different CA processes.

  13. Dynamic regulation of uncoupling protein 2 expression by microRNA-214 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guangsheng; Wang, Jianlu; Xu, Kesen; Dong, Jiahong

    2016-07-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM), a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, uses oxidative stress induction as a common effector pathway. However, GEM alone or in combination with oxaliplatin hardly renders any survival benefits to HCC patients. We have recently shown that this is part due to the overexpression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) that in turn mediates resistance to GEM in HCC patients. However, not much is known about regulatory mechanisms underlying UCP2 overexpression in HCC. Differential protein expression in HCC cell lines did not show a concomitant change in UCP2 transcript level, indicating post-transcriptional or post-translational regulatory mechanism. In situ analysis revealed that UCP2 is a putative target of miR-214 miR-214 expression is significantly down-regulated in HCC patient samples as compared with normal adjacent tissues and in cell line, human hepatoblastoma cells (HuH6), with high UCP2 protein expression. We demonstrated using miR-214 mimic and antagomir that the miRNA targeted UCP2 expression by directly targeting the wild-type, but not a miR-214 seed mutant, 3' UTR of UCP2 Overexpression of miR-214 significantly attenuated cell proliferation. Finally, analysis in 20 HCC patients revealed an inverse correlation in expression of UCP2 and miR-214 (Pearson's correlation coefficient, r=-0.9792). Cumulatively, our data indicate that in the context of HCC, miR-214 acts as a putative tumour suppressor by targeting UCP2 and defines a novel mechanism of regulation of UCP2. PMID:27129291

  14. Regulation of the p27Kip1 tumor suppressor by miR-221 and miR-222 promotes cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Sage, Carlos; Nagel, Remco; Egan, David A; Schrier, Mariette; Mesman, Elly; Mangiola, Annunziato; Anile, Corrado; Maira, Giulio; Mercatelli, Neri; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Agami, Reuven

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent post-transcriptional regulators of protein coding genes. Patterns of misexpression of miRNAs in cancer suggest key functions of miRNAs in tumorigenesis. However, current bioinformatics tools do not entirely support the identification and characterization of the mode of action of such miRNAs. Here, we used a novel functional genetic approach and identified miR-221 and miR-222 (miR-221&222) as potent regulators of p27Kip1, a cell cycle inhibitor and tumor suppressor. Using miRNA inhibitors, we demonstrate that certain cancer cell lines require high activity of miR-221&222 to maintain low p27Kip1 levels and continuous proliferation. Interestingly, high levels of miR-221&222 appear in glioblastomas and correlate with low levels of p27Kip1 protein. Thus, deregulated expression of miR-221&222 promotes cancerous growth by inhibiting the expression of p27Kip1. PMID:17627278

  15. Developmental and stress regulation on expression of a novel miRNA, Fan-miR73, and its target ABI5 in strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Mou, Wangshu; Luo, Zisheng; Li, Li; Limwachiranon, Jarukitt; Mao, Linchun; Ying, Tiejin

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a critical plant hormone for fruit ripening and adaptive stress responses in strawberry. Previous high-throughput sequencing results indicated that ABA-insensitive (ABI)5, an important transcription factor in the ABA signaling pathway, was a target for a novel microRNA (miRNA), Fan-miR73. In the present study, exogenous ABA treatment was found to accelerate fruit ripening through differentially regulating the transcripts of ABA metabolism and signal transduction related genes, including NCED1, PYR1, ABI1, and SnRK2.2. Expression of Fan-miR73 was down-regulated in response to exogenous ABA treatment in a dosage-dependent manner, which resulted in an accumulation of ABI5 transcripts in the ripening-accelerated fruits. In addition, both UV-B radiation and salinity stress reduced the transcript levels of Fan-miR73, whereas promoted ABI5 expression. Furthermore, high negative correlations between the transcriptional abundance of Fan-miR73 and ABI5 were observed during ripening and in response to stress stimuli. These results enriched the possible regulatory role of miRNA involved in the post-transcriptional modification of ABI5 during strawberry ripening, as well as responses to environmental stresses. PMID:27325048

  16. MicroRNA-9 up-regulates E-cadherin through inhibition of NF-κB1–Snail1 pathway in melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shujing; Kumar, Suresh M; Lu, Hezhe; Liu, Aihua; Yang, Ruifeng; Pushparajan, Anitha; Guo, Wei; Xu, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Hsa-miR-9 has been shown to have opposite functions in different tumour types; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that hsa-miR-9 is down-regulated in metastatic melanomas compared to primary melanomas. Overexpression of miR-9 in melanoma cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation and migratory capacity with decreased F-actin polymerization and down-regulation of multiple GTPases involved in cytoskeleton remodelling. miR-9 overexpression induced significant down-regulation of Snail1 with a concomitant increase in E-cadherin expression. In contrast, knockdown of miR-9 increased Snail1 expression as well as melanoma cell proliferation and migration capacity. Mechanistically, miR-9 expression down-regulated NF-κB1 in melanoma and the effect was abolished by mutations in the putative miR-9 binding sites within the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of NF-κB1. Anti-miR-9 miRNA inhibitor also increased the expression of NF-κB1. The effects of miR-9 on Snail1 expression and melanoma cell proliferation and migration were rescued by overexpression of NF-κB1 in these cells. Furthermore, miR-9 overexpression resulted in significantly decreased melanoma growth and metastasis in vivo. In summary, miR-9 inhibits melanoma proliferation and metastasis through down-regulation of the NF-κB1-Snail1 pathway. This study finds a new mechanism that miR-9 utilizes to decrease E-cadherin expression and inhibit melanoma progression. The results suggest that function of microRNAs is context and tumour type-specific. PMID:22131135

  17. Limb immobilization induces a coordinate down-regulation of mitochondrial and other metabolic pathways in men and women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkan Abadi

    Full Text Available Advancements in animal models and cell culture techniques have been invaluable in the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate muscle atrophy. However, few studies have examined muscle atrophy in humans using modern experimental techniques. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in global gene transcription during immobilization-induced muscle atrophy in humans and then explore the effects of the most prominent transcriptional alterations on protein expression and function. Healthy men and women (N = 24 were subjected to two weeks of unilateral limb immobilization, with muscle biopsies obtained before, after 48 hours (48 H and 14 days (14 D of immobilization. Muscle cross sectional area (approximately 5% and strength (10-20% were significantly reduced in men and women (approximately 5% and 10-20%, respectively after 14 D of immobilization. Micro-array analyses of total RNA extracted from biopsy samples at 48 H and 14 D uncovered 575 and 3,128 probes, respectively, which were significantly altered during immobilization. As a group, genes involved in mitochondrial bioenergetics and carbohydrate metabolism were predominant features at both 48 H and 14 D, with genes involved in protein synthesis and degradation significantly down-regulated and up-regulated, respectively, at 14 D of muscle atrophy. There was also a significant decrease in the protein content of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, and the enzyme activity of cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase after 14 D of immobilization. Furthermore, protein ubiquitination was significantly increased at 48 H but not 14 D of immobilization. These results suggest that transcriptional and post-transcriptional suppression of mitochondrial processes is sustained throughout 14 D of immobilization, while protein ubiquitination plays an early but transient role in muscle atrophy following short-term immobilization in humans.

  18. MicroRNA-124-3p regulates cell proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, and bioenergetics by targeting PIM1 in astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Danni; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yao; Li, Bowen; Xue, Lian; Shao, Naiyuan; Wang, Qiang; Xia, Xiwei; Yang, Yilin; Zhi, Feng

    2016-07-01

    The PIM1 protein is an important regulator of cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, and metabolism in various human cancers. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are powerful post-transcriptional gene regulators that function through translational repression or transcript destabilization. Therefore, we aimed to identify whether a close relationship exists between PIM1 and miRNAs. PIM1 protein levels and mRNA levels were significantly upregulated in astrocytoma tissues, indicating the oncogenic role of PIM1 in astrocytoma. Further bioinformatics analysis indicated that miR-124-3p targeted the 3'-UTR of PIM1. We also observed an inverse correlation between the miR-124-3p levels and PIM1 protein or mRNA levels in astrocytoma samples. Next, we experimentally confirmed that miR-124-3p directly recognizes the 3'-UTR of the PIM1 transcript and regulates PIM1 expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Furthermore, we examined the biological consequences of miR-124-3p targeting PIM1 in vitro. We showed that the repression of PIM1 in astrocytoma cancer cells by miR-124-3p suppressed proliferation, invasion, and aerobic glycolysis and promoted apoptosis. We observed that the restoration or inhibition of PIM1 activity resulted in effects that were similar to those induced by miR-124-3p inhibitors or mimics in cancer cells. Finally, overexpression of PIM1 rescued the inhibitory effects of miR-124-3p. In summary, these findings aid in understanding the tumor-suppressive role of miR-124-3p in astrocytoma pathogenesis through the inhibition of PIM1 translation. PMID:27088547

  19. MicroRNA miR-16-1 regulates CCNE1 (cyclin E1) gene expression in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubillaga-Guerrero, Ma Isabel; Alarcón-Romero, Luz Del Carmen; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Bermúdez-Morales, Víctor Hugo; Deas, Jessica; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in diverse biological processes through regulation of gene expression. The microRNA profile has been shown to be altered in cervical cancer (CC). MiR-16-1 belongs to the miR-16 cluster and has been implicated in various aspects of carcinogenesis including cell proliferation and regulation of apoptosis; however, its function and molecular mechanism in CC is not clear. Cyclin E1 (CCNE1) is a positive regulator of the cell cycle that controls the transition of cells from G1 to S phase. In CC, CCNE1 expression is frequently upregulated, and is an indicator for poor outcome in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Thus, in the present brief communication, we determine whether the CCNE1 gene is regulated by miR-16-1 in CC cells. To identify the downstream cellular target genes for upstream miR-16-1, we silenced endogenous miR-16-1 expression in cell lines derived from CC (C-33 A HPV-, CaSki HPV16+, SiHa HPV16+, and HeLa HPV18+ cells), using siRNAs expressed in plasmids. Using a combined bioinformatic analysis and RT-qPCR, we determined that the CCNE1 gene is targeted by miR-16-1 in CC cells. SiHa, CaSki, and HeLa cells demonstrated an inverse correlation between miR-16-1 expression and CCNE1 mRNA level. Thus, miR-16-1 post-transcriptionally down-regulates CCNE1 gene expression. These results, suggest that miR-16-1 plays a vital role in modulating cell cycle processes in CC. PMID:26629104

  20. Regulation of the Expression of Heparan Sulfate 3-O-Sulfotransferase 3B (HS3ST3B) by Inflammatory Stimuli in Human Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Anne-Sophie; Delos, Maxime; Martinez, Pierre; Carpentier, Mathieu; Allain, Fabrice; Denys, Agnès

    2016-07-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is recognized as an important player in a wide range of dynamic steps of inflammatory reactions. Thereby, structural HS remodeling is likely to play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses; however, little is known about underlying mechanism. In this study, we analyzed the regulation of expression of HS 3-O-sulfotransferases (HS3STs) in response to inflammatory stimuli. We found that among the seven HS3ST isoenzymes, only the expression of HS3ST3B was markedly up-regulated in human primary monocytes and the related cell line THP1 after exposure to TLR agonists. TNF-α was also efficient, to a lesser extent, to increase HS3ST3B expression, while IL-6, IL-4, and IFN-γ were poor inducers. We then analyzed the molecular mechanisms that regulate the high expression of HS3ST3B in response to LPS. Based on the expression of HS3ST3B transcripts and on the response of a reporter gene containing the HS3ST3B1 promoter, we provide evidence that LPS induces a rapid and strong transcription of HS3ST3B1 gene, which was mainly dependent on the activation of NF-κB and JNK signaling pathways. Additionally, active p38 MAPK and de novo synthesized proteins are involved in post-transcriptional mechanisms to maintain a high level of HS3ST3B mRNA to a steady state. Altogether, our findings indicate that HS3ST3B1 gene behaves as a primary response gene, suggesting that it may play an important role in making 3-O-sulfated HS with specific functions in the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1529-1542, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26575945

  1. Regulation of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE genes/microRNA 156 Module by the Homeodomain Proteins PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shruti Lal; Leo Bryan Pacis; Harley M.S. Smith

    2011-01-01

    The morphology of inflorescences is regulated in part by the temporal and spatial events that regulate flower specification.In Arabidopsis,an endogenous flowering time pathway mediated by a subset of SQUAMOSA PROMOTERBINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) transcription factors,including SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5,function to specify flowers by activating floral meristem identity genes.During shoot development,SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 are post-transcriptionally regulated by microRNA156 (miR156).The photoperiod regulated florigenic signal,FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT),promotes floral induction,in part by activating SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5.In turn,these SPLs function in parallel with FT to specify flower meristems.Two related BELL1-like homeobox genes PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) expressed in the shoot apical meristem are absolutely required for the specification of floral meristems.Genetic studies show that the floral specification function of FT depends upon PNY and PNF; however,the interplay between these homeodomain proteins and SPLs is not known.In this manuscript,we show that the photoperiodic floral induction of SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 is dependent upon PNY and PNF.Further,PNY and PNF also control SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 expression by negatively regulating miR156.Lastly,ectopic expression of SPL4 partially rescues the pny pnf non-flower-producing phenotype,while overexpression of SPL3 or SPL5 in pny pnf plants was unable to restore flower specification.These results suggest that:(1) SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 function is dependent upon PNY and PNF,or (2) expression of multiple SPLs is required for floral specification in pny pnf plants.

  2. Regulation of Three Nitrogenase Gene Clusters in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Thiel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 fixes nitrogen under aerobic conditions in specialized cells called heterocysts that form in response to an environmental deficiency in combined nitrogen. Nitrogen fixation is mediated by the enzyme nitrogenase, which is very sensitive to oxygen. Heterocysts are microxic cells that allow nitrogenase to function in a filament comprised primarily of vegetative cells that produce oxygen by photosynthesis. A. variabilis is unique among well-characterized cyanobacteria in that it has three nitrogenase gene clusters that encode different nitrogenases, which function under different environmental conditions. The nif1 genes encode a Mo-nitrogenase that functions only in heterocysts, even in filaments grown anaerobically. The nif2 genes encode a different Mo-nitrogenase that functions in vegetative cells, but only in filaments grown under anoxic conditions. An alternative V-nitrogenase is encoded by vnf genes that are expressed only in heterocysts in an environment that is deficient in Mo. Thus, these three nitrogenases are expressed differentially in response to environmental conditions. The entire nif1 gene cluster, comprising at least 15 genes, is primarily under the control of the promoter for the first gene, nifB1. Transcriptional control of many of the downstream nif1 genes occurs by a combination of weak promoters within the coding regions of some downstream genes and by RNA processing, which is associated with increased transcript stability. The vnf genes show a similar pattern of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of expression suggesting that the complex pattern of regulation of the nif1 cluster is conserved in other cyanobacterial nitrogenase gene clusters.

  3. Both 5' and 3' flanks regulate Zebrafish brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Gerhard

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise control of developmental and cell-specific expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene is essential for normal neuronal development and the diverse functions of BDNF in the adult organism. We previously showed that the zebrafish BDNF gene has multiple promoters. The complexity of the promoter structure and the mechanisms that mediate developmental and cell-specific expression are still incompletely understood. Results Comparison of pufferfish and zebrafish BDNF gene sequences as well as 5' RACE revealed three additional 5' exons and associated promoters. RT-PCR with exon-specific primers showed differential developmental and organ-specific expression. Two exons were detected in the embryo before transcription starts. Of the adult organs examined, the heart expressed a single 5' exon whereas the brain, liver and eyes expressed four of the seven 5' exons. Three of the seven 5' exons were not detectable by RT-PCR. Injection of promoter/GFP constructs into embryos revealed distinct expression patterns. The 3' flank profoundly affected expression in a position-dependent manner and a highly conserved sequence (HCS1 present in 5' exon 1c in a dehancer-like manner. Conclusions The zebrafish BDNF gene is as complex in its promoter structure and patterns of differential promoter expression as is its murine counterpart. The expression of two of the promoters appears to be regulated in a temporally and/or spatially highly circumscribed fashion. The 3' flank has a position-dependent effect on expression, either by affecting transcription termination or post-transcriptional steps. HCS1, a highly conserved sequence in 5' exon 1c, restricts expression to primary sensory neurons. The tools are now available for detailed genetic and molecular analyses of zebrafish BDNF gene expression.

  4. Dynamic regulation of alternative splicing and chromatin structure in Drosophila gonads revealed by RNA-seq

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Qiang; Chepelev, Iouri; Wei, Gang; Tarayrah, Lama; Cui, Kairong; Zhao, Keji; Chen, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Both transcription and post-transcriptional processes, such as alternative splicing, play crucial roles in controlling developmental programs in metazoans. Recently emerged RNA-seq method has brought our understandings of eukaryotic transcriptomes to a new level, because it can resolve both gene expression level and alternative splicing events simultaneously.

  5. The carbon storage regulator (Csr system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Revelles

    Full Text Available The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively, revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system.

  6. The ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 regulates craniofacial development by promoting cranial neural crest cell survival and stem-cell like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniak, Sophie; Kabbara, Samuela; Lumb, Rachael; Scherer, Michaela; Secker, Genevieve; Harvey, Natasha; Kumar, Sharad; Schwarz, Quenten

    2013-11-15

    The integration of multiple morphogenic signalling pathways and transcription factor networks is essential to mediate neural crest (NC) cell induction, delamination, survival, stem-cell properties, fate choice and differentiation. Although the transcriptional control of NC development is well documented in mammals, the role of post-transcriptional modifications, and in particular ubiquitination, has not been explored. Here we report an essential role for the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 in cranial NC cell development. Our analysis of Nedd4(-/-) embryos identified profound deficiency of cranial NC cells in the absence of structural defects in the neural tube. Nedd4 is expressed in migrating cranial NC cells and was found to positively regulate expression of the NC transcription factors Sox9, Sox10 and FoxD3. We found that in the absence of these factors, a subset of cranial NC cells undergo apoptosis. In accordance with a lack of cranial NC cells, Nedd4(-/-) embryos have deficiency of the trigeminal ganglia, NC derived bone and malformation of the craniofacial skeleton. Our analyses therefore uncover an essential role for Nedd4 in a subset of cranial NC cells and highlight E3 ubiquitin ligases as a likely point of convergence for multiple NC signalling pathways and transcription factor networks. PMID:24080509

  7. The carbon storage regulator (Csr) system exerts a nutrient-specific control over central metabolism in Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Millard, Pierre; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Oswald, Eric; Létisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    The role of the post-transcriptional carbon storage regulator (Csr) system in nutrient utilization and in the control of the central metabolism in E. coli reference commensal strain Nissle 1917 was investigated. Analysis of the growth capabilities of mutants altered for various components of the Csr system (csrA51, csrB, csrC and csrD mutations) showed that only the protein CsrA - the key component of the system - exerts a marked role in carbon nutrition. Attenuation of CsrA activity in the csrA51 mutant affects the growth efficiency on a broad range of physiologically relevant carbon sources, including compounds utilized by the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. Detailed investigations of the metabolomes and fluxomes of mutants and wild-type cells grown on carbon sources representative of glycolysis and of the ED pathway (glucose and gluconate, respectively), revealed significant re-adjusting of central carbon metabolism for both compounds in the csrA51 mutant. However, the metabolic re-adjusting observed on gluconate was strikingly different from that observed on glucose, indicating a nutrient-specific control of metabolism by the Csr system. PMID:23840455

  8. ABCA1基因调控与动脉粥样硬化的关系%Relationship between ABCA1 gene regulation and atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨燕; 刘静

    2008-01-01

    ATP结合盒转运体A1(ABCA1)足一种整合膜蛋白,它以ATP为能源,转运细胞内的游离胆固醇、磷脂至细胞外并与载脂蛋白A1结合,形成高密度脂蛋白.ABCA1基因是胆固醇逆转运和高密度脂蛋白(HDL)生成起始步骤的关键基因.ABCA1的表达在转录和转录后水平受肝X受体/视黄醇X受体(LXR/RXR)等多种因子调控.ABCA1功能障碍将导致动脉粥样硬化的发生、发展,与心脑血管疾病密切相关.%ABCA1,an integration member protein,can transport intraeellular free cholesterol, phospholipid to extracells, combine with apo-A1 for forming HDL, getting energy by discomposing ATP.ABCA1 gene is a critical gene in cholesterol counter transport and the onset of HDL generation.The expression of ABCA1 is regulated by various factors such as LXR/RXR and cAMP at transcription and post-transcriptional level.The desfunetion of ABCA1 causes the development of atherosclerosis, and is significantly related with cardio-cerebrovaseular disorder.

  9. Inhibition of expression in Escherichia coli of a virulence regulator MglB of Francisella tularensis using external guide sequence technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoping Xiao

    Full Text Available External guide sequences (EGSs have successfully been used to inhibit expression of target genes at the post-transcriptional level in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We previously reported that EGS accessible and cleavable sites in the target RNAs can rapidly be identified by screening random EGS (rEGS libraries. Here the method of screening rEGS libraries and a partial RNase T1 digestion assay were used to identify sites accessible to EGSs in the mRNA of a global virulence regulator MglB from Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium. Specific EGSs were subsequently designed and their activities in terms of the cleavage of mglB mRNA by RNase P were tested in vitro and in vivo. EGS73, EGS148, and EGS155 in both stem and M1 EGS constructs induced mglB mRNA cleavage in vitro. Expression of stem EGS73 and EGS155 in Escherichia coli resulted in significant reduction of the mglB mRNA level coded for the F. tularensis mglB gene inserted in those cells.

  10. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatenay-Lapointe, Marc; Shadel, Gerald S

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity. PMID:21655263

  11. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields Joshua A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previously, we reported data illustrating the requirement for CsrA in several virulence related phenotypes of C. jejuni strain 81–176, indicating that the Csr pathway is important for Campylobacter pathogenesis. Results We compared the Escherichia coli and C. jejuni orthologs of CsrA and characterized the ability of the C. jejuni CsrA protein to functionally complement an E. coli csrA mutant. Phylogenetic comparison of E. coli CsrA to orthologs from several pathogenic bacteria demonstrated variability in C. jejuni CsrA relative to the known RNA binding domains of E. coli CsrA and in several amino acids reported to be involved in E. coli CsrA-mediated gene regulation. When expressed in an E. coli csrA mutant, C. jejuni CsrA succeeded in recovering defects in motility, biofilm formation, and cellular morphology; however, it failed to return excess glycogen accumulation to wild type levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that C. jejuni CsrA is capable of efficiently binding some E. coli CsrA binding sites, but not others, and provide insight into the biochemistry of C. jejuni CsrA.

  12. Regulation of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 steroidogenic genes by hypoxia-inducible miR-10b in H295R cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Identification of miR-10b as a hypoxia-inducible microRNA in H295R human adrenocortical cells. • Characterization of miR-10b as a negative regulator of the human CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 genes. • Evidence to support that CYP11B1 and and CYP11B2 mRNAs are likely targets of miR-10b. • miR-10b inhibits cortisol and aldosterone production in H295R cells. - Abstract: Although numerous studies have shown that hypoxia affects cortisol and aldosterone production in vivo, the underlying molecular mechanisms regulating the steroidogenic genes of these steroid hormones are still poorly known. MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators that control diverse biological processes and this study describes the identification and validation of the hypoxia-inducible microRNA, miR-10b, as a negative regulator of the CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 steroidogenic genes in H295R human adrenocortical cells. Using the human TaqMan Low Density miRNA Arrays, we determined the miRNA expression patterns in H295R cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and in cells overexpressing the human HIF-1α. Computer analysis using three in silico algorithms predicted that the hypoxia-inducible miR-10b molecule targets CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 mRNAs. Gene transfection studies of luciferase constructs containing the 3′-untranslated region of CYP11B1 or CYP11B2, combined with miRNA overexpression and knockdown experiments provide compelling evidence that CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 mRNAs are likely targets of miR-10b

  13. miR-122 regulates p53/Akt signalling and the chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Manfè

    Full Text Available Advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL is resistant to chemotherapy and presents a major area of medical need. In view of the known role of microRNAs (miRNAs in the regulation of cellular signalling, we aimed to identify the functionally important miRNA species, which regulate apoptosis in CTCL. Using a recently established model in which apoptosis of CTCL cell lines is induced by Notch-1 inhibition by γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs, we found that miR-122 was significantly increased in the apoptotic cells. miR-122 up-regulation was not specific for GSI-1 but was also seen during apoptosis induced by chemotherapies including doxorubicin and proteasome blockers (bortezomib, MG132. miR-122 was not expressed in quiescent T-cells, but was detectable in CTCL: in lesional skin in mycosis fungoides and in Sézary cells purified from peripheral blood. In situ hybridization results showed that miR-122 was expressed in the malignant T-cell infiltrate and increased in the advanced stage mycosis fungoides. Surprisingly, miR-122 overexpression decreased the sensitivity to the chemotherapy-induced apoptosis via a signaling circuit involving the activation of Akt and inhibition of p53. We have also shown that induction of miR-122 occurred via p53 and that p53 post-transcriptionally up-regulated miR-122. miR-122 is thus an amplifier of the antiapoptotic Akt/p53 circuit and it is conceivable that a pharmacological intervention in this pathway may provide basis for novel therapies for CTCL.

  14. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Chatenay-Lapointe

    Full Text Available Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity.

  15. MicroRNA-16 Modulates HuR Regulation of Cyclin E1 in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Guo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA binding protein (RBPs and microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are implicated in development of cancers. Although their individual roles have been studied, the crosstalk between RBPs and miRNAs is under intense investigation. Here, we show that in breast cancer cells, cyclin E1 upregulation by the RBP HuR is through specific binding to regions in the cyclin E1 mRNA 3' untranslated region (3'UTR containing U-rich elements. Similarly, miR-16 represses cyclin E1, dependent on its cognate binding sites in the cyclin E1 3'UTR. Evidence in the literature indicates that HuR can regulate miRNA expression and recruit or dissociate RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC. Despite this, miR-16 and HuR do not affect the other’s expression level or binding to the cyclin E1 3'UTR. While HuR overexpression partially blocks miR-16 repression of a reporter mRNA containing the cyclin E1 3'UTR, it does not block miR-16 repression of endogenous cyclin E1 mRNA. In contrast, miR-16 blocks HuR-mediated upregulation of cyclin E1. Overall our results suggest that miR-16 can override HuR upregulation of cyclin E1 without affecting HuR expression or association with the cyclin E1 mRNA.

  16. WNT7A Regulation by miR-15b in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, James A.; King, Mandy L.; Okuda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    WNT signaling is well known to play an important role in the regulation of development, cell proliferation and cell differentiation in a wide variety of normal and cancerous tissues. Despite the wealth of knowledge concerning when and where various WNT genes are expressed and downstream events under their control, there is surprisingly little published evidence of how they are regulated. We have recently reported that aberrant WNT7A is observed in serous ovarian carcinomas, and WNT7A is the sole ligand accelerating ovarian tumor progression through CTNNB1 (β-catenin)/TCF signaling in the absence of CTNNB1 mutations. In the present study, we report that WNT7A is a direct target of miR-15b in ovarian cancer. We showed that a luciferase reporter containing the putative binding site of miR-15b in the WNT7A 3’-UTR was significantly repressed by miR-15b. Mutation of the putative binding site of miR-15b in the WNT7A 3’-UTR restored luciferase activity. Furthermore, miR-15b was able to repress increased levels of TOPFLASH activity by WNT7A, but not those induced by S33Y. Additionally, miR-15b dose-dependently decreased WNT7A expression. When we evaluated the prognostic impact of WNT7A and miR-15b expression using TCGA datasets, a significant inverse correlation in which high-expression of WNT7A and low-expression of miR-15b was associated with reduced survival rates of ovarian cancer patients. Treatment with decitabine dose-dependently increased miR-15b expression, and silencing of DNMT1 significantly increased miR-15b expression. These results suggest that WNT7A is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-15b, which could be down-regulated by promoter hypermethylation, potentially via DNMT1, in ovarian cancer. PMID:27195958

  17. Differential regulation of the PGC family of genes in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E Sweeney

    Full Text Available The PGC family of transcriptional co-activators (PGC-1alpha [Ppargc1a], PGC-1beta [Ppargc1b], and PRC [Pprc] coordinates the upregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and Ppargc1a is known to be activated in response to mitochondrial damage in sepsis. Therefore, we postulated that the PGC family is regulated by the innate immune system. We investigated whether mitochondrial biogenesis and PGC gene expression are disrupted in an established model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis both in mice with impaired innate immune function (TLR2-/- and TLR4-/- and in wild-type controls. We found an early up-regulation of Ppargc1a and Ppargc1b post-infection (at 6 h in WT mice, but the expression of both genes was concordantly dysregulated in TLR2-/- mice (no increase at 6 h and in TLR4-/- mice (amplified at 6 h. However, the third family member, PRC, was regulated differently, and its expression increased significantly at 24 h in all three mouse strains (WT, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/-. In silico analyses showed that Ppargc1a and Ppargc1b share binding sites for microRNA mmu-mir-202-3p. Thus, miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional mRNA degradation could account for the failure to increase the expression of both genes in TLR2-/- mice. The expression of mmu-mir-202-3p was measured by real-time PCR and found to be significantly increased in TLR2-/- but not in WT or TLR4-/- mice. In addition, it was found that mir-202-3p functionally decreases Ppargc1a mRNA in vitro. Thus, both innate immune signaling through the TLRs and mir-202-3p-mediated mRNA degradation are implicated in the co-regulation of Ppargc1a and Ppargc1b during inflammation. Moreover, the identification of mir-202-3p as a potential factor for Ppargc1a and Ppargc1b repression in acute inflammation may open new avenues for mitochondrial research and, potentially, therapy.

  18. Identification of male-biased microRNA-107 as a direct regulator for nuclear receptor subfamily 5 group A member 1 based on sexually dimorphic microRNA expression profiling from chicken embryonic gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Nan; Wang, Xin; Hou, Yue; Feng, Yanping; Gong, Yanzhang

    2016-07-01

    Several studies indicate that sexual dimorphic microRNAs (miRNAs) in chicken gonads are likely to have important roles in sexual development, but a more global understanding of the roles of miRNAs in sexual differentiation is still needed. To this end, we performed miRNA expression profiling in chicken gonads at embryonic day 5.5 (E5.5). Among the sex-biased miRNAs validated by qRT-PCR, twelve male-biased and six female-biased miRNAs were consistent with the sequencing results. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that some sex-biased miRNAs were potentially involved in gonadal development. Further functional analysis found that over-expression of miR-107 directly inhibited nuclear receptor subfamily 5 group A member 1 (NR5a1), and its downstream cytochrome P450 family 19 subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP19A1). However, anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) was not directly or indirectly regulated by miR-107. Overall results indicate that miR-107 may specifically mediate avian ovary-development by post-transcriptional regulation of NR5a1 and CYP19A1 in estrogen signaling pathways. PMID:27036932

  19. The staphylococcal accessory regulator, SarA, is an RNA-binding protein that modulates the mRNA turnover properties of late-exponential and stationary phase Staphylococcus aureus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Morrison

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of mRNA turnover is gaining recognition as a mechanism by which Staphylococcus aureus regulates gene expression, but the factors that orchestrate alterations in transcript degradation are poorly understood. In that regard, we previously found that 138 mRNA species, including the virulence factors protein A (spa and collagen binding protein (cna, are stabilized in a sarA-dependent manner during exponential phase growth, suggesting that SarA protein may directly or indirectly effect the RNA turnover properties of these transcripts. Herein, we expanded our characterization of the effects of sarA on mRNA turnover during late exponential and stationary phases of growth. Results revealed that the locus affects the RNA degradation properties of cells during both growth phases. Further, using gel mobility shift assays and RIP-ChIP, it was found that SarA protein is capable of binding mRNA species that it stabilizes both in vitro and within bacterial cells. Taken together, these results suggest that SarA post-transcriptionally regulates S. aureus gene expression in a manner that involves binding to and consequently altering the mRNA turnover properties of target transcripts.

  20. Inter- and intra-combinatorial regulation by transcription factors and microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Joseph T

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a novel class of non-coding small RNAs. In mammalian cells, miRNAs repress the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs or degrade mRNAs. miRNAs play important roles in development and differentiation, and they are also implicated in aging, and oncogenesis. Predictions of targets of miRNAs suggest that they may regulate more than one-third of all genes. The overall functions of mammalian miRNAs remain unclear. Combinatorial regulation by transcription factors alone or miRNAs alone offers a wide range of regulatory programs. However, joining transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms enables higher complexity regulatory programs that in turn could give cells evolutionary advantages. Investigating coordinated regulation of genes by miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs from a statistical standpoint is a first step that may elucidate some of their roles in various biological processes. Results Here, we studied the nature and scope of coordination among regulators from the transcriptional and miRNA regulatory layers in the human genome. Our findings are based on genome wide statistical assessment of regulatory associations ("interactions" among the sets of predicted targets of miRNAs and sets of putative targets of transcription factors. We found that combinatorial regulation by transcription factor pairs and miRNA pairs is much more abundant than the combinatorial regulation by TF-miRNA pairs. In addition, many of the strongly interacting TF-miRNA pairs involve a subset of master TF regulators that co-regulate genes in coordination with almost any miRNA. Application of standard measures for evaluating the degree of interaction between pairs of regulators show that strongly interacting TF-miRNA, TF-TF or miRNA-miRNA pairs tend to include TFs or miRNAs that regulate very large numbers of genes. To correct for this potential bias we introduced an additional Bayesian measure that incorporates

  1. Regulations and instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulations and instructions for operating the RA reactor consist of the following chapters: general regulations with the fundamental RA reactor characteristics, operating regulations and instructions for the personnel on duty, regulations for accidental conditions, training program for the staff of the Laboratory for reactor operation

  2. Trans-generation inheritance of methylation patterns in a tobacco transgene following a post-transcriptional silencing event

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunerová Bedřichová, Jana; Bleys, A.; Fojtová, Miloslava; Crhák Khaitová, Lucie; Depicker, A.; Kovařík, Aleš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2008), s. 1049-1062. ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/05/H505; GA ČR(CZ) GA521/07/0116; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600040611 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : transgenes * silencing * DNA methylation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.493, year: 2008

  3. The nuclear SUV3-1 mutation affects a variety of post-transcriptional processes in yeast mitochondria.

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad-Webb, H; Perlman, P S; Zhu, H.; Butow, R A

    1990-01-01

    The SUV3-1 mutation was isolated earlier as a suppressor of a deletion of a conserved RNA processing site (dodecamer) near the 3' end of the var1 gene. Previous studies indicate that the suppressor enhances translation of mutant var1 messages; unexpectedly, it also causes over-accumulation of excised intron RNA of the large rRNA gene intron and blocks cleavage at the dodecamer site within that intron. In this study most mitochondrial genes in SUV3-1 and suv3 nuclear contexts are surveyed for ...

  4. The yeast nuclear gene suv3 affecting mitochondrial post-transcriptional processes encodes a putative ATP-dependent RNA helicase.

    OpenAIRE

    Stepien, P P; Margossian, S P; Landsman, D.; Butow, R A

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression is controlled largely through the action of products of the nuclear genome. The yeast nuclear gene suv3 has been implicated in a variety of mitochondrial posttranscriptional processes and in translation and, thus, represents a key control element in nuclear-mitochondrial interactions. We have exploited a property of a mutant allele of suv3, SUV3-1, that causes, among other effects, a massive increase in the abundance of excised group I introns to clone the wild-t...

  5. Medical treatment of primary sclerosing cholangitis: a role for novel bile acids and other (post-)transcriptional modulators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Pusl, Thomas; Rauws, Erik R; Rust, Christian

    2009-02-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a rare chronic cholestatic disease of the liver and bile ducts that is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, generally leads to end-stage liver disease, and is complicated by malignancies of the biliary tree and the large intestine. The pathogenesis of PSC remains enigmatic, making the development of targeted therapeutic strategies difficult. Immunosuppressive and antifibrotic therapeutic agents were ineffective or accompanied by major side effects. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has consistently been shown to improve serum liver tests and might lower the risk of colon carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma by yet unknown mechanisms. Whether "high dose" UDCA improves the long-term prognosis in PSC as suggested by small pilot trials remains to be demonstrated. The present overview discusses potential therapeutic options aside of targeted immunological therapies and UDCA. The C23 bile acid norUDCA has been shown to markedly improve biochemical and histological features in a mouse model of sclerosing cholangitis without any toxic effects. Studies in humans are eagerly being awaited. Nuclear receptors like the farnesoid-X receptor (FXR), pregnane-X receptor (PXR), vitamin D receptor (VDR), and peroxisome-proliferator-activator receptors (PPARs) have been shown to induce expression of diverse carriers and biotransformation enzymes of the intestinal and hepatic detoxification machinery and/or to modulate fibrogenesis. Pros and cons of respective receptor agonists for the future treatment of PSC are discussed in detail. In our view, the novel bile acid norUDCA and agonists of PPARs, VDR, and PXR appear particularly attractive for further studies in PSC. PMID:18751930

  6. Endogenous post-transcriptional gene silencing of flavone synthase resulting in high accumulation of anthocyanins in black dahlia cultivars.

    OpenAIRE

    Deguchi, Ayumi; Ohno, Sho; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Doi, Motoaki

    2013-01-01

    Black color in flowers is a highly attractive trait in the floricultural industry, but its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. This study was performed to identify the bases of the high accumulation of anthocyanidins in black cultivars and to determine whether the high accumulation of total anthocyanidins alone leads to the black appearance. Our approach was to compare black dahlia (Dahlia variabilis) cultivars with purple cultivars and a purple flowering mutant of a black cultivar, us...

  7. Inhibition of Post-Transcriptional RNA Processing by CDK Inhibitors and Its Implication in Anti-Viral Therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holčáková, J.; Müller, P.; Tomasec, P.; Hrstka, R.; Nekulová, M.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Strnad, Miroslav; Wilkinson, G. W. G.; Vojtěšek, B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2014). E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS TYPE-1 * DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITORS * LARGE T-ANTIGEN Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  8. PSD-95 is post-transcriptionally repressed during early neural development by PTBP1 and PTBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Sika; Gray, Erin E; Chawla, Geetanjali;

    2012-01-01

    . Psd-95 was transcribed early in mouse embryonic brain, but most of its product transcripts were degraded. The polypyrimidine tract binding proteins PTBP1 and PTBP2 repressed Psd-95 (also known as Dlg4) exon 18 splicing, leading to premature translation termination and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay...

  9. Post-Transcriptional Silencing of Flavonol Synthase mRNA in Tobacco Leads to Fruits with Arrested Seed Set

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Mahajan; Paramvir Singh Ahuja; Sudesh Kumar Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Flavonoids are synthesized by phenylpropanoid pathway. They are known to participate in large number of physiological and biochemical processes in plants. Parthenocarpy and male sterility has earlier been reported by silencing chalcone synthase (CHS) encoding gene. Silencing of CHS has blocked the synthesis of most of useful flavonoids including flavan-3-ols and flavonols. Also, these studies could not identify whether parthenocarpy/male sterility were due to lack of flavan-3-ols or flavonols...

  10. The Roles of Two miRNAs in Regulating the Immune Response of Sea Cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengjuan; Li, Chenghua; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Weiwei; Jin, Chunhua; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key regulators in many pathological processes by suppressing the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of target genes. MiR-2008 was previously found to be significantly up-regulated in diseased sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus by high-through sequencing, whereas the reads of miR-137, a well-documented tumor repressor, displayed no significant change. In the present study, we found that miR-137 expression was slightly attenuated and miR-2008 was significantly enhanced after Vibrio splendidus infection or Lipopolysaccharides application. Further target screening and dual-luciferase reporter assay revealed that the two important miRNAs shared a common target gene of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (AjBHMT), which exhibited noncorrelated messenger RNA and protein expression patterns after bacterial challenge. In order to fully understand their regulatory mechanisms, we conducted the functional experiments in vitro and in vivo. The overexpression of miR-137 in sea cucumber or primary coelomocytes significantly decreased, whereas the inhibition of miR-137 increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of AjBHMT. In contrast, miR-2008 overexpression and inhibition showed no effect on AjBHMT mRNA levels, but the concentration of AjBHMT protein displayed significant changes both in vitro and in vivo. Consistently, the homocysteine (Hcy) contents were also accordingly altered in the aberrant expression analysis of both miRNAs, consistent with the results of the AjBHMT silencing assay in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, small interfering RNA mediated AjBHMT knockdown and Hcy exposure analyses both significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased the number of surviving invasive pathogen in sea cucumber coelomocytes. Taken together, these findings confirmed the differential roles of sea cucumber miR-137 and miR-2008 in regulating the common target AjBHMT to promote ROS production

  11. Regulation of miR394 in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (FOC Infection in Garlic (Allium sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar Chand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of post transcriptional regulators that negatively regulate gene expression through target mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition and play important roles in plant development and stress response. In the present study, 6 conserved miRNAs from garlic (Allium sativum L. were analysed to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (FOC infection. Stem-loop RT-PCR revealed that miR394 is significantly induced in garlic seedlings post treatment with FOC for 72 h. The induction of miR394 expression during FOC infection was restricted to the basal stem plate tissue, the primary site of infection. Garlic miR394 was also upregulated by exogenous application of jasmonic acid. Two putative targets of miR394 encoding F-box domain and cytochrome P450 (CYP450 family proteins were predicted and verified using 5’ RLM-RACE (RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends assay. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the transcript levels of the predicted targets were significantly reduced in garlic plants exposed to FOC. When garlic cultivars with variable sensitivity to FOC were exposed to the pathogen, an upregulation of miR394 and down regulation of the targets were observed in both varieties. However, the expression pattern was delayed in the resistant genotypes. These results suggest that miR394 functions in negative modulation of FOC resistance and the difference in timing and levels of expression in variable genotypes could be examined as markers for selection of FOC resistant garlic cultivars.

  12. Regulation of miR394 in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (FOC) Infection in Garlic (Allium sativum L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Subodh K; Nanda, Satyabrata; Joshi, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of post-transcriptional regulators that negatively regulate gene expression through target mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition and play important roles in plant development and stress response. In the present study, six conserved miRNAs from garlic (Allium sativum L.) were analyzed to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepae (FOC) infection. Stem-loop RT-PCR revealed that miR394 is significantly induced in garlic seedlings post-treatment with FOC for 72 h. The induction of miR394 expression during FOC infection was restricted to the basal stem plate tissue, the primary site of infection. Garlic miR394 was also upregulated by exogenous application of jasmonic acid. Two putative targets of miR394 encoding F-box domain and cytochrome P450 (CYP450) family proteins were predicted and verified using 5' RLM-RACE (RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends) assay. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the transcript levels of the predicted targets were significantly reduced in garlic plants exposed to FOC. When garlic cultivars with variable sensitivity to FOC were exposed to the pathogen, an upregulation of miR394 and down regulation of the targets were observed in both varieties. However, the expression pattern was delayed in the resistant genotypes. These results suggest that miR394 functions in negative modulation of FOC resistance and the difference in timing and levels of expression in variable genotypes could be examined as markers for selection of FOC resistant garlic cultivars. PMID:26973694

  13. Down-regulation of the detoxifying enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 by vanadium in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2009-05-01

    Recent data suggest that vanadium (V5+) compounds exert protective effects against chemical-induced carcinogenesis, mainly through modifying various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. In fact, we have shown that V5+ down-regulates the expression of Cyp1a1 at the transcriptional level through an ATP-dependent mechanism. However, incongruously, there is increasing evidence that V5+ is found in higher amounts in cancer cells and tissues than in normal cells or tissues. Therefore, the current study aims to address the possible effect of this metal on the regulation of expression of an enzyme that helps maintain endogenous antioxidants used to protect tissues/cells from mutagens, carcinogens, and oxidative stress damage, NAD(P) H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1). In an attempt to examine these effects, Hepa 1c1c7 cells and its AhRdeficient version, c12, were treated with increasing concentrations of V5+ in the presence of two distinct Nqo1 inducers, the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SUL). Our results showed that V5+ inhibits the TCDD- and SUL-mediated induction of Nqo1 at mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels. At transcriptional level, V5+ was able to decrease the TCDD- and SUL-induced nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the subsequent binding to antioxidant responsive element (ARE) without affecting Nrf2 protein levels. Looking at post-transcriptional level; we found that V5+ did not affect Nqo1 mRNA transcripts turn-over rates. However, at the post-translational level V5+ increased Nqo1 protein half-life. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that V5+ down-regulates Nqo1 at the transcriptional level, possibly through inhibiting the ATP-dependent activation of Nrf2. PMID:19367690

  14. A genome-wide miRNA screen revealed miR-603 as a MGMT-regulating miRNA in glioblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kimberly; Steed, Tyler; Nguyen, Thien; Futalan, Diahnn; Akers, Johnny C.; Sarkaria, Jann; Jiang, Tao; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Carter, Bob S.; Chen, Clark C.

    2014-01-01

    MGMT expression is a critical determinant for therapeutic resistance to DNA alkylating agents. We previously demonstrated that MGMT expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-181d and other miRNAs. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Candidate miRNAs were further tested for inverse correlation with MGMT expression in clinical specimens. We identified 15 candidate miRNAs and characterized the top candidate, miR-603. Transfection of miR-603 suppressed MGMT mRNA/protein expression in vitro and in vivo; this effect was reversed by transfection with antimiR-603. miR-603 affinity-precipitated with MGMT mRNA and suppressed luciferase activity in an MGMT-3'UTR-luciferase assay, suggesting direct interaction between miR-603 and MGMT 3'UTR. miR-603 transfection enhanced the temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity of MGMT-expressing glioblastoma cell lines. Importantly, miR-603 mediated MGMT suppression and TMZ resistance were reversed by expression of an MGMT cDNA. In a collection of 74 clinical glioblastoma specimens, both miR-603 and miR-181d levels inversely correlated with MGMT expression. Moreover, a combined index of the two miRNAs better reflected MGMT expression than each individually. These results suggest that MGMT is co-regulated by independent miRNAs. Characterization of these miRNAs should contribute toward strategies for enhancing the efficacy of DNA alkylating agents. PMID:24994119

  15. Regulating Rho GTPases and their regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Richard G; Ridley, Anne J

    2016-08-01

    Rho GTPases regulate cytoskeletal and cell adhesion dynamics and thereby coordinate a wide range of cellular processes, including cell migration, cell polarity and cell cycle progression. Most Rho GTPases cycle between a GTP-bound active conformation and a GDP-bound inactive conformation to regulate their ability to activate effector proteins and to elicit cellular responses. However, it has become apparent that Rho GTPases are regulated by post-translational modifications and the formation of specific protein complexes, in addition to GTP-GDP cycling. The canonical regulators of Rho GTPases - guanine nucleotide exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins and guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors - are regulated similarly, creating a complex network of interactions to determine the precise spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPases. PMID:27301673

  16. Expression and regulation of the macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha gene by nicotine in rat alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Inn-Wen; Lin, Shiu-Ru; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Wang, Tung-Heng; Hung, Jen-Yu; Paulauskis, Joseph D

    2002-01-01

    expression of MIP-1 alpha mRNA. Moreover, we performed RNA decay assay by measuring the half-life of MIP-1 alpha mRNA. Treatment of RAM cells with the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D following exposure to nicotine revealed that the half-life of MIP-1 alpha mRNA was markedly increased by nicotine treatment, supporting a role of post-transcriptional stabilization in MIP-1 alpha gene expression. These observations indicate that nicotine can induce MIP-1 alpha mRNA expression and protein synthesis in RAM cells, mediating, at least in part, via the generation of ROS. In addition, the increase in MIP-1 alpha mRNA level involves, both transcriptional activation and post-transcriptional stabilization. PMID:12101081

  17. The ATPase Inhibitory Factor 1 (IF1): A master regulator of energy metabolism and of cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bermúdez, Javier; Cuezva, José M

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution we summarize most of the findings reported for the molecular and cellular biology of the physiological inhibitor of the mitochondrial H(+)-ATP synthase, the engine of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and gate of cell death. We first describe the structure and major mechanisms and molecules that regulate the activity of the ATP synthase placing the ATPase Inhibitory Factor 1 (IF1) as a major determinant in the regulation of the activity of the ATP synthase and hence of OXPHOS. Next, we summarize the post-transcriptional mechanisms that regulate the expression of IF1 and emphasize, in addition to the regulation afforded by the protonation state of histidine residues, that the activity of IF1 as an inhibitor of the ATP synthase is also regulated by phosphorylation of a serine residue. Phosphorylation of S39 in IF1 by the action of a mitochondrial cAMP-dependent protein kinase A hampers its interaction with the ATP synthase, i.e., only dephosphorylated IF1 interacts with the enzyme. Upon IF1 interaction with the ATP synthase both the synthetic and hydrolytic activities of the engine of OXPHOS are inhibited. These findings are further placed into the physiological context to stress the emerging roles played by IF1 in metabolic reprogramming in cancer, in hypoxia and in cellular differentiation. We review also the implication of IF1 in other cellular situations that involve the malfunctioning of mitochondria. Special emphasis is given to the role of IF1 as driver of the generation of a reactive oxygen species signal that, emanating from mitochondria, is able to reprogram the nucleus of the cell to confer by various signaling pathways a cell-death resistant phenotype against oxidative stress. Overall, our intention is to highlight the urgent need of further investigations in the molecular and cellular biology of IF1 and of its target, the ATP synthase, to unveil new therapeutic strategies in human pathology. This article is part of a Special Issue

  18. Different domains of P21Cip1/waf1 regulate DNA replication and DNA repair-associated processes after UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Many genotoxic insults result in p21 up-regulation and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest but UV irradiation triggers p21 proteolysis. The significance of the increased p21 turnover is unclear and might be associated to DNA repair. While the role of p21 in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) remains controversial, two recent reports explore its effect on Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS), a process that avoids replication blockage during S phase. The first report shows that p21 degradation is required for efficient PCNA ubiquitination, a post transcriptional modification that is relevant for TLS. The second report demonstrates that p21 (-/-) cells have increased TLS-associated mutagenic rates. Herein we analyze the effect of p21 on different PCNA-driven processes including DNA replication, NER and TLS. Whereas only the CDK binding domain of p21 is required for cell cycle arrest in unstressed cells; neither the CDK- nor the PCNA-binding domains of p21 are able to block early and late steps of NER. Intriguingly, through its PCNA binding domain, p21 inhibited recruitment of the TLS-polymerase, polη to PCNA foci after UV. Moreover, this obstruction correlates with accumulation of γH2AX and increased apoptosis. Taking together, our data emphasizes the link between p21 turnover and efficient TLS. This might also suggest a potential effect of p21 on other activities of polζ, a DNA polymerase with central roles in other biological scenarios such as genetic conversion, homologous recombination and modulation of the cellular response to genotoxic agents

  19. PUMILIO-2 is involved in the positive regulation of cellular proliferation in human adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigunov, Patrícia; Sotelo-Silveira, Jose; Kuligovski, Crisciele; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo; Rebelatto, Carmen K; Moutinho, José A; Brofman, Paulo S; Krieger, Marco A; Goldenberg, Samuel; Munroe, David; Correa, Alejandro; Dallagiovanna, Bruno

    2012-01-20

    Stem cells can either differentiate into more specialized cells or undergo self-renewal. Several lines of evidence from different organisms suggest that these processes depend on the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The presence of the PUF [Pumilio/FBF (fem-3 binding factor)] domain defines a conserved family of RNA binding proteins involved in repressing gene expression. It has been suggested that a conserved function of PUF proteins is to repress differentiation and sustain the mitotic proliferation of stem cells. In humans, Pumilio-2 (PUM2) is expressed in embryonic stem cells and adult germ cells. Here we show that PUM2 is expressed in a subpopulation of adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) cultures, with a granular pattern of staining in the cytoplasm. Protein levels of PUM2 showed no changes during the differentiation of ASCs into adipocytes. Moreover, RNAi knockdown of pum2 did not alter the rate of adipogenic differentiation compared with wild-type control cells. A ribonomic approach was used to identify PUM2-associated mRNAs. Microarray analysis showed that PUM2-bound mRNAs are part of gene networks involved in cell proliferation and gene expression control. We studied pum2 expression in cell cultures with low or very high levels of proliferation and found that changes in pum2 production were dependent on the proliferation status of the cell. Transient knockdown of pum2 expression by RNAi impaired proliferation of ASCs in vitro. Our results suggest that PUM2 does not repress differentiation of ASCs but rather is involved in the positive control of ASCs division and proliferation. PMID:21649561

  20. Tight regulation of the interaction between Brassica napus and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum at the microRNA level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jia-Yi; Xu, You-Ping; Zhao, Li; Li, Shuang-Sheng; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are multifunctional non-coding short nucleotide molecules. Nevertheless, the role of miRNAs in the interactions between plants and necrotrophic pathogens is largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of the miRNA repertoire of the economically important oil crop oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and those involved in interacting with its most devastating necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. We identified 280 B. napus miRNA candidates, including 53 novel candidates and 227 canonical members or variants of known miRNA families, by high-throughput deep sequencing of small RNAs from both normal and S. sclerotiorum-inoculated leaves. Target genes of 15 novel candidates and 222 known miRNAs were further identified by sequencing of degradomes from the two types of samples. MiRNA microarray analysis revealed that 68 miRNAs were differentially expressed between S. sclerotiorum-inoculated and uninoculated leaves. A set of these miRNAs target genes involved in plant defense to S. sclerotiorum and/or other pathogens such as nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) R genes and nitric oxygen and reactive oxygen species related genes. Additionally, three miRNAs target AGO1 and AGO2, key components of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Expression of several viral PTGS suppressors reduced resistance to S. sclerotiorum. Arabidopsis mutants of AGO1 and AGO2 exhibited reduced resistance while transgenic lines over-expressing AGO1 displayed increased resistance to S. sclerotiorum in an AGO1 expression level-dependent manner. Moreover, transient over-expression of miRNAs targeting AGO1 and AGO2 decreased resistance to S. sclerotiorum in oilseed rape. Our results demonstrate that the interactions between B. napus and S. sclerotiorum are tightly regulated at miRNA level and probably involve PTGS. PMID:27325118

  1. Ocean Dumping Control Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These Regulations were made further to the Ocean Dumping Control Act which provides for restrictions in dumping operations. The Regulations contain model applications for permits to dump or load a series of materials. (NEA)

  2. Trout Stream Special Regulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This layer shows Minnesota trout streams that have a special regulation as described in the 2006 Minnesota Fishing Regulations. Road crossings were determined using...

  3. Regulation of Genetic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... advertised. The Commission has the authority to regulate advertising that delivers health-related information to consumers to ensure that it is not false or misleading. Top of page FDA Regulation and ...

  4. Activists versus Captured Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Daubanes, Julien; Rochet, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of activism in a regulated industry where the regulator has been captured by the industry. Unlike ordinary economic agents, activists are insensitive to monetary incentives. Moreover, they are less well informed than regulators and their actions generate dead-weight costs. Yet we find that activism may increase social welfare because it disciplines captured regulators and reduces the social cost of imperfect regulatory systems.

  5. Hepcidin: regulation of the master iron regulator

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Iron, an essential nutrient, is required for many diverse biological processes. The absence of a defined pathway to excrete excess iron makes it essential for the body to regulate the amount of iron absorbed; a deficiency could lead to iron deficiency and an excess to iron overload and associated disorders such as anaemia and haemochromatosis respectively. This regulation is mediated by the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin binds to the only known iron export protein, ferroportin (FP...

  6. EST analysis in Ginkgo biloba: an assessment of conserved developmental regulators and gymnosperm specific genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runko Suzan J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ginkgo biloba L. is the only surviving member of one of the oldest living seed plant groups with medicinal, spiritual and horticultural importance worldwide. As an evolutionary relic, it displays many characters found in the early, extinct seed plants and extant cycads. To establish a molecular base to understand the evolution of seeds and pollen, we created a cDNA library and EST dataset from the reproductive structures of male (microsporangiate, female (megasporangiate, and vegetative organs (leaves of Ginkgo biloba. Results RNA from newly emerged male and female reproductive organs and immature leaves was used to create three distinct cDNA libraries from which 6,434 ESTs were generated. These 6,434 ESTs from Ginkgo biloba were clustered into 3,830 unigenes. A comparison of our Ginkgo unigene set against the fully annotated genomes of rice and Arabidopsis, and all available ESTs in Genbank revealed that 256 Ginkgo unigenes match only genes among the gymnosperms and non-seed plants – many with multiple matches to genes in non-angiosperm plants. Conversely, another group of unigenes in Gingko had highly significant homology to transcription factors in angiosperms involved in development, including MADS box genes as well as post-transcriptional regulators. Several of the conserved developmental genes found in Ginkgo had top BLAST homology to cycad genes. We also note here the presence of ESTs in G. biloba similar to genes that to date have only been found in gymnosperms and an additional 22 Ginkgo genes common only to genes from cycads. Conclusion Our analysis of an EST dataset from G. biloba revealed genes potentially unique to gymnosperms. Many of these genes showed homology to fully sequenced clones from our cycad EST dataset found in common only with gymnosperms. Other Ginkgo ESTs are similar to developmental regulators in higher plants. This work sets the stage for future studies on Ginkgo to better understand seed and

  7. Hypoxic regulation of the NKG2D ligand, H60

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth Ravindran

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia in the context of cancer has been well studied as it has been shown that tumors that are in hypoxic conditions tend to become malignant or metastatic. There is evidence that hypoxia is able to modulate tumor immunogenicity, however this phenomenon has not been well characterized. Here, we look at the effects of hypoxia on tumor immunogenicity from the perspective of NK cell recognition. We find that hypoxia decreases the expression of the NKG2D ligand, H60 post-transcriptionally but n...

  8. A Feed-Forward Loop Consisting of the Response Regulator RpaB and the Small RNA PsrR1 Controls Light Acclimation of Photosystem I Gene Expression in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Taro; Nagayama, Ryuta; Georg, Jens; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Wilde, Annegret; Hess, Wolfgang R; Hihara, Yukako

    2016-04-01

    Since cyanobacteria need to decrease PSI content to avoid absorption of excess light energy, down-regulation of PSI gene expression is one of the key characteristics of the high-light (HL) acclimation response. The transcriptional regulator RpaB and the small RNA PsrR1 (photosynthesis regulatory RNA1) have been suggested to be the two most critical factors for this response inSynechocystissp. PCC 6803. In this study, we found that the HLR1 DNA-binding motif, the recognition sequence for RpaB, is highly conserved in the core promoter region of thepsrR1gene among cyanobacterial species. Gel mobility shift assay revealed that RpaB binds to the HLR1 sequence ofpsrR1in vitro. RNA gel blot analysis together with chromatin affinity purification (ChAP) analysis suggested that PSI genes are activated and thepsrR1gene is repressed by the binding of RpaB under low-light (LL) conditions. A decrease in DNA binding affinity of RpaB occurs within 5 min after the shift from LL to HL conditions, leading to the prompt decrease in PSI promoter activity together with derepression ofpsrR1gene expression. Accumulating PsrR1 molecules then prevent translation from pre-existing PSI transcripts. By this dual repression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, rapid and strict down-regulation of PSI expression under HL is secured. Our findings suggest that RpaB and PsrR1 constitute a feed-forward loop for the regulation of PSI gene expression to achieve a rapid acclimation response to the damaging HL conditions. PMID:26872833

  9. Up-regulation of NF-kB-sensitive miRNA-125b and miRNA-146a in metal sulfate-stressed human astroglial (HAG) primary cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Aileen I.; Percy, Maire E.; Cui, Jian-Guo; Li, Yuan Yuan; Bhattacharjee, S.; Hill, James M.; Kruck, Theodore P.A.; Zhao, Yuhai; Lukiw, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) constitute a unique class of small, non-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs) that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. The presence of two inducible miRNAs, miRNA-125b and miRNA-146a, involved in respectively, astroglial cell proliferation and in the innate immune and inflammatory response, is significantly up-regulated in human neurological disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this study we analyzed abundances miRNA-125b and miRNA-146a in magnesium-, iron-, gallium, and aluminum-sulfate-stressed human-astroglial (HAG) cells, a structural and immune-responsive brain cell type. The combination of iron- plus aluminum-sulfate was found to be significantly synergistic in up-regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) abundance, NF-κB-DNA binding and miRNA-125b and miRNA-146a expression. Treatment of metal-sulfate stressed HAG cells with the antioxidant phenyl butyl nitrone (PBN) or the NF-κB inhibitors curcumin, the metal chelator-anti-oxidant pyrollidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), or the resveratrol analog CAY10512, abrogated both NF-κB signaling and induction of these miRNAs. Our observations further illustrate the potential of physiologically relevant amounts of aluminum and iron sulfates to synergistically up-regulate specific miRNAs known to contribute to AD-relevant pathogenetic mechanisms, and suggest that antioxidants or NF-κB inhibitors may be useful to quench metal-sulfate triggered genotoxicity. PMID:22099153

  10. Regulation of human RNase-L by the miR-29 family reveals a novel oncogenic role in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Teresa Y; Ezelle, Heather J; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Lapidus, Rena G; Scheibner, Kara A; Hassel, Bret A

    2013-01-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase-L is the terminal component of an interferon-regulated RNA decay pathway known as the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) system, whose established functions include antimicrobial and tumor suppressive activities. RNase-L activity requires binding of the small molecule 2-5A, leading to RNase-L dimerization and cleavage of single-stranded RNA. RNase-L expression is controlled post-transcriptionally by its 3'-untranslated region (3' UTR), which exerts a strong negative effect on RNase-L levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that repress expression of target genes by binding to regions of complementarity often in the 3' UTR. The miR-29 family acts as a tumor suppressor in several cancers, including acute and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and has many oncogenic targets. We report that the miR-29 family represses RNase-L protein expression across several cell types. Using a luciferase reporter, we showed that miR-29 acts via 4 target sites within the RNASEL 3' UTR. Mutation of all sites is required for abrogation of miR-29 repression. In light of the reported tumor suppressive role of miR-29 in K562 CML cells and miR-29 repression of RNase-L in these cells, we generated K562 cells with stable RNase-L knockdown and demonstrated that loss of RNase-L inhibits proliferation in vitro as well as tumor growth in a xenograft model. Our findings identify a previously unknown miRNA regulator of RNase-L expression and support a novel oncogenic role for RNase-L in CML and potentially other hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:23113544

  11. MiR-27a targets sFRP1 in hFOB cells to regulate proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donggeng Guo

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a key role in the regulation of almost all the physiological and pathological processes, including bone metabolism. Recent studies have suggested that miR-27 might play a key role in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Increasing evidence indicates that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway contributes to different stages of bone formation. In this study, we identify miR-27a can promote osteoblast differentiation by repressing a new target, secreted frizzled-related proteins 1 (sFRP1 expression at the transcriptional level. Here, 21 candidate targets of miR-27a involved in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling were predicted, and a significant decrease in sFRP1 luciferase activity was observed both in 293T and MG63 cells co-transfected with the matched luciferase reporter constructs and miR-27a mimic. Furthermore, the presence of exogenous miR-27a significantly decreased sFRP1 mRNA and protein expression in hFOB1.19 cells during both proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. The over-expression of miR-27a or knockdown sFRP1 significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic hFOBs, the percentage of cells in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle and the expression of key osteoblastic markers, including ALP, SPP1, RUNX2 and ALP activity. Over-expression of miR-27a or knockdown of endogenous sFRP1 led to an accumulation of β-catenin in hFOBs. In the present study, we demonstrate that miR-27a induced gene silencing effect is a vital mechanism contributing to bone metabolism in hFOB cells in vitro, which is partly affected by the post-transcriptional regulation of sFRP1, during osteoblast proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation.

  12. Altered microRNA Expression Profiles and Regulation of INK4A/CDKN2A Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Breast Cancer Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutful Kabir, Farruk Mohammad; DeInnocentes, Patricia; Bird, Richard Curtis

    2015-12-01

    microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling of cancer versus normal cells may reveal the characteristic regulatory features that can be correlated to altered gene expression in both human and animal models of cancers. In this study, the comprehensive expression profiles of the 277 highly characterized miRNAs from the canine genome were evaluated in spontaneous canine mammary tumor (CMT) models harboring defects in a group of cell cycle regulatory and potent tumor suppressor genes of INK4/CDKN2 family including p16/INK4A, p14ARF, and p15/INK4B. A large number of differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in three CMT cell lines to potentially target oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cancer biomarkers. A group of the altered miRNAs were identified by miRNA target prediction tools for regulation of the INK4/CDKN2 family tumor suppressor genes. miRNA-141 was experimentally validated for INK4A 3'-UTR target binding in the CMT cell lines providing an essential mechanism for the post-transcriptional regulation of the INK4A tumor suppressor gene in CMT models. A well-recognized group of miRNAs including miR-21, miR-155, miR-9, miR-34a, miR-143/145, and miR-31 were found to be altered in both CMTs and human breast cancer. These altered miRNAs might serve as potential targets for advancing the development of future therapeutic reagents. These findings further strengthen the validity and use of canine breast cancers as appropriate models for the study of human breast cancers. PMID:26095675

  13. The Effect of microRNAs in the Regulation of Human CYP3A4: a Systematic Study using a Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhiyun; Jiang, Songshan; Zhang, Yiting; Wang, Xiaofei; Peng, Xueling; Meng, Chunjie; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Honglian; Guo, Luo; Qin, Shengying; He, Lin; Shao, Fengmin; Zhang, Lirong; Xing, Qinghe

    2014-03-01

    CYP3A4 metabolizes more than 50% of the drugs on the market. The large inter-individual differences of CYP3A4 expression may contribute to the variability of human drug responses. Post-transcriptional regulation of CYP3A4 is poorly understood, whereas transcriptional regulation has been studied much more thoroughly. In this study, we used multiple software programs to predict miRNAs that might bind to CYP3A4 and identified 112 potentially functional miRNAs. Then a luciferase reporter system was used to assess the effect of the overexpression of each potentially functional miRNA in HEK 293T cells. Fourteen miRNAs that significantly decreased reporter activity were measured in human liver samples (N = 27) as candidate miRNAs. To establish a more effective way to analyze in vivo data for miRNA candidates, the relationship between functional miRNA and target mRNA was modeled mathematically. Taking advantage of this model, we found that hsa-miR-577, hsa-miR-1, hsa-miR-532-3p and hsa-miR-627 could significantly downregulate the translation efficiency of CYP3A4 mRNA in liver. This study used in silico, in vitro and in vivo methods to progressively screen functional miRNAs for CYP3A4 and to enhance our understanding of molecular events underlying the large inter-individual differences of CYP3A4 expression in human populations.

  14. Radiation Control Regulation 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Regulation (No. 434-1993) was made in pursuance of the Radiation Control Act 1990 and replaces the Active Substances Regulations 1959 repealed by the Act. It entered into force on 1 September 1993. The Regulation specifies that the technical radiation protection definitions have the same meaning as in the 1990 recommendations. The Regulation provides for the licensing of persons to use radioactive substances and radiation apparatus. It prescribes activities which may only be carried out by an accredited radiation expert and regulates the use of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances as well as the disposal and transport of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances. (NEA)

  15. Views of the regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In dealing with a challenging problem in occupational exposure the nuclear regulator in South Africa concluded that the involvement of stake holders was critical. Valuable lessons were learnt in the process. These related to co-operation amongst regulators, the involvement of regulators in addressing occupational exposure problems, the training of workers by the regulator and the need for technical training of the workers. In general, it was also learnt that regulators should establish mechanisms to measure and continuously improve the satisfaction of their stake holders. (author)

  16. Nuclear safety regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Safety Regulations for Nuclear Installations and Nuclear Safety Codes for Nuclear Pressure Retaining Components were issued by the NNSA in 1995. The Atomic Act and Regulations on the Safety Regulation for Transportation of Radioactive Materials have been finished and submitted to the State Council in 1995. At the same time the NNSA organized a revised collection of regulations on nuclear safety in both Chinese and English, titled 'The Collection of Regulations on Nuclear Safety of the People's Republic of China'. To enhance the implementation of newly issued nuclear safety regulations, the NNSA conducted seven times of propagating activities in relation to the regulations for nuclear pressure retaining components and research reactors design and operating in 1995

  17. The pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein PDX-1 regulates the ductal specific keratin 19 through the degradation of MEIS1 and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes von Burstin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreas organogenesis is the result of well-orchestrated and balanced activities of transcription factors. The homeobox transcription factor PDX-1 plays a crucial role in the development and function of the pancreas, both in the maintenance of progenitor cells and in determination and maintenance of differentiated endocrine cells. However, the activity of homeobox transcription factors requires coordination with co-factors, such as PBX and MEIS proteins. PBX and MEIS proteins belong to the family of three amino acid loop extension (TALE homeodomain proteins. In a previous study we found that PDX-1 negatively regulates the transcriptional activity of the ductal specific keratin 19 (Krt19. In this study, we investigate the role of different domains of PDX-1 and elucidate the functional interplay of PDX-1 and MEIS1 necessary for Krt19 regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that PDX-1 exerts a dual manner of regulation of Krt19 transcriptional activity. Deletion studies highlight that the NH(2-terminus of PDX-1 is functionally relevant for the down-regulation of Krt19, as it is required for DNA binding of PDX-1 to the Krt19 promoter. Moreover, this effect occurs independently of PBX. Second, we provide insight on how PDX-1 regulates the Hox co-factor MEIS1 post-transcriptionally. We find specific binding of MEIS1 and MEIS2 to the Krt19 promoter using IP-EMSA, and siRNA mediated silencing of Meis1, but not Meis2, reduces transcriptional activation of Krt19 in primary pancreatic ductal cells. Over-expression of PDX-1 leads to a decreased level of MEIS1 protein, and this decrease is prevented by inhibition of the proteasome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data provide evidence for a dual mechanism of how PDX-1 negatively regulates Krt19 ductal specific gene expression. These findings imply that transcription factors may efficiently regulate target gene expression through diverse, non

  18. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  19. The development of regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 2002, The Act on Protection Against Ionising Radiation and Nuclear Safety which regulates all aspects of protection against ionising radiation and nuclear safety entered into force in Slovenia. The Slovenian government and its responsible ministries shall issue several governmental and ministerial regulations to support the above - mentioned act. The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) which acts within the Ministry of the Environment, Spatial Planing and Energy takes an active part in drafting the regulations which are defined in the act. Due to a very comprehensive and pretentious task, that is to be completed in a relatively short period of time, taking into consideration the involvement of stakeholders and all competent ministries, the SNSA within the Quality Management System developed a special procedure that insures the systematic approach to the preparation of regulations. The article will briefly represent the process that: defines the preparation, development, harmonisation, review, approval and issue of regulations and uniforms the format of developed regulations. (author)

  20. Nuclear safety regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enactment of nuclear safety regulations in 1996 is mainly focused on the preparation of related regulations, and safety guides for nuclear materials control, the reprocessing installations of spent fuels, the treatment and disposal for radioactive waste. The NNSA also assists the departments concerned of the State Council for modification on the 'Atomic Energy Act' (draft) and the' Regulations on the Safety Supervision and Control of Radioactive Materials Transportation' (draft)

  1. Attention in emotion regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gelow, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The concept of emotion and how to regulate it is a central aspect of modern psychology. Within the process model of emotion regulation (Gross, 1998), one issue is how attentional deployment affects emotion regulation and how this can be measured. In task 1, pictures of positive or negative valence were showed in two conditions, either attend or decrease emotional reaction, while participants’ eye movements were followed with an eye tracker. Ratings of arousal and valence were significantly af...

  2. Accounting Regulation in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Hora, Michal; Chyzevska, Ludmila

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to evaluate the regulation and organization of accounting in Ukraine under the changes in the national economic system development and impact of IFRS implementation. The system of legal regulation of accounting in Ukraine is presented by five levels, each comprised of a number of corresponding subjects of regulation and documents. Typical Chart of Accounts is evidence of the continental accounting model in Ukraine. The accounting standards provide freedom of choice as ...

  3. Emotional regulation and friendship

    OpenAIRE

    Zaccagnini, J.L.; Ruiz-Aranda, D.

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has been shown that emotional regulation facilitates the establishment and maintenance of social relations (Dodge Garber, 1991; Saarni, 1999). The objective of the present study was to analyze the influence of emotional regulation (Gross y John, 2003) in positive friendship (Berscheid, 2003), specifically at the level of intimacy with friends. In addition, we examined the mediating role of positive emotions in the relationship between the emotional regulation and the leve...

  4. Benchmarking and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Agrell, Per Joakim; Bogetoft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publication...

  5. Better Regulation in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Wiener, Jonathan B.

    2006-01-01

    "Better Regulation" is afoot in Europe. After several transatlantic conflicts over regulatory topics such as the precautionary principle, genetically modified foods, and climate change, Europe and America now appear to be converging on the analytic basis for regulation. In a process of hybridization, European institutions are borrowing "Better Regulation" reforms from both the US approach to regulatory review using benefit-cost analysis and from European member states' initiatives on administ...

  6. Riboswitch-dependent gene regulation and its evolution in the plant kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Bocobza, Samuel; Adato, Avital; Mandel, Tali; Shapira, Michal; Nudler, Evgeny; Aharoni, Asaph

    2007-01-01

    Riboswitches are natural RNA sensors that affect gene control via their capacity to bind small molecules. Their prevalence in higher eukaryotes is unclear. We discovered a post-transcriptional mechanism in plants that uses a riboswitch to control a metabolic feedback loop through differential processing of the precursor RNA 3′ terminus. When cellular thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) levels rise, metabolite sensing by the riboswitch located in TPP biosynthesis genes directs formation of an unstable...

  7. Dissecting microRNA-mediated regulation of stemness, reprogramming, and pluripotency

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young Jin; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Chauhan, Himanshu; Park, Won Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Kim, Kye-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous short non-coding RNAs 19–24 nucleotides in length, play key regulatory roles in various biological events at the post-transcriptional level. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent a valuable tool for disease modeling, drug discovery, developmental studies, and potential cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine due to their unlimited self-renewal and pluripotency. Therefore, remarkable progress has been made in recent decade...

  8. MiR-214 regulates the function of osteoblast under simulated microgravity by targeting ATF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxian; Wang, Xiaogang; Li, Qi; Lv, Ke; Wan, Yumin; Li, Yinghui; Bai, Yanqiang

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small fragments of single-stranded RNA containing 18-24 nucleotides, and are generated from endogenous transcripts. MicroRNAs function in post-transcriptional gene silencing by targeting the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of mRNAs, resulting in translational repression. Growing evidence shows that microRNAs (miRNAs) regu-late various developmental and homeostatic events in vertebrates and invertebrates. Osteoblast differentiation is a key step in proper skeletal development and acquisition of bone mass; How-ever, the physiological role of non-coding small RNAs, especially miRNAs, in osteoblast dif-ferentiation remains elusive. Methods: To study the potential involvement of miRNAs in osteoblast differentiation under stimulated microgravity, we analyzed the expression of 20 bone relative miRNAs using real time PCR platform to find particularly miRNAs whose expression is altered during osteoblast differentiation. TargetScan, miRBase and Miranda were used to predict the target gene of candidate miRNA. To investigate whether ATF4 can be directly targeted by miR-214, we engineered luciferase reporters that have either the wild-type 3'UTRs of these genes, or the mutant UTRs with a 6 base pair (bp) deletion in the target sites. Lastly, to address the in vivo role of miR-214 in bone formation, tail suspension mice model was used to simulate the change of osteoblast function and bone loss. Results: Recent studies have sug-gested that miRNAs might play a role in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Here, we identify miR-214 in MC3T3-E1 cells, which is a primary mouse osteoblasts cell line, to promote osteoblast differentiation by repressing Activating Transcription Factor4 (ATF4) ex-pression at the posttranscriptional level. What is more, miR-214 was found to be transcribed in C2C12 cells during bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced (BMP2-induced) osteogenesis, and overexpression of miR-214 attenuated BMP2-induced osteoblastogenesis

  9. Emotion-regulation choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheppes, Gal; Scheibe, Susanne; Suri, Gaurav; Gross, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite centuries of speculation about how to manage negative emotions, little is actually known about which emotion-regulation strategies people choose to use when confronted with negative situations of varying intensity. On the basis of a new process conception of emotion regulation, we hypothesiz

  10. Benchmarking and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    nchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The applica...

  11. Reconceptualizing Civil Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galang, Roberto Martin; Castello, Itziar

    2011-01-01

    This article re-conceptualizes the notion of civil regulation, through an analysis of 775 projects by firms located in 21 Asian countries, wherein we map the state of civil regulation initiatives in the region. We challenge two established assumptions in the Corporate Social Responsibility...... literature. First, contrary to what is commonly argued, we claim that strong states in Asia promote civil regulation in what we call the “paradox of the weak state”. Second, we not only argue that civil regulation is mainly enforced by multinational enterprises willing to promote international social and...... environmental standards; but also that local, small and medium companies play a key role in the development of Asian civil regulation. We call this second finding the “CSR importation trap”. Our findings are supported by evidence on the limitations in the interchangeable properties of business and governments...

  12. MR-02A GENOME-WIDE miRNA SCREEN REVEALED MIR-603 AS A MGMT-REGULATING miRNA IN GLIOBLASTOMAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Deepa; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Ng, Kimberly; Steed, Tyler; Nguyen, Thien; Futalan, Diahnn; Akers, Johnny; Tao, Jiang; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Carter, Bob; Chen, Clark

    2014-01-01

    MGMT expression is a critical determinant for therapeutic resistance to DNA alkylating agents. We previously demonstrated that MGMT expression is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-181d and other miRNAs. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Candidate miRNAs were further tested for inverse correlation with MGMT expression in clinical specimens. We identified 15 candidate miRNAs. Comparison of these candidates to those predicted computational algorithms, including DIANA micro, Targetscan, miRanda, and microcosm showed poor agreement (3-22%), suggesting the need for empiric validation of in silico predictions. Transfection of miR-603, the top scoring candidate, suppressed MGMT mRNA/protein expression in vitro and in vivo; this effect was reversed by transfection with antimiR-603. miR-603 affinity-precipitated with MGMT mRNA and suppressed luciferase activity in an MGMT-3'UTR-luciferase assay, suggesting direct interaction between miR-603 and MGMT 3'UTR. miR-603 transfection enhanced the temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity of MGMT-expressing glioblastoma cell lines. Importantly, miR-603 mediated MGMT suppression and TMZ resistance were reversed by expression of an MGMT cDNA. miR-603 cooperates with miR-181d to bind to the 3'UTR of MGMT to suppress MGMT expression. In a collection of 74 clinical glioblastoma specimens, both miR-603 and miR-181d levels inversely correlated with MGMT expression. However, a combined index of the two miRNAs better reflected MGMT expression than each individually. These results suggest that MGMT is co-regulated by independent miRNAs. Our results further suggest that these miRNA may regulate MGMT by direct binding of MGMT 3'UTR or through modulation of proteins that regulate MGMT stability/degradation. Characterization of these miRNAs should contribute toward strategies for enhancing the efficacy of DNA alkylating agents.

  13. Regulating function of let-7 family on cell stemness%Let-7家族对细胞"干性"的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斯瑶; 安靓

    2009-01-01

    Originally discovery indicates a class of miRNA, let-7, which binds to target messenger RNAs (mRNA) through a post-transcription regulation and induces either translation repression or mRNA degradation, plays a regulatory role in the stem cells /cancer stem cells self renewal, development, differentiation, metastasis and apoptosis. Based on these findings about let-7's function and its regulatory processes, this review will summarizes these processes and the potential role in the stem cell and cancer stem cell. A more complete understand of its function on sternness will thus find new solution to the research, the diagnose and therapy of human cancer.%Let-7是目前研究最为广泛的microRNA家族之一.通过转录后调控机制,let-7可以特异性结合到信使RNA(mRNA)上,从而降解靶基因mRNA或抑制其翻译.研究表明,let-7家族在干细胞与肿瘤干细胞中参与多种调控机制,在维持干细胞特性(stemness),即高增殖、低分化和自我更新能力的过程中起到重要调控作用.本文将从干细胞与肿瘤干细胞两个方面,综述let-7与细胞"干性"间存在的联系和调控机制.

  14. Regulation of megakaryocytopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caen, J P; Han, Z C; Bellucci, S; Alemany, M

    1999-09-01

    After 35 years of research, a physiological regulator of platelet production has been identified and the recombinant protein is available. With the discovery of thrombopoietin (TPO), its potential use in a wide variety of clinical megakaryocytic and platelet disorders has been expected and clinical trials have been undertaken. To date, the reported encouraging pre-clinical studies indicate that, as with erythropoietin or G-CSF, minimal toxicity can be expected. A potential limiting side-effect of TPO could be the induction of thrombosis. Nevertheless, it is too early to know whether this cytokine will be of major therapeutic importance for patients with life-threatening thrombocytopenia, such as patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation or subjected to a high dose of chemotherapy. Several experimental and clinical studies are still needed to determine the efficacy of TPO in the prevention or the amelioration of bleeding, which is the ultimate goal for the appropriate use of cytokines with haemostatic benefit. Basic and clinical studies on regulators of megakaryocytopoiesis have rapidly progressed. Now, there is no doubt that some of these regulators are effective in correcting haematopoietic disorders of various aetiologies. Studies on negative regulators not only are important to understand the regulation of megakaryocytopoiesis in normal and pathological states but also have a potential clinical application. Some of these regulators have been shown to be effective in the treatment of essential thrombocythaemia and other myeloproliferative disorders. Platelet factor 4 (PF4) and some other chemokines are also capable of protecting progenitor cells from the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs. However, detailed investigations are still required to determine the precise mechanism(s) of action of these regulators and to establish the optimal clinical protocols of negative regulators alone or in association with positive regulators for the treatment of various

  15. Electrical installations and regulations

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, J F

    1966-01-01

    Electrical Installations and Regulations focuses on the regulations that apply to electrical installations and the reasons for them. Topics covered range from electrical science to alternating and direct current supplies, as well as equipment for providing protection against excess current. Cables, wiring systems, and final subcircuits are also considered, along with earthing, discharge lighting, and testing and inspection.Comprised of 12 chapters, this book begins with an overview of electrical installation work, traits of a good electrician, and the regulations governing installations. The r

  16. The power of regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slides accompanying a presentation at The Power of Change Conference in Vancouver, BC in April 1995 about regulations affecting the power industry were presented. Issues addressed included customer choice, incentive regulation changes (price-caps, revenue sharing and pricing flexibility), the reactions of Canadian industry to regulatory changes, and anticipated reactions of the financial markets to changes in regulations. The potential effects of competition and changes that will create competition were discussed. The level of readiness of Canadian financial, ownership and regulatory bodies was discussed. The needs and expectations of investors from a new regulatory regime were quesstimated. Possible alternatives to the present regulatory framework were suggested

  17. Pepper CabZIP63 acts as a positive regulator during Ralstonia solanacearum or high temperature-high humidity challenge in a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lei; Liu, Zhiqin; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Tong; Liang, Jiaqi; Wen, Jiayu; Liu, Yanyan; Li, Jiazhi; Shi, Lanping; Tang, Qian; Shi, Wei; Hu, Jiong; Liu, Cailing; Zhang, Yangwen; Lin, Wei; Wang, Rongzhang; Yu, Huanxin; Mou, Shaoliang; Hussain, Ansar; Cheng, Wei; Cai, Hanyang; He, Li; Guan, Deyi; Wu, Yang; He, Shuilin

    2016-04-01

    CaWRKY40 is known to act as a positive regulator in the response of pepper (Capsicum annuum) to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation (RSI) or high temperature-high humidity (HTHH), but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Herein, we report that CabZIP63, a pepper bZIP family member, participates in this process by regulating the expression of CaWRKY40. CabZIP63 was found to localize in the nuclei, be up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, bind to promoters of both CabZIP63(pCabZIP63) and CaWRKY40(pCaWRKY40), and activate pCabZIP63- and pCaWRKY40-driven β-glucuronidase expression in a C- or G-box-dependent manner. Silencing of CabZIP63 by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in pepper plants significantly attenuated their resistance to RSI and tolerance to HTHH, accompanied by down-regulation of immunity- or thermotolerance-associated CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1, and CaHSP24. Hypersensitive response-mediated cell death and expression of the tested immunity- and thermotolerance-associated marker genes were induced by transient overexpression (TOE) of CabZIP63, but decreased by that of CabZIP63-SRDX. Additionally, binding of CabZIP63 to pCaWRKY40 was up-regulated by RSI or HTHH, and the transcript level of CaWRKY40 and binding of CaWRKY40 to the promoters of CaPR1, CaNPR1, CaDEF1 and CaHSP24 were up-regulated by TOE of CabZIP63. On the other hand, CabZIP63 was also up-regulated transcriptionally by TOE of CaWRKY40. The data suggest collectively that CabZIP63 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of CaWRKY40 at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, forming a positive feedback loop with CaWRKY40 during pepper's response to RSI or HTHH. Altogether, our data will help to elucidate the underlying mechanism of crosstalk between pepper's response to RSI and HTHH. PMID:26936828

  18. Sport Fishing Regulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The regulations for sport fishing on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge are outlined in this document. Fishing is only permitted from sunrise to sunset, and only...

  19. Legislation and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 3 of the document contains some details about the Brazilian legislation and regulation, the nuclear and environmental licensing, and emergency preparedness legislation

  20. Volume Regulated Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    - serves a multitude of functions in the mammalian cell, regulating the membrane potential (Em), cell volume, protein activity and the driving force for facilitated transporters giving Cl- and Cl- channels a major potential of regulating cellular function. These functions include control of the cell cycle...... of volume perturbations evolution have developed system of channels and transporters to tightly control volume homeostasis. In the past decades evidence has been mounting, that the importance of these volume regulated channels and transporters are not restricted to the defense of cellular volume......, controlled cell death and cellular migration. Volume regulatory mechanisms has long been in focus for regulating cellular proliferation and my thesis work have been focusing on the role of Cl- channels in proliferation with specific emphasis on ICl, swell. Pharmacological blockage of the ubiquitously...

  1. Optimal Regulation of Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    Pagano, Marco; Immordino, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    We study regulation of the auditing profession in a model where audit quality is unobservable and enforcing regulation is costly. The optimal audit standard falls short of the first-best audit quality, and is increasing in the riskiness of firms and in the amount of funding they seek. The model can encompass collusion between clients and auditors, arising from the joint provision of auditing and consulting services: deflecting collusion requires less ambitious standards. Finally, banning the ...

  2. Restructuring nuclear regulations.

    OpenAIRE

    Mossman, Kenneth L.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear regulations are a subset of social regulations (laws to control activities that may negatively impact the environment, health, and safety) that concern control of ionizing radiation from radiation-producing equipment and from radioactive materials. The impressive safety record among nuclear technologies is due, in no small part, to the work of radiation safety professionals and to a protection system that has kept pace with the rapid technologic advancements in electric power generati...

  3. Rethinking financial regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas M. Hoenig

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, revolutionary changes in financial markets, combined with incidents such as Barings and Daiwa, have revived concerns about the adequacy of financial regulation. Historically, financial regulatory policy has been driven by the view that to maintain the health of the financial system you must maintain the health of individual institutions.> In light of ongoing changes in financial markets, however, extending the traditional approach to financial market regulation may not work. ...

  4. Supermarkets and Planning Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, Rachel; Harmgart, Heike

    2008-01-01

    We are interested in evaluating the impact of restrictive planning regulation on entry into the UK grocery retail industry. We estimate a model similar to Bresnahan and Reiss (1991) where we allow for multiple store formats. We find that more restrictive planning regulation reduces the number of large format supermarkets in equilibrium. However, the impact is overstated if variation in demographic characteristics across markets is not also controlled for. Our estimates suggest that restrictiv...

  5. Regulating deregulated energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The North American gas and electricity markets are fast evolving, and regulators are currently faced with a host of issues such as market-based rates, unbundling, stranded costs, open access, and incentive regulation are surfacing as a result of deregulation. The regulatory environment in Ontario was reviewed by the author. Deregulated markets rule, from commodities to gas and electricity. Additionally, there is an evolution of traditional utility regulation. A look at deregulated markets revealed that there are regulations on boundary conditions on the deregulated market. Under the Ontario Energy Board (OEB), all generators, transmitters, distributors, and retailers of electricity must be licensed. The standard supply service (SSS) offered by electricity distributors and system gas which is still being sold by natural gas distributors continues to be regulated by OEB. One issue that was addressed was separation for revenues and costs of the utility's purchase and sale of gas business, at least for accounting purposes. The next issue discussed was cost of system gas and SSS, followed by timely signals and prudent incurred costs. Historical benefits were reviewed, such as historical commitments to low-cost electricity. Pooling transportation costs, transmission pricing continued, market-based rates, unbundling, stranded costs, open access, incentive regulation/ performance based regulation (PBR) were all discussed. Price cap on PBR, both partial and comprehensive were looked at. A requirement to review guidelines on cost of capital and an application to extend blanket approval provisions for gas storage were discussed, as they are amongst some of the challenges of the future. Other challenges include revised rules and practice and procedure; practice directions for cost awards, appeals, and other functions; confidentiality guidelines; and refinements to the role of and approaches to alternative dispute resolution. The future role of regulators was examined in light

  6. Summary of the regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) prescribes regulations for the international movement of all radioactive materials among member nations. The U.S. governmental agencies regulating the transportation of radioactive materals include the Department of Transportation (DOT), which is responsible for safety in packaging, shipping, carriage, stowage, storage, and handling of all radioactive materials; the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which is responsible for (1) safety and safeguards in receipt, possession, use, transfer of by-product, source, and special nuclear materials and (2) safety in packaging of fissile and radioactive materials in quantities exceeding Type A limits, defined in the Code of Federal Regulations; the Energy Research and Development Administration, which is responsible for safety in all aspects of radioactive material transport by its license-exempt contractors; and the Postal Service, which is responsible for safety in shipment by mail. Current regulatory actions involving NRC that may influence the transportation of radioactive materials include the examination of the regulations, legal contests, and the adoption of new regulations. The NRC published a draft of an environmental impact statement on transportation in March 1976 and will conduct a rulemaking proceeding after the final version of the statement is published in the fall. Of the new regulations, the most recent innovations in the IAEA regulations and a quality assurance program of increased rigor are foremost. The two most prominent ideas of the reguations IAEA regulations are the assignment of radiotoxicity values to each radionuclide rather than to grups of radionuclides, providing for increased flexibility in package limits for most radionuclides, and the allowance of small releases from Type B packages under hypothetical accident conditions. The DOT and NRC are in the process of adopting these IAEA revisions

  7. Financial Regulation Going Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin Allen; Elena Carletti

    2010-01-01

    The financial sector is heavily regulated in order to prevent financial crises. The recent crisis showed how ineffective this regulation and other types of government intervention were in achieving this aim. We argue that the crisis was primarily caused by housing price bubbles. These occurred because of too loose monetary policies and the easy availability of credit resulting from the build up of large foreign exchange reserves by Asian central banks. A number of regulatory reforms are sugge...

  8. On Globalisation of Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Wessels

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article the opinion that financial regulation should be dealt with on a national, and not on a global scale is criticised. The objections against global regulation are discussed and dismissed. The greater good of a solid global system is inconsistent with maintaining the full force of national social or economic policies. Bob Wessels submits that the best way forward is to look for (a combination of the best methods of regulation on the basis of geography, the nature of regulation itself (hard law, best practices, guidelines, the function of certain rules in relation to the goals or the expectations they aim to address and the character of these rules. A parallel is drawn with the way in which cross-border insolvencies are regulated, including solutions from practitioners in the global insolvency of Lehman Brothers Group of Companies. Given the essential role courts play the presence of new rules of the international insolvency should be supported by more robust rules for the cross-border judicial coordination of cross-border cases, such as a convention. The body of financial regulation should be guided by international accepted principles and guidelines and international regulation and national implementation should reflect a balance between what is necessary in the light of the past events, while still leaving room for fair national demands and policies. The allocation of clear responsibility and authority to regulating bodies should warrant an efficient and effective answer for what, at the core, is a global problem, related to international financial markets.

  9. Corruption, Institutions and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Breen, Michael; Gillanders, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the effects of corruption and institutional quality on the quality of business regulation. Our key findings indicate that corruption negatively affects the quality of regulation and that general institutional quality is insignificant once corruption is con- trolled for. These findings hold over a number of specifications which include additional exogenous historical and geographic controls. The findings imply that policy-makers should focus on curbing corruption to improve regulati...

  10. The regulator's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The speaker recalls the task of regulators in establishing criteria and standards and assessing and controlling their fulfillment, as well as the fact that there are many types of radiological regulators, depending on their targets, structures, level of independence, and others. She also stresses that regulators take the environment presently into account to protect people as far as ionising radiation is concerned, that is, environmental protection is provided by present regulations, although implicitly based on an anthropocentric focus. In this sense, there is a clear need to develop a framework for the protection of environment, on the basis of the evolution of the present system. There is a preference for a unique, coherent, timely, integrated and manageable radiological human and environment protection system, which has to be developed internationally. Such an enhanced environmental protection framework needs of clearly defined specific 'bricks' (principles/criteria/tools). Regulators will face important challenges in adapting to an integrated man/environment protection framework, and need to act nationally in the meantime to fulfill obligations, as well as actively encourage international initiatives. A proposal on a radiological environmental framework is laid down, and finally she states the overall regulators viewpoint on this process: 'The path towards pragmatism and credibility'. (author)

  11. Dexamethasone regulates CFTR expression in Calu-3 cells with the involvement of chaperones HSP70 and HSP90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe M Prota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dexamethasone is widely used for pulmonary exacerbation in patients with cystic fibrosis, however, not much is known about the effects of glucocorticoids on the wild-type cystic fibrosis channel transmembrane regulator (CFTR. Our aim was to determine the effects of dexamethasone treatment on wild-type CFTR expression. METHODS AND RESULTS: Dose-response (1 nM to 10 µM and time course (3 to 48 h curves were generated for dexamethasone for mRNA expression in Calu-3 cells using a real-time PCR. Within 24 h, dexamethasone (10 nM showed a 0.3-fold decrease in CFTR mRNA expression, and a 3.2-fold increase in αENaC mRNA expression compared with control groups. Dexamethasone (10 nM induced a 1.97-fold increase in the total protein of wild-type CFTR, confirmed by inhibition by mifepristone. To access surface protein expression, biotinylation followed by Western blotting showed that dexamethasone treatment led to a 2.35-fold increase in the amount of CFTR in the cell surface compared with the untreated control groups. Once protein translation was inhibited with cycloheximide, dexamethasone could not increase the amount of CFTR protein. Protein stability was assessed by inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide (50 µg/ml at different times in cells treated with dexamethasone and in untreated cells. Dexamethasone did not alter the degradation of wild-type CFTR. Assessment of the B band of CFTR within 15 min of metabolic pulse labeling showed a 1.5-fold increase in CFTR protein after treatment with dexamethasone for 24 h. Chaperone 90 (HSP90 binding to CFTR increased 1.55-fold after treatment with dexamethasone for 24 h, whereas chaperone 70 (HSP70 binding decreased 0.30 fold in an immunoprecipitation assay. CONCLUSION: Mature wild-type CFTR protein is regulated by dexamethasone post transcription, involving cotranslational mechanisms with HSP90 and HSP70, which enhances maturation and expression of wild-type CFTR.

  12. Characterizing dynamic regulatory programs in mouse lung development and their potential association with tumourigenesis via miRNA-TF-mRNA circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Juan; Ye, Xinghuo; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Background In dynamic biological processes, genes, transcription factors(TF) and microRNAs(miRNAs) play vital regulation roles. Many researchers have focused on the transcription factors or miRNAs in transcriptional or post transcriptional stage, respectively. However, the transcriptional regulation and post transcriptional regulation is not isolated in the whole dynamic biological processes, there are few reserchers who have tried to consider the network composed by genes, miRNAs and TFs in ...

  13. miRVine: a microRNA expression atlas of grapevine based on small RNA sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Belli Kullan, Jayakumar; Lopes Paim Pinto, Daniela; Bertolini, Edoardo; Fasoli, Marianna; Zenoni, Sara; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Pezzotti, Mario; Meyers, Blake C.; Farina, Lorenzo; Pè, Mario Enrico; Mica, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Background miRNAs are the most abundant class of small non-coding RNAs, and they are involved in post-transcriptional regulations, playing a crucial role in the refinement of genetic programming during plant development. Here we present a comprehensive picture of miRNA regulation in Vitis vinifera L. plant during its complete life cycle. Furthering our knowledge about the post-transcriptional regulation of plant development is fundamental to understand the biology of such an important crop. R...

  14. Novel Regulation of the Synthesis of α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Subunit GluA1 by Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) in the Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadó, Rut; Soto, David; Miñano-Molina, Alfredo J; Pozo, Macarena; Carrasco, Patricia; Yefimenko, Natalia; Rodríguez-Álvarez, José; Casals, Núria

    2015-10-16

    The regulation of AMPA-type receptor (AMPAR) abundance in the postsynaptic membrane is an important mechanism involved in learning and memory formation. Recent data suggest that one of the constituents of the AMPAR complex is carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific isoform located in the endoplasmic reticulum of neurons. Previous results had demonstrated that CPT1C deficiency disrupted spine maturation in hippocampal neurons and impaired spatial learning, but the role of CPT1C in AMPAR physiology had remained mostly unknown. In the present study, we show that CPT1C binds GluA1 and GluA2 and that the three proteins have the same expression profile during neuronal maturation. Moreover, in hippocampal neurons of CPT1C KO mice, AMPAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents and synaptic levels of AMPAR subunits GluA1 and GluA2 are significantly reduced. We show that AMPAR expression is dependent on CPT1C levels because total protein levels of GluA1 and GluA2 are decreased in CPT1C KO neurons and are increased in CPT1C-overexpressing neurons, whereas other synaptic proteins remain unaltered. Notably, mRNA levels of AMPARs remained unchanged in those cultures, indicating that CPT1C is post-transcriptionally involved. We demonstrate that CPT1C is directly involved in the de novo synthesis of GluA1 and not in protein degradation. Moreover, in CPT1C KO cultured neurons, GluA1 synthesis after chemical long term depression was clearly diminished, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment was unable to phosphorylate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and stimulate GluA1 protein synthesis. These data newly identify CPT1C as a regulator of AMPAR translation efficiency and therefore also synaptic function in the hippocampus. PMID:26338711

  15. Regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α expression by interleukin-1β (IL-1 β, insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I and II (IGF-II in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Rossi Sartori-Cintra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha regulates genes related to cellular survival under hypoxia. This factor is present in osteroarthritic chondrocytes, and cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta, participate in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, thereby increasing the activities of proteolytic enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases, and accelerating cartilage destruction. We hypothesize that Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α can regulate cytokines (catabolic action and/or growth factors (anabolic action in osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the modulation of HIF-1α in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β and insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I and II (IGF-II and to determine the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol-3kinase (PI-3K pathway in this process. METHODS: Human osteroarthritic chondrocytes were stimulated with IL-1β, IGF-I and IGF-II and LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3K. Nuclear protein levels and gene expression were analyzed by western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, respectively. RESULTS: HIF-1α expression was upregulated by IL-1β at the protein level but not at the gene level. IGF-I treatment resulted in increases in both the protein and mRNA levels of HIF-1α , whereas IGF-II had no effect on its expression. However, all of these stimuli exploited the PI-3K pathway. CONCLUSION: IL-1β upregulated the levels of HIF-1α protein post-transcriptionally, whereas IGF-I increased HIF-1α at the transcript level. In contrast, IGF-II did not affect the protein or gene expression levels of HIF-1α . Furthermore, all of the tested stimuli exploited the PI-3K pathway to some degree. Based on these findings, we are able to suggest that Hypoxia inducible Factor-1 exhibits protective activity in chondrocytes during osteoarthritis.

  16. Regulating energy industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of sector-based regulation takes on significant importance in the context of market liberalization. The overall aim is to conciliate, in the considered sector, fair competition with the achievement of public service missions. However, the nature of the authority in charge of this regulation is not prone to harmonized clauses, even in Europe. For electricity for example, the 96/92/CE directive of 19 December 1996 concerning common rules for the inner electricity market, does not state this and Germany, which has not designed any sector-based regulator, applies the general procedure of litigation settlement by the equivalent of the competition Council. In France, the law Nr 2000-108 of 10 February 2000 defines the CRE (Electricity Regulation Commission) is article 28 as including six members, three of which are appointed by Government and the three others respectively by each of the presidents of the parliamentary assemblies. Many other countries have made the same choice. However, the scope of the missions given to these specialized authorities varies considerably according to the country. At European level, what are the different models of organisation of sector-based regulation in the energy field? How are the new regulators organised in relation with the competition authorities? Will the new models converge on the medium term or on the long term? Must we anticipate the creation of European regulation authorities to rule the problems concerning several national markets? What can we learn from the recent electricity crisis in California? To try and answer these questions, Mr Michel Matheu presented a European comparative study and before the debate started, Mr Pierre Couveinhes suggested a reflection on the practical implications of the analyses carried out. (authors)

  17. Nuclear regulation in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current state of nuclear regulations in the USA is examined. Since Three Mile Island the regulation of the nuclear power industry has been undergoing a noticeable transition. It will be argued here that the transition is characterized by two indicia. First, the primary focus of state and federal regulators has been on the financial aspects of the industry: this is best seen in the context of decisions allocating the costs of nuclear plant cancellations. Second, decisionmaking power has been decentralized: although the regulatory history of nuclear power demonstrates the tradition of centralized decisionmaking power (i.e., formerly the primary decisionmaking body was the Atomic Energy Commission), now States share decisionmaking power with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In Section 1 a brief legislative history of nuclear regulation is presented to establish the assertion that nuclear regulation, both de jure and de facto, was centralized. Next, Section 2 canvasses recent United States Supreme Court opinions regarding nuclear regulation. The Court frequently acts as policymaker through the consequences of its opinions, if not by its intent. In the area of nuclear policymaking, the Court has paid allegiance recently both to the tradition of centralization and to the movement toward decentralization. This dualism is reflected in other federal court decisions as well which will be briefly mentioned. Continuing the analysis of Federal regulation, Section 3 examines the current reform efforts of the NRC. Section 4 presents an examination of State responses to nuclear plant cancellations. In this section, State administrative agency and court decisions will be examined and recent State legislation will be discussed. (author)

  18. Regulation function of non-coding small RNA in Salmonella%沙门菌非编码小RNA调控功能研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟霞; 王亨; 朱国强

    2011-01-01

    细菌非编码小RNA(sRNA)是原核生物中新发现的基因表达调控因子,可在转录后水平调节基因的表达。沙门菌是sRNA研究的模式菌,研究者利用生物信息学预测技术、全基因组分析技术和高通量RNA测序技术,至少发现70余种沙门菌sRNA。它们通过感应温度,pH值,渗透压或氧分压等环境信号,利用碱基互补方式与靶标mRNA结合,调控靶标mRNA的翻译、降解或稳定性。通常一种sRNA有多个靶基因或靶位点,可调节多种基因的表达,在沙门菌营养物质代谢、外膜蛋白合成、群体感应和毒力表达等诸多生命过程中发挥重要的调控作用。%Non-coding small RNA(sRNA) is a new factor to regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level in prokaryote.As a model organism for sRNA research,at least 70 sRNAs have been identified by biocomputational prediction approaches,the whole genome analysis and high-throughout sequencing technology in Salmonella species.These sRNA can regulate translation,degradation and stability of target mRNAs by base pairing with them while sensing environmental signal such as temperature,pH,osmotic pressure and oxygen concentration.One sRNA can regulate multiple genes expression via targeting mRNA or gene sites.They play an important regulation role in substance metabolism,outer membrane proteins synthesis,quorum sensing and virulence gene expression.

  19. Identification of adaptive mutations in the influenza A virus non-structural 1 gene that increase cytoplasmic localization and differentially regulate host gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Forbes

    Full Text Available The NS1 protein of influenza A virus (IAV is a multifunctional virulence factor. We have previously characterized gain-of-function mutations in the NS1 protein arising from the experimental adaptation of the human isolate A/Hong Kong/1/1968(H3N2 (HK to the mouse. The majority of these mouse adapted NS1 mutations were demonstrated to increase virulence, viral fitness, and interferon antagonism, but differ in binding to the post-transcriptional processing factor cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30. Because nuclear trafficking is a major genetic determinant of influenza virus host adaptation, we assessed subcellular localization and host gene expression of NS1 adaptive mutations. Recombinant HK viruses with adaptive mutations in the NS1 gene were assessed for NS1 protein subcellular localization in mouse and human cells using confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation. In human cells the HK wild-type (HK-wt virus NS1 protein partitioned equivalently between the cytoplasm and nucleus but was defective in cytoplasmic localization in mouse cells. Several adaptive mutations increased the proportion of NS1 in the cytoplasm of mouse cells with the greatest effects for mutations M106I and D125G. The host gene expression profile of the adaptive mutants was determined by microarray analysis of infected mouse cells to show either high or low extents of host-gene regulation (HGR or LGR phenotypes. While host genes were predominantly down regulated for the HGR group of mutants (D2N, V23A, F103L, M106I+L98S, L98S, M106V, and M106V+M124I, the LGR phenotype mutants (D125G, M106I, V180A, V226I, and R227K were characterized by a predominant up regulation of host genes. CPSF30 binding affinity of NS1 mutants did not predict effects on host gene expression. To our knowledge this is the first report of roles of adaptive NS1 mutations that impact intracellular localization and regulation of host gene expression.

  20. Up-regulated microRNA-143 in cancer stem cells differentiation promotes prostate cancer cells metastasis by modulating FNDC3B expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumor progression and metastasis, including in prostate cancer. There is an obvious and urgent need for effective cancer stem cells specific therapies in metastatic prostate cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an important class of pervasive genes that are involved in a variety of biological functions, especially in cancer. The goal of this study was to identify miRNAs involved in prostate cancer metastasis and cancer stem cells. A microarray and qRT-PCR were performed to investigate the miRNA expression profiles in PC-3 sphere cells and adherent cells. A transwell assay was used to evaluate the migration of PC-3 sphere cells and adherent cells. MiR-143 was silenced with antisense oligonucleotides in PC-3, PC-3-M and LNCaP cells. The role of miR-143 in prostate cancer metastasis was measured by wound-healing and transwell assays in vitro and bioluminescence imaging in vivo. Bioinformatics and luciferase report assays were used to identify the target of miR-143. The expression of miR-143 and the migration capability were reduced in PC-3 sphere cells and progressively increased during sphere re-adherent culture. Moreover, the down-regulation of miR-143 suppressed prostate cancer cells migration and invasion in vitro and systemically inhibited metastasis in vivo. Fibronectin type III domain containing 3B (FNDC3B), which regulates cell motility, was identified as a target of miR-143. The inhibition of miR-143 increased the expression of FNDC3B protein but not FNDC3B mRNA in vitro and vivo. These data demonstrate for the first time that miR-143 was up-regulated during the differentiation of prostate cancer stem cells and promoted prostate cancer metastasis by repressing FNDC3B expression. This sheds a new insight into the post-transcriptional regulation of cancer stem cells differentiation by miRNAs, a potential approach for the treatment of prostate cancer

  1. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  2. Probiotics and Appetite Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Anne Toksvig

    resistance and blood lipid profile among others. Probiotics which are health promoting bacteria can potentially be used to affect the GM and thereby change metabolic outcomes of the host. Animal studies have shown associations between intake of probiotics and appetite regulation, but currently no human...... intestine, in an animal study and in two human studies the effect of the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei L. casei W8 (W8) on appetite regulation, blood lipids and blood fatty acids. In addition, it was investigated if W8 had an effect on the fecal microbiota of the human...... (GCG) gene encoding GLP-1 and GLP-2 and expression of the gene SCD1 encoding stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1); which is involved in the formation of triacylglycerol (TAG); was studied in piglets supplemented with W8 for two weeks. To study the acute effect of W8 on appetite regulation, glycemic...

  3. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  4. ANTICIPATING AND REGULATING BIOSYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Iorga Siman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Regulating biosystems closely related to human beings are structures still difficult to understand.Numerous intimate processes taking place in these systems, even their actual constitution, are insufficiently decoded, and that they have populated the world long before man invented the first regulator, appears not to have contributed much to their knowledge. This work is intended to highlight what regulating biosystems are.There is no secret that somatic muscles perform control operations which no act of moving would be possible without. All actions are the result of dynamic controlled processes adjusted to strict control laws. By treating them very seriously may lead to knowledge of processes occurring in complex systems

  5. Environmentally regulated aerospace coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Virginia L.

    1995-01-01

    Aerospace coatings represent a complex technology which must meet stringent performance requirements in the protection of aerospace vehicles. Topcoats and primers are used, primarily, to protect the structural elements of the air vehicle from exposure to and subsequent degradation by environmental elements. There are also many coatings which perform special functions, i.e., chafing resistance, rain erosion resistance, radiation and electric effects, fuel tank coatings, maskants, wire and fastener coatings. The scheduled promulgation of federal environmental regulations for aerospace manufacture and rework materials and processes will regulate the emissions of photochemically reactive precursors to smog and air toxics. Aerospace organizations will be required to identify, qualify and implement less polluting materials. The elimination of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC's) and implementation of pollution prevention requirements are added constraints which must be addressed concurrently. The broad categories of operations affected are the manufacture, operation, maintenance, and repair of military, commercial, general aviation, and space vehicles. The federal aerospace regulations were developed around the precept that technology had to be available to support the reduction of organic and air toxic emissions, i.e., the regulations cannot be technology forcing. In many cases, the regulations which are currently in effect in the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), located in Southern California, were used as the baseline for the federal regulations. This paper addresses strategies used by Southern California aerospace organizations to cope with these regulatory impacts on aerospace productions programs. All of these regulatory changes are scheduled for implementation in 1993 and 1994, with varying compliance dates established.

  6. Regulation as Rhetoric

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen; Györy, Csaba

    This paper analyses the way regulatory agencies strategically use public ‘rhetoric’ and ‘management of appearance’ to strengthen their regulation. It reports a comparative study of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) which is the US federal securities regulator and the Danish Tax and...... environment, these two agencies apply strategies that appear to be strikingly similar, and these similarities are worth investigating not despite, but exactly because of the differing political and social environment. We track recent shifts in organizational practice at these two agencies and argue that both...

  7. Nuclear regulation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed

  8. Nuclear regulations and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an historical overview of the nuclear regulation system in Argentina a description is made of the country's Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) and of its regulation and control functions. Its organic structure is also outlined. A detailed report is given of the environmental monitoring activities in the sites of the operating Argentine nuclear power plants as well as those of the nuclear research centres. A special reference is made of the monitoring of the relevant uranium mining districts in Argentina. The radon determination in houses of several regions of the country is also mentioned

  9. Regulated underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidance package is designed to assist DOE Field operations by providing thorough guidance on the underground storage tank (UST) regulations. [40 CFR 280]. The guidance uses tables, flowcharts, and checklists to provide a ''roadmap'' for DOE staff who are responsible for supervising UST operations. This package is tailored to address the issues facing DOE facilities. DOE staff should use this guidance as: An overview of the regulations for UST installation and operation; a comprehensive step-by-step guidance for the process of owning and operating an UST, from installation to closure; and a quick, ready-reference guide for any specific topic concerning UST ownership or operation

  10. Regulation, Competition, and Information

    OpenAIRE

    Mian Muhammad Javed

    2002-01-01

    You know it is very hard after the Governor, State Bank, to make a presentation but I will try to do it in a very mundane way. You know the Regulatory Bodies specially in the Economic Sector in recent times. There has been a sort of resurgence, leaving aside the regulation of the financial sector, which has been doing very well. Our old memory of regulation is not so pleasant. Long ago, there used to be a transport Authority which used to dole out “Route Permits” as political favours, and the...

  11. Cyberplagiarism in University Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Cavanillas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the legal framework for plagiarism, and its twofold nature of illicit appropriation (from the author of the plagiarized work and fraud (with regard to the target audience of the plagiarism. Based on these premises, academic cyberplagiarism is analysed as a form of plagiarism carried out using electronic tools in the university setting. The question of responsibility (who can regulate the legal consequences of plagiarism? before and after the Ley Orgánica de Universidades (organic law on universities, LOU is studied, as is the disciplinary handling of cyberplagiarism with the limited regulations currently in place at universities.

  12. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  13. Nuclear safety regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Departmental Rules and The Safety Guides were issued by the NNSA in 1998. The NNSA performed the activities of propagation and implementation of nuclear safety regulations at QTNPP in order to improve the nuclear safety culture of operating organization and construct and contract organizations

  14. Emotion regulation during isolation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poláčková Šolcová, Iva; Šolcová, Iva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, Suppl. 1 (2012). ISSN 0020-7594. [International Congress of Psychology /30./. 22.07.2012-27.07.2012, Cape Town] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP407/11/2226 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : emotion regulation * isolation * Mars500 Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  15. International telecommunications market regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Productivity Commission

    2001-01-01

    On 23 February 1999 the Assistant Treasurer referred international telecommunic-ations market regulation for inquiry and report within six months. The report focused on the reform of international telecommunications markets, in particular on the payment arrangements between providers of international telecommunications services.

  16. Regulation after Bush

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn Robert; Passell Peter

    2008-01-01

    Barack Obama and John McCain have staked out very different positions on serious questions involving economic regulation everything from housing finance to alternative energy mandates but practical considerations will dissolve many of these differences, according to Robert Hahn and Peter Passell.

  17. Vehicle recycling regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smink, Carla

    2007-01-01

    The number of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) in the EU is increasing continously. Around 75 percent of an ELV are recyclable metals. The forecast growth in the number of ELVs calls for regulation that aims to minimise the environmental impact of a car. Using Denmark as an example, this article...

  18. Jordan Corporate Governance Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan Institute of Directors

    2013-01-01

    As the importance of Corporate Governance increases, an awareness and understanding of the different relevant regulations becomes of paramount value. The importance and value of Corporate Governance is not the core of this publication. The publication is built around the premise that Corporate Governance is important and increasingly becoming of significant importance for growth, continued...

  19. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wulp, Mariette Y. M.; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Groen, Albert K.

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-codin

  20. Legislation and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 3 of the document contains some details about the Brazilian legislation and regulation, the legislative and regulatory framework, regulatory body and responsibility of the license holder

  1. Regulating the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Byron

    2007-01-01

    The Internet's breakthrough to primetime usage beginning in the mid-1990s evolved in an era of openness. Unfettered access seemed key to Internet development. An important foundation for the 1996 Telecommunications Act was the theory that the telecom industry would work best if it were free of government regulation, a guiding principle that has…

  2. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  3. Regulating emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The presentation is designed for individuals who are involved in therapeutic administration of radioactive material and the implementation of the radiation safety programme. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has regulatory authority over the medical use of by-product material and the radiation from by-product material. The presentation will address how the NRC regulates new medical uses (i.e. emerging technologies) used in radiation oncology that are too new to be covered in the current regulations. NRC's process that allows licensees to get approved for these emerging technologies until regulations are promulgated for the new modalities will be described. The presentation will also cover NRC's reporting requirements for medical events and other radiation safety-related incidents. Some examples of errors that have occurred for these new NRC-regulated activities will be provided. The root causes in these events will be identified to prevent similar additional incidents from occurring in other facilities performing the same type of therapy. (author)

  4. Regulation of Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, George A.

    1985-01-01

    Explains relationships between energy intake and expenditure focusing on the cellular, chemical and neural mechanisms involved in regulation of energy balance. Information is referenced specifically to conditions of obesity. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  5. Regulating nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Parliament passed the Atomic Energy Control Act in 1946, it erected the framework for nuclear safety in Canada. Under the Act, the government created the Atomic Energy Control Board and gave it the authority to make and enforce regulations governing every aspect of nuclear power production and use in this country. The Act gives the Control Board the flexibility to amend its regulations to adapt to changes in technology, health and safety standards, co-operative agreements with provincial agencies and policy regarding trade in nuclear materials. This flexibility has allowed the Control Board to successfully regulate the nuclear industry for more than 40 years. Its mission statement 'to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment' concisely states the Control Board's primary objective. The Atomic Energy Control Board regulates all aspects of nuclear energy in Canada to ensure there is no undue risk to health, safety, security or the environment. It does this through a multi-stage licensing process

  6. Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator (LYST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaojie; Chang, Bo; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of vesicle trafficking to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) as well as regulation of the size of these organelles are critical to maintain their functions. Disruption of the lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) results in Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, prolonged bleeding, severe immunodeficiency, recurrent bacterial infection, neurologic dysfunction and hemophagocytic lympohistiocytosis (HLH). The classic diagnostic feature of the syndrome is enlarged LROs in all cell types, including lysosomes, melanosomes, cytolytic granules and platelet dense bodies. The most striking CHS ocular pathology observed is an enlargement of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which leads to aberrant distribution of eye pigmentation, and results in photophobia and decreased visual acuity. Understanding the molecular function of LYST and identification of its interacting partners may provide therapeutic targets for CHS and other diseases associated with the regulation of LRO size and/or vesicle trafficking, such as asthma, urticaria and Leishmania amazonensis infections. PMID:26427484

  7. Microarray Analysis of Rice d1 (RGA1) Mutant Reveals the Potential Role of G-Protein Alpha Subunit in Regulating Multiple Abiotic Stresses Such as Drought, Salinity, Heat, and Cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangam, Annie P; Pathak, Ravi R; Raghuram, Nandula

    2016-01-01

    , binding to nucleotides, carbohydrates, receptors and lipids, morphogenesis, flower development, and cell homeostasis. We also mined 63 miRNAs that bind to the stress responsive transcripts identified in this study, indicating their post-transcriptional regulation. Overall, these results indicate the potentially extensive role of RGA1 in the regulation of multiple abiotic stresses in rice for further validation. PMID:26858735

  8. Microarray Analysis of Rice d1 (RGA1) Mutant Reveals the Potential Role of G-Protein Alpha Subunit in Regulating Multiple Abiotic Stresses Such as Drought, Salinity, Heat, and Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangam, Annie P.; Pathak, Ravi R.; Raghuram, Nandula

    2016-01-01

    , binding to nucleotides, carbohydrates, receptors and lipids, morphogenesis, flower development, and cell homeostasis. We also mined 63 miRNAs that bind to the stress responsive transcripts identified in this study, indicating their post-transcriptional regulation. Overall, these results indicate the potentially extensive role of RGA1 in the regulation of multiple abiotic stresses in rice for further validation. PMID:26858735

  9. Inconsistent Regulators: Evidence From Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Sumit Agarwal; David Lucca; Amit Seru; Francesco Trebbi

    2012-01-01

    US state chartered commercial banks are supervised alternately by state and federal regulators. Each regulator supervises a given bank for a fixed time period according to a predetermined rotation schedule. We use unique data to examine differences between federal and state regulators for these banks. Federal regulators are significantly less lenient, downgrading supervisory ratings about twice as frequently as state supervisors. Under federal regulators, banks report higher nonperforming loa...

  10. Regulating the private security industry

    CERN Document Server

    Percy, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    The under-regulation of the private security industry has increasingly become a topic of media and academic interest. This Adelphi Paper enters the debate by explaining why the industry requires further regulation, and what is wrong with the current system. It begins by briefly defining the industry and explaining the need for more effective regulation, before analysing three types of regulation: domestic, international and informal (including self-regulation).

  11. Leadership and the Independent Regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Jamison, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Being a utility regulator has perils because the independence of the regulator necessarily removes power from politicians, operators, and others. Furthermore, regulators are sometimes scapegoats for unpopular policies and unavoidably become involved in shaping the policies that they are supposed to implement. As a result of such frictions, regulators are sometimes removed from office or marginalized in some way. How can regulators not only survive in such an environment, but also thrive? Jami...

  12. Coregulation of transcription factors and microRNAs in human transcriptional regulatory network

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Shui-Tein; Fuh Chiou-Shann; Chen Cho-Yi; Juan Hsueh-Fen; Huang Hsuan-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recent studies have suggested that miRNAs and transcription factors are primary metazoan gene regulators; however, the crosstalk between them still remains unclear. Methods We proposed a novel model utilizing functional annotation information to identify significant coregulation between transcriptional and post-transcriptional layers. Based on this model, function-en...

  13. Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 regulates calpain activity and the degradation of cyclooxygenase-2 in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongzheng; Schneider, Ryan A; Shah, Vaibhav; Huang, Yongcheng; Likhotvorik, Rostislav I; Keshvara, Lakhu; Hoyt, Dale G

    2009-01-01

    Background The peptidyl-proline isomerase, Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 (PIN1), regulates turnover of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in murine aortic endothelial cells (MAEC) stimulated with E. coli endotoxin (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN). Degradation of iNOS was reduced by a calpain inhibitor, suggesting that PIN1 may affect induction of other calpain-sensitive inflammatory proteins, such as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, in MAEC. Methods MAEC, transduced with lentivirus encoding an inactive control short hairpin (sh) RNA or one targeting PIN1 that reduced PIN1 by 85%, were used. Cells were treated with LPS/IFN, calpain inhibitors (carbobenzoxy-valinyl-phenylalaninal (zVF), PD150606), cycloheximide and COX inhibitors to determine the effect of PIN1 depletion on COX-2 and calpain. Results LPS or IFN alone did not induce COX-2. However, treatment with 10 μg LPS plus 20 ng IFN per ml induced COX-2 protein 10-fold in Control shRNA MAEC. Induction was significantly greater (47-fold) in PIN1 shRNA cells. COX-2-dependent prostaglandin E2 production increased 3-fold in KD MAEC, but did not increase in Control cells. The additional increase in COX-2 protein due to PIN1 depletion was post-transcriptional, as induction of COX-2 mRNA by LPS/IFN was the same in cells containing or lacking PIN1. Instead, the loss of COX-2 protein, after treatment with cycloheximide to block protein synthesis, was reduced in cells lacking PIN1 in comparison with Control cells, indicating that degradation of the enzyme was reduced. zVF and PD150606 each enhanced the induction of COX-2 by LPS/IFN. zVF also slowed the loss of COX-2 after treatment with cycloheximide, and COX-2 was degraded by exogenous μ-calpain in vitro. In contrast to iNOS, physical interaction between COX-2 and PIN1 was not detected, suggesting that effects of PIN1 on calpain, rather than COX-2 itself, affect COX-2 degradation. While cathepsin activity was unaltered, depletion of PIN1 reduced calpain activity

  14. Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 regulates calpain activity and the degradation of cyclooxygenase-2 in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likhotvorik Rostislav I

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peptidyl-proline isomerase, Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 (PIN1, regulates turnover of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in murine aortic endothelial cells (MAEC stimulated with E. coli endotoxin (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN. Degradation of iNOS was reduced by a calpain inhibitor, suggesting that PIN1 may affect induction of other calpain-sensitive inflammatory proteins, such as cyclooxygenase (COX-2, in MAEC. Methods MAEC, transduced with lentivirus encoding an inactive control short hairpin (sh RNA or one targeting PIN1 that reduced PIN1 by 85%, were used. Cells were treated with LPS/IFN, calpain inhibitors (carbobenzoxy-valinyl-phenylalaninal (zVF, PD150606, cycloheximide and COX inhibitors to determine the effect of PIN1 depletion on COX-2 and calpain. Results LPS or IFN alone did not induce COX-2. However, treatment with 10 μg LPS plus 20 ng IFN per ml induced COX-2 protein 10-fold in Control shRNA MAEC. Induction was significantly greater (47-fold in PIN1 shRNA cells. COX-2-dependent prostaglandin E2 production increased 3-fold in KD MAEC, but did not increase in Control cells. The additional increase in COX-2 protein due to PIN1 depletion was post-transcriptional, as induction of COX-2 mRNA by LPS/IFN was the same in cells containing or lacking PIN1. Instead, the loss of COX-2 protein, after treatment with cycloheximide to block protein synthesis, was reduced in cells lacking PIN1 in comparison with Control cells, indicating that degradation of the enzyme was reduced. zVF and PD150606 each enhanced the induction of COX-2 by LPS/IFN. zVF also slowed the loss of COX-2 after treatment with cycloheximide, and COX-2 was degraded by exogenous μ-calpain in vitro. In contrast to iNOS, physical interaction between COX-2 and PIN1 was not detected, suggesting that effects of PIN1 on calpain, rather than COX-2 itself, affect COX-2 degradation. While cathepsin activity was unaltered, depletion of PIN1

  15. Markets, religion, regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    of regulation, certification and standardization on a global scale. Building on research on global kosher (a Hebrew term meaning “fit” or “proper”), halal (an Arabic word that literally means “permissible” or “lawful”) and Hindu vegetarianism this paper argues that these economies or markets to a...... large extent are conditioned by and themselves condition forms of transnational governmentality, that is, new and often overlapping practices of government and grassroots politics. I explore religious economies and markets at three interrelated levels of the social scale: state and non-state regulation......Most recent scholarship on moral economies or religious markets argues for the compatibility of economies/markets and religious practices in particular national or regional contexts. However, over the last couple of decades or so religious markets have entered a new phase characterized by new forms...

  16. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  17. Volume Regulation in Epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    We review studies on regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and regulatory volume increase (RVI) of major ion and water transporting vertebrate epithelia. The rate of RVD and RVI is faster in cells of high osmotic permeability like amphibian gallbladder and mammalian proximal tubule as compared to...... amphibian skin and mammalian cortical collecting tubule of low and intermediate osmotic permeability. Crosstalk between entrance and exit mechanisms interferes with volume regulation both at aniso-osmotic and iso-osmotic volume perturbations. It has been proposed that cell volume regulation is an intrinsic...... function of iso-osmotic fluid transport that depends on Na+ recirculation. The causative relationship is discussed for a fluid-absorbing and a fluid-secreting epithelium of which the Na+ recirculation mechanisms have been identified. A large number of transporters and ion channels involved in cell volume...

  18. Auditing and Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Pettinicchio, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Effective financial reporting has become of critical importance in our economic markets and the international accounting scandals of the last decades have accentuated the role of auditing in protecting stakeholders' interests and contributing to an efficient functioning of financial markets. Auditing regulation has been at the centre of recent international debates (e.g. EU Green paper; 2010) and different regulatory interventions have been put in place in different countries and in different...

  19. POTENT REGULATORS OF METABOLISM

    OpenAIRE

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Yang, Kryscilla Jian Zhang; Lee, Seung-Ah; Yuen, Jason J.; Blaner, William S.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its analogs) are highly potent regulators of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Because of these activities, retinoids have been most extensively studied in the contexts of embryonic development and of proliferative diseases, especially cancer and skin disease. Recently, there has been considerable new research interest focused on gaining understanding of the roles that retinoids and/or retinoid-related proteins may have in the development of met...

  20. Human telomerase activity regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wojtyla, Aneta; Gladych, Marta; Rubis, Blazej

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase has been recognized as a relevant factor distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells. Thus, it has become a very promising target for anticancer therapy. The cell proliferative potential can be limited by replication end problem, due to telomeres shortening, which is overcome in cancer cells by telomerase activity or by alternative telomeres lengthening (ALT) mechanism. However, this multisubunit enzymatic complex can be regulated at various levels, including expression control b...

  1. Regulating hate speech online

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, James

    2010-01-01

    The exponential growth in the Internet as a means of communication has been emulated by an increase in far-right and extremist web sites and hate based activity in cyberspace. The anonymity and mobility afforded by the Internet has made harassment and expressions of hate effortless in a landscape that is abstract and beyond the realms of traditional law enforcement. This paper examines the complexities of regulating hate speech on the Internet through legal and technological frameworks. It ex...

  2. Iron regulation by hepcidin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Ningning; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A

    2013-01-01

    Hepcidin is a key hormone that is involved in the control of iron homeostasis in the body. Physiologically, hepcidin is controlled by iron stores, inflammation, hypoxia, and erythropoiesis. The regulation of hepcidin expression by iron is a complex process that requires the coordination of multiple proteins, including hemojuvelin, bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6), hereditary hemochromatosis protein, transferrin receptor 2, matriptase-2, neogenin, BMP receptors, and transferrin. Misregulati...

  3. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably cons...

  4. The regulation of hunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildtrup, Jens; Jensen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a tax/subsidy on hunters based on game population. The tax/subsidy is the difference between actual and optimal population multiplied by an individual, variable tax rate. The tax rate is, among other things, based on the difference between the marginal value of the game...... population to the hunter and the regulator and differences in user costs of the population. The paper shows that the population tax/subsidy secures a first-best optimum....

  5. Cyberplagiarism in University Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago Cavanillas

    2008-01-01

    The article examines the legal framework for plagiarism, and its twofold nature of illicit appropriation (from the author of the plagiarized work) and fraud (with regard to the target audience of the plagiarism). Based on these premises, academic cyberplagiarism is analysed as a form of plagiarism carried out using electronic tools in the university setting. The question of responsibility (who can regulate the legal consequences of plagiarism?) before and after the Ley Orgánica de Universidad...

  6. Fibronectin Mechanobiology Regulates Tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Karin; Seo, Bo Ri; Fischbach, Claudia; Gourdon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is an essential extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein involved in both physiological and pathological processes. The structure–function relationship of Fn has been and is still being studied, as changes in its molecular structure are integral in regulating (or dysregulating) its biological activities via its cell, matrix component, and growth factor binding sites. Fn comprises three types of repeating modules; among them, FnIII modules are mechanically unstable domains that...

  7. Beyond State Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Madanat, Philip; Pies, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Holding the news media accountable has traditionally been a task of the state in Jordan. Media laws and regulations are numerous and do not leave too much space for self-regulatory practices on a national basis. The Jordan Press Association (JPA) is the core of so-called established media accountability institutions. It conducted a law-like code of ethics in 2003 and runs ombuds committees (currently three) dealing with mishaps of the media to prevent journalists from legal liability. Thou...

  8. Improving CS regulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesse, R.J.; Scheer, R.M.; Marasco, A.L.; Furey, R.

    1980-10-01

    President Carter issued Executive Order 12044 (3/28/78) that required all Federal agencies to distinguish between significant and insignificant regulations, and to determine whether a regulation will result in major impacts. This study gathered information on the impact of the order and the guidelines on the Office of Conservation and Solar Energy (CS) regulatory practices, investigated problems encountered by the CS staff when implementing the order and guidelines, and recommended solutions to resolve these problems. Major tasks accomplished and discussed are: (1) legislation, Executive Orders, and DOE Memoranda concerning Federal administrative procedures relevant to the development and analysis of regulations within CS reviewed; (2) relevant DOE Orders and Memoranda analyzed and key DOE and CS staff interviewed in order to accurately describe the current CS regulatory process; (3) DOE staff from the Office of the General Counsel, the Office of Policy and Evaluation, the Office of the Environment, and the Office of the Secretary interviewed to explore issues and problems encountered with current CS regulatory practices; (4) the regulatory processes at five other Federal agencies reviewed in order to see how other agencies have approached the regulatory process, dealt with specific regulatory problems, and responded to the Executive Order; and (5) based on the results of the preceding four tasks, recommendations for potential solutions to the CS regulatory problems developed. (MCW)

  9. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  10. Taiwan Regulation of Biobanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chien-Te; Hung, Tzu-Hsun; Yeh, Chan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces legal framework and governance structure in relation to the management and development of biobanks in Taiwan. At first, we briefly describe Taiwan's population, political system and health care system. Secondly, this research introduces biobanking framework of Taiwan including 25 biobanks established with the approval of the Ministry of Health and Welfare. In those biobanks, "Taiwan Biobank" is the first and the largest government-supported biobank which comprises population-based cohort study and disease- oriented study. Since the collection of information, data, and biological specimen of biobanks often involve highly sensitive personal information, in the legal framework of Taiwan, there is a specific regulation, "Human Biobank Management Act" (HBMA), which plays an important role in regulating biobanks in Taiwan. HBMA, the Personal Information Act and other regulations constitute a comprehensive legal and regulatory privacy framework of biobanks. Through the introduction and analysis of the current legal framework applicable to biobanks, we found that there are several challenges that need to be solved appropriately that involve duplicate review systems, the obstacles in the international collaboration, and data sharing between biobanks in Taiwan. PMID:26711420

  11. Whither tobacco product regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Ann; Hammond, David; Gartner, Coral

    2012-03-01

    Despite decades of industry innovation and regulatory efforts, the harmfulness of conventional cigarettes has not changed. There are several pitfalls in this area, including the long time lag before health impacts of product regulatory changes become apparent, the danger of consumers deriving false reassurance of lesser harm in the interim period, the lack of relevant expertise and the lack of an internationally agreed and evidence-based strategic approach. Articles 9 and 10 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provide the potential for such a global strategy, and knowledge and research has increased significantly over recent years. However, there are huge opportunity costs in implementing product disclosure and regulatory strategies: most national regulators have very limited human and financial resources, which should be focused on other evidence-based tobacco control interventions. We believe therefore that it is now time to abandon the notion of safe or safer cigarettes while moving consumers towards cleaner nicotine products as soon as possible. In parallel to this, we recommend a number of other strategies be implemented including: reducing the appeal of all tobacco products, forbidding new tobacco products or brand variants being marketed without evidence of reduced harm, appeal or addictiveness, and developing a tobacco industry resourced, but industry independent, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control global repository to assist national regulators in understanding and regulating the products on their markets. PMID:22345253

  12. The international radioactive transportation regulations: A model for national regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Series No. 6 (herein after denoted as the ''International Regulations'') serve as the model for the regulations for individual countries and international modal organizations controlling the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to outline the background and history of the International Regulations, the general principles behind the requirements of the International Regulations, the structure and general contents of the latest edition of the International Regulations, and the roles of various international bodies in the development and implementation of the International Regulations and the current status of regulatory and supportive document development at both the international and domestic level. This review will provide a basis for users and potential users to better understand the source and application of the International Regulations. 1 tab

  13. Nuclear regulation in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key prerequisite to the development of a nuclear program to provide a country's electricity is that governments and the public are confident that a nuclear accident 'will not occur' over the whole life of the program. This can only be achieved by three elements being equally strong: an excellent design, a highly competent and safety conscious operator, and a strong competent regulator with appropriate legal powers. This paper will outline what is necessary to achieve the third of these prerequisites. It will outline the principles by which a Regulatory Agency ensures that licensees meet their responsibility for the safety of their nuclear plant, based on both internationally accepted ideas, the Nuclear Safety Convention, and Canadian practice. The paper will cover legislative principles -- what to include in legislation, what to include in regulations, and what to include in standards and guides. The problem of 'prescriptive requirements' versus 'general performance statements' in regulations will be addressed, and the implications of this problem on ensuring licensees retain responsibility for safety, and on licensees' desire for a high degree of certainty in what is expected of them, both to get a licence and to keep it, in today's economic climate. The paper will also address compliance and the differences between the lawyers' definition of compliance (meeting specific requirements defined by law) and the nuclear safety engineers' view of compliance, (meeting commitments made at the time a licence was given), and how these views can be reconciled. The paper will discuss how Canada's new Nuclear Safety and Control Act has addressed some of these issues, and how the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission is implementing the new Act. The issue of transfer of regulatory programs and technology to the regulatory agencies of countries buying a nuclear plant from Canadian companies will be discussed, and examples given of how this has been accomplished to the benefit of

  14. Situated bio-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prainsack, Barbara; Wahlberg, Ayo

    2013-01-01

    Several years ago, both authors engaged in research into bioscience and biomedical regulation in Asian countries. One of us (BP) explored why the regulatory and discursive embedding of human embryonic stem cell in Israel was much more permissive than elsewhere. The other author (AW) sought to und...... case studies meant bringing what we call ‘ethnographic sensibility’ to our research. This paper discusses the implications of this approach, which often entails rendering visible the contradictions and ‘disorders’ in what seems coherent and orderly....

  15. Regulering og simulering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen-Thøde, Mogens

    Dette notat er primært udarbejdet til brug i undervisningen i kurset Energisystemer og Regulering pa civilingeniørlinien lndeklima og Energiøkonomi på Aalborg Universitet, hvilket naturligvis sætter sit spor bade i omfang og udvælgelse af emner. Hensigten er at give en introduktion til det teoret...... teoretiske grundlag for reguleringsteknikken samtidig med en indføring i simulering af dynamiske systemer, således at læseren får en rimelig forståelse af dynamiske systemers virkemåde og karakteristika....

  16. Ionising radiations regulations 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (UK) Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 come into force on 1.1.86 with supporting Approved Code of Practice. They are discussed under the headings: introduction; notifications to start work with ionising radiations; dose limitation (ALARP -as low as reasonably practicable); designation of controlled and supervised areas; Radiation Protection Advisers to be appointed by employers; Local Rules; Radiation Protection Supervisors to be appointed by employers from among employees; instruction and training; dosimetry and medical surveillance; control of radioactive substances; radiation monitoring; assessment of hazards; articles and equipment. (U.K.)

  17. FACTORS REGULATING LIBERAL TRANSLATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚海红

    2012-01-01

    Literal translation and liberal translation are two important methods and both play key roles in translation.However,some textbooks say that most translations are literal translations while others maintain most are liberal ones,besides,some others suggest a combination of the two.This paper focuses on the facts that regulate liberal translation.Because of the differences in culture,society,history,geography,and so on,there exists a great difference between Chinese language and English language,which does naturally lead to the liberal translation.

  18. The regulation of hunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildtrup, Jens; Jensen, Frank

    multiplied by an individual, variable tax rate. The variable tax rate is, among other things, based on the difference in marginal value of the population between the hunter and the regulator. The paper shows that the population tax/subsidy secures a first-best optimum. Thus, the population tax is a good...... of the individual harvest. However, information about the individual harvest may be costly to obtain. Thus, we may have to look for alternatives to the existing system. This paper proposes a population tax/subsidy as an alternative which is the difference between the actual and optimal population...

  19. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes accomplishments over the past year on understanding of terpene synthesis in mint plants and sage. Specifically reported are the fractionation of 4-S-limonene synthetase, the enzyme responsible for the first committed step to monoterpene synthesis, along with isolation of the corresponding RNA and DNA cloning of its gene; the localization of the enzyme within the oil glands, regulation of transcription and translation of the synthetase, the pathway to camphor biosynthesis,a nd studies on the early stages and branch points of the isoprenoid pathway.

  20. Wiring regulations in brief

    CERN Document Server

    Tricker, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Tired of trawling through the Wiring Regs?Perplexed by Part P?Confused by cables, conductors and circuits?Then look no further! This handy guide provides an on-the-job reference source for Electricians, Designers, Service Engineers, Inspectors, Builders, Students, DIY enthusiastsTopic-based chapters link areas of working practice - such as cables, installations, testing and inspection, special locations - with the specifics of the Regulations themselves. This allows quick and easy identification of the official requirements relating to the situati

  1. REGULATION OF VASCULOGENESIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.B.D. AbbottReproductive Toxicology Division, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by a complex, interactive family of receptors and lig...

  2. Self-Regulation in School

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Ulrike Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Successful self-regulation depends on the ability to regulate the self both motivationally and emotionally in order to protect the self and the learning process against competing personal needs as well as situational distractions. Successful self-regulation further requires students to adequately use metacognitive and cognitive learning strategies to organize the learning process efficiently. The studies presented in this dissertation focus on students' strategies for regulating themselves in...

  3. Mergers in Regulated Industries: Electricity

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis W. Carlton

    2007-01-01

    Mergers in any industry can raise complicated questions about the elimination of competition and the achievement of efficiencies. Mergers in regulated industries such as electricity raise even more complicated issues as the analyst needs to grapple with the constraining effects of regulation, multiple levels of regulation, the ability to evade regulation, and the desire for efficiency. This paper discusses the electricity industry in general and one particular electricity merger that the U.S....

  4. Strategic Behaviour under Regulation Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Nillesen, Paul; Michael G. Pollitt

    2003-01-01

    Liberalisation of generation and supply activities in the electricity sectors is often followed by regulatory reform of distribution networks. In order to improve the efficiency of distribution utilities, some regulators have adopted incentive regulation schemes that rely on performance benchmarking. Although regulation benchmarking can influence the ?regulation game?, the subject has received limited attention. This paper discusses how strategic behaviour can result in inefficient behav...

  5. Nuclear regulation - the Canadian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the Atomic Energy Control Board was established 35 years ago the basic philosophy of nuclear regulation in Canada and the underlying principles of the regulatory process remain essentially unchanged. This paper outlines the Canadian approach to nuclear regulation and explains in practical terms how the principles of regulation are applied. (author)

  6. The Arabidopsis translocator protein (AtTSPO is regulated at multiple levels in response to salt stress and perturbations in tetrapyrrole metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umen James G

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO, previously known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR, is important for many cellular functions in mammals and bacteria, such as steroid biosynthesis, cellular respiration, cell proliferation, apoptosis, immunomodulation, transport of porphyrins and anions. Arabidopsis thaliana contains a single TSPO/PBR-related gene with a 40 amino acid N-terminal extension compared to its homologs in bacteria or mammals suggesting it might be chloroplast or mitochondrial localized. Results To test if the TSPO N-terminal extension targets it to organelles, we fused three potential translational start sites in the TSPO cDNA to the N-terminus of GFP (AtTSPO:eGFP. The location of the AtTSPO:eGFP fusion protein was found to depend on the translational start position and the conditions under which plants were grown. Full-length AtTSPO:eGFP fusion protein was found in the endoplasmic reticulum and in vesicles of unknown identity when plants were grown in standard conditions. However, full length AtTSPO:eGFP localized to chloroplasts when grown in the presence of 150 mM NaCl, conditions of salt stress. In contrast, when AtTSPO:eGFP was truncated to the second or third start codon at amino acid position 21 or 42, the fusion protein co-localized with a mitochondrial marker in standard conditions. Using promoter GUS fusions, qRT-PCR, fluorescent protein tagging, and chloroplast fractionation approaches, we demonstrate that AtTSPO levels are regulated at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational levels in response to abiotic stress conditions. Salt-responsive genes are increased in a tspo-1 knock-down mutant compared to wild type under conditions of salt stress, while they are decreased when AtTSPO is overexpressed. Mutations in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis genes and the application of chlorophyll or carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitors also affect AtTSPO expression. Conclusion Our

  7. Transformer 2β and miR-204 regulate apoptosis through competitive binding to 3' UTR of BCL2 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Y; Nishida, K; Kajita, K; Satake, Y; Akaike, Y; Fujita, K; Kano, S; Masuda, K; Rokutan, K

    2015-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs are potent post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Human transformer 2β (Tra2β) is a serine/arginine-rich-like protein splicing factor and is now implicated to have wide-ranging roles in gene expression as an RNA-binding protein. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) with an anti-Tra2β antibody and microarray analysis identified a subset of Tra2β-associated mRNAs in HCT116 human colon cancer cells, many of which encoded cell death-related proteins including Bcl-2 (B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2). Tra2β knockdown in HCT116 cells decreased Bcl-2 expression and induced apoptosis. Tra2β knockdown accelerated the decay of BCL2α mRNA that encodes Bcl-2 and full-length 3' UTR, while it did not affect the stability of BCL2β mRNA having a short, alternatively spliced 3' UTR different from BCL2α 3' UTR. RIP assays with anti-Tra2β and anti-Argonaute 2 antibodies, respectively, showed that Tra2β bound to BCL2α 3' UTR, and that Tra2β knockdown facilitated association of miR-204 with BCL2α 3' UTR. The consensus sequence (GAA) for Tra2β-binding lies within the miR-204-binding site of BCL2 3' UTR. Mutation of the consensus sequence canceled the binding of Tra2β to BCL2 3' UTR without disrupting miR-204-binding to BCL2 3' UTR. Transfection of an anti-miR-204 or introduction of three-point mutations into the miR-204-binding site increased BCL2 mRNA and Bcl-2 protein levels. Inversely, transfection of precursor miR-204 reduced their levels. Experiments with Tra2β-silenced or overexpressed cells revealed that Tra2β antagonized the effects of miR-204 and upregulated Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, TRA2β mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in 22 colon cancer tissues compared with paired normal tissues and positively correlated with BCL2 mRNA expression. Tra2β knockdown in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) increased their sensitivity to anticancer drugs. Taken together, our findings suggest that Tra2β regulates apoptosis by

  8. Regulation of toll-like receptors 3, 7 and 9 in porcine alveolar macrophages by different genotype 1 strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzemtseva, Liudmila; de la Torre, Eugenia; Martín, Gerard; Soldevila, Ferran; Ait-Ali, Tahar; Mateu, Enric; Darwich, Laila

    2014-04-15

    stimulated TLR3 expression. These observations suggest that at least TLR3 is regulated differentially by different genotype 1 PRRSV strains and this seems to be related apparently to the replication levels of each strain, as well as, to the TNF-α inducing capability. The fact that mRNA transcripts were kept constant also suggests that this regulation occurs at a post-transcriptional level. PMID:24534144

  9. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

  10. Regulation of ATM induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: ATM, the tumour suppressor protein mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia, is of pivotal importance in controlling the cells primary response to ionising radiation (IR) induced DNA damage. Mutations in ATM which reduce the level of the ATM protein and/or compromise ATM functions are known to give rise to radiosensitivity and defective cell cycle checkpoint control. In response to DNA damage ATM kinase is rapidly activated and initiates downstream signalling to cell cycle control molecules including p53. To investigate additional mechanisms of ATM control we have employed ATM antisense expression in cultured cells, western analyses and immunohistochemistry in situ. We report that ATM can be up-regulated up to 10-fold following exposure to low levels of ionising radiation. ATM radiation-induction was radiation dose dependent while the rapidity of the response indicates a post translational pathway. The concurrent time frames for the radiation-induction of ATM levels and the activation of ATM kinase activity appear to be complimentary in boosting ATM's protective response to IR induced DNA damage, especially in ATM 'low expressing' systems. We also provide the first report of ATM misregulation in 2 cancer patients, indicating that ATM is not only radio-protective but has possible implications in cancer, particularly breast cancer. These results have particular importance in defining the regulation of the ATM protein as an: adaptive radio-response; radio-prognostic market in tumours and normal tissue, and breast cancer marker

  11. Regulation as delegation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Bar-Gill

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to consider the conception of reverse delegation when the government acts a principal and an individual ndash an agent from the point of view of behavioral PrincipalAgent Theory. Methods statistical method sociological polling. Results In diverse areas ndash from retirement savings to consumer credit to prescription drug use to fuel economy and energy efficiency rules to tobacco consumption to food and beverage consumption ndash government makes decisions for us or endeavors to help us make better decisions thus serving as our agent. From the point of view of PrincipalAgent Theory and behavioral PrincipalAgent Theory a great deal of modern regulation can be helpfully evaluated as a hypothetical delegation. Shifting from personal decisions to public goods problems the authors view the idea of reverse delegation with the government as principal and the individuals as agents. They show that the essence of delegation changes depending on the context. The article describes conditions under which various approaches will make sense. Scientific novelty the paper is devoted to the foreign experience of regulation through delegation by the example of a country with developed market economy the USA. It shows the prospects of such approach in solving both the public and the private tasks. Application of PrincipalAgent Theory and behavioral PrincipalAgent Theory is viewed to distinguish between such types of hypothetical delegation as information default rules incentives precommitments mandates and prohibitions. The article considers the benefits and costs of delegation and circumstances in which one or another approach makes sense. Practical significance PrincipalAgent Theory is widely used in economics and political science and can serve as a convenient tool to consider the optimal scale and essence of the assistance rendered to us by the government as our agent. The paper is of interest for the Russian legal science as the institution of

  12. A pressure regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device for regulating the pressure of a gas in a glove box comprises a resiliently biassed pressure sensitive diaphragm and a spool valve operable by deflection of the diaphragm. The diaphragm is arranged to be exposed on one side to atmospheric pressure and on the other side to the pressure of the gas in the glove box, and the spool valve is used to control simultaneously the rates at which gas is pumped in and out of the glove box. The valve spool has two axially spaced circumferential grooves A, B which provide communication between conduits C, D and E, F respectively, the flow control along each path being effected by means of apertures in a sleeve within which the spool slides. (author)

  13. NCAM regulates cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna;

    2002-01-01

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells...... independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment to a...... fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine...

  14. Views of the regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to remember what the concept and objective of optimization are and the role of dose constraints. In relation to exposures from any particular source within a practice, radiation protection shall be optimized so that the magnitude of individual doses, except for therapeutic medical exposures, the number of exposed people and the likelihood of incurring exposures will all be kept 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA), economic and social factors being taken into account, within the restriction that the dose to individuals delivered by the source be subject to dose constraints. Dose constraints and dose limits to occupational exposures are necessary since the workers are not the direct beneficiaries of the exposures and the optimization procedures based on collective doses could result in inequities. The dose constraint has the secondary function of ensuring that the sum of the doses that an individual received from different practices to which the individual can be exposed does not exceed the dose limit. Before discussing co-operation, it is fundamental to provide a description of the role and responsibilities of the regulatory authority, employers and workers. The role and responsibilities of the regulatory authority in establishing regulations, granting authorizations, undertaking inspections, ensuring enforcement, and dealing with accidents and emergencies are set by the national legislation. To achieve this objective, the licensee is required to use, to the extent practicable, procedures and engineering controls that are based upon sound radiation protection and safety principles. The regulations establish that the licensees and employers of workers who are engaged in activities that involve or could involve occupational exposure shall be responsible for the protection of these workers against any occupational exposure that is not excluded from regulatory control

  15. TFEB regulates lysosomal proteostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wensi; Wang, Fan; Savini, Marzia; Ake, Ashley; di Ronza, Alberto; Sardiello, Marco; Segatori, Laura

    2013-05-15

    Loss-of-function diseases are often caused by destabilizing mutations that lead to protein misfolding and degradation. Modulating the innate protein homeostasis (proteostasis) capacity may lead to rescue of native folding of the mutated variants, thereby ameliorating the disease phenotype. In lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), a number of highly prevalent alleles have missense mutations that do not impair the enzyme's catalytic activity but destabilize its native structure, resulting in the degradation of the misfolded protein. Enhancing the cellular folding capacity enables rescuing the native, biologically functional structure of these unstable mutated enzymes. However, proteostasis modulators specific for the lysosomal system are currently unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and function, in modulating lysosomal proteostasis in LSDs. We show that TFEB activation results in enhanced folding, trafficking and lysosomal activity of a severely destabilized glucocerebrosidase (GC) variant associated with the development of Gaucher disease (GD), the most common LSD. TFEB specifically induces the expression of GC and of key genes involved in folding and lysosomal trafficking, thereby enhancing both the pool of mutated enzyme and its processing through the secretory pathway. TFEB activation also rescues the activity of a β-hexosaminidase mutant associated with the development of another LSD, Tay-Sachs disease, thus suggesting general applicability of TFEB-mediated proteostasis modulation to rescue destabilizing mutations in LSDs. In summary, our findings identify TFEB as a specific regulator of lysosomal proteostasis and suggest that TFEB may be used as a therapeutic target to rescue enzyme homeostasis in LSDs. PMID:23393155

  16. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, R.

    1989-11-09

    Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

  17. Genome-Wide Survey of MicroRNA - Transcription Factor Feed-Forward Regulatory Circuits in Human

    OpenAIRE

    Re, Angela; Cora, Davide; Taverna, Daniela; Caselle, Michele

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we describe a computational framework for the genome-wide identification and characterization of mixed transcriptional/post-transcriptional regulatory circuits in humans. We concentrated in particular on feed-forward loops (FFL), in which a master transcription factor regulates a microRNA, and together with it, a set of joint target protein coding genes. The circuits were assembled with a two step procedure. We first constructed separately the transcriptional and post-transcript...

  18. Light-harvesting complex gene expression is controlled by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms during photoacclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    CERN Document Server

    Durnford Dion, G; McKim, Sarah M; Sarchfield, Michelle L

    2003-01-01

    To compensate for increases in photon flux density (PFD), photosynthetic organisms possess mechanisms for reversibly modulating their photosynthetic apparatus to minimize photodamage. The photoacclimation response in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was assessed following a 10-fold increase in PFD over 24h. In addition to a 50% reduction in the amount of chlorophyll and light-harvesting complexes (LHC) per cell, the expression of genes encoding polypeptides of the light-harvesting antenna were also affected. The abundance of Lhcb (a LHCH gene), Lhcb4 (a CP29-like gene), and Lhca (a LHCI gene) transcripts were reduced by 65 to 80%, within 1-2 h; however, the RNA levels of all three genes recovered to their low-light (LL) concentrations within 6-8 h. To determine the role of transcript turnover in this transient decline in abundance, the stability of all transcripts was measured. Although there was no change in the Lhcb or Lhca transcript turnover time, the Lhcb4 mRNA stability decreased 2.5-fold immediately following...

  19. Post-transcriptional control of Amblyomin-X on secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and expression of adhesion molecules in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, C C; Dias, R Y; Branco, V G; Cavalcante, M F; Souza, J G; Abdalla, D S P; Chudzinski-Tavassi, A M; Farsky, S H P

    2015-07-01

    Angiogenesis is a pivotal process of homeostasis and tissue repair, but it also favours neovascularisation syndromes and cancer nutrition. The chemical mediation of angiogenesis is complex, involving a balance between serine proteases and their inhibitors. We addressed the mechanisms of action of a Kunitz serine protease inhibitor (KPI) on spontaneous angiogenesis, using Amblyomin-X, a KPI designed from the cDNA library of the Amblyomma cajennense tick. Amblyomin-X treatment (10-1000 ng/10 μL; each 48 h; 3 times) reduced the number of vessels in the subcutaneous dorsal tissue of male Swiss mice, as measured by intravital microscopy, haematoxylin-eosin staining, and PECAM-1 immunofluorescence labeling. Incubation of Amblyomin-X with t-End endothelial cells, a murine endothelial microvascular lineage, did not alter cell proliferation, cell-cycle phases, necrosis and apoptosis, and the production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. Nevertheless, Amblyomin-X treatment reduced t-End migration and adhesion to Matrigel(®), and inhibited the VEGF-A secretion and VCAM-1 and β3 integrin expressions by posttranscriptional pathways. Together, data herein outline novel posttranscriptional mechanisms of KPIs on endothelial cells during angiogenesis and point out the possible application of Amblyomin-X as a local inhibitor to undesired neovascularisation process. PMID:25912945

  20. SSR markers in transcripts of genes linked to post-transcriptional and transcriptional regulatory functions during vegetative and reproductive development of Elaeis guineensis

    OpenAIRE

    Tranbarger Timothy; Kluabmongkol Wanwisa; Sangsrakru Duangjai; Morcillo Fabienne; Tregear James W; Tragoonrung Somvong; Billotte Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is a perennial monocotyledonous tropical crop species that is now the world's number one source of edible vegetable oil, and the richest dietary source of provitamin A. While new elite genotypes from traditional breeding programs provide steady yield increases, the long selection cycle (10-12 years) and the large areas required to cultivate oil palm make genetic improvement slow and labor intensive. Molecular breeding programs have th...