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Sample records for cave-dwelling harvestmen opiliones

  1. Repeated and time-correlated morphological convergence in cave-dwelling harvestmen (Opiliones, Laniatores from Montane Western North America.

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    Shahan Derkarabetian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many cave-dwelling animal species display similar morphologies (troglomorphism that have evolved convergent within and among lineages under the similar selective pressures imposed by cave habitats. Here we study such ecomorphological evolution in cave-dwelling Sclerobuninae harvestmen (Opiliones from the western United States, providing general insights into morphological homoplasy, rates of morphological change, and the temporal context of cave evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We gathered DNA sequence data from three independent gene regions, and combined these data with Bayesian hypothesis testing, morphometrics analysis, study of penis morphology, and relaxed molecular clock analyses. Using multivariate morphometric analysis, we find that phylogenetically unrelated taxa have convergently evolved troglomorphism; alternative phylogenetic hypotheses involving less morphological convergence are not supported by Bayesian hypothesis testing. In one instance, this morphology is found in specimens from a high-elevation stony debris habitat, suggesting that troglomorphism can evolve in non-cave habitats. We discovered a strong positive relationship between troglomorphy index and relative divergence time, making it possible to predict taxon age from morphology. Most of our time estimates for the origin of highly-troglomorphic cave forms predate the Pleistocene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While several regions in the eastern and central United States are well-known hotspots for cave evolution, few modern phylogenetic studies have addressed the evolution of cave-obligate species in the western United States. Our integrative studies reveal the recurrent evolution of troglomorphism in a perhaps unexpected geographic region, at surprisingly deep time depths, and in sometimes surprising habitats. Because some newly discovered troglomorphic populations represent undescribed species, our findings stress the need for further biological

  2. Fossil harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones from Bitterfeld amber

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    Jason Dunlop

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fossil harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones: Dyspnoi and Eupnoi are described from Bitterfeld amber, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany deposited in the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin. The exact age of this amber has been in dispute, but recent work suggests it is youngest Palaeogene (Oligocene: Chattian. Histricostoma tuberculatum (Koch & Berendt, 1854, Caddo dentipalpus (Koch & Berendt, 1854, Dicranopalpus ramiger (Koch & Berendt, 1854 and Leiobunum longipes Menge, 1854 – all of which are also known from Eocene Baltic amber – are reported from Bitterfeld amber for the first time. They support the idea that both ambers sampled a similar terrestrial arthropod fauna: irrespective of any difference in age. Mitostoma gruberi sp. n. and Amilenus deltshevi sp. n. are described as new. One fossil is, in our opinion, morphologically indistinguishable from the extant species Lacinius erinaceus Staręga, 1966 from the Caucuses, and is tentatively assigned to this taxon. The Bitterfeld material thus includes the first fossil record of the extant genera Amilenus Martens, 1969 and Lacinius Thorell, 1876 respectively.

  3. Harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) from the Middle Jurassic of China

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    Huang, Diying; Selden, Paul A.; Dunlop, Jason A.

    2009-08-01

    Harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) are familiar animals in most terrestrial habitats but are rare as fossils, with only a handful of species known from each of the Palaeozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras. Fossil harvestmen from Middle Jurassic (ca. 165 Ma) strata of Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China, are described as Mesobunus martensi gen. et sp. nov. and Daohugopilio sheari gen. et sp. nov.; the two genera differ primarily in the relative length of their legs and details of the pedipalps. Jurassic arachnids are extremely rare and these fossils represent the first Jurassic, and only the fourth Mesozoic, record of Opiliones. These remarkably well-preserved and modern-looking fossils are assigned to the Eupnoi, whereby M. martensi demonstrably belongs in Sclerosomatidae. It thus represents the oldest record of a modern harvestman family and implies a high degree of evolutionary stasis among one of the most widespread and abundant groups of long-legged, round-bodied harvestmen.

  4. Evolutionary biology of harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones).

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    Giribet, Gonzalo; Sharma, Prashant P

    2015-01-07

    Opiliones are one of the largest arachnid orders, with more than 6,500 species in 50 families. Many of these families have been erected or reorganized in the last few years since the publication of The Biology of Opiliones. Recent years have also seen an explosion in phylogenetic work on Opiliones, as well as in studies using Opiliones as test cases to address biogeographic and evolutionary questions more broadly. Accelerated activity in the study of Opiliones evolution has been facilitated by the discovery of several key fossils, including the oldest known Opiliones fossil, which represents a new, extinct suborder. Study of the group's biology has also benefited from rapid accrual of genomic resources, particularly with respect to transcriptomes and functional genetic tools. The rapid emergence and utility of Phalangium opilio as a model for evolutionary developmental biology of arthropods serve as demonstrative evidence of a new area of study in Opiliones biology, made possible through transcriptomic data.

  5. Male dimorphism and alternative reproductive tactics in harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones).

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    Buzatto, Bruno A; Machado, Glauco

    2014-11-01

    Strong sexual selection may lead small males or males in poor condition to adopt alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) as a way to avoid the risk of being completely excluded from the mating pool. ARTs, sometimes accompanying morphological dimorphism among males, are taxonomically widespread, especially common in arthropods. Here we review the current knowledge on ARTs and male dimorphism in a diverse but relatively overlooked group of arachnids, the order Opiliones, popularly known as harvestmen or daddy long-legs. We begin with a summary of harvestman mating systems, followed by a review of the two lines of evidence for the presence of ARTs in the group: (1) morphological data from natural populations and museum collections; and (2) behavioral information from field studies. Despite receiving less attention than spiders, scorpions and insects, our review shows that harvestmen are an exciting group of organisms that are potentially great models for sexual selection studies focused on ARTs. We also suggest that investigating the proximate mechanisms underlying male dimorphism in the order would be especially important. New research on ARTs and male dimorphism will have implications for our understanding of the evolution of mating systems, sperm competition, and polyandry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neotropical Behaviour.

  6. The Opiliones tree of life: shedding light on harvestmen relationships through transcriptomics

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    Sharma, Prashant P.; Tourinho, Ana Lúcia

    2017-01-01

    Opiliones are iconic arachnids with a Palaeozoic origin and a diversity that reflects ancient biogeographic patterns dating back at least to the times of Pangea. Owing to interest in harvestman diversity, evolution and biogeography, their relationships have been thoroughly studied using morphology and PCR-based Sanger approaches to infer their systematic relationships. More recently, two studies utilized transcriptomics-based phylogenomics to explore their basal relationships and diversification, but sampling was limiting for understanding deep evolutionary patterns, as they lacked good taxon representation at the family level. Here, we analysed a set of the 14 existing transcriptomes with 40 additional ones generated for this study, representing approximately 80% of the extant familial diversity in Opiliones. Our phylogenetic analyses, including a set of data matrices with different gene occupancy and evolutionary rates, and using a multitude of methods correcting for a diversity of factors affecting phylogenomic data matrices, provide a robust and stable Opiliones tree of life, where most families and higher taxa are precisely placed. Our dating analyses using alternative calibration points, methods and analytical parameters provide well-resolved old divergences, consistent with ancient regionalization in Pangea in some groups, and Pangean vicariance in others. The integration of state-of-the-art molecular techniques and analyses, together with the broadest taxonomic sampling to date presented in a phylogenomic study of harvestmen, provide new insights into harvestmen interrelationships, as well as an overview of the general biogeographic patterns of this ancient arthropod group. PMID:28228511

  7. Alarm communication: a new function for the scent-gland secretion in harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones)

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    Machado, Glauco; Bonato, Vinícius; Oliveira, Paulo

    2002-05-01

    Most harvestmen are nocturnal, nonacoustical, and nonvisual arthropods. They have a pair of exocrine glands on the cephalothorax that produce defensive volatile secretions. We investigated in the field the possible alarm effect of these secretions in the gregarious harvestman Goniosoma aff. proximum. A cotton swab soaked with the species' own exudate (treatment), or with water (control), was held 1-2 cm from the center of harvestmen aggregations. The results showed that the gland secretion elicits an alarm response in Goniosoma: whereas 73.3% of the aggregations dispersed after being stimulated with the gland exudate, only 3.3% responded to the water control. Respondent groups are larger than non-respondent groups, and the time of reaction to the secretion was inversely related to group size. This is the first demonstration of a chemically-mediated alarm effect in harvestmen. The alarm response in gregarious harvestmen has possibly evolved as a by-product of a primarily defensive reaction in the context of predator avoidance. The discovery of this novel function of scent-gland secretion is meaningful in view of the widespread occurrence of gregarious habit among species of the order Opiliones.

  8. Phylogenomic resolution of paleozoic divergences in harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones) via analysis of next-generation transcriptome data.

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    Hedin, Marshal; Starrett, James; Akhter, Sajia; Schönhofer, Axel L; Shultz, Jeffrey W

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies are rapidly transforming molecular systematic studies of non-model animal taxa. The arachnid order Opiliones (commonly known as "harvestmen") includes more than 6,400 described species placed into four well-supported lineages (suborders). Fossil plus molecular clock evidence indicates that these lineages were diverging in the late Silurian to mid-Carboniferous, with some fossil harvestmen representing the earliest known land animals. Perhaps because of this ancient divergence, phylogenetic resolution of subordinal interrelationships within Opiliones has been difficult. We present the first phylogenomics analysis for harvestmen, derived from comparative RNA-Seq data for eight species representing all suborders. Over 30 gigabases of original Illumina short-read data were used in de novo assemblies, resulting in 50-80,000 transcripts per taxon. Transcripts were compared to published scorpion and tick genomics data, and a stringent filtering process was used to identify over 350 putatively single-copy, orthologous protein-coding genes shared among taxa. Phylogenetic analyses using various partitioning strategies, data coding schemes, and analytical methods overwhelmingly support the "classical" hypothesis of Opiliones relationships, including the higher-level clades Palpatores and Phalangida. Relaxed molecular clock analyses using multiple alternative fossil calibration strategies corroborate ancient divergences within Opiliones that are possibly deeper than the recorded fossil record indicates. The assembled data matrices, comprising genes that are conserved, highly expressed, and varying in length and phylogenetic informativeness, represent an important resource for future molecular systematic studies of Opiliones and other arachnid groups.

  9. Endemic harvestmen and spiders of Austria (Arachnida: Opiliones, Araneae

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    Komposch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive overview of plant, fungus and animal species of Austria revealed a total of 748 endemic and subendemic species, including, 11 harvestman and 46 spider species. Altogether two endemic harvestmen (Nemastoma bidentatum relictum, Nemastoma schuelleri and 8 endemic spiders (Abacoproeces molestus, Collinsia (caliginosa nemenziana, Mughiphantes severus, Mughiphantes styriacus, Pelecopsis alpica, Scotophaeus nanus, Troglohyphantes novicordis, Troglohyphantes tauriscus, beside 9 subendemic harvestman and 38 subendemic spider species have been recorded from Austria. Hot-spots of endemism in the Eastern Alps are the north-eastern (Ennstaler Alps and southern Calcareous Alps (Karawanken, Karnische Alps and the Central Alps (Hohe Tauern, Gurktaler Alps, Ötztaler and Stubaier Alps. Most of the endemic arachnid species occur from the nival down to the montane zone. Important habitats are rocky areas, caves and woodlands. High absolute numbers and percentages of endemics can be found within the harvestman families Cladonychiidae, Ischyropsalididae and Nemastomatidae and in the spider genera Lepthyphantes s. l. and Troglohyphantes. The conservation status of these highly endangered taxa – 85 % of the spider species and 100 % of the harvestman taxa are endangered in Austria – is poor.

  10. Neotropical harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones) use sexually dimorphic glands to spread chemicals in the environment.

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    Fernandes, Nathália da Silva; Willemart, Rodrigo Hirata

    2014-04-01

    Sexually dimorphic glands have convergently appeared in animals and are often responsible for the production of pheromones. In the suborder Laniatores of the order Opiliones (Arachnida), glands of such type are widespread, but there is not a single paper on how they are used. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and a behavioral approach, we describe glandular openings and how these glands are used, in the harvestmen Gryne perlata and Gryne coccinelloides (Cosmetidae). Males of these two species have glandular openings on the metatarsi of legs I and on the metatarsi IV. Males were shown rubbing the glands of the metatarsi I against their other legs, whereas glands on the metatarsi IV are gently touched on the substrate or rubbed either against other legs, or against the substrate. Not all behaviors were seen in both species.

  11. An occurence records database of French Guiana harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones).

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    Cally, Sébastien; Solbès, Pierre; Grosso, Bernadette; Murienne, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    This dataset provides information on specimens of harvestmen (Arthropoda, Arachnida, Opiliones) collected in French Guiana. Field collections have been initiated in 2012 within the framework of the CEnter for the Study of Biodiversity in Amazonia (CEBA: www.labex-ceba.fr/en/). This dataset is a work in progress.  Occurrences are recorded in an online database stored at the EDB laboratory after each collecting trip and the dataset is updated on a monthly basis. Voucher specimens and associated DNA are also stored at the EDB laboratory until deposition in natural history Museums. The latest version of the dataset is publicly and freely accessible through our Integrated Publication Toolkit at http://130.120.204.55:8080/ipt/resource.do?r=harvestmen_of_french_guiana or through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility data portal at http://www.gbif.org/dataset/3c9e2297-bf20-4827-928e-7c7eefd9432c.

  12. An occurence records database of French Guiana harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones

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    Sébastien Cally

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This dataset provides information on specimens of harvestmen (Arthropoda, Arachnida, Opiliones collected in French Guiana. Field collections have been initiated in 2012 within the framework of the CEnter for the Study of Biodiversity in Amazonia (CEBA: www.labex-ceba.fr/en/. This dataset is a work in progress.  Occurrences are recorded in an online database stored at the EDB laboratory after each collecting trip and the dataset is updated on a monthly basis. Voucher specimens and associated DNA are also stored at the EDB laboratory until deposition in natural history Museums. The latest version of the dataset is publicly and freely accessible through our Integrated Publication Toolkit at http://130.120.204.55:8080/ipt/resource.do?r=harvestmen_of_french_guiana or through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility data portal at http://www.gbif.org/dataset/3c9e2297-bf20-4827-928e-7c7eefd9432c.

  13. Ovipositor morphology of cosmetid harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones, Laniatores): a new source of informative characters.

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    Walker, Eric A; Townsend, Victor R

    2014-12-01

    The external morphology of the penis is an important source of systematic characters in phylogenetic studies of harvestmen. Modern taxonomic studies generally include micrographs generated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to illustrate penis morphology. In contrast, the external morphology of the ovipositor has largely been ignored for harvestmen belonging to the suborder Laniatores. Comparative studies of ovipositor microanatomy using SEM are especially lacking for species belonging to the superfamily Gonyleptoidea. In an effort to determine if the ovipositor could be a useful source of informative characters for these harvestmen, we investigated interspecific variation in the external morphology of the ovipositor for 14 species from the family Cosmetidae. Our SEM-based study revealed that the external surface of the distal tips of the ovipositors of most species was generally divided into four symmetrical lobes, although we observed a bilobed condition in Erginulus clavotibialis and Erginulus subserialis. The distal surfaces were also generally smooth, with the exception of the ovipositor of Erginulus weyerensis, which featured small surface setae. In addition, we observed considerable interspecific variation in the morphology of the peripheral setae on the distal tip, especially with respect to relative size, morphology of the shaft, and number, symmetry, and shapes of the distal tips. The functional significance, if any, of variation in the structure of the peripheral setae is unclear. Additional behavioral studies of copulation and oviposition are needed to determine the functional relationships between reproductive morphology and behavior. The morphological variation that we observed suggests that future taxonomic studies of cosmetid harvestmen, and potentially other gonyleptoidean taxa, would benefit from the inclusion of descriptions of ovipositor morphology.

  14. Interspecific variation in the microanatomy of cosmetid harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones, Laniatores).

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    Rodriguez, Andrea L; Townsend, Victor R; Johnson, Megan B; White, Tara B

    2014-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a useful tool for identifying interspecific variation in often overlooked structures that may represent useful sources for informative phylogenetic characters. In this study, we used SEM to compare the morphology of 12 cosmetid species from Central America, the Caribbean, and North America including multiple species for the genera Cynorta, Erginulus, and Paecilaema. To determine if microanatomical structures were unique to the cosmetid taxa under examination, we investigated the microanatomical structures of six additional species of gonyleptoidean harvestmen representing the families Agoristenidae, Cranaidae, Gonyleptidae, Manaosbiidae, and Stygnidae. Our results indicate that the shape of the ocularium (narrow, intermediate, or broad) did not vary within cosmetid genera, whereas the morphology of the rough pit glands on the eye mound varied considerably between species. Each cosmetid species had 10-20 rough pit glands on the ocularium whereas only the eye mounds of Avima intermedia (Agoristenidae) and Glysterus sp. (Gonyleptidae) had similar structures. With regards to the surface texture of the dorsal scutum, cosmetid harvestmen exhibited a rivulose-microgranulate morphology (6 species), a microtuberculate-rivulose-microrgranulate morphology (4 species), or a microgranulate morphology (2 species). In contrast, each of the gonyleptoidean species exhibited a microgranulate pattern, with the exception of Stygnoplus clavotibialis, which had a rivulose-microgranulate surface texture. For cosmetid harvestmen, we observed considerable interspecific variation in the shape and number of teeth on the fixed and moveable fingers of the male chelicerae. Similarly, we also observed interspecific variation in the distribution and shape of tubercles on the ventral and dorsal surfaces of the femur of the pedipalp. Overall, our results indicate that there are several microanatomical structures associated with the ocularium, dorsal scutum

  15. Opiliones are no longer the same--on suprafamilial groups in harvestmen (Arthropoda: Arachnida).

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    Kury, Adriano B

    2015-03-02

    A review of the names used in the arachnid order Opiliones above superfamily level is presented. Many historical branching patterns of Opiliones (for five terminals), of Laniatores (for six terminals), and of Cyphophthalmi (for six terminals) are extrapolated, compared and graphically displayed. For the first time a historical review is made of the circumscriptions of those names and comparisons are drawn to current usage. Critical clades are used as terminals and represented by the oldest valid generic name of each. Comments are made on the variant usage for 25 suprafamilial names from the literature. Cladistic definitions are provided for these names under relevant hypotheses of phylogeny. It is noted that virtually all important suprafamilial names in Opiliones changed concept over time, and the purpose of this project is to clarify the original usage compared to current, and to add historical perspective. Two options are considered for higher-level nomenclature in Opiliones: (1) a circumscriptional option, sticking to the original inclusion of the names; (2) an inertial option, where no name has priority, and follows recent use in the literature. As there is no priority for names not regulated by ICZN, option 2 prevails, because it entails massive momentum. The following new names are introduced as unranked taxa to define clades under different hypotheses of phylogeny: Tricospilata (= Triaenonychidae + Grassatores), Lomaniatores (Laniatores in the restricted sense used by Loman/Pocock), and Eulaniatores (Laniatores excluding the bizarre Synthetonychiidae). Some of the hypotheses implied by these names are conflicting and mutually exclusive, but the state of knowledge of harvestman taxonomy is quickly changing, and no hypothesis that clearly supersedes the others can be detected.

  16. Some data concerning the harvestmen fauna (Arachnida, Opiliones from the Caraş-Severin county (Banat, Romania

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    Babalean Anda

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Some data on 12 opilion species collected by the authors between 2001-2003 from the North-Western part of Caraş-Severin County (Banat, Rumania are presented and briefly discussed.

  17. Additional vinyl ketones and their pyranyl ketones in gonyleptid harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) suggest these metabolites are widespread in this family.

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    Wouters, Felipe C; Rocha, Daniele F O; Gonçalves, Caroline C S; Machado, Glauco; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2013-09-27

    Four species of gonyleptid harvestmen, Acanthogonyleptes pulcher, Gonyleptes saprophilus (Gonyleptinae), Sodreana barbiellini, and Sodreana leprevosti (Sodreaninae), were examined by GC-MS and ¹³H NMR. All of these species release vinyl ketones, and three of them produce the corresponding pyranyl ketones, which are presumed hetero-Diels-Alder (HDA) dimers. The vinyl ketones 5-methyl-1-hexen-3-one, rac-4-methyl-1-hexen-3-one, and (S)-4-methyl-1-hexen-3-one were synthesized. Natural 4-methyl-1-hexen-3-one is present as a single stereoisomer and has the R-configuration. Vinyl ketone dimers (HDA dimers) were also observed in the scent gland exudate and characterized by HRMS, ¹³C NMR, and ¹H NMR chemical shifts of the pyranyl moiety.

  18. Occurrence and Distribution of Cave Dwelling Frogs of Peninsular India

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    Jayant Biswas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The life in subterranean caves always needs a high degree of biological adaptability, due to its unusual ecosystem. The cave dwelling species usually get selected from preadapted biological traits for cave life. The cave dwelling tendencies in frog are very uncommon. Majority of reported cave frogs usually prefer cave for temporary shelter. In India, the biospeleological inventory is still in its primary stage. Till date no serious attempt has been taken to understand the cave dwelling habitat for any frog in India. Inspite of it, in India time to time various reports on natural histories of anurans reveal its cave dwelling tendencies. On the basis of personal observations and available literature in this report I have documented the occurrences and distributions of five cave dwelling frogs of India. Common biological traits from all the established cave frogs, which could be referred as preadapted for cave life, have been discussed. Further, the possible threats and IUCN status of each discussed species has been highlighted.

  19. New Canadian records of Nemastoma bimaculatum (Fabricius), and a brief summary of introduced Eurasian harvestmen in North America (Arachnida, Opiliones).

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    Shear, William A

    2016-03-07

    Eurasian harvestmen have been introduced to, and have established themselves in North America. Species known to have been introduced include Trogulus tricarinatus (L.) 1767, Paroligolophus agrestis (Meade) 1855, Rilaena triangularis (Herbst) 1799, Oligolophus tridens (C. L. Koch) 1836, and Nemastoma bimaculatum (Fabricius) 1775, for the last of which new Canadian records (Ontario) are given below. It is not entirely determined if the species Phalangium opilio (L.) 1758, Opilio parietinus (DeGeer) 1778 and Mitopus morio (Fabricius) 1779 are introduced to North America, or are naturally of Holarctic distribution. The former seems the more likely hypothesis for the first two, but M. morio in North America may be native or may not be that species. Detailed descriptions and illustrations of all these species may be found in Martens (1978).

  20. A new Tithaeus species from Hainan Island, China (Arachnida, Opiliones, Laniatores, Epedanidae, with a key to the Chinese species

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    Chao Zhang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the harvestmen Tithaeus calyptratus sp. n. (Epedanidae, Opiliones from Hainan Island (China is diagnosed, described and illustrated. A key to the two Chinese species of Tithaeus is provided.

  1. Molecular phylogeny of the harvestmen genus Sabacon (Arachnida: Opiliones: Dyspnoi) reveals multiple Eocene-Oligocene intercontinental dispersal events in the Holarctic.

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    Schönhofer, Axel L; McCormack, Maureen; Tsurusaki, Nobuo; Martens, Jochen; Hedin, Marshal

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the phylogeny and biogeographic history of the Holarctic harvestmen genus Sabacon, which shows an intercontinental disjunct distribution and is presumed to be a relatively old taxon. Molecular phylogenetic relationships of Sabacon were estimated using multiple gene regions and Bayesian inference for a comprehensive Sabacon sample. Molecular clock analyses, using relaxed clock models implemented in BEAST, are applied to date divergence events. Biogeographic scenarios utilizing S-DIVA and Lagrange C++ are reconstructed over sets of Bayesian trees, allowing for the incorporation of phylogenetic uncertainty and quantification of alternative reconstructions over time. Four primary well-supported subclades are recovered within Sabacon: (1) restricted to western North America; (2) eastern North American S. mitchelli and sampled Japanese taxa; (3) a second western North American group and taxa from Nepal and China; and (4) eastern North American S. cavicolens with sampled European Sabacon species. Three of four regional faunas (wNA, eNA, East Asia) are thereby non-monophyletic, and three clades include intercontinental disjuncts. Molecular clock analyses and biogeographic reconstructions support nearly simultaneous intercontinental dispersal coincident with the Eocene-Oligocene transition. We hypothesize that biogeographic exchange in the mid-Tertiary is likely correlated with the onset of global cooling, allowing cryophilic Sabacon taxa to disperse within and among continents. Morphological variation supports the divergent genetic clades observed in Sabacon, and suggests that a taxonomic revision (e.g., splitting Sabacon into multiple genera) may be warranted.

  2. A new cave-dwelling millipede of the genus Scutogona from central Portugal (Diplopoda, Chordeumatida, Chamaesomatidae)

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    Enghoff, Henrik; P. S. Reboleira, Ana Sofia

    2013-01-01

    A new cave-dwelling species of the genus Scutogona Ribuat, 1913, S. minor n. sp., is described from caves of Sicó karst in central Portugal. The classification and delimitation of Scutogona vis-à-vis related genera, in particular Meinerteuma Mauriès, 1982, is discussed.......A new cave-dwelling species of the genus Scutogona Ribuat, 1913, S. minor n. sp., is described from caves of Sicó karst in central Portugal. The classification and delimitation of Scutogona vis-à-vis related genera, in particular Meinerteuma Mauriès, 1982, is discussed....

  3. An Experimental Study of the Thermal Behavior of the Courtyard Style Cave Dwelling

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    刘艳峰; 刘亚; 刘加平

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the courtyard on moderating the hush climate and improving the thermal environment of the courtyard style cave dwelling, and the interaction amongst the ambient, the courtyard and its surrounding cave rooms were investigated. A field measurement was carried out in such a typical dwelling in the winter. The results presented in this paper prove the ability of this dwelling to transform an extreme winter environment outside cave rooms into a better outdoor community space and will be helpful for modern architects to seek a low cost housing solution with concern for sustainable development.

  4. Chemical defense in the cave-dwelling millipede Brachydesmus troglobius Daday, 1889 (Diplopoda, Polydesmidae

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    Makarov Slobodan E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The troglomorphic millipede Brachydesmus troglobius Daday, 1889 (Polydesmida: Polydesmidae secretes allomones from glands on both lateral surfaces of its body segments. The secretion was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis with electron and chemical ionization, and was shown to be composed of a mixture of benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, benzoylnitrile, benzoic acid and mandelonitrile benzoate. Hydrogen cyanide was qualitatively identified by the picric acid test. This is the first identification of these compounds in a cave-dwelling polydesmid.

  5. Study on constructive system of green cave dwelling in Loess Plateau-Interpretation with the "regional gene" theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This article reveals the inherent evolution adjusting mechanism of regional architecture by means of considering the concept and method of "regional gene" as the research approach of regional architecture construction system, and in the meanwhile establishes the "gene database" of regional architecture and optimum technology, on the basis of the principle of sustainable development and scientific evaluation system. In addition, this article chooses the planning of model villages of cave dwellings in Loess Plateau and the construction of ecological cave dwellings for case study to prove the feasibility of the research approach.

  6. Associative learning in a harvestman (Arachnida, Opiliones).

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    dos Santos, Gilson Costa; Hogan, Jerry A; Willemart, Rodrigo Hirata

    2013-11-01

    Associative learning has been demonstrated in many species of invertebrates, but has not been studied in arachnids, except for some spiders and a whip-spider. Herein, we tested the ability of a Neotropical harvestman, Discocyrtus invalidus (Arachnida, Opiliones) to associate a shelter with a chemical stimulus. We used an arena with a white light at the top and two openings on the floor, one giving access to a dark shelter and the other one closed with a mesh. Filter paper with different chemicals (mate or green tea) surrounded both openings. A harvestman (n=37) was released in the arena and its behavior recorded. The procedure was repeated for 14 consecutive days with each individual. We found that harvestmen got faster at finding the refuge, became less exploratory and tended to move toward the open shelter as the days passed. We conclude that the animals learned to associate the chemical stimulus with the shelter.

  7. Surveying Europe’s Only Cave-Dwelling Chordate Species (Proteus anguinus) Using Environmental DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márton, Orsolya; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Gál, Júlia Tünde; Jelić, Dušan

    2017-01-01

    In surveillance of subterranean fauna, especially in the case of rare or elusive aquatic species, traditional techniques used for epigean species are often not feasible. We developed a non-invasive survey method based on environmental DNA (eDNA) to detect the presence of the red-listed cave-dwelling amphibian, Proteus anguinus, in the caves of the Dinaric Karst. We tested the method in fifteen caves in Croatia, from which the species was previously recorded or expected to occur. We successfully confirmed the presence of P. anguinus from ten caves and detected the species for the first time in five others. Using a hierarchical occupancy model we compared the availability and detection probability of eDNA of two water sampling methods, filtration and precipitation. The statistical analysis showed that both availability and detection probability depended on the method and estimates for both probabilities were higher using filter samples than for precipitation samples. Combining reliable field and laboratory methods with robust statistical modeling will give the best estimates of species occurrence. PMID:28129383

  8. An overview of the Mediterranean cave-dwelling horny sponges (Porifera, Demospongiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Manconi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present synthesis focuses on the so called ‘horny sponges’ recorded from marine caves of the Mediterranean Sea. The main aim is to provide a list of all recorded species, diagnostic keys to their identification up to family and genus level, and exhaustive, formally uniform descriptions at the species level contributing to sharing of information on the faunistics and taxonomy of Mediterranean cave-dwelling species, including habitat preferences. The majority of species was recorded in 105 Mediterranean marine caves hosting four orders of horny sponges belonging to 9 families, 19 genera and 40 species. Species endemic to the Mediterranean Sea harboured in marine caves are 14 with an endemicity value of 35%. For each species morphological descriptions are supported by illustrations both original and from the literature, including the diagnostic traits of the skeleton by light and scanning electron microscopy giving further characterization at the specific level. A detailed map together with a list of all caves harbouring horny sponges is also provided with geographic coordinates.

  9. Lateral and "vertico-lateral" cave dwellings in Haddej and Guermessa: characteristic geocultural heritage of Southeast Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhchim, Nouri; Ben Fraj, Tarek; Reynard, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Southeast Tunisia is known for different types of cave dwellings developed for centuries on the Matmata-Dahar plateau. Their shaping takes into account the geological and geomorphological context of the sites. They thus provide an interesting example of geoheritage on which was developed an important cultural and architectural heritage. Most of these sites are now not more used and partly abandoned. An interdisciplinary research - crossing geomorphological and archaeological approaches - was carried out in two sites: Haddej and Guermessa. Haddej site belongs to the Matmata area and its surroundings located in the northern part of the plateau. It is characterized by cave dwellings dug vertically and then laterally in the Quaternary wind silt accumulations (loess) filling the valleys that dissect the plateau surface. The latter corresponds to the back of a monoclinic structure cuesta.Guermessa site belongs to the Tataouine region, located in the southern part of the plateau. It is characterized by troglodyte dwellings dug laterally in alternations of limestone, clay, marl and dolomite layers of Cenomanian and Turonian age. These alternations are the backbone of buttes still partially attached to the front of the cuesta. Both sites offer favourable conditions for geomorphological study. They exhibit a wide range of structural landforms within the monoclinic structure, and their surroundings present a variety of shapes and Quaternary formations allowing the study of the geomorphological and palaeoenvironmental changes that happened during the Quaternary in this now arid region. These geosites were assessed using the method developed by the University of Lausanne (Reynard et al. 2015), which allowed us to assign them a strong scientific, aesthetic, cultural, educational and tourist value. Proposals for their tourist promotion were then proposed taking into account the lack of maintenance that reduces their cultural and tourist value. Reference Reynard E., Perret A

  10. 陕北窑洞民居发展对策研究%Study on Development Countermeasures of Cave Dwellings in Northern Area of Shaanxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程军

    2011-01-01

    针对陕北地区传统民居窑洞,从窑洞本身及其发展环境出发,分析了窑洞的建筑特色和使用价值以及它在陕北地区的发展现状,指出窑洞的发展正面临着十分尴尬的境地.运用SWOT分析法,概括了窑洞的优势、劣势、机遇、挑战,优势方面突出其作为生土建筑的生态优势,因地制宜的特征,解决黄土高原土地和能源、环境等问题的作用,以及富含乡土特色的审美价值;劣势方面突出了村落布局缺乏整体性、交通不便、室内通风采光条件欠缺、造型和空间单一呆板;机遇方面则突出了世界范围内对建筑生态学的日益重视,以及对地下民用建筑的探索和应用;挑战则在于窑洞建筑技术、窑洞民居与城市化之间的矛盾、窑洞民居与现代生活之间的矛盾、“限制”型的管理模式几个方面.在此基础上,建议陕北窑洞的发展应该通过舆论正确引导、改变人们的传统观念;从筑窑技术上努力改善窑洞的缺点;加大基础设施建设,改善窑居环境;开发具有陕北特色的窑洞文化旅游;建设具有陕北特色的社会主义新农村.%In view of traditional houses in northern area of Shaanxi Province which was cave dwellings,based on cave dwelling and its development environment, the paper had analyzed architectural characteristics and use value of cave dwelling and its development in northern area of Shaanxi Province, and then pointed out that cave dwelling development had been reduced into an awkward situation. By using SWOT analysis method,the strengths,weaknesses,opportunities and threats of cave dwellings had been summarized. In terms of strengths, cave dwelling had ecological advantage as native architecture, was constructed based on local conditions, could solve land, energy and environment problems on Loess Plateau,and abounded in aesthetic value of native feature. In terms of weaknesses,village layout lacked of integrity

  11. Hunting, Swimming, and Worshiping: Human Cultural Practices Illuminate the Blood Meal Sources of Cave Dwelling Chagas Vectors (Triatoma dimidiata) in Guatemala and Belize

    OpenAIRE

    Lori Stevens; M Carlota Monroy; Antonieta Guadalupe Rodas; Dorn, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Triatoma dimidiata, currently the major Central American vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease, inhabits caves throughout the region. This research investigates the possibility that cave dwelling T. dimidiata might transmit the parasite to humans and links the blood meal sources of cave vectors to cultural practices that differ among locations. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined the blood meal sources of twenty-four T. dimidiata collected fr...

  12. Combined mitochondrial and nuclear markers revealed a deep vicariant history for Leopoldamys neilli, a cave-dwelling rodent of Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Latinne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historical biogeography and evolutionary processes of cave taxa have been widely studied in temperate regions. However, Southeast Asian cave ecosystems remain largely unexplored despite their high scientific interest. Here we studied the phylogeography of Leopoldamys neilli, a cave-dwelling murine rodent living in limestone karsts of Thailand, and compared the molecular signature of mitochondrial and nuclear markers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a large sampling (n = 225 from 28 localities in Thailand and a combination of mitochondrial and nuclear markers with various evolutionary rates (two intronic regions and 12 microsatellites. The evolutionary history of L. neilli and the relative role of vicariance and dispersal were investigated using ancestral range reconstruction analysis and Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC. Both mitochondrial and nuclear markers support a large-scale population structure of four main groups (west, centre, north and northeast and a strong finer structure within each of these groups. A deep genealogical divergence among geographically close lineages is observed and denotes a high population fragmentation. Our findings suggest that the current phylogeographic pattern of this species results from the fragmentation of a widespread ancestral population and that vicariance has played a significant role in the evolutionary history of L. neilli. These deep vicariant events that occurred during Plio-Pleistocene are related to the formation of the Central Plain of Thailand. Consequently, the western, central, northern and northeastern groups of populations were historically isolated and should be considered as four distinct Evolutionarily Significant Units (ESUs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study confirms the benefit of using several independent genetic markers to obtain a comprehensive and reliable picture of L. neilli evolutionary history at different levels of resolution. The complex genetic

  13. First Biosynthetic pathway of 1-hepten-3-one in Iporangaia pustulosa (Opiliones)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Daniele F. O.; Wouters, Felipe C.; Machado, Glauco; Marsaioli, Anita J.

    2013-11-01

    Arthropods produce a great variety of natural compounds, many of which have unexplored biosynthesis. Among the armored harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) of the suborder Laniatores, the defensive gland exudates contain vinyl ketones and other constituents of supposed polyketide origin. We have studied the biosynthesis of 1-hepten-3-one in the Neotropical harvestman Iporangaia pustulosa by feeding individuals with 13C-labeled precursors, demonstrating its mixed acetate/propionate origin. 13C NMR spectroscopy showed an unusual labeling pattern suggesting different propionate sources for starting and extender units. Our analysis also indicates the presence of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, converting acetate into propionyl-CoA via succinyl-CoA, together with other C3 unit routes. This is the first biosynthetic study of alkyl vinyl ketones in arthropods. Our results shed light on the origin and diversification of chemical compounds in a major arthropod group.

  14. Hunting, swimming, and worshiping: human cultural practices illuminate the blood meal sources of cave dwelling Chagas vectors (Triatoma dimidiata in Guatemala and Belize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Stevens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma dimidiata, currently the major Central American vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease, inhabits caves throughout the region. This research investigates the possibility that cave dwelling T. dimidiata might transmit the parasite to humans and links the blood meal sources of cave vectors to cultural practices that differ among locations.We determined the blood meal sources of twenty-four T. dimidiata collected from two locations in Guatemala and one in Belize where human interactions with the caves differ. Blood meal sources were determined by cloning and sequencing PCR products amplified from DNA extracted from the vector abdomen using primers specific for the vertebrate 12S mitochondrial gene. The blood meal sources were inferred by ≥ 99% identity with published sequences. We found 70% of cave-collected T. dimidiata positive for human DNA. The vectors had fed on 10 additional vertebrates with a variety of relationships to humans, including companion animal (dog, food animals (pig, sheep/goat, wild animals (duck, two bat, two opossum species and commensal animals (mouse, rat. Vectors from all locations fed on humans and commensal animals. The blood meal sources differ among locations, as well as the likelihood of feeding on dog and food animals. Vectors from one location were tested for T. cruzi infection, and 30% (3/10 tested positive, including two positive for human blood meals.Cave dwelling Chagas disease vectors feed on humans and commensal animals as well as dog, food animals and wild animals. Blood meal sources were related to human uses of the caves. We caution that just as T. dimidiata in caves may pose an epidemiological risk, there may be other situations where risk is thought to be minimal, but is not.

  15. 黄土高原地区窑居度假村开发现状及其意义研究%Development and Significance of Cave Dwelling Resort on the Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明; 孙庆珍

    2011-01-01

    Relevant ecotourism theories were applied to further investigate the mushrooming cave dwelling resorts on the Loess Plateau. By introducing the present development of cave dwelling settlements in the study area, types of cave dwelling resort were summarized: historical cave dwelling resort based on high cultural value, artistic value and aesthetic value; cave dwelling resort characterized by primitive folk customs; cave hotel showing folk house features of the Loess Plateau. Luochuan Resort of the Loess Folk Customs, Miaoshang Resort of Sanmenxia, Stone Cave Hotel of Y angjialing in Yan'an were respectively studied to analyze features and development conditions of cave dwelling resort, on the basis of which development principles and countermeasures were discussed. The orientation of cave dwelling resort on the Loess Plateau should be determined first, suotainability and accountability of ecotourism should be followed. Finally, the significance of cave dwelling resort for promoting local economic development, enhancing the rational utilization of natural resources, protecting and developing traditional settlements of cave dwellings was given.%运用生态旅游研究中的相关理论,对目前大量兴起的黄土高原窑居度假村进行了深入调研.从介绍黄土高原窑居聚落的现状入手,总结了窑居度假村的类型,即依托文化价值、艺术价值、审美价值较高的历史窑洞民居形成的旅游度假区;以原汁原味的窑洞民居及风土人情为特色开发的窑洞度假村;体现黄土高原民居特色的窑洞宾馆,并以洛川黄土风情度假村、三门峡庙上村民俗度假村、延安杨家岭石窑宾馆为例,详细分析了窑居度假村的特点和发展现状,在此基础上探讨了窑居度假村的开发原则与对策,强调应明确黄土高原窑居度假村开发的方向,并遵循生态旅游的可持续性原则与责任性原则.最后指出黄土高原窑居度假村的开发在促进当地

  16. Research on Daylighting Factors of Cave Dwelling and Its Improvement Measurements%窑洞采光因素分析及改善研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫幼锋; 赵占雄; 赵世光

    2011-01-01

    本文通过对甘肃平凉地区窑洞采光的具体测量,分析了采光影响因素,提出了改善采光的设计方法和改造措施.首先,参考不同窑洞的照度,综合分析了光气候、窑洞朝向、口部构造、窑内空间设计、窑洞进深及窑内表面材料光反射等因素对采光量的制约.其次,完善适用于窑洞的天空照度模型,提出了窑内工作面综合照度公式,计算分析表明室外环境是影响采光的首要因素,采光口高度、透光材料及窑内表面反光材料对采光量的影响较大.最后,提出了窑洞在选址、设计、施工和室内装饰等方面的改善措施.%In this paper, based on the daylighting measurement of cave dwellings in Pingliang area of Gansu,the influence factors of daylighting were analyzed, and the related design and improvement measurements for enhancing the daylighting effect were provided. Firstly,the constraints of influence factors on cave illuminance were discussed,including light climate,cave orientation,hole structure,interior space design, indoor depth and internal surface material, etc. Secondly, with the improved sky illuminance model suitable to cave dwellings, the synthesized illuminance equation for working surface was presented. It was found out that the outdoor environment was the most important factor,and the height of daylighting openings,the transmission material and the reflecting material of internal surface had relatively larger influence on daylighting quality. Finally, improvement measurements of site selection, design, construction and interior decoration were pointed out.

  17. Interessante Weberknechtfunde aus Polen (Arachnida: Opiliones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staręga, Wojciech

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Many new localities for Polish harvestmen are recorded, specifically for species whose ranges do not encompass the whole country. Opilio canestrinii is recorded for the first time in Poland.

  18. Molecular systematics of eastern North American Phalangodidae (Arachnida: Opiliones: Laniatores), demonstrating convergent morphological evolution in caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Marshal; Thomas, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    The phalangodid harvestmen (Opiliones: Laniatores) fauna of the southeastern United States has remained obscure since original descriptions of many genera and species over 60 years ago. The obscurity of this interesting group is pervasive, with uncertainty regarding basic systematic information such as generic limits, species limits, and geographic distributions. This situation is unfortunate, as the fauna includes several cave-obligate forms of interest from both conservation and evolutionary perspectives, and the group likely exhibits interesting biogeographic patterns because of their low dispersal ability. Here, we use DNA sequence data from two genes to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships of southeastern phalangodid taxa, for a sample of all described genera from the region. Our results demonstrate that the southeastern fauna is likely monophyletic, and is most-closely related to western North American phalangodids with a similar penis morphology. Within the southeastern clade, trends in the evolution of penis morphology correspond broadly to molecular phylogenetic patterns, although penis evolution is overall relatively conservative in the group. Biogeographically, it appears that western taxa in the southeast (i.e., from west of the Appalachian Valley) are early diverging, with later diversification in the montane southern Blue Ridge, and subsequent diversification back towards the west. This W>E>W pattern has been observed in other groups from the southeast. The multiple cave-modified species in the region are genetically divergent and appear phylogenetically isolated; explicit topological hypothesis testing suggests that troglomorphism has evolved convergently in at least three independent lineages. The total number of species in the region remains uncertain-mitochondrial COI data reveal many highly divergent, geographically coherent groups that might represent undescribed species, but these divergent mitochondrial lineages do not always exhibit

  19. Phylogenomic analyses resolve an ancient trichotomy at the base of Ischyropsalidoidea (Arachnida, Opiliones) despite high levels of gene tree conflict and unequal minority resolution frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richart, Casey H; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Hedin, Marshal

    2016-02-01

    Phylogenetic resolution of ancient rapid radiations has remained problematic despite major advances in statistical approaches and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we report on a combined phylogenetic approach utilizing transcriptome data in conjunction with Sanger sequence data to investigate a tandem of ancient divergences in the harvestmen superfamily Ischyropsalidoidea (Arachnida, Opiliones, Dyspnoi). We rely on Sanger sequences to resolve nodes within and between closely related genera, and use RNA-seq data from a subset of taxa to resolve a short and ancient internal branch. We use several analytical approaches to explore this succession of ancient diversification events, including concatenated and coalescent-based analyses and maximum likelihood gene trees for each locus. We evaluate the robustness of phylogenetic inferences using a randomized locus sub-sampling approach, and find congruence across these methods despite considerable incongruence across gene trees. Incongruent gene trees are not recovered in frequencies expected from a simple multispecies coalescent model, and we reject incomplete lineage sorting as the sole contributor to gene tree conflict. Using these approaches we attain robust support for higher-level phylogenetic relationships within Ischyropsalidoidea.

  20. A new Leiobunum species from Greece (Arachnida, Opiliones, Phalangiidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaman, Ivo M.

    1996-01-01

    Leiobunum gruberi nov. spec. (Arachnida, Opiliones, Phalangiidae) from northern Greece (Macedonia, Leptokaria) is described and figured. This species is closely related to Leiobunum seriatum Simon, 1878, known from the Near East, Cyprus and eastern Anatolia. A short review of known taxa of the genus

  1. A revised dated phylogeny of the arachnid order Opiliones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant P; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    Dating the Opiliones tree of life has become an important enterprise for this group of arthropods, due to their ancient origins and important biogeographic implications. To incorporate both methodological innovations in molecular dating as well as new systematic discoveries of harvestman diversity, we conducted total evidence dating on a data set uniting morphological and/or molecular sequence data for 47 Opiliones species, including all four well-known Palaeozoic fossils, to test the placement of both fossils and newly discovered lineages in a single analysis. Furthermore, we investigated node dating with a phylogenomic data set of 24,202 amino acid sites for 14 species of Opiliones, sampling all extant suborders. In this way, we approached molecular dating of basal harvestman phylogeny using different data sets and approaches to assess congruence of divergence time estimates. In spite of the markedly different composition of data sets, our results show congruence across all analyses for age estimates of basal nodes that are well constrained with respect to fossil calibrations (e.g., Opiliones, Palpatores). By contrast, derived nodes that lack fossil calibrations (e.g., the suborders Cyphophthalmi, and Laniatores) have large uncertainty intervals in diversification times, particularly in the total evidence dating analysis, reflecting the dearth of calibration points and undersampling of derived lineages. Total evidence dating consistently produced older median ages than node dating for ingroup nodes, due to the nested placement of multiple Palaeozoic fossils. Our analyses support basal diversification of Opiliones in the Ordovician-Devonian period, corroborating the inferred ancient origins of this arthropod order, and underscore the importance of diversity discovery-both paleontological and neontological-in evolutionary inference.

  2. Mitochondrial rRNA secondary structures and genome arrangements distinguish chelicerates: comparisons with a harvestman (Arachnida: Opiliones: Phalangium opilio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masta, Susan E

    2010-01-01

    Arachnids are a highly diverse group of arthropods, and many of the mitochondrial genomes that have been sequenced from arachnids possess unusual features in their inferred gene structures and genome organization. The first complete sequence of a mitochondrial genome from the arachnid order Opiliones (harvestmen) is presented here. Secondary structures of the two mitochondrial ribosomal subunits of Phalangium opilio are inferred and compared to mitochondrial rRNA structures of a hexapod and a chelicerate. The large subunit rRNA of P. opilio is found to have more helices conserved than in other arthropods, while the small subunit rRNA shows a complexity similar to that of other arthropods. These comparisons suggest that a reduction in rRNA complexity occurred in Pancrustacea after the divergence of Pancrustacea and Chelicerata from a common ancestor. The gene arrangement of the mitochondrial genome of P. opilio is compared with the gene order of taxa from all seven other orders of arachnids for which representative mitochondrial genomes have been sequenced. Taxa from five of these seven orders possess gene arrangements identical to that of Limulus polyphemus, and P. opilio is found to have a similar arrangement. However, in P. opilio, some genes near the putative control region are rearranged, with the suite of genes encoding tRNA(Gln), the control region, and tRNA(Ile) located downstream of the two ribosomal RNA genes, and upstream of where they are typically located in chelicerates. The genome encodes only 21 of the typical 22 mitochondrial tRNA genes and lacks the gene for tRNA(Leu(CUN)). The protein-coding genes in the mitochondrial genome of P. opilio show a significantly decreased use of codons recognized by tRNA(Leu(CUN)), likely due to selection to utilize the more specific tRNA(Leu(UUR)) anticodon. The gene arrangement and lack of a tRNA(Leu(CUN)) gene in P. opilio is most parsimoniously explained by the occurrence of at least two translocation events, one

  3. 地区建筑营建的被动式节能设计对策的体系化研究——以绿色窑居节能空间的形态设计为例%Systematic Research of Passive Design Strategies on Regional Architecture Construction:Taking the Form Design of Energy-efficient Space for Green Cave Dwellings as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏秦; 林磊; 刘勇

    2013-01-01

    该文从窑居微气候环境控制中遇到的通风、采光、保温与降湿等矛盾入手,以建筑环境构成的层级结构作为基本分类准则,依据影响地区建筑微气候的各种环境因素调节的原理,提出地区建筑营建的被动式设计对策的体系化框架.该文还结合拓扑几何学原理,以单体窑居的节能空间设计为例,探讨其形态的被动式设计对策细则.%This paper focuses on ventilation,lighting,insulation,humidity reduction and other problems encountered in microclimate control of cave dwellings,regards the principles of hierarchical structure of building environment and regulation of a variety of influencing factors that affect the building microclimate as the basic principles of classification,and proposes systematic structure for passive design strategies on regional architecture.In addition,it uses the principles of topological geometry,takes the energy-efficient space design of cave dwellings as an example,and explores the passive design strategies for its form design.

  4. A divergent Cardinium found in daddy long-legs (Arachnida: Opiliones).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jin; Masters, Amber; Avery, Amanda; Werren, John H

    2010-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that a newly described bacterial endosymbiont, Cardinium, is widespread in arthropods and induces different reproductive manipulations in hosts. In this study, we used a portion of the 16S rRNA gene of the Cardinium to screen 16 Opilionid species from the suborder Palptores. We found the incidence of Cardinium in these Opiliones was significantly higher than in other pooled arthropods (31.2% versus 7.2%, P=0.007). Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian analysis revealed two distinct clades in Opiliones. One is a divergent monophyletic clade with strong support that has so far not been found in other arthropods, and a second one contains Cardinium both from Opiliones and other arthropods. There is not complete concordance of the Cardinium strains with host phylogeny, suggesting some horizontal movement of the bacteria among Opiliones. Although the divergence in the sequenced 16S rRNA region between the Cardinium infecting Opiliones and Cardinium from other arthropods is greater than among Cardinium found in other arthropods, all are monophyletic with respect to the outgroup bacteria (endosymbionts of Acanthamoeba). Based on high pairwise genetic distances, deep branch, and a distinct phylogenetic grouping, we conclude that some Opiliones harbor a newly discovered Cardinium clade.

  5. Spatial arrangement overrules environmental factors to structure native and non-native assemblages of synanthropic harvestmen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Muster

    Full Text Available Understanding how space affects the occurrence of native and non-native species is essential for inferring processes that shape communities. However, studies considering spatial and environmental variables for the entire community - as well as for the native and non-native assemblages in a single study - are scarce for animals. Harvestmen communities in central Europe have undergone drastic turnovers during the past decades, with several newly immigrated species, and thus provide a unique system to study such questions. We studied the wall-dwelling harvestmen communities from 52 human settlements in Luxembourg and found the assemblages to be largely dominated by non-native species (64% of specimens. Community structure was analysed using Moran's eigenvector maps as spatial variables, and landcover variables at different radii (500 m, 1000 m, 2000 m in combination with climatic parameters as environmental variables. A surprisingly high portion of pure spatial variation (15.7% of total variance exceeded the environmental (10.6% and shared (4% components of variation, but we found only minor differences between native and non-native assemblages. This could result from the ecological flexibility of both, native and non-native harvestmen that are not restricted to urban habitats but also inhabit surrounding semi-natural landscapes. Nevertheless, urban landcover variables explained more variation in the non-native community, whereas coverage of semi-natural habitats (forests, rivers at broader radii better explained the native assemblage. This indicates that some urban characteristics apparently facilitate the establishment of non-native species. We found no evidence for competitive replacement of native by invasive species, but a community with novel combination of native and non-native species.

  6. The distribution of the invasive harvestman Dicranopalpus ramosus in the Netherlands (Arachnida: Opiliones)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordijk, J.; Wijnhoven, H.; Cuppen, J.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Dicranopalpus ramous is one of the most characteristic harvestmen in our country. Because this species is quite easy to identify, many persons were able to contribute to the first distribution map ever presented for a harvestman species in the Netherlands. Remarkably, D. ramosus has succeeded to col

  7. Baltic amber harvestman types (Arachnida: Opiliones: Eupnoi and Dyspnoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Dunlop

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Baltic amber eupnoid and dyspnoid types (Arachnida: Opiliones in the Berendt collection are redescribed from their repository in the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin. Type specimens of Caddo dentipalpis (Koch & Berendt, 1854, Dicranopalpus ramiger (Koch & Berendt, 1854, Nemastoma (? incertum Koch & Berendt, 1854, Mitostoma (? denticulatum (Koch & Berendt, 1854 and Histricostoma (? tuberculatum (Koch & Berendt, 1854 are all redescribed and the first photographs and camera lucida drawings of this material are presented. N.  (? incertum is removed from synonymy with M.  (? denticulatum. The status of the other Baltic amber harvestman types and their affinities are discussed. The type of Sabacon bachofeni Roewer, 1939 (= S. claviger (Menge, 1854 held in the Bavarian State collection, Munich is also redescribed here, but the repository of three other Roewer harvestman types and all of Menge’s types remains uncertain. The problematic Cheiromachus coriaceus Menge, 1854 is considered a nomen dubium, as is Phalangium succineum Presl, 1822, which may not even be a harvestman. Typenmaterial der Weberknecht-Gruppen Eupnoi und Dyspnoi (Arachnida: Opiliones vom Baltischen Bernstein aus der Berendt-Sammlung des Museums für Naturkunde Berlin wurde bearbeitet. Dabei wurde das Typusmaterial von Caddo dentipalpis (Koch & Berendt, 1854, Dicranopalpus ramiger (Koch & Berendt, 1854, Nemastoma (? incertum Koch & Berendt, 1854, Mitostoma (? denticulatum (Koch & Berendt, 1854 und Histricostoma (? tuberculatum (Koch & Berendt, 1854 revidiert und die ersten Fotografien und camera lucida-Zeichnungen dieses Materials hergestellt. N.  (? incertum wurde aus der Synonymie von M.  (? denticulatum herausgenommen. Der Status der anderen Weberknecht Typen aus dem Baltischen Bernstein und ihre Stellung werden diskutiert. Sabacon bachofeni Roewer, 1939 (= S. claviger (Menge, 1854 wird anhand des Holotypus aus der Bayerischen Staatssammlung M

  8. 太行山南段洞栖蝙蝠的分布及栖息地重要性分析%Distribution and analysis of the importance of underground habitats of cave-dwelling bats in the south of Taihang Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 王延校; 何新焕; 牛红星

    2011-01-01

    Populations and underground habitats of cave-dwelling bat species were investigated in the south of Taihang Mountain. Data were collected during 76 surveys in 38 underground sites, 28 of which had not been surveyed previously by bat researchers. Between August 2009 and September 2010, approximately 17 000 bats were recorded. They represented nine species which belonged to four genera of two families. The most abundant species was Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. Data were collected on many cave variables such as the total length of passages (L) , the maximal width ( W) and the maximal height ( H). A conservation scoring system was proposed for the sites investigated, and the roosts were evaluated for their conservation importance. Each site was assigned a combined total by adding scores for the species observed in the cave. Scores for the individual species were obtained by multiplying the species abundance (Ai) and the species points (Mi). The most important sites in the area were Huanglianshu Tunnel and Jianhe Caves. The former served as hibemaculum and nursery roost to c. 2500 bats representing eight species and the latter to c. 2100 bats representing five species. Based on cluster and principal component analyses, there were no significant difference between the two sides of the southern Taihang Mountain in terms of either bat species and population sizes. There were significant difference in the total length of passages, the maximal width, the maximal height and canopy cover between hibernation and non-hibernation sites. Principal component analysis indicated that topographic condition, concealment and human disturbance were the first three components of bat habitat selection. The load of the first three components was 85. 96%. At present, many big caves which contained large bat populations and several species of concern have been, or will be, developed as tourist sites. Cave-dwelling bats in the region are a facing serious crisis of survival. The data will help

  9. Cave dwelling Onychophora from a Lava Tube in the Galapagos

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    Luis Espinasa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new population of velvet worms (Onychophora inhabiting a lava tube cave in the island of Santa Cruz, Galapagos, is reported here. The population size is large, suggesting that they may be troglophilic. Its members are darkly pigmented, with no obvious troglomorphic features. Their 16S rRNA sequence showed no differences when compared to an unidentified species of surface velvet worm from the same island, thus supporting cave and surface populations belong to the same species. Based on the 16S rRNA data, the Galapagos velvet worms derived from an Ecuadorian/Colombian clade, as would be expected of ease of dispersal from the nearest mainland to the Galapagos Islands.

  10. Step back! Niche dynamics in cave-dwelling predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammola, Stefano; Piano, Elena; Isaia, Marco

    2016-08-01

    The geometry of the Hutchinson's hypervolume derives from multiple selective pressures defined, on one hand, by the physiological tolerance of the species, and on the other, by intra- and interspecific competition. The quantification of these evolutionary forces is essential for the understanding of the coexistence of predators in light of competitive exclusion dynamics. We address this topic by investigating the ecological niche of two medium-sized troglophile spiders (Meta menardi and Pimoa graphitica). Over one year, we surveyed several populations in four subterranean sites in the Western Italian Alps, monitoring monthly their spatial and temporal dynamics and the associated physical and ecological variables. We assessed competition between the two species by means of multi regression techniques and by evaluating the intersection between their multidimensional hypervolumes. We detected a remarkable overlap between the microclimatic and trophic niche of M. menardi and P. graphitica, however, the former -being larger in size- resulted the best competitor in proximity of the cave entrance, causing the latter to readjust its spatial niche towards the inner part, where prey availability is scarcer ("step back effect"). In parallel to the slight variations in the subterranean microclimatic condition, the niche of the two species was also found to be seasonal dependent, varying over the year. With this work, we aim at providing new insights about the relationships among predators, demonstrating that energy-poor environments such as caves maintain the potential for diversification of predators via niche differentiation and serve as useful models for theoretical ecological studies.

  11. Stammbewohnende Weberknechte (Arachnida: Opiliones in einem Fichten- einem Misch- und einem Buchenbestand im Solling

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    Sührig, Alexander

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Solling mountains (Southern Lower Saxony, Germany the fauna was sampled for one year with stem eclectors in adjacent spruce, mixed (spruce/beech, and beech stands. The tree age was more than 90 years. Four sampling treatments were established: eclectors on spruce stems in the spruce stand (1, on beech stems in the beech stand (2, and on spruce (3 and beech stems in the mixed stand (4. The following harvestmen species, with 1601 individuals in total, were found: Mitopus morio, Oligolophus tridens, Platybunus bucephalus, Leiobunum blackwalli, and Leiobunum rotundum. The number of individuals was highest on spruce stems in the more open spruce stand, mainly due to Mitopus morio, whereas number of species was highest on beech stems in the mixed stand. Both the number of individuals and species were lowest on beech stems in the beech stand. Here, additional information about the phenology of the harvestmen species is given.

  12. Sinostoma yunnanicum, the first nemastomatine harvestman in China (Arachnida: Opiliones: Nemastomatidae).

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    Martens, Jochen

    2016-06-20

    The easternmost Nemastomatinae species, Sinostoma yunnanicum n. gen., n. sp., from northern Yunnan, China is described. It extends the geographic distribution of Nemastomatinae by roughly 3000 km southeastwards. Within Nemastomatinae Sinostoma displays plesiomorphic characters, including the long, basic bulb of the truncus shaft and the extremely short glans of penis, armed with short robust spines. Sinostoma may represent a relict line in the early evolution of nemastomatine harvestmen.

  13. First experimental evidence that a harvestman (Arachnida: Opiliones detects odors of non-rotten dead prey by olfaction

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    Thaiany Miranda Costa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Harvestmen feed on live, dead and fresh, or decomposing animals, fungi, and plant matter, being very dependent on chemoreception to find food. Herein we performed an experiment to test if individuals of Discocyrtus pectinifemur Mello-Leitão, 1937 (Gonyleptidae (n = 23 behave differently when in contact with olfactory cues from different sources (rotten prey, non-rotten prey and a control. Using dead crickets in a box covered with a mesh, and recording the time the harvestmen spent in the vicinities of the box, we show that D. pectinifemur detects non-rotten prey and stays longer on it than on the other two treatments. Our results contrast with a previous study on another species, showing that we should not generalize results obtained for one species. Our data also suggest that olfactory receptors occur on the legs of these harvestmen and that D. pectinifemur might choose dietary items based on olfaction.

  14. Glacial refugia, recolonization patterns and diversification forces in Alpine-endemic Megabunus harvestmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Gregor A; Papadopoulou, Anna; Muster, Christoph; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Knowles, L Lacey; Steiner, Florian M; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C

    2016-06-01

    The Pleistocene climatic fluctuations had a huge impact on all life forms, and various hypotheses regarding the survival of organisms during glacial periods have been postulated. In the European Alps, evidence has been found in support of refugia outside the ice shield (massifs de refuge) acting as sources for postglacial recolonization of inner-Alpine areas. In contrast, evidence for survival on nunataks, ice-free areas above the glacier, remains scarce. Here, we combine multivariate genetic analyses with ecological niche models (ENMs) through multiple timescales to elucidate the history of Alpine Megabunus harvestmen throughout the ice ages, a genus that comprises eight high-altitude endemics. ENMs suggest two types of refugia throughout the last glacial maximum, inner-Alpine survival on nunataks for four species and peripheral refugia for further four species. In some geographic regions, the patterns of genetic variation are consistent with long-distance dispersal out of massifs de refuge, repeatedly coupled with geographic parthenogenesis. In other regions, long-term persistence in nunataks may dominate the patterns of genetic divergence. Overall, our results suggest that glacial cycles contributed to allopatric diversification in Alpine Megabunus, both within and at the margins of the ice shield. These findings exemplify the power of ENM projections coupled with genetic analyses to identify hypotheses about the position and the number of glacial refugia and thus to evaluate the role of Pleistocene glaciations in driving species-specific responses of recolonization or persistence that may have contributed to observed patterns of biodiversity.

  15. First Amazonian species of Maracaynatum, with comments on the genus (Opiliones: Laniatores: Samoidae).

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    Colmenares, Pío A; Tourinho, Ana Lúcia

    2016-11-17

    Among Opiliones, the family Samoidae Sørensen, 1886 is a group of small Laniatores with a wide tropical distribution. Neotropical samoids are distributed mainly in the Caribbean subregion, with species recorded from insular localities and the Venezuelan coastal range. Previously, for continental South America only three genera and just a few specimens of unidentified Samoidae have been recorded from Brazil. In this paper we describe Maracaynatum isadorae sp. nov., the first record of the genus for Brazil and the first samoid described for the Amazon biome. We also provide an emended diagnosis for the genus and a map with its distribution.

  16. Embryonic development of Ampheres leucopheus and Iporangaia pustulosa (Arachnida: Opiliones: Gonyleptidae).

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    Gnaspini, Pedro; Lerche, Cristiano Frederico

    2010-09-15

    The first studies concerning the embryonic development of harvestmen started in the late 19th century, and focused mostly on holarctic species, and only three species of the suborder Laniatores (the largest, among the four suborders considered presently) were studied. Moreover, the last studies on embryology of harvestmen were made during the late 1970s. This study focused on the embryonic development of Ampheres leucopheus (Gonyleptidae, Caelopyginae) and Iporangaia pustulosa (Gonyleptidae, Progonyleptoidellinae). The embryonic development was followed in the field, by taking daily photographs of different eggs during about 2 months. When laid, eggs of A. leucopheus and I. pustulosa have approximately 1.13 and 1.30 mm in diameter, respectively, and the second is embedded in a large amount of mucus. The eggs grow, mainly due to water absorption at the beginning of the process, and they reach a diameter of about 1.35 and 1.59 mm, respectively, close to hatching. It took, respectively, 29-56 days and 35-66 days from egg laying to hatching. For the description of the embryonic development, we use photographs from the field, SEM micrographs, and histological analysis. This allowed us, for instance, to document the progression of structures and pigmentation directly from live embryos in the field, and to record microstructures, such as the presence of perforations in the cuticle of the embryo in the place where eyes are developing. Yet, contrary to what was expected in the literature, we record an egg tooth in one of the studied laniatoreans.

  17. Sperm morphology of the neotropical harvestman Iporangaia pustulosa (Arachnida: Opiliones): comparative morphology and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, J; Mancini, K; Machado, G; Dolder, H

    2007-03-01

    We describe herein the sperm morphology of the harvestman Iporangaia pustulosa. Adult males were dissected, the reproductive tract was schematized and the seminal vesicle was processed by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The male reproductive tract is composed of a tubular testis, two deferent ducts, a seminal vesicle, a propulsive organ and a penis, similar to that observed in other Opiliones. The spermatozoa from the seminal vesicle are oval, aflagellate and immotile, presenting a nucleus surrounding an invagination of the cytoplasm, as well as a complex acrosome and projections on the cell surface. In the testis, spermatozoa are devoid of projections. In the seminal vesicle, they gradually acquire the projections with tufts adhering to it. Consequently, spermatozoa in various distinct stages of projection development can be found in the seminal vesicle. We believe that these projections (1) could help transport sperm along the male and perhaps female reproductive tracts; (2) are used to anchor the spermatozoa inside the female spermatheca in order to avoid mechanical displacement by the genitalia of other males and (3) may play a role in oocyte recognition. We propose that the evolution of aflagellarity in Opiliones is related to the unique morphology of the female reproductive tract. Since eggs are fertilized on the tip of the ovipositor just prior to being laid, there is no advantage favoring sperm mobility. Additionally, female sperm receptacles are small and males that produced small spermatozoa would have a higher chance of fertilizing more eggs.

  18. Weberknechte (Arachnida: Opiliones in Mischbeständen aus Fichte und Buche im Vergleich zu Fichten- und Buchenreinbeständen – eine Studie im Solling

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    Sührig, Alexander

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Solling mountains (Southern Lower Saxony, Germany a block design study was carried out in 18 old (> 90 yrs and middle-aged (58 - 89 yrs spruce, beech, and mixed forest stands (spruce/beech, arranged in six blocks, each consisting of a spruce, a beech, and a mixed forest stand, to investigate the effect of the forest stand type on the diversity and structure of epigeic macrofauna communities. In each age class, the fauna was sampled for one year by means of soil core samples, ground photo eclectors, and pitfall traps. The results for the harvestmen presented in this contribution focus on pitfall trap catches. In each age class, the numbers of individuals of the harvestmen species and the species density as well as the cover and diversity of the ground vegetation were significantly highest in the more open spruce or spruce and mixed forest stands, according to a nonparametrical twofactorial analysis of variance. Important extrinsic factors influencing the diversity and structure of the harvestmen communities are habitat diversity, stratification of the vegetation, and space for locomotory activity. Additionally, in the present study information about the phenology of the harvestmen species is given. In the Solling mountains 16 harvestmen species have been recorded to date.

  19. Sexually dimorphic tegumental gland openings in Laniatores (Arachnida, Opiliones), with new data on 23 species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemart, Rodrigo H; Pérez-González, Abel; Farine, Jean-Pierre; Gnaspini, Pedro

    2010-06-01

    Sexually dimorphic glands often release sexual pheromones both in vertebrates and invertebrates. Species of Laniatores (Arachnida, Opiliones) seem to depend on chemical communication but few studies have addressed this topic. In this study, we review the literature for the Phalangida and present new data for 23 species of Laniatores. In 16 taxa, we found previously undescribed sexually dimorphic glandular openings on the femur, patella, metatarsus, and tarsus of legs I and metatarsus of legs III and IV. For the other species, we provide scanning electron micrographs of previously undescribed sexually dimorphic setae and pegs located on swollen regions of the legs. We also list additional species in which males have swollen regions on the legs, including the tibia, metatarsus, and tarsus of legs I, trochanter and tibia of legs II, femur, metatarsus, and tarsus of legs III, and metatarsus and tarsus of legs IV. The function and biological role of the secretions released by these glands are discussed.

  20. Deep genetic divergences in Aoraki denticulata (Arachnida, Opiliones, Cyphophthalmi): a widespread 'mite harvestman' defies DNA taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Sarah L; Baker, Jessica M; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2007-12-01

    Aoraki denticulata (Arachnida, Opiliones, Cyphophthalmi, Pettalidae), a widespread 'mite harvestman' endemic to the South Island of New Zealand, is found in leaf littler habitats throughout Nelson and Marlborough, and as far south as Arthur's Pass. We investigated the phylogeography and demographic history of A. denticulata in the first genetic population-level study within Opiliones. A total of 119 individuals from 17 localities were sequenced for 785 bp of the gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I; 102 of these individuals were from the Aoraki subspecies A. denticulata denticulata and the remaining 17 were from the subspecies A. denticulata major. An extraordinarily high degree of genetic diversity was discovered in A. denticulata denticulata, with average uncorrected p-distances between populations as high as 19.2%. AMOVA, average numbers of pairwise differences, and pairwise F(ST) values demonstrated a significant amount of genetic diversity both within and between populations of this subspecies. Phylogenetic analysis of the data set revealed many well-supported groups within A. denticulata denticulata, generally corresponding to clusters of specimens from single populations with short internal branches, but separated by long branches from individuals from other populations. No haplotypes were shared between populations of the widespread small subspecies, A. denticulata denticulata. These results indicate a subspecies within which very little genetic exchange occurs between populations, a result consistent with the idea that Cyphophthalmi are poor dispersers. The highly structured populations and deep genetic divergences observed in A. denticulata denticulata may indicate the presence of cryptic species. However, we find a highly conserved morphology across sampling localities and large genetic divergences within populations from certain localities, equivalent to those typically found between populations from different localities. Past geological events may have

  1. World Checklist of Opiliones species (Arachnida. Part 1: Laniatores – Travunioidea and Triaenonychoidea

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    Adriano Kury

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Comprising more than 6500 species, Opiliones is the third most diverse order of Arachnida, after the megadiverse Acari and Araneae. The database referred here is part 1 of 12 of a project containing an intended worldwide checklist of species and subspecies of Opiliones as Darwin Core archives, and it includes the superfamilies Travunioidea and Triaenonychoidea. These two superfamilies are often treated together under the denomination of Insidiatores. In this Part 1, a total of 571 species and subspecies are listed. Briggsidae and Cladonychiidae are both downgraded to subfamilies of Travuniidae. Peltonychia Roewer, 1935 is an available name and senior synonym of Hadziana Roewer, 1935 and is herein revalidated. Seven genera of Triaenonychidae described by Lawrence between 1931 and 1933 originally failed to comply ICZN rules for availability (Art. 13.3. All of them only became available when Staręga (1992 designated a type species for each. Therefore, the correct authorships of Austromontia Lawrence, 1931, Biacumontia Lawrence, 1931, Graemontia Lawrence, 1931, Larifugella Lawrence, 1933, Mensamontia Lawrence, 1931, Monomontia Lawrence, 1931 and Rostromontia Lawrence, 1931 are all Staręga, 1992. Fumontana Shear, 1977, originally referred only to subfamily Triaenonychinae (as opposed to Soerensenellinae then and not corresponding to present Triaenonychinae, not to any tribe (which in turn correspond to modern subfamilies is herein included in the subfamily Triaenonychinae. Picunchenops Maury, 1988 originally not included in any tribe of Triaenonychidae, is herein included in the subfamily Triaenonychinae. Trojanella Karaman, 2005, originally ranked as Travunioidea incertae sedis, is herein included in the Travuniidae Travuniinae. Nuncia ovata Roewer, 1915 (synonymized with Triaenonyx cockayni Hogg, 1920 by Forster (1954, but with inverted precedence is here combined as Nuncia coriacea ovata Roewer, 1915 as correct senior synonym instead of

  2. Sexually dimorphic legs in a neotropical harvestman (Arachnida, Opiliones): ornament or weapon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemart, Rodrigo H; Osses, Francini; Chelini, Marie Claire; Macías-Ordóñez, Rogelio; Machado, Glauco

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of sexually dimorphic traits has been the focus of much theoretical work, but empirical approaches to this topic have not been equally prolific. Males of the neotropical family Gonyleptidae usually present a strong fourth pair of legs armed with spines, but their functional significance is unknown. We investigated the putative functions of the leg armature in the harvestman Neosadocus maximus. Being a non-visual species, the spines on male legs can only be perceived by females through physical contact. Thus, we could expect females to touch the armature on the legs of their mates if they were to evaluate it. However, we found no support for this hypothesis. We did show that (1) leg armature is used as a weapon in contests between males and (2) spines and associated sensilla are sexually dimorphic structures involved in "nipping behavior", during which a winner emerged in most fights. Finally, we demonstrate that five body structures directly involved in male-male fights show positive allometry in males, presenting slopes higher than 1, whereas the same structures show either no or negative allometry in the case of females. In conclusion, leg armature in male harvestmen is clearly used as a device in intrasexual contests.

  3. Taxonomic notes on the genus Auranus (Opiliones, Laniatores, Stygnidae), with description of two new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, Pío A; Porto, Willians; Tourinho, Ana Lúcia

    2016-04-12

    Among the Amazonian families of harvestmen the members of Stygnidae are better known due to the recent revision of the family and efforts of specialists describing new taxa in the last few years. Species of Amazonian genus Auranus Mello-Leitão, 1941, have been collected in several inventories that were carried out in different locations of the Amazon basin. In this paper we provide a new diagnosis for Auranus, and the description of two new species: Auranus leonidas sp. nov. and Auranus xerxes sp. nov. from the Brazilian states of Roraima and Amazonas, respectively. We also offer complementary genital descriptions of Auranus hehu Pinto-da-Rocha & Tourinho 2012, Auranus parvus Mello-Leitão, 1941, and Auranus tepui Pinto-da-Rocha & Tourinho 2012. Five species are recognized in Auranus, including the two new species described in this paper. The lamina parva modified into a calyx is proposed as putative synapomorphy for the genus Auranus. Therefore, A. hoeferscovitorum, which does not possess this character, is removed from Auranus. Instead we propose for it the new combination Verrucastygnus hoeferscovitorum comb. nov. We also provide a key to the males of Auranus, and a map with the distribution for all species examined in this work.

  4. Review of terminology for the outline of dorsal scutum in Laniatores (Arachnida, Opiliones).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kury, Adriano B; Medrano, Miguel

    2016-03-29

    In many Opiliones (notably the Laniatores) the five most anterior opisthosomal tergites are fused with the carapace forming the so called dorsal scutum (DS) (Latreille 1804; Simon 1879; Hadži 1942) with a highly variable shape arising from multiple factors, such as differential development of musculature (especially of coxa IV), internal organs and influence of appendages (Loman 1903; Winkler 1957). The different degrees of fusion of the tergites were first studied by Hadži (1942), who proposed a terminology for them. This terminology was adopted and enhanced by Kratochvíl (1958) and Martens (1978). A shield formed by the fusion of the carapace with abdominal tergites I to V is called scutum magnum (Hadži 1942). The shield formed by the fusion of carapace with abdominal tergites I to VII is called scutum complexum (Kratochvíl 1958) and occurs in the males of Heteropachylinae Kury, 1994 (Kury 1994) and Paralolidae Kratochvíl, 1958 (Kratochvíl 1958). Finally, the scutum completum (Hadži 1942) is formed by the complete fusion of the carapace and abdominal scutum, formed by tergites I to VIII, and occurs in the Sandokanidae (Martens 1978). In this paper we focus on the different forms of the scutum magnum.

  5. Les opilions dans les écosystèmes montagnards pyrénéens. I Les opilions de la haute vallée d'Ossau (Pyrénées-Atlantiques; France

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    D'Amico, F.

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available A study carried out in upper-Ossau valley (Pyrénées- Atlantiques; France between 1987 and 1989 has revealed a high diversity of Opilionid fauna in such mountain area: eighteen species have been found. In this paper, the main features of their phenology, altitudinal distribution and ecology are presented.

    [fr] Une étude menée sur les Opilions (Arachnida en haute-vallée d'Ossau (Pyrénées-Atlantiques; France entre 1987 et 1989 a permis de souligner la richesse et la diversité de ce groupe dans les écosystèmes montagnards: dix-huit espèces ont été inventoriées. Nous présentons ici les principaux aspects de leur phénologie, de leur distribution altitudinale et de leur écologie. [es] Un estudio sobre los Opiliones (Arachnida en el Alto Valle de Ossau (Pirineos Atlánticos, Francia entre 1987 y 1989 ha permitido señalarla riqueza y diversidad de este grupo en los ecosistemas de montaña: dieciocho especies se han inventariado. Presentamos aquí los principales aspectos de su fenología, distribución altitudinal y ecología.

  6. Sandokanid phylogeny based on eight molecular markers--the evolution of a southeast Asian endemic family of Laniatores (Arachnida, Opiliones).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2009-08-01

    Little is known about the familial and generic level phylogeny of Laniatores, the most diverse suborder of Opiliones. We investigated the internal phylogeny of the family Sandokanidae (formerly Oncopodidae), the putative sister group of the other families of the highly diverse infraorder Grassatores (Opiliones: Laniatores), on the basis of sequence data from eight molecular loci: 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), histones H3, H4, and U2 snRNA. Exemplars of all recognized sandokanid genera, as well as a putative new genus from Thailand, were included. Data analyses were based on a direct optimization approach using parsimony, as well as maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches on static alignments. The results obtained include the monophyly of Sandokanidae and its stability under a variety of parameter sets and methods. The internal phylogeny is relatively robust to parameter choice and demonstrates the monophyly of nearly all described genera, corroborating previous morphological observations. However, conflict among data sets exists with respect to the monophyly of the largest genus Gnomulus. Morphological character evolution, particularly of characters used to define genera, such as tarsal count and male genitalia, is reexamined and the performance of the eight molecular markers in phylogenetic estimation is evaluated.

  7. Is radon emission in caves causing deletions in satellite DNA sequences of cave-dwelling crickets?

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    Giuliana Allegrucci

    Full Text Available The most stable isotope of radon, 222Rn, represents the major source of natural radioactivity in confined environments such as mines, caves and houses. In this study, we explored the possible radon-related effects on the genome of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae sampled in caves with different concentrations of radon. We analyzed specimens from ten populations belonging to two genetically closely related species, D. geniculata and D. laetitiae, and explored the possible association between the radioactivity dose and the level of genetic polymorphism in a specific family of satellite DNA (pDo500 satDNA. Radon concentration in the analyzed caves ranged from 221 to 26,000 Bq/m3. Specimens coming from caves with the highest radon concentration showed also the highest variability estimates in both species, and the increased sequence heterogeneity at pDo500 satDNA level can be explained as an effect of the mutation pressure induced by radon in cave. We discovered a specific category of nuclear DNA, the highly repetitive satellite DNA, where the effects of the exposure at high levels of radon-related ionizing radiation are detectable, suggesting that the satDNA sequences might be a valuable tool to disclose harmful effects also in other organisms exposed to high levels of radon concentration.

  8. Influence of Mining Pollution on Metal Bioaccumulation and Biomarker Responses in Cave Dwelling Fish, Clarias gariepinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Preez, Gerhard; Wepener, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Cave ecosystems remain largely unstudied and risk being severely degraded as a result of anthropogenic activities. The Wonderfontein Cave, situated in the extensive gold mining region of the Witwatersrand Basin, is one such system that hosts a population of Clarias gariepinus, which is exposed to the influx of polluted mine water from the Wonderfontein Spruit River. The aim of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of metals, as well as relevant biomarkers, in C. gariepinus specimens sampled from the Wonderfontein Cave during high (April 2013) and low (September 2013) flow surveys. Results were also compared to a surface population associated with the Wonderfontein Spruit River. There were temporal differences in metal bioaccumulation patterns and this was attributed to the lack of dilution during the low flow period. Metals associated with acid mine drainage, i.e. Co, Mn and Zn were significantly higher in the Wonderfontein Cave population and were reflected in an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers (catalase, protein carbonyls and superoxide dismutase) and the induction of metallothionein, a biomarker of metal exposure. The surface population was exposed to metals associated with geological weathering processes, i.e. Fe and Al.

  9. On some new cave-dwelling ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Trechini from eastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrbica Maja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The following new cavernicolous ground beetle taxa are described from three caves in eastern Serbia: Duvalius (Paraduvalius trifunovici sp. n., from the Mandina Pećina Cave, village of Zlot, near Bor, Kučajske Planine Mts., D. (P. rtanjensis sp. n., from the Golema Porica Pit, Mt. Rtanj, and Glabroduvalius gen. n., G. tupiznicensis sp. n., from the Gornja Lenovačka Pećina Cave, village of Lenovac, near Zaječar, Mt. Tupižnica. The new taxa are easily distinguished from related organisms. All important morphological features have been listed, along with the diagnoses and illustrations of the taxa. The new taxa are relicts and endemics of eastern Serbia and probably belong to old phyletic lineages of Tertiary or even pre-Tertiary origin. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173038, br. 43001 i br. 43002

  10. Local scale connectivity in the cave-dwelling brooding fish Apogon imberbis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, Delphine; Rastorgueff, Pierre-Alexandre; Selva, Marjorie; Chevaldonné, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    A lower degree of population connectivity is generally expected for species living in a naturally fragmented habitat than for species living in a continuum of suitable environment. Due to clear-cut environmental conditions with the surrounding littoral zone, underwater marine caves of the Mediterranean Sea constitute a good model to explore the effect of habitat discontinuity on the population structure of their inhabitants. With this goal, the genetic population structure of Apogon imberbis, a mouth-brooding teleost, was explored using the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene and 7 nuclear microsatellite loci from 164 fishes sampled at the micro-scale (ca. 40 km) of the Marseille area (Bay of Marseille and Calanques coast, in NW Mediterranean). Both marker types indicated a low level of genetic structure within the studied area. We propose that each suitable crack and cavity is used as a stepping-stone habitat between disconnected large cave-habitats. This, together with larval dispersal, ensures enough gene flow between caves to homogenize the genetic pattern at microscale while isolation by distance and by open waters could explain the small structure observed. The present study indicates that the effect of natural fragmentation in connectivity disruption can largely be counter-balanced by life history traits and overlooked details in habitat preferences.

  11. First discovery of a cave-dwelling Tineid moth (Lepidoptera, Tineidae) from East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bong-Kyu Byun; Sat-Byul Shin; Yang-Seop Bae; Do Sung Kim; Yong Geun Choi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report Monopis crocicapitella (Clemens, 1859) (Tineidae), which was collected from bat guano in a cave in the southern region of Korea, for the first time from East Asia. We briefly redescribe and illustrate the external morphology and genital structures of both sexes. Also, we discuss the local habitat characteristics and some of the ecological information that was observed during our field investi-gation.

  12. Cave-dwelling cyclopoids (Crustacea, Copepoda) from Venezia Giulia (northeastern Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoch, Fabio

    1987-01-01

    Description of some troglobiont cyclopids from cave waters of Venezia Giulia (northeastern Italy). Acanthocyclops gordani Petkovski, Acanthocyclops venustus stammen (Kiefer), Acanthocyclops troglophilus (Kiefer), Diacyclops charon (Kiefer) and Diacyclops tantalus (Kiefer), are recorded for the first

  13. Cave-dwelling bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera and conservation concerns in South central Mindanao, Philippines

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    Krizler C. Tanalgo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The stable microclimate in caves provides a relatively constant habitat for many bat species in the Philippines, but human encroachment continues to disrupt this habitat and imperil many of the species roosting in the caves.  In South central Mindanao, the diversity and conservation status of cave bats remain undocumented and unexplored.  We employed mist-netting to capture bats from five different caves within the town of Kabacan, northern Cotabato, Philippines.  A total of 14 bat species were identified including the Philippine endemics Hipposideros pygmaeus and Ptenochirus jagori and the threatened Megaerops wetmorei. However, despite the declining conservation status of the bats, local disturbance such as bat hunting for bush meat and unregulated tourism are currently taking place in the caves.  Large species such as Eonycteris spelaea and Rousettus amplexicaudatus are killed almost every day for food and trade.  Therefore, the high species richness, and the presence of endemic and threatened species coupled with the occurrence of anthropogenic disturbances in caves suggests the need for an urgent and effective conservation intervention involving the local government and public community. 

  14. A taxonomic catalogue of the Dyspnoi Hansen and Sørensen, 1904 (Arachnida: Opiliones).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhofer, Axel L

    2013-01-01

    An update of the systematics and determination key of the Opiliones suborder Dyspnoi is provided. The included catalogue represents the first comprehensive species and synonymy listing since Roewer (1923). It summarises all taxonomic changes to date and attempts to be a sound basis against the exponential growing number of online errors, for which examples are given. Species taxonomy features most obvious changes within the Nemastomatidae. The number of species in the collective genus Nemastoma is reduced from 96 (Hallan 2005) to its sensu stricto definition of 7, and the excluded names are transferred to other genera or considered as nomina dubia, predominantly in Paranemastoma. The systematics of the superfamily Ischyropsalidoidea is discussed and family-level diagnoses are renewed to support taxonomical changes: The morphological heterogeneity in the Sabaconidae is resolved by reverting the family to its original monogeneric state. Taracus and Hesperonemastoma are separated as Taracidae fam. n., and Crosbycus is tentatively transferred to this assembly. The remaining genera of Ceratolasmatidae, Acuclavella and Ceratolasma, are included as subfamily Ceratolasmatinae in the Ischyropsalididae and Ischyropsalis is assigned subfamily status, respectively. Other nomenclatural acts are restricted to species-group level with the following synonymies established: Sabacon jonesi Goodnight & Goodnight, 1942 syn. n. (=cavicolens (Packard, 1884)), Dicranolasma diomedeum Kulczyński, 1907 syn. n. (=hirtum Loman, 1894), Mitostoma (Mitostoma) sketi Hadži, 1973a syn. n. (=chrysomelas (Hermann, 1804)), Mitostoma asturicum Roewer, 1951 syn. n. (=pyrenaeum (Simon, 1879a)), Nemastoma formosum Roewer, 1951 syn. n. (=Nemastomella bacillifera bacillifera (Simon, 1879a)), Nemastoma reimoseri Roewer, 1951 syn. n. (=Paranemastoma bicuspidatum (C.L. Koch, 1835)), Nemastoma tunetanum Roewer, 1951 syn. n. (=Paranemastoma bureschi (Roewer, 1926)), Phalangium flavimanum C.L. Koch, 1835 syn. n

  15. Marco Isaia, Mauro Paschetta, Enrico Lana, Paolo Pantini, Axel L. Schönhofer, Erhard Christian & Guido Bandino (2011: Aracnidi sotterranei delle Alpi Occidentali italiane/Subterranean Arachnids of the Western Italian Alps (Arachnida: Araneae, Opiliones, Palpigradi, Pseudoscorpiones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaenker, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available book review: Marco Isaia, Mauro Paschetta, Enrico Lana, Paolo Pantini, Axel L. Schönhofer, Erhard Christian & Guido Bandino (2011: Aracnidi sotterranei delle Alpi Occidentali italiane/Subterranean Arachnids of the Western Italian Alps (Arachnida: Araneae, Opiliones, Palpigradi, Pseudoscorpiones

  16. From the mountains to the coast and back again: Ancient biogeography in a radiation of short-range endemic harvestmen from California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emata, K N; Hedin, M

    2016-05-01

    The harvestmen genus Calicina is represented by 25 short-range endemic species occurring in the western Sierra Nevada, Transverse and Coast Ranges of California. Our principal aim was to reconstruct the temporal and spatial biogeographic history of this arachnid lineage. We inferred a time-calibrated species tree for 21 of 25 described Calicina species using multiple genes and multilocus coalescent-based methods. This species tree was used as a framework for algorithmic biogeographic and divergence time analyses, and a phylogenetic canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was used to examine the relationship between morphological evolution and environmental variables. Species tree and biogeographic analyses indicate that high-elevation Sierran taxa are early-diverging in Calicina, with subsequent biogeographic "criss-crossing" of lineages from the Sierra Nevada to the Coast Ranges, back to the Sierra Nevada, then back to Coast Ranges. In both the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges, distantly-related parapatric lineages essentially never occur in sympatry. CCA reveals that in both the Coast Ranges and the Sierra Nevada, distant phylogenetic relatives evolve convergent morphologies. Our evidence shows that Calicina is clearly dispersal-limited, with an ancient biogeographic history that provides unique insight into the complex geologic evolution of California since the mid-Paleogene.

  17. Catalogue of Opiliones (Arachnida) types deposited in the Arachnida and Myriapoda collection of the Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronato-Ribeiro, Amanda; Pinto-Da-Rocha, Ricardo; Rheims, Cristina Anne

    2013-01-01

    A catalogue of the Opiliones types of the "Instituto Butantan", São Paulo, Brazil is given, surveying the collection after severe fire damaged in 2010. Of a total of 91 species with type material listed for the collection, 69 could be located, and 22 are considered lost. The species are arranged according to their families and genera. The collection of Salvador de Toledo Piza Jr., housed at the Museu de Zoologia "Luiz de Queiroz", was donated to the Instituto Butantan in 2009. These types received a new accession number and are listed under this new affiliation for the first time.

  18. Longipin: An Amyloid Antimicrobial Peptide from the Harvestman Acutisoma longipes (Arachnida: Opiliones) with Preferential Affinity for Anionic Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Isabel de Fátima Correia; de Melo, Robson Lopes; Riske, Karin A.; Daffre, Sirlei; Montich, Guillermo; da Silva Junior, Pedro Ismael

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to vertebrate immune systems, invertebrates lack an adaptive response and rely solely on innate immunity in which antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play an essential role. Most of them are membrane active molecules that are typically unstructured in solution and adopt secondary/tertiary structures upon binding to phospholipid bilayers. This work presents the first characterization of a constitutive AMP from the hemolymph of an Opiliones order animal: the harvestman Acutisoma longipes. This peptide was named longipin. It presents 18 aminoacid residues (SGYLPGKEYVYKYKGKVF) and a positive net charge at neutral pH. No similarity with other AMPs was observed. However, high sequence similarity with heme-lipoproteins from ticks suggested that longipin might be a protein fragment. The synthetic peptide showed enhanced antifungal activity against Candida guilliermondii and C. tropicalis yeasts (MIC: 3.8–7.5 μM) and did not interfered with VERO cells line viability at all concentrations tested (200–0.1 μM). This selectivity against microbial cells is related to the highest affinity of longipin for anionic charged vesicles (POPG:POPC) compared to zwitterionic ones (POPC), once microbial plasma membrane are generally more negatively charged compared to mammalian cells membrane. Dye leakage from carboxyfluorescein-loaded POPG:POPC vesicles suggested that longipin is a membrane active antimicrobial peptide and FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the peptide chain is mainly unstructured in solution or in the presence of POPC vesicles. However, upon binding to POPG:POPC vesicles, the FT-IR spectrum showed bands related to β-sheet and amyloid-like fibril conformations in agreement with thioflavin-T binding assays, indicating that longipin is an amyloid antimicrobial peptide. PMID:27997568

  19. Under the volcano: phylogeography and evolution of the cave-dwelling Palmorchestia hypogaea (Amphipoda, Crustacea at La Palma (Canary Islands

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    Oromí Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amphipod crustacean Palmorchestia hypogaea occurs only in La Palma (Canary Islands and is one of the few terrestrial amphipods in the world that have adapted to a strictly troglobitic life in volcanic cave habitats. A surface-dwelling closely related species (Palmorchestia epigaea lives in the humid laurel forest on the same island. Previous studies have suggested that an ancestral littoral Orchestia species colonized the humid forests of La Palma and that subsequent drought episodes in the Canaries reduced the distribution of P. epigaea favouring the colonization of lava tubes through an adaptive shift. This was followed by dispersal via the hypogean crevicular system. Results P. hypogaea and P. epigaea did not form reciprocally monophyletic mitochondrial DNA clades. They showed geographically highly structured and genetically divergent populations with current gene flow limited to geographically close surface locations. Coalescence times using Bayesian estimations assuming a non-correlated relaxed clock with a normal prior distribution of the age of La Palma, together with the lack of association of habitat type with ancestral and recent haplotypes, suggest that their adaptation to cave life is relatively ancient. Conclusion The data gathered here provide evidence for multiple invasions of the volcanic cave systems that have acted as refuges. A re-evaluation of the taxonomic status of the extant species of Palmorchestia is needed, as the division of the two species by habitat and ecology is unnatural. The information obtained here, and that from previous studies on hypogean fauna, shows the importance of factors such as the uncoupling of morphological and genetic evolution, the role of climatic change and regressive evolution as key processes in leading to subterranean biodiversity.

  20. Rowlandius dumitrescoae species group: new diagnosis, key and description of new cave-dwelling species from Brazil (Schizomida, Hubbardiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giupponi, Alessandro Ponce de Leão; de Miranda, Gustavo Silva; Villarreal, Osvaldo M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Rowlandius dumitrescoae species group is reviewed and rediagnosed, and its composition is revised. The group now includes Rowlandius cousinensis, Rowlandius decui, Rowlandius dumitrescoae, Rowlandius insignis, Rowlandius linsduarte, Rowlandius monensis, Rowlandius peckorum, Rowlandius potiguar, Rowlandius sul, Rowlandius ubajara, and Rowlandius pedrosoi sp. n. A new species is described from a cave in northeast Brazil (Santa Quitéria, Ceará). Identification keys and distributional maps are provided for the species of the group. Sixteen species of Schizomida, including five of Rowlandius, are currently recognized from Brazil. PMID:27920601

  1. 建筑学前沿与窑洞建筑%Cutting Edge of Architecture and Cave Dwelling Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘亚栋; 赵西平; 阮丹

    2014-01-01

    This paper talked from the architect Wangshu who is widely recognized in contemporary China, talked about tra-ditional and ecological levels in “architectural meaning”, and then referred to the Northern Shaanxi cave. Through the discu-ssion of cave dwel ing, the author obtained that the low tech-nology strategy is a way to solve the ecological and environ-mental protection and energy consumption problem.%本文从当代中国广受认可的建筑师王澍谈起,谈到了“建筑意”中传统与生态的层面,进而提到了陕北窑洞。通过对窑洞的探讨,得出了低技策略是解决生态环保及能耗问题的一种方式。

  2. A study on the effects of golf course organophosphate and carbamate pesticides on endangered, cave-dwelling arthropods Kauai, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Three endemic species, two arthropods and one isopod, are present in the Kauai caves. These species are critical components of the cave ecosystems and are possibly...

  3. A new genus and species for the first recorded cave-dwelling Cavernicola (Platyhelminthes from South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Leal-Zanchet

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Species diversity of Brazilian cave fauna has been seriously underestimated. A karst area located in Felipe Guerra, northeastern Brazil, which is a hotspot of subterranean diversity in Brazil, has revealed more than 20 troglobitic species, most of them still undescribed. Based on recent samplings in this karst area, we document the occurrence of the suborder Cavernicola (Platyhelminthes in South American hypogean environments for the first time and describe a new genus and species for this suborder. Hausera Leal-Zanchet & Souza, gen. n. has features concordant with those defined for the family Dimarcusidae. The new genus is characterized by two unique features, viz. an intestine extending dorsally to the brain and ovovitelline ducts located dorsally to the nerve cords, which is complemented by a combination of other characters. The type-specimens of Hausera hauseri Leal-Zanchet & Souza, sp. n. are typical stygobionts, unpigmented and eyeless, and they may constitute an oceanic relict as is the case of other stygobiotic invertebrates found in this karst area in northeastern Brazil.

  4. Two new cave-dwelling genera of short-tailed whip-scorpions from Brazil (Arachnida: Schizomida: Hubbardiidae

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    Ricardo Pinto-da-Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Two new genera of short-tailed whip-scorpions are described based on material from Brazilian iron ore and canga caves in the Carajás region, Pará, Brazil. Naderiore gen. nov. with a single species N. carajas sp. nov. and also monotypic Cangazomus gen. nov. (type species C. xikrin sp. nov.. The relationships of the two new genera with previously described genera are discussed. Naderiore most closely resembles Adisomus Cokendolpher & Reddell, 2000, Piaroa Villarreal, Tourinho & Giupponi, 2008 and Calima Moreno-González & Villarreal, 2012, and can be distinguished from them by Dm3 modified as macrosetae in the male flagellum. Cangazomus most closely resembles Naderiore , Adisomus Cokendolpher & Reddell, 2000, and Piaroa Villarreal, Tourinho & Giupponi, 2008. It differs from all of them by the presence of two pairs of ramified spermathecal lobes, each composed of a differentiated stalk and distoterminal ramified bulbs, chitinized arch without anterior branch and notched lateral tip, pedipalps unarmed and not sexually dimorphic, and the male flagellar setae Dm3 as a microsetae.

  5. More on the Mesopotamian-Yungas disjunction in subtropical and temperate Argentina: Bioclimatic distribution models of the harvestman Discocyrtus dilatatus (Opiliones: Gonyleptidae

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    Julia Vergara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this paper, the potential distribution of the Mesopotamian harvestman Discocyrtus dilatatus Sørensen, 1884 is modeled, and the species' bioclimatic profile is described. Models were built with the presence-only methods Maxent and Bioclim, using 85 unique records (of which 49 are new and 11 non-correlated bioclimatic variables as predictors. Both Maxent and Bioclim supported the Mesopotamian-Yungas disjunct pattern observed in D. dilatatus, and confirmed the hypothesis that the sub-xeric Dry Chaco is an effective barrier for the two portions of the range. Similarly to results of previous studies on other Mesopotamian harvestmen, temperature variables proved more relevant than precipitation variables in the final models. In the combined overall score obtained with Maxent, bc4-temperature seasonality ranked as the most relevant, and only one precipitation variable (bc18-precipitation of warmest quarter, in second place ranked among the top five. In the Most Limiting Factor analysis, which identifies the relevant variables in a local scale, temperature variables were again more determining than precipitation variables in most of the range. One single variable, bc5-maximal temperature of warmest month, proved critical near the boundaries of the modeled range and the Dry Chaco, suggesting that extremely high temperatures (and not the supposed aridity are responsible for the 450 km distribution gap.

  6. New records and distribution modeling of Gryne orensis (Sørensen) (Opiliones: Cosmetidae) support the Mesopotamian-Yungas disjunction in subtropical Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Luis E; Vergara, Julia

    2013-11-12

    The presence of Gryne orensis (Sørensen) (Opiliones: Cosmetidae) in a Yungas locality (northwestern Argentina) is reported for the first time, providing new evidence for the Mesopotamian-Yungas disjunct pattern. Combining a total of 19 new Mesopotamian records with previous, reliable citations from the literature, a dataset of 45 points was used to model the potential distribution of the species, using the presence-only methods BIOCLIM and MAXENT. Models supported the existence of a distributional gap across the Semiarid Chaco. The imprecise literature record from "El Impenetrable", province of Chaco, is assigned to three tentative locations to evaluate if models are affected by their inclusion; in all cases, the disjunction was maintained. It was thereby estimated that the actual record might have originated in a site closer to the Humid Chaco and/or associated to streams. This paper also provides a statement of the bioclimatic profile and identification of major environmental constraints that define the range of G. orensis. 

  7. Fauna Simalurensis : Opiliones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roewer, C.Fr.

    1924-01-01

    Die in dieser Arbeit beschriebenen Opilioniden wurden von Herrn Edw. Jacobson im Jahre 1913 gesammelt auf der an der Westküste Sumatras gelegenen Insel Simalur und deren Satellit-Insel (Pulu) Babi, welch letztere auf 2° 7" nördl. Br. und 96° 40" östl. L. gelegen und zusammen mit der Insel (Pulu) Las

  8. Descriptions of two new, cryptic species of Metasiro (Arachnida: Opiliones: Cyphophthalmi: Neogoveidae) from South Carolina, USA, including a discussion of mitochondrial mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, Ronald M; Wheeler, Ward C

    2014-06-09

    Specimens of Metasiro from its three known disjunct population centers in the southeastern US were examined and had a 769 bp fragement of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequenced. These populations are located in the western panhandle of Florida and nearby areas of Georgia, in the Savannah River delta of South Carolina, and on Sassafras Mt. in South Carolina. This range extends over as much as 500 km, which is very large for a species of cyphophthalmid harvestmen and presents a degree of physical separation among populations such that we would expect them to actually be distinguishable species. We examined the morphology, including the spermatopositors of males, and sequences from 221 specimens. We found no discernible differences in the morphologies of specimens from the different populations, but corrected pairwise distances of COI were about 15% among the three population centers. We also analyzed COI data using a General Mixed Yule Coalescent (GMYC) model implemented in the R package SPLITS; with a single threshold, the most likely model had four species within Metasiro. Given this level of molecular divergence, the monophyly of the population haplotypes, and the number of exclusive COI nucleotide and amino acid differences distinguishing the populations, we here raise the Savannah River and Sassafras Mt. populations to species status: M. savannahensis sp. nov., and M. sassafrasensis sp. nov., respectively. This restricts M. americanus (Davis, 1933) to just the Lower Chattahoochee Watershed, which in this study includes populations along the Apalachicola River and around Florida Caverns State Park. GMYC models reconstructed the two main haplotype clades within M. americanus as different species, but they are not exclusive to different areas. We estimate COI percent divergence rates in certain cyphophthalmid groups and discuss problems with historical measures of this rate. We hypothesize that Metasiro began diversifying over 20

  9. New species in the Sitalcina sura species group (Opiliones, Laniatores, Phalangodidae), with evidence for a biogeographic link between California desert canyons and Arizona sky islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, Angela; Hedin, Marshal

    2016-01-01

    The western United States is home to numerous narrowly endemic harvestman taxa (Arachnida, Opiliones), including members of the genus Sitalcina Banks, 1911. Sitalcina is comprised of three species groups, including the monospecific Sitalcina californica and Sitalcina lobata groups, and the Sitalcina sura group with eight described species. All species in the Sitalcina sura group have very small geographic distributions, with group members distributed like disjunct "beads on a string" from Monterey south to southern California and southeast to the sky-island mountain ranges of southern Arizona. Here, molecular phylogenetic and species delimitation analyses were conducted for all described species in the Sitalcina sura group, plus several newly discovered populations. Species trees were reconstructed using multispecies coalescent methods implemented in *BEAST, and species delimitation was accomplished using Bayes Factor Delimitation (BFD). Based on quantitative species delimitation results supported by consideration of morphological characters, two new species (Sitalcina oasiensis sp. n., Sitalcina ubicki sp. n.) are described. We also provide a description of the previously unknown male of Sitalcina borregoensis Briggs, 1968. Molecular phylogenetic evidence strongly supports distinctive desert versus coastal clades, with desert canyon taxa from southern California more closely related to Arizona taxa than to geographically proximate California coastal taxa. We hypothesize that southern ancestry and plate tectonics have played a role in the diversification history of this animal lineage, similar to sclerophyllous plant taxa of the Madro-Tertiary Geoflora. Molecular clock analyses for the Sitalcina sura group are generally consistent with these hypotheses. We also propose that additional Sitalcina species await discovery in the desert canyons of southern California and northern Baja, and the mountains of northwestern mainland Mexico.

  10. A companion to Part 2 of the World Checklist of Opiliones species (Arachnida): Laniatores – Samooidea, Zalmoxoidea and Grassatores incertae sedis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-González, Abel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background A series of databases is being prepared to list the valid species of Opiliones worldwide. This paper containing nomenclatural acts is meant to accompany Part 2, which includes the members of the infraorder Grassatores of the superfamilies Samooidea and Zalmoxoidea plus the Grassatores currently not allocated to any family (i.e. Grassatores incertae sedis). New information The following 32 taxonomic changes are proposed here: (1-3) The Afrotropical genera Hovanoceros Lawrence, 1959, Malgaceros Lawrence, 1959 and Tetebius Roewer, 1949 (all currently in Samoidae) are all newly transferred to Biantidae. (4-5) Microminua soerenseni Soares & Soares, 1954, from Brazil is newly transferred to Tibangara (Gonyleptoidea: Cryptogeobiidae), newly combined as Tibangara soerenseni new comb., new familial allocation for the species. (6-7) The new genus Llaguenia Gen. nov is erected for the South American species Zamora peruviana Roewer, 1956, newly combined as Llaguenia peruviana new comb., and newly placed in Gonyleptoidea: Cranaidae (Prostygninae). (8) Bebedoura Roewer, 1949, known from a single Brazilian species, is transferred from Tricommatinae to Grassatores incertae sedis. (9) Microconomma Roewer, 1915, known from a single Cameroonian species, is transferred from Samoidae to Grassatores incertae sedis. (10) Stygnomimus Roewer, 1927, with two Indomalayan species and hitherto included in the Stygnommatidae, is here formally considered Grassatores incertae sedis. (11) Bichito González-Sponga, 1998, known from a single Venezuelan species, originally described in Phalangodidae: Phalangodinae, and currently in Grassatores incertae sedis is transferred to Samoidae. (12) The Neotropical genus Microminua Sørensen, 1932, currently with two species, is newly transferred from Kimulidae to Samoidae. (13-14) Cornigera González-Sponga, 1987 (currently in Samoidae), is newly considered a junior subjective synonym of Microminua, and its single species is combined

  11. Gradient Evolution of Body Colouration in Surface- and Cave-Dwelling Poecilia mexicana and the Role of Phenotype-Assortative Female Mate Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bierbach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological speciation assumes reproductive isolation to be the product of ecologically based divergent selection. Beside natural selection, sexual selection via phenotype-assortative mating is thought to promote reproductive isolation. Using the neotropical fish Poecilia mexicana from a system that has been described to undergo incipient ecological speciation in adjacent, but ecologically divergent habitats characterized by the presence or absence of toxic H2S and darkness in cave habitats, we demonstrate a gradual change in male body colouration along the gradient of light/darkness, including a reduction of ornaments that are under both inter- and intrasexual selection in surface populations. In dichotomous choice tests using video-animated stimuli, we found surface females to prefer males from their own population over the cave phenotype. However, female cave fish, observed on site via infrared techniques, preferred to associate with surface males rather than size-matched cave males, likely reflecting the female preference for better-nourished (in this case: surface males. Hence, divergent selection on body colouration indeed translates into phenotype-assortative mating in the surface ecotype, by selecting against potential migrant males. Female cave fish, by contrast, do not have a preference for the resident male phenotype, identifying natural selection against migrants imposed by the cave environment as the major driver of the observed reproductive isolation.

  12. THERMAL DESIGN OF A ZERO ENERGY CAVE-DWELLING SOLAR HOUSE%零辅助能耗窑居太阳房热工设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘加平; 杨柳

    1999-01-01

    针对陕北黄土高原地区传统窑洞民居的特征和丰富的太阳辐射资源条件,提出零辅助采暖能耗窑居太阳房,其中集热部件以附加阳光间为主要形式.在对阳光间式窑居太阳房准稳态过程定量分析以及现场调查和测试结果的基础上,依据Fanger的热舒适理论和Micintyre的方法,确定了陕北地区窑居建筑室内设计计算温度,给出了零辅助能耗窑居太阳房的热工计算和设计方法.

  13. A new genus for Cirolana troglexuma Botosaneanu & Iliffe, 1997, an anchialine cave dwelling cirolanid isopod (Crustacea, Isopoda, Cirolanidae from the Bahamas

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    Niel L. Bruce

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cirolana troglexuma Botosaneanu & Iliffe, 1997 is redescribed and a Lucayalana Bruce & Brix, gen. n. established for the species. In total 38 specimens were collected from Hatchet Bay Cave, Eleuthera. Specimens on which previous records of L. troglexuma (from Exuma Cays, Cat Island, and Eleuthera were based have been re-examined when possible. The diagnostic identifying characters and purported apomorphies for Lucayalana gen. n. are: frontal lamina short, narrow, less than 7% width of labrum, not extending to anterior margin of head; pleonite 3 extending posteriorly to posterior of pleonite 5, laterally overlapping pleonites 4 and 5; ventrally broad, forming a strong ventrally directed blade; pereopods 1–3 merus inferior margin RS not molariform. Mitochondrial COI and 16S loci and the nuclear 18S locus data show that all specimens are the one species. Comparison to additional cirolanid COI sequence data (BOLD, GenBank show that Lucayalana troglexuma is genetically distinct to all other cirolanid genera with available COI sequences. The single male and females have shared COI (with three females, 16S (eight females and 18S sequences (two females.

  14. Gradient evolution of body colouration in surface- and cave-dwelling Poecilia mexicana and the role of phenotype-assortative female mate choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbach, David; Penshorn, Marina; Hamfler, Sybille; Herbert, Denise B; Appel, Jessica; Meyer, Philipp; Slattery, Patrick; Charaf, Sarah; Wolf, Raoul; Völker, Johannes; Berger, Elisabeth A M; Dröge, Janis; Wolf, Konstantin; Riesch, Rüdiger; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Indy, Jeanne R; Plath, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Ecological speciation assumes reproductive isolation to be the product of ecologically based divergent selection. Beside natural selection, sexual selection via phenotype-assortative mating is thought to promote reproductive isolation. Using the neotropical fish Poecilia mexicana from a system that has been described to undergo incipient ecological speciation in adjacent, but ecologically divergent habitats characterized by the presence or absence of toxic H2S and darkness in cave habitats, we demonstrate a gradual change in male body colouration along the gradient of light/darkness, including a reduction of ornaments that are under both inter- and intrasexual selection in surface populations. In dichotomous choice tests using video-animated stimuli, we found surface females to prefer males from their own population over the cave phenotype. However, female cave fish, observed on site via infrared techniques, preferred to associate with surface males rather than size-matched cave males, likely reflecting the female preference for better-nourished (in this case: surface) males. Hence, divergent selection on body colouration indeed translates into phenotype-assortative mating in the surface ecotype, by selecting against potential migrant males. Female cave fish, by contrast, do not have a preference for the resident male phenotype, identifying natural selection against migrants imposed by the cave environment as the major driver of the observed reproductive isolation.

  15. Two new cave-dwelling species of the short-tailed Whipscorpion genus Rowlandius (Arachnida: Schizomida: Hubbardiidae) from northeastern Brazil, with comments on male dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Adalberto J; Ferreira, Rodrigo Lopes; Buzatto, Bruno A

    2013-01-01

    Two new species of the arachnid order Schizomida, Rowlandius ubajara sp.nov. and Rowlandius potiguar sp.nov., are described based on both male and female specimens collected in caves from northeastern Brazil. Rowlandius ubajara is known only from the Ubajara Cave, in the state of Ceará; R. potiguar is recorded from 20 caves of the Apodi Limestone Group, in the state of Rio Grande do Norte. A remarkable dimorphism in male pedipalp length is described and analyzed in R. potiguar. The distribution of male pedipalp length is clearly bimodal in the species, but the two male morphs (homeomorphic and heteromorphic) present some overlap in the sizes of this structure. Moreover, males show a steeper allometry in pedipalp length than females, indicating that this trait is under a different selective regime in males and in females.

  16. Highly disjunct and highly infected millipedes – a new cave-dwelling species of Chiraziulus (Diplopoda: Spirostreptida: Cambalidae from Iran and notes on Laboulbeniales ectoparasites

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    Ana Sofia P.S. Reboleira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiraziulus is a highly disjunct, hitherto monotypic genus of cambalid millipedes, geographically isolated in Iran by more than 7000 km from its presumed closest relatives in East Asia and North America. Recent fieldwork in caves of Iran has provided several specimens of this genus, allowing the description of Chiraziulus troglopersicus sp. nov. The intraspecific variability of the type species, C. kaiseri Mauriès, 1983, is illustrated with scanning electron micrographs. Chiraziulus is characterized by exceedingly long microtrichose gonopod flagella which from their insertion points on the posterior face of the anterior gonopod coxites first point distad instead of basad or basad-posteriad as in most other flagelliferous Cambalidea (and Julida, then traverse a groove on the mesal surface of the anterior gonopod coxites, making a full (360° loop. The same feature is also illustrated for the first time in the genus Cambala. The patterns and prevalence of the infection with a species of ectoparasitic fungus of the genus Rickia (order Laboulbeniales in the type material of C. kaiseri is described. An updated review of the cave-adapted fauna of Iran is given.

  17. 乡村旅游导向下的陕北窑洞民居的发展%Development of Cave Dwellings in Northern Shaanxi under the Guidance of Rural Tourism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林道果

    2013-01-01

    本文通过分析陕北窑洞民居的发展现状,总结出传统窑洞在当前发展中所存在的问题。并结合当前乡村旅游的发展趋势,提出了在乡村旅游导向下的陕北窑洞民居的发展策略。%This paper analyzes the current development of no-rthern Shaanxi cave dwel ings, sums up problems existing in the current development of traditional cave dwel ing. Combin-ed with the current development trend of rural tourism, it puts forward the developing strategy of cave dwel ings in north Sh-aanxi under the guidance of rural tourism.

  18. Faunistic spider collections in the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin: The collection of Erich Hesse

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    Kielhorn, Karl-Hinrich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ‘Hesse collection’ of spiders (Araneae and harvestmen (Opiliones in the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin is documented. Biographical notes on Erich Hesse – a former arachnid curator at the museum (1921–1940 – are provided. The ‘Hesse collection’ was actually put together by other workers, and can be broadly divided into two parts. One comes from Bielinek (= Bellinchen on the Polish side of the Oder Valley (West Pommerania; now part of the ‘Unteres Odertal’ National Park. This Bielinek material includes notable records of Heriaeus oblongus Simon, 1918 and Gibbaranea ullrichi (Hahn, 1835. The other part of the collection comes from Colbitz-Letzlinger Heide in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. Notable here are Pistius truncatus (Pallas, 1772 and Philodromus buchari Kubcová, 2004; the latter representing the first record of this species for Saxony-Anhalt.

  19. Penis morphology in a Burmese amber harvestman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Jason A.; Selden, Paul A.; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-02-01

    A unique specimen of the fossil harvestman Halitherses grimaldii Giribet and Dunlop, 2005 (Arachnida: Opiliones) from the Cretaceous (ca. 99 Ma) Burmese amber of Myanmar reveals a fully extended penis. This is the first record of a male copulatory organ of this nature preserved in amber and is of special importance due to the age of the deposit. The penis has a slender, distally flattened truncus, a spatulate heart-shaped glans and a short distal stylus, twisted at the tip. In living harvestmen, the penis yields crucial characters for their systematics. Male genital morphology in H. grimaldii appears to be unique among the wider Dyspnoi clade to which this fossil belongs. The large eyes in the fossil differ markedly from other members of the subfamily Ortholasmatinae to which H. grimaldii was originally referred. Based on recent data, it has been argued that large eyes may be plesiomorphic for Palpatores (i.e. the suborders Eupnoi and Dyspnoi), potentially rendering this character plesiomorphic for the fossil too. Thus, the unique structure of the penis seen here, and the probable lack of diaphanous teeth, present in all other extant non-acropsopilionid Dyspnoi, suggest that H. grimaldii represents a new, extinct family of large-eyed dyspnoid harvestmen, Halithersidae fam. nov.; a higher taxon in amber diagnosed here on both somatic and genital characters.

  20. Taxonomic review of the Neotropical genus Neopachylus (Arachnida, Opiliones, Gonyleptidae

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    Vivian Moreira Montemor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic review of the genus Neopachylus Roewer, 1913 together with keys to the species for both males and females are presented. Gephyropachylus marginatus Mello-Leitão, 1931 is considered a junior subjective synonym of Neopachylus serrinha Soares & Soares, 1947, and Huralvius incertus Mello-Leitão, 1935 is considered a synonym of Neopachylus nebulosus (Mello-Leitão, 1936. This genus is restricted to southern Brazil, occurring in states of Paraná, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul.

  1. On the identity of Flirtea (Arachnida, Opiliones, Cosmetidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kury, Adriano B; García, Andrés F

    2016-03-21

    Flirtea C.L. Koch, 1839, is one of the oldest genera described in Cosmetidae, currently including 30 species mostly from the Andes. Its type species, Cosmetus pictus Perty, 1833, from Brazil, the type material of which is long lost, has since long been misidentified in the literature due to a redescription based on another unrelated species, while the true F. picta was widely known as Flirtea phalerata C.L. Koch, 1840. This unrelated species is here described as Cynorta pictoides sp. nov. Flirtea picta is here redescribed based on abundant material collected in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest biome from Bahia state, and a neotype is designated for its type species. Here, we propose a particular pattern of a white mask blot on the dorsal scutum be called "scaramuccia", and variation in this pattern is described. Genital morphology of Flirtea picta is described for the first time. Flirtea is rediagnosed and most species currently assigned to Flirtea are suggested to belong to other genera. Cynorta valida Roewer, 1928 and Paecilaema batman Pinto-da-Rocha & Yamaguti, 2013 are newly transferred to Flirtea, yielding the new combinations Flirtea valida and Flirtea batman.

  2. Trogulus martensi Chemini, 1983 im Raum Basel (Arachnida, Opiliones, Trogulidae

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    Weiss, Ingmar

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Trogulus martensi Chemini, 1983, formerly thought to be endemic in northern Italy, is recorded from several places near Basle (first records in Switzerland and France. The species is close to T. galasensis Avram, 1971. Important differences to the syntopic T. closanicus Avram, 1971 (first published record in Fance and the sympatric T. nepaeformis (Scopoli, 1763 are shown and discussed. Additional biometric, autecological and phenological data of Trogulus martensi are presented.

  3. New systematic assignments in Gonyleptoidea (Arachnida, Opiliones, Laniatores

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    Ricardo Pinto-da-Rocha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available As part of an ongoing revision of the family Gonyleptidae, we have identified many species that are synonyms of previously described species or misplaced in this family. This article summarizes these findings, adding previously unavailable information or correcting imprecise observations to justify the presented taxonomic changes.The following new familial or subfamilial assignments are proposed: Nemastygnus Roewer, 1929 and Taulisa Roewer, 1956 are transferred to Agoristenidae, Agoristeninae; Napostygnus Roewer, 1929 to Cranaidae; Ceropachylinus peruvianus Roewer, 1956 and Pirunipygus Roewer, 1936 are transferred to Gonyleptidae, Ampycinae; Gyndesops Roewer, 1943, Haversia Roewer, 1913 and Oxapampeus Roewer, 1963 are transferred to Gonyleptidae, Pachylinae.The following generic synonymies are proposed for the family Gonyleptidae: Acanthogonyleptes Mello-Leitão, 1922 = Centroleptes Roewer, 1943; Acrographinotus Roewer, 1929 = Unduavius Roewer, 1929; Gonyleptes Kirby, 1819 = Collonychium Bertkau, 1880; Mischonyx Bertkau, 1880 = Eugonyleptes Roewer, 1913 and Gonazula Roewer, 1930; Parampheres Roewer, 1913 = Metapachyloides Roewer, 1917; Pseudopucrolia Roewer, 1912 = Meteusarcus Roewer, 1913; Haversia Roewer, 1913 = Hoggellula Roewer, 1930.The following specific synonymies are proposed for the family Gonyleptidae: Acanthogonyleptes singularis (Mello-Leitão, 1935 = Centroleptes flavus Roewer, 1943, syn. n.; Geraeocormobius sylvarum Holmberg, 1887 = Discocyrtus serrifemur Roewer, 1943, syn. n.; Gonyleptellus bimaculatus (Sørensen, 1884 = Gonyleptes cancellatus Roewer, 1917, syn. n.; Gonyleptes atrus Mello-Leitão, 1923 = Weyhia brieni Giltay, 1928, syn. n.; Gonyleptes fragilis Mello-Leitão, 1923 = Gonyleptes banana Kury, 2003, syn. n.; Gonyleptes horridus Kirby, 1819 = Collonychium bicuspidatum Bertkau, 1880, syn. n., Gonyleptes borgmeyeri Mello-Leitão, 1932, syn. n., Gonyleptes curvicornis Mello-Leitão, 1932, syn. n., Metagonyleptes hamatus Roewer, 1913, syn. n. and Paragonyleptes simoni Roewer, 1930, syn. n.; Gonyleptes pustulatus Sørensen, 1884 = Gonyleptes guttatus Roewer, 1917, syn. n.; Haversia defensa (Butler, 1876 = Sadocus vallentini Hogg, 1913, syn. n.; Liogonyleptoides minensis (Piza, 1946 = Currala bahiensis Soares, 1972, syn. n.; Megapachylus grandis Roewer, 1913 = Metapachyloides almeidai Soares & Soares, 1946, syn. n.; Mischonyx cuspidatus (Roewer, 1913 = Gonazula gibbosa Roewer, 1930 syn. n.; Mischonyx scaber (Kirby, 1819 = Xundarava holacantha Mello-Leitão, 1927, syn. n.; Parampheres tibialis Roewer, 1917 = Metapachyloides rugosus Roewer, 1917, syn. n.; Parapachyloides uncinatus (Sørensen, 1879 = Goyazella armata Mello-Leitão, 1931, syn. n.; Pseudopucrolia mutica (Perty, 1833 = Meteusarcus armatus Roewer, 1913, syn. n.The following new combinations are proposed: Acrographinotus ornatus (Roewer, 1929, comb. n. (ex Unduavius; Gonyleptellus bimaculatus (Sørensen, 1884, comb. n. (ex Gonyleptes; Gonyleptes perlatus (Mello-Leitão, 1935, comb. n. (ex Moojenia; Mischonyx scaber (Kirby, 1819, comb. n. (ex Gonyleptes; and Neopachyloides peruvianus (Roewer, 1956, comb. n. (ex Ceropachylus.The following species of Gonyleptidae, Gonyleptinae are revalidated: Gonyleptes atrus Mello-Leitão, 1923 and Gonyleptes curvicornis (Roewer, 1913.

  4. 越南南部穴居伊塔步甲一新种(鞘翅目:步甲科:棒角甲亚科)%A New Cave-dwelling Species of the Genus Itamus Schmidt-G(o)bel (Insecta:Coleoptera: Carabidae: Paussinae) from Southern Vietnam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田明义

    2011-01-01

    记述采自越南胡志明市附近Tan Phu火山熔岩管系统中的穴居步甲1新种.模式标本分别保存在巴黎自然博物馆、华南农业大学昆虫标本室和胡志明大学昆虫标本室.德氏伊塔步甲Itamus deuvei,新种(图1~8)本种为伊塔步甲属中两个喜洞穴种类之一(另一种穴伊塔步甲Itamus cavicola,产于巴布亚新几内亚的新爱尔兰岛),其与穴伊塔步甲的主要区别在于:体细长、触角长、缺眼毛、翅沟极浅且无刻点、阳茎中叶近端部明显伸长.正模:(♂),越南同奈省定贯县和新富县之间,火山溶岩管,17-Ⅻ-2006,Bedos A,采于蝙蝠类便上(编号No.Vn06-253);副模:4(♂♂)2♀♀(编号No.Viet-048),地点同正模,23-Ⅻ-1994,Deharveng L,TamT Q和Bedos A采.%Itamus deuvei, sp. nov. is described from Tan Phu, near Ho Chi Minh City,southern Vietnam, based on seven specimens collected in a lava tube system. It is the second troglophile species of the genus Itamus Schmidt-G(o)bel and is easily distinguished from I. cavicola (Moore), the other troglophile from Papua New Guinea, by its more elongate body, longer antennae, head without a supraorbital setiferous pore, and very shallow and impunctate elytral striae.

  5. The distribution of spiders and Harvestmen (Chelicerata) in the Dutch National Park "De Hoge Veluwe"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammen, van der L.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary study is made of the distribution of Araneida and Opilionida (Chelicerata) in a National Park in The Netherlands. Special attention is paid to the influence of vegetation structure on the distribution of the spiders.

  6. An enigmatic spiny harvestman from Baltic amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Dunlop

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A new harvestman (Arachnida: Opiliones from Baltic amber (Palaeogene: Eocene; ca. 44–49 Ma is described as Piankhi steineri n. gen., n. sp. This enigmatic fossil expresses long, slender pedipalps without a tarsal claw, which is characteristic for the suborder Dyspnoi. The chelicerae are notably enlarged and the dorsal body surface is formed from a carapace with a separate prosomatic tergite (metapeltidium, plus a large opisthosomal scute (or scutum parvum. However these characters, combined with the distinctly spiny limbs and further rows of spines across the fossil's opisthosoma, have no parallel among the modern dyspnoid harvestmen that we are aware of. The fossil resolves features reminiscent of modern members of the dyspnoid families Ceratolasmatidae, Nipponopsalididae, Ischyropsalididae and Sabaconidae, but does not show unequivocal apomorphies of any one particular family. We must entertain the possibility that this is an extinct body plan from the Eocene of north-central Europe, and we tentatively refer the fossil to a new genus in an unresolved position among the Ischyropsalidoidea (Dyspnoi. An amorphous triangular structure behind the anal region is assumed to be faecal matter, rather than part of the original anatomy. doi:10.1002/mmng.201200007

  7. Geological and ecological assessment of the exposure degree of the Zăton-Bulba karst system (Mehedinţi Plateau to anthropogenic hazards: intrinsic vulnerability and biodiversity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Goran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mehedinţi Plateau represents an area highly marked by the intensity of the karst processes and by the diversity of the exokarst and endokarst features. The analyzed area includes two parallel limestone bars, developed on the Carpathian structures direction (NNE-SSW. The geological and geomorphological research, guided by a working protocol similar to that of the EPIK method, highlighted the role played by the lithology, structure, tectonics, epikarst and protective cover, related to the infiltration conditions, flow parameters and impact area of a potential contamination event; also, we carried on microtectonic studies on the Bulba Valley, Peşterii Hill, Podul Natural Cave and Bulba Cave. In addition to the results obtained following the EPIK method protocol, we bring forward data concerning the water quality, performing hydrogeochemical analyses on water samples collected from the main sources in the region. Our research has been focused on TDS, on cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, NH4+ and on anions (HCO3-, Cl-. We conclude by modelling the cumulative abundance and the species richness of the harvestmen (Opiliones in the studied area, under different degrees of human impact on habitats

  8. Chromosome complement and meiosis of Holmbergiana weyenberghii (Opiliones: Sclerosomatidae: Gagrellinae from Argentina Complemento cromosómico y meiosis de Holmbergiana weyenberghii (Opiliones: Sclerosomatidae: Gagrellinae de Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio G. Rodríguez Gil

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The cytogenetical analysis of the harvestman Holmbergiana weyenberghii (Holmberg (Eupnoi, Sclerosomatidae, Gagrellinae from Argentina is reported for the first time. The complement of males is composed of 18 chromosomes. In meiosis there are nine homomorphic bivalents: one large, five medium-sized and three small. The chromosome number of H. weyenberghii is within the range of diploid numbers of the subfamily Gagrellinae Thorell, which shows the lowest chromosome numbers among the sclerosomatids.Se analiza citogenéticamente, por primera vez, una especie de opilión proveniente de Argentina: Holmbergiana weyenberghii (Holmberg (Eupnoi, Sclerosomatidae, Gagrellinae. Los machos tienen un complemento cromosómico compuesto por 18 cromosomas. En meiosis, hay nueve bivalentes homomórficos: uno mayor, cinco medianos y tres menores. El número cromosómico de H. weyenberghii se encuentra dentro del rango de números diploides de los Gagrellinae Thorell; esta subfamilia presenta los números cromosómicos más bajos de Sclerosomatidae.

  9. Opiliones aus Java, Nusa Kambangan und Krakatau, gesammelt von Edw. Jacobson (1908—1911)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roewer, C.Fr.

    1912-01-01

    Diese aus 81 Exemplaren bestehende Sammlung umfasst 12 Arten, grösstenteils der Subfamilie der Gagrellini (Fam. Phalangiidae) angehörend; von allen ist nur eine Art neu und bildet zugleich auch ein neues Genus.

  10. The Leiobunum rupestre species group: resolving the taxonomy of four widespread European taxa (Opiliones: Sclerosomatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Martens

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the central European opilionid fauna the widely used species names Leiobunum rupestre Herbst, 1799 and Leiobunum tisciae Avram, 1968 pose taxonomic and distributional problems. In addition, Nelima apenninica Martens, 1969 is close to L. tisciae in terms of external and genital morphology, but is specifically distinct. While coxal denticulation is largely lacking in N. apenninica, the validity of the genus Nelima Roewer, 1910 is questioned again. In addition, Leiobunum subalpinum Komposch, 1998, a recently described novelty from the eastern Alps, is closely related to L. rupestre. The four species are combined as the morphologically defined Leiobunum rupestre species group. Except for L. subalpinum, they were found to be allopatrically distributed from the Carpathians across central and Northwest Europe to the south-western Alps. The latter species is locally sympatric and partly elevationally parapatric to L. rupestre. Leiobunum tisciae is a recently introduced name and here recognized as a junior synonym of a number of taxa described much earlier, of which L. gracile Thorell, 1876 is re-introduced as oldest available name. Detailed morphological and distributional data for all taxa are presented.

  11. Chromosome complement and meiosis of Holmbergiana weyenberghii (Opiliones: Sclerosomatidae: Gagrellinae from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio G. Rodríguez Gil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza citogenéticamente, por primera vez, una especie de opilión proveniente de Argentina: Holmbergiana weyenberghii (Holmberg (Eupnoi, Sclerosomatidae, Gagrellinae. Los machos tienen un complemento cromosómico compuesto por 18 cromosomas. En meiosis, hay nueve bivalentes homomórficos: uno mayor, cinco medianos y tres menores. El número cromosómico de H. weyenberghii se encuentra dentro del rango de números diploides de los Gagrellinae Thorell; esta subfamilia presenta los números cromosómicos más bajos de Sclerosomatidae.

  12. A new species of Metagovea Rosas Costa, 1950 from Napo Province, Ecuador (Opiliones, Cyphophthalmi, Neogoveidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giupponi, Alessandro P L; Kury, Adriano Brilhante

    2015-01-01

    As a result of an expedition to Ecuador in 2014, a new species of mite harvestman was discovered. This new species belonging to the genus Metagovea Rosas Costa, 1950 - Metagovealigiae sp. n. - is described, based on male and female specimens from Napo Province, Ecuador. This is the fourth species described for the genus and the second from Ecuador. A simple terminology is proposed for the microtrichiae of the spermatopositor and genital characters in the family are discussed. The genus Brasiliogovea Martens, 1969 is consistently misspelled in the literature as Brasilogovea. The description of Metagovealigiae offered opportunity to discuss some aspects of systematics of the family.

  13. Bioclimatic profile and potential distribution of the Mesopotamian harvestman Discocyrtus testudineus (Holmberg, 1876) (Opiliones, Gonyleptidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Luis E

    2014-06-23

    The geographic range of the Neotropical harvestman Discocyrtus testudineus (Holmberg, 1876) (Gonyleptidae) is addressed by determining the species' bioclimatic profile and modeling its potential distribution. Analysis was performed on a record set of 71 localities, including literature records and 34 new localities reported here. The bioclimatic profile was characterized through extreme, median and dispersion features of the values of 19 bioclimatic variables across the record set. Predictive models were built with the presence-only methods MAXENT and, secondarily, BIOCLIM. Discocyrtus testudineus is a typical Mesopotamian harvestman, spreading across a wide region along the middle and lower Paraná River in subtropical / temperate Argentina, and extending, more or less continuously, up to the central province of Córdoba. Apparently diverging records (Paso de los Libres, on the Uruguay River, and Quilmes, on the southern coast of Rio de la Plata) proved to be predictable, even if suppressed from the dataset. Comparisons of cumulative frequencies curves and dispersion features (box-plots) were made with Discocyrtus dilatatus Sørensen, 1884 and Gryne orensis (Sørensen, 1884), other Mesopotamian species for which bioclimatic data are available. The relative importance of the bioclimatic variables used for modeling was also estimated.

  14. Iandumoema uai, a new genus and species of troglobitic harvestman from Brazil (Arachnida, Opiliones, Gonyleptidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pinto-da-Rocha

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A new genus and species of harvestman, landumoema uai, is described based on material from Gruta Olhos d'Água, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Its troglomorphisms include depigmentation on body, legs and eyes. It is the third troglobitic species of harvestman recorded from Brazilian caves and the second in the family Gonyleptidae.

  15. Hidden Mediterranean diversity: assessing species taxa by molecular phylogeny within the opilionid family Trogulidae (Arachnida, Opiliones).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhofer, Axel L; Martens, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive study to evaluate the relationships between the western palearctic harvestman families Dicranolasmatidae, Trogulidae and Nemastomatidae with focus on the phylogeny and systematics of Trogulidae, using combined sequence data of the nuclear 28S rRNA and the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Bayesian analysis and Maximum parsimony do not reliably resolve Dicranolasma as distinct family but place it on a similar phylogenetic level as several lineages of Trogulidae. Nemastomatidae and Trogulidae turned out to be monophyletic, as did genera Anelasmocephalus and Trogulus within the Trogulidae. The genera Calathocratus, Platybessobius and Trogulocratus each appeared para or polyphyletic, respectively and are synonymized with Calathocratus. The monotypic genus Kofiniotis is well supported. We show molecular data to be in general concordance with taxa characterized by morphology. Molecular data are especially useful to calibrate morphological characters for systematic purposes within homogeneous taxa. In the majority of closely related valid species we show the lowest level of genetic distance to be not lower than 5%. By this threshold in terms of traditionally accepted species the estimated number of species turns out to be 1.5-2.4 times higher than previously believed. With respect to European fauna cryptic diversity in Trogulidae is obviously extraordinarily high and hitherto largely underestimated.

  16. Nemastoma bidentatum (Arachnida: Opiliones: Nemastomatidae: neu für Deutschland und die Tschechische Republik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schönhofer, Axel L.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available N. bidentatum Roewer, 1914 was found at two places in Germany: first on the island “Harriersand” in the Weser river (Lower Saxony, second on the banks of the river Elbe in the Elbsandsteingebirge (Saxony. Adjacent to the latter locality an occurrence in the Czech Republic could be located close to the German/Czech border in the floodplain of the river Elbe as well. These records are the first for Germany and the Czech Republic. They enlarge the distribution area of N. bidentatum remarkably in both a northern and a western direction. The two populations show conspicuous differences in the form of the male cheliceral apophysis, which assigns them to the subspecies bidentatum Roewer, 1914 (in Lower Saxony and sparsum Gruber & Martens, 1968 (in Saxony and the Czech Republik respectively. Differences, morphological characters and variability of the populations are illustrated. Relationships, abundance, ecology and provenance are discussed. N. dentigerum Canestrini, 1873 is recorded in Saxony for the first time. New records of N. triste C. L. Koch, 1835 and N. lugubre (Müller, 1776 are given.

  17. A new monster from southwest Oregon forests: Cryptomaster behemoth sp. n. (Opiliones, Laniatores, Travunioidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrett, James; Derkarabetian, Shahan; Richart, Casey H; Cabrero, Allan; Hedin, Marshal

    2016-01-01

    The monotypic genus Cryptomaster Briggs, 1969 was described based on individuals from a single locality in southwestern Oregon. The described species Cryptomaster leviathan Briggs, 1969 was named for its large body size compared to most travunioid Laniatores. However, as the generic name suggests, Cryptomaster are notoriously difficult to find, and few subsequent collections have been recorded for this genus. Here, we increase sampling of Cryptomaster to 15 localities, extending their known range from the Coast Range northeast to the western Cascade Mountains of southern Oregon. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data reveal deep phylogenetic breaks consistent with independently evolving lineages. We use discovery and validation species delimitation approaches to generate and test species hypotheses, including a coalescent species delimitation method to test multi-species hypotheses. For delimited species, we use light microscopy and SEM to discover diagnostic morphological characters. Although Cryptomaster has a small geographic distribution, this taxon is consistent with other short-range endemics in having deep phylogenetic breaks indicative of species level divergences. Herein we describe Cryptomaster behemoth sp. n., and provide morphological diagnostic characters for identifying Cryptomaster leviathan and Cryptomaster behemoth.

  18. North Pyrenean populations of Megabunus diadema (Fabricius, 1779 (Arachnida: Opiliones are characterized by highly male-biased sex ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Amico, F.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Megabunus diadema (Fabricius, 1779 is an Atlantic and European harvestman species characterized by a discontinuous distribution from Scandinavia to the Iberian Peninsula. With very few male individuals ever observed in the field until now, the biological uniqueness of the species lies in its reproduction mode, hitherto regarded as asexual, facultative parthenogenesis. Based on a large sample of 741 sexed individuals, the study indicates a sex ratio much higher than what was formerly known, equal to 65.58% of males. Locally varying from 0 to 100% (median 75.5% of males, the sex ratio depends indeed on the altitude and the phenological cycle: the proportion of males decreases with increasing altitude and increases gradually during the spring to reach a plateau in summer. By describing populations locally dominated by male individuals and providing new information on the spatial and temporal patterns of tertiary sex ratio, we question the currently admitted reproduction mode of the species which could be normally sexual, at least locally, rather than asexual. A distribution map of the species on the northern slope of the Pyrenees is provided for the first time. Our study also complements the distribution for the southern slopes of the Pyrenees and the rest of the Iberian Peninsula published recently by Merino-Sáinz et al. (2013.Megabunus diadema (Fabricius 1779 es una especie de opilión Atlántica y Europea, caracterizada por una distribución discontinua desde Escandinavia a la Península Ibérica. La singularidad biológica de la especie se encuentra en el modo de reproducción, la partenogénesis facultativa, hasta ahora considerada como asexual. De hecho, hasta el momento se han observado muy pocos individuos masculinos en el campo. Los resultados de este estudio muestran, sobre una amplia muestra (741 individuos sexuados, que la proporción de sexo masculino es muy superior a lo conocido hasta ahora (65%. Localmente este porcentaje puede variar entre 0 y 100% (mediana del 75,5% para los machos. Los resultados muestran que la proporción de sexos depende de la altitud y del ciclo fenológico: la proporción de machos disminuye con la altitud y aumenta gradualmente durante la primavera hasta llegar a una meseta en verano. Para describir las poblaciones dominadas localmente por individuos masculinos y proporcionar nueva información sobre los patrones espaciales y temporales de la proporción de sexos en poblaciones adultas, cuestionamos el modo de reproducción actualmente admitido de la especie que podría ser normalmente sexual, al menos localmente, en lugar de asexual. Se proporciona, por primera vez, un mapa de distribución de la especie en la vertiente norte de los Pirineos. Nuestro estudio también complementa el estudio publicado recientemente por Merino-Sáinz et al. (2013 sobre su distribución en la vertiente sur de los Pirineos y en el resto de la Península Ibérica.

  19. Further notes on New Zealand Enantiobuninae (Opiliones, Neopilionidae, with the description of a new genus and two new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Taylor

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mangatangi parvum gen. n. and sp. and Forsteropsalis pureroa sp. n. are described from the North Island of New Zealand. Pantopsalis listeri (White 1849 and P. cheliferoides (Colenso 1882 are redescribed and no longer regarded as nomina dubia; P. luna (Forster 1944 is identified as a junior synonym of P. listeri. A key to Pantopsalis species is provided.

  20. Four new species of Cosmetus from Panama, with comments on the systematics of the genus (Opiliones: Cosmetidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Coronato-Ribeiro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Four new sympatric species of Cosmetus Perty, 1833 are described from "Reserva Natural Privada Burbayar, Provinciar Panamá, Panamá" (male holotypes deposited in MIUP. Cosmetus balboa sp. nov. can be distinguished by the combinations of following features: smooth ocularium, larger distal tubercle on pedipalpal femur, coxa I with large ventral tubercle directed upwards, coxa IV with one large dorsoproximal tubercle, two geminate (from base dorsoapical tubercles with blunt apex. Cosmetus burbayar sp. nov., can be distinguished from other species of the genus by the irregular and discontinuous shape of its yellow spot, extending from lateral anterior to posterior margins and invading prosoma, areas I-III and free tergites. Cosmetus pollera sp. nov. can be distinguished from congeners by two small yellow and two large pairs of spots on prosoma and two other spots on posterior margin of dorsal scutum. Cosmetus tamboritos sp. nov. is distinguished from other species of the genus by the following combinations of characters: having two retrolateral apical tubercles on bulla, one being double size of other; coxa IV lacks patches of a cluster of four tubercles on dorsolateral proximal region and two pointed tubercles fused at their apices; and femur IV with bifid retrolateral apical tubercle. The penis of Cosmetus arietinus (Mello-Leitão, 1940 and C. variolosus Mello-Leitão, 1942 are described for the first time. A table with the main diagnostic features of Cosmetus species is given. We suggest that the spine of area III, sexually dimorphic chelicerae and posterior legs, and pigmentation of dorsal scutum are good diagnosti c features at species level.

  1. Paecilaema batman, a new species of Brazilian troglophilous harvestman that exhibits a remarkable color patches variation (Opiliones: Cosmetidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pinto-da-Rocha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A new species of harvestman, Paecilaema batman, from Brazilian limestone caves of the state of Goiás, is described, and a remarkable intraspecific color patch variation is discussed. Paecilaema batman sp. nov. differs from other species of the genus by the following combination of features: chelicera similar in both sexes; prosoma without color patches; typical color patches on area I; and area III with two high spines. The new species is considered troglophilous.

  2. Neosataria, replacement name for Sataria Annandale, 1920 (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Bithyniidae), preoccupied by Sataria Roewer, 1915 (Arachnida: Opiliones: Sclerosomatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Siddharth; Khot, Rahul

    2015-06-24

    The family Bithyniidae is represented in tropical Asia by the following genera, Bithynia, Digonistoma, Mysorella, Parabithynia, Emmericiopsis, Hydrobioides, Parafossarulus, Pseudovivipara, Sataria and Wattebladia (Dudgeon 1999; Pyron & Brown 2015).

  3. Evolutionary and biogeographical history of an ancient and global group of arachnids (Arachnida: Opiliones: Cyphophthalmi) with a new taxonomic arrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giribet, Gonzalo; Sharma, Prashant P.; Benavides, Ligia R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the phylogeny, biogeography, time of origin and diversification, ancestral area reconstruction and large-scale distributional patterns of an ancient group of arachnids, the harvestman suborder Cyphophthalmi. Analysis of molecular and morphological data allow us to propose a new cla...

  4. Characterization of Platymessa with redescription of the type species and a new generic synonymy (Arachnida, Opiliones, Cosmetidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Miguel; Kury, Adriano B

    2016-03-01

    The genus Platymessa was originally described by Mello-Leitão and diagnosed following the Roewerian system. It originally included two species from the Colombian Andes. Subsequently, a third species was described: Platymessa transversalis Roewer, 1963, which is herein transferred to the genus Chusgonobius Roewer, 1952, forming the new combination Chusgonobius transversalis. Herein, an emended diagnosis is given to Platymessa, the type species, Platymessa h-inscriptum Mello-Leitão, 1941, is redescribed and P. nigrolimbata Mello-Leitão, 1941 is considered its junior subjective synonym. Brachylibitia Mello-Leitão, 1941, is herein considered a junior subjective synonym of Platymessa and its type species, Brachylibitia ectroxantha Mello-Leitão, 1941, considered a species inquirenda, forming the new combination Platymessa ectroxantha. Genital morphology of Platymessa h-inscriptum is described and some characters are discussed regarding their importance in cosmetid taxonomy. Novel forms of sexual dimorphism are described in coxa IV.

  5. Das Höhlenlangbein Amilenus aurantiacus (Opiliones: Phalangiidae ist Höhlentier des Jahres 2016 in Deutschland

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    Zaenker, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the nomination of the ‘Cave Animal of the Year’ the Society of German Cave and Karst Explorers calls public and authorities’ attention to the understudied biodiversity of subterranean ecosystems. Here the Cave Animal of the Year 2016, Amilenus aurantiacus (Simon, 1881, is presented. It is the first time that a harvestman has been chosen. Ist ecology, habitat and morphology are described. New records from Hesse, Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg and North Rhine-Westphalia are listed and discussed.

  6. Charming Foshan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongPing

    2004-01-01

    Driving along Foshan's expressway, lined with modern buildings on either side, one gets the impression of a young city. Upon exploring further, however, and seeing ancestral temples, folk residences, ancient gardens, cave-dwellings, museums and ancient villages, Foshan's long history and inherent culture become apparent. Foshan City's ancient ambience enhances its air of contemporary energy.

  7. Subterranean species of Acipes Attems, 1937 (Diplopoda, Julida, Blaniulidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Henrik; P. S. Reboleira, Ana Sofia

    2013-01-01

    Two new blind, cave-dwelling species of the genus Acipes Attems, 1937, are described from the Algarve, southern Portugal: A. machadoi n. sp. and A. bifilum n. sp. Acipes andalusius Enghoff & Mauriès, 1999, is reported from the mesovoid shallow substratum in Alicante (Spain), 250 km from the type...

  8. Providing Prisoners' Children a Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    TEN years ago, Zhang Shuqin, a police inspector I in Shaanxi, visited a special family by chance. In this family, both the husband and wife were serving prison sentences, leaving five children and their 70-year-old granny at home. In their shabby cave dwelling, there was some cardboard on the bedframe instead of mattress and blankets. The old woman was coughing violently and the four-year-old girl was

  9. Differences in chemosensory response between eyed and eyeless Astyanax mexicanus of the Rio Subterráneo cave

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background In blind cave-dwelling populations of Astyanax mexicanus, several morphological and behavioral shifts occurred during evolution in caves characterized by total and permanent darkness. Previous studies have shown that sensory systems such as the lateral line (mechanosensory) and taste buds (chemosensory) are modified in cavefish. It has long been hypothesized that another chemosensory modality, the olfactory system, might have evolved as well to provide an additional mechanism for f...

  10. Evolutionary tuning of an adaptive behavior requires enhancement of the neuromast sensory system

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cave animals are faced with the challenge of carrying out fundamental life processes in a completely dark environment. Evolution of behavioral changes could be one of the key steps that adapt these animals to the absence of light. Astyanax mexicanus is a teleost with sighted surface dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave dwelling (cavefish) forms. Cavefish, a descendant of surface fish ancestors, have evolved a suite of constructive traits including an increase in the number and diameter of s...

  11. Evolution of a behavioral shift mediated by superficial neuromasts helps cavefish find food in darkness

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    How cave animals adapt to life in darkness is a poorly understood aspect of evolutionary biology [1]. Here we identify a behavioral shift and its morphological basis in Astyanax mexicanus, a teleost with a sighted surface dwelling form (surface fish) and various blind cave dwelling forms (cavefish) [2–4]. Vibration attraction behavior (VAB) is the ability of fish to swim toward the source of a water disturbance in darkness. VAB was typically seen in cavefish, rarely in surface fish, and advan...

  12. The lens controls cell survival in the retina: evidence from the blind cavefish Astyanax

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The lens influences retinal growth and differentiation during vertebrate eye development but the mechanisms are not understood. The role of the lens in retinal growth and development was studied in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which has eyed surface-dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. A lens and laminated retina initially develop in cavefish embryos, but the lens dies by apoptosis. The cavefish retina is subsequently disorganized, apoptotic cells appear, the p...

  13. Parental genetic effects in a cavefish adaptive behavior explain disparity between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic parental genetic effects are important in many biological processes but their roles in the evolution of adaptive traits and their consequences in naturally evolving populations remain to be addressed. By comparing two divergent blind cave-dwelling cavefish populations with a sighted surface-dwelling population (surface fish) of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, we report here that convergences in vibration attraction behavior (VAB), the lateral line sensory receptors underlying this ...

  14. Differentially expressed genes identified by cross-species microarray in the blind cavefish Astyanax

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Changes in gene expression were examined by microarray analysis during development of the eyed surface dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus De Filippi, 1853. The cross-species microarray used surface and cavefish RNA hybridized to a DNA chip prepared from a closely related species, the zebrafish Danio rerio Hamilton, 1822. We identified a total of 67 differentially expressed probe sets at three days post-fertilization: six upregula...

  15. Evolution of an adaptive behavior and its sensory receptors promotes eye regression in blind cavefish

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background How and why animals lose eyesight during adaptation to the dark and food-limited cave environment has puzzled biologists since the time of Darwin. More recently, several different adaptive hypotheses have been proposed to explain eye degeneration based on studies in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which consists of blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) and sighted surface-dwelling (surface fish) forms. One of these hypotheses is that eye regression is the result of indirect selec...

  16. Evolution and development in the cavefish Astyanax

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The teleost Astyanax mexicanus is a single species consisting of two radically different forms: a sighted pigmented surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and a blind depigmented cave dwelling form (cavefish). The two forms of Astyanax have favorable attributes, including descent from a common ancestor, ease of laboratory culture, and the ability to perform genetic analysis, permitting their use as a model system to explore questions in evolution and development. Here we review current research...

  17. Verzeichnis der Spinnentiere (excl. Acarida Deutschlands (Arachnida: Araneida, Opilionida, Pseudoscorpionida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platen, Ralph

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of german arachnids (spiders, harvestmen, pseudoscorpions is presented here for the first time. 956 species of spiders, 45 species of harvestmen and 45 species of pseudoscorpions are listed. Important junior synonyms are given. References are cited for the species established in Germany.

  18. Taxonomic notes on Holcobunus Roewer, 1910, with descriptions of three new species, and new records for Holcobunus nigripalpis Roewer, 1910 (Opiliones: Eupnoi: Sclerosomatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourinho, Ana Lúcia; Pinto-da-Rocha, Ricardo; Bragagnolo, Cibele

    2015-10-05

    Three new Brazilian species of Holcobunus Roewer, 1910 are described, thus increasing the total number of species in the genus to five: Holcobunus bicornutus Mello-Leitão, 1940, H. nigripalpis Roewer, 1910, Holcobunus dissimilis sp. nov. (type locality: Espírito Santo, Santa Teresa, Reserva Biologia Augusto Ruschi), Holcobunus ibitirama sp. nov. (type locality: Espírito Santo, Ibitirama, Santa Marta, close to Parque Nacional Caparaó), and Holcobunus uaisoh sp. nov. (type locality: Minas Gerais, Fervedouro, Parque Estadual Serra do Brigadeiro). A new record for Holcobunus nigripalpis Roewer, 1910 from Minas Gerais is also provided and the morphological variation in both penis and somatic morphology in the genus are presented and discussed. These observations enhance our understanding of both the diversity and distribution of Holcobunus.

  19. First Harvestman Record for the Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile, with Morphological Notes on Acropsopilio chilensis (Opiliones: Caddidae: Acroposopilioninae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-González, Abel; Ramírez, Martín J; Soto, Eduardo M; Pizarro-Araya, Jaime

    2014-08-15

    Acropsopilio chilensis Silvestri, 1904 (Eupnoi: Caddidae: Acropsopilioninae), is recorded for Robinson Crusoe Island, Chile. This is the first harvestman species recorded for the Juan Fernández Archipelago and also the first extra-continental record for this species. During the comparison with continental co-specific specimens, some previously unknown, remarkable morphological characteristics were discovered, among them: the absence of ovipositor seminal receptacles and tracheal system, small and probably imperforate spiracles and the presence of a subdistal spiny structure, maybe a stylus, in the major branch of the penis. 

  20. Two new species of Phareicranaus Roewer, 1913 (Opiliones: Laniatores: Cranaidae), with notes on gregarious behavior and maternal care in Phareicranaus manauara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, Pío A; Tourinho, Ana Lúcia

    2014-02-24

    In this paper we describe two new species of Phareicranaus Roewer, 1913: Phareicranaus rohei sp. nov. from the state of Amazonas, Brazil and Phareicranaus tizana sp. nov., from the state of Zulia, Venezuela. The number of known species of this genus increases to 47. We discuss and suggest the possible relationships of these species with their relatives and assign them into the clades proposed by Pinto-da-Rocha & Bonaldo (2011). Additionally, we conducted field observations at the type locality of Phareicranaus manauara (Pinto-da-Rocha, 1994), provide the first descriptions of maternal care and gregarious behavior, and discuss the occurrence of this behavior in the genus.

  1. Do cave features affect underground habitat exploitation by non-troglobite species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunghi, Enrico; Manenti, Raoul; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

    2014-02-01

    Many biospeleological studies focus on organisms that are exclusive inhabitants of the subterranean realm, but organisms that are not obligate cave-dwellers are frequent in caves, and may account for a substantial portion of biomass. Moreover, several taxa that are usually epigeous are regularly found inside caves, but for most of them it is unknown whether they accidentally enter them, or whether they actively select caves for specific environmental features. In this study we analysed the community of non-strict cave-dwelling organisms (amphibians, gastropods, spiders and orthopterans) in 33 caves from Central Italy, to assess how environmental factors determine community structure. Cave features strongly affected the distribution of the taxa considered. The combined effect of cave morphology and microclimate explained nearly 50% of the variation of community structure. Most of community variation occurred along a gradient from deep, dark and humid caves, to dry caves with wider entrances and extended photic areas. Most of species were associated with humid, deep and dark caves. Most of the non-troglobiont amphibians and invertebrates did not occur randomly in caves, but were associated to caves with specific environmental features. Analysing relationships between cave-dwelling species and environmental variables can allow a more ecological and objective classification of cave-dwelling organisms.

  2. First record of Stygnidae for the state of Espírito Santo and description of a new Protimesius (Arachnida: Opiliones: Laniatores Primeiro registro de Stygnidae para o estado do Espírito Santo e descrição de um novo Protimesius (Arachnida: Opiliones: Laniatores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano B. Kury

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Protimesius osvaldoi sp. nov. is described from the Reserva Biológica de Sooretama, state of Espírito Santo, southeastern Brazil, being the first record of Stygnidae from this State and the southernmost record of the family in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (hitherto, the family was recorded down to Bahia only, extending in 210 km south of the previously known distribution. This is a large species, with armature of leg IV very reduced and penial morphology differing from the closest counterparts mainly in the ventral plate, which recedes deeply at the lateral borders and has the distal margin curved ventrally and by the presence of two small intermediate setae. Protimesius Roewer, 1913 consisted hitherto of 17 species, recorded from northern/northeastern Brazil and Amazonia of adjacent countries. A key is given for the 17 species of Protimesius for which males are known.Protimesius osvaldoi sp. nov. é descrita da Reserva Biológica de Sooretama, Espírito Santo, sudeste do Brasil, sendo considerado o primeiro registro de Stygnidae para este Estado (até então a distribuição registrada para a família se estendia apenas até a Bahia e o registro mais ao sul na Floresta Atlântica, aumentando em 210 km ao sul a distribuição do grupo. Protomesius osvaldoi é uma espécie de tamanho grande, com armação reduzida na perna IV e placa ventral. Protimesius possui 17 espécies, registradas no norte e nordeste do Brasil e Região Amazônica. É apresentada uma chave para as 17 espécies de Protimesius com machos conhecidos.

  3. Descripción de dos nuevas especies de pseudoscorpiones cavernícolas de la provincia de Cádiz (Arachnida, Pseudoscorpionida, Chthoniidae, Neobisiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carabajal Márquez, E.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of cave-dwelling Pseudoscorpionida from Cádiz (South Spain are described: Chthonius (Ephippiochthonius aguileraorum sp. n. and Neobisium (Ommatoblothrus rodrigoi sp. n., and it is compared with the close relatives species.

    Se describen dos nuevas especies de Pseudoscorpionida cavernícolas procedentes de la provincia de Cádiz (sur de España: Chthonius (Ephippiochthonius aguileraorum sp. n. y Neobisium (Ommatoblothrus rodrigoi sp. n., y se comparan con las especias más próximas.

  4. The role of a lens survival pathway including sox2 and αA-crystallin in the evolution of cavefish eye degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background The teleost Astyanax mexicanus is a single species consisting of eyed surface-dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) morphs. Cavefish eyes are lost through apoptosis of the lens, which in turn promotes the degeneration of other optic tissues. The αA-crystallin (αA-crys) gene is strongly downregulated in the cavefish lens and is located in a genomic region (QTL) responsible for eye loss. Therefore, αA-crys has been proposed as a candidate for regulating cavefish ...

  5. Taxonomic notes on Acanthomegabunus Tsurusaki, Tchemeris & Logunov 2000 (Arachnida: Opiliones: Phalangiidae), with a description of the new species A. altaicus sp. n. from the Altai Mountains of Russia and NE Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchemeris, A N

    2015-07-28

    The genus Acanthomegabunus Tsurusaki, Tchemeris & Logunov 2000 is diagnosed and redescribed. A key to species is presented. A new species, Acanthomegabunus altaicus sp. n. from the Аltai Mountains of Russia and NE Kazakhstan is diagnosed, described and figured; its distribution is mapped, along with new records of A.sibiricus Tsurusaki, Tchemeris & Logunov 2000.

  6. Genome Editing in Astyanax mexicanus Using Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalko, Johanna E; Ma, Li; Jeffery, William R

    2016-06-20

    Identifying alleles of genes underlying evolutionary change is essential to understanding how and why evolution occurs. Towards this end, much recent work has focused on identifying candidate genes for the evolution of traits in a variety of species. However, until recently it has been challenging to functionally validate interesting candidate genes. Recently developed tools for genetic engineering make it possible to manipulate specific genes in a wide range of organisms. Application of this technology in evolutionarily relevant organisms will allow for unprecedented insight into the role of candidate genes in evolution. Astyanax mexicanus (A. mexicanus) is a species of fish with both surface-dwelling and cave-dwelling forms. Multiple independent lines of cave-dwelling forms have evolved from ancestral surface fish, which are interfertile with one another and with surface fish, allowing elucidation of the genetic basis of cave traits. A. mexicanus has been used for a number of evolutionary studies, including linkage analysis to identify candidate genes responsible for a number of traits. Thus, A. mexicanus is an ideal system for the application of genome editing to test the role of candidate genes. Here we report a method for using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to mutate genes in surface A. mexicanus. Genome editing using TALENs in A. mexicanus has been utilized to generate mutations in pigmentation genes. This technique can also be utilized to evaluate the role of candidate genes for a number of other traits that have evolved in cave forms of A. mexicanus.

  7. Differentially-expressed opsin genes identified in Sinocyclocheilus cavefish endemic to China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fanwei MENG; Yahui ZHAO; John H.POSTLETHWAIT; Chunguang ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Eye degeneration is a common troglomorphic character of cave-dwelling organisms.Comparing the morphology and molecular biology of cave species and their close surface relatives is a powerful tool for studying regressive eye evolution and other adaptive phenotypes.We compared two co-occurring and closely-related species of the fish genus Sinocyclocheilus,which is endemic to China and includes both surface-and cave-dwelling species.Sinocyclocheilus tileihornes,a cave species,had smaller eyes than Sinocyclocheilus angustiporus,a surface species.Histological and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the cavefish had shorter cones and more disorderly rods than did the surface-dwelling species.Using quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization,we found that rhodopsin and a long-wavelength sensitive opsin had significantly lower expression levels in the cavefish.Furthermore,one of two short-wavelength-sensitive opsins was expressed at significantly higher levels in the cavefish.Changes in the expression ofopsin genes may have played a role in the degeneration of cavefish eyes.

  8. [The sources of histoplasmosis infection on the Isla de la Juventud, Cuba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Andreu, C M; Martínez Machin, G

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to report the isolation of Histoplasma capsulatum, etiologic agent of histoplasmosis, from soil in sites inhabited by bats and chicken in the Island of Youth, Cuba. The fungus was cultured from four species of cave dwelling bats too. The identification of H. capsulatum was done by mycelial to yeast conversion and exoantigen test. It is pointed out the epidemiological value of some of these isolations in caves of great importance from the archaeological, speleological or tourist point of view, and the potential risk that they represent to human health. The authors conclude with some recommendation to prevent the infection with H. capsulatum in people who have to keep in contact with those environments.

  9. New Species of Campodeidae (Diplura) from Mexican caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra, Alberto; Palacios, Jose; Garcia, Arturo; Montejo, Maira

    2016-01-01

    Six new taxa of Campodeidae (Diplura) are described in the genera Litocampa, Juxtlacampa, Oncinocampa, and Tachycampa. We also redescribe the interesting species Juxtlacampa juxtlahucensis Wygodzinsky, 1944 from Juxtlahuaca cave in Guerrero, Mexico. All of these taxa are cave-dwelling species with more or less noticeable troglobiomorphic features They inhabit the subterranean ecosystem in six limestone massifs and one lava tube cave in the central states of Mexico. Four of these species are included in the "tachycampoide" group and one species in the "podocampoide" group (sensu Bareth & Conde). Nine species already known in Central and South America of the "tachycampoide" group, in such poorly-sampled regions compared with the eight species in the well-sampled Mediterranean region (Ibero-Sardinia and north Africa), suggest an American origin for this group.

  10. Phylogeny of cockroaches (Insecta, Dictyoptera, Blattodea), with placement of aberrant taxa and exploration of out-group sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djernæs, Marie; Klass, Klaus-Dieter; Picker, Mike D.

    2012-01-01

    We addressed the phylogeny of cockroaches using DNA sequence data from a broad taxon sample of Dictyoptera and other non-endopterygotan insect orders. We paid special attention to several taxa in which relationships are controversial, or where no molecular evidence has been used previously......: Nocticolidae, a family of small, often cave-dwelling cockroaches, has been suggested to be the sister group of the predaceous Mantodea or of the cockroach family Polyphagidae; Lamproblatta, traditionally placed in Blattidae, has recently been given family status and placed as sister to Polyphagidae......; and Saltoblattella montistabularis Bohn, Picker, Klass & Colville, a jumping cockroach, which has not yet been included in any phylogenetic studies. We used mitochondrial (COI + COII and 16S) and nuclear (18S and 28S) genes, and analysed the data using Bayesian inference (BI) and maximum likelihood (ML...

  11. 青海民和喇家史前遗址的发掘%Excavation of the Prehistoric Lajia Site in Minhe,Qinghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    中国社会科学院考古研究所; 青海省文物考古研究所

    2002-01-01

    The excavation of the Lajia site in Minhe, Qinghai, preliminarily revealed a lot of previously-unknown phenomena. The results include the discovery of wide ditches, a small-sized square, and human sacrifices and victims, the ascertainment of the existence of a settlement consisting of cave dwellings, and the revelation of vestiges of the disasters caused by an earthquake and flood happening 4,000 years ago. These aspects combine to bring to light links of prehistoric disasters with a settlement of that time, which constitutes an unprecedented achievement. Providing new material for researching into the origin of ancient civilization, the work marks a great breakthrough in the study of the Qijia culture in the upper Yellow River valley, and calls for furthering multidisciplinary study in archaeology.

  12. Redescription of two subterranean amphipods Niphargus molnari Méhely, 1927 and Niphargus gebhardti Schellenberg, 1934 (Amphipoda, Niphargidae and their phylogenetic position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorottya Angyal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed redescription of two endemic, cave-dwelling niphargid species of the Hungarian Mecsek Mts., Niphargus molnari Méhely, 1927 and Niphargus gebhardti Schellenberg, 1934 is given based on newly collected material. Morphology was studied under light microscopy and with scanning electon microscopy. Morphological descriptions are complemented with mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI sequences as barcodes for both species and with notes on their ecology. Using three independent molecular markers we showed that N. gebhardti belongs to the clade distributed between Central and Eastern Europe, whereas phylogenetic relationship of N. molnari to the rest of Niphargus species is not clear. The two species from the Mecsek Mts. are phylogenetically not closely related. Both species need to be treated as vulnerable according to IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

  13. 榆林地区传统窑居能耗分析评价%Energy Consumption Evaluation of Traditional Cave Building in Yulin Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师丽

    2012-01-01

    Based on the theory of life cycle assessment, combined with the characteristics of cave dwelling architecture, selected the Yulin area on two kinds of typical cave, calculated the each stage of the life cycle of the unit energy consumption, and the calculated data were compared with finishing, established a home energy assessment model.%文章基于生命周期评价理论,结合窑洞建筑自身特点,选取榆林地区两种典型窑洞,计算其生命周期各阶段的单位能耗,并对计算数据进行比较整理,建立了窑居能耗的评价模式.

  14. The first troglobitic species of freshwater flatworm of the suborder Continenticola (Platyhelminthes from South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Teles de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian cave diversity, especially of invertebrates, is poorly known. The Bodoquena Plateau, which is located in the Cerrado Biome in central Brazil, has approximately 200 recorded caves with a rich system of subterranean water resources and high troglobitic diversity. Herein we describe a new troglobitic species of Girardia that represents the first obligate cave-dwelling species of the suborder Continenticola in South America. Specimens of the new species, which occur in a limestone cave in the Bodoquena Plateau, in the Cerrado biome, are unpigmented and eyeless. Species recognition in the genus Girardia is difficult, due to their great morphological resemblance. However, the new species can be easily recognized by a unique feature in its copulatory apparatus, namely a large, branched bulbar cavity with multiple diverticula.

  15. Two new species of freshwater flatworms (Platyhelminthes: Tricladida: Continenticola) from South American caves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Stella; Morais, Ana Laura; Bichuette, Maria Elina; Leal-Zanchet, Ana

    2016-03-14

    The diversity of freshwater triclads in the Neotropical region is considered to be low, but extensive areas of South America remain almost unexplored. Herein we describe two cave-dwelling, new species of Girardia, one from a transition zone of the Cerrado and Caatinga phytophysiognomies and the other from the Cerrado phytophysiognomy. The species from the Cerrado-Caatinga transition is a troglobite, eyeless and whitish; the species from the Cerrado area is possibly a troglophile, since it shows heavily pigmented body and eyes. Each species is easily recognized by a unique combination of features in its external morphology and copulatory apparatus. The two new species of Girardia show a restricted distribution, even the troglophile, and occur in caves without legal protection. Therefore, they must be considered as vulnerable organisms in a conservation context.

  16. Construction of bacterial artificial chromosome libraries for the Lake Malawi cichlid (Metriaclima zebra), and the blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, Federica; Kidd, Celeste; Borowsky, Richard; Kocher, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Teleost fishes have become important models for studying the evolution of the genetic mechanisms of development. A key resource for comparative genomics and positional cloning are large-insert libraries constructed in bacterial artificial chromosomes. We have constructed bacterial artificial chromosome libraries for two species of teleost fish that are important models for the study of developmental evolution. Metriaclima zebra is one of several hundred closely related, morphologically diverse, haplochromine cichlids which have evolved over the last one million years in Lake Malawi, East Africa. The Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, is well known for adaptations related to the recent evolution of blind cave-dwelling forms. Clones and high-density filters for each library are available to the scientific community through the Hubbard Center for Genome Studies.

  17. Evolutionary tuning of an adaptive behavior requires enhancement of the neuromast sensory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Jeffery, William R

    2011-01-01

    Cave animals are faced with the challenge of carrying out fundamental life processes in a completely dark environment. Evolution of behavioral changes could be one of the key steps that adapt these animals to the absence of light. Astyanax mexicanus is a teleost with sighted surface dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave dwelling (cavefish) forms. Cavefish, a descendant of surface fish ancestors, have evolved a suite of constructive traits including an increase in the number and diameter of superficial neuromasts (SN). Prior to our study, no clear relationships had been established between constructive traits and the evolution of behavior. The current results link SN enhancement to vibration attraction behavior (VAB), a behavioral shift that is beneficial for feeding in a dark environment. We discuss a possible scenario in which the evolution of VAB may be a key factor in the establishment and survival of cavefish ancestors in the dark cave environment.

  18. Parental genetic effects in a cavefish adaptive behavior explain disparity between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Ashida, Go; Jeffery, William R

    2012-09-01

    Epigenetic parental genetic effects are important in many biological processes but their roles in the evolution of adaptive traits and their consequences in naturally evolving populations remain to be addressed. By comparing two divergent blind cave-dwelling cavefish populations with a sighted surface-dwelling population (surface fish) of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, we report here that convergences in vibration attraction behavior (VAB), the lateral line sensory receptors underlying this behavior, and the feeding benefits of this behavior are controlled by parental genetic effects, either maternal or paternal inheritance. From behavioral studies and mathematical evolutionary simulations, we further demonstrate that disparity in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in one of these cavefish populations that has hybridized with surface fish can be explained by paternal inheritance of VAB. The results suggest that parental genetic effects in adaptive behaviors may be important factors in biasing mitochondrial DNA inheritance in natural populations that are subject to introgression.

  19. Astyanax transgenesis and husbandry: how cavefish enters the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elipot, Yannick; Legendre, Laurent; Père, Stéphane; Sohm, Frédéric; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2014-08-01

    Astyanax mexicanus, a teleost fish comprising both sighted river-dwelling and blind cave-dwelling morphs, is becoming increasingly used in the field of developmental and evolutionary biology. Thus, new experimental and technological tools are needed on this emerging fish model by the expanding scientific community. Here, we describe Astyanax husbandry and egg spawning habits, a prerequisite to the successful establishment of Astyanax transgenic lines. We then compare two different transgenesis methods on both surface and cave Astyanax. Both meganuclease (I-SceI)- and transposase (Tol2)-mediated transgenesis are equivalently efficient, resulting in ∼40% mosaic transgenic fish in F0. Furthermore, the transmission rate was analyzed in F1 in the case of the I-SceI method and was found to be 16%. Finally, the transgene was found stable up the F3 generation, demonstrating the feasibility of generating stable transgenic lines in Astyanax and opening a wide range of possibilities for this fish model.

  20. A new species of Charinus Simon, 1892 (Arachnida: Amblypygi: Charinidae from Israel and new records of C. ioanniticus (Kritscher, 1959

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S. Miranda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Charinus is described from Israel and new localities for C. ioanniticus are reported. Charinus israelensis sp. nov. is a cave dwelling species with extremely small median eyes, no median tubercle and reduced lateral eyes. It is similar to C. ioanniticus, which occurs in nearby areas, but can be differentiated by the shape of the carapace, the number of pedipalp spines and the development of the eyes. A detailed comparison is made between the two species, including pictures, drawings and scanning electron micrographs. Charinus ioanniticus is reported here from several new localities in Israel and Turkey. Identification keys to the Charinus species groups and to the species of the bengalensis group are provided.

  1. Cave invertebrates in Espírito Santo state, Brazil: a primary analysis of endemism, threats and conservation priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marconi Souza Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cave-dwelling invertebrates were studied according to their composition, biodiversity, distribution and threats in the Atlantic Forest Central Biodiversity Corridor, a priority area for conservation actions in Brazil. Twelve obligate cave species were found, plus 495 troglophile species. Araneae (103 spp., Coleoptera (61 spp., Diptera (56 spp. and Lepidoptera (38 spp. were the richest taxa. The richness was higher in the carbonate caves (63 spp., sd = 16.7 and the highest diversity in granitic caves (H´= 2.68, sd = 0.5. The spatial turnover was 63.45 and similarity less than 30%. The total richness was correlated with the linear extension of the caves (Rs = 0.757, p ≤ 0.05. Surrounding area deforestation and religious and tourist use were the main threats. Emergency attention is recommended regarding protective actions, management and conservation of caves of extremely high biological importance.

  2. The subterranean fauna of a biodiversity hotspot region - Portugal: an overview and its conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reboleira Ana Sofia P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview of the obligate hypogean fauna in Portugal (including Azores and Madeira archipelagos is provided, with a list of obligated cave-dwelling species and subspecies, and a general perspective about its conservation. All the available literature on subterranean Biology of Portugal since the first written record in 1870 until today has been revised. A total of 43 troglobiont and 67 stygobiont species and subspecies from 12 orders have been described so far in these areas, included in the so-called Mediterranean hotspot of biodiversity. The subterranean fauna in Portugal has been considered moderately poor with some endemic relicts and it remains to be demonstrated if this fact is still true after investing in standard surveys in cave environments. The major problems related to the conservation of cave fauna are discussed, but it is clear that the protection of this specialized fauna implies an adequate management of surface habitats.

  3. Rare sponges from marine caves: discovery of Neophrissospongia nana nov. sp. (Demospongiae, Corallistidae from Sardinia with an annotated checklist of Mediterranean lithistids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Manconi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A new record of lithistid demosponges is reported from a western Sardinian karstic cave. The new specimen matches the trait of the genus Neophrissospongia (Corallistidae for an ectosomal skeleton of radial dichotriaenes, a choanosomal skeleton as a network of dicranoclone desmas, and streptaster/amphiaster microscleres with short spiny rays bearing blunt tips. The cave-dwelling N. nana nov. sp. diverges from the other species of the genus in diagnostic characters such as the large irregular plate-like growth form, the topographic distribution of inhalant and exhalant apertures, and a smaller size of all spicular types. Moreover it displays an additional rare second type of dichotriaenes with smooth cladomes, shared with other genera of Corallistidae but never reported before for the genus Neophrissospongia. In addition N. nana nov. sp. bears style-like sub-ectosomal spicules shared with N. microstylifer from deep water of New Caledonia. As for the latter trait, a present in-depth analysis of N. nolitangere from the Atlantic Ocean contrasts with previous historical records reporting monaxial spicules as oxeas/anisoxeas. The diagnosis of the genus Neophrissospongia is therefore emended for the growth form and for the micro-traits of dichotriaenes and monaxial sub-ectosomal spicules. Morphological data indicate that the new species is allied to N. nolitangere and N. microstylifer from Eastern Atlantic and New Caledonian deep water, respectively, and confirm the highly disjunct geographic range of the genus Neophrissospongia in the Lusitanian-Macaronesian-Mediterranean area and the Pacific Ocean supporting the relic condition of the genus in the Mediterranean Sea. This discovery stresses the key status of Mediterranean palaeoendemics as possible remnants of an ancient Tethyan fauna and focuses the need to plan conservation measures for these rare cave-dwelling taxa.

  4. Macroecology of Sexual Selection: A Predictive Conceptual Framework for Large-Scale Variation in Reproductive Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Glauco; Buzatto, Bruno A; García-Hernández, Solimary; Macías-Ordóñez, Rogelio

    2016-09-01

    Abiotic factors exert direct and indirect influences on behavioral, morphological, and life-history traits. Because some of these traits are related to reproduction, there is a causal link between climatic conditions and the expression of reproductive traits. This link allows us to generate predictions on how reproductive traits vary in large geographic scales. Here we formalize this macroecological framework, present some general predictions, and explore empirical examples using harvestmen as study organisms. Our results show that the length of breeding season in harvestmen is primarily influenced by the number of warm months and that precipitation plays a secondary role in modulating the period devoted to reproduction. Moreover, we show that the probability of resource defense polygyny increases with longer breeding seasons and that the presence of this type of mating system positively affects the magnitude of sexual dimorphism in harvestmen. Finally, the presence of postovipositional parental care is also influenced by the length of breeding season but not by actual evapotranspiration, which is our proxy for the intensity of biotic interactions. We argue that the macroecological framework proposed here may be a fruitful field of investigation, with important implications for our understanding of sexual selection and the evolution of reproductive traits in both animals and plants.

  5. Using DNA-barcoding to make the necrobiont beetle family Cholevidae accessible for forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilthuizen, Menno; Scholte, Cindy; van Wijk, Renske E J; Dommershuijzen, Jessy; van der Horst, Devi; Zu Schlochtern, Melanie Meijer; Lievers, Rik; Groenenberg, Dick S J

    2011-07-15

    The beetle family Cholevidae (Coleoptera: Staphylinoidea), sometimes viewed as the subfamily Cholevinae of the Leiodidae, consists of some 1700 species worldwide. With the exception of specialized cave-dwelling species and species living in bird and mammal nests and burrows, the species are generalized soil-dwellers that, at least in temperate regions, are mostly found on vertebrate cadavers. Although they have been regularly reported from human corpses, and offer potential because of many species' peak activity in the cold season, they have not been a focus of forensic entomologists so far. This is probably due to their small size and the difficulty in identifying the adults and their larvae. In this paper, we show that DNA-barcoding can help make this group of necrobiont beetles available as a tool for forensic research. We collected 86 specimens of 20 species of the genera Catops, Fissocatops, Apocatops, Choleva, Nargus, Ptomaphagus, and Sciodrepoides from the Netherlands and France and show that a broad "barcoding gap" allows almost all species to be easily and unambiguously identified by the sequence of the "barcoding gene" cytochrome c oxidase I (COI). This opens up the possibility of adding Cholevidae to the set of insect taxa routinely used in forensic entomology.

  6. Litomosoides yutajensis n. sp., first record of this filarial genus in a mormoopid bat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero R.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five bats were trapped in Yutaje (Amazonas, Venezuela and examined for Litomosoides (Filarioidea: Onchocercidae. Of the nine recovered bat species, only Pteronotus parnelli was infected; it is a cave-dwelling species belonging to a family, Mormoopidae, which has not previously been included in the host range of the genus. The new species, L. yutajensis n. sp., has two median cephalic bosses covered with rugosities and differs from the 15 recognized species and subspecies from bats in several characters. Alike L. molossi Esslinger, 1973, L. chandleri Esslinger, 1973 and L. chitwoodi Bain, Guerrero, Rodriguez 2003 , the new species has cuticular lateral bosses on the body. Eight of 10 P. parnelli were microfilaraemic, but only three had adult worms, showing that microfilariae survive longer than adults, which could lengthen the period of transmission. No infective larvae were detected in the following macronyssid mites: 58 Ornithonyssus bacoti, Ornithonyssinae, experimentally fed on microfilaraemic bats and dissected 15 days later, and a few Radfordiella sp., Macronyssinae, recovered from P. parnelli.

  7. Morphological and ecological investigations on sympatric Lipophrys species (Blenniidae, Pisces)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, C. D.

    1980-03-01

    The three syntopic blenniids Lipophrys canevai, L. adriaticus, and L. dalmatinus were investigated off Katarina Island near Rovinj, Yugoslavia, in regard to their habitats and food organisms. The shallow, sheltered rocky sea shore turned out to be the characteristic habitat for L. dalmatinus and L. adriaticus, whereas L. canevai also inhabits surf-exposed biotopes. The overlap of the microhabitats was below 50 %. Algae are the main food of all three species with respect to biomass, but harpacticoids dominated in L. adriaticus and especially L. dalmatinus when considering abundance of food organisms. Overlap of trophic niches was high (80 %) between L. canevai and L. adriaticus but lower (anatomy of eyes, including the closely related, cave-dwelling L. nigriceps. This species reveals special adaptations to life in dimly lit biotopes: reduction of the basic melanophore pigmentation, development of clinging organs, and enlargement of eyes and lenses combined with an effective ratio of retinal elements and modes of accommodation. It is concluded that the four species are members of one “Lebensorttyp” (Riedl, 1966) of which L. nigriceps has superimposed the basic characteristics with specializations to a greater and the other three species to a lesser degree.

  8. The role of ultrasonic bat detectors in improving inventory and monitoring surveys in Vietnamese karst bat assemblages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neil M. FUREY; Iain J. MACKIE; Paul A. RACEY

    2009-01-01

    Bats account for 30% of mammal diversity in SE Asia and are potential bioindieators of wider biodiversity impacts resulting from habitat loss and climate change. As existing sampling techniques in the region typically fall to record bats that habitually fly in open areas and at higher altitudes, current inventory efforts are less than comprehensive. Acoustic sampling with bat detectors may help to overcome these limitations for insectivorous bats, but has yet to be tested in mainland SE Asia. To do so, we sampled bats while simultaneously recording the echolocation calls of insectivorous species commuting and foraging in a variety of karst habitats in north Vietnam. Monitoring of cave-dwelling bats was also undertaken. Discriminant function analysis of 367 echolocation calls produced by 30 insectivorous species showed that acoustic identification was feasible by correctly classifying 89. 1% of caLls. In all habitats, acoustic sampling and capture methods recorded significantly more species each night than capture methods alone. Capture methods consequently failed to record 29% (ten spp. of aerial insectivores) of the bat fauna in commuting and foraging habitats and 11% ( two spp. ) of that in our cave sample. Only four of these species were subsequently captured following significantly greater sampling effort. This strongly suggests that acoustic methods axe indispensable for maximizing bat inventory completeness in SE Asia. As accurate inventories and monitoring are essential for effective species conservation, we recommend the inclusion of acoustic sampling in future studies of bat assemblages across the region [Current Zoology 55 (5) : 327 - 341, 2009].

  9. Asymmetric Facial Bone Fragmentation Mirrors Asymmetric Distribution of Cranial Neuromasts in Blind Mexican Cavefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Joshua B; Gangidine, Andrew; Powers, Amanda K

    2016-11-01

    Craniofacial asymmetry is a convergent trait widely distributed across animals that colonize the extreme cave environment. Although craniofacial asymmetry can be discerned easily, other complex phenotypes (such as sensory organ position and numerical variation) are challenging to score and compare. Certain bones of the craniofacial complex demonstrate substantial asymmetry, and co-localize to regions harboring dramatically expanded numbers of mechanosensory neuromasts. To determine if a relationship exists between this expansion and bone fragmentation in cavefish, we developed a quantitative measure of positional symmetry across the left-right axis. We found that three different cave-dwelling populations were significantly more asymmetric compared to surface-dwelling fish. Moreover, cave populations did not differ in the degree of neuromast asymmetry. This work establishes a method for quantifying symmetry of a complex phenotype, and demonstrates that facial bone fragmentation mirrors the asymmetric distribution of neuromasts in different cavefish populations. Further developmental studies will provide a clearer picture of the developmental and cellular changes that accompany this extreme phenotype, and help illuminate the genetic basis for facial asymmetry in vertebrates.

  10. Diversity, Host Specialization, and Geographic Structure of Filarial Nematodes Infecting Malagasy Bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasindrazana, Beza; Dellagi, Koussay; Lagadec, Erwan; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Goodman, Steven M; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated filarial infection in Malagasy bats to gain insights into the diversity of these parasites and explore the factors shaping their distribution. Samples were obtained from 947 individual bats collected from 52 sites on Madagascar and representing 31 of the 44 species currently recognized on the island. Samples were screened for the presence of micro- and macro-parasites through both molecular and morphological approaches. Phylogenetic analyses showed that filarial diversity in Malagasy bats formed three main groups, the most common represented by Litomosa spp. infecting Miniopterus spp. (Miniopteridae); a second group infecting Pipistrellus cf. hesperidus (Vespertilionidae) embedded within the Litomosoides cluster, which is recognized herein for the first time from Madagascar; and a third group composed of lineages with no clear genetic relationship to both previously described filarial nematodes and found in M. griveaudi, Myotis goudoti, Neoromicia matroka (Vespertilionidae), Otomops madagascariensis (Molossidae), and Paratriaenops furculus (Hipposideridae). We further analyzed the infection rates and distribution pattern of Litomosa spp., which was the most diverse and prevalent filarial taxon in our sample. Filarial infection was disproportionally more common in males than females in Miniopterus spp., which might be explained by some aspect of roosting behavior of these cave-dwelling bats. We also found marked geographic structure in the three Litomosa clades, mainly linked to bioclimatic conditions rather than host-parasite associations. While this study demonstrates distinct patterns of filarial nematode infection in Malagasy bats and highlights potential drivers of associated geographic distributions, future work should focus on their alpha taxonomy and characterize arthropod vectors.

  11. Otolith morphology and hearing abilities in cave- and surface-dwelling ecotypes of the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana (Teleostei: Poeciliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Ladich, Friedrich; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Cave fish have rarely been investigated with regard to their inner ear morphology, hearing abilities, and acoustic communication. Based on a previous study that revealed morphological differences in the saccular otolith between a cave and two surface populations of Poecilia mexicana, we checked for additional differences in utricular and lagenar otoliths and tested whether different populations have similar hearing sensitivities. We found pronounced differences in the shape of all three otoliths. Otoliths of the saccule and lagena from cave fish differed from those of surface fish in the features of the face oriented towards the sensory epithelium. In addition, otoliths of the utricle and lagena were significantly heavier in cave fish. Auditory sensitivities were measured between 100 and 1500Hz, utilizing the auditory evoked potential recording technique. We found similar hearing abilities in cave and surface fish, with greatest sensitivity between 200 and 300Hz. An acoustic survey revealed that neither ecotype produced species-specific sounds. Our data indicate that cave dwelling altered the otolith morphology in Atlantic mollies, probably due to metabolic differences. Different otolith morphology, however, did not affect general auditory sensitivity or acoustic behavior.

  12. Evidence for multiple genetic forms with similar eyeless phenotypes in the blind cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Thomas E; Martasian, David P; Jeffery, William R

    2002-04-01

    A diverse group of animals has adapted to caves and lost their eyes and pigmentation, but little is known about how these animals and their striking phenotypes have evolved. The teleost Astyanax mexicanus consists of an eyed epigean form (surface fish) and at least 29 different populations of eyeless hypogean forms (cavefish). Current alternative hypotheses suggest that adaptation to cave environments may have occurred either once or multiple times during the evolutionary history of this species. If the latter is true, the unique phenotypes of different cave-dwelling populations may result from convergence of form, and different genetic changes and developmental processes may have similar morphological consequences. Here we report an analysis of variation in the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase 2 (ND2) gene among different surface fish and cavefish populations. The results identify a minimum of two genetically distinctive cavefish lineages with similar eyeless phenotypes. The distinction between these divergent forms is supported by differences in the number of rib-bearing thoracic vertebrae in their axial skeletons. The geographic distribution of ND2 haplotypes is consistent with roles for multiple founder events and introgressive hybridization in the evolution of cave-related phenotypes. The existence of multiple genetic lineages makes A. mexicanus an excellent model to study convergence and the genes and developmental pathways involved in the evolution of the eye and pigment degeneration.

  13. Evolution of a behavioral shift mediated by superficial neuromasts helps cavefish find food in darkness.

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    Yoshizawa, Masato; Goricki, Spela; Soares, Daphne; Jeffery, William R

    2010-09-28

    How cave animals adapt to life in darkness is a poorly understood aspect of evolutionary biology [1]. Here we identify a behavioral shift and its morphological basis in Astyanax mexicanus, a teleost with a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and various blind cave-dwelling forms (cavefish) [2-4]. Vibration attraction behavior (VAB) is the ability of fish to swim toward the source of a water disturbance in darkness. VAB was typically seen in cavefish, rarely in surface fish, and was advantageous for feeding success in the dark. The potential for showing VAB has a genetic component and is linked to the mechanosensory function of the lateral line. VAB was evoked by vibration stimuli peaking at 35 Hz, blocked by lateral line inhibitors, first detected after developmental increases in superficial neuromast (SN) number and size [5-7], and significantly reduced by bilateral ablation of SN. We conclude that VAB and SN enhancement coevolved to compensate for loss of vision and to help blind cavefish find food in darkness.

  14. Differentially expressed genes identified by cross-species microarray in the blind cavefish Astyanax.

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    Strickler, Allen G; Jeffery, William R

    2009-03-01

    Changes in gene expression were examined by microarray analysis during development of the eyed surface dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus De Filippi, 1853. The cross-species microarray used surface and cavefish RNA hybridized to a DNA chip prepared from a closely related species, the zebrafish Danio rerio Hamilton, 1822. We identified a total of 67 differentially expressed probe sets at three days post-fertilization: six upregulated and 61 downregulated in cavefish relative to surface fish. Many of these genes function either in eye development and/or maintenance, or in programmed cell death. The upregulated probe set showing the highest mean fold change was similar to the human ubiquitin specific protease 53 gene. The downregulated probe sets showing some of the highest fold changes corresponded to genes with roles in eye development, including those encoding gamma crystallins, the guanine nucleotide binding proteins Gnat1 and Gant2, a BarH-like homeodomain transcription factor, and rhodopsin. Downregulation of gamma-crystallin and rhodopsin was confirmed by in situ hybridization and immunostaining with specific antibodies. Additional downregulated genes encode molecules that inhibit or activate programmed cell death. The results suggest that cross-species microarray can be used for identifying differentially expressed genes in cavefish, that many of these genes might be involved in eye degeneration via apoptotic processes, and that more genes are downregulated than upregulated in cavefish, consistent with the predominance of morphological losses over gains during regressive evolution.

  15. The lens has a specific influence on optic nerve and tectum development in the blind cavefish Astyanax.

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    Soares, Daphne; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Strickler, Allen G; Jeffery, William R

    2004-01-01

    We used the teleost Astyanaxmexicanus to examine the role of the lens in optic nerve and tectum development. This speciesis unusually suited for studies of nervous system development and evolution because of its two extant forms: an eyed surface dwelling (surface fish) and several blind cave dwelling (cavefish) forms. Cavefish embryos initially form eye primordia, but the lens eventually dies by apoptosis, then the retina ceases to grow, and finally the degenerating eyes sink into the orbits. Transplantation of an embryonic surface fish lens into a cavefish optic cup restores eye development. We show here that retinal nerve fibers are formed and project to the optic tectum in cavefish embryos. In adult cavefish that have completed lens degeneration, however, the number of retinal axons in the optic nerve is substantially reduced compared to surface fish. The presumptive brain domains of embryonic cavefish are not altered relative to surface fish based on expression of the regional marker genes Pax6, Pax2.1, and engrailed2. In contrast, the adult cavefish brain is elongated, the optic tectum is diminished in volume, and the number of tectal neurons is reduced relative to surface fish. Unilateral transplantation of an embryonic surface fish lens into a cavefish optic cup increases the size of the optic nerve, the number of retinotectal projections from the restored eye, and the volume and neuronal content of the contralateral optic tectum. The results suggest that the lens has a specific influence on optic nerve and tectum development during eye growth in Astyanax.

  16. Non-visual numerical discrimination in a blind cavefish (Phreatichthys andruzzii).

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    Bisazza, Angelo; Tagliapietra, Christian; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Foà, Augusto; Agrillo, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Over a decade of comparative studies, researchers have found that rudimentary numerical abilities are widespread among vertebrates. While experiments in mammals and birds have employed a variety of stimuli (visual, auditory and tactile), all fish studies involved visual stimuli and it is unknown whether fish can process numbers in other sensory modalities. To fill this gap, we studied numerical abilities in Phreatichthys andruzzii, a blind cave-dwelling species that evolved in the phreatic layer of the Somalia desert. Fish were trained to receive a food reward to discriminate between two groups of objects placed in opposite positions of their home tank. In Experiment 1, subjects learned to discriminate between two and six objects, with stimuli not controlled for non-numerical continuous variables that co-vary with numbers, such as total area occupied by stimuli or density. In Experiment 2, the discrimination was two versus four, with half of the stimuli controlled for continuous quantities and half not controlled for continuous quantities. The subjects discriminated only the latter condition, indicating that they spontaneously used non-numerical information, as other vertebrates tested in similar experiments. In Experiments 3 and 4, cavefish trained from the beginning only with stimuli controlled for continuous quantities proved able to learn the discrimination of quantities based on the sole numerical information. However, their numerical acuity was lower than that reported in other teleost fish tested with visual stimuli.

  17. Prox 1 in eye degeneration and sensory organ compensation during development and evolution of the cavefish Astyanax.

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    Jeffery, W; Strickler, A; Guiney, S; Heyser, D; Tomarev, S

    2000-05-01

    We have investigated expression of the homeobox gene Prox 1 during eye degeneration and sensory organ compensation in cavefish embryos. The teleost Astyanax mexicanus consists of sighted surface-dwelling forms (surface fish) and several populations of blind cave-dwelling forms (cavefish), which have evolved independently. Eye formation is initiated during cavefish development, but the lens vesicle undergoes apoptosis, and the eye subsequently arrests and degenerates. The requirement of Prox 1 for lens fiber differentiation and gamma-crystallin expression in the mouse suggests that changes in the expression of this gene could be involved in cavefish eye degeneration. Surface fish and cavefish embryos stained with a Prox 1 antibody showed Prox 1 expression in the lens, neuroretina, myotomes, heart, hindbrain, and gut, as reported in other vertebrates. We found that Prox 1 expression is not altered during cavefish lens development. Prox 1 protein was detected in the lens vesicle as soon as it formed and persisted until the time of lens degeneration in each cavefish population. The cavefish lens vesicle was also shown to express a gamma-crystallin gene, suggesting that Prox 1 is functional in cavefish lens development. In addition to the tissues described above, Prox 1 is expressed in developing taste buds and neuromasts in cavefish, which are enhanced to compensate for blindness. It is concluded that the Prox 1 gene is not involved in lens degeneration, but that expansion of the Prox 1 expression domain occurs during taste bud and neuromast development in cavefish.

  18. Chapter 8. Evolution and development in the cavefish Astyanax.

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    Jeffery, William R

    2009-01-01

    The teleost Astyanax mexicanus is a single species consisting of two radically different forms: a sighted pigmented surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and a blind depigmented cave-dwelling form (cavefish). The two forms of Astyanax have favorable attributes, including descent from a common ancestor, ease of laboratory culture, and the ability to perform genetic analysis, permitting their use as a model system to explore questions in evolution and development. Here, we review current research on the molecular, cellular, and developmental mechanisms underlying the loss of eyes and pigmentation in Astyanax cavefish. Although functional eyes are lacking in adults, cavefish embryos begin to develop eye primordia, which subsequently degenerate. The major cause of eye degeneration appears to be apoptotic cell death of the lens, which prevents the growth of other optic tissues, including the retina. Ultimately, the loss of the eye is the cause of craniofacial differences between cavefish and surface fish. Lens apoptosis is induced by enhanced activity of the Hedgehog signaling system along the cavefish embryonic midline. The absence of melanin pigmentation in cavefish is due to a block in the ability of undifferentiated melanoblasts to accumulate L-tyrosine, the precursor of L-DOPA and melanin, in melanosomes. Genetic analysis has shown that this defect is caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the p/oca2 gene encoding an integral melanosomal membrane protein. We discuss how current studies of eye and pigment regression have revealed some of the mechanisms in which cavefish development has been changed during evolution.

  19. To see or not to see: evolution of eye degeneration in mexican blind cavefish.

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    Jeffery, William R; Strickler, Allen G; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2003-08-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms responsible for the loss of eyes in cave animals are still unresolved. Hypotheses invoking natural selection or neutral mutation have been advanced to explain eye regression. Here we describe comparative molecular and developmental studies in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus that shed new light on this problem. A. mexicanus is a single species consisting of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and many blind cave-dwelling forms (cavefish) from different caves. We first review the evolutionary relationships of Astyanax cavefish populations and conclude that eye degeneration may have evolved multiple times. We then compare the mechanisms of eye degeneration in different cavefish populations. We describe the results of experiments showing that programmed cell death of the lens plays a key role in controlling eye degeneration in these cavefish populations. We also show that Pax6 gene expression and fate determination in the optic primordia are modified similarly in different cavefish populations, probably due to hyperactive midline signaling. We discuss the contributions of the comparative developmental approach toward resolving the evolutionary mechanisms of eye degeneration. A new hypothesis is presented in which both natural selection and neutral mutation are proposed to have roles in cavefish eye degeneration.

  20. Conservation of retinal circadian rhythms during cavefish eye degeneration.

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    Espinasa, Luis; Jeffery, William R

    2006-01-01

    Regressive evolution of morphological features is a common evolutionary event. However, the relationship between structural degeneration and loss of physiological function is often unclear because the ancestral and derived states of a character are usually not available for comparison. Here, we report studies on retinomotor rhythms during development of the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus, a single teleost species consisting of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and several blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. The eyed and blind forms of Astyanax diverged from a common sighted ancestor within the past million years. Despite the absence of functional eyes in cavefish adults, optic primordia are formed in embryos, but then gradually arrest in development, degenerate, and sink into the orbits. Although a layered retina is formed in cavefish embryos, it is deficient in photoreceptor cells, and in some cases the retinal pigment epithelium has lost its pigmentation. We show that the capacity to exhibit light-entrained retinomotor rhythms has been conserved in the degenerating embryonic eyes of two different Astyanax cavefish populations. The results indicate that loss of circadian retinal function does not precede and is therefore not required for eye degeneration in the blind cavefish.

  1. Adaptive evolution of eye degeneration in the Mexican blind cavefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, W R

    2005-01-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms responsible for eye degeneration in cave-adapted animals have not been resolved. Opposing hypotheses invoking neural mutation or natural selection, each with certain genetic and developmental expectations, have been advanced to explain eye regression, although little or no experimental evidence has been presented to support or reject either theory. Here we review recent developmental and molecular studies in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, a single species consisting of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and many blind cave-dwelling forms (cavefish), which shed new light on this problem. The manner of eye development and degeneration, the ability to experimentally restore eyes, gene expression patterns, and comparisons between different cavefish populations all provide important clues for understanding the evolutionary forces responsible for eye degeneration. A key discovery is that Hedgehog midline signaling is expanded and inhibits eye formation by inducing lens apoptosis in cavefish embryos. Accordingly, eyes could have been lost by default as a consequence of natural selection for constructive traits, such as feeding structures, which are positively regulated by Hh signaling. We conclude from these studies that eye degeneration in cavefish may be caused by adaptive evolution and pleiotropy.

  2. The lens controls cell survival in the retina: Evidence from the blind cavefish Astyanax.

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    Strickler, Allen G; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Jeffery, William R

    2007-11-15

    The lens influences retinal growth and differentiation during vertebrate eye development but the mechanisms are not understood. The role of the lens in retinal growth and development was studied in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which has eyed surface-dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. A lens and laminated retina initially develop in cavefish embryos, but the lens dies by apoptosis. The cavefish retina is subsequently disorganized, apoptotic cells appear, the photoreceptor layer degenerates, and retinal growth is arrested. We show here by PCNA, BrdU, and TUNEL labeling that cell proliferation continues in the adult cavefish retina but the newly born cells are removed by apoptosis. Surface fish to cavefish lens transplantation, which restores retinal growth and rod cell differentiation, abolished apoptosis in the retina but not in the RPE. Surface fish lens deletion did not cause apoptosis in the surface fish retina or affect RPE differentiation. Neither lens transplantation in cavefish nor lens deletion in surface fish affected retinal cell proliferation. We conclude that the lens acts in concert with another optic component, possibly the RPE, to promote retinal cell survival. Accordingly, deficiency in both optic structures may lead to eye degeneration in cavefish.

  3. New record of a phoretic flea associated with earwigs (Dermaptera, Arixeniidae and a redescription of the bat flea Lagaropsylla signata (Siphonaptera, Ischnopsyllidae

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    Michael W. Hastriter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lagaropsylla signata (Wahlgren, 1903, previously known only from the Island of Java, Indonesia is redescribed and reported for the first time in Deer Cave, Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia (west coast of Borneo. Many were found clinging to the earwig Arixenia esau Jordan, 1909. A similar account of a phoretic flea (Lagaropsylla turba Smit, 1958 on the same species of cave-dwelling earwig has been reported in peninsular Malaysia in a well-documented association with the hairless naked bulldog bat, Cheiromeles torquatus Horsfield, 1824. The association of L. signata with A. esau is parallel to the evolution and co-existence with bats in Deer Cave just as in the case of L. turba, A. esau, and C. torquatus. The evidence suggests that L. turba and L. signata are obligate phoretic parasites whose survival depends on A. esau to access a bat host. Arixenia esau is reported for the first time in Deer Cave and the occurrence of L. signata on the island of Borneo represented a new record, previously being found only on the island of Java. Images of L. signata attached to A. esau are provided. Xeniaria jacobsoni (Burr, 1912, often associated with A. esau in other geographical areas, was not present in the material examined from Deer Cave. The natural history of the earwig genera Arixenia Jordan, 1909 and Xeniaria Maa, 1974 are discussed and summarized relative to their associations with phoretic fleas and their bat hosts.

  4. Evolution of paedomorphosis in plethodontid salamanders: ecological correlates and re-evolution of metamorphosis.

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    Bonett, Ronald M; Steffen, Michael A; Lambert, Shea M; Wiens, John J; Chippindale, Paul T

    2014-02-01

    Life-history modes can profoundly impact the biology of a species, and a classic example is the dichotomy between metamorphic (biphasic) and paedomorphic (permanently aquatic) life-history strategies in salamanders. However, despite centuries of research on this system, several basic questions about the evolution of paedomorphosis in salamanders have not been addressed. Here, we use a nearly comprehensive, time-calibrated phylogeny of spelerpine plethodontids to reconstruct the evolution of paedomorphosis and to test if paedomorphosis is (1) reversible; (2) associated with living in caves; (3) associated with relatively dry climatic conditions on the surface; and (4) correlated with limited range size and geographic dispersal. We find that paedomorphosis arose multiple times in spelerpines. We also find evidence for re-evolution of metamorphosis after several million years of paedomorphosis in a lineage of Eurycea from the Edwards Plateau region of Texas. We also show for the first time using phylogenetic comparative methods that paedomorphosis is highly correlated with cave-dwelling, arid surface environments, and small geographic range sizes, providing insights into both the causes and consequences of this major life history transition.

  5. Lens gene expression analysis reveals downregulation of the anti-apoptotic chaperone alphaA-crystallin during cavefish eye degeneration.

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    Strickler, Allen G; Byerly, Mardi S; Jeffery, William R

    2007-12-01

    We have conducted a survey of the expression patterns of five genes encoding three different classes of major lens proteins during eye degeneration in the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus. This species consists of two forms, an eyed surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and a blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) form. Cavefish form an optic primordium with a lens vesicle and optic cup. In contrast to surface fish, however, the cavefish lens does not differentiate fiber cells and undergoes massive apoptosis. The genes encoding the lens intrinsic membrane proteins MIP and MP19 and the divergent betaB1- and gammaM2-crystallins are expressed during cavefish lens development, although their levels are reduced because of a smaller lens, and the spatial distribution of their transcripts is modified because of the lack of differentiated fiber cells. In contrast, the alphaA-crystallin gene, which encodes a heat shock protein-related chaperone with antiapoptotic activity, is substantially downregulated in the developing cavefish lens. The results suggest that suppression of alphaA-crystallin antiapoptotic activity may be involved in cavefish eye degeneration.

  6. A new genus and species of blind sleeper (Teleostei: Eleotridae) from Oaxaca, Mexico: First obligate cave gobiiform in the Western Hemisphere

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    Walsh, Stephen J.; Chakrabarty, Prosanta

    2016-01-01

    Caecieleotris morrisi, new genus and species of sleeper (family Eleotridae), is described from a submerged freshwater cave in a karst region of the northern portion of the State of Oaxaca, Mexico, Río Papaloapan drainage, Gulf of Mexico basin. The new species represents the first cave-adapted sleeper known from the Western Hemisphere and is one of only 13 stygobitic gobiiforms known worldwide, with all others limited in distribution to the Indo-Pacific region. The new taxon represents a third independent evolution of a hypogean lifestyle in sleepers, the others being two species ofOxyeleotris (O. caeca and O. colasi) from New Guinea and a single species, Bostrychus microphthalmus, from Sulawesi. Caecieleotris morrisi, new species, is distinguished from epigean eleotrids of the Western Atlantic in lacking functional eyes and body pigmentation, as well as having other troglomorphic features. It shares convergent aspects of morphology with cave-dwelling species of Oxyeleotris and B. microphthalmus but differs from those taxa in lacking cephalic pores and head squamation, among other characters. Description of C. morrisi, new species, brings the total number of eleotrid species known from Mexico to 12. Seven of these, including the new species, occur on the Atlantic Slope.

  7. Alimentação de um filhote de bem-te-vi, Pitangus sulphuratus (Linnaeus (Passeriformes, Tyrannidae, em ambiente urbano Feeding of a fledgling oreat kiskadee, Pitanqus sulphuratus (Ilnnaeus (Passeriformes, Tyrannidae in urban environment

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    Maria Martha Argel-de-Oliveira

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The observation of parents feeding a captive fledgling of Great Kiskadee revealed that visitation is more frequent in the first hour after sunrising, with lesscr peaks along the day. The diet supplied consisted mainly of insects (Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, along with other items as human-made materiais (food scraps, pellets of animal food, lizards (Hemidactylus mabouia, non-identified fruit pulp, gastropods and arachnids (Opiliones. The ability that P. sulphuratus has for identifying food items absent froni more natural habitats and for exploiting resources of unpredictablc spatial and temporal distributions confers the species a dietary flexibility that probably contributes to its efficiency in colonizing urban habitats.

  8. Eupolybothrus cavernicolus Komerički & Stoev sp. n. (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Lithobiidae: the first eukaryotic species description combining transcriptomic, DNA barcoding and micro-CT imaging data

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    Pavel Stoev

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate how a classical taxonomic description of a new species can be enhanced by applying new generation molecular methods, and novel computing and imaging technologies. A cave-dwelling centipede, Eupolybothrus cavernicolus Komerički & Stoev sp. n. (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Lithobiidae, found in a remote karst region in Knin, Croatia, is the first eukaryotic species for which, in addition to the traditional morphological description, we provide a fully sequenced transcriptome, a DNA barcode, detailed anatomical X-ray microtomography (micro-CT scans, and a movie of the living specimen to document important traits of its ex-situ behaviour. By employing micro-CT scanning in a new species for the first time, we create a high-resolution morphological and anatomical dataset that allows virtual reconstructions of the specimen and subsequent interactive manipulation to test the recently introduced ‘cybertype’ notion. In addition, the transcriptome was recorded with a total of 67,785 scaffolds, having an average length of 812 bp and N50 of 1,448 bp (see GigaDB. Subsequent annotation of 22,866 scaffolds was conducted by tracing homologs against current available databases, including Nr, SwissProt and COG. This pilot project illustrates a workflow of producing, storing, publishing and disseminating large data sets associated with a description of a new taxon. All data have been deposited in publicly accessible repositories, such as GigaScience GigaDB, NCBI, BOLD, Morphbank and Morphosource, and the respective open licenses used ensure their accessibility and re-usability.

  9. Endemics under threat: an assessment of the conservation status of Cuban bats

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    Carlos Mancina

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reviewing available information from published literature, museum database, personal communications and from the authors own field data, the conservation status of Cuban bats has been assessed using six qualitative parameters: abundance, distribution, roosting habits, aggregation level, forest dependence, and degree of endemism. The resulting Red List is analogous to that of the IUCN, species having been included in four categories of risk. Four out of the 26 extant bats of Cuba should be considered endangered, four vulnerable to extinction, twelve potentially threatened, and six in a stable situation. Most of the species of bats endemic to Cuba are under some form of threat. The major threats to the survival of Cuban bats are the destruction of forests and the modification of caves, the latter being critical habitats for the mostly cave-dwelling Cuban bat fauna. We argue that its conservation should be the result of a cooperative effort promoting research and habitat management. Riassunto Endemismi minacciati: una valutazione dello stato di conservazione dei chirotteri cubani. Lo stato di conservazione dei chirotteri cubani è stato valutato a partire da sei parametri qualitativi: abbondanza, distribuzione, roost utilizzati, livello di aggregazione, dipendenza da ambienti forestali e grado di endemismo. A questo scopo sono state esaminate le informazioni bibliografiche, i database dei musei e dati non pubblicati, in parte raccolti dagli stessi autori. La Lista Rossa risultante è analoga a quella dell’IUCN, comprendendo quattro categorie di rischio crescente. Delle 26 specie attualmente presenti a Cuba, 4 sono da considerarsi in pericolo di estinzione, 4 "vulnerabili", 12 "potenzialmente minacciate" e 6 "stabili". La maggior parte delle specie endemiche è in qualche misura minacciata. La deforestazione e l’alterazione delle cavità carsiche, che costituiscono un habitat

  10. World Register of marine Cave Species (WoRCS: a new Thematic Species Database for marine and anchialine cave biodiversity

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    Vasilis Gerovasileiou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific exploration of marine cave environments and anchialine ecosystems over recent decades has led to outstanding discoveries of novel taxa, increasing our knowledge of biodiversity. However, biological research on underwater caves has taken place only in a few areas of the world and relevant information remains fragmented in isolated publications and databases. This fragmentation makes assessing the conservation status of marine cave species especially problematic, and this issue should be addressed urgently given the stresses resulting from planned and rampant development in the coastal zone worldwide. The goal of the World Register of marine Cave Species (WoRCS initiative is to create a comprehensive taxonomic and ecological database of known species from marine caves and anchialine systems worldwide and to present this as a Thematic Species Database (TSD of the World Register of marine Species (WoRMS. WoRCS will incorporate ecological data (e.g., type of environment, salinity regimes, and cave zone as well as geographical information on the distribution of species in cave and anchialine environments. Biodiversity data will be progressively assembled from individual database sources at regional, national or local levels, as well as from literature sources (estimate: >20,000 existing records of cave-dwelling species scattered in several databases. Information will be organized in the WoRCS database following a standard glossary based on existing terminology. Cave-related information will be managed by the WoRCS thematic editors with all data dynamically linked to WoRMS and its team of taxonomic editors. In order to mobilize data into global biogeographic databases, a Gazetteer of the Marine and Anchialine Caves of the World will be established. The presence records of species could be eventually georeferenced for submission to the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS and constitute an important dataset for biogeographical and

  11. Diversity, Host Specialization, and Geographic Structure of Filarial Nematodes Infecting Malagasy Bats.

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    Beza Ramasindrazana

    Full Text Available We investigated filarial infection in Malagasy bats to gain insights into the diversity of these parasites and explore the factors shaping their distribution. Samples were obtained from 947 individual bats collected from 52 sites on Madagascar and representing 31 of the 44 species currently recognized on the island. Samples were screened for the presence of micro- and macro-parasites through both molecular and morphological approaches. Phylogenetic analyses showed that filarial diversity in Malagasy bats formed three main groups, the most common represented by Litomosa spp. infecting Miniopterus spp. (Miniopteridae; a second group infecting Pipistrellus cf. hesperidus (Vespertilionidae embedded within the Litomosoides cluster, which is recognized herein for the first time from Madagascar; and a third group composed of lineages with no clear genetic relationship to both previously described filarial nematodes and found in M. griveaudi, Myotis goudoti, Neoromicia matroka (Vespertilionidae, Otomops madagascariensis (Molossidae, and Paratriaenops furculus (Hipposideridae. We further analyzed the infection rates and distribution pattern of Litomosa spp., which was the most diverse and prevalent filarial taxon in our sample. Filarial infection was disproportionally more common in males than females in Miniopterus spp., which might be explained by some aspect of roosting behavior of these cave-dwelling bats. We also found marked geographic structure in the three Litomosa clades, mainly linked to bioclimatic conditions rather than host-parasite associations. While this study demonstrates distinct patterns of filarial nematode infection in Malagasy bats and highlights potential drivers of associated geographic distributions, future work should focus on their alpha taxonomy and characterize arthropod vectors.

  12. A potential benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish: downregulation of the oca2 gene increases tyrosine and catecholamine levels as an alternative to melanin synthesis.

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    Helena Bilandžija

    Full Text Available Albinism, the loss of melanin pigmentation, has evolved in a diverse variety of cave animals but the responsible evolutionary mechanisms are unknown. In Astyanax mexicanus, which has a pigmented surface dwelling form (surface fish and several albino cave-dwelling forms (cavefish, albinism is caused by loss of function mutations in the oca2 gene, which operates during the first step of the melanin synthesis pathway. In addition to albinism, cavefish have evolved differences in behavior, including feeding and sleep, which are under the control of the catecholamine system. The catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways diverge after beginning with the same substrate, L-tyrosine. Here we describe a novel relationship between the catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways in Astyanax. Our results show significant increases in L-tyrosine, dopamine, and norepinephrine in pre-feeding larvae and adult brains of Pachón cavefish relative to surface fish. In addition, norepinephrine is elevated in cavefish adult kidneys, which contain the teleost homologs of catecholamine synthesizing adrenal cells. We further show that the oca2 gene is expressed during surface fish development but is downregulated in cavefish embryos. A key finding is that knockdown of oca2 expression in surface fish embryos delays the development of pigmented melanophores and simultaneously increases L-tyrosine and dopamine. We conclude that a potential evolutionary benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish may be to provide surplus L-tyrosine as a precursor for the elevated catecholamine synthesis pathway, which could be important for adaptation to the challenging cave environment.

  13. A potential benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish: downregulation of the oca2 gene increases tyrosine and catecholamine levels as an alternative to melanin synthesis.

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    Bilandžija, Helena; Ma, Li; Parkhurst, Amy; Jeffery, William R

    2013-01-01

    Albinism, the loss of melanin pigmentation, has evolved in a diverse variety of cave animals but the responsible evolutionary mechanisms are unknown. In Astyanax mexicanus, which has a pigmented surface dwelling form (surface fish) and several albino cave-dwelling forms (cavefish), albinism is caused by loss of function mutations in the oca2 gene, which operates during the first step of the melanin synthesis pathway. In addition to albinism, cavefish have evolved differences in behavior, including feeding and sleep, which are under the control of the catecholamine system. The catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways diverge after beginning with the same substrate, L-tyrosine. Here we describe a novel relationship between the catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways in Astyanax. Our results show significant increases in L-tyrosine, dopamine, and norepinephrine in pre-feeding larvae and adult brains of Pachón cavefish relative to surface fish. In addition, norepinephrine is elevated in cavefish adult kidneys, which contain the teleost homologs of catecholamine synthesizing adrenal cells. We further show that the oca2 gene is expressed during surface fish development but is downregulated in cavefish embryos. A key finding is that knockdown of oca2 expression in surface fish embryos delays the development of pigmented melanophores and simultaneously increases L-tyrosine and dopamine. We conclude that a potential evolutionary benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish may be to provide surplus L-tyrosine as a precursor for the elevated catecholamine synthesis pathway, which could be important for adaptation to the challenging cave environment.

  14. Winter distribution and use of high elevation caves as foraging sites by the endangered Hawaiian hoary bat, Lasiurus cinereus semotus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, Frank; Montoya-Aiona, Kristina; Pinzari, Corinna A.; Todd, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    We examine altitudinal movements involving unusual use of caves by Hawaiian hoary bats, Lasiurus cinereus semotus, during winter and spring in the Mauna Loa Forest Reserve (MLFR), Hawai‘i Island. Acoustic detection of hoary bat vocalizations, were recorded with regularity outside 13 lava tube cave entrances situated between 2,200 to 3,600 m asl from November 2012 to April 2013. Vocalizations were most numerous in November and December with the number of call events and echolocation pulses decreasing through the following months. Bat activity was positively correlated with air temperature and negatively correlated with wind speed. Visual searches found no evidence of hibernacula nor do Hawaiian hoary bats appear to shelter by day in these caves. Nevertheless, bats fly deep into caves as evidenced by numerous carcasses found in cave interiors. The occurrence of feeding buzzes around cave entrances and visual observations of bats flying in acrobatic fashion in cave interiors point to the use of these spaces as foraging sites. Peridroma moth species (Noctuidae), the only abundant nocturnal, flying insect sheltering in large numbers in rock rubble and on cave walls in the MLFR, apparently serve as the principal prey attracting hoary bats during winter to lava tube caves in the upper MLFR. Caves above 3,000 m on Mauna Loa harbor temperatures suitable for Pseudogymnoascus destructansfungi, the causative agent of White-nose Syndrome that is highly lethal to some species of North American cave-dwelling bats. We discuss the potential for White-nose Syndrome to establish and affect Hawaiian hoary bats.

  15. Genome editing using TALENs in blind Mexican Cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus.

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    Li Ma

    Full Text Available Astyanax mexicanus, a teleost fish that exists in a river-dwelling surface form and multiple cave-dwelling forms, is an excellent system for studying the genetic basis of evolution. Cavefish populations, which independently evolved from surface fish ancestors multiple times, have evolved a number of morphological and behavioral traits. Quantitative trait loci (QTL analyses have been performed to identify the genetic basis of many of these traits. These studies, combined with recent sequencing of the genome, provide a unique opportunity to identify candidate genes for these cave-specific traits. However, tools to test the requirement of these genes must be established to evaluate the role of candidate genes in generating cave-specific traits. To address this need, we designed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs to target two genes that contain coding changes in cavefish relative to surface fish and map to the same location as QTL for pigmentation, oculocutaneous albinism 2 (oca2 and melanocortin 1 receptor (mc1r. We found that surface fish genes can be mutated using this method. TALEN-induced mutations in oca2 result in mosaic loss of melanin pigmentation visible as albino patches in F0 founder fish, suggesting biallelic gene mutations in F0s and allowing us to evaluate the role of this gene in pigmentation. The pigment cells in the albino patches can produce melanin upon treatment with L-DOPA, behaving similarly to pigment cells in albino cavefish and providing additional evidence that oca2 is the gene within the QTL responsible for albinism in cavefish. This technology has the potential to introduce a powerful tool for studying the role of candidate genes responsible for the evolution of cavefish traits.

  16. Genome editing using TALENs in blind Mexican Cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Jeffery, William R; Essner, Jeffrey J; Kowalko, Johanna E

    2015-01-01

    Astyanax mexicanus, a teleost fish that exists in a river-dwelling surface form and multiple cave-dwelling forms, is an excellent system for studying the genetic basis of evolution. Cavefish populations, which independently evolved from surface fish ancestors multiple times, have evolved a number of morphological and behavioral traits. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses have been performed to identify the genetic basis of many of these traits. These studies, combined with recent sequencing of the genome, provide a unique opportunity to identify candidate genes for these cave-specific traits. However, tools to test the requirement of these genes must be established to evaluate the role of candidate genes in generating cave-specific traits. To address this need, we designed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to target two genes that contain coding changes in cavefish relative to surface fish and map to the same location as QTL for pigmentation, oculocutaneous albinism 2 (oca2) and melanocortin 1 receptor (mc1r). We found that surface fish genes can be mutated using this method. TALEN-induced mutations in oca2 result in mosaic loss of melanin pigmentation visible as albino patches in F0 founder fish, suggesting biallelic gene mutations in F0s and allowing us to evaluate the role of this gene in pigmentation. The pigment cells in the albino patches can produce melanin upon treatment with L-DOPA, behaving similarly to pigment cells in albino cavefish and providing additional evidence that oca2 is the gene within the QTL responsible for albinism in cavefish. This technology has the potential to introduce a powerful tool for studying the role of candidate genes responsible for the evolution of cavefish traits.

  17. A review of the millipede genus Sinocallipus Zhang, 1993 (Diplopoda: Callipodida: Sinocallipodidae, with notes on gonopods monotony vs. peripheral diversity in millipedes

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    Pavel Stoev

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The millipede genus Sinocallipus is reviewed, with four new cave-dwelling species, Sinocallipus catba, Sinocallipus deharvengi, Sinocallipus jaegeri and Sinocallipus steineri, being described from caves in Laos and Vietnam. With the new records the number of species in the genus reaches six and the genus range is extended to Central Vietnam and North and Central Laos. Both, Sinocallipus jaegeri from Khammouan Province in Laos and Sinocallipus simplipodicus Zhang, 1993 from Yunnan, China, show high level of reduction of eyes, which has not been recorded in other Callipodida. Peripheral characters such as the relative lengths of antennomeres, the number of ocelli, the number of pleurotergites or even the shape of paraprocts and the coloration seem to provide more information for the distinction of the species than do the relatively uniform gonopods. The differences in gonopods mainly concern the shape and length of cannula, the length and shape of coxal processes g and k, and the number of the acicular projections of the femoroid. An explanation is offered for the function of the trochanteral lobe of 9th leg-pair. It provides mechanical support for the cannula and seems to assist sperm charge and insemination during copulation. An identification key to the species in the genus is produced to accommodate the new species. The new species descriptions were automatically exported at the time of publication to a wiki (www.species-id.net through a specially designed software tool, the Pensoft Wiki Convertor (PWC, implemented here for the first time together with a newly proposed citation mechanism for simultaneous journal/wiki publications.

  18. Evolution of space dependent growth in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus.

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    Natalya D Gallo

    Full Text Available The relationship between growth rate and environmental space is an unresolved issue in teleosts. While it is known from aquaculture studies that stocking density has a negative relationship to growth, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, primarily because the growth rate of populations rather than individual fish were the subject of all previous studies. Here we investigate this problem in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which consists of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish and several blind cave-dwelling (cavefish forms. Surface fish and cavefish are distinguished by living in spatially contrasting environments and therefore are excellent models to study the effects of environmental size on growth. Multiple controlled growth experiments with individual fish raised in confined or unconfined spaces showed that environmental size has a major impact on growth rate in surface fish, a trait we have termed space dependent growth (SDG. In contrast, SDG has regressed to different degrees in the Pachón and Tinaja populations of cavefish. Mating experiments between surface and Pachón cavefish show that SDG is inherited as a dominant trait and is controlled by multiple genetic factors. Despite its regression in blind cavefish, SDG is not affected when sighted surface fish are raised in darkness, indicating that vision is not required to perceive and react to environmental space. Analysis of plasma cortisol levels showed that an elevation above basal levels occurred soon after surface fish were exposed to confined space. This initial cortisol peak was absent in Pachón cavefish, suggesting that the effects of confined space on growth may be mediated partly through a stress response. We conclude that Astyanax reacts to confined spaces by exhibiting SDG, which has a genetic component and shows evolutionary regression during adaptation of cavefish to confined environments.

  19. Blind cavefish and heat shock protein chaperones: a novel role for hsp90alpha in lens apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooven, Thomas A; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Jeffery, William R

    2004-01-01

    Lens apoptosis plays a central role in cavefish eye degeneration. Heat shock proteins (hsps) can regulate apoptosis; therefore, we examined the relationship between constitutive hsp70 and hsp90 expression and lens apoptosis. The model system is Astyanax mexicanus, a teleost species consisting of an eyed surface-dwelling (surface fish) form and numerous blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. Optic primordia are formed in the cavefish embryo but they subsequently undergo lens apoptosis, arrest in development and degenerate. Astyanax hsp90 and hsp70 DNAs were isolated to use as probes to compare gene expression during surface fish and cavefish development. Hsp90beta, which encodes one of two hsp90 isoforms, was not expressed in the surface fish or cavefish lens, whereas hsp70 was expressed in the lens of both forms, suggesting that neither is directly involved in lens apoptosis. In contrast, hsp90alpha, the other hsp90 isoform, was expressed in the cavefish but not the surface fish lens. Hsp90alpha expression peaked shortly before the beginning of lens apoptosis in three convergent cavefish populations, suggesting a close relationship with lens apoptosis. The absence of hsp90beta in the lens allowed us to use geldanamycin and radicicol, specific inhibitors of hsp90 chaperone function, to determine whether lens cell death requires hsp90alpha expression. Both inhibitors blocked TUNEL labeling in the cavefish lens, suggesting that hsp90alpha is required for apoptosis. In contrast to their effects on the lens, these inhibitors induced TUNEL labeling in the surface epidermis, presumably due to effects on hsp90beta function, implying that the two-hsp90 isoforms may have contrasting roles in cell survival. We conclude that hsp90alpha plays a novel role in lens apoptosis and cavefish eye degeneration.

  20. Retinal homeobox genes and the role of cell proliferation in cavefish eye degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Allen G; Famuditimi, Kuburat; Jeffery, William R

    2002-05-01

    The teleost Astyanax mexicanus exhibits eyed surface dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave dwelling (cavefish) forms. Despite lacking functional eyes as adults, cavefish embryos form eye primordia, which later arrest in development, degenerate and sink into the orbit. We are comparing the expression patterns of various eye regulatory genes during surfacefish and cavefish development to determine the cause of eye degeneration. Here we examine Rx and Chx/Vsx family homeobox genes, which have a major role in cell proliferation in the vertebrate retina. We isolated and sequenced a full-length RxcDNA clone (As-Rx1) and part of a Chx/Vsx(As-Vsx2) gene, which appear to be most closely related to the zebrafish Rx1 and Alx/Vsx2 genes respectively. In situ hybridization shows that these genes have similar but non-identical expression patterns during Astyanax eye development. Expression is first detected in the optic vesicle, then throughout the presumptive retina of the optic cup, and finally in the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ), the region of the growing retina where most new retinoblasts are formed. In addition, As-Rx1 is expressed in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) of the retina, which contains the photoreceptor cells, and As-Vsx2 is expressed in the inner nuclear layer, probably in the bipolar cells. With the exception of reduced As-Rx-1 expression in the ONL, the As-Rx1 and As-Vsx2 expression patterns were unchanged in the developing retina of two different cavefish populations, suggesting that cell proliferation is not inhibited. These results were confirmed by using PCNA and BrdU markers for retinal cell division. We conclude that the CMZ is active in cell proliferation long after eye growth is diminished and is therefore not the major cause of eye degeneration.

  1. Evolution of space dependent growth in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Natalya D; Jeffery, William R

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between growth rate and environmental space is an unresolved issue in teleosts. While it is known from aquaculture studies that stocking density has a negative relationship to growth, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, primarily because the growth rate of populations rather than individual fish were the subject of all previous studies. Here we investigate this problem in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which consists of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and several blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. Surface fish and cavefish are distinguished by living in spatially contrasting environments and therefore are excellent models to study the effects of environmental size on growth. Multiple controlled growth experiments with individual fish raised in confined or unconfined spaces showed that environmental size has a major impact on growth rate in surface fish, a trait we have termed space dependent growth (SDG). In contrast, SDG has regressed to different degrees in the Pachón and Tinaja populations of cavefish. Mating experiments between surface and Pachón cavefish show that SDG is inherited as a dominant trait and is controlled by multiple genetic factors. Despite its regression in blind cavefish, SDG is not affected when sighted surface fish are raised in darkness, indicating that vision is not required to perceive and react to environmental space. Analysis of plasma cortisol levels showed that an elevation above basal levels occurred soon after surface fish were exposed to confined space. This initial cortisol peak was absent in Pachón cavefish, suggesting that the effects of confined space on growth may be mediated partly through a stress response. We conclude that Astyanax reacts to confined spaces by exhibiting SDG, which has a genetic component and shows evolutionary regression during adaptation of cavefish to confined environments.

  2. Evolution of pigment cell regression in the cavefish Astyanax: a late step in melanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, David W; Hixon, Ernest; Jeffery, William R

    2004-01-01

    Pigmentation and eyes are often lost in cave-adapted animals. Although the mechanisms of eye degeneration are beginning to be understood, little is known about the evolutionary and developmental processes involved in pigment cell regression. In teleost embryos, a population of neural crest cells migrates into the body wall and differentiates into melanophores, xanthophores, and iridophores. All three pigment cell types are present in the eyed surface-dwelling form (surface fish) of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus. However, melanophores are absent or substantially reduced in number in various derived populations of the conspecific blind cave-dwelling form (cavefish). We show here that tyrosinase-positive melanoblasts are present in cavefish. DiI labeling revealed a population of trunk neural crest cells in cavefish embryos that migrate to locations normally occupied by differentiated melanophores. We also discovered a cell population in cavefish embryos and adults resembling melanoblasts in several features, including the ability to synthesize melanin when supplied with the tyrosinase substrate l-dopa. DiI-tyrosinase double-labeling and neural keel explant experiments showed that the tyrosinase-positive cells are derived from the neural crest. The number of melanoblasts varies in different adult cavefish populations relative to the extent of melanophore reduction. Although cavefish melanoblasts can synthesize melanin from exogenous l-dopa, they are unable to convert exogenous l-tyrosine to l-dopa and melanin. We conclude that pigment cell regression in cavefish is mediated by an evolutionary change late in melanogenesis that may involve an impediment in the ability to convert l-tyrosine to l-dopa and melanin.

  3. Ultrastructure of tarsal sensilla and other integument structures of two Pseudocellus species (Ricinulei, Arachnida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarico, Giovanni; Palacios-Vargas, José G; Fuentes Silva, Mariano; Alberti, Gerd

    2006-04-01

    Ricinuleids are one of the least investigated groups of Arachnida. In particular, knowledge of their ultrastructure is poor. Observations of the distal tarsomeres of ricinuleids show differences in their shape and equipment of surface structures. Legs I and II are used by the Ricinulei to explore their surroundings with tentative movements. The tarsomeres of these legs show similarities in shape and surface structures that distinguish them from those of legs III and IV. In this study, 11 different structures of the tarsomere surfaces of two cave-dwelling species, Pseudocellus pearsei and P. boneti from México, were investigated for the first time with scanning and transmission electron microscopy and discussed regarding their possible function: 1) a single treelike ramifying seta resembles a no pore single-walled (np-sw) sensillum; 2) setae occurring in a small number and possessing a bipartite shaft represent terminal pore single-walled (tp-sw) sensilla. The surface of the proximal half of the shaft shows small branches. The distal half has a smooth surface; 3) long setae with conspicuous longitudinal lamellae show characteristics of chemoreceptive wall pore single-walled (wp-sw) sensilla; 4) frequent small wp-sw sensilla with flat and irregular lamellae; 5) very short wp-sw sensilla occurring solitary or in groups; 6) a few short setae with smooth surface correspond to wp-sw sensilla; 7) a single short clubbed seta articulating in a flat pit is considered to be a np-sw sensillum; 8) common long setae with a pointed tip show characteristics of mechanoreceptive np-sw sensilla; 9) ventral setae with adhesive and mechanosensory function are accompanied by multicellular "class III" glands; 10) slit organs with mechanoreceptive function; and 11) dome-like tubercles with no indication of sensorial function. Several of these sensilla form a sensory field on the dorsofrontal surface which is particularly pronounced on the distal tarsomeres of legs I and II.

  4. Effects of persistent insecticides on beneficial soil arthropod in conventional fields compared to organic fields, puducherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarashan, Padmavathy; Gopalswamy, Poyyamoli

    2013-07-15

    The usage of synthetic fertilizers/insecticides in conventional farming has dramatically increased over the past decades. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of bio-pesticides and insecticides/pesticides on selected beneficial non targeted arthropods. Orders Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Oribatida and Coleoptera were the main groups of arthropods found in the organic fields and Coleoptera, Oribatida, Gamasida and Collembola in conventional fields. Pesticides/insecticides had a significant effect on non-targeted arthropods order- Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Hymenoptera and Thysonoptera were suppressed after pesticides/insecticides spraying. Bio-insecticides in organic fields had a non-significant effect on non targeted species and they started to increase in abundance after 7 days of spraying, whereas insecticide treatment in conventional fields had a significant long-term effect on non targeted arthropods and short term effect on pests/insects, it started to increase after 21 days of the spraying. These results indicate that insecticide treatment kept non targeted arthropods at low abundance. In conclusion, organic farming does not significantly affected the beneficial-non targeted arthropods biodiversity, whereas preventive insecticide application in conventional fields had significant negative effects on beneficial non targeted arthropods. Therefore, conventional farmers should restrict insecticide applications, unless pest densities reach the thresholds and more desirably can switch to organic farming practices.

  5. Nucleotide composition of CO1 sequences in Chelicerata (Arthropoda): detecting new mitogenomic rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Juliette; Judson, Mark L I; Deharveng, Louis; Lourenço, Wilson R; Cruaud, Corinne; Hassanin, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Here we study the evolution of nucleotide composition in third codon-positions of CO1 sequences of Chelicerata, using a phylogenetic framework, based on 180 taxa and three markers (CO1, 18S, and 28S rRNA; 5,218 nt). The analyses of nucleotide composition were also extended to all CO1 sequences of Chelicerata found in GenBank (1,701 taxa). The results show that most species of Chelicerata have a positive strand bias in CO1, i.e., in favor of C nucleotides, including all Amblypygi, Palpigradi, Ricinulei, Solifugae, Uropygi, and Xiphosura. However, several taxa show a negative strand bias, i.e., in favor of G nucleotides: all Scorpiones, Opisthothelae spiders and several taxa within Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida. Several reversals of strand-specific bias can be attributed to either a rearrangement of the control region or an inversion of a fragment containing the CO1 gene. Key taxa for which sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes will be necessary to determine the origin and nature of mtDNA rearrangements involved in the reversals are identified. Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida were found to show a strong variability in nucleotide composition. In addition, both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes have been affected by higher substitution rates in Acari and Pseudoscorpiones. The results therefore indicate that these two orders are more liable to fix mutations of all types, including base substitutions, indels, and genomic rearrangements.

  6. Terrestrial cave invertebrates of the Vrachanska Planina Mountains

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    PETAR BERON

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The modern biospeleological research in Bulgaria started in 1921 in the Ledenika Cave. From 65 caves of “Vrachanski Balkan” Nature Park and its surroundings have been recorded a total of 218 species of terrestrial invertebrates, including 32 species of troglobionts, most of them endemic to Vrachanska Planina Mts. (including the caves near Lakatnik: Isopoda Oniscoidea – 4, Chilopoda – 1, Diplopoda – 5, Opiliones – 2, Pseudoscorpiones – 3, Araneae – 3, Collembola – 2, Diplura – 2, Coleoptera, Carabidae – 7, Coleoptera, Leiodidae – 3. Troglobites are known from 51 caves, the richest being the caves near Lakatnik (Temnata dupka - 10, Zidanka - 7, Razhishkata dupka - 5, Svinskata dupka - 6, Kozarskata peshtera - 5, near Vratsa (Ledenika - 11, Barkite 8 - 5, Belyar - 6, Toshova dupka near Glavatsi - 6 and others.

  7. Genetic differentiation between cave and surface-dwelling populations of Garra barreimiae (Cyprinidae in Oman

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    Seemann Robert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic similarities among cave-dwelling animals displaying troglomorphic characters (e.g. reduced eyes and lack of pigmentation have induced a long-term discussion about the forces driving convergent evolution. Here we introduce Garra barreimiae Fowler & Steinitz, 1956, as an interesting system to study the evolution of troglomorphic characters. The only hitherto known troglomorphic population of this species lives in Al Hoota Cave (Sultanate of Oman close to a surface population. As a first approach, we assessed the genetic differentiation between the two morphotypes of G. barreimiae to determine whether gene flow still occurs. Results We analysed the mitochondrial control region (CR. In G. barreimiae the CR starts immediately downstream of the tRNA-Thr gene, while the tRNA-Pro gene is missing at this genomic location. Interestingly, a putative tRNA-Pro sequence is found within the CR. The phylogenetic analyses of the CR sequences yielded a tree divided into three clades: Clade 1 has a high genetic distance to the other clades and contains the individuals of three populations which are separated by a watershed from all the others. Clade 2 comprises the individuals from Wadi Bani Khalid, the geographically most remote population. Clade 3 comprises all other populations investigated including that of Al Hoota Cave. The latter forms a haplogroup which also includes individuals from the adjacent surface population. Conclusions Our data indicates that the troglomorphic cave population is of quite recent origin supporting the hypothesis that selection drives the fast evolution of troglomorphic traits. In this context pleiotropic effects might play an important role as it has been shown for Astyanax. There seems to be some gene flow from the cave population into the adjacent surface populations. One blind individual, found at a surface locality geographically distinct from Al Hoota Cave, is genetically differentiated from the

  8. Serotonin immunoreactive interneurons in the brain of the Remipedia: new insights into the phylogenetic affinities of an enigmatic crustacean taxon

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    Stemme Torben

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Remipedia, a group of homonomously segmented, cave-dwelling, eyeless arthropods have been regarded as basal crustaceans in most early morphological and taxonomic studies. However, molecular sequence information together with the discovery of a highly differentiated brain led to a reconsideration of their phylogenetic position. Various conflicting hypotheses have been proposed including the claim for a basal position of Remipedia up to a close relationship with Malacostraca or Hexapoda. To provide new morphological characters that may allow phylogenetic insights, we have analyzed the architecture of the remipede brain in more detail using immunocytochemistry (serotonin, acetylated α-tubulin, synapsin combined with confocal laser-scanning microscopy and image reconstruction techniques. This approach allows for a comprehensive neuroanatomical comparison with other crustacean and hexapod taxa. Results The dominant structures of the brain are the deutocerebral olfactory neuropils, which are linked by the olfactory globular tracts to the protocerebral hemiellipsoid bodies. The olfactory globular tracts form a characteristic chiasm in the center of the brain. In Speleonectes tulumensis, each brain hemisphere contains about 120 serotonin immunoreactive neurons, which are distributed in distinct cell groups supplying fine, profusely branching neurites to 16 neuropilar domains. The olfactory neuropil comprises more than 300 spherical olfactory glomeruli arranged in sublobes. Eight serotonin immunoreactive neurons homogeneously innervate the olfactory glomeruli. In the protocerebrum, serotonin immunoreactivity revealed several structures, which, based on their position and connectivity resemble a central complex comprising a central body, a protocerebral bridge, W-, X-, Y-, Z-tracts, and lateral accessory lobes. Conclusions The brain of Remipedia shows several plesiomorphic features shared with other Mandibulata, such as deutocerebral

  9. Evolution of an adaptive behavior and its sensory receptors promotes eye regression in blind cavefish

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    Yoshizawa Masato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How and why animals lose eyesight during adaptation to the dark and food-limited cave environment has puzzled biologists since the time of Darwin. More recently, several different adaptive hypotheses have been proposed to explain eye degeneration based on studies in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which consists of blind cave-dwelling (cavefish and sighted surface-dwelling (surface fish forms. One of these hypotheses is that eye regression is the result of indirect selection for constructive characters that are negatively linked to eye development through the pleiotropic effects of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling. However, subsequent genetic analyses suggested that other mechanisms also contribute to eye regression in Astyanax cavefish. Here, we introduce a new approach to this problem by investigating the phenotypic and genetic relationships between a suite of non-visual constructive traits and eye regression. Results Using quantitative genetic analysis of crosses between surface fish, the Pachón cavefish population and their hybrid progeny, we show that the adaptive vibration attraction behavior (VAB and its sensory receptors, superficial neuromasts (SN specifically found within the cavefish eye orbit (EO, are genetically correlated with reduced eye size. The quantitative trait loci (QTL for these three traits form two clusters of congruent or overlapping QTL on Astyanax linkage groups (LG 2 and 17, but not at the shh locus on LG 13. Ablation of EO SN in cavefish demonstrated a major role for these sensory receptors in VAB expression. Furthermore, experimental induction of eye regression in surface fish via shh overexpression showed that the absence of eyes was insufficient to promote the appearance of VAB or EO SN. Conclusions We conclude that natural selection for the enhancement of VAB and EO SN indirectly promotes eye regression in the Pachón cavefish population through an antagonistic relationship involving genetic

  10. Occurrence of organic wastewater and other contaminants in cave streams in northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Joseph R.; Becker, C.; Hensley, S.; Stark, R.; Meyer, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    found in caves and surface-water sites included brominated flame retardants, organochlorine pesticides (chlordane and nonachlor), and polychlorinated biphenyls. The placement of samplers in the caves (near the cave mouth compared to farther in the system) might have influenced the number of halogenated organics detected due to possible aerial transport of residues. Guano from cave-dwelling bats also might have been a source of some of these chlorinated organics. Seven-day survival and growth bioassays with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to samples of cave water indicated initial toxicity in water from two of the caves, but these effects were transient, with no toxicity observed in follow-up tests. ??Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.

  11. A new loach, Oreonectes luochengensis sp.nov.(Cypriniformes: Balitoridae) from Guangxi, China%广西岭鳅属鱼类一新种——罗城岭鳅(鲤形目:爬鳅科)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨剑; 吴铁军; 韦日锋; 杨君兴

    2011-01-01

    2008年9月,在广西壮族自治区罗城县天河镇附近一洞穴采集到一批条鳅亚科鱼类标本.经鉴定,为岭鳅属(Oreonectes)一新种.新种与岭鳅属的其他已知种类在以下组合特征上有区别:背鳍条3,7; 臀鳍条2,5; 胸鳍条1,11~12; 腹鳍条1,7; 尾鳍分枝鳍条为14~16.头平扁; 眼正常; 下唇表面具浅皱.腹鳍起点位于背鳍起点垂线下方之前,尾柄上、下缘无明显鳍褶; 尾鳍后缘平截.体侧具不明显的细小鳞片,或鳞片隐于皮下.头部无侧线感觉系统管孔.成体粉红色,无色素,各鳍透明; 浸泡标本体呈乳黄色,不透明,通体无色斑.%A cave-dwelling loach, Oreonectes luochengensis sp. nov. has been described based on collections from a cave in Tianhe town, Luocheng, Guangxi, China in September 2008. It can be distinguished from all known Oreonectes species by the following combination of characters: dorsal-fin rays 3, 7; anal-fin rays 2, 5; pectoral-fin rays 1, 11-12;pelvic-fin rays 1, 7 and 14-16 branched caudal-fin rays; head compressed; eyes present; surface of lower lip covered with shallow longitudinal groove; dorsal-fin origin posterior to vertical line of pelvic-fin origin; caudal peduncle without caudal-adipose keels; edge of caudal fin truncation; tiny scales present under skin; no cephalic lateral-line system;body pink in living status, without pigments in adult, after fixed in formalin, body yellowish, non-transparent, no markings on body side.

  12. Feeding overlap in two sympatric species of Rhinella (Anura: Bufonidae of the Atlantic Rain Forest Sobreposição alimentar em duas espécies simpátricas de Rhinella (Anura: Bufonidae da Mata Atlântica

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    Leandro T. Sabagh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A clear understanding of the relationships between overlapping, similarity, and competition is necessary to understand many of the questions about the structure and operation of a community. Rhinella icterica (Spix, 1824 and Rhinella crucifer (Wied Neuwied, 1821 are sympatric species of toads occurring in the National Park of Serra dos Órgãos in southeastern Brazil. The aim of the present study was to assess the dietary overlap of these two species. Ninety-four stomachs were analyzed, and 2245 prey items were found. Common prey were Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, Lepidoptera larvae, Blattaria, Orthoptera, Hemiptera, Opiliones, and Aranaea. Ants were the most important prey in both diets, followed by beetles and cockroaches. The niche breadth of R. icterica was 1.76 and of R. crucifer was 1.28. The dietary overlap between the species was 98.62%. A positive correlation was observed between jaw width and prey size consumed by R. icterica.Um claro entendimento das relações entre sobreposição, similaridade e competição é necessário para entender muitas questões sobre a estrutura e o funcionamento de uma comunidade. Rhinella icterica (Spix, 1824 e Rhinella crucifer (Wied Neuwied, 1821 são espécies simpátricas que ocorrem no Parque Nacional da Serra dos Órgãos, região sudeste do Brasil. O objetivo do presente estudo foi verificar a sobreposição alimentar dessas duas espécies. Foram analisados 94 estômagos e encontradas 2245 presas. Os grupos comuns foram: Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera, larva de Lepidoptera, Blattaria, Orthoptera, Hemiptera, Opiliones e Aranaea. Formigas foram as presas mais importantes na dieta, seguidas por besouros e baratas. A amplitude de nicho de R. icterica foi de 1,76 e a de R. cruicifer 1,28. A sobreposição de nicho alimentar entre as espécies foi de 98,62%. Houve relação positiva entre a largura da mandíbula e a dimensão das presas consumidas em R. icterica.

  13. [Bats and Viruses: complex relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhain, F

    2015-10-01

    With more than 1 200 species, bats and flying foxes (Order Chiroptera) constitute the most important and diverse order of Mammals after Rodents. Many species of bats are insectivorous while others are frugivorous and few of them are hematophagous. Some of these animals fly during the night, others are crepuscular or diurnal. Some fly long distances during seasonal migrations. Many species are colonial cave-dwelling, living in a rather small home range while others are relatively solitary. However, in spite of the importance of bats for terrestrial biotic communities and ecosystem ecology, the diversity in their biology and lifestyles remain poorly known and underappreciated. More than sixty viruses have been detected or isolated in bats; these animals are therefore involved in the natural cycles of many of them. This is the case, for instance, of rabies virus and other Lyssavirus (Family Rhabdoviridae), Nipah and Hendra viruses (Paramyxoviridae), Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV (Coronaviridae). For these zoonotic viruses, a number of bat species are considered as important reservoir hosts, efficient disseminators or even directly responsible of the transmission. Some of these bat-borne viruses cause highly pathogenic diseases while others are of potential significance for humans and domestic or wild animals; so, bats are an important risk in human and animal public health. Moreover, some groups of viruses developed through different phylogenetic mechanisms of coevolution between viruses and bats. The fact that most of these viral infections are asymptomatic in bats has been observed since a long time but the mechanisms of the viral persistence are not clearly understood. The various bioecology of the different bat populations allows exchange of virus between migrating and non-migrating conspecific species. For a better understanding of the role of bats in the circulation of these viral zoonoses, epidemiologists must pay attention to

  14. Invertebrados cavernícolas da porção meridional da província espeleológica do Vale do Ribeira, sul do Brasil Cavernicolous invertebrate from south speleological province of the Ribeira Valley, south Brazil

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    Ricardo Pinto-da-Rocha

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1986 to 1992, I surveyed the invertebrate fauna of twelve limestone caves from South Ribeira Valley (State of Paraná, Brazil. Associated to walls in the entrace zone live Enoploctenus and Blechroscelis spiders, Goniosoma opilionids, Strinalia crickets, Latebraria amphipyroides moths, and Culicidae and Sciaridae dipterans. In aphotic zone, occur Plato spiders, Daguerreia inermis opilionids, Pseudonannolene strinatii diplopods, Smicridea caddisflies and the aquatic crustacean Aegla paulensis. I found in both zones Ctenus fasciatus spiders. Paronella collembolans, Zelurus travassosi heteropterans, Cholevidae and Anthribidae beetles, Phoridae dipterans and Braconidae wasps. One of the most important energy sources in these caves is the hematophagous bat guano. Associated to the guano piles there is a fauna composed by psedoscorpiones, acarians, Katantodesmus diplopods, Acherontides and Paronella collembolans, Dissochaetus beetles and Phoridae dipterans. The cave fauna studied is similar to that Ribeira Valley of the State of São Paulo. The most expressive difference is the absence of some taxa very common in São Paulo caves, such as the Oniscidae and Styloniscidae isopods, Cryptodesmidae and Chelodesmidae diplopods. Endecous crickets, Tricommatidae harvestmen, Calamoceratidae caddisflies and Neoditomyia Keroplatidae dipterans.

  15. Chemical elements in invertebrate orders for environmental quality studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L.; Franca, Elvis J.; Paiva, Jose D.S.; Hazin, Clovis A., E-mail: marcelo_rlm@hotmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: dan-paiva@hotmail.com, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Fonseca, Felipe Y.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Bacchi, Marcio A., E-mail: felipe-yamada@hotmail.com, E-mail: lis@cena.usp.br, E-mail: mabacchi@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Among the biomonitors of environmental quality, there is a lack of studies on using invertebrates to evaluate quantitatively chemical elements in ecosystems. This group of animals is quite numerous, widely distributed and adaptable to the most diverse environmental conditions. These features are very useful for the environmental quality assessment, as well as the several occurring insect-plant interactions performing essential functions in ecosystems. The objective of this work is to study the variability of chemical composition of invertebrate orders for using in environmental quality monitoring studies. Instrumental neutron activation analysis - INAA was applied to determine some nutrients and trace elements in invertebrate samples. Sampling by pitfall traps was carried out in riverine ecosystems from the urban area from the Piracicaba Municipality, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Invertebrate and reference material samples were irradiated in the nuclear research reactor IEA-R1, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN. Fragments of a Ni-Cr alloy were irradiated for monitoring the thermal neutron flux. Hymenoptera order was considered the most representative according to the total number of sampled species (about 60%). Significant amounts of Ba, Br, Fe and Sc were found in invertebrates of the order Opiliones. Potassium, rubidium and zinc were highly accumulated in species from Blattodea order, indicating a consistent pattern of accumulation for this invertebrate order. Taking into account the abundance of Hymenoptera order, the chemical composition of its species was significant different at the 95% confidence level for Br and Na in the sampled locals. (author)

  16. A checklist of the non-acarine arachnids (Chelicerata: Arachnida of the Ndumo Game Reserve, Maputaland, South Africa

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    C.R. Haddad

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Arachnids (Chelicerata: Arachnida were collected in the Ndumo Game Reserve (Maputaland, South Africa during 11 collecting trips in the period 2000–2006. Sampling was undertaken by various methods in eight broad habitat types: Acacia tortilis savanna; Acacia xanthophloea (fever tree forests; deciduous broadleaf woodland; Ficus (wild fig tree forests; floodplain vegetation; riparian forest; sand forest; and subtropical bush. In total, 457 species of arachnids were collected, representing six orders, 59 families and 240 determined genera. The most diverse order was the Araneae (46 families, 431 spp., followed by the Pseudoscorpiones (6 families, 12 spp., Scorpiones (3 families, 8 spp., Opiliones (2 families, 3 spp., Solifugae (1 family, 2 spp. and Amblypygi (a single species. The most diverse families all belonged to the Araneae: Salticidae (82 spp., Thomisidae (56 spp. and Araneidae (38 spp.. The spider diversity is the highest recorded from any protected area in South Africa so far, and represents approximately 22 % of the country’s spider fauna. The habitat and guild associations of each species are provided.

  17. Secondary structure of expansion segment D1 in LSU rDNA from Arachnida and its phylogenetic application in Eriophyoid mites and in Acari.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng-Hang; Zhao, Ya-E; Xu, Yang; Hu, Li; Chen, Yi-Meng

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of researchers have applied secondary-structure based multiple alignments of rDNA genes in phylogeny. These studies mostly depended on a few valuable divergent domains in LSU and SSU rDNA. Yet other divergent domains, e.g. D1, were poorly investigated and rarely used. However, these domains might contain additional evolutionary data and play a vital role in DNA-based phylogenetic study. Here, we investigated all available D1 sequences of Arachnida taxa and predicted corresponding secondary structures to help identify homologous positions in the D1 region. Long insertions were found exclusive to Eriophyoidea and folded into three newly proposed helices. Non-Acari taxa were all GC rich. In Acari, most Trombidiformes and all Mesostigmata (Parasitiformes) taxa were AT rich and Ixodida (Parasitiformes) GC rich; however there was no consistent base bias in Sarcoptiformes sequences. For Eriophyoid mites, genera Cecidophyopsis and Aceria were both well supported in MP, NJ, ME and ML tress based on D1 sequences, and clusters of Cecidophyopsis species were identical with former study. This demonstrated that the D1 region could act as a valuable molecular marker in phylogenetic reconstruction of Eriophyoidea. Additionally, D1 has been proven suitable in phylogenetic analysis at the family and genus level in Acari, but not in Opiliones.

  18. Biodiversity loss following the introduction of exotic competitors: does intraguild predation explain the decline of native lady beetles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Smith

    Full Text Available Exotic species are widely accepted as a leading cause of biodiversity decline. Lady beetles (Coccinellidae provide an important model to study how competitor introductions impact native communities since several native coccinellids have experienced declines that coincide with the establishment and spread of exotic coccinellids. This study tested the central hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic species has caused these declines. Using sentinel egg experiments, we quantified the extent of predation on previously-common (Hippodamia convergens and common (Coleomegilla maculata native coccinellid eggs versus exotic coccinellid (Harmonia axyridis eggs in three habitats: semi-natural grassland, alfalfa, and soybean. Following the experiments quantifying egg predation, we used video surveillance to determine the composition of the predator community attacking the eggs. The extent of predation varied across habitats, and egg species. Native coccinellids often sustained greater egg predation than H. axyridis. We found no evidence that exotic coccinellids consumed coccinellid eggs in the field. Harvestmen and slugs were responsible for the greatest proportion of attacks. This research challenges the widely-accepted hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic competitors explains the loss of native coccinellids. Although exotic coccinellids may not be a direct competitor, reduced egg predation could indirectly confer a competitive advantage to these species. A lower proportion of H. axyridis eggs removed by predators may have aided its expansion and population increase and could indirectly affect native species via exploitative or apparent competition. These results do not support the intraguild predation hypothesis for native coccinellid decline, but do bring to light the existence of complex interactions between coccinellids and the guild of generalist predators in coccinellid foraging habitats.

  19. Scorpion sheds 'tail' to escape: consequences and implications of autotomy in scorpions (Buthidae: Ananteris.

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    Camilo I Mattoni

    Full Text Available Autotomy, the voluntary shedding or detachment of a body part at a determined cleavage plane, is a common anti-predation defense mechanism in several animal taxa, including arthropods. Among arachnids, autotomy has been observed in harvestmen, mites, and spiders, always involving the loss of legs. Autotomy of the opisthosoma (abdomen was recently reported in a single species of the Neotropical buthid scorpion genus Ananteris Thorell, 1891, but few details were revealed. Based on observations in the field and laboratory, examination of material in museum collections, and scanning electron microscopy, we document autotomy of the metasoma (the hind part of the opisthosoma, or 'tail' in fourteen species of Ananteris. Autotomy is more common in males than females, and has not been observed in juveniles. When the scorpion is held by the metasoma, it is voluntarily severed at the joints between metasomal segments I and II, II and III, or III and IV, allowing the scorpion to escape. After detachment, the severed metasoma moves (twitches automatically, much like the severed tail of a lizard or the severed leg of a spider, and reacts to contact, even attempting to sting. The severed surface heals rapidly, scar tissue forming in five days. The lost metasomal segments and telson cannot be regenerated. Autotomy of the metasoma and telson results in permanent loss of the posterior part of the scorpion's digestive system (the anus is situated posteriorly on metasomal segment V and the ability to inject venom by stinging. After autotomy, scorpions do not defecate and can only capture small prey items. However, males can survive and mate successfully for up to eight months in the laboratory. In spite of diminished predation ability after autotomy, survival allows males to reproduce. Autotomy in Ananteris therefore appears to be an effective, adaptive, anti-predation escape mechanism.

  20. Scorpion sheds 'tail' to escape: consequences and implications of autotomy in scorpions (Buthidae: Ananteris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoni, Camilo I; García-Hernández, Solimary; Botero-Trujillo, Ricardo; Ochoa, José A; Ojanguren-Affilastro, Andrés A; Pinto-da-Rocha, Ricardo; Prendini, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Autotomy, the voluntary shedding or detachment of a body part at a determined cleavage plane, is a common anti-predation defense mechanism in several animal taxa, including arthropods. Among arachnids, autotomy has been observed in harvestmen, mites, and spiders, always involving the loss of legs. Autotomy of the opisthosoma (abdomen) was recently reported in a single species of the Neotropical buthid scorpion genus Ananteris Thorell, 1891, but few details were revealed. Based on observations in the field and laboratory, examination of material in museum collections, and scanning electron microscopy, we document autotomy of the metasoma (the hind part of the opisthosoma, or 'tail') in fourteen species of Ananteris. Autotomy is more common in males than females, and has not been observed in juveniles. When the scorpion is held by the metasoma, it is voluntarily severed at the joints between metasomal segments I and II, II and III, or III and IV, allowing the scorpion to escape. After detachment, the severed metasoma moves (twitches) automatically, much like the severed tail of a lizard or the severed leg of a spider, and reacts to contact, even attempting to sting. The severed surface heals rapidly, scar tissue forming in five days. The lost metasomal segments and telson cannot be regenerated. Autotomy of the metasoma and telson results in permanent loss of the posterior part of the scorpion's digestive system (the anus is situated posteriorly on metasomal segment V) and the ability to inject venom by stinging. After autotomy, scorpions do not defecate and can only capture small prey items. However, males can survive and mate successfully for up to eight months in the laboratory. In spite of diminished predation ability after autotomy, survival allows males to reproduce. Autotomy in Ananteris therefore appears to be an effective, adaptive, anti-predation escape mechanism.

  1. Biodiversity loss following the introduction of exotic competitors: does intraguild predation explain the decline of native lady beetles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chelsea A; Gardiner, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    Exotic species are widely accepted as a leading cause of biodiversity decline. Lady beetles (Coccinellidae) provide an important model to study how competitor introductions impact native communities since several native coccinellids have experienced declines that coincide with the establishment and spread of exotic coccinellids. This study tested the central hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic species has caused these declines. Using sentinel egg experiments, we quantified the extent of predation on previously-common (Hippodamia convergens) and common (Coleomegilla maculata) native coccinellid eggs versus exotic coccinellid (Harmonia axyridis) eggs in three habitats: semi-natural grassland, alfalfa, and soybean. Following the experiments quantifying egg predation, we used video surveillance to determine the composition of the predator community attacking the eggs. The extent of predation varied across habitats, and egg species. Native coccinellids often sustained greater egg predation than H. axyridis. We found no evidence that exotic coccinellids consumed coccinellid eggs in the field. Harvestmen and slugs were responsible for the greatest proportion of attacks. This research challenges the widely-accepted hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic competitors explains the loss of native coccinellids. Although exotic coccinellids may not be a direct competitor, reduced egg predation could indirectly confer a competitive advantage to these species. A lower proportion of H. axyridis eggs removed by predators may have aided its expansion and population increase and could indirectly affect native species via exploitative or apparent competition. These results do not support the intraguild predation hypothesis for native coccinellid decline, but do bring to light the existence of complex interactions between coccinellids and the guild of generalist predators in coccinellid foraging habitats.

  2. Patterns of Protein Evolution in Cytochrome c Oxidase 1 (COI) from the Class Arachnida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Monica R; Hebert, Paul D N

    2015-01-01

    Because sequence information is now available for the 648bp barcode region of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI) from more than 400,000 animal species, this gene segment can be used to probe patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The present study examines levels of amino acid substitution and the frequency of indels in COI from 4177 species of arachnids, including representatives from all 16 orders and 43% of its families (267/625). It examines divergences at three taxonomic levels-among members of each order to an outgroup, among families in each order and among BINs, a species proxy, in each family. Order Distances vary fourfold (0.10-0.39), while the mean of the Family Distances for the ten orders ranges fivefold (0.07-0.35). BIN Distances show great variation, ranging from 0.01 or less in 12 families to more than 0.25 in eight families. Patterns of amino acid substitution in COI are generally congruent with previously reported variation in nucleotide substitution rates in arachnids, but provide some new insights, such as clear rate acceleration in the Opiliones. By revealing a strong association between elevated rates of nucleotide and amino acid substitution, this study builds evidence for the selective importance of the rate variation among arachnid lineages. Moreover, it establishes that groups whose COI genes have elevated levels of amino acid substitution also regularly possess indels, a dramatic form of protein reconfiguration. Overall, this study suggests that the mitochondrial genome of some arachnid groups is dynamic with high rates of amino acid substitution and frequent indels, while it is 'locked down' in others. Dynamic genomes are most prevalent in arachnids with short generation times, but the possible impact of breeding system deserves investigation since many of the rapidly evolving lineages reproduce by haplodiploidy, a mode of reproduction absent in 'locked down' taxa.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Pseudocellus pearsei (Chelicerata: Ricinulei and a comparison of mitochondrial gene rearrangements in Arachnida

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    Braband Anke

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial genomes are widely utilized for phylogenetic and population genetic analyses among animals. In addition to sequence data the mitochondrial gene order and RNA secondary structure data are used in phylogenetic analyses. Arachnid phylogeny is still highly debated and there is a lack of sufficient sequence data for many taxa. Ricinulei (hooded tickspiders are a morphologically distinct clade of arachnids with uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Results The first complete mitochondrial DNA genome of a member of the Ricinulei, Pseudocellus pearsei (Arachnida: Ricinulei was sequenced using a PCR-based approach. The mitochondrial genome is a typical circular duplex DNA molecule with a size of 15,099 bp, showing the complete set of genes usually present in bilaterian mitochondrial genomes. Five tRNA genes (trnW, trnY, trnN, trnL(CUN, trnV show different relative positions compared to other Chelicerata (e.g. Limulus polyphemus, Ixodes spp.. We propose that two events led to this derived gene order: (1 a tandem duplication followed by random deletion and (2 an independent translocation of trnN. Most of the inferred tRNA secondary structures show the common cloverleaf pattern except tRNA-Glu where the TψC-arm is missing. In phylogenetic analyses (maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, Bayesian inference using concatenated amino acid and nucleotide sequences of protein-coding genes the basal relationships of arachnid orders remain unresolved. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses (ML, MP, BI of arachnid mitochondrial genomes fail to resolve interordinal relationships of Arachnida and remain in a preliminary stage because there is still a lack of mitogenomic data from important taxa such as Opiliones and Pseudoscorpiones. Gene order varies considerably within Arachnida – only eight out of 23 species have retained the putative arthropod ground pattern. Some gene order changes are valuable characters in phylogenetic analysis of

  4. Patterns of Protein Evolution in Cytochrome c Oxidase 1 (COI from the Class Arachnida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica R Young

    Full Text Available Because sequence information is now available for the 648bp barcode region of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COI from more than 400,000 animal species, this gene segment can be used to probe patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The present study examines levels of amino acid substitution and the frequency of indels in COI from 4177 species of arachnids, including representatives from all 16 orders and 43% of its families (267/625. It examines divergences at three taxonomic levels-among members of each order to an outgroup, among families in each order and among BINs, a species proxy, in each family. Order Distances vary fourfold (0.10-0.39, while the mean of the Family Distances for the ten orders ranges fivefold (0.07-0.35. BIN Distances show great variation, ranging from 0.01 or less in 12 families to more than 0.25 in eight families. Patterns of amino acid substitution in COI are generally congruent with previously reported variation in nucleotide substitution rates in arachnids, but provide some new insights, such as clear rate acceleration in the Opiliones. By revealing a strong association between elevated rates of nucleotide and amino acid substitution, this study builds evidence for the selective importance of the rate variation among arachnid lineages. Moreover, it establishes that groups whose COI genes have elevated levels of amino acid substitution also regularly possess indels, a dramatic form of protein reconfiguration. Overall, this study suggests that the mitochondrial genome of some arachnid groups is dynamic with high rates of amino acid substitution and frequent indels, while it is 'locked down' in others. Dynamic genomes are most prevalent in arachnids with short generation times, but the possible impact of breeding system deserves investigation since many of the rapidly evolving lineages reproduce by haplodiploidy, a mode of reproduction absent in 'locked down' taxa.

  5. Phylogenomic interrogation of arachnida reveals systemic conflicts in phylogenetic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant P; Kaluziak, Stefan T; Pérez-Porro, Alicia R; González, Vanessa L; Hormiga, Gustavo; Wheeler, Ward C; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2014-11-01

    Chelicerata represents one of the oldest groups of arthropods, with a fossil record extending to the Cambrian, and is sister group to the remaining extant arthropods, the mandibulates. Attempts to resolve the internal phylogeny of chelicerates have achieved little consensus, due to marked discord in both morphological and molecular hypotheses of chelicerate phylogeny. The monophyly of Arachnida, the terrestrial chelicerates, is generally accepted, but has garnered little support from molecular data, which have been limited either in breadth of taxonomic sampling or in depth of sequencing. To address the internal phylogeny of this group, we employed a phylogenomic approach, generating transcriptomic data for 17 species in combination with existing data, including two complete genomes. We analyzed multiple data sets containing up to 1,235,912 sites across 3,644 loci, using alternative approaches to optimization of matrix composition. Here, we show that phylogenetic signal for the monophyly of Arachnida is restricted to the 500 slowest-evolving genes in the data set. Accelerated evolutionary rates in Acariformes, Pseudoscorpiones, and Parasitiformes potentially engender long-branch attraction artifacts, yielding nonmonophyly of Arachnida with increasing support upon incrementing the number of concatenated genes. Mutually exclusive hypotheses are supported by locus groups of variable evolutionary rate, revealing significant conflicts in phylogenetic signal. Analyses of gene-tree discordance indicate marked incongruence in relationships among chelicerate orders, whereas derived relationships are demonstrably robust. Consistently recovered and supported relationships include the monophyly of Chelicerata, Euchelicerata, Tetrapulmonata, and all orders represented by multiple terminals. Relationships supported by subsets of slow-evolving genes include Ricinulei + Solifugae; a clade comprised of Ricinulei, Opiliones, and Solifugae; and a clade comprised of Tetrapulmonata

  6. Pseudoscorpion mitochondria show rearranged genes and genome-wide reductions of RNA gene sizes and inferred structures, yet typical nucleotide composition bias

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    Ovchinnikov Sergey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudoscorpions are chelicerates and have historically been viewed as being most closely related to solifuges, harvestmen, and scorpions. No mitochondrial genomes of pseudoscorpions have been published, but the mitochondrial genomes of some lineages of Chelicerata possess unusual features, including short rRNA genes and tRNA genes that lack sequence to encode arms of the canonical cloverleaf-shaped tRNA. Additionally, some chelicerates possess an atypical guanine-thymine nucleotide bias on the major coding strand of their mitochondrial genomes. Results We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of two divergent taxa from the chelicerate order Pseudoscorpiones. We find that these genomes possess unusually short tRNA genes that do not encode cloverleaf-shaped tRNA structures. Indeed, in one genome, all 22 tRNA genes lack sequence to encode canonical cloverleaf structures. We also find that the large ribosomal RNA genes are substantially shorter than those of most arthropods. We inferred secondary structures of the LSU rRNAs from both pseudoscorpions, and find that they have lost multiple helices. Based on comparisons with the crystal structure of the bacterial ribosome, two of these helices were likely contact points with tRNA T-arms or D-arms as they pass through the ribosome during protein synthesis. The mitochondrial gene arrangements of both pseudoscorpions differ from the ancestral chelicerate gene arrangement. One genome is rearranged with respect to the location of protein-coding genes, the small rRNA gene, and at least 8 tRNA genes. The other genome contains 6 tRNA genes in novel locations. Most chelicerates with rearranged mitochondrial genes show a genome-wide reversal of the CA nucleotide bias typical for arthropods on their major coding strand, and instead possess a GT bias. Yet despite their extensive rearrangement, these pseudoscorpion mitochondrial genomes possess a CA bias on the major coding strand. Phylogenetic

  7. The diversity and evolution of chelicerate hemocyanins

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    Rehm Peter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxygen transport in the hemolymph of many arthropod species is facilitated by large copper-proteins referred to as hemocyanins. Arthropod hemocyanins are hexamers or oligomers of hexamers, which are characterized by a high O2 transport capacity and a high cooperativity, thereby enhancing O2 supply. Hemocyanin subunit sequences had been available from horseshoe crabs (Xiphosura and various spiders (Araneae, but not from any other chelicerate taxon. To trace the evolution of hemocyanins and the emergence of the large hemocyanin oligomers, hemocyanin cDNA sequences were obtained from representatives of selected chelicerate classes. Results Hemocyanin subunits from a sea spider, a scorpion, a whip scorpion and a whip spider were sequenced. Hemocyanin has been lost in Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, Solifugae and Acari, which may be explained by the evolution of trachea (i.e., taxon Apulmonata. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis was used to reconstruct the evolution of hemocyanin subunits and a relaxed molecular clock approach was applied to date the major events. While the sea spider has a simple hexameric hemocyanin, four distinct subunit types evolved before Xiphosura and Arachnida diverged around 470 Ma ago, suggesting the existence of a 4 × 6mer at that time. Subsequently, independent gene duplication events gave rise to the other distinct subunits in each of the 8 × 6mer hemocyanin of Xiphosura and the 4 × 6mer of Arachnida. The hemocyanin sequences were used to infer the evolutionary history of chelicerates. The phylogenetic trees support a basal position of Pycnogonida, a sister group relationship of Xiphosura and Arachnida, and a sister group relationship of the whip scorpions and the whip spiders. Conclusion Formation of a complex hemocyanin oligomer commenced early in the evolution of euchelicerates. A 4 × 6mer hemocyanin consisting of seven subunit types is conserved in most arachnids since more than 400 Ma, although some

  8. Developing an analytical model to increase urban security from the Secured perspective by Designing (SBD Approach using fuzzy AHP method (case study: region 17 of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zabihi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended abstract1-IntroductionSafety and security have been significant issues throughout history, from early prehistoric cave-dwelling societies to medieval and modern cities (P. Cozens, 2008. Crime is a part of our way of living. It is tied to the physical distribution of people and objects, to the routine activity patterns of daily life, and to the ways in which people perceive and use information about the environment (Brantingham & Brantingham, 1993. Statistics show that there is a meaningful relationship between different districts and kind and repetition of crimes in Tehran, so that these districts can be categorized based on city safety (Rezvan, 2007In some regions unsafely is more likely due to environmental, social, economic and even occupational reasons. One of these areas is region 3 of district 17 in Tehran, which suffers from high population density, aggregation of deteriorated and compact areas, multiplicity of cross-regional land use, separation of the area by two railways (Tehran-Tabriz and Tehran- South, etc. Mentioned limitations along with other relevant factors, has created numerous problems such as low level of urban security in the area and feeling of insecurity among residents.2- Theoretical basesSecured by design is a UK based initiative which was devised in1989, with the aim of countering the rise in household burglary, reducing crime through the design of the environment and encouraging urban designers to design out crime at the planning stage (Armitage, 2004. SBD also aims to achieve security for the building shell and to introduce appropriate internal and external design features that facilitate natural surveillance and create a sense of ownership and responsibility, in order to deter criminal and anti-social behavior within the cartilage of the business. New opportunity theories of crime and crime prevention measures such as situational crime prevention and crime prevention through environmental design largely