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Sample records for caustic-side solvent extraction

  1. Next Generation Solvent Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Birdwell, Joseph F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bonnesen, Peter V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University confirmed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Inter laboratory efforts were coordinated with complementary engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

  2. Next Generation Solvent (NGS): Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Birdwell, Jr, Joseph F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bonnesen, Peter V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delmau, Laetitia Helene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duncan, Nathan C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ensor, Dale [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Hill, Talon G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Denise L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rajbanshi, Arbin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Roach, Benjamin D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Szczygiel, Patricia L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sloop, Jr., Frederick V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stoner, Erica L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Neil J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University confirmed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Interlaboratory efforts were coordinated with complementary engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

  3. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

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    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  4. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

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    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  5. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

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    Smith, Tara E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Scherman, Carl [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Martin, David [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Suggs, Patricia [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant-based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant-based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilities and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.

  6. Demonstration of Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction with Savannah River Site High Level Waste

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    Walker, D.D.

    2001-08-27

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet for the decontamination of high level waste using a 33-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River Technology Center. This represents the first CSSX process demonstration using Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste. Three tests lasting 6, 12, and 48 hours processed simulated average SRS waste, simulated Tank 37H/44F composite waste, and Tank 37H/44F high level waste, respectively.

  7. Recommended Guanidine Suppressor for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL; Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL; Duncan, Nathan C [ORNL; Ensor, Dale [Tennessee Technological University; Hill, Talon G [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Roach, Benjamin D [ORNL; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V [ORNL; Williams, Neil J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The guanidine recommended for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side is N,N ,N -tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). Systematic testing has shown that it is significantly more lipophilic than the previously recommended guanidine DCiTG, the active extractant in the commercial guanidine product LIX -79, while not otherwise changing the solvent performance. Previous testing indicated that the extent of partitioning of the DCiTG suppressor to the aqueous strip solution is significantly greater than expected, potentially leading to rapid depletion of the suppressor from the solvent and unwanted organic concentrations in process effluents. Five candidate guanidines were tested as potential replacements for DCiTG. The tests included batch extraction with simulated waste and flowsheet solutions, third-phase formation, emulsion formation, and partition ratios of the guanidine between the solvent and aqueous strip solution. Preliminary results of a thermal stability test of the TiDG solvent at one month duration indicated performance approximately equivalent to DCiTG. Two of the guanidines proved adequate in all respects, and the choice of TiDG was deemed slightly preferable vs the next best guanidine BiTABG.

  8. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Chemical and Physical Properties Progress in FY 2000 and FY 2001.

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    Moyer, BA

    2002-04-17

    The purpose of this work was to provide chemical- and physical-property data addressing the technical risks of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process as applied specifically to the removal of cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site. As part of the overall Salt Processing Project, this effort supported decision-making in regards to selecting a preferred technology among three alternatives: (1) CSSX, (2) nonelutable ion-exchange with an inorganic silicotitanate material and (3) precipitation with tetraphenylborate. High risks, innate to CSSX, that needed specific attention included: (1) chemical stability of the solvent matrix, (2) radiolytic stability of the solvent matrix, (3) proof-of-concept performance of the proposed process flowsheet with simulated waste, and (4) performance of the CSSX flowsheet with actual SRS high-level waste. This body of work directly addressed the chemical-stability risk and additionally provided supporting information that served to plan, carry out, and evaluate experiments conducted by other CSSX investigators addressing the other high risks. Information on cesium distribution in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping served as input for flowsheet design, provided a baseline for evaluating solvent performance under numerous stresses, and contributed to a broad understanding of the effects of expected process variables. In parallel, other measurements were directed toward learning how other system components distribute in the flowsheet. Such components include the solvent components themselves, constituents of the waste, and solvent-degradation products. Upon understanding which components influence flowsheet performance, it was then possible to address in a rational fashion how to clean up the solvent and maintain its stable function.

  9. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

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    Casella, V

    2007-06-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU.'' The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Revision of this report is a deliverable in Technical Task Report SP-TTR-2006-00010, ''NaI Shield Box Testing.'' Gamma-ray monitors were developed to: {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, {lg_bullet} Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be approximately fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.)

  10. Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System

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    Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater

  11. MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT

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    Casella, V

    2005-12-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified

  12. Stability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Solvent: Effect of High Nitrite on Solvent Nitration

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    Bonnesen, P.V.

    2002-06-26

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether nitrated organic compounds could be formed during operation of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process, and whether such compounds would present a safety concern. The CSSX process was developed to remove cesium from alkaline high-level salt waste stored at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). The solvent is composed of the cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis-(4-tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6), a fluorinated alcohol phase modifier, tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and an isoparaffinic diluent (Iospar{reg_sign}). During the CSSX process, the solvent is expected to be exposed to high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite dissolved in the alkaline waste feed. The solvent will also be exposed to dilute (50 mM) nitric acid solutions containing low concentrations of nitrite during scrubbing, followed by stripping with 1 mM nitric acid. The solvent is expected to last for one year of plant operation, and the temperatures the solvent may experience during the process could range from as low as 15 C to as high as 35 C. Excursions from standard process conditions could result in the solvent experiencing higher temperatures, as well as concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and most importantly nitric acid, that exceed normal operating conditions. Accordingly, conditions may exist where nitration reactions involving the solvent components, possibly leading to other chemical reactions stemming from nitration reactions, could occur. To model such nitration reactions, the solvent was exposed to the types of nitrate- and nitrite-containing solutions that might be expected to be encountered during the process (even under off-normal conditions), as a function of time, temperature, and concentration of nitrate, nitrite, and nitric acid. The experiments conducted as part of this report were designed to examine the more specific effect that high nitrite concentrations could have on forming nitrated

  13. Demonstration of Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction with Optimized Solvent in the 2-cm Centrifugal Contactor Apparatus Using Dissolved Salt Cake from Tank 37H

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    Norato, M.A.

    2003-01-06

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flow sheet with optimized solvent. This represents the third such process demonstration using actual Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW). The present test differed from previous studies in the use of radioactive waste derived from Tank 37H dissolved salt cake, as opposed to supernate solutions used in previous demonstrations.

  14. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)

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    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and

  15. THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES

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    Fondeur, F.; Herman, D.; Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-30

    Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is a semicrystalline polymer with excellent engineering plastic properties and suitable processing temperatures. PPS can also be made containing branches (using a trifunctional monomer) and with crosslinked microstructure (when curing the monomer at high temperature in the presence of oxygen). PPS is made from the condensation reaction between para-dichlorobenzene and sodium sulfide with the assistance of a catalyst (to lower the activation barrier). The synthesis conditions for making PPS has evolved since its invention in the 1960's to the optimal conditions developed by the Philips Corporation in the 1970's. The resulting polymer consists of chemically stable molecular moieties such as benzene rings and ether like sulfur linkages between the aromatic rings. Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 3.3 E8 rad (330 Mrad), or the equivalent of 11 years of gamma irradiation (assuming a stripping solution concentration of 7.5 Ci/gal), and several months of exposures to 3M caustic solution and caustic salt simulant, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, demonstrates PPS is stable to the new solvent.

  16. Thermal And Spectroscopic Analyses Of Next Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Solvent Contacted With 3, 8, And 16 Molar Nitric Acid

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    Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

    2011-12-07

    A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. The NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU{sup a} and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. Reaction rates are much faster in 8 M and 16 M nitric acid than in 3 M nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, the nitric acid reacts with the extractant to produce initially organo-nitrate species. The reaction also releases soluble fluorinated alcohols such as tetrafluoropropanol. With longer contact time, the modifier reacts to produce a tarry substance with evolved gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO). Calorimetric analysis of the reaction product mixtures revealed that the organo-nitrates reaction products are not explosive and will not deflagrate.

  17. Characterization of solids deposited on the modular caustic-side solvent extraction unit (MCU) coalescer media removed in May and October 2014

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    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    During routine maintenance, the coalescers utilized in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing of Salt Batch 6 and a portion of Salt Batch 7 were sampled and submitted to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization, for the purpose of identifying solid phase constituents that may be accumulating in these coalescers. Specifically, two samples were received and characterized: A decontaminated salt solution (DSS) coalescer sample and a strip effluent (SE) coalescer sample. Aliquots of the samples were analyzed by XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, SEM, and EDS. Other aliquots of the samples were leached in acid solution, and the leachates were analyzed by ICP-AES. In addition, modeling was performed to provide a basis for comparison of the analytical results.

  18. DWPF Flowsheet Studies with Simulants to Determine Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit Solvent Partitioning and Verify Actinide Removal Process Incorporation Strategy

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    Herman, C

    2006-04-21

    The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) facility and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) are scheduled to begin processing salt waste in fiscal year 2007. A portion of the streams generated in the salt processing facilities will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to be incorporated in the glass matrix. Before the streams are introduced, a combination of impact analyses and research and development studies must be performed to quantify the impacts on DWPF processing. The Process Science & Engineering (PS&E) section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 to evaluate the impacts on DWPF processing. Simulant Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet studies have been performed using previous composition and projected volume estimates for the ARP sludge/monosodium titanate (MST) stream. Due to changes in the flammability control strategy for DWPF for salt processing, the incorporation strategy for ARP has changed and additional ARP flowsheet tests were necessary to validate the new processing strategy. The last round of ARP testing included the incorporation of the MCU stream and identified potential processing issues with the MCU solvent. The identified issues included the potential carry-over and accumulation of the MCU solvent components in the CPC condensers and in the recycle stream to the Tank Farm. Therefore, DWPF requested SRNL to perform additional MCU flowsheet studies to better quantify the organic distribution in the CPC vessels. The previous MCU testing used a Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) simulant since it was anticipated that both of these facilities would begin salt processing during SB4 processing. The same sludge simulant recipe was used in this round of ARP and MCU testing to minimize the number of changes between the two phases of testing so a better comparison could be made. ARP and MCU stream simulants were made for this phase of testing

  19. SALTSTONE VAULT CLASSIFICATION SAMPLES MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT/ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS WASTE STREAM APRIL 2011

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    Eibling, R.

    2011-09-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained by SRNL on April 5, 2011 (Tank 50H sampling occurred on April 4, 2011) during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout and for additional vault classification analyses. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. Additional inorganic species determined by B&W TSG-RACL include aluminum, boron, chloride, cobalt, copper, fluoride, iron, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate/nitrite as Nitrogen, strontium, sulfate, uranium, and zinc and the following radionuclides: gross alpha, gross beta/gamma, 3H, 60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 106Ru, 106Rh, 125Sb, 137Cs, 137mBa, 154Eu, 238Pu, 239/240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243/244Cm. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the VOCs benzene, toluene, and 1-butanol. GEL also determines phenol (total) and the following radionuclides: 147Pm, 226Ra and 228Ra. Preparation of the 2QCY11 saltstone samples for the quarterly analysis and for vault classification purposes and the subsequent TCLP analyses of these samples showed that: (1) The saltstone waste form disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 was not characteristically hazardous for toxicity. (2) The concentrations of the eight RCRA metals and UHCs identified as possible in the saltstone waste form were present at levels below the UTS. (3) Most of the

  20. Conceptual Design of a Simplified Skid-Mounted Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process for Removal of Cesium from Savannah Rive Site High-Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell, JR.J.F.

    2004-05-12

    This report presents the results of a conceptual design of a solvent extraction process for the selective removal of {sup 137}Cs from high-level radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). This study establishes the need for and feasibility of deploying a simplified version of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process; cost/benefit ratios ranging from 33 to 55 strongly support the considered deployment. Based on projected compositions, 18 million gallons of dissolved salt cake waste has been identified as having {sup 137}Cs concentrations that are substantially lower than the worst-case design basis for the CSSX system that is to be deployed as part of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) but that does not meet the waste acceptance criteria for immobilization as grout in the Saltstone Manufacturing and Disposal Facility at SRS. Absent deployment of an alternative cesium removal process, this material will require treatment in the SWPF CSSX system, even though the cesium decontamination factor required is far less than that provided by that system. A conceptual design of a CSSX processing system designed for rapid deployment and having reduced cesium decontamination factor capability has been performed. The proposed accelerated-deployment CSSX system (CSSX-A) has been designed to have a processing rate of 3 million gallons per year, assuming 90% availability. At a more conservative availability of 75% (reflecting the novelty of the process), the annual processing capacity is 2.5 million gallons. The primary component of the process is a 20-stage cascade of centrifugal solvent extraction contactors. The decontamination and concentration factors are 40 and 15, respectively. The solvent, scrub, strip, and wash solutions are to have the same compositions as those planned for the SWPF CSSX system. As in the SWPF CSSX system, the solvent and scrub flow rates are equal. The system

  1. Demonstration of Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction with Optimized Solvent in the 2-cm Centrifugal Contactor Apparatus Using Dissolved Salt Cake from Tank 37H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norato, M.A.

    2002-10-21

    A solvent extraction process for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions has been developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant (BOBCalix) dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix (Isopar(R) L). An alkylphenoxy alcohol modifier added to the solvent enhances the extraction power of the calixarene and prevents the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, trioctylamine (TOA), improves stripping performance and mitigates the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The solvent extraction process was successfully demonstrated with actual SRS HLW supernate during testing performed at SRTC in FY-2001. However, the solvent system has recently been optimized to enhance extractant solubility in the diluent and increase suppressor concentration. The results of the optimized solvent performance in tests using the same SRS composite waste supernate as was used FY-20 01 are described in another report.

  2. Conceptual Design of a Simplified Skid-Mounted Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process for Removal of Cesium from Savannah Rive Site High-Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdwell, JR.J.F.

    2004-05-12

    This report presents the results of a conceptual design of a solvent extraction process for the selective removal of {sup 137}Cs from high-level radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). This study establishes the need for and feasibility of deploying a simplified version of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process; cost/benefit ratios ranging from 33 to 55 strongly support the considered deployment. Based on projected compositions, 18 million gallons of dissolved salt cake waste has been identified as having {sup 137}Cs concentrations that are substantially lower than the worst-case design basis for the CSSX system that is to be deployed as part of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) but that does not meet the waste acceptance criteria for immobilization as grout in the Saltstone Manufacturing and Disposal Facility at SRS. Absent deployment of an alternative cesium removal process, this material will require treatment in the SWPF CSSX system, even though the cesium decontamination factor required is far less than that provided by that system. A conceptual design of a CSSX processing system designed for rapid deployment and having reduced cesium decontamination factor capability has been performed. The proposed accelerated-deployment CSSX system (CSSX-A) has been designed to have a processing rate of 3 million gallons per year, assuming 90% availability. At a more conservative availability of 75% (reflecting the novelty of the process), the annual processing capacity is 2.5 million gallons. The primary component of the process is a 20-stage cascade of centrifugal solvent extraction contactors. The decontamination and concentration factors are 40 and 15, respectively. The solvent, scrub, strip, and wash solutions are to have the same compositions as those planned for the SWPF CSSX system. As in the SWPF CSSX system, the solvent and scrub flow rates are equal. The system

  3. Characterization of Solids Deposited on the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Strip Effluent (SE) Coalescer Media Removed in April 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-13

    entrance discs of the coalescer. A solvent trim (a cocktail of solvent components with a high concentration of modifier) was added to the solvent on 2/22/2015. It is believed that the trim did not mix completely with the solvent and that it was subsequently spread around the MCU components including the coalescers, where it may have deposited. Chronologically, the modifier, the TiDG’s decomposition products and silicates deposited on the entrance discs first and after the pressure drop increased significantly, parts of the coalescer media detached itself from the central porous steel mandrel and a significant amount of steel debris, mercury, titanium, and additional aluminum and silicates deposited on the coalescer.

  4. Characterization of solids deposited on the modular caustic-side solvent extraction unit (MCU) coalescer media removed in October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In February 2015, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a Strip Effluent (SE) coalescer (FLT-304) from MCU. That coalescer was first installed at MCU in July 2014 and removed in October 2014. While processing approximately 31,400 gallons of strip solution, the pressure drop steadily increased from 1 psi to beyond the administrative limit of 20 psi. The physical and chemical analysis was conducted on this coalescer to determine the mechanism that led to the plugging of this coalescer. Characterization of this coalescer revealed the adsorption of organic containing amines as well as MCU modifier. The amines are probably from the decomposition of the suppressor (TiDG) as well as from bacteria. This adsorption may have changed the surface energetics (characteristics) of the coalescer fibers and therefore, their wetting behavior. A very small amount of inorganic solids were found to have deposited on this coalescer (possibly an artifact of cleaning the coalescer with Boric acid. However, we believe that inorganic precipitation, as has been seen in the past, did not play a role in the high pressure drop rise of this coalescer. With regards to the current practice of reducing the radioactive content of the SE coalescer, it is recommended that future SE coalescer should be flushed with 10 mM boric acid which is currently used at MCU. Plugging of the SE coalescer was most likely due to the formation and accumulation of a water-in-oil emulsion that reduced the overall porosity of the coalescer. There is also evidence that a bimodal oil particle distribution may have entered and deposited in the coalescer and caused the initial increase in pressure drop.

  5. Solvent Extraction Batch Distribution Coefficients with Savannah River Site Dissolved Salt Cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.D.

    2002-03-07

    Researchers characterized high-level waste derived from dissolved salt cake from the Savannah River Site (SRS) tank farm and measured the cesium distribution coefficients (DCs) for extraction, scrub, and stripping steps of the caustic-side solvent extraction (CSSX) flowsheet. The measurements used two SRS high-level waste samples derived entirely or in part from salt cake. The chemical compositions of both samples are reported. Dissolved salt cake waste contained less Cs-137 and more dianions than is typical of supernate samples. Extraction and scrub DCs values for both samples exceeded process requirements and agreed well with model predictions. Strip DCs values for the Tank 46F sample also met process requirements. However, strip DCs values could not be calculated for the Tank 38H sample due to the poor material balance for Cs-137. Potential explanations for the poor material balance are discussed and additional work to determine the cause is described.

  6. Solvent Extraction Batch Distribution Coefficients with Savannah River Site Dissolved Salt Cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.D.

    2002-05-22

    Researchers characterized high-level waste derived from dissolved salt cake from the Savannah River Site (SRS) tank farm and measured the cesium distribution coefficients (DCs) for extraction, scrub, and stripping steps of the caustic-side solvent extraction (CSSX) flowsheet. The measurements used two SRS high-level waste samples derived entirely or in part from salt cake. The chemical compositions of both samples are reported. Dissolved salt cake waste contained less Cs-137 and more dianions than is typical of supernate samples. Extraction, scrub, and strip DCs values for both samples exceeded process requirements and agreed well with model predictions. The results indicate no significant problems processing dissolved salt cake compared to supernate. During the course of testing, researchers observed sorption of cesium on glass sample vials containing strip solutions. The problem was detected in the material balance calculated for each organic/aqueous contact. Methods and recommendations for avoiding this problem are discussed.

  7. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF URANIUM VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, H.M.; Ader, M.; Ross, L.E.

    1959-02-01

    A process is presented for extracting uranium salt from aqueous acidic solutions by organic solvent extraction. It consists in contacting the uranium bearing solution with a water immiscible dialkylacetamide having at least 8 carbon atoms in the molecule. Mentioned as a preferred extractant is dibutylacetamide. The organic solvent is usually used with a diluent such as kerosene or CCl/sub 4/.

  8. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. ‘preliminary’) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

  9. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  10. Method for analyzing solvent extracted sponge core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellington, W.E.; Calkin, C.L.

    1988-11-22

    For use in solvent extracted sponge core measurements of the oil saturation of earth formations, a method is described for quantifying the volume of oil in the fluids resulting from such extraction. The method consists of: (a) separating the solvent/oil mixture from the water in the extracted fluids, (b) distilling at least a portion of the solvent from the solvent/oil mixture substantially without co-distillation or loss of the light hydrocarbons in the mixture, (c) determining the volume contribution of the solvent remaining in the mixture, and (d) determining the volume of oil removed from the sponge by substracting the determined remaining solvent volume.

  11. Extractive Distillation with Salt in Solvent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Extractive distillation with salt in solvent is a new process for producing anhydrous ethanol by combining the principle of "salt effect" and some traditional extractive distillation methods. Compared with the common extractive distillation the performance of solvent is improved, the recycling amount of solvent is reduced to 1/4-1/5, and the number of theoretical plates is reduced to 1/3. Energy consumption and cost of equipment are also reduced and continuous production is realized. High efficiency and low solvent wastage make this technique feasible.

  12. Solvent Extraction Developments in Southern Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The largest solvent-extraction plant in the world at the time, the Nchanga Copper Operation, was in Zambia. The first commercial process using solvent extraction for the refining of the platinum-group metals was in South Africa. More recently, the Southern African region has seen the implementation of solvent extraction for other base metals, precious metals, and specialty metals. These include the world firsts of primary production of zinc at Skorpion Zinc in Namibia and the large-scale refining of gold by Harmony Gold in South Africa. Several other flowsheets that use solvent-extraction technology are currently under commissioning, development, or feasibility study for implementation in this part of the world, including those for the recovery of copper, cobalt, nickel, tantalum, and niobium.

  13. Using GC-FID to Quantify the Removal of 4-sec-Butylphenol from NGS Solvent by NaOH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloop, Jr., Frederick V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    A caustic wash of the solvent used in the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process was found to remove the modifier breakdown product 4-sec-butylphenol (SBP) with varying efficiency depending on the aqueous NaOH concentration. Recent efforts at ORNL have aimed at characterizing the flowsheet chemistry and reducing the technical uncertainties of the NG-CSSX process. One technical uncertainty has been the efficacy of caustic washing of the solvent for the removal of lipophilic anions, in particular, the efficient removal of SBP, an important degradation product of the solvent modifier, Cs-7SB. In order to make this determination, it was necessary to develop a sensitive and reliable analytical technique for the detection and quantitation of SBP. This report recounts the development of a GC-FID-based (Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detection) technique for analyzing SBP and the utilization of the technique to subsequently confirm the ability of the caustic wash to efficiently remove SBP from the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) used in NG-CSSX. In particular, the developed technique was used to monitor the amount of SBP removed from a simple solvent and the full NGS by contact with sodium hydroxide wash solutions over a range of concentrations. The results show that caustic washing removes SBP with effectively the same efficiency as it did in the original Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process.

  14. Solvent extraction:The coordination chemistry behind extractive metallurgy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The modes of action of the commercial solvent extractants used in extractive hydrometallurgy are classified according to whether the recovery process involves the transport of metal cations, Mn+, metalate anions, MXxn-, or metal salts, MXx into a water-immiscible solvent. Well-established principles of coordination chemistry provide an explanation for the remarkable strengths and selectivities shown by most of these extractants. Reagents which achieve high selectivity when transporting metal ...

  15. Solvent extraction of metals with hydroxamic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, F; Khorassani, J H

    1978-07-01

    Solvent extraction with hydroxamic acids has been investigated. with comparison of aliphatic and aromatic reagents for the extraction of iron, copper, cobalt and nickel. Caprylohydroxamic acid has been evaluated for use in extraction systems for titanium, vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and uranium, both in terms of acidity of aqueous phase and oxidation state of the metal. It has been established that caprylohydroxamic acid in 1-hexanol is a suitable extractant for the removal of titanium(IV), vanadium(V), chromium(VI), molybdenum(VI) and uranium(VI) from 6M hydrochloric acid.

  16. Organic solvents in electromembrane extraction: recent insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chuixiu; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Electromembrane extraction (EME) was invented in 2006 as a miniaturized sample preparation technique for the separation of ionized species from aqueous samples. This concept has been investigated in different areas of analytical chemistry by different research groups worldwide since the introduct......Electromembrane extraction (EME) was invented in 2006 as a miniaturized sample preparation technique for the separation of ionized species from aqueous samples. This concept has been investigated in different areas of analytical chemistry by different research groups worldwide since...... the introduction. Under the influence of an electrical field, EME is based on electrokinetic migration of the analytes through a supported liquid membrane (SLM), which is an organic solvent immobilized in the pores of the polymeric membrane, and into the acceptor solution. Up to date, close to 150 research...... articles with focus on EME have been published. The current review summarizes the performance of EME with different organic solvents and discusses several criteria for efficient solvents in EME. In addition, the authors highlight their personal perspective about the most promising organic solvents for EME...

  17. Solvent

    OpenAIRE

    Hamida Y. Mostafa; Ebaa A. El-Shamy; Amal S. Farag; Nadia G. Kandile

    2013-01-01

    Neat ethylacetoacetate (EAA) and its mixtures with a co-solvent and an anti-solvent have been studied for refining of heavy wax distillate fraction to produce substantially non-carcinogenic base oil. The co-solvent and anti-solvent used are dipropylene glycol (DPG) and ethylene glycol (EG) respectively. The solubility characteristics of the main solvent and its mixed solvent systems were studied. Selection of the optimum solvent mixture and extraction variables has been studied. The effect of...

  18. Solvent extraction: the coordination chemistry behind extractive metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A Matthew; Bailey, Phillip J; Tasker, Peter A; Turkington, Jennifer R; Grant, Richard A; Love, Jason B

    2014-01-07

    The modes of action of the commercial solvent extractants used in extractive hydrometallurgy are classified according to whether the recovery process involves the transport of metal cations, M(n+), metalate anions, MXx(n-), or metal salts, MXx into a water-immiscible solvent. Well-established principles of coordination chemistry provide an explanation for the remarkable strengths and selectivities shown by most of these extractants. Reagents which achieve high selectivity when transporting metal cations or metal salts into a water-immiscible solvent usually operate in the inner coordination sphere of the metal and provide donor atom types or dispositions which favour the formation of particularly stable neutral complexes that have high solubility in the hydrocarbons commonly used in recovery processes. In the extraction of metalates, the structures of the neutral assemblies formed in the water-immiscible phase are usually not well defined and the cationic reagents can be assumed to operate in the outer coordination spheres. The formation of secondary bonds in the outer sphere using, for example, electrostatic or H-bonding interactions are favoured by the low polarity of the water-immiscible solvents.

  19. Green solvents and technologies for oil extraction from oilseeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S P Jeevan; Prasad, S Rajendra; Banerjee, Rintu; Agarwal, Dinesh K; Kulkarni, Kalyani S; Ramesh, K V

    2017-01-01

    Oilseeds are crucial for the nutritional security of the global population. The conventional technology used for oil extraction from oilseeds is by solvent extraction. In solvent extraction, n-hexane is used as a solvent for its attributes such as simple recovery, non-polar nature, low latent heat of vaporization (330 kJ/kg) and high selectivity to solvents. However, usage of hexane as a solvent has lead to several repercussions such as air pollution, toxicity and harmfulness that prompted to look for alternative options. To circumvent the problem, green solvents could be a promising approach to replace solvent extraction. In this review, green solvents and technology like aqueous assisted enzyme extraction are better solution for oil extraction from oilseeds. Enzyme mediated extraction is eco-friendly, can obtain higher yields, cost-effective and aids in obtaining co-products without any damage. Enzyme technology has great potential for oil extraction in oilseed industry. Similarly, green solvents such as terpenes and ionic liquids have tremendous solvent properties that enable to extract the oil in eco-friendly manner. These green solvents and technologies are considered green owing to the attributes of energy reduction, eco-friendliness, non-toxicity and non-harmfulness. Hence, the review is mainly focussed on the prospects and challenges of green solvents and technology as the best option to replace the conventional methods without compromising the quality of the extracted products.

  20. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF GINGER OLEORESIN USING ULTRASOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normalina Arpi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of ultrasound in extraction process creates novel and interesting methodologies, which are oftencomplementary to conventional extraction methods. In the present study, the use of ultrasound to extract oleoresin fromginger (Zingiber officinale R. was investigated. The extraction was performed by using ethanol as solvent in thepresence of ultrasonic irradiations operating at frequency of 42 kHz at extraction temperature of 60 oC. The oleoresinextracted was in the form of dark thick liquid with specific ginger flavor. Based on GC-MS analysis, the use ofultrasound was not give an effect on alteration of main component in ginger oleoresin. The main component inextracted ginger oleoresin was zingerone. Gingerol as one of the pungent principle of the ginger oleoresin was notdetected due to decomposition of gingerol at a temperature above 45 oC. Extraction rate of ultrasound-assistedextraction was about 1.75 times more rapid than a conventional system based on soxhlet. The scanning electronmicroscopy images provided more evidence for the mechanical effects of ultrasound, mainly appearing on cells’ wallsand shown by the destruction of cells, facilitating the release of their contents.

  1. PULSED MIXER-SETTLER SOLVENT EXTRACTION CONTACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figg, W.S.

    1958-08-12

    A mixer-settler extractor is described for contacting immiscible liquids having different specific gravities in order to withdraw one or more components from one liquid with the aid of the other liquid. The extractor consists of a hollow column, a rotary drive shafi extending : through the column with a number of impellers spaced thereon, an equal nunnber of separator plate sets each consisting of one fluorothene and one stainless steel plate with peripheral recesses and flow slots mounted on the column, and a pulse generator. This apparatus is particularly useful in solvent extraction processes for recovering plutonium from aqueous acidic solutions of irradiated uranium.

  2. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  3. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  4. Selection and evaluation of alternative solvents for caprolactam extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delden, van Mathijs L.; Kuipers, Norbert J.M.; Haan, de André B.

    2006-01-01

    Because of the strict legislation for currently applied solvents in the industrial extraction of caprolactam, being benzene, toluene and chlorinated hydrocarbons, a need exists for alternative, environmentally benign solvents. An experimental screening procedure consisting of several steps was used

  5. Solvent Extraction in Hydrometallurgy: Present and Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    During the past 10 years, there have been incremental advances in the application of solvent extraction to process hydrometallurgy. The most cited areas in the literature include chemistry, chemical engineering, pilot plants, and plant operation. Within these areas, there were considerable interest in synergism,diluents, degradation, contactors, surfactants, hydrometallurgical applications, environmental and secondary applications, and health and safety. The summary to the present is followed by a prediction for the future in the above areas of interest. These include the use of speciation; improved understanding of the role of surfactants on the system; optimization through modelling, pilot plants, and contactor selection; improvements in plant operation; further new applications; and plant safety. The review has indicated that considerable knowledge is now available to optimize and improve on process design and plant applications.

  6. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  7. The use of environmentally sustainable bio-derived solvents in solvent extraction applications-A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Li; Kathryn H. Smith; Geoffrey W. Stevens

    2016-01-01

    Replacement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by greener or more environmental y sustainable solvents is becoming increasingly important due to the increasing health and environmental concerns as wel as economic pressures associated with VOCs. Solvents that are derived from biomass, namely bio-derived solvents, are a type of green solvent that have attracted intensive investigations in recent years because of their advantages over con-ventional VOCs, such as low toxicity, biodegradability and renewability. This review aims to summarize the use of bio-derived solvents in solvent extraction applications, with special emphasis given to utilization of biodiesels and terpenes. Compared with the conventional VOCs, the overall performance of these bio-derived solvents is comparable in terms of extraction yields and selectivity for natural product extraction and no difference was found for metal extraction. To date most researchers have focused on laboratory scale thermodynamics studies. Future work is required to develop and test new bio-derived solvents and understand the kinetic performance as well as solvent extraction pilot plant studies.

  8. Solvent Extraction and Characterization of Neutral Lipids in Oocystis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renil eAnthony

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are a favorable feedstock for bioproducts and biofuels due to their high oil content, fast growth rates and low resource demands. Solvent lipid extraction efficiency from microalgae is dependent on algal strain and the extraction solvent. Four non-polar extraction solvents were evaluated for the recovery of neutral cellular lipids from microalgae Oocystis sp. (UTEX LB2396. Methylene chloride, hexane, diethyl ether, and cyclohexane were selected as the extraction solvents. All solvent extracts contained hexadecanoic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid; accounting for 70% of total lipid content with a proportional wt% composition of the three fatty acids, except for the hexane extracts that showed only hexadecanoic acid and linoleic acid. While not statistically differentiated, methylene chloride proved to be the most effective solvent for Oocystis sp. among the four solvents tested with a total average neutral lipid recovery of 0.25% of dry weight followed by diethyl ether (0.18%, cyclohexane (0.14% and hexane (0.11%. This research presents a simple methodology to optimize the selection of lipid specific extraction solvents for the microalgal strain selected.

  9. Solid-liquid solvent extraction of metal ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Peng; Haiyan Fan; Jinzhang Gao

    2003-01-01

    An overview of extraction of some trace metal ions using molten solvent (low melting substance) during last two decadesis presented. The development of this technique since its inception is briefly traced. The comparison of extraction efficiency, thermo-dynamics and kinetics mainly involving extraction of rare earth ions between molten solvent extraction at high temperature and usualliquid-liquid extraction at room temperature are discussed in detail. The various parameters obtained from the previous and presentstudies such as equilibrium extraction constant Kex, pH1/2, thermodynamic and kinetic data are displayed in tabular form. Finally, thecurrent demands, disadvantages and future prospects are also evaluated.

  10. Separation of Quercentin by Pre-dispersed Solvent Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡伟; 孙瑛; 叶汝强; 吴树森; 刘洪来

    2003-01-01

    Pre-dispersed solvent extraction (PDSE) was used to extract quercentin from its diluted solution. The influences of temperature, phase volume ratio (PVR), concentration of sodium Dodecyl benzene sulphonate and pH value etc. on the extraction efficiency were examined. It is found that, compared with traditional extraction techniques under the same condition, a higher extraction productivity can be obtained by PDSE. The stability of colloidal liquid aphrons plays an important role in this process. In a certain scope, the extraction efficiency increases with PVR. Excessive amount of solvent is not much helpful. A new analytical method by using ultraviolet spectrometer to determine the concentration of quercentin is established.

  11. Removal of Phenol from Dilute Solutions by Predispersed Solvent Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Predispersed solvent extraction (PDSE) is a new method for separating solutes from aqueous solution by solvent extraction and one which has shown promise for extraction from extremely dilute solution very efficient and very quick. The use of colloidal liquid aphrons in predispersed solvent extraction may ameliorate the problems such as emulsion formation, reduction of interfacial mass transfer and low interfacial mass transfer areas in solvent extraction process. In present paper, colloidal liquid aphrons are successfully generated using kerosene as a solvent, tributyl phosphate(TBP) as an extractant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulphate(SDBS) as surfactant in aqueous phase and Tween-80 in oil phase. Extraction of phenol from dilute solution was studied by using colloidal liquid aphrons and colloidal gas aphrons in a semi-batch extraction column. It has been found that the PDSE process is more suitable for extraction of dilute solutions. It has also been discovered that the PDSE process has a great advantage over traditional single-stage extraction process.

  12. Effective lipid extraction from algae cultures using switchable solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samori, Chiara; Lopez Barreiro, Diego; Vet, Robin; Pezzolesi, Laura; Brilman, Derk W.F. (Wim); Galletti, Paola; Tagliavini, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    A new procedure based on switchable polarity solvents (SPS) was proposed for lipid extraction of wet algal samples or cultures, thereby circumventing the need for an energy intensive drying step and facilitating easy recovery of the lipids from the extraction liquid. Lipids were extracted by using N

  13. Affinity Solvents for Intensified Organics Extraction: Development Challenges and Prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In most organics extraction processes, the commonly used solvents employ solely physical interactions. Therefore, for the recovery and purification of products from complex mixtures, the selectivity and/or capacity of classical solvents towards the desired solutes is usually insufficient, enforcing the need for complex and thus expensive separation schemes. Significant simplification and cost-reduction can be achieved when affinity solvents would be available that are able to recognize the solutes of interest by their molecular structure. The main development challenges to establish such affinity solvents are: Selection and incorporation of molecular recognition and complexation capabilities; Evaluation of extraction capabilities; Efficient recovery and recycling of the affinity solvents; Implementation in industrial extraction equipment. This paper presents how these development challenges are addressed at the University of Twente, going all the way from affinity solvent design and synthesis, via high throughput screening and characterization up to pilot plant evaluation. Essential in the successful development of affinity solvents are structural cooperations with molecular chemists and custom synthesis companies for their design and synthesis. The various aspects are illustrated by several examples where newly developed environmentally benign affinity solvents appeared able to create major breakthroughs. The applications addressed involve oxygenates, sugars, and pharmaceutical ingredients, such as optical isomers and biomolecules.

  14. Carotenoid extraction from plants using a novel, environmentally friendly solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Betty K; Chapman, Mary H

    2009-02-11

    Few environmentally friendly solvents are available to extract carotenoids for use in foods. The most effective known solvents are products of the petroleum industry and toxic for human consumption. Yet carotenoid extracts are desirable for use in dietary supplements and as additives to enhance the health benefits of processed foods. Ethyl lactate is an excellent solvent to extract both trans- and cis-lycopene isomers from dried tomato powder, the extraction efficiency of which is enhanced by the addition of the antioxidants alpha-tocopherol and alpha-lipoic acid, both of which are known to benefit human health. It is also useful to extract lutein and beta-carotene from dried powders prepared from white corn and carrots. Because of its low flammability and its origin as a byproduct of the corn and soybean industries, it is more advantageous than ethyl acetate, which is a petroleum product.

  15. Kinetics study of oil extraction from Citrus auranticum L. by solvent-free microwave extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Heri Septya Kusuma; Prilia Dwi Amelia; Cininta Admiralia; Mahfud Mahfud

    2016-01-01

    Citrus and its oil are of high economic and medicinal value because of their multiple uses, such as in the food industry, cosmetics and folk medicine. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of solvent-free microwave extraction for the extraction of essential oils from Citrus auranticum L. peels. Specifically, this study verifies the kinetics based on second-order model and mechanism of solvent-free microwave extraction of Citrus auranticum L. peels. Solvent-free microwave extra...

  16. Compound forming extractants, solvating solvents and inert solvents IUPAC chemical data series

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y; Kertes, A S

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium Constants of Liquid-Liquid Distribution Reactions, Part III: Compound Forming Extractants, Solvating Solvents, and Inert Solvents focuses on the compilation of equilibrium constants of various compounds, such as acids, ions, salts, and aqueous solutions. The manuscript presents tables that show the distribution reactions of carboxylic and sulfonic acid extractants and their dimerization and other reactions in the organic phase and extraction reactions of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The book also states that the inorganic anions in these solutions are irrelevant, since they d

  17. Antimicrobial potentials of different solvent extracted samples from Physalis ixocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wajid; Bakht, Jehan; Shafi, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the antimicrobial activities of different solvent extracted samples isolated from different parts of Physalis ixocarpa through disc diffusion assay using three different concentrations. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that different parts of the plant showed varying degree of inhibition against different bacteria at different concentrations. Different solvent extracted samples from the calyx showed inhibitory activity against most of the bacteria under study. Extracts from leaf and fruit samples showed activity against S. aureus and K. pneumoniae and extracts from the stem tissues were effective to control the growth of E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Crude methanolic extract from the stem and n-butanol extracted samples from fruit exhibited strong inhibitory activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae at highest concentrations. Antifungal activity was observed only in crude methanol extract from the leaf against Rhizopus stolinifer, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum.

  18. COBALT SALTS PRODUCTION BY USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Liudmila V. Dyakova; Aleksander G. Kasikov; Elena S. Kshumaneva; Svetlana V. Drogobuzhskaya

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the extracting cobalt salts by using mixtures on the basis of tertiary amine from multicomponent solutions from the process of hydrochloride leaching of cobalt concentrate. The optimal composition for the extraction mixture, the relationship between the cobalt distribution coefficients and modifier’s nature and concentration, and the saltingout agent type have been determined. A hydrochloride extraction technology of cobalt concentrate yielding a purified concentrated cob...

  19. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  20. Solvent extraction of gold using ionic liquid based process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, Megawati; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-01-01

    In decades, many research and mineral processing industries are using solvent extraction technology for metal ions separation. Solvent extraction technique has been used for the purification of precious metals such as Au and Pd, and base metals such as Cu, Zn and Cd. This process uses organic compounds as solvent. Organic solvents have some undesired properties i.e. toxic, volatile, excessive used, flammable, difficult to recycle, low reusability, low Au recovery, together with the problems related to the disposal of spent extractants and diluents, even the costs associated with these processes are relatively expensive. Therefore, a lot of research have boosted into the development of safe and environmentally friendly process for Au separation. Ionic liquids (ILs) are the potential alternative for gold extraction because they possess several desirable properties, such as a the ability to expanse temperature process up to 300°C, good solvent properties for a wide range of metal ions, high selectivity, low vapor pressures, stability up to 200°C, easy preparation, environmentally friendly (commonly called as "green solvent"), and relatively low cost. This review paper is focused in investigate of some ILs that have the potentials as solvent in extraction of Au from mineral/metal alloy at various conditions (pH, temperature, and pressure). Performances of ILs extraction of Au are studied in depth, i.e. structural relationship of ILs with capability to separate Au from metal ions aggregate. Optimal extraction conditon in order to gain high percent of Au in mineral processing is also investigated.

  1. Simultaneous extraction of flavonoids from Chamaecyparis obtusa using deep eutectic solvents as additives of conventional extractions solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baokun; Park, Ha Eun; Row, Kyung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Three flavones (quercetin, myricetin and amentoflavone) were extracted from Chamaecyparis obtusa leaves using deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as additives to conventional extractions solvents. Sixteen DESs were synthesized from different salts and hydrogen bond donors. In addition, C. obtusa was extracted under optimal conditions of methanol as the solvent in the heating process (60°C) for 120 min at a solid/liquid ratio of 80%. Under these optimal conditions, a good linear relationship was observed at analyte concentrations ranging from 5.0 to 200.0 μg/mL (R(2) > 0.999). The extraction recovery ranged from 96.7 to 103.3% with the inter- and intraday relative standard deviations of obtusa, the quantities of quercetin, myricetin and amentoflavone extracted were 325.90, 8.66 and 50.34 µg/mL, respectively. Overall, DESs are expected to have a wide range of applications.

  2. Solvent-free extraction of food and natural products

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiano-Tixier, Anne-Sylvie; Vian, Maryline; Allaf, Tamara; Vorobiev, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    This review presents useful and green techniques of solvent-free extraction used in ancient times, such as extraction of olive oil and citrus essential oil, and innovative techniques, such as pulsed electric field, microwave, instantaneous controlled pressure drop, and extrusion. We discuss the devices, their applications, mechanisms, and parameters influencing sample preparation prior to analysis of natural products.

  3. A new model for solvent extraction in columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1989-12-08

    A new model was developed for analyzing solvent extraction processes carried out in columns. Each column is treated as a series of well-defined equilibrium stages where the backmixing (other-phase carryover) between stages can be large. By including all mass transfer effects in the backmixing value, the same number of stages can be used for all extracted components no matter what their distribution coefficients. This greatly simplifies the calculations required when modeling multicomponent solvent extraction processes. Initial testing shows the new model to be better than either the Height of an Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) or the Height of a Transfer Unit (HTU) method.

  4. Mechanism of crud formation in copper solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳建设; 蓝卓越; 邱冠周; 王淀佐

    2002-01-01

    The authors investigated the mechanism of crud formation in copper solvent extraction. It is indicated that pH value of solution and the phase ratio (O/A) are the main factors affecting crud formation in solvent extraction. The amount of crud extraction increases with aqueous pH value increase, and reduces with the increase of the phase ratio. Fe3+, Mg2+, fine air bubble and suspended particulates in leaching solution contribute to crud formation. One case is that a series of reactions of hydrolization and polymerization occurs for Fe3+, while pH>2.5, polyhydric complex or Fe-SO4 complex are formed. Then the complex-ions of FeOH2+, Fe2(OH)4+2 cause poly-reaction, which is likely to lead emulsion. The study on Zeta potential indicates the repulsion between electriferous droplets in solvent extraction prevents phase coalescence, which is one of the major reasons for emulsion.

  5. Ultrasound Energy Effect on Solvent Extraction of Amaranth Seed Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Il; Chung, Ki Won; Lee, Seung Bum; Hong, In Kwon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Dankook University, Seoul (Korea); Park, Kyung Ai [Seoul Metropolitan Government Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasonic energy has been widely applied to cleaning, medical appliances, extraction, etc. And ultrasonic energy can be applied to solvent extraction of plant oil from amaranth seed. Amaranth seed oil contains small amount of squalene. Squalene is polyunsaturated branched hydrocarbon, which is an essential part of the human body. In this study, the seed oil was extracted from amaranth seed by ultrasonic solvent extraction process. Ultrasonic irradiation time was 1, 3 ,5, 10, 20 and 30 min and extraction temperature was 20, 30, and 40 degree C. And ultrasonic power was 390 W and 520 W. The extracted amounts of amaranth seed oil and squalene were increased with the increase of ultrasonic power and irradiation time. Using ultrasonic energy in solvent extraction, extraction time was very shorten. The optimum extraction temperature was 30 degree C, it was caused that ultrasonic energy effects were increased in the matters of low temperature. The maximum extracted amount of amaranth seed oil was 0.746 g and squalene was 37.54 mg per 10 g amaranth seed at 30 degree C. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. COBALT SALTS PRODUCTION BY USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila V. Dyakova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the extracting cobalt salts by using mixtures on the basis of tertiary amine from multicomponent solutions from the process of hydrochloride leaching of cobalt concentrate. The optimal composition for the extraction mixture, the relationship between the cobalt distribution coefficients and modifier’s nature and concentration, and the saltingout agent type have been determined. A hydrochloride extraction technology of cobalt concentrate yielding a purified concentrated cobalt solution for the production of pure cobalt salts has been developed and introduced at Severonikel combine.

  7. Oil recovery from petroleum sludge through ultrasonic assisted solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Huang, Shuhui; Li, Yubao

    2016-09-18

    The effect of ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE) process on oil recovery from refinery oily sludge was examined in this study. Two types of UAE treatment including UAE probe (UAEP) system and UAE bath (UAEB) system were investigated. Their oil recovery efficiencies were compared to that of mechanical shaking extraction (MSE). Three solvents including cyclohexane (CHX), ethyl acetate (EA), and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) were examined as the extraction solvents. The influence of experimental factors on oil and solvent recovery was investigated using an orthogonal experimental design. Results indicated that solvent type, solvent-to-sludge (S/S) ratio, and treatment duration could have significant effects on oil recovery in UAE treatment. Under the optimum conditions, UAEP treatment can obtain an oil recovery of 68.8% within 20 s, which was higher than that (i.e., 62.0%) by MSE treatment after 60 min' extraction. UAEB treatment can also obtain a promising oil recovery within shorter extraction duration (i.e., 15 min) than MSE. UAE was thus illustrated as an effective and improved approach for oily sludge recycling.

  8. SPIRAL CONTACTOR FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, C.R.

    1961-06-13

    The patented extraction apparatus includes a column, perforated plates extending across the column, liquid pulse means connected to the column, and an imperforate spiral ribbon along the length of the column.

  9. SOLVENT EXTRACTION FOR URANIUM MOLYBDENUM ALLOY DISSOLUTION FLOWSHEET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-06-07

    H-Canyon Engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to perform two solvent extraction experiments using dissolved Super Kukla (SK) material. The SK material is an uranium (U)-molybdenum (Mo) alloy material of 90% U/10% Mo by weight with 20% 235U enrichment. The first series of solvent extraction tests involved a series of batch distribution coefficient measurements with 7.5 vol % tributylphosphate (TBP)/n-paraffin for extraction from 4-5 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), using 4 M HNO{sub 3}-0.02 M ferrous sulfamate (Fe(SO3NH2)2) scrub, 0.01 M HNO3 strip steps with particular emphasis on the distribution of U and Mo in each step. The second set of solvent extraction tests determined whether the 2.5 wt % sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) solvent wash change frequency would need to be modified for the processing of the SK material. The batch distribution coefficient measurements were performed using dissolved SK material diluted to 20 g/L (U + Mo) in 4 M HNO{sub 3} and 5 M HNO{sub 3}. In these experiments, U had a distribution coefficient greater than 2.5 while at least 99% of the nickel (Ni) and greater than 99.9% of the Mo remained in the aqueous phase. After extraction, scrub, and strip steps, the aqueous U product from the strip contains nominally 7.48 {micro}g Mo/g U, significantly less than the maximum allowable limit of 800 {micro}g Mo/g U. Solvent washing experiments were performed to expose a 2.5 wt % Na2CO3 solvent wash solution to the equivalent of 37 solvent wash cycles. The low Mo batch distribution coefficient in this solvent extraction system yields only 0.001-0.005 g/L Mo extracted to the organic. During the solvent washing experiments, the Mo appears to wash from the organic.

  10. Deacidification of Soybean Oil Combining Solvent Extraction and Membrane Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Fornasero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the removal of free fatty acids (FFAs from soybean oil, combining solvent extraction (liquid-liquid for the separation of FFAs from the oil and membrane technology to recover the solvent through nanofiltration (NF. Degummed soybean oil containing 1.05 ± 0.10% w/w FFAs was deacidified by extraction with ethanol. Results obtained in the experiences of FFAs extraction from oil show that the optimal operating conditions are the following: 1.8 : 1 w : w ethanol/oil ratio, 30 minutes extraction time and high speed of agitation and 30 minutes repose time after extraction at ambient temperature. As a result of these operations two phases are obtained: deacidified oil phase and ethanol phase (containing the FFAs. The oil from the first extraction is subjected to a second extraction under the same conditions, reducing the FFA concentration in oil to 0.09%. Solvent recovery from the ethanol phase is performed using nanofiltration technology with a commercially available polymeric NF membrane (NF-99-HF, Alfa Laval. From the analysis of the results we can conclude that the optimal operating conditions are pressure of 20 bar and temperature of 35°C, allowing better separation performance: permeate flux of 28.3 L/m2·h and FFA retention of 70%.

  11. Rare earth element enrichment using membrane based solvent extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertiharta, I. G. B. N.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Zunita, M.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical, catalytic, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of rare earth elements are required in broad applications. Rare earth elements have similar physical and chemical properties thus it is difficult to separate one from each other. Rare earth element is relatively abundant in earth's crust but rarely occur in high concentrated deposits. Traditionally, ion-exchange and solvent extraction techniques have been developed to separate and purify single rare earth solutions or compounds. Recently, membrane starts to gain attention for rare earth separation by combining membrane and proven technologies such as solvent extraction. Membrane-based process offers selective, reliable, energy efficient and easy to scale up separation. During membrane-based separation process, one phase passes through membrane pores while the other phase is rejected. There is no direct mixing of two phases thus the solvent loss is very low. Membrane can also lower solvent physical properties requirement (viscosity, density) and backmixing, eliminate flooding phenomenon and provide large interfacial area for mass transfer. This paper will summarize research efforts in developing membrane technology for rare earth element separation. Special attention will be given to solvent extraction related process as the commonly used method for rare earth element separation. Furthermore, membrane configuration and its potentials will also be discussed.

  12. Kinetics study of oil extraction from Citrus auranticum L. by solvent-free microwave extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heri Septya Kusuma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Citrus and its oil are of high economic and medicinal value because of their multiple uses, such as in the food industry, cosmetics and folk medicine. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of solvent-free microwave extraction for the extraction of essential oils from Citrus auranticum L. peels. Specifically, this study verifies the kinetics based on second-order model and mechanism of solvent-free microwave extraction of Citrus auranticum L. peels. Solvent-free microwave extraction is used to extract essential oils from Citrus auranticum L. peels. The initial extraction rate, the extraction capacity and the second-order extraction rate constant were calculated using the model. Using a three-step experimental design of the kinetics of oil extraction from Citrus auranticum L. peels by solvent-free microwave extraction, this study showed that the extraction process was based on the second-order extraction model. The initial extraction rate (h, the extraction capacity (CS, the second-order extraction rate constant (k, and coefficient of determination (R2 was 0.7483 g L-1 min-1, 0.7291 g L-1, 1.4075 L g-1 min-1 and 0.9992, respectively.

  13. Application of ultrasound in solvent extraction of nickel and gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesic, B.

    1996-07-01

    The effects of ultrasound on the rate of solvent extraction of nickel with Lix 65N and Lix 70, and gallium with Kelex 100 were investigated. These solvent extraction systems are noted by their sluggish nature. Low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound increased the rates of extraction of nickel by factors of four to seven. The ultrasound had no effect on the final chemical equilibrium. Gallium extraction rates were enhanced with the use of ultrasound by as much as a factor of 15. Again, the ultrasound had no effect on extraction equilibrium. For both nickel and gallium, the enhanced rates were attributed to increased interfacial surface area associated with ultrasonically induced cavitation and microdroplet formation. The stability of the microdroplets permitted intermittent application of ultrasound with corresponding decreases in ultrasonic energy requirements. The lowest energy consumption was observed with short (0.25 to 5 s) bursts of high power (41 to 61 W) ultrasonic inputs. The study also provided insight into the factors that affect the complex extraction of gallium from sodium aluminate solutions. The rate controlling step was found to be the dehydration of the gallate ion, Ga(OH)4, and the first complex formation between gallium and Kelex 100. Sodium was found to enhance the extraction rate up to a point, beyond which increased concentration was detrimental. Increasing aluminum concentration was found to slow extraction rates. Modifiers and diluents were shown to markedly affect extraction rates even without ultrasound. Ketone modifiers, particularly 2-undecanone, when used with Kermac 470B or Escaid 200 diluents enhanced extraction rates of gallium to the point that the use of ultrasound provided no additional benefits. The positive effects of ketone modifiers for the solvent extraction of gallium had not been previously reported.

  14. Fuel grade ethanol by solvent extraction: Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedder, D.W.

    1987-04-01

    This report summarizes final results for ethanol recovery by solvent extraction and extractive distillation. At conclusion this work can be summarized as ethanol dehydration and recovery dilute fermentates is feasible using liquid/liquid extraction and extractive distillation. Compared to distillation, the economics are more attractive for less than 5 wt % ethanol. However, an economic bias in favor of SEED appears to exist even for 10 wt % feeds. It is of particular interest to consider the group extraction of ethanol and acetic acid followed by conversion to a mixture of ethanol and ethyl acetate. The latter species is a more valuable commodity and group extraction of inhibitory species is one feature of liquid/liquid extraction that is not easily accomodated using distillation. Upflow immobilized reactors offer the possibility of achieving high substrate conversion while also maintaining low metabolite concentrations. However, many questions remain to be answered with such a concept. 135 refs., 42 figs., 61 tabs.

  15. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: TERRA-KLEEN SOLVENT EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remediation of PCBs in soils has been difficult to implement on a full-scale, cost-effective basis. The Terra-Kleen solvent extraction system has overcome many of the soil handling, contaminant removal, and regulatory restrictions that have made it difficult to implement a cost-e...

  16. Development of Solvent Extraction Approach to Recycle Enriched Molybdenum Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Brown, M. Alex [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Sen, Sujat [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Bowers, Delbert L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Wardle, Kent [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Pupek, Krzysztof Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Dzwiniel, Trevor L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Pereira, Candido [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Krumdick, Gregory K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-06-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, in cooperation with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, is developing a recycling process for a solution containing valuable Mo-100 or Mo-98 enriched material. Previously, Argonne had developed a recycle process using a precipitation technique. However, this process is labor intensive and can lead to production of large volumes of highly corrosive waste. This report discusses an alternative process to recover enriched Mo in the form of ammonium heptamolybdate by using solvent extraction. Small-scale experiments determined the optimal conditions for effective extraction of high Mo concentrations. Methods were developed for removal of ammonium chloride from the molybdenum product of the solvent extraction process. In large-scale experiments, very good purification from potassium and other elements was observed with very high recovery yields (~98%).

  17. Solvent extractants for nickel and cobalt: New opportunities in aqueous processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylov, Indje

    2003-07-01

    The last two decades have witnessed unprecedented growth in the development and implementation of solvent extraction technology in the extractive metallurgy of nickel and cobalt. Solvent extraction is proving to be a powerful tool, opening new opportunities for simpler, more cost-efficient and environmentally sound metal refining processes. This article provides an overview of some of the latest developments regarding the solvent extractants.

  18. Microfluidic Extraction of Biomarkers using Water as Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Manohara, Harish; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, Imran

    2009-01-01

    A proposed device, denoted a miniature microfluidic biomarker extractor (mu-EX), would extract trace amounts of chemicals of interest from samples, such as soils and rocks. Traditionally, such extractions are performed on a large scale with hazardous organic solvents; each solvent capable of dissolving only those molecules lying within narrow ranges of specific chemical and physical characteristics that notably include volatility, electric charge, and polarity. In contrast, in the mu-EX, extractions could be performed by use of small amounts (typically between 0.1 and 100 L) of water as a universal solvent. As a rule of thumb, in order to enable solvation and extraction of molecules, it is necessary to use solvents that have polarity sufficiently close to the polarity of the target molecules. The mu-EX would make selection of specific organic solvents unnecessary, because mu-EX would exploit a unique property of liquid water: the possibility of tuning its polarity to match the polarity of organic solvents appropriate for extraction of molecules of interest. The change of the permittivity of water would be achieved by exploiting interactions between the translational states of water molecules and an imposed electromagnetic field in the frequency range of 300 to 600 GHz. On a molecular level, these interactions would result in disruption of the three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network among liquid-water molecules and subsequent solvation and hydrolysis of target molecules. The mu-EX is expected to be an efficient means of hydrolyzing chemical bonds in complex macromolecules as well and, thus, enabling analysis of the building blocks of these complex chemical systems. The mu-EX device would include a microfluidic channel, part of which would lie within a waveguide coupled to an electronically tuned source of broad-band electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range from 300 to 600 GHz (see figure). The part of the microfluidic channel lying in the waveguide would

  19. Extraction of Organochlorine Pesticides in Sediments Using Soxhlet, Ultrasonic and Accelerated Solvent Extraction Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANG Yinhai; CAO Zhengmei; NIE Xinhua

    2005-01-01

    The application of soxhlet, ultrasonic and accelerated solvent extraction techniques to the analysis of six organochlorine pesticides (α-HCH, β-HCH, γ-HCH, o, p'-DDT, p, p'-DDT and p, p'-DDE) in Taihu Lake sediment samples is described. It was found that the limits of quantification ranged from 0.002 μg g-1 to 0.004 μg g-1, and the recoveries of organochlorine pesticides with the three extraction techniques were acceptable (> 80.7%). With a mass selective detector,better results were obtained by accelerated solvent extraction using hexane-acetone (1: 1) as compared with soxhlet and ultrasonic extraction. It was shown that the accelerated solvent extraction was the optimum technique for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides in sediments. The general features of the three extraction techniques are also presented.

  20. Effect of solvent type and ratio on betacyanins and antioxidant activity of extracts from Hylocereus polyrhizus flesh and peel by supercritical fluid extraction and solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathordoobady, Farahnaz; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Selamat, Jinap; Manap, Mohd Yazid Abd

    2016-07-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of solvent type and ratio as well as the extraction techniques (i.e. supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and conventional solvent extraction) on betacyanins and antioxidant activity of the peel and fresh extract from the red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus). The peel and flesh extracts obtained by SFE at 25MPa pressure and 10% EtOH/water (v/v) mixture as a co-solvent contained 24.58 and 91.27mg/100ml total betacyanin, respectively; while the most desirable solvent extraction process resulted in a relatively higher total betacyanin in the peel and flesh extracts (28.44 and 120.28mg/100ml, respectively). The major betacyanins identified in the pitaya peel and flesh extracts were betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin, butyrylbetanin, isophyllocactin and iso-butyrylbetanin. The flesh extract had the stronger antioxidant activity than the peel extract when the higher proportion of ethanol to water (E/W) was applied for the extraction.

  1. Solvent extraction of radionuclides from aqueous tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnesen, P.; Sachleben, R.; Moyer, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop an efficient solvent-extraction and stripping process to remove the fission products {sup 99}Tc, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs from alkaline tank waste, such as those stored at Hanford and Oak Ridge. As such, this task expands on FY 1995`s successful development of a solvent-extraction and stripping process for technetium separation from alkaline tank-waste solutions. This process now includes the capability of removing both technetium and strontium simultaneously. In this form, the process has been named SRTALK and will be developed further in this program as a prelude to developing a system capable of removing technetium, strontium, and cesium.

  2. Supercritical water oxidation of spent extraction solvent simulants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王帅; 秦强; 陈土方方; 夏晓彬; 马洪军; 乔延波; 何柳斌

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of nuclear technology has led to more liquid organic radioactive wastes. Different from the regular aqueous radioactive wastes, these liquids possess a higher hazard potential and cannot be disposed through the conventional methods due to their radioactivity and chemical nature. Spent extraction solvent is a kind of common liquid organic radioactive wastes. In this work, tri-butyl phosphate (TBP), which is more difficult to degrade in the spent extraction solvent, was used as the model compound. Influences of reaction conditions on total organic carbon (TOC) removal and the volume percentage of each gas component under supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) were studied. The SCWO behaviors of spent extraction solvent simulants were studied under the optimal conditions derived from the TBP experiment. The SCWO experiments were studied at 400–550◦C, oxidant stoichiometric ratio of 0–200%, feed concentration of 1.5%–4%and pressure of 25 MPa for 15–75 s. The results show that the TOC removal of the simulants was greater than 99.7%and CH4, H2 and CO were not detected at 550◦C, 25 MPa, oxidant stoichiometric ratio of 150%, feed concentration of 3%, and residence time of 30 s.

  3. Hydrophilic actinide complexation studied by solvent extraction radiotracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, J. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry Consultant Group, Vaestra Froelunda (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Actinide migration in the ground water is enhanced by the formation of water soluble complexes. It is essential to the risk analysis of a wet repository to know the concentration of central atoms and the ligands in the ground water, and the stability of complexes formed between them. Because the chemical behavior at trace concentrations often differ from that at macro concentrations, it is important to know the chemical behavior of actinides at trace concentrations in ground water. One method used for such investigations is the solvent extraction radiotracer (SXRT) technique. This report describes the SXRT technique in some detail. A particular reason for this analysis is the claim that complex formation constants obtained by SXRT are less reliable than results obtained by other techniques. It is true that several difficulties are encountered in the application of SXRT technique to actinide solution, such as redox instability, hydrophilic complexation by side reactions and sorption, but it is also shown that a careful application of the SXRT technique yields results as reliable as by any other technique. The report contains a literature survey on solvent extraction studies of actinide complexes formed in aqueous solutions, particularly by using the organic reagent thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) dissolved in benzene or chloroform. Hydrolysis constants obtained by solvent extraction are listed as well as all actinide complexes studied by SX with inorganic and organic ligands. 116 refs, 11 tabs.

  4. Effect of solvent extraction on Tunisian esparto wax composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saâd Inès

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The increase of needs for renewable and vegetable based materials will help to drive the market growth of vegetable waxes. Because of their highly variable composition and physicochemical properties, plant waxes have found numerous applications in the: food, cosmetic, candle, coating, polish etc... The aim of this project is to determine the effect of solvent extraction (petroleum ether and ethanol on Tunisian esparto wax composition. The GC-MS was applied in order to determine the waxes compositions. Then, physicochemical parameters of these two samples of waxes: acid value, saponification value, iodine value and melting point were measured in order to deduct their properties and possible fields of uses. Results showed that esparto wax composition depended on the solvent extraction and that major components of the two samples of waxes were: alkanes, esters of fatty acids and phenols. Furthermore, esparto waxes were characterized by an antioxidant and antibacterial activities but the potential of these activities depended on the solvent of wax extraction.

  5. Ultrasound induced green solvent extraction of oil from oleaginous seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Vian, Maryline Abert; Fine, Frédéric; Carré, Patrick; Tostain, Sylvain; Chemat, Farid

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction of rapeseed oil was investigated and compared with conventional extraction for energy efficiency, throughput time, extraction yield, cleanness, processing cost and product quality. A multivariate study enabled us to define optimal parameters (7.7 W/cm(2) for ultrasonic power intensity, 40 °C for processing temperature, and a solid/liquid ratio of 1/15) for ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil from oilseeds to maximize lipid yield while reducing solvent consumption and extraction time using response surface methodology (RSM) with a three-variable central composite design (CCD). A significant difference in oil quality was noted under the conditions of the initial ultrasound extraction, which was later avoided using ultrasound in the absence of oxygen. Three concepts of multistage cross-current extraction were investigated and compared: conventional multistage maceration, ultrasound-assisted maceration and a combination, to assess the positive impact of using ultrasound on the seed oil extraction process. The study concludes that ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil is likely to reduce both economic and ecological impacts of the process in the fat and oil industry.

  6. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, AND MCU-13-191: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-10-31

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, and MCU-13-191 received on September 4, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent (remaining heel in the SHT tank) at MCU contains excess Isopar L and a deficit concentration of modifier and trioctylamine when compared to the standard MCU solvent. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar L trimming at this time. Since MCU is switching to NGS, there is no need to add TOA nor modifier. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {{sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2011.

  7. Improvement of Soybean Oil Solvent Extraction through Enzymatic Pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. V. Grasso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate multienzyme hydrolysis as a pretreatment option to improve soybean oil solvent extraction and its eventual adaptation to conventional processes. Enzymatic action causes the degradation of the cell structures that contain oil. Improvements in terms of extraction, yield, and extraction rate are expected to be achieved. Soybean flakes and collets were used as materials and hexane was used as a solvent. Temperature, pH, and incubation time were optimized and diffusion coefficients were estimated for each solid. Extractions were carried out in a column, oil content was determined according to time, and a mathematical model was developed to describe the system. The optimum conditions obtained were pH 5.4, 38°C, and 9.7 h, and pH 5.8, 44°C, and 5.8h of treatment for flakes and collets, respectively. Hydrolyzed solids exhibited a higher yield. Diffusion coefficients were estimated between 10-11 and 10-10. The highest diffusion coefficient was obtained for hydrolyzed collets. 0.73 g oil/mL and 0.7 g oil/mL were obtained at 240 s in a column for collets and flakes, respectively. Hydrolyzed solids exhibited a higher yield. The enzymatic incubation accelerates the extraction rate and allows for higher yield. The proposed model proved to be appropriate.

  8. DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

    2011-06-29

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

  9. Comparison of Extraction Techniques with Different Solvents for DDT Analogues in Sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANG Yin-Hai; JIANG Xin; D. MARTENS; ZHAO Qi-Guo

    2005-01-01

    Four techniques, Soxhlet extraction (SOX), ultrasonic extraction (USE), fluidized-bed extraction (FBE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with different solvents (methanol, hexane/acetone and acetonitrile) were used for the extraction of DDT analogues in sediments. Results revealed that the four extraction techniques had high recoveries (>86.0%) with low standard deviations (< 12.0%) for most of DDT analogues, meaning that they could all successfully extract DDT analogues in sediments. Accelerated solvent extraction using methanol and hexane/acetone (1:1), fluidized-bed extraction using hexane/acetone (1:1) and the ultrasonic extraction using hexane/acetone (1:1) were comparable or better than Soxhlet extraction using hexane/acetone (1:1). Considering solvent- and time-consumption, level of automation,and environmental risk, accelerated solvent extraction with hexane/acetone (1:1) was better than the other extraction techniques.

  10. The applicability of Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) to extract lipid biomarkers from soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Jansen; K.G.J. Nierop; M.C. Kotte; P. de Voogt; J.M. Verstraten

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the ability of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) to extract selected lipid biomarkers (C-19=C-34 n-alkanes, n-alcohols and n-fatty acids as well as dehydroabietic acid and P-sitosterol) from a sandy soil profile under Corsican pine. Two organic layers (moss and F1) as well as two

  11. Organic compounds of different extractability in total solvent extracts from soils of contrasting water repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassova, Irena; Doerr, Stefan H.

    2010-05-01

    Previous studies examining organic compounds that may cause water-repellent behaviour of soils have typically focussed on analysing only the lipophilic fraction of extracted material. This study aimed to provide a more comprehensive examination by applying single- and sequential-accelerated solvent extraction (ASE), separation and analysis by GC/MS of the total solvent extracts of three soils taken from under eucalypt vegetation with different levels of water repellency. Water repellency increased in all the soils after extraction with DCM:MeOH (95:5), but was eliminated with iso-propanol/ammonia (95:5). Quantities of major lipid compound classes varied between solvents and soils. Iso-propanol/ammonia (95:5) solvent released saccharides, glycerol, aromatic acids and other polar organic compounds, which were more abundant in fractionated extracts from the single extraction and the third step sequential ASE extraction, than in the extracts from the DCM:MeOH ASE solvent. Dominant compounds extracted from all soils were long-chain alkanols (>C22), palmitic acid, C29 alkane, β-sitosterol, terpenes, terpenoids and other polar compounds. The soil with smallest repellency lacked >C18 fatty acids and had smallest concentrations of alkanols (C26, C28 and C30) and alkanes (C29, C31), but a greater abundance of more complex polar compounds than the more repellent soils. We therefore speculate that the above compounds play an important role in determining the water repellency of the soils tested. The results suggest that one-stage and sequential ASE extractions with iso-propanol:ammonia and subsequent fractionation of extracts are a useful approach in providing a comprehensive assessment of the potential compounds involved in causing soil water repellency.

  12. An appropriate solvent for the preparation of Prasaplai extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan Tangyuenyongwatana

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Prasaplai is a Thai traditional formulation for relieving dysmenorrhea and adjusting the cycle of menstruation. Threefatty acid esters, (E-4-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylbut-3-en-1-yl linoleate (1, (E-4-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylbut-3-en-1-yl oleate(2 and (E-4-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylbut-3-en-1-yl palmitate (3, were formed during storage by the interaction of componentsin the preparation. The recommended dose (1.0 g of Prasaplai was separately extracted by exhaustive sonication with three different solvents; which are hexane, 40% ethanol and distilled water, and yielded 26.70±0.11 mg (2.7% w/w, 33.96± 0.05 mg (3.40% w/w, and 49.83±0.30 mg (4.98% w/w, respectively. The crude extracts were analyzed by HPLC for contents of the four major compounds i.e (E-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylbut-3-en-1-ol (compound D, (E-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenylbutadiene (DMPBD, piperine, -asarone, and three artifacts. The results showed that only the hexane extractcontained the artifacts while the 40% ethanol extract contained the maximum amounts of the major active anti-inflammatorycomponents, and water extract contained only compound D. These results suggest that the 40% ethanol extract should be theappropriate extract for the preparation of Prasaplai in modern dosage forms due to the high content of active anti-inflammatory agents in the extract.

  13. Advanced integrated solvent extraction and ion exchange systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction (SX) and ion exchange (IX) systems are a series of novel SX and IX processes that extract and recover uranium and transuranics (TRUs) (neptunium, plutonium, americium) and fission products {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs from acidic high-level liquid waste and that sorb and recover {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs from alkaline supernatant high-level waste. Each system is based on the use of new selective liquid extractants or chromatographic materials. The purpose of the integrated SX and IX processes is to minimize the quantity of waste that must be vitrified and buried in a deep geologic repository by producing raffinates (from SX) and effluent streams (from IX) that will meet the specifications of Class A low-level waste.

  14. A short review of headspace extraction and ultrasonic solvent extraction for honey volatiles fingerprinting

    OpenAIRE

    Jerković, I.; Marijanović, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Honey volatiles exhibit a potential role in distinguishing honeys as a function of botanical origin, but heating of honey generates artefacts such as compounds of Strecker degradation and Maillard reaction products. This short review is focused on the most recently applied methods for honey volatiles fingerprinting (without generation of thermal artefacts): headspace extraction (dynamic headspace extraction (DHE), headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME)) and ultrasonic solvent extract...

  15. Extraction of hydrocarbons from microalga Botryococcus braunii with switchable solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samorì, Chiara; Torri, Cristian; Samorì, Giulia; Fabbri, Daniele; Galletti, Paola; Guerrini, Franca; Pistocchi, Rossella; Tagliavini, Emilio

    2010-05-01

    Lipid extraction is a critical step in the development of biofuels from microalgae. Here a new procedure was proposed to extract hydrocarbons from dried and water-suspended samples of the microalga Botryococcus braunii by using switchable-polarity solvents (SPS) based on 1,8-diazabicyclo-[5.4.0]-undec-7-ene (DBU) and an alcohol. The high affinity of the non-ionic form of DBU/alcohol SPS towards non-polar compounds was exploited to extract hydrocarbons from algae, while the ionic character of the DBU-alkyl carbonate form, obtained by the addition of CO(2), was used to recover hydrocarbons from the SPS. DBU/octanol and DBU/ethanol SPS were tested for the extraction efficiency of lipids from freeze-dried B. braunii samples and compared with n-hexane and chloroform/methanol. The DBU/octanol system was further evaluated for the extraction of hydrocarbons directly from algal culture samples. DBU/octanol exhibited the highest yields of extracted hydrocarbons from both freeze-dried and liquid algal samples (16% and 8.2% respectively against 7.8% and 5.6% with n-hexane).

  16. Ultrasonic-assisted extraction of essential oil from Botryophora geniculate using different extracting solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibullah, Wilfred, Cecilia Devi

    2016-11-01

    This study compares the performance of ionic liquids to substitute conventional solvents (hexane, dichloromethane and methanol) to extract essential oil from Botryophora geniculate plant. Two different Ionic liquids ([C3MIM][Ac], [C4MIM][Ac]) with co-solvent diethyl ether were used in the ultrasonic-assisted extraction. The effect of various experimental conditions such as time, temperature and solvent were studied. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) was used to analyze essential oils. The results showed that in ultrasonic-assisted extraction using ionic liquids as a solvent gave highest yield (9.5%) in 30 min at temperature 70°C. When using ultrasonic bath with hexane, dichloromethane and methanol, yields was (3.34%), (3.6%) and (3.81%) at 90 min, respectively were obtained. The ultrasonic-assisted extraction under optimal extraction conditions (time 30 min, temperature of 70°C) gave the best yield for the essential oil extraction.

  17. Deep eutectic solvents as novel extraction media for protein partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qun; Wang, Yuzhi; Huang, Yanhua; Ding, Xueqin; Chen, Jing; Xu, Kaijia

    2014-05-21

    Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvent (DES) were synthesized, including choline chloride (ChCl)-urea, tetramethylammonium chloride (TMACl)-urea, tetrapropylammonium bromide (TPMBr)-urea and ChCl-methylurea. An aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) based ChCl-urea DES was studied for the first time for the extraction of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Single factor experiments proved that the extraction efficiency of BSA was influenced by the mass of the DES, concentration of K2HPO4 solution, separation time and extraction temperature. The optimum conditions were determined through an orthogonal experiment with the four factors described above. The results showed that under the optimum conditions, the average extraction efficiency could reach up to 99.94%, 99.72%, 100.05% and 100.05% (each measured three times). The relative standard deviations (RSD) of extraction efficiencies in precision, repeatability and stability experiments were 0.5533% (n = 5), 0.8306% (n = 5) and 0.9829% (n = 5), respectively. UV-vis and FT-IR spectra confirmed that there were no chemical interactions between BSA and the DES in the extraction process, and the CD spectra proved that the conformation of BSA did not change after extraction. The conductivity, DLS and TEM were combined to investigate the microstructure of the top phase and the possible mechanism for the extraction. The results showed that hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding interactions and the salting-out effect played important roles in the transfer process, and the aggregation and surrounding phenomenon were the main driving forces for the separation. All of these results proved that ionic liquid (IL)-based ATPSs could potentially be substituted with DES-based ATPSs to offer new possibilities in the extraction of proteins.

  18. Terra-Kleen Response Group, Inc. Solvent Extraction Technology Rapid Commercialization Initiative Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra-Kleen Response Group Inc. (Terra-Kleen), has commercialized a solvent extraction technology that uses a proprietary extraction solvent to transfer organic constituents from soil to a liquid phase in a batch process at ambient temperatures. The proprietary solvent has a rel...

  19. The role of aggregate formation in solvent extraction of calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaonkar, A.G.; Neuman, R.D.

    1986-09-01

    In solvent extraction processes involving hydrometallurgical separations, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, and nuclear waste processing operations, metal ions transfer across the boundary between two immiscible liquids. Hence, the properties of the liquid/liquid interface can often influence the extraction process. This suggests that one, therefore, should be able to control the extraction rate by proper manipulation of the nature of the liquid/liquid interface. In an earlier communication (1) from this laboratory, aggregates, possibly reversed micelles, were proposed to form in the system di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP)/n-hexane/CaCl/sub 2/ solution under certain conditions. The objective of the present study was to determine whether the amount of calcium extracted and the rate of extraction become significant when reversed micelles form. The interfacial tension (..gamma..), equilibrium distribution coefficient (K/sub d/), and mass transfer coefficient (k/sub ao/) were obtained for the system HDEHP/n-hexane/0.01 mol dm/sup -3/ CaCl/sub 2/ solution. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Investigation of aggregation in solvent extraction of lanthanides by acidic extractants (organophosphorus and naphthenic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, N.; Wu, J.; Yu, Z.; Neuman, R.D.; Wang, D.; Xu, G.

    1997-01-01

    Three acidic extractants (I) di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), (II) 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEHPEHE) and (III) naphthenic acid were employed in preparing the samples for the characterization of the coordination structure of lanthanide-extractant complexes and the physicochemical nature of aggregates formed in the organic diluent of the solvent extraction systems. Photo correlation spectroscopy (PCS) results on the aggregates formed by the partially saponified HDEHP in n-heptane showed that the hydrodynamic radius of the aggregates was comparable to the molecular dimensions of HDEHP. The addition of 2-octanol into the diluent, by which the mixed solvent was formed, increased the dimensions of the corresponding aggregates. Aggregates formed from the lanthanide ions and HDEHP in the organic phase of the extraction systems were found very unstable. In the case of naphthenic acid, PCS data showed the formation of w/o microemulsion from the saponified naphthenic acid in the mixed solvent. The extraction of lanthanides by the saponified naphthenic acid in the mixed solvent under the given experimental conditions was a process of destruction of the w/o microemulsion. A possible mechanism of the breakdown of the w/o microemulsion droplets is discussed.

  1. A Study for Extraction Kinetics of Β-Carotene from Oven Dried Carrot by Solvent Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Das

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this work was to study the kinetics of the extraction of β-carotene by solvent (ethanol extraction from carrots dried at 50ºC in an oven. The moisture content after drying was 11±1.5% (dry weight basis. Extraction time was 5 hours and extraction process was carried out at 30ºC. The ratio of Carrot (gm: ethanol (ml of 1:60 was maintained throughout the extraction process. The experimental data of extracted β- Carotene yield during solvent extraction were modeled with seven different mathematical models, including Power law, Peleg, Weinbull’s equation, Pseudo 2nd order, Intraparticle diffusion, Logarithmic, Weinbull’s distribution and one RSM model developed in this study. Pseudo 2nd order model was best fitted model (R2 - 0.99, χ 2 - 0.0091, RMSE- 0.1566, MAE- 0.0115 to describe extraction kinetics of β-carotene from carrot. The extraction time has significant effect on extraction process at p<0.05 level.

  2. Solvent extraction of chlorinated compounds from soils and hydrodechlorination of the extract phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murena, Fabio; Gioia, Francesco

    2009-03-15

    The remediation of soils contaminated with chlorinated compounds was investigated. The process consists of solvent extraction followed by catalytic hydroprocessing (hydrodechlorination) of the extract phase. A mixture of ethylacetate-acetone-water (E-A-W) was adopted as solvent in the extraction process. Tests of extraction of chlorobenzene from a model contaminated soil were carried out and the Langmuir adsorption equation was characterized. The solvent, contaminated with different chlorinated compounds was then hydrotreated with a Pd/C catalyst. The chlorinated compounds tested are: chlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene and hexachloroethane at various initial concentrations. The reaction runs were carried out at room temperature and at a hydrogen pressure of 1bar. Hydrotreating of these compounds takes place according to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism whose kinetic parameters were determined. The experiments show that high destruction efficiencies may be reached in reasonably short times, particularly for hexachloroethane. Longer times are necessary for the aromatic compounds (chlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene) for which the CCl bond is much stronger than that in the aliphatic compound. Time for a 95% destruction efficiency for all experimental runs was determined. A noteworthy finding is that ethylacetate and acetone do not undergo any reaction during hydrotreating. Thus the treated extract solution may be recycled inasmuch as it conserves its full extracting capacity towards chlorinated compounds. A limitation in recycling is the inhibiting effect of benzene on the HDCl rate: benzene produced by HDCl of chlorinated compounds, accumulates in the solvent mixture in the event of recycling. Simulation of the process with the recycling of the solvent was carried out, accounting for the inhibiting effect of benzene.

  3. Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction: Supramolecular Aspects of Solvent Exchange Volume 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloe, Karsten [Technischen Universität Dresden; Tasker, Peter A [ORNL; Oshima, Tatsuya [University of Miyazaki; Watarai, Hitoshi [Institute for NanoScience Design at Osaka University; Nilsson, Mikael [University of California, Irvine

    2013-01-01

    Preface The theme of supramolecular chemistry (SC), entailing the organization of multiple species through noncovalent interactions, has permeated virtually all aspects of chemical endeavor over the past several decades. Given that the observed behavior of discrete molecular species depends upon their weak interactions with one another and with matrix components, one would have to conclude that SC must indeed form part of the fabric of chemistry itself. A vast literature now serves to categorize SC phenomena within a body of consistent terminology. The word supramolecular itself appears in the titles of dozens of books, several journals, and a dedicated encyclopedia. Not surprisingly, the theme of SC also permeates the field of solvent extraction (SX), inspiring the framework for this volume of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction. It is attempted in the six chapters of this volume to identify both how supramolecular behavior occurs and is studied in the context of SX and how SC is influencing the current direction of SX. Researchers and practitioners have long dealt with supramolecular interactions in SX. Indeed, the use of polar extractant molecules in nonpolar media virtually assures that aggregative interactions will dominate the solution behavior of SX. Analytical chemists working in the 1930s to the 1950s with simple mono- and bidentate chelating ligands as extractants noted that extraction of metal ions obeyed complicated mass-action equilibria involving complex stoichiometries. As chemists and engineers developed processes for nuclear and hydrometallurgical applications in the 1950s and 1960s, the preference for aliphatic diluents only enhanced the complexity and supramolecular nature of extraction chemistry. Use of physical techniques such as light scattering and vapor-pressure measurements together with various spectroscopic methods revealed organic-phase aggregates from well-defined dimers to small aggregates containing a few extractant molecules to large

  4. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280... extraction process for citric acid. A solvent extraction process for recovery of citric acid from conventional Aspergillus niger fermentation liquor may be safely used to produce food-grade citric acid...

  5. Coal extraction by aprotic dipolar solvents. Final report. [Tetramethylurea, hexa-methylphosphoramide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, J T

    1985-12-01

    The overall goals of this project were to examine the rate and amount of extraction of coals at low temperature by a class of solvents with a generic structure to include tetramethylurea (TMU) and hexa-methylphosphoramide (HMPA) and to examine the nature of the extracted coal chemicals. The class of solvents with similar action, however, can be classified as aprotic, base solvents or, somewhat more broadly, specific solvents. The action of solvents by this last classification was then examined to postulate a mechanism of attack. Experimental work was conducted to explain the specific solvent attack including (1) pure solvent extraction, (2) extraction in mixtures with otherwise inert solvents and inhibitors, and (3) extraction with simultaneous catalytic enhancement attempts including water-gas shift conversion. Thus nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas-chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis of extract molecules and extraction with high-pressure CO in TMU (plus 2% H2O) was performed. Effects of solvent additives such as cumene and quinone of large amounts of inert solvents such as tetralin, liminone, or carbon disulfide on extraction were also determined. Results are discussed. 82 refs., 36 figs., 37 tabs.

  6. Solvent Extraction of Alkaline Earth Metals with Alkylphosphorus Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUXin; ZHUTun

    2002-01-01

    Solvent extraction equiliria of four main alkaline earth metals (magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium) with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA), 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-(2-ethylhexyl) ester, di(2,4,4-tri-methylpentyl) phosphinic acid and IR spectra of the extracts have been studied. The selectivity order is dependent of the e/r value and hydration energy of the metal ions. The minor shift of the P→O in IR absorption of the alkaline earth metal extracts indicates that the interaction between the metal ions and P→O is much weaker for alkaline earth metals than for transitional metals. The distribution of the four alkaline earth elements between aqueous solutions and solutions of DEHPA and neutral organophosphorus compunds, tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) or tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) in kerosene have been determined at varying ratio of TBP or TOPO to DEHPA and the positive synergism is observed. The synergic effects is explained by using IR spectra of the loaded organic phase.

  7. Non-polar Solvent Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Volatile Constituents from Dried Zingiber Officinale Rosc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong; WANG Zi-Ming; WANG Yu-Tang; LI Tie-Chun; CHENG Jian-Hua; LIU Zhong-Ying; ZHANG Han-Qi

    2007-01-01

    A new method, non-polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction (NPSMAE), was applied to the extraction of essential oil from Zingiber officinale Rosc. in closed-vessel system. By adding microwave absorption mediumcarbonyl iron powders (CIP) into extraction system, the essential oil was extracted by the non-polar solvent (ether)which can be heated by CIP. The constituents of essential oil obtained by NPSMAE were comparable with those obtained by hydrodistillation (HD) by GC-MS analysis, which indicates that NPSMAE is a feasible way to extract essential oil from dried plant materials. The NPSMAE took much less extraction time (5 min) than HD (180 min),and its extraction efficiency was much higher than that of conventional polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction (PSMAE) and mixed solvent microwave-assisted extraction (MSMAE). It can be a good alternative for the extraction of volatile constituents from dried plant samples.

  8. Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, James [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Almeida, Valmor de [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiao, Xiangmin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Sims, Brett [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States). Borough of Manhattan Community College; Li, Xaiolin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2013-01-08

    The objective of this project is to develop a specialized sharp interface tracking simulation capability for predicting interaction of micron-sized drops and bubbles in rotating flows relevant to optimized design of contactor devices used in solvent extraction processes of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The primary outcomes of this project include the capability to resolve drops and bubbles micro-hydrodynamics in solvent extraction contactors, determining from first principles continuum fluid mechanics how micro-drops and bubbles interact with each other and the surrounding shearing fluid for realistic flows. In the near term, this effort will play a central role in providing parameters and insight into the flow dynamics of models that average over coarser scales, say at the millimeter unit length. In the longer term, it will prove to be the platform to conduct full-device, detailed simulations as parallel computing power reaches the exaflop level. The team will develop an accurate simulation tool for flows containing interacting droplets and bubbles with sharp interfaces under conditions that mimic those found in realistic contactor operations. The main objective is to create an off-line simulation capability to model drop and bubble interactions in a domain representative of the averaged length scale. The technical approach is to combine robust interface tracking software, subgrid modeling, validation quality experiments, powerful computational hardware, and a team with simulation modeling, physical modeling and technology integration experience. Simulations will then fully resolve the microflow of drops and bubbles at the microsecond time scale. This approach is computationally intensive but very accurate in treating important coupled physical phenomena in the vicinity of interfaces. The method makes it possible to resolve spatial scales smaller than the typical distance between bubbles and to model some non-equilibrium thermodynamic features such as finite

  9. Determining an Efficient Solvent Extraction Parameters for Re-Refining of Waste Lubricating Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ali Durrani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Re-refining of vehicle waste lubricating oil by solvent extraction is one of the efficient and cheapest methods. Three extracting solvents MEK (Methyl-Ethyl-Ketone, 1-butanol, 2-propanol were determined experimentally for their performance based on the parameters i.e. solvent type, solvent oil ratio and extraction temperature. From the experimental results it was observed the MEK performance was highest based on the lowest oil percent losses and highest sludge removal. Further, when temperature of extraction increased the oil losses percent also decreased. This is due to the solvent ability that dissolves the base oil in waste lubricating oil and determines the best SOR (Solvent Oil Ratio and extraction temperatures.

  10. Secondary amines as switchable solvents for lipid extraction from non-broken microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ying; Schuur, Boelo; Samorì, Chiara; Tagliavini, Emilio; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2013-12-01

    Lipids from algal biomass may provide renewable fuel and chemical feedstock in large quantities. The energy intensity of drying and milling of algae prior to extraction and of solvent recovery afterwards is a major obstacle. The objective is to use switchable solvents to extract oil directly from wet microalgae slurries without the need for drying and milling, and subsequently recover the extracted oil and solvent by simple phase splitting, using CO2 as trigger. In this work secondary amine solvents were investigated for lipids extraction, polarity switching and phase splitting ability upon contacting with CO2. For strain Desmodesmus sp. extraction yields from the wet algal slurries, with and without cell disruption, were comparable with Bligh & Dyer method yields. Oil and solvent recovery via phase separation was realized by CO2 induced phase splitting, making secondary amines a candidate for further development of an energy efficient lipid extraction technology for non-broken microalgae.

  11. The solvent absorption-extractive distillation (SAED) process for ethanol recovery from gas/vapor streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.

    1993-12-31

    A low energy system for ethanol recovery and dehydration has been developed. This system utilizes a solvent for (1) absorption of ethanol vapors, and then the same solvent for (2) extractive distillation. The ideal solvent for this process would have a high affinity for ethanol, and no affinity for water. Heavy alcohols such as dodecanol, and tridecanol, some phosphorals, and some fatty acids have been determined to meet the desired specifications. These solvents have the effect of making water more volatile than ethanol. Thus, a water stream is taken off initially in the dehydration column, and a near anhydrous ethanol stream is recovered from the ethanol/solvent stripper column. Thus the solvent serves dual uses (1) absorption media, and (2) dehydration media. The SAED process as conceptualized would use a solvent similar to solvents used for direct extractive separation of ethanol from aqueous ethanol solutions.

  12. Deep eutectic solvents as efficient solvent system for the extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-01-20

    Three different deep eutectic solvents (DESs) prepared by the complexation of choline chloride with urea, ethylene glycol and glycerol along with their hydrated counterparts were used for the selective extraction of κ-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii. Upon comparison of the quality of the polysaccharide with the one obtained using water as extraction media as well as the one extracted using widely practiced conventional method, it was found that, the physicochemical as well as rheological properties of κ-carrageenan obtained using DESs as solvents was at par to the one obtained using conventional method and was superior in quality when compared to κ-carrageenan obtained using water as solvent. Considering the tedious nature of the extraction method employed in conventional extraction process, the DESs can be considered as suitable alternative solvents for the facile extraction of the polysaccharide directly from the seaweed. However, among the hydrated and non-hydrated DESs, the hydrated ones were found to be more effective in comparison to their non-hydrated counterparts.

  13. Comparison of solvent extraction and solid-phase extraction for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls in transformer oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahindrakar, A N; Chandra, S; Shinde, L P

    2014-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) of nine polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from transformer oil samples was evaluated using octadecyl (CI8)-bonded porous silica. The efficiency of SPE of these PCBs was compared with those obtained by solvent extraction with DMSO and hexane. Average recoveries exceeding 95% for these PCBs were obtained via the SPE method using small cartridges containing 100mg of 40 pm CI8-bonded porous silica. The average recovery by solvent extraction with DMSO and hexane exceeded 83%. It was concluded that the recoveries and precision for the solvent extraction of PCBs were poorer than those for the SPE.

  14. Efficient removal of naphthalene-2-ol from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jingjing; Cheng, Yan; Yang, Chunping; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Wencan; Jiao, Panpan; He, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    Naphthalene-2-ol is a typical biologically recalcitrant pollutant in dye wastewater. Solvent extraction of naphthalene-2-ol from aqueous solutions using mixed solvents was investigated. Various extractants and diluents were evaluated, and the effects of volume ratio of extractant to diluent, initial pH, initial concentration of naphthalene-2-ol in aqueous solution, extraction time, temperature, volume ratio of organic phase to aqueous phase (O/A), stirring rate and extraction stages, on extraction efficiency were examined separately. Regeneration and reuse of the spent extractant were also investigated. Results showed that tributyl phosphate (TBP) achieved 98% extraction efficiency for naphthalene-2-ol in a single stage extraction, the highest among the 12 extractants evaluated. Extraction efficiency was optimized when cyclohexane and n-octane were used as diluents. The solvent combination of 20% TBP, 20% n-octanol and 60% cyclohexane (V/V) obtained the maximum extraction efficiency for naphthalene-2-ol, 99.3%, within 20min using three cross-current extraction stages under the following extraction conditions: O/A ratio of 1:1, initial pH of 3, 25°C and stirring rate of 150r/min. Recovery of mixed solvents was achieved by using 15% (W/W) NaOH solution at an O:A ratio of 1:1 and a contact time of 15min. The mixed solvents achieved an extraction capacity for naphthalene-2-ol stably higher than 90% during five cycles after regeneration.

  15. Selective Extraction of Rare Earth Elements from Permanent Magnet Scraps with Membrane Solvent Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daejin; Powell, Lawrence E; Delmau, Lætitia H; Peterson, Eric S; Herchenroeder, Jim; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2015-08-18

    The rare earth elements (REEs) such as neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium were successfully recovered from commercial NdFeB magnets and industrial scrap magnets via membrane assisted solvent extraction (MSX). A hollow fiber membrane system was evaluated to extract REEs in a single step with the feed and strip solutions circulating continuously through the MSX system. The effects of several experimental variables on REE extraction such as flow rate, concentration of REEs in the feed solution, membrane configuration, and composition of acids were investigated with the MSX system. A multimembrane module configuration with REEs dissolved in aqueous nitric acid solutions showed high selectivity for REE extraction with no coextraction of non-REEs, whereas the use of aqueous hydrochloric acid solution resulted in coextraction of non-REEs due to the formation of chloroanions of non-REEs. The REE oxides were recovered from the strip solution through precipitation, drying, and annealing steps. The resulting REE oxides were characterized with XRD, SEM-EDX, and ICP-OES, demonstrating that the membrane assisted solvent extraction is capable of selectively recovering pure REEs from the industrial scrap magnets.

  16. Secondary amines as switchable solvents for lipid extraction from non-broken microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, Y.; Schuur, B.; Samori, C.; Tagliavini, E.; Brilman, D.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Lipids from algal biomass may provide renewable fuel and chemical feedstock in large quantities. The energy intensity of drying and milling of algae prior to extraction and of solvent recovery afterwards is a major obstacle. The objective is to use switchable solvents to extract oil directly from we

  17. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Oil Extraction from Jatropha curcas L. Using Ethanol as a Solvent

    OpenAIRE

    Silmara Bispo dos Santos; Marcio Arêdes Martins; Ana Lívia Caneschi; Paulo Rafael Morette Aguilar; Jane Sélia dos Reis Coimbra

    2015-01-01

    In the study the yield and kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the oil extraction process from Jatropha curcas L. using ethanol as a solvent were evaluated for different temperatures, moisture contents of the solid phase, and particle sizes. The extraction process yield increased with contact time of solid particles with the solvent until reaching equilibrium (saturation of the solvent), for all the temperatures, moisture contents, and average particle sizes. These parameters significantl...

  18. Radiation chemistry in solvent extraction: FY2010 Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Leigh R. Martin; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes work accomplished under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program in the area of radiation chemistry during FY 2010. The tasks assigned during FY 2010 included: • Development of techniques to measure free radical reaction kinetics in the organic phase. • Initiation of an alpha-radiolysis program • Initiation of an effort to understand dose rate effects in radiation chemistry • Continued work to characterize TALSPEAK radiation chemistry Progress made on each of these tasks is reported here. Briefly, a method was developed and used to measure the kinetics of the reactions of the •NO3 radical with solvent extraction ligands in organic solution, and the method to measure •OH radical reactions under the same conditions has been designed. Rate constants for the CMPO and DMDOHEMA reaction with •NO3 radical in organic solution are reported. Alpha-radiolysis was initiated on samples of DMDOHEMA in alkane solution using He ion beam irradiation and 211At isotope irradiation. The samples are currently being analyzed for comparison to DMDOHEMA ?-irradiations using a custom-developed mass spectrometric method. Results are also reported for the radiolytic generation of nitrous acid, in ?-irradiated nitric acid. It is shown that the yield of nitrous acid is unaffected by an order-of-magnitude change in dose rate. Finally, recent results for TALSPEAK radiolysis are reported, summarizing the effects on solvent extraction efficiency due to HDEHP irradiation, and the stable products of lactic acid and DTPA irradiation. In addition, results representing increased scope are presented for the radiation chemistry program. These include an investigation of the effect of metal complexation on radical reaction kinetics using DTPA as an example, and the production of a manuscript reporting the mechanism of Cs-7SB radiolysis. The Cs-7SB work takes advantage of recent results from a current LDRD program to understand the fundamental chemistry

  19. Comparison of extraction techniques and modeling of accelerated solvent extraction for the authentication of natural vanilla flavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Esmeralda; Chaintreau, Alain

    2009-06-01

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of vanilla beans has been optimized using ethanol as a solvent. A theoretical model is proposed to account for this multistep extraction. This allows the determination, for the first time, of the total amount of analytes initially present in the beans and thus the calculation of recoveries using ASE or any other extraction technique. As a result, ASE and Soxhlet extractions have been determined to be efficient methods, whereas recoveries are modest for maceration techniques and depend on the solvent used. Because industrial extracts are obtained by many different procedures, including maceration in various solvents, authenticating vanilla extracts using quantitative ratios between the amounts of vanilla flavor constituents appears to be unreliable. When authentication techniques based on isotopic ratios are used, ASE is a valid sample preparation technique because it does not induce isotopic fractionation.

  20. Liquid-liquid equilibrium extraction of ethanol with mixed solvent for bioethanol concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroaki Habaki; Haihao Hu; Ryuichi Egashira

    2016-01-01

    The extraction of ethanol with the solvents of aldehydes mixed with m-xylene was studied for the bioethanol concentration process. Furfural and benzaldehyde were selected as extraction solvents, with which the solubility of water is smal , expecting large distribution coefficient of ethanol. The liquid–liquid two-phase region was the largest with m-xylene solvent, followed by benzaldehyde and furfural. The region of two liquid–liquid phase be-came larger with the mixed solvent of m-xylene and furfural than that with furfural solvent. The NRTL model was applied to the ethanol–water–furfural–m-xylene system, and the model could well express the liquid–liquid equilibrium of the system. For any solvent used in this study, the separation selectivity of ethanol relative to water decreased as the distribution coefficient of ethanol increased. The separation selectivity with m-xylene was the largest among the employed solvents, but the distribution coefficient was the smal est. The solvent mix-ture of furfural and m-xylene showed relatively high distribution coefficient of ethanol and separation selectivity, even in the higher mass fraction of m-xylene in the solvent phase. The ethanol extraction with a countercurrent multistage extractor by a continuous operation was simulated to evaluate the extraction performance. The ethanol content could be concentrated in the extract phase with relatively small number of extraction stages but low yield of ethanol was obtained.

  1. Water-enhanced solubility of carboxylic acids in organic solvents and its applications to extraction processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, J.N.; King, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    The solubilities of carboxylic acids in certain organic solvents increase remarkably with an increasing amount of water in the organic phase. This phenomenon leads to a novel extract regeneration process in which the co-extracted water is selectively removed from an extract, and the carboxylic acid precipitates. This approach is potentially advantageous compared to other regeneration processes because it removes a minor component of the extract in order to achieve a large recovery of acid from the extract. Carboxylic acids of interest include adipic acid, fumaric acid, and succinic acid because of their low to moderate solubilities in organic solvents. Solvents were screened for an increase in acid solubility with increased water concentration in the organic phase. Most Lewis-base solvents were found to exhibit this increased solubility phenomena. Solvents that have a carbonyl functional group showed a very large increase in acid solubility. 71 refs., 52 figs., 38 tabs.

  2. Solvent extraction, ion chromatography, and mass spectrometry of molybdenum isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphas, N; Reisberg, L; Marty, B

    2001-06-01

    A procedure was developed that allows precise determination of molybdenum isotope abundances in natural samples. Purification of molybdenum was first achieved by solvent extraction using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate. Further separation of molybdenum from isobar nuclides was obtained by ion chromatography using AG1-X8 strongly basic anion exchanger. Finally, molybdenum isotopic composition was measured using a multiple collector inductively coupled plasma hexapole mass spectrometer. The abundances of molybdenum isotopes 92, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, and 100 are 14.8428(510), 9.2498(157), 15.9303(133), 16.6787(37), 9.5534(83), 24.1346(394), and 9.6104(312) respectively, resulting in an atomic mass of 95.9304(45). After internal normalization for mass fractionation, no variation of the molybdenum isotopic composition is observed among terrestrial samples within a relative precision on the order of 0.00001-0.0001. This demonstrates the reliability of the method, which can be applied to searching for possible isotopic anomalies and mass fractionation.

  3. SUPPLEMENTAL ANALYSES FOR SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLES MCU-11-314, MCU-11-315, MCU-11-316, MCU-11-317, MCU-11-318 AND MCU-11-319

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A; . Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-29

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) periodically analyses solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-11-314, MCU-11-315, MCU-11-316, MCU-11-317, MCU-11-318 and MCU-11-319 have been previously reported. MCU has experienced a modest decline in cesium removal efficiency while processing the current feed, 'Macrobatch 3'. While the target decontamination factor (DF) is 200, the fiscal year 2011 DF average is 161. The results of the prior solvent analysis report did not identify a specific factor that would correlate with the poor cesium decontamination beyond a low concentration of the suppressor, trioctylamine. New analyses of the quarterly sample are reported in this document, as well as a cross-check of {sup 137}Cs measurements for SRNL and F/H lab. Furthermore, in an attempt to discover the reason for the decline in DF at MCU, SRNL was tasked with analyzing numerous Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and chemical feed samples.

  4. Comparison and Combination of Solvent Extraction and Adsorption for Crude Glycerol Enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Hunsom, Mali; Saila, Payia; Chaiyakam, Penpisuth; Kositnan, Winata

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of enrichment of crude glycerol via solvent extraction and adsorption was performed at a laboratory scale at ambient temperature (30 oC). Effect of various parameters on the properties of the obtained glycerol including glycerol-, ash- and contaminant contents and color, was explored. The results showed that the enrichment of glycerol by solvent extraction was significantly affected by the solvent type and ratio of solvent to pre-treated crude glycerol. The use of n-C3H7OH...

  5. The extraction of aromatic amino acids with binary and ternary mixtures of hydrophilic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokshina, N. Ya.; Pakhomova, O. A.; Niftaliev, S. I.

    2007-11-01

    The extraction of tyrosine and phenylalanine with binary and ternary mixtures of hydrophilic solvents from aqueous salt solutions was studied, and several tendencies were observed. Simplex-lattice planning of experiment was used for the optimization of the composition of solvent mixtures. It was shown that the extraction systems developed could be employed for the almost complete extraction of tyrosine and phenylalanine from aqueous solutions.

  6. Extraction by solvent using microwave and ultrasound-assisted techniques followed by HPLC analysis of Harpagoside from Harpagophytum procumbens and comparison with conventional solvent extraction methods

    OpenAIRE

    Filly, Aurore; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne-Sylvie; Petitcolas, Emmanuel; Mabrouki, Fathi; Chemat, Farid; Ollivier, Évelyne

    2016-01-01

    This research paper presents a quick and ecofriendly technique for the extraction of harpagoside (HS), the active marker of Harpagophytum procumbens (HP), along with a comparison with conventional methods so as to propose an efficient HPLC method. HP is widely used as an anti-inflammatory in phytotherapy. The quality control of the herbal drug and extract calls for a time consuming method of conventional extraction, which involves a high consumption of solvents. In this study, HP has been ...

  7. Ultrasonication-Assisted Solvent Extraction of Quercetin Glycosides from ‘Idared’ Apple Peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolyn M. Huber

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin and quercetin glycosides are physiologically active flavonol molecules that have been attributed numerous health benefits. Recovery of such molecules from plant matrices depends on a variety of factors including polarity of the extraction solvent. Among the solvents of a wide range of dielectric constants, methanol recovered the most quercetin and its glycosides from dehydrated ‘Idared’ apple peels. When ultra-sonication was employed to facilitate the extraction, exposure of 15 min of ultrasound wavelengths of dehydrated apple peel powder in 80% to 100% (v/v methanol in 1:50 (w:v solid to solvent ratio provided the optimum extraction conditions for quercetin and its glycosides. Acidification of extraction solvent with 0.1% (v/v or higher concentrations of HCl led to hydrolysis of naturally occurring quercetin glycosides into the aglycone as an extraction artifact.

  8. Chemical composition of Artemisia annua L. leaves and antioxidant potential of extracts as a function of extraction solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Younas, Umer; Chan, Kim Wei; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-05-21

    This study was conducted to investigate the chemical and nutritional composition of Artemisia annua leaves in addition to determination of antioxidant potential of their extracts prepared in different solvents. Chemical composition was determined by quantifying fat, protein, carbohydrate, fiber, tocopherol, phytate, and tannin contents. Extraction of A. annua leaves, for antioxidant potential evaluation, was carried out using five solvents of different polarities, i.e., hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Antioxidant potential was evaluated by estimating total phenolic (TPC), flavonoid (TFC) contents, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), DPPH radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation. Efficiency of different solvents was compared for the yield of antioxidant extracts from leaf samples and a clear variation was observed. The highest TPC, TFC, TEAC, DPPH radical scavenging and lowest lipid peroxidation were observed in MeOH extracts, whereas aqueous extract exhibited high ferric reducing antioxidant power; suggesting MeOH to be the most favorable extractant.

  9. Solvent Extraction of Chemical Attribution Signature Compounds from Painted Wall Board: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Jon H.; Colburn, Heather A.

    2009-10-29

    This report summarizes work that developed a robust solvent extraction procedure for recovery of chemical attribution signature (CAS) compound dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP) (as well as diethyl methyl phosphonate (DEMP), diethyl methyl phosphonothioate (DEMPT), and diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP)) from painted wall board (PWB), which was selected previously as the exposed media by the chemical attribution scientific working group (CASWG). An accelerated solvent extraction approach was examined to determine the most effective method of extraction from PWB. Three different solvent systems were examined, which varied in solvent strength and polarity (i.e., 1:1 dichloromethane : acetone,100% methanol, and 1% isopropanol in pentane) with a 1:1 methylene chloride : acetone mixture having the most robust and consistent extraction for four original target organophosphorus compounds. The optimum extraction solvent was determined based on the extraction efficiency of the target analytes from spiked painted wallboard as determined by gas chromatography x gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) analysis of the extract. An average extraction efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained for these four compounds. The extraction approach was further demonstrated by extracting and detecting the chemical impurities present in neat DMMP that was vapor-deposited onto painted wallboard tickets.

  10. Design of a solvent extraction process for PAH-contaminated sediments : The WAU-acetone process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rulkens, W.H.; Bruning, H.; Hasselt, H.J. van; Rienks, J.; Veen, H.J. van; Terlingen, J.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Solvent extraction is one of the possibilities to clean-up polluted sediments. It is especially attractive when the sediment mainly consists of clay particles polluted with contaminants which are not, or not easily, biodegradable. Using acetone as extracting agent the extraction process has been inv

  11. Desulfurization of diesel by oxidation/extraction scheme. Influence of the extraction solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Verduzco, L.F.; Torres-Garcia, E.; Gomez-Quintana, R.; Gonzalez-Pena, V.; Murrieta-Guevara, F. [Programa de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, CP 07730 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2004-11-24

    Due to the future specifications for sulfur content in middle distillate like diesel, a lot of research work has been done to develop alternative methods for desulfurization. This work presents the results for the desulfurization of diesel by an oxidation and extraction (O/E) scheme. This process can be considered like a post-treatment to the traditional hydrodesulfurization. A diesel with 320ppmw of total sulfur was employed to evaluate the elimination of sulfur compounds. The oxidation reaction was carried out with hydrogen peroxide at 30wt.%, in a heterogeneous system with a WO{sub x}/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst at 15wt.% of W; the extraction was performed with four polar solvents. The experiments were done in a batch reactor at 333K and atmospheric pressure. As an average, the sulfur content in the diesel after treatment was 90ppmw. A speciation of the sulfur compounds before and after O/E scheme was also included. Additionally, solubility data of dibenzothiophene sulfone in the polar solvents as a function of temperature were obtained.

  12. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: TERRA KLEEN SOLVENT EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY - TERRA-KLEEN RESPONSE GROUP, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Terra-Kleen Solvent Extraction Technology was developed by Terra-Kleen Response Group, Inc., to remove polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and other organic constituents from contaminated soil. This batch process system uses a proprietary solvent at ambient temperatures to treat ...

  13. Influence of green solvent extraction on carotenoid yield from shrimp (Pandalus borealis) processing waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; El-Houri, Rime Bahij; Fretté, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In this work, sunflower oil (SF) and methyl ester of sunflower oil (ME-SF) were introduced as two green solvents for extracting astaxanthin (ASX) from shrimp processing waste. The effects of temperature (25, 45, 70 °C), solvent to waste ratio (3, 6, 9), waste particle size (0.6 and 2.5 mm) and mo...

  14. Application of natural deep eutectic solvents to the extraction of anthocyanins from Catharanthus roseus with high extractability and stability replacing conventional organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yuntao; Rozema, Evelien; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2016-02-19

    Natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) have attracted a great deal of attention in recent times as promising green media. They are generally composed of neutral, acidic or basic compounds that form liquids of high viscosity when mixed in certain molar ratio. Despite their potential, viscosity and acid or basic nature of some ingredients may affect the extraction capacity and stabilizing ability of the target compounds. To investigate these effects, extraction with a series of NADES was employed for the analysis of anthocyanins in flower petals of Catharanthus roseus in combination with HPLC-DAD-based metabolic profiling. Along with the extraction yields of anthocyanins their stability in NADES was also studied. Multivariate data analysis indicates that the lactic acid-glucose (LGH), and 1,2-propanediol-choline chloride (PCH) NADES present a similar extraction power for anthocyanins as conventional organic solvents. Furthermore, among the NADES employed, LGH exhibits an at least three times higher stabilizing capacity for cyanidins than acidified ethanol, which facilitates their extraction and analysis process. Comparing NADES to the conventional organic solvents, in addition to their reduced environmental impact, they proved to provide higher stability for anthocyanins, and therefore have a great potential as possible alternatives to those organic solvents in health related areas such as food, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics.

  15. Interfacial Phenomena in Solvent Extraction and Its Influence on Process Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Solvent extraction is now finding applications in a broader range of fields than the past. Many of these applications require process equipment with shorter contact times, and in some cases to the point where the traditional equilibrium stage approach is not a good model for predicting performance. In addition,feed streams are becoming lower in concentration of the solute. This means greater feed to solvent flow ratios are being used and so loss of organics as entrainment in the feed is more of a concern both economically and environmentally. These trends mean that a greater emphasis is being placed on the kinetics of extraction and stripping in models to predict performance and on formation and coalescence of drops to control entrainment. This paper reviews recent advances in the tools for investigating kinetics and coalescence in solvent extraction processes and some of the insights that are being uncovered in these fundamental processes in solvent extraction technology.

  16. Separation of nickel, cobalt and copper by solvent extraction with P204

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nickel, cobalt and copper were separated by solvent extraction with P204. The experimental results show that [Co(NH3)6]3+ is an inert complex in extraction kinetics, therefore cobalt can be separated from nickel and copper by non-equilibrium solvent extraction. Under the conditions of temperature 25℃, contact time of two phases 10 min, phase ratio 1:1, aqueous pH 10.10 and concentration of P204 20 %, [ Co(NH3 )6 3+ is hardly extracted by P204, while the percentage extractions of nickel and copper are 79.3 % and 93.9 % respectively. Nickel and copper are separated by equi librium solvent extraction with P204. Under the conditions of temperature 25 ℃, contact time of two phases 1 min, phase ratio 1:1, equilibrium pH 4.01 and concentration of P204 20%, the separation factor of copper and nickel is 216.

  17. DBC solvent extraction of U(VI) from thiocyanate medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The extraction behavior of uranium(VI) from thiocyanate medium with dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DBC) in nitrobenzene and the effects of alkali cations on the extraction were investigated. The results showed that the uranium (VI) can be effectively extracted in the presence of potassium cation, uranium (VI) is extracted as complex anionic species UO2(SCN)-3, and the stoichiometry of the extracted complex is KUO2(SCN)32DBC(o).

  18. Novel biphasic separations utilising highly selective molecularly imprinted polymers as biorecognition solvent extraction agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, Oliver K; Allender, Christopher J; Barrow, David A

    2006-10-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) represent a class of artificial receptors that promise an environmentally robust alternative to naturally occurring biorecognition elements of biosensing devices and systems. However, in general, the performance of conventional MIPs in aqueous environments is poor. In the study reported here, this limitation has been addressed by the novel application of MIPs as a solvent extraction solid phase in a biphasic solvent system. This paper describes a previously unreported use of MIPs as solvent extraction reagents, their successful application to aqueous sample media and the opportunities for utilisation of this unique system in novel biosensing and separation procedures. This study demonstrates the development of a novel biphasic solvent system utilising MIP in the extracting phase to enhance both efficiency and selectivity of a simple two phase liquid extraction. Monodisperse propranolol imprinted polymer microspheres [p(divinylbenzene-co-methacrylic acid)] were prepared by precipitation polymerisation. Initially, the affinity of the polymers for (R,S)-propranolol was assessed by established techniques whereby the MIP demonstrated greater affinity for the template than did the non-imprinted control polymer (NIP). Importantly, MIP performance was also assessed using the novel dual solvent system. The depletion of (R,S)-propranolol from the aqueous phase into the polymer containing organic phase was determined. When compared to control extractions containing no polymer the presence of MIP in the extracting solvent phase resulted in an increased extraction of (R,S)-propranolol from the aqueous phase. Importantly, this extraction was significantly greater in the presence of MIP when compared to NIP. This unique principle generates opportunities for MIP based extractions and chemical enrichments in industrial applications, offering commercial, ecological and practical advantages to traditional solvent extraction techniques. The

  19. Extraction-Scrub-Strip test results from the interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 9 Tank 21H qualification samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-23

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 9 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). The Salt Batch 9 characterization results were previously reported. An Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) test was performed to determine cesium distribution ratios (D(Cs)) and cesium concentration in the strip effluent and decontaminated salt solution (DSS) streams; this data will be used by Tank Farm Engineering to project a cesium decontamination factor (DF). This test used actual Tank 21H material, and a blend solvent prepared by SRNL that mimics the solvent composition currently being used at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The ESS test showed acceptable performance with an extraction D(Cs) value of 52.4. This value is consistent with results from previous salt batch ESS tests using similar solvent formulations. This compares well against the predicted value of 56.5 from a recently created D(Cs) model

  20. Effect of solvent and extraction time on the antioxidant properties of Citrus macroptera

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of solvents and different time intervals on the extractions of phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties of the pulp of the Citrus macroptera. The pulp of the fruit was extracted for one and two hours separately with four types of solvent namely- methanol, ethanol, acetone and water. Total phenolic content was determined by using Folin-Ceucalteu method, while ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), 1,1- diphenyl-2-picryl...

  1. Reactive Extraction of L (+ Tartaric Acid by Amberlite LA-2 in Different Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Inci

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of L(+ tartaric acid from aqueous solutions by amberlite LA-2 is a secondary amine mixture in different diluent solvents. Extraction equilibria of L(+ tartaric acid by amberlite LA-2 in 1-octanol, cyclohexane, isooctane, hexane, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK solvents at temperature 298.15 K have been measured. The batch extraction experiments distribution coefficients (D, loading factors ( Z and extraction efficiency (E were calculated. The maximum removal of L(+ tartaric acid is 91 % with MIBK and 0.92 mol.L-1 initial concentration of Amberlite LA-2.

  2. SOLVENT EFFECT ON EXTRACTION OF GALLIC ACID FROM AMALAKI CHURNA (EMBLICA OFFICINALIS Gaertn. TO REDUCE MATRIX EFFECT USING HPTLC AND UV-SPECTROSCOPY WITH 12 DIFFERENT NATURE SOLVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukla V.J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Standardization of Ayurvedic formulations is an important aspect for research in Indian medicine. In this era every Pharma company prefer to use pure extract of component for production of best product in short period of time. The literature survey reveals that no work has been reported for solvent selection of extraction of Ayurvedic drugs. Amalaki is one of the most useable ayurveda drug. So, the present study was selected with an aim to select solvent for extraction of component of interest. Standard for evaluating quality of Amalaki churna by employing various physico-chemical parameters. For solvent selection 12 different nature solvents are selected for extraction. Polar solvent selected are Water, Di methylsulfoxide (DMSO, Ethylene glycol, Acetonitrile, Di methyl formeamide (DMF and Methanol. Non polar solvents are Acetone, Acetic acid, Ethyl acetate, Chloroform, Di ethylether and Toluene. Extraction was done by maceration method. Results are taken by chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods. In observation component was easily extracted with less interfering component in non polar solvent. Gallic acid is component of interest for Amalaki and it is well extracted in Di ethyl ether as per result of chromatography and spectroscopy. Conclusion is that selection of solvent for extraction as per their component of interest from material.

  3. Extraction of Betulin, Trimyristin, Eugenol and Carnosic Acid Using Water-Organic Solvent Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulgentius N. Lugemwa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A solvent system consisting of ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water, in the volume ratio of 4.5:4.5:1, was developed and used to extract, at room temperature, betulin from white birch bark and antioxidants from spices (rosemary, thyme, sage, and oregano and white oak chips. In addition, under reflux conditions, trimyristin was extracted from nutmeg using the same solvent system, and eugenol from olives was extracted using a mixture of salt water and ethyl acetate. The protocol demonstrates the use of water in organic solvents to extract natural products from plants. Measurement of the free-radical scavenging activity using by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH indicated that the extraction of plant material using ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water (4.5:4.5:1, v/v/v was exhaustive when carried out at room temperature for 96 h.

  4. Exploiting Sequential Injection on-line Solvent Extraction/Back Extraction with Detection by ETAAS or ICPMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jianhua; Hansen, Elo Harald

    tolerances. With detection by ETAAS, separation/preconcentration by solvent extraction has enjoyed much use. However, this approach is not necessarily the optimal one since introduction of organic eluates directly into the graphite tube might lead to deteriorated reproducibility and lower sensitivity....... And for ICPMS, organics are prohibitive because they give rise to an unstable plasma, and excessive carbon deposited on the sampling and skimmer cones might result in a gradual loss of sensitivity. All of these difficulties can be readily overcome by using solvent extraction/back extraction. Surprisingly...

  5. Exploiting sequential injection on-line solvent extraction/back extraction with detection by ETAAS and ICPMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jianhua; Hansen, Elo Harald

    . With detection by ETAAS, separation/preconcentration by solvent extraction has enjoyed much use. However, this approach is not necessarily the optimal one since introduction of organic eluates directly into the graphite tube might lead to deteriorated reproducibility and lower sensitivity. And for ICPMS......, organics are prohibitive because they give rise to an unstable plasma, and excessive carbon deposited on the sampling and skimmer cones might result in a gradual loss of sensitivity. All of these difficulties can be readily overcome by using solvent extraction/back extraction. Surprisingly, this approach...

  6. Antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted organic solvent extracts of fruits, flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis L. from Jaffna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E Christy Jeyaseelan; S Jenothiny; MK Pathmanathan; JP Jeyadevan

    2012-01-01

    To reveal the antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted different cold organic solvent extracts of fruits, flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis (L. against) some pathogenic bacteria. Methods: Powders of fruits, flowers and leaves of L. inermis were continuously extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate and ethanol at ambient temperature. The dried extracts were prepared into different concentrations and tested for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method, and also the extracts were tested to determine the available phytochemicals.Results:Except DCM extract of flower all other test extracts revealed inhibitory effect on all tested bacteria and their inhibitory effect differed significantly (P<0.05). The highest inhibitory effect was showed by ethyl acetate extract of flower against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), and ethyl acetate extract of fruit on Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flower, fruit and leaf expressed inhibition even at 1 mg/ 100 μl against all test bacteria. Among the tested phytochemicals flavonoids were detected in all test extracts except DCM extract of flower.Conclusions:The study demonstrated that the ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of fruit and flower of L. inermis are potentially better source of antibacterial agents compared to leaf extracts of respective solvents.

  7. A green deep eutectic solvent-based aqueous two-phase system for protein extracting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi, E-mail: wyzss@hnu.edu.cn; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • A strategy for the protein purification with a deep eutectic solvent(DES)-based aqueous two-phase system. • Choline chloride-glycerin DES was selected as the extraction solvent. • Bovine serum albumin and trypsin were used as the analytes. • Aggregation phenomenon was detected in the mechanism research. - Abstract: As a new type of green solvent, deep eutectic solvent (DES) has been applied for the extraction of proteins with an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) in this work. Four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based DESs were synthesized to extract bovine serum albumin (BSA), and ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. Single factor experiments have been done to investigate the effects of the extraction process, including the amount of DES, the concentration of salt, the mass of protein, the shaking time, the temperature and PH value. Experimental results show 98.16% of the BSA could be extracted into the DES-rich phase in a single-step extraction under the optimized conditions. A high extraction efficiency of 94.36% was achieved, while the conditions were applied to the extraction of trypsin (Try). Precision, repeatability and stability experiments were studied and the relative standard deviations (RSD) of the extraction efficiency were 0.4246% (n = 3), 1.6057% (n = 3) and 1.6132% (n = 3), respectively. Conformation of BSA was not changed during the extraction process according to the investigation of UV–vis spectra, FT-IR spectra and CD spectra of BSA. The conductivity, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to explore the mechanism of the extraction. It turned out that the formation of DES–protein aggregates play a significant role in the separation process. All the results suggest that ChCl-based DES-ATPS are supposed to have the potential to provide new possibilities in the separation of proteins.

  8. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING ACTINIDE AND LANTHANIDE METAL VALUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, R.A.; Hyman, H.H.; Vogler, S.

    1962-08-14

    A process of countercurrently extracting an aqueous mineral acid feed solution for the separation of actinides from lanthanides dissolved therern is described. The feed solution is made acid-defrcient with alkali metal hydroxide prior to.contact with acid extractant; during extraction, however, acid is transferred from organic to aqueous solution and the aqueous solution gradually becomes acid. The acid-deficient phase ' of the process promotes the extraction of the actinides, while the latter acid phase'' of the process improves retention of the lanthanides in the aqueous solution. This provides for an improved separation. (AEC)

  9. Influence of solvents on extraction of U(Ⅵ) by N,N'-didecanoylpiperazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Extraction behavior of N, N'-didecanoylpiperazine (DDPEZ) for U(Ⅵ)in a series of solvents from aqueous nitric acid media was investigated for the first time.The dependence of distribution ratios on the concentration of aqueous nitric acid.extractant and temperature has been discussed. The increasing sequence of extractiveability of DDPEZ is given: chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, dimethylbenzene, toluene,benzene.``

  10. Chetoui olive leaf extracts: influence of the solvent type on the phenolics and antioxidant activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abaza, L.; Ben Youssef, N.; Manai, H.; Haddada, F.M.; Methenni, K.; Zarrouk, M.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the solvent type on the extraction of phenolics and the antioxidant properties of the extracts obtained from Chetoui olive leaves. Extraction was conducted at room temperature using four solvents: deionized water (ddH2O), 80% methanol (80% MeOH), 70% ethanol (70% EtOH), and 80% acetone. Total phenols and total flavonoids were measured using the Folin-Ciocalteau and aluminum chloride colorimetric methods, respectively. The antioxidant properties have been determined by two scavenging activity methods, DPPH and ABTS. (Author).

  11. Anticomplement activity of organic solvent extracts from Korea local Amarantaceae spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seil; Lee, Jai-Heon; Lee, Young-Choon; Moon, Hyung-In

    2012-04-01

    The study evaluated the anticomplement activity from various solvent extracts of nine Amarantaceae plants (Achyranthes japonica (Miq.) Nakai, Amaranthus mangostanus L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., Amaranthus spinosus L., Celosia argentea var. spicata., Amaranthus lividus L., Celosia cristata L., Amaranthus viridis L., Gomphrena globosa L.) from South Korea on the classical pathway. We have evaluated various organic solvent extract from nine Amarantaceae plants with regard to its anticomplement activity on the classical pathway. Achyranthes japonica chloroform extracts showed inhibitory activity against complement system with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) value of 73.1μg/ml. This is the first report of anticomplement activity from Amarantaceae plants.

  12. Recovery of zinc from low-grade zinc oxide ores by solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃文庆; 蓝卓越; 黎维中

    2003-01-01

    The recovery of zinc from low-grade zinc oxide ores with solvent extraction-electrowinning technique was investigated by using D2EHPA as extractant and 260# kerosene as diluent. The results show that it is possible to selectively leach zinc from the ores by heap leaching. The zinc concentration of leach solution in the first leaching cycle is 32.57 g/L, and in the sixteenth cycle the zinc concentration is 8.27g/L after solvent extraction. The leaching solution is subjected to solvent extraction, scrubbing and selective stripping for enrichment of zinc and removal of impurities. The pregnant zinc sulfate solution produced from the stripping cycle is suitable for zinc electrowinning.Extra-pure zinc metal was obtained in the electrowinning test under conventional conditions.

  13. Energy requirements for wet solvent extraction of lipids from microalgal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory J O

    2016-04-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae requires energy efficient processes for extracting and converting triacylglyceride lipids to fuel, compatible with coproduction of protein feeds and nutraceuticals. Wet solvent extraction involves mechanical cell rupture, lipid extraction via solvent contacting, physical phase separation, thermal solvent recovery, and transesterification. A detailed analysis of the effect of key process parameters on the parasitic energy demand of this process was performed. On a well-to-pump basis, between 16% and 320% of the resultant biodiesel energy was consumed depending solely on the process parameters. Highly positive energy balances can be achieved, but only if a correctly designed process is used. This requires processing concentrated biomass (ca 25%w/w) with a high triacylglyceride content (ca 30%w/w), and an efficient extraction process employing a non-polar solvent, low solvent-to-paste ratio, and efficient energy recovery. These requirements preclude many laboratory scale processes and polar co-solvents as viable options for large-scale biofuel production.

  14. Solvent extraction of vanadium from sulfuric acid solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mingyu; ZHANG Guiqing; WANG Xuewen; ZHANG Jialiang

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of vanadium(V) extracted from sulfuric acid solution was investigated using Cyanex 923 as an cxtractant. The effects of the concentration of Cyanex 923 and the pH of the solution were studied. The extraction of vanadium(V) increases with the increase of Cyanex 923 concentration and shaking time. Cyanex 923 can extract vanadium(V) fi'om sulfuric acid solution at low pH conditions, and the best pH conditions for exuaction of vanadium(V) are at pH 1.0-2.0. The species extracted into the organic phase is VO2HSO4 with one molecule of Cyanex 923. Equilibrium studies were used to assess the extraction efficiency of vanadium(V) recovery from the sulfuric acid solution.

  15. Minimum amount of extracting solvent of AB/BC countercurrent extraction separation using organic feed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程福祥; 吴声; 张玻; 刘艳; 王嵩龄; 廖春生; 严纯华

    2014-01-01

    For an AB/BC countercurrent extraction separation using organic feed, the conditions to have minimum amount of ex-tracting solvent (Smin) and minimum amount of scrubbing agent solution (Wmin) were discussed, and the formulae of bothSmin and Wmin were deduced. It was shown that only when the ratio of flowrate of central component B leaving aqueous outlet to that leaving organic outlet took a certain optimal value, the AB/BC separation could have Smin as well asWmin, and this optimal ratio was decided by the separation factors between the three components but independent of feed composition.Smin was only relative to the separation factor of A/C pair but regardless of the separation factors of other pairs as well as feed composition, whereasWmin was determined by the separation factors between the components together with feed composition. Meanwhile it was also found that the organic stream out of feed stage was same composition as the initial organic feed when the separation system was given by the two minimum amounts and its steady state was achieved. Finally the results above were used to design a LuYb/YbTm separation case and the stage-wise compositions of each component in both the organic and the aqueous phase at steady state were given by computer simulation.

  16. Effectivity of Beta vulgaris L. Extract with various Solvent Fractions to Aedes aegypti Larval Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutiara Widawati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue vector control is mostly done by using plant-based insecticides. Insecticides from the vegetable and fruit extracts of the leaves of plants that contain compounds alkaloids, saponins, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenoids, and polyphenols can be used as an alternative to naturally control Ae. aegypti. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the B. vulgaris L. extract larvacide against larvae of Ae. aegypti. The materials that been used was B. vulgaris L. fruit parts which was milled and dried to become a powder form. 800 g of dry powder was extracted by 70% methanol by percolation method with occasional stirring for 3 days. The extract was concentrated using an evaporator. 60 g remaining residue was dissolved in distilled water and re-extracted with diethyl ether, chloroform, and ethyl acetate. Each fraction extract was dried with anhydrous sodium sulfate and the solvent was distilled. The extract was tested qualitatively to determine the content of secondary metabolites. Larvacide test performed by dissolving each extracts in dimetilsulphoxide (DMSO at concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 1%. The larvae used was larval of Ae. aegypti age of seven days. Death larvae counted every day for seven days to determine the effect of the contact. Tests carried out at a temperature of 27±1°C by immersing 25 larvae at each concentration of the extract with 50 mL volume and three replications was performed. The data obtained were analyzed further with different test. The results showed that fruit extract contains flavonoids, alkoloid, sterols, triterpenes, saponins and tannins. Highest mortality happened which was 82.5% and the lowest mortality happened with a concentration of 0.1% diethyl ether extract fraction. The extracts that are dissolved in various solvent fractions have not been effective as a larvacide until the highest concentration which was 1%. Methanol and polar solvent extracts of the fruit has a larvacide potency a bit

  17. Options for the recovery of cerium by solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldenhoff, K.H. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports the results of an experimental program to examine the use of various commercial reagents for the extraction of cerium (IV) from sulphate solutions. Extractants tested include organophosphorus esters (TOPO, Cyanex 923 and Cyanex 925), organophosphorus acids (DEHPA, lonquest 801 and Cyanex 272) and high molecular weight amine, Alamine 336. The suitability of reagents is assessed in terms of process relevant criteria such as extraction dependence on acidity, selectivity over other rare earths and thorium, stability of reagent towards oxidation and loading characteristics. (author) 15 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  18. POLY(AMINOMETHYLENEPHOSPHONIC ACID FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METAL IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M’hamed Kaid

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diaminododecyltetramethylenetetraphosphonic acid (DADTMTPA has been investigated in liquid - liquid extraction of Zn (II and Cu (II in acetate media. The extraction of both cations was carried out in different media with the addition of CH3COONa, CH3COOH, HCl and H2SO4 at different pH values. The maximum extraction yield for copper is 70% after addition of 10 mg of sodium acetate and for zinc is 30% after addition of acetic acid at pHi = 5.5, in one step.

  19. Substitution of carcinogenic solvent dichloromethane for the extraction of volatile compounds in a fat-free model food system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayot, Nathalie; Lafarge, Céline; Bou-Maroun, Elias; Cayot, Philippe

    2016-07-22

    Dichloromethane is known as a very efficient solvent, but, as other halogenated solvents, is recognized as a hazardous product (CMR substance). The objective of the present work is to propose substitution solvent for the extraction of volatile compounds. The most important physico-chemical parameters in the choice of an appropriate extraction solvent of volatile compounds are reviewed. Various solvents are selected on this basis and on their hazard characteristics. The selected solvents, safer than dichloromethane, are compared using the extraction efficiency of volatile compounds from a model food product able to interact with volatile compounds. Volatile compounds with different hydrophobicity are used. High extraction yields were positively correlated with high boiling points and high Log Kow values of volatile compounds. Mixtures of solvents such as azeotrope propan-2-one/cyclopentane, azeotrope ethyl acetate/ethanol, and mixture ethyl acetate/ethanol (3:1, v/v) gave higher extraction yields than those obtained with dichloromethane.

  20. Optimization of solvent extraction of shea butter (Vitellaria paradoxa) using response surface methodology and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajala, E O; Aberuagba, F; Olaniyan, A M; Onifade, K R

    2016-01-01

    Shea butter (SB) was extracted from its kernel by using n-hexane as solvent in an optimization study. This was to determine the optima operating variables that would give optimum yield of SB and to study the effect of solvent on the physico-chemical properties and chemical composition of SB extracted using n-hexane. A Box-behnken response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the optimization study while statistical analysis using ANOVA was used to test the significance of the variables for the process. The variables considered for this study were: sample weight (g), solvent volume (ml) and extraction time (min). The physico-chemical properties of SB extracted were determined using standard methods and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for the chemical composition. The results of RSM analysis showed that the three variables investigated have significant effect (p butter extracted using traditional method (SBT) showed that it is a more suitable raw material for food, biodiesel production, cosmetics, medicinal and pharmaceutical purposes than shea butter extracted using solvent extraction method (SBS). Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) results obtained for the two samples were similar to what was obtainable from other vegetable oil.

  1. 1/6TH SCALE STRIP EFFLUENT FEED TANK-MIXING RESULTS USING MCU SOLVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this task was to determine if mixing was an issue for the entrainment and dispersion of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) solvent in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT). The MCU strip effluent stream containing the Cs removed during salt processing will be transferred to the DWPF for immobilization in HLW glass. In lab-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing, mixing of the solvent in the dilute nitric acid solution proved problematic, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to perform scaled SEFT mixing tests to evaluate whether the problem was symptomatic of the lab-scale set-up or of the solvent. The solvent levels tested were 228 and 235 ppm, which represented levels near the estimated DWPF solvent limit of 239 ppm in 0.001M HNO{sub 3} solution. The 239 ppm limit was calculated by Norato in X-CLC-S-00141. The general approach for the mixing investigation was to: (1) Investigate the use of fluorescent dyes to aid in observing the mixing behavior. Evaluate and compare the physical properties of the fluorescent dyed MCU solvents to the baseline Oak Ridge CSSX solvent. Based on the data, use the dyed MCU solvent that best approximates the physical properties. (2) Use approximately a 1/6th linear scale of the SEFT to replicate the internal configuration for DWPF mixing. (3) Determine agitator speed(s) for scaled testing based on the DWPF SEFT mixing speed. (4) Perform mixing tests using the 1/6th SEFT and determine any mixing issues (entrainment/dispersion, accumulation, adhesion) through visual observations and by pulling samples to assess uniformity. The mixing tests used MCU solvent fabricated at SRNL blended with Risk Reactor DFSB-K43 fluorescent dye. This dyed SRNL MCU solvent had equivalent physical properties important to mixing as compared to the Oak Ridge baseline solvent, blended easily with the MCU solvent, and provided an excellent visual aid.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Quentin C. Berg; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Jason C. Hissam; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Abha Saddawi; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2006-03-07

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of carbon electrodes for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells (DCFC), and on carbon foam composites used in ballistic armor, as well as the hydrotreatment of solvents used in the basic solvent extraction process. A major goal is the production of 1500 pounds of binder pitch, corresponding to about 3000 pounds of hydrotreated solvent.

  3. Phytochemical and antioxidant properties of different solvent extracts of Kirkia wilmsii tubers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kayini Chigayo; Paul Eanas Lesedi Mojapelo; Simon Mnyakeni-Moleele; Jane Masiiwa Misihairabgwi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine suitable phytochemical extraction solvents, screen for phyto-chemicals, determine the total phenol and flavonoid contents and the antioxidant activities of different solvent extracts of Kirkia wilmsii (K. wilmsii), an ethnomedicine in South Africa. Methods: Extractions were performed from dried tubers of the K. wilmsii plant, using several solvents and varying extraction times. Extract yields were determined and suitable extraction solvents were selected. Total phenol and flavonoid contents of the extracts were determined spectrophotometrically using gallic acid and quercetin as standards. The free radical scav-enging activity of the extracts was investigated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical. Results: Phytochemical screening confirmed the presence of phenolics, flavonoids, terpe-noids, tannins, cardenolide deoxy sugars and reducing sugars. Of the 12 solvent extracts used, six gave yields higher than 5%, while the other six gave yields less than 1%. The highest extract yield of 52.9%was obtained using 80%methanol while the lowest yield of 7.3%was obtained using ethanol at 60 min. The 80%methanol, methanol/chloroform/water (12:5:3) and 60%methanol extracts were significantly higher than those of ethanol, methanol and water (P<0.05). Total phenolic content recorded extracts ranged from (45.32 ± 0.50) to (122.84 ± 0.31) mg gallic acid equivalent per gram. A maximum total flavonoid content of (917.02 ± 0.10) mg quercetin equivalent per gram and a minimum of (206.26 ± 0.10) mg quercetin equivalent per gram were recorded for methanol and water, respectively. The flavonoid content for methanol was significantly higher than all the other extracts (P<0.05). The scavenging profiles of K. wilmsii extracts were significantly lower (P<0.05) than that of ascorbic acid and IC50 values ranged from 129.94 mg/mL for methanol to 225.04 mg/mL for water. An IC50 value of 56.52 mg/mL was obtained with ascorbic acid. Conclusions: Ethanol, methanol

  4. ANALYSIS OF BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF MARINE ALGAE KAPPAPHYCUS ALVAREZII USING THREE SOLVENT EXTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prabha*, D.J. Prakash and P.N. Sudha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The seaweeds are economically valuable resources, used as food, fodder, fertilizer and medicine and thus useful to mankind in many ways. In the present study, Kappaphycus alvarezii, a marine alga, has been analysed for the presence of bioactive products using three solvent extracts. Antimicrobial activity was also done using the same extracts of seaweed. The results revealed that the selected seaweed has active secondary metabolites and also exhibited antimicrobial activity, mainly in the methanolic extract of Kappaphycus alvarezii.

  5. Solvent extraction of uranium(Ⅵ)and europium(Ⅲ)from nitrate media by picolinamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Bo-Rong; CHENG Qian; CAO Wei-Guo; XIANG Qun; LI Yu; ZHAO Yu-Jia

    2005-01-01

    The solvent extraction of uranium(Ⅵ) and europium(Ⅲ) from nitric acid solution was studied with picolinamide dissolved in ethylene dichloride. The distribution ratios of U(Ⅵ) and Eu(Ⅲ) as a function of aqueous HNO3 concentration, extractant concentration in organic phase and temperature as well as the salting-out agent concentration have been measured. The experiment results show that picolinamide has higher extractability for U(Ⅵ1)than for Eu(Ⅲ). The composition of extracted species, equilibrium constants and enthalpies of extraction reaction have also been presented.

  6. Research and Application Progress in Countercurrent Solvent Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾江涛; 吴声; 廖春生; 严纯华

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the recent progress made by Peking University is briefly introduced. Based on Theory of Countercurrent Extraction established by Prof. Guangxian Xu, the static equilibrium and dynamic process for two- and three-outlet countercurrent extractions, and designed the optimized parameters for the real cascades to separate different rare earth minerals, which can be scaled-up to the industrial process without any further experimental verification were systematically investigated. In order to stabilize the quality of products and improve the capability of automation for extraction process, we have also established an 241Am stimulated X-ray fluorescent energy dispersive method to detect the elemental composition in both organic and aqueous phases, which can be used as an on-line analysis method in practice. Furthermore, the expert system and the control software with open- and close-loop models have been set up. Combined with the detected data from on-line analysis, the flow-rates of extracting, feeding, scrubbing and stripping solutions can be controlled in an optimum status for the industrial cascades. In addition, we have developed a new multi-input and multi-output countercurrent extraction process for separating multi-component rare earth mixture with lower chemical cost and pollution.

  7. Thermal Properties of Simulated and High-Level Waste Solutions Used for the Solvent Extraction Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2001-06-27

    Researchers measured the heat capacity and thermal conductivity of supernate from a blend of Tank 37H and 44F, of a simulant of this blend, and of a simulant specifically designed for solvent extraction experiments. The measured heat capacity of the blend from the Tanks 37H and 44F equaled 0.871 cal/(g degrees C). The simulant of this blend produced an identical result. The heat capacity of the simulant designed for solvent extraction testing equaled 0.859 cal/(g degrees C). All three solutions have thermal conductivities in the range of 0.54 to 0.6 Watts/(m degrees C). The slight variation in the thermophysical properties of these solutions successfully explains the different flowmeter readings observed during the real waste demonstration of the solvent extraction technology.

  8. Predictive model for ionic liquid extraction solvents for rare earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabda, Mariusz; Oleszek, Sylwia; Panigrahi, Mrutyunjay; Kozak, Dmytro; Eckert, Franck; Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to select the most effective ionic liquid extraction solvents for dysprosium (III) fluoride using a theoretical approach. Conductor-like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS), based on quantum chemistry and the statistical thermodynamics of predefined DyF3-ionic liquid systems, was applied to reach the target. Chemical potentials of the salt were predicted in 4,400 different ionic liquids. On the base of these predictions set of ionic liquids' ions, manifesting significant decrease of the chemical potentials, were selected. Considering the calculated physicochemical properties (hydrophobicity, viscosity) of the ionic liquids containing these specific ions, the most effective extraction solvents for liquid-liquid extraction of DyF3 were proposed. The obtained results indicate that the COSMO-RS approach can be applied to quickly screen the affinity of any rare earth element for a large number of ionic liquid systems, before extensive experimental tests.

  9. Predictive model for ionic liquid extraction solvents for rare earth elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabda, Mariusz; Oleszek, Sylwia [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 2,1-Katahira, 2-Chome, 980-8577 Sendai (Japan); Institute of Environmental Engineering of the Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. M. Sklodowskiej-Curie 34, 41-819, Zabrze (Poland); Panigrahi, Mrutyunjay; Kozak, Dmytro; Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 2,1-Katahira, 2-Chome, 980-8577 Sendai (Japan); Eckert, Franck [COSMOlogic GmbH & Co KG, Imbacher Weg 46, 50379 Leverkusen (Germany)

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of our study was to select the most effective ionic liquid extraction solvents for dysprosium (III) fluoride using a theoretical approach. Conductor-like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS), based on quantum chemistry and the statistical thermodynamics of predefined DyF{sub 3}-ionic liquid systems, was applied to reach the target. Chemical potentials of the salt were predicted in 4,400 different ionic liquids. On the base of these predictions set of ionic liquids’ ions, manifesting significant decrease of the chemical potentials, were selected. Considering the calculated physicochemical properties (hydrophobicity, viscosity) of the ionic liquids containing these specific ions, the most effective extraction solvents for liquid-liquid extraction of DyF{sub 3} were proposed. The obtained results indicate that the COSMO-RS approach can be applied to quickly screen the affinity of any rare earth element for a large number of ionic liquid systems, before extensive experimental tests.

  10. PURIFICATION OF COBALT ANOLYTE USING THE NOVEL SOLVENT EXTRACTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.F. Shen; W.Y. Xue; W. Y. Niu

    2003-01-01

    In present research, a novel extractant system (D2EHPA + naphthenic acid +pyridine-ester) was used to purify cobalt anolyte and a simulated industrial produc-tion were carried out. This novel extraction system can extract Cu and/or Ni againstCo from chloride medium solutions at pH range of 2.5-4.5. About 2g/l nickel and0.2g/l copper were removed from the cobalt chloride anolyte containing about 100g/lcobalt and 200g/l chloride ions respectively, the raffinate contains nickel and copperless than 0.03g/l and 0. 0003g/l respectively and can be used to electrolyze high-puritycobalt. About 5.5t cobalt anolyte was purified in the simulation industrial experimentand kilogram quantities of cobalt of 99.98% purity and about 95% recovery have beenproduced.

  11. Efficient solvent extraction of antioxidant-rich extract from a tropical diatom,Chaetoceros calcitrans (Paulsen) Takano 1968

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Chern Foo; Fatimah Md Yusoff; Maznah Ismail; Mahiran Basri; Nicholas Mun Hoe Khong; Kim Wei Chan; Sook Kun Yau

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To compare thein vitro antioxidant capacity of a diatom,Chaetoceros calcitrans (C. calcitrans) extracted using six types of solvents. Methods:Each extract was evaluated in terms of extraction yield, total carotenoid, fucoxanthin content, total phenolic and antioxidant capacities (DPPH• andABTS•+ scavenging activity and iron chelating activity). Results: The methanol extract exhibited the highest yield [(22.71 ± 0.96) g/100 g dry weight (DW)], total carotenoid [(4.46 ± 0.36) mg/g DW], total phenolic [(2.49 ± 0.08) mg gallic acid equivalents/g DW] and second highest fucoxanthin content [(2.08 ± 0.03) mg fucoxanthin/g DW] as compared to other solvent extracts. Methanolic extract also exhibited significantly higher (P Conclusions: Methanol was the recommended solvent for the production of antioxidant rich extract fromC. calcitrans. Both carotenoids and phenolic acids were found to be positively correlated to the antioxidant capacities ofC. calcitrans. Lead bioactives confirmed by subsequent high performance liquid chromatography studies were fucoxanthin, gallic acid and protocatechuic acid.

  12. Efficient solvent extraction of antioxidant-rich extract from a tropical diatom,Chaetoceros calcitrans (Paulsen) Takano 1968简

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su; Chern; Foo; Fatimah; Md.Yusoff; Maznah; Ismail; Mahiran; Basri; Nicholas; Mun; Hoe; Khong; Kim; Wei; Chan; Sook; Kun; Yau

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the in vitro antioxidant capacity of a diatom, Chaetoceros calcitrans(C. calcitrans) extracted using six types of solvents.Methods: Each extract was evaluated in terms of extraction yield, total carotenoid,fucoxanthin content, total phenolic and antioxidant capacities(DPPH and ABTS +scavenging activity and iron chelating activity).Results: The methanol extract exhibited the highest yield [(22.71 ± 0.96) g/100 g dry weight(DW)], total carotenoid [(4.46 ± 0.36) mg/g DW], total phenolic [(2.49 ± 0.08) mg gallic acid equivalents/g DW] and second highest fucoxanthin content [(2.08 ± 0.03) mg fucoxanthin/g DW] as compared to other solvent extracts. Methanolic extract also exhibited significantly higher(P < 0.05) scavenging(DPPH, ABTS +) and iron chelating activities.Conclusions: Methanol was the recommended solvent for the production of antioxidant rich extract from C. calcitrans. Both carotenoids and phenolic acids were found to be positively correlated to the antioxidant capacities of C. calcitrans. Lead bioactives confirmed by subsequent high performance liquid chromatography studies were fucoxanthin, gallic acid and protocatechuic acid.

  13. Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and solvent extraction of papaya seed oil: yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaram, Shadi; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd

    2013-10-10

    The main objective of the current work was to evaluate the suitability of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) for the recovery of oil from papaya seed as compared to conventional extraction techniques (i.e., Soxhlet extraction (SXE) and solvent extraction (SE)). In the present study, the recovery yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil obtained from different extraction methods and conditions were compared. Results indicated that both solvent extraction (SE, 12 h/25 °C) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) methods recovered relatively high yields (79.1% and 76.1% of total oil content, respectively). Analysis of fatty acid composition revealed that the predominant fatty acids in papaya seed oil were oleic (18:1, 70.5%-74.7%), palmitic (16:0, 14.9%-17.9%), stearic (18:0, 4.50%-5.25%), and linoleic acid (18:2, 3.63%-4.6%). Moreover, the most abundant triacylglycerols of papaya seed oil were triolein (OOO), palmitoyl diolein (POO) and stearoyl oleoyl linolein (SOL). In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) significantly (p composition of papaya seed oil extracted by different extraction methods (SXE, SE and UAE) and conditions.

  14. Effects of extraction solvent on fucose content in fucoidan extracted from brown seaweed (Sargassum sp.) from Pulau Langkawi, Kedah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Bibi Marliana; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan; Joe, Lim Seng

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of extraction solvent on the fucose content in fucoidan that had been isolated from Sargassum sp., which is a type of brown seaweed that was harvested in Pulau Langkawi, Kedah, Malaysia. There were three different solvents that were used in the extraction process in order to isolate the crude fucoidan including the hydrochloric acid, HCl, calcium chloride, CaCl2 solution and also the papain ezyme solution. Other extraction parameters that were the extraction temperature and time were fixed at three hours, at 45°C respectively. It was found that there was a significant different (pfucoidan that had been extracted by using the enzymatic extraction (papain) with those were extracted by HCl and CaCl2 solution. However, the fucose content in fucoidan been extracted with HCl and CaCl2 solution showed no significant different (p> 0.05) amongst each other. Hence, this study indicated that the extraction of fucoidan using HCl tend to possess higher fucose content which will increase the potential of the extraction method to be used in the industries such as pharmaceuticals as well as the nutraceuticals.

  15. Water as a green solvent combined with different techniques for extraction of essential oil from lavender flowers

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Using water as a green solvent with a variable geometry makes use of physical and chemical phenomena that are fundamentally different from those applied in conventional extraction techniques such as hydro-distillation, steam distillation or solvent extraction. Advantages and drawbacks of using water as a solvent with different physical and chemical states have been compared. A total of ten extraction techniques: hydro-distillation (HD), steam distillation (SD), turbo-hydro-distillation (THD),...

  16. Mechanism of gold solvent extraction from aurocyanide solution by quaternary amines: models of extracting species based on hydrogen bonding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism of gold solvent extraction from KAu(CN)2 solution was investigated by means of FTIR, EXAFS, ICP and radioactive tracer methods. Two extraction systems were studied, namely N263-tributyl phosphate(TBP)-n-dodecane and N263-iso-octanol-n-dodecane. High-reso- lution FT IR spectroscopy indicated that the CN stretching vibrations of the two extraction systems differred greatly. In order to interpret the significant difference in CN stretching vibrations, two extracting species models are proposed supramolecular structures based on the formation of hydrogen bonds between Au(CN)2- and modifiers such as TBP and iso-octanol.

  17. Extractant selection strategy for solvent-impregnated resins in fermentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, C. van den; Roelands, C.P.M.; Bussmann, P.J.Th.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Verdoes, D.; Wielen, L. van der

    2008-01-01

    The application of extractants in whole-cell biocatalysis can have a positive impact on industrial fermentations, in terms of productivity, total amount of product produced, and cell growth. When a product is continuously removed from the microorganism surroundings, product inhibition will be dimini

  18. Isotope effects of hafnium in solvent extraction using crown ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Moriyama, Hirotake [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Hirata, Takafumi [Laboratory for Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishizawa, Kazushige [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Hafnium isotopes were fractionated in a liquid-liquid extraction system by using seven types of crown ethers, tributyl phosphate, or {omicron}-diethoxybenzene. The largest isotope effect was observed in the isotope pair of {sup 177}Hf-{sup 179}Hf with dibenzo-24-crown-8; the isotope enrichment factor was observed to be 0.0129{+-}0.0032. (author)

  19. Stable Isotope-Assisted Evaluation of Different Extraction Solvents for Untargeted Metabolomics of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Doppler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of extraction protocols for untargeted metabolomics approaches is still difficult. We have applied a novel stable isotope-assisted workflow for untargeted LC-HRMS-based plant metabolomics , which allows for the first time every detected feature to be considered for method evaluation. The efficiency and complementarity of commonly used extraction solvents, namely 1 + 3 (v/v mixtures of water and selected organic solvents (methanol, acetonitrile or methanol/acetonitrile 1 + 1 (v/v, with and without the addition of 0.1% (v/v formic acid were compared. Four different wheat organs were sampled, extracted and analysed by LC-HRMS. Data evaluation was performed with the in-house-developed MetExtract II software and R. With all tested solvents a total of 871 metabolites were extracted in ear, 785 in stem, 733 in leaf and 517 in root samples, respectively. Between 48% (stem and 57% (ear of the metabolites detected in a particular organ were found with all extraction mixtures, and 127 of 996 metabolites were consistently shared between all extraction agent/organ combinations. In aqueous methanol, acidification with formic acid led to pronounced pH dependency regarding the precision of metabolite abundance and the number of detectable metabolites, whereas extracts of acetonitrile-containing mixtures were less affected. Moreover, methanol and acetonitrile have been found to be complementary with respect to extraction efficiency. Interestingly, the beneficial properties of both solvents can be combined by the use of a water-methanol-acetonitrile mixture for global metabolite extraction instead of aqueous methanol or aqueous acetonitrile alone.

  20. Determination of Technetium-99 in Environmental Samples by Solvent Extraction at Controlled Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Q.J.; Aarkrog, A.; Dahlgaard, H.

    1989-01-01

    Distribution coefficients of technetium and ruthenium are determined under different conditions with CCl4, cyclohexanone, and 5% tri-isooctylamine (TIOA)/xylene. A method for analyzing 99Tc in environmental samples has been developed by solvent extraction in which the valences of technetium...... are subsequently separated by solvent extraction with cyclohexanone and 5% TIOA/xylene. The decontamination of the procedure is 1.35 .cntdot. 105 for 103Ru and 1.66 .cntdot. 105 for 110mAg. The chemical yield of technetium-99 is 55%....

  1. Solvent extraction of scandium from lateritic nickel- cobalt ores using different organic reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferizoğlu Ece

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scandium is the most important and strategic metal that can be recovered as a by-product from lateritic nickel-cobalt ores. In this research, different extractants were investigated in order to extract scandium from a sulfate medium by a using a solvent extraction method. Generally, the organic extractants are classified as acidic, neutral and basic organophosphorus compounds. However, in solvent extraction of scandium, the acidic and neutral organophosphorus compounds are preferred due to their higher extraction efficiencies. Thus, the aim of the present study was to compare the scandium extraction efficiencies of some acidic and neutral organic reagents. For this reason, Ionquest 290 (Bis(2,4,4-trimethylpenthyl phosphonic acid, DEHPA (Di(2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid, Cyanex 272 ((Bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid which are acidic organophosphorus compounds, and Cyanex 923 (Trialkylphosphine oxide, which is a neutral organophosphorus compound, were used. The extraction capacities of these organics were studied with respect to the extractant concentration at same pH and phase ratio. As a result of the study, DEHPA was found to have higher scandium extraction efficiency with lower iron extraction at pH = 0.55 at a phase ratio of 10:1 = A:O.

  2. Selective Extraction of Bio-oil from Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Salix psammophila by Organic Solvents with Different Polarities through Multistep Extraction Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao Yang; Hang Lyu; Kaifei Chen; Xiangdong Zhu; Shicheng Zhang; Jianmin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Bio-oil obtained from hydrothermal liquefaction of Salix psammophila is a very complicated mixture with some highly valued chemicals. In order to separate the chemicals from bio-oil, solvent extraction using nine solvents with different polarities were investigated in detail. The bio-oil extraction yield of the nine solvents were from high to low: tetrahydrofuran > toluene > ethyl acetate > acetone > ether > methylene chloride > methanol > petroleum ether > n-hexane. Based on their extraction...

  3. Efficient solvent extraction of antioxidant-rich extract from a tropical diatom, Chaetoceros calcitrans (Paulsen Takano 1968

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Chern Foo

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Methanol was the recommended solvent for the production of antioxidant rich extract from C. calcitrans. Both carotenoids and phenolic acids were found to be positively correlated to the antioxidant capacities of C. calcitrans. Lead bioactives confirmed by subsequent high performance liquid chromatography studies were fucoxanthin, gallic acid and protocatechuic acid.

  4. Review on aggregation of acid extractants in solvent extraction of metal ions: remark on the general model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The aggregation behavior of various acid extractants in the solvent extraction systems of metal ions is re-examined and explained according to knowledge obtained in recent work. The conclusions are as follows. (1) Complexes formed by the extractants and metal ions can form reversed micelles in organic diluents, depending on the microstructures of the complexes. The dimers of the acid extractant cannot percolate to the metal-extractant aggregates, and the acid-salt complexes are always formed in the aggregates. The reversed micelles or the W/O microemulsions formed by different species cannot be associated with each other to form a unified aggregate. (2) In solvent extraction systems, hydration of the extractants and metal ions can be considered as the driving force of forming reversed micelles. (3) Information of the first approach to the insight of the bicontinuous microemulsion of NaDEHP shows that various components in the aqueous phase behave confined and very similar to the typical AOT/n-heptane W/O microemulsions. (4) In the extraction of lanthanide ions by the W/O microemulsion of sodium naphthenate, the saponification is a process of forming reversed micelle or W/O microemulsion, while the extraction step is a process of destroying reversed micelles or W/O microemulsion droplets.

  5. CHEMICAL FIXATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    OpenAIRE

    SASAMOTO, Naoki; MASHIMO, Miki; MATSUMOTO, Shigeno; Yamamoto, Hideki; SHIBATA, Junji

    1996-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to create a chemical fixation process,where carbon dioxide and sodium chloride solution are converted to sodium hydrogen carbonate and hydrochloric acid. Because the reaction has a large and positive free energy change,it does not proceed unless a suitable condition is established.The reaction is able to proceed if hydrochloric acid,which is one of the reaction products,is removed from the reaction system by extraction with amine.Stripping of hydrochloric acid ...

  6. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Oil Extraction from Jatropha curcas L. Using Ethanol as a Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Bispo dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study the yield and kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the oil extraction process from Jatropha curcas L. using ethanol as a solvent were evaluated for different temperatures, moisture contents of the solid phase, and particle sizes. The extraction process yield increased with contact time of solid particles with the solvent until reaching equilibrium (saturation of the solvent, for all the temperatures, moisture contents, and average particle sizes. These parameters significantly influenced (95% confidence the extracted oil yield. A convective mass transfer model was used to simulate the extraction process and estimate the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. For all conditions evaluated, values of oil yield in the liquid phase close to equilibrium were obtained in approximately 20 min. The variations of enthalpy and entropy were positive, indicating that the process is endothermic and irreversible. Values obtained for the variation in Gibbs free energy showed that the extraction process using ethanol as a solvent is spontaneous and thermodynamically favorable for the moisture content of 0%, where the smaller the average particle size the greater the spontaneity of the process.

  7. Cogeneration of biodiesel and nontoxic cottonseed meal from cottonseed processed by two-phase solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Junfeng [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Fine Petrochemical Engineering, Jiangsu Polytechnic University, Changzhou 213016 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Yun, Zhi; Shi, Haixian [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2010-12-15

    In the present work, the preparation of biodiesel from cottonseed oil produced by two-phase solvent extraction (TSE) was studied. The experimental results of TSE process of cottonseed showed that the optimal extraction conditions were 30 g samples, 240 mL extraction solvent mixture and methanol/petroleum ether volume ratio 60:40, extraction temperature 30 C, extraction time 30 min. Under the extraction conditions, the extraction rate of cottonseed oil could achieve 98.3%, the free fatty acid (FFA) and water contents of cottonseed oil were reduced to 0.20% and 0.037%, respectively, which met the requirement of alkali-catalyzed transesterification. The free gossypol (FG) content in cottonseed meal produced from two-phase solvent extraction could reduce to 0.014% which was far below the FAO standard. And the nontoxic cottonseed meal could be used as animal protein feed resources. After the TSE process of cottonseed, the investigations were carried out on transesterification of methanol with oil-petroleum ether solution coming from TSE process in the presence of sodium hydroxide (CaO) as the solid base catalyst. The influences of weight ratio of petroleum ether to cottonseed oil, reaction temperature, molar ratio of methanol to oil, alkali catalyst amount and reaction time on cottonseed oil conversion were respectively investigated by mono-factor experiments. The conversion of cottonseed oil into fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) could achieve 98.6% with 3:1 petroleum ether/oil weight ratio, 65 C reaction temperature, 9:1 methanol/oil mole ratio, 4% (catalyst/oil weight ratio, w/w) solid base catalyst amount and 3 h reaction time. The properties of FAME product prepared from cottonseed oil produced by two-phase solvent extraction met the ASTM specifications for biodiesel. (author)

  8. Cogeneration of biodiesel and nontoxic cottonseed meal from cottonseed processed by two-phase solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Junfeng, E-mail: qianjunfeng80@126.co [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Fine Petrochemical Engineering, Jiangsu Polytechnic University, Changzhou 213016 (China) and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Yun Zhi; Shi Haixian [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2010-12-15

    In the present work, the preparation of biodiesel from cottonseed oil produced by two-phase solvent extraction (TSE) was studied. The experimental results of TSE process of cottonseed showed that the optimal extraction conditions were 30 g samples, 240 mL extraction solvent mixture and methanol/petroleum ether volume ratio 60:40, extraction temperature 30 deg. C, extraction time 30 min. Under the extraction conditions, the extraction rate of cottonseed oil could achieve 98.3%, the free fatty acid (FFA) and water contents of cottonseed oil were reduced to 0.20% and 0.037%, respectively, which met the requirement of alkali-catalyzed transesterification. The free gossypol (FG) content in cottonseed meal produced from two-phase solvent extraction could reduce to 0.014% which was far below the FAO standard. And the nontoxic cottonseed meal could be used as animal protein feed resources. After the TSE process of cottonseed, the investigations were carried out on transesterification of methanol with oil-petroleum ether solution coming from TSE process in the presence of sodium hydroxide (CaO) as the solid base catalyst. The influences of weight ratio of petroleum ether to cottonseed oil, reaction temperature, molar ratio of methanol to oil, alkali catalyst amount and reaction time on cottonseed oil conversion were respectively investigated by mono-factor experiments. The conversion of cottonseed oil into fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) could achieve 98.6% with 3:1 petroleum ether/oil weight ratio, 65 deg. C reaction temperature, 9:1 methanol/oil mole ratio, 4% (catalyst/oil weight ratio, w/w) solid base catalyst amount and 3 h reaction time. The properties of FAME product prepared from cottonseed oil produced by two-phase solvent extraction met the ASTM specifications for biodiesel.

  9. Solvent extraction of cadmium and zinc from sulphate solutions: Comparison of mechanical agitation and ultrasonic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabor, Mahboubeh; Ahmadi, Ali; Zilouei, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    This research was conducted to evaluate the potential of ultrasonic irradiation during the solvent extraction of metals, and comparing its efficiency with a mechanically stirred system (MSSX). The simultaneous extraction of zinc and cadmium from sulphate solutions was investigated by di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an organic extractant which was diluted (20%) in kerosene at the organic: aqueous phase ratio of 1:1 and the temperature of 25°C. The influence of some critical parameters, including contact time, solution pH, ultrasonic power, and zinc/cadmium ratio were investigated on the extraction of the metals. Results show that D2EHPA selectively extract zinc rather than cadmium in both mechanically and ultrasonically mixed systems. It was also found that increase of ultrasonic power from 10 to 120W cause a small decrease in zinc extraction; while, at low and high levels of the induced power, cadmium extraction was significantly decreased. Results also show that maximum extraction amounts of zinc (88.7%) and cadmium (68.2%) by the MSSX system occurred at the pH of 3 and the contact times of 3 and 20min, respectively. Although capability of extraction in the ultrasonically assisted solvent extraction (USAX) system for both metals was higher, the selectivity was lower than that of MSSX system under different conditions especially in high zinc/cadmium ratios. It can be concluded that physical effects (i.e. mixing) inducing at low ultrasonic powers (below 60W) mainly results in increasing solvent extraction rate, while the chemical actions applied at the higher powers have a negative outcome on the extraction rate particularly for cadmium.

  10. Determination of terpenoid content in pine by organic solvent extraction and fast-GC analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Elizabeth Harman-Ware

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoids, naturally occurring compounds derived from isoprene units present in pine oleoresin, are a valuable source of chemicals used in solvents, fragrances, flavors and have shown potential use as a biofuel. This paper describes a method to extract and analyze the terpenoids present in loblolly pine saplings and pine lighter wood. Various extraction solvents were tested over different times and temperatures. Samples were analyzed by pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry before and after extractions to monitor the extraction efficiency. The pyrolysis studies indicated that the optimal extraction method used a 1:1 hexane/acetone solvent system at 22°C for 1 h. Extracts from the hexane/acetone experiments were analyzed using a low thermal mass modular accelerated column heater for fast-GC/FID analysis. The most abundant terpenoids from the pine samples were quantified, using standard curves, and included the monoterpenes, α- and β- pinene, camphene and δ-carene. Sesquiterpenes analyzed included caryophyllene, humulene and α-bisabolene. Diterpenoid resin acids were quantified in derivatized extractions, including pimaric, isopimaric, levopimaric, palustric, dehydroabietic, abietic and neoabietic acids.

  11. Effect of different format-solvent rosemary extracts (Rosmarinus officinalis) on frozen chicken nuggets quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocío Teruel, M; Garrido, M Dolores; Espinosa, Miriam C; Linares, M Belén

    2015-04-01

    Three kinds of Rosmarinus officinalis extract (powder-acetone, liquid-methanol, liquid-acetone) were used to examine the effects of format-solvent on the active compounds extracted (total phenolic, carnosol and carnosic acid content) and antioxidant activity (FRAP, ABTS). The results showed that both, as the format but also the solvent used, had significant effect on the parameters analyzed (p < 0.05). The highest antioxidant activity was found for the powder-acetone extract followed by the liquid methanol and liquid acetone extracts (p < 0.05). The effect of the three different extracts on the physical-chemical and sensory quality of frozen chicken nuggets was evaluated. At the dose proposed by the European Union Directive 2010/69/EU for the carnosic and carnosol compounds [150 ppm (mg/kg fat basic)], the format-solvent combination of the rosemary extracts used did not modify the chicken nuggets quality characteristics (pH, colour, sensory quality) and still underlines the effectiveness of these extracts.

  12. Separation of zirconium and hafnium by solvent extraction using mixture of TBP and Cyanex 923

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taghizadeh, M., E-mail: mtaghizadeh@aeoi.org.ir [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, End of North Karegar Ave., P.O. Box 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanadi, M.; Zolfonoun, E. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, End of North Karegar Ave., P.O. Box 14395-836, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-31

    In this study, a new Zr/Hf separation procedure by solvent extraction is proposed. The method is based on using the mixture of TBP and Cyanex 923 as extractant in the organic phase. Several parameters including; TBP/Cyanex 923 volume ratio, extractant concentration in the organic phase, nitric acid and NaNO{sub 3} concentration in aqueous phase have been investigated. The results demonstrate better condition respect to traditional TBP/HNO{sub 3} process. Lower required acid concentration and more zirconium extraction are some advantages of the new separation process.

  13. Separation of zirconium and hafnium by solvent extraction using mixture of TBP and Cyanex 923

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, M.; Ghanadi, M.; Zolfonoun, E.

    2011-05-01

    In this study, a new Zr/Hf separation procedure by solvent extraction is proposed. The method is based on using the mixture of TBP and Cyanex 923 as extractant in the organic phase. Several parameters including; TBP/Cyanex 923 volume ratio, extractant concentration in the organic phase, nitric acid and NaNO 3 concentration in aqueous phase have been investigated. The results demonstrate better condition respect to traditional TBP/HNO 3 process. Lower required acid concentration and more zirconium extraction are some advantages of the new separation process.

  14. Studies on antimicrobial activities of solvent extracts of different spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Dilek; Toroglu, Sevil

    2011-03-01

    The antimicrobial activities of the ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extract of 12 plant species were studied. The extract of Capsicum annuum (red pepper) (fruit) Zingiber officinale (ginger) (root), Cuminum cyminum (cumin), Alpinia ficinarum (galingale), Coriandrum sativum (coriander), Cinnamomun zeylanicum Nees (cinnamomun), Origanum onites L. (thyme), Folium sennae (senna), Eugenia caryophyllata (cloves), Flos tiliae (lime), Folium menthae crispae (peppermint) and Piper nigrum (blackpepper) were tested in vitro against 2 fungi and 8 bacterial species by the disc diffusion method. Klebsiella pneumonia 13883, Bacillus megaterium NRS, Pseudomonas aeroginosa ATCC 27859, Staphylococcus aureus 6538 P, Escherichia coil ATCC 8739, Enterobacter cloaca ATCC 13047, Corynebacterium xerosis UC 9165, Streptococcus faecalis DC 74, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Rhodotorula rubra were used in this investigation. The results indicated that extracts of different spices has shown antibacterial activity in the range of 7-24 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibition zone Eugenia caryophyllata (clove), 7-20 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Capsicum annum (red pepper) and Cinnamomun zeylanicum (cinnamon) bark, 7-18 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Folium sennae (senna) leaves, 7-16 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibition zone Zingiber officinale (ginger) root, 7-15 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Cuminum cyminum (cumin) seed, 7-14 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibition zone Folium menthae crispae (peppermint), Origanum onites (thyme) leaves and Alpinia ficinarum (galingale) root, 7-12 mm 30 microl(-1) inhibiton zone Piper nigrum (blackpepper), 7-11 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Flos tiliae (lime) leaves, 7-8 mm 30microl(-1) inhibition zone Coriandrum sativum (coriander) to the microorganisms tested.

  15. Accelerated solvent extraction for GC-based tobacco fingerprinting and its comparison with simultaneous distillation and extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Pang, Tao; Guo, Ziming; Li, Yanli; Wang, Xiaolin; Deng, Jianhua; Zhong, Kejun; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2010-04-15

    An accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) procedure has been developed as a pretreatment method for chemical fingerprinting of volatile and semi-volatile components in cut tobacco. The ASE extraction conditions including temperature, operation pressure and extraction cycles were optimized to maximize extraction yield. The method was validated with repeatability, recovery and linearity. Compared with simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE), ASE provides higher extraction yields, less extraction time, lower solvent consumption and less labor time, and is more suitable for tobacco sample preparation. A typical ASE extract was analyzed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS). A total of 305 components with signal-to-noise ratio higher than 100 were tentatively identified by NIST05 and Wiley database. Finally, 36 cigarette samples from six cigarette brands were analyzed using the developed chemical fingerprinting method. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis shows good discrimination of different cigarette brands. The results indicate that ASE method can serve as high-throughput sample preparation technique for cigarette chemical fingerprint analysis.

  16. Recombinant human proinsulin from transgenic corn endosperm: solvent screening and extraction studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Farinas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant pharmaceutical proteins are being produced in different systems such as bacteria and mammalian cell cultures. The use of transgenic plants as bioreactors has recently arisen as an alternative system offering many practical and economic advantages. However, finding an optimum strategy for the downstream processing (DSP of recombinant proteins from plants still remains a challenge. In this work, we studied the extraction of recombinant human proinsulin (rhProinsulin produced in the endosperm of transgenic corn seeds. An efficient extraction solvent was selected and the effects of temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio, time, and impeller rotational speed on the extraction were evaluated using an experimental design. After an extraction kinetics study, temperature was further evaluated to maximize rhProinsulin concentration in the extracts and to minimize the native corn components carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and proteins. A high efficiency condition for extracting rhProinsulin with the selected solvent - 50 mM sodium bicarbonate buffer pH 10.0 and 5 mM DTT - was an extraction time of 2 h at a solvent-to-solid ratio of 10:1 and 25º C. The maximum rhProinsulin concentration in the extracts at that condition was 18.87 mg l-1 or 0.42% of the total soluble protein. These values are within the range in which the production of pharmaceutical proteins in plants can be competitive with other expression systems. The results presented provide information for the development of an additional production platform for the hormone insulin.

  17. Determination of Uranium in Apatite Minerals by Solvent Extraction--Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    [Abstract] Solvent, extraction-ICP atomic emission spectrometry was applied to the determination of uranium in apatite minerals. Apatite minerals were treated with nitric acid. After removing a small quantity of insoluble residue, uranium was extracted with 0.05 mol/dm^3 1-phonyl-3-mcthyl-4-trifluoroacetyl-5-pyrazolonc-diisobutyl kctone at pH 0.8. The uranium content in the apatite was found to be (20.3〜132.9)×10^%.

  18. Effects of Ultrasound Power, Temperature and Flow Rate of Solvent on Decontamination of Sensitive Equipment by Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Andrle

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The solvent extraction process is regarded amongst other known methods to be applicable for decontamination of sensitive equipment components, especially in cases the components are contaminated in-depth with chemical warfare agents. Viability of the solvent extraction method was evaluated on coupons of butadiene rubber contaminated by sulphur mustard before decontamination by the solvent extraction. The contaminated coupons were extracted in a flow cell, which the solvent (ethoxynonafluorobutane passed through. Three following specific operational factors, namely the temperature, the flow rate, and the power of ultrasound bath, were assessed for the extent of influencing upon the respective observed extraction efficiencies. The paper describes the results of the evaluation of the solvent extraction effectiveness.Defence Science Journal, 2014, 64(2, pp. 168-172. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.64.3887

  19. Impurity Distribution Behavior in Caprolactam Extraction with Environmentally Benign Mixed Solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delden, van M.L.; Drumm, C.; Kuipers, N.J.M.; Haan, de A.B.

    2006-01-01

    In a previous study a solvent mixture of heptane containing 40 mass % heptanol was selected as an alternative in the industrial extraction of caprolactam to replace benzene, toluene, or chlorinated hydrocarbons. This work reports the equilibrium distribution ratio of caprolactam and four model impur

  20. Solvent extraction as additional purification method for postconsumer plastic packaging waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoden van Velzen, E.U.; Jansen, M.

    2011-01-01

    An existing solvent extraction process currently used to convert lightly polluted post-industrial packaging waste into high quality re-granulates was tested under laboratory conditions with highly polluted post-consumer packaging waste originating from municipal solid refuse waste. The objective was

  1. TERRA-KLEEN RESPONSE GROUP, INC. SOLVENT EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of a field demonstration conducted under the SITE program. The technology which was demonstrated was a solvent extraction technology developed by Terra-Kleen Response Group. Inc. to remove organic contaminants from soil. The technology employs...

  2. Influence of the amine salt anion on the synergic solvent extraction of praseodymium with mixtures of chelating extractants and tridodecylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukov, I.L.; Jordanov, V.M. [Higher Inst. of Chemical Technology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-11-01

    The solvent extraction of Pr with thenoyltrifluoroacetone, (HTTA) or 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-pyrazol-5-one(HP) and tridodecylammonium salt (TDAHA,A{sup -} = Cl{sup -},NO{sub 3}{sup -}, ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) in C{sub 6}H{sub 6} has been studied. The composition of the extracted species has been determined as Pr(TTA){sub 3} TDAHA and TDAH{sup +}[PrP{sub 4}]{sup -}. The values of the equilibrium constants, have been calculated. The extraction mechanism has been discussed on the basis of the experimental data. 34 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Mechanism of gold solvent extraction from aurocyanide solution by quaternary amines: models of extracting species based on hydrogen bonding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马刚; 闫文飞; 陈景; 严纯华; 高宏成; 周维金; 施鼐; 吴谨光; 徐光宪; 黄昆; 余建民; 崔宁

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism of gold solvent extraction from KAu(CN)2 solution was investigated by means of FTIR, EXAFS, ICP and radioactive tracer methods. Two extraction systems were studied, namely N263-tributyl phosphate(TBP)-n-dodecane and N263-iso-octanol-n-dodecane. High-resolution FT IR spectroscopy indicated that the CN stretching vibrations of the two extraction systems differred greatly. In order to interpret the significant difference in CN stretching vibrations, twoextracting species models are proposed——supramolecular structures based on the formation ofhydrogen bonds between Au(CN)2- and modifiers such as TBP and iso-octanol.

  4. Effect of different solvents on extraction of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of hawthorn (Crataegus orientalis fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer ÇOKLAR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of bio compounds from plant materials is one of the most important step of the processes such as dietary supplement production and recovery of the compounds from the industrial wastes. It is highly affected from the factors such as solvent type, particle size, extraction time and temperature. To determine the total phenolics, individual phenolic profile and antioxidant activity of Hawthorn (Crataegus orientalis fruit extracted with different solvents and to specify the best solvent for extraction of phenolics were aimed in this research. Fruits, picked from wild growing trees in Beyşehir, were extracted with water, methanol and methanol:water (1:1 mixture. Highest total phenolics and antioxidant activity were observed in methanol:water extract. While gallic acid was extracted effectively in water, methanol:water mixture was the best solvent for extraction of procyanidin B1, procyanidin B2, (-- epicatechin, epigallocatechin gallate and rutin.

  5. Chemical profiling of Centella asiatica under different extraction solvents and its antibacterial activity, antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supawan Rattanakom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Centella asiatica (L urban, synonym Hydrocotyle asiatica, is found almost all over the world. This plant is famous in Ayurvedic medicine and used in the management of central nervous system, skin and gastrointestinal disorder. Thus this research had been done to evaluate the effect of solvent extraction (Ethanol, Chloroform and Hexane of C. asiatica on chemical profile, antioxidant activity and antibacterial activity against some foodborne pathogens. The result showed that all solvents (ethanol, chloroform and hexane used in extraction showed antibacterial activity against Salmonella enterica Typhimurium U302, S. enterica Enteritidis, S. enterica 4,5,12:I human (US clone, Bacillus cereus and B. subtilis at 50mg/ml concentration. In antioxidant part, ethanolic extract gave highest phenolic content and FRAP value. The results also showed that different extraction solvent gave different chemical profile. Hexane extract C. asiatica showed lowest in both antibacterial and antioxidant activity. Ethanolic and chloroform extract of C. asiatica showed promising potential in both antibacterial and antioxidant activity.

  6. Ohmic heating as a pre-treatment in solvent extraction of rice bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Gopu Raveendran; Divya, V R; Prasannan, Liji; Habeeba, V; Prince, M V; Raghavan, G S V

    2014-10-01

    Rice bran, which is one of the major by products of paddy contain high quality proteins and edible oil apart from fibre, ash and NFE (nitrogen free extract). The existing solvent extraction method employs n-hexane as the most viable solvent for the extraction of oil from rice bran. But the high cost and scarce availability of n-hexane resulted in uneconomical extraction of rice bran oil. In this study, rice bran was ohmically heated for different time periods(1, 2 and 3 min) with different current values (5, 15 and 20 A) and with different concentration of sodium chloride (1 M, 0.1 M and 0.01 M) as conducting medium. The ohmically heated rice bran was subjected to extraction studies. Ohmic heating of rice bran of paddy varieties Red Triveni and Basmati reduced the extraction time by nearly 75 % and 70 % respectively and gave a maximum quantity of oil extracted when compared to bran, which was not ohmically heated. From the experiments with varying concentrations, residence time of ohmic heating and currents, it was found that ohmically heating the rice bran with 1 M sodium chloride solution and with a current value of 20 A for 3 min gave maximum oil extraction with minimum extraction time.

  7. Response Surface Modeling and Optimization of Accelerated Solvent Extraction of Four Lignans from Fructus Schisandrae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A new method based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE combined with response surface methodology (RSM modeling and optimization has been developed for the extraction of four lignans in Fructus Schisandrae (the fruits of Schisandra chinensis Baill. The RSM method, based on a three level and three variable Box-Behnken design (BBD, was employed to obtain the optimal combination of extraction condition. In brief, the lignans schizandrin, schisandrol B, deoxyschizandrin and schisandrin B were optimally extracted with 87% ethanol as extraction solvent, extraction temperature of 160 °C, static extraction time of 10 min, extraction pressure of 1,500 psi, flush volume of 60% and one extraction cycle. The 3D response surface plot and the contour plot derived from the mathematical models were applied to determine the optimal conditions. Under the above conditions, the experimental value of four lignans was 14.72 mg/g, which is in close agreement with the value predicted by the model.

  8. Flavonoid compositions and antioxidant activity of calamondin extracts prepared using different solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyi-Neng Lou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Calamondin has been demonstrated to exhibit antioxidant function and tyrosinase inhibitory activity, which might be attributed to its flavonoid compounds. To improve their application, the flavonoid compositions and antioxidant activity of calamondin extracts, prepared by different solvents, were investigated. The results showed that total phenolic and flavonoid contents of extracts from peel of calamondin were higher than that from pulp, except the flavonoid content in hot water extract. The flavonoids found in extracts of calamondin were 3′,5′-di-C-β-glucopyranosylphloretin (DGPP, naringin, hesperidin, nobiletin, tangeretin, and diosmin. DGPP exhibited the highest quantity, while naringin and hesperidin were the other two major flavonoids. The content of DGPP in hot water extract of peel was higher than in extracts of organic solvents, however, the contents of nobiletin and tangeretin were found only in extracts of organic solvents. The highest levels of total flavonoids and DGPP were obtained in hot water extract from peel at 90°C. The extracts of hot water and ethyl acetate showed higher 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging potency than that of ethanol and methanol. A positive relationship existed between total phenolic contents and DPPH scavenging potency (p < 0.01, while total flavonoid compositions also showed correlation (p < 0.05. Thus, DGPP, naringin, and hesperidin might contribute to antioxidant activity. Collectively, the hot water extract of calamondin peel might have potential for health food and cosmetic applications due to its good antioxidant activity and high level of DGPP.

  9. Successive solvent extraction and free radical scavenging activity of Azadirachta indica A. juss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant-based or plant-derived drugs occupied 30% of the modern system of medicine. Several trees possess a variety of biologically active compounds. Among them, Azadirachta indica, belonging to the family Meliaceae, plays a vital role as it acts as nature′s pharmacy from several centuries of time. In the path of searching for potential antioxidants from plant origin, different parts of Azadirachta indica have been selected. Aim: Successive solvent extracts of leaves, seeds and root barks of Azadirachta indica A. Juss (neem were studied for their free radical scavenging activity. Materials and Methods: Extraction capacity of different solvents based on their polarity order was compared and the extracts were subjected to 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Statistical Analysis: All values were expressed in mean±SEM and correlation coefficient (R 2 values obtained from dose response curves were expressed for antioxidant results. Results: The results showed that the highest yields was found with the hydroalcoholic extract of leaves, followed by the hydroalcoholic extract of seeds and methanolic extracts of leaves and seeds, respectively. Free radical scavenging activity of various extracts was determined by measuring 1, DPPH free radical scavenging activity. The results were expressed in terms of IC 50 values. The root bark methanol extract was found to exhibit the highest IC 50 of 14.82-μg/mL at the concentration of 25-μg/mL. Conclusion: It is concluded that hydroalcohol and methanol are the best solvents to extract the antioxidant compounds from Azadirachta indica. The root bark methanolic extract was found to have the highest free radical scavenging potential against DPPH radical.

  10. Determination of extractability of pine bark using supercritical CO(2) extraction and different solvents: optimization and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem; Otto, Frank; Gruener, Sabine; Parlar, Harun

    2009-01-28

    Bark from Pinus brutia was extracted with supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), using CO(2), at various extraction conditions both at laboratory and at pilot scale. Optimized parameters were 200 bar, 60 degrees C, and 3% ethanol at a solvent/feed ratio of 30. Additionally, the pine bark was sonicated (1 h at 50 degrees C) by different solvents (n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and ethanol) to investigate the correlation between the different extraction setups and to obtain information on SFE up-scaling possibilities. Analyzed by HPLC, 7.2% of (-)-catechin was extractable at laboratory scale, and 58.4% (800 bar) and 47.8% (200 bar), both with modifiers, at pilot scale. By sonication with ethanol, 46.8% of (-)-catechin and almost 100% of (-)-epicatechin and (-)-catechin gallate were extracted. Ethyl acetate extract revealed high correlations with the laboratory scale SFE (r = 0.98) and also pilot scale SFE runs at 200 (r = 0.99) and 800 bar (r = 0.98) without modifiers.

  11. Accelerated, microwave-assisted, and conventional solvent extraction methods affect anthocyanin composition from colored grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Akhtar, Humayoun; Rabalski, Iwona; Bryan, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Anthocyanins are important dietary components with diverse positive functions in human health. This study investigates effects of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) on anthocyanin composition and extraction efficiency from blue wheat, purple corn, and black rice in comparison with the commonly used solvent extraction (CSE). Factorial experimental design was employed to study effects of ASE and MAE variables, and anthocyanin extracts were analyzed by spectrophotometry, high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector (DAD), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry chromatography. The extraction efficiency of ASE and MAE was comparable with CSE at the optimal conditions. The greatest extraction by ASE was achieved at 50 °C, 2500 psi, 10 min using 5 cycles, and 100% flush. For MAE, a combination of 70 °C, 300 W, and 10 min in MAE was the most effective in extracting anthocyanins from blue wheat and purple corn compared with 50 °C, 1200 W, and 20 min for black rice. The anthocyanin composition of grain extracts was influenced by the extraction method. The ASE extraction method seems to be more appropriate in extracting anthocyanins from the colored grains as being comparable with the CSE method based on changes in anthocyanin composition. The method caused lower structural changes in anthocaynins compared with the MAE method. Changes in blue wheat anthocyanins were lower in comparison with purple corn or black rice perhaps due to the absence of acylated anthocyanin compounds in blue wheat. The results show significant differences in anthocyanins among the 3 extraction methods, which indicate a need to standardize a method for valid comparisons among studies and for quality assurance purposes.

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF TIME AND TYPE OF SOLVENT ON EFFICIENCY OF THE EXTRACTION OF POLYPHENOLS FROM GREEN TEA AND ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES OBTAINED EXTRACTS

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Drużyńska; Agnieszka Stępniewska; Rafał Wołosiak

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of the type of solvent and time on efficiency of the extraction of polyphenols and antioxidant properties extracts obtained from green tea. Extraction was conducted at room temperature using four solvents: water and 80% ethanol, 80% methanol and 80% acetone (water solutions, v/v) at 15, 30 and 60 minutes. Extracts were analysed for contents of polyphenols and catechins. The antioxidant properties have been determined by two methods: scaven...

  13. Pulsed electric field (PEF) as an intensification pretreatment for greener solvent lipid extraction from microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, Mauricio D Antezana; Sturm, Belinda S M; Nord, Ryan D; Carey, William J; Moore, David; Shinogle, Heather; Stagg-Williams, Susan M

    2013-06-01

    Microalgae, with their high lipid content, are a promising feedstock for renewable fuels. Traditionally, human and environmentally toxic solvents have been used to extract these lipids, diminishing the sustainability of this process. Herein, pulsed electric field technology was utilized as a process intensification strategy to enhance lipid extraction from Ankistrodesmus falcatus wet biomass using the green solvent, ethyl acetate. The extraction efficiency for ethyl acetate without PEF was lower (83-88%) than chloroform. In addition, the ethyl acetate exhibited a 2-h induction period, while the chloroform showed no time dependence. Utilizing PEF technology resulted in 90% of the cells being lysed and a significant enhancement in the rate of lipid recovery using ethyl acetate. The increase in lipid recovery was due to the presence of the electric field and not due to temperature effects. The PEF technology uses less energy than other PEF systems reported in the literature.

  14. Separation and recovery of heavy metals from waste water using synergistic solvent extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yang, Limei; Xu, Zheng; Sun, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metal wastewater pollution is one of the three major water pollutions in the world. The zinc hydrometallurgy smelting process usually discharge large quantities of heavy metal wastewater into the environment. In this paper, a synergistic solvent extraction process has been developed to recover copper, nickel, zinc and cadmium respectively from calcium and magnesium. The synergistic organic system contained 0.50 M Versatic 10 and 0.5 M Mextral 984H in DT100. Adjusting pH to 2.0 at 40 °C, the copper will be extracted preferentially with the extraction rate more than 99%. Continuing to adjust pH to 4.2 at 40 °C, the nickel will be extracted secondly with an extraction rate more than 98%; the zinc and cadmium in raffinate could be extracted separately while pH is about 6.5.

  15. Determination of fatty acid composition and quality characteristics of oils from palm fruits using solvent extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmin, Hasimah; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Awang, Roila

    2015-09-01

    Palm oil contains about 45% of saturated palmitic acid and 39% of mono-unsaturated oleic acid. Investigations made in the past to trace the fatty acid composition in palm revealed that ripeness of fresh fruit bunch (FFB) affect oil composition. However, there is no evidence that processing operations affect oil composition, although different stage of processing does affect the quality of oil extracted. An improved method for sterilizing the oil palm fruits by dry heating, followed by oil extraction has been studied. This method eliminates the use of water, thus, increasing the extraction of lipid soluble. The objective of this study is to determine the possibility production of palm oil with different fatty acid composition (FAC) as well as the changes in quality from conventional milling. The unripe and ripe FFB were collected, sterilized and extracted using different method of solvent extraction. Preliminary data have shown that variation in FAC will also alter the physical and chemical properties of the oil extracted.

  16. Choice of solvent extraction technique affects fatty acid composition of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolshahi, Anna; Majd, Mojtaba Heydari; Rad, Javad Sharifi; Taheri, Mehrdad; Shabani, Aliakbar; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-04-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil has important nutritional and therapeutic properties because of its high concentration of essential fatty acids. The extraction method used to obtain natural compounds from raw material is critical for product quality, in particular to protect nutritional value. This study compared the fatty acid composition of pistachio oil extracted by two conventional procedures, Soxhlet extraction and maceration, analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Four solvents with different polarities were tested: n-hexane (Hx), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtAc) and ethanol (EtOH). The highest unsaturated fatty acid content (88.493 %) was obtained by Soxhlet extraction with EtAc. The Soxhlet method extracted the most oleic and linolenic acids (51.99 % and 0.385 %, respectively) although a higher concentration (36.32 %) of linoleic acid was extracted by maceration.

  17. Efficient Extraction of Astaxanthin from Phaffia rhodozyma with Polar and Non-polar Solvents after Acid Washing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Chunhua; YANG Shuzhen; LIU Xiaolu; YAN Hai

    2013-01-01

    method of extracting astaxanthin from Phaffia rhodozyma with various solvents after acid washing was investigated.The extraction efficiency was distinctly increased after acid washing of P.rhodozyma cells.When the concentration of HCl was 0.4 mol·L-,the highest extraction efficiency of astaxanthin was achieved which was about three times higher than the control.Acetone or benzene as single polar or non-polar solvent was the most effective solvent in our research.With a combination of isopropanol and n-hexane (volume ratio of 2 ∶ 1),the maximal extraction efficiency was achieved,approximately 60% higher than that obtained with a single solvent.The liquid-solid ratio and the extracting time were also optimized.Under the optimum extraction conditions,the extraction yield of astaxanthin exceeded 98%.

  18. Combining Solvent Extraction and Bioremediation for Removing Weathered Petroleum from Contaminated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Guo-Zhong; F.COULON; YANG Yue-Wei; LI Hong; SUI Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy,practicality and sustainability of a combined approach based on solvent extraction and biodegradation to remediate the soils contaminated with high levels of weathered petroleum hydrocarbons.The soils used in this study were obtained from the Shengli Oilfield in China,which had a long history of contamination with high concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons.The contaminated soils were washed using a composite organic solvent consisting of hexane and pentane (4:1,v/v) and then bioremediated in microcosms which were bioaugmentated with Bacillus subtilis FQ06 strains and/or rhamnolipid.The optimal solvent extraction conditions were determined as extraction for 20 min at 25 ℃ with solvent-soil ratio of 6:1 (v/w).On this basis,total petroleum hydrocarbon was decreased from 140000 to 14000 mg kg-1,which was further reduced to < 4000 mg kg-1 by subsequent bioremediation for 132 d.Sustainability assessment of this integrated technology showed its good performance for both short-and long-term effectiveness.Overall the results encouraged its application for remediating contaminated sites especially with high concentration weathered hydrocarbons.

  19. Combination pulsed electric field with ethanol solvent for Nannochloropsis sp. extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafis, Ghazy Ammar; Mumpuni, Perwitasari Yekti; Indarto, Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, energy is one of human basic needs. As the human population increased, energy consumption also increased. This condition causes energy depletion. In case of the situation, alternative energy is needed to replace existing energy. Microalgae is chosen to become one of renewable energy resource, especially biodiesel, because it contains high amount of lipid instead of other feedstock which usually used. Fortunately, Indonesia has large area of water and high intensity of sunlight so microalgae cultivation becomes easier. Nannochloropsis sp., one of microalgae species, becomes the main focus because of its high lipid content. Many ways to break the cell wall of microalgae so the lipid content inside the microalgae will be released, for example conventional extraction, ultrasonic wave extraction, pressing, and electrical method. The most effective way for extraction is electrical method such as pulsed electric field method (PEF). The principal work of this method is by draining the electrical current into parallel plate. Parallel plate will generate the electrical field to break microalgae cell wall and the lipid will be released. The aim of this work is to evaluate two-stage procedure for extraction of useful components from microalgae Nannochloropsis sp. The first stage of this procedure includes pre-treatment of microalgae by ethanol solvent extraction and the second stage applies the PEF extraction using a binary mixture of water and ethanol solvent. Ethanol is chosen as solvent because it's safer to be used and easier to be handled than other solvent. Some variables that used to study the most effective operation conditions are frequency and duty cycle for microalgae. The optimum condition based on this research are at frequency 1 Hz and duty cycle 13%.

  20. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein with deep eutectic solvent immobilized magnetic graphene oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Ding, Xueqin; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    As a new type of green solvent, four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized, and then a core-shell structure magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4-NH2@GO) nanoparticles have been prepared and coated with the ChCl-based DESs. Magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES was studied for the first time for the extraction of proteins. The characteristic results of vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES. The concentrations of proteins in studies were determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The advantages of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES in protein extraction were compared with Fe3O4-NH2@GO and Fe3O4-NH2, and Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. The influence factors of the extraction process such as the pH value, the temperature, the extraction time, the concentration of protein and the amount of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol were evaluated. Desorption experimental result showed 98.73% of BSA could be eluted from the solid extractant with 0.1 mol/L Na2HPO4 solution contained 1 mol/L NaCl. Besides, the conformation of BSA was not changed during the elution by the investigation of circular dichromism (CD) spectra. Furthermore, the analysis of real sample demonstrated that the prepared magnetic nanoparticles did have extraction ability on proteins in bovine whole blood.

  1. Evaluation of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of solvent extracts of Anacyclus pyrethrum L., from Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El Amine Dib

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, solvent extracts from aerial parts of Anacyclus pyrethrum L. were assessed for their total phenol content, antimicrobial and antioxidant (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging and ferric-ion reducing power activities. The amounts of total phenolics and flavonoids in the solvent extracts were determined spectrometrically. (310.78 mg GA/g extract and antioxidant activity (IC50 = 0.056 mg/mL. Increasing the concentration of the extracts resulted in increased ferric reducing antioxidant power for both extracts tested. The methanolic extract exhibited the best antimicrobial activity against three gram-positive bacterium (Listeria monocytogenes: 100%, Bacillus. cereus: 69% and Staphylococcus aureus: 66%, as well as against Candida albicans (81%. Finally, a relationship was observed between the biological activities potential and total phenolic and flavonoid levels of the extract. The results of this study provided an alternative of utilising Anacyclus pyrethrumaerial parts as readily accessible source of natural antioxidant in food cosmetic and pharmaceutical industry

  2. Extraction of garlic with supercritical CO2 and conventional organic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. del Valle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L. and garlic extracts have therapeutical properties that stem from their sulfur-containing compounds, mainly allicin. The main objective of this work was to compare conventional and "premium" garlic extracts in terms of yield and quality, with the latter being obtained using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 as the solvent. Yield ranged between 0.65 and 1.0% and increased with extraction pressure (150-400 bar at a constant temperature of 50°C. Extraction temperature (35-60°C, on the other hand, had little effect at a constant pressure of 300 bar. Based on yield and quality considerations, the best extraction conditions using SC-CO2 were 35-50°C and 300-400 bar. A yield of 5.5% was obtained by conventional extraction using ethanol as the solvent, but ethanol appeared to be less selective for valuable components than SC-CO2. The use of fresh garlic resulted in extracts that more closely resembled commercial products, possibly because of thermal and oxidative degradation of valuable microconstituents during drying.

  3. Solvent extraction of copper and zinc from bioleaching solutions with LIX984 and D2EHPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Zhuo-yue; HU Yue-hua; LIU Jian-she; WANG Jun

    2005-01-01

    The solvent extraction of copper and zinc from the bioleaching solutions of low-grade sulfide ores with LIX984 and D2EHPA was investigated. The influences of extractant content, aqueous pH value, phase ratio and equilibration time on metals extraction were studied. The results show that LIX984 has a higher selectivity for copper than for iron, zinc and other metals, and has the copper extraction rate above 97%,while the zinc and iron extraction rate is less than 1.6% respectively. Zinc extraction is carried out following the copper extraction from the raffinate. The zinc extraction with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid(D2EHPA) is low due to its poor cation exchange. A sodium salt of D2EHPA is used and the zinc extraction rate is enhanced to above 98%. Though iron (Ⅲ) is strongly extracted before the extraction of zinc by D2EHPA, it is difficult to strip iron from the organic phase by sulfuric acid. The zinc stripping rate is above 99% with 100 g/L sulfuric acid, while that of iron is 0.16%. Hence, the separation of zinc from iron can be achieved by the selective stripping.

  4. Study of the separation of zirconium and hafnium from nitric solutions by solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Janubia Cristina B.S.; Rocha, Laura R.T.; Morais, Carlos Antonio de, E-mail: jcbsa@cdtn.br, E-mail: lrtr@cdtn.br, E-mail: cmorais@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, BH (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the study of the separation of Zr and Hf in nitric and hydrochloric media by solvent extraction technique. As aqueous phase, solutions prepared from the Zr and Hf hydroxides and the liquor generated from the product of the alkaline fusion of the zircon were used. The content of Zr and Hf in these solutions were 15 g/L and 0.6 g/L Hf respectively, and its acidity was varied between 1.0 and 10 mol/L. The effect of the acid extractants (DEHPA, IONQUEST®801 and CYANEX®272), solvating extractants (TBP and CYANEX®923) and basic extractants (PRIMENE®JTM, ALAMINE®336 and ALIQUAT®336), all of them diluted in dodecane, was investigated. In the solutions of the basic extractants, 5.0% of tridecanol was added as a modifier agent. Among the extractants investigated, the TBP in a nitric medium showed the best performance in the separation of the Zr/Hf. For acid extractants a high extraction was observed, however, with low selectivity. With the basic extractants no metals extraction was observed under the conditions investigated. The best results were obtained with the liquor generated from the product of alkaline fusion of zircon at acidity 7.0 mol/L and nitrate concentration of 9.2 mol/L. Under these conditions an extraction percentage of 91.6% for Zr and of 12.1% for Hf and a separation factor of Zr/Hf of 79.3 was obtained. (author)

  5. The enhancement of antioxidant compounds extracted from Thymus vulgaris using enzymes and the effect of extracting solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Alejandra; Martínez, María Eugenia; Soto, Carmen; Poirrier, Paola; Perez-Correa, Jose R; Vergara-Salinas, Jose R; Zúñiga, María Elvira

    2013-08-15

    We evaluate the total phenolic compounds (TPC) content and the antioxidant activity (AA) of extracts obtained from ground fresh thyme (FT) and depleted thyme (DT), a by-product of the process of essential oil extraction. In addition, enzymatic treatments were evaluated to improve the extraction yields of polyphenolic compounds from thyme. Extractions were performed using several solvents as methanol, ethanol, and water. Enzymes were applied prior to extraction or during the extraction process. The best results were obtained using a mixture of methanol and water, resulting in 2790 and 220 mg Gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/L of TPC for FT and DT, respectively. A similar result was observed for AA. With regard to enzymatic treatment, application of Grindamyl CA 150 enzyme as a pre-treatment resulted in the production of an extract from DT with 614 mg TE (trolox equivalent)/L of AA, 70% more than the control, and an AA of 621 mg TE/L (74% more than the control sample) was obtained using Grindamyl CA 150 during the extraction process. These results suggest that enzymatic treatment is an interesting alternative for producing antioxidant extracts from DT.

  6. Antifungal activity of extracts from Piper aduncum leaves prepared by different solvents and extraction techniques against dermatophytes Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maximillan Leite; Magalhães, Chaiana Froés; da Rosa, Marcelo Barcellos; de Assis Santos, Daniel; Brasileiro, Beatriz Gonçalves; de Carvalho, Leandro Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Barreto; Zani, Carlos Leomar; de Siqueira, Ezequias Pessoa; Peres, Rodrigo Loreto; Andrade, Anderson Assunção

    2013-12-01

    The effects of different solvents and extraction techniques upon the phytochemical profile and anti-Trichophyton activity of extracts from Piper aduncum leaves were evaluated. Extract done by maceration method with ethanol has higher content of sesquiterpenes and antifungal activity. This extract may be useful as an alternative treatment for dermatophytosis.

  7. Antifungal activity of extracts from Piper aduncum leaves prepared by different solvents and extraction techniques against dermatophytes Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton interdigitale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximillan Leite Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different solvents and extraction techniques upon the phytochemical profile and anti-Trichophyton activity of extracts from Piper aduncum leaves were evaluated. Extract done by maceration method with ethanol has higher content of sesquiterpenes and antifungal activity. This extract may be useful as an alternative treatment for dermatophytosis.

  8. Response Surface Optimization of Rotenone Using Natural Alcohol-Based Deep Eutectic Solvent as Additive in the Extraction Medium Cocktail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetty Shafiqa Othman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone is a biopesticide with an amazing effect on aquatic life and insect pests. In Asia, it can be isolated from Derris species roots (Derris elliptica and Derris malaccensis. The previous study revealed the comparable efficiency of alcohol-based deep eutectic solvent (DES in extracting a high yield of rotenone (isoflavonoid to binary ionic liquid solvent system ([BMIM]OTf and organic solvent (acetone. Therefore, this study intends to analyze the optimum parameters (solvent ratio, extraction time, and agitation rate in extracting the highest yield of rotenone extract at a much lower cost and in a more environmental friendly method by using response surface methodology (RSM based on central composite rotatable design (CCRD. By using RSM, linear polynomial equations were obtained for predicting the concentration and yield of rotenone extracted. The verification experiment confirmed the validity of both of the predicted models. The results revealed that the optimum conditions for solvent ratio, extraction time, and agitation rate were 2 : 8 (DES : acetonitrile, 19.34 hours, and 199.32 rpm, respectively. At the optimum condition of the rotenone extraction process using DES binary solvent system, this resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in a rotenone concentration of 0.49 ± 0.07 mg/ml and yield of 0.35 ± 0.06 (%, w/w as compared to the control extract (acetonitrile only. In fact, the rotenone concentration and yield were significantly influenced by binary solvent ratio and extraction time (P<0.05 but not by means of agitation rate. For that reason, the optimal extraction condition using alcohol-based deep eutectic solvent (DES as a green additive in the extraction medium cocktail has increased the potential of enhancing the rotenone concentration and yield extracted.

  9. Effect of solvent on the extraction of lanthanides with picrolonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A.; Saeed, M.M. [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad (Pakistan). Chemistry Div.; Rehman, H. [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad (Pakistan). Central Analytical Facility Div.; Anwar, J. [Punjab Univ., Lahore (Pakistan). Inst. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    Extraction of Eu(III), Tb(III) and Lu(III), as representatives of lanthanides, has been studied with picrolonic acid [1-p-nitrophenyl-3-methyl-4-nitro-5-pyrazolone (HPA)] as extractant in various solvents such as acetylacetone (ACAC), 1-octanol (ONL), n-hexanol (HNL), 1-butanol (nBNL), 2-butanol (iBNL), cyclohexanone (CHN), n-butyl ether (BE), di(1,2-dichloroethyl)ether (DCEE), diisobutylketone (DIBK), benzene and toluene from aqueous solution of pH 1-2, having ionic strength of 0.01 mol dm{sup -3} (K{sup +}/H{sup +}, Cl{sup -}). The composition of the extracted adduct has been determined as M(PA){sub 3} except in DCEE where it is M(PA){sub 3}.(HPA). Extraction constants (log K{sub ex}) were calculated and on the basis of log K{sub ex}, the role of diluents in the extraction process has been discussed. The solvents with respect to their extractability of the rare earth metal ions can be arranged in the order ACAC > DIBK > BE> DCEE > ONL > HNL > CHN. (orig.)

  10. Extraction of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil by deep eutectic solvents (DESs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Aránzazu; Rodríguez-Juan, Elisa; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rios, José Julian; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan

    2016-04-15

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are "green" solvents, applied in this study for the extraction of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil (VOO). Different combinations of DES consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) in various mixing ratios with sugars, alcohols, organic acids, and urea, as well as a mixture of three sugars were used. The yields of the DES extractions were compared with those from conventional 80% (v/v) methanol/water. DES showed a good solubility of phenolic compounds with different polarities. The two most abundant secoiridoid derivatives in olive oil, oleacein and oleocanthal, extracted with ChCl/xylitol and ChCl/1,2-propanediol showed an increase of 20-33% and 67.9-68.3% with respect to conventional extraction, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first time that phenolic compounds have been extracted from VOO oil using DES. Our results suggest that DES offers an efficient, safe, sustainable, and cost effective alternative to methanol for extraction of bioactive compounds from VOO.

  11. Solvent optimization on Taxol extraction from Taxus baccata L., using HPLC and LC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Sadeghi-aliabadi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the purpose of the study: Taxol, a natural antitumor agent, was first isolated from the extract of the bark of Taxus brevifolia Nutt., which is potentially a limited source for Taxol. In the search of an alternative source, optimum and cost benefit extracting solvents, various solvents with different percentage were utilized to extract Taxol from needles of Taxus baccata. "nMethods: One g of the dried needles of Taxus baccata, collected from Torkaman and Noor cities of Iran, was extracted with pure ethanol or acetone and 50% and 20% of ethanol or acetone in water. Solvents were evaporated to dryness and the residues were dissolved in 5 ml of methanol and filtered. To one ml of the filtrate was added 50 μl of cinamyl acetate as the internal standard and 20 μl of the resulting solution was subjected to the HPLC to determine the extraction efficiencies of tested solvents. Five μl of filtrate was also subjected to the LC-MS using water/acetonitrile (10/90 as mobile phase and applying positive electrospray ionization (ESI to identify the authenticity of Taxol. "nResults: Results of this study indicated that Taxol extraction efficiency was enhanced as the percentage of ethanol or acetone was increased. HPLC analysis showed that Taxol could be quantified by UV detection using standard curve. The standard curve covering the concentration ranges of 7.8 - 500 μg/ml was linear (r2= 0.9992 and CV% ranged from 0.52 to 15.36. LC-MS analysis using ESI in positive-ion mode confirmed the authenticity of Taxol (m/z 854; M+H, as well as some adduct ions such as M+Na (m/z 876, M+K (m/z 892 and M+CH3CN+H2O (m/z 913. "nConclusions: The results suggest that 100% acetone is the best solvent for the extraction of Taxol from Taxus baccata needles.

  12. Selection and design of ionic liquids as solvents in extractive distillation and extraction processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, B.

    2015-01-01

    Since the late 1990’s there has been a tremendous growth in literature on ionic liquids (ILs) for a broad range of applications, i.e. catalysis, electrolytes for batteries, in solvolysis of biomass, and also in separation technology. ILs can be applied as solvents for absorption (e.g. of CO2), extra

  13. Comparison of Methanol and Tetraglyme as Extraction Solvents for Determination of Volatile Organics in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    determining volatile organics in soil can be classified into thefollowing groups: 1. Static or dynamic headspace analysis 2. Solvent extraction-direct...methods based on the dynamic headspace method whereby the volatiles are stripped from a soil/water slurry using a conventional purge-and-trap instrument...651. Brazell, R.S. and MP. Maskarinec (1981) Dynamic headspace analysis of solid waste materials. Journal of High Resolution Chromatography and

  14. Comparative study on sulphur reduction from heavy petroleum - Solvent extraction and microwave irradiation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi Dyadya Mohammed, Abubakar Garba Isah, Musa Umaru, Shehu Ahmed, Yababa Nma Abdullahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulphur- containing compounds in heavy crude oils are undesirable in refining process as they affect the quality of the final product, cause catalyst poisoning and deactivation in catalytic converters as well as causing corrosion problems in oil pipelines, pumps and refining equipment aside environmental pollution from their combustion and high processing cost. Sulphur reduction has being studied using microwave irradiation set at 300W for 10 and 15minutes and oxidative- solvent extraction method using n- heptane and methanol by 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 crude- solvent ratios after being oxidized with hydrogen peroxide, H2O2 oxidants. Percentage sulphur removal with n- heptane solvent by 1:1 and 1:2 are 81.73 and 85.47%; but extraction using methanol by different observed ratios gave less sulphur reduction. Indeed when microwave irradiated at 300W for 10 and 15minutes, 53.68 and 78.45% reduction were achieved. This indicates that microwave irradiation had caused oxidation by air in the oven cavity and results to formation of alkyl radicals and sulphoxide from sulphur compound in the petroleum. The prevailing sulphur found in the crude going by FT-IR results is sulphides which oxidized to sulphoxide or sulphones. It is clear that sulphur extraction with heptane is more efficient than microwave irradiation but economically due to demands for solvent and its industrial usage microwave irradiation can serve as alternative substitute for sulphur reduction in petroleum. Sulphur reduction by microwave radiation should be up- scaled from laboratory to a pilot plant without involving extraction column in the refining.

  15. Comparative study on sulphur reduction from heavy petroleum - Solvent extraction and microwave irradiation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, Abdullahi Dyadya; Isah, Abubakar Garba; Umaru, Musa; Ahmed, Shehu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Technology, P.M.B 65, Minna (Nigeria); Abdullahi, Yababa Nma [National Petroleum Investment Management Services (Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation), Lagos (Nigeria)

    2012-07-01

    Sulphur- containing compounds in heavy crude oils are undesirable in refining process as they affect the quality of the final product, cause catalyst poisoning and deactivation in catalytic converters as well as causing corrosion problems in oil pipelines, pumps and refining equipment aside environmental pollution from their combustion and high processing cost. Sulphur reduction has being studied using microwave irradiation set at 300W for 10 and 15minutes and oxidative- solvent extraction method using n- heptane and methanol by 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 crude- solvent ratios after being oxidized with hydrogen peroxide, H2O2 oxidants. Percentage sulphur removal with n- heptane solvent by 1:1 and 1:2 are 81.73 and 85.47%; but extraction using methanol by different observed ratios gave less sulphur reduction. Indeed when microwave irradiated at 300W for 10 and 15minutes, 53.68 and 78.45% reduction were achieved. This indicates that microwave irradiation had caused oxidation by air in the oven cavity and results to formation of alkyl radicals and sulphoxide from sulphur compound in the petroleum. The prevailing sulphur found in the crude going by FT-IR results is sulphides which oxidized to sulphoxide or sulphones. It is clear that sulphur extraction with heptane is more efficient than microwave irradiation but economically due to demands for solvent and its industrial usage microwave irradiation can serve as alternative substitute for sulphur reduction in petroleum. Sulphur reduction by microwave radiation should be up- scaled from laboratory to a pilot plant without involving extraction column in the refining.

  16. Ethanol as a solvent and hot extraction technique preserved the antioxidant properties of tamarind (Tamarindus indica seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nushrat Yeasmen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of two extraction solvents (ethanol and acetone and two extraction techniques i.e., hot extraction at 400C and cold extraction at 260C were investigated on the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of extracts from Tamarindus indica seed. The antioxidant activity of T. indica was determined by evaluating 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH scavenging activity, ferric reducing power assay (FRAP and ascorbic acid equivalent content (AAC. The tested sample showed appreciable amounts of total phenolic contents (51.45-71.68 mg GAE/gm of dry extract, DPPH scavenging capacity (61.18-71.17%, IC50 values (98.30-248.60, reducing power (0.6377-0.7702 and total antioxidant capacity (22.75-43.80 AAE/gm at different solvents and techniques. Current study data shown higher extract yields, phenolic contents, scavenging activity, reducing power and antioxidant activity using ethanol solvent compared to the respective acetone solvent. In addition, higher extract yields and other properties were obtained by hot extraction at 400C compared to the cold extraction at 260C. Present study suggests that ethanol as a solvent and hot extraction technique could be better to preserve the antioxidant properties of tamarind seed. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2015; 2(3.000: 332-337

  17. Extraction of oil from pequi fruit (Caryocar Brasiliense, Camb. using several solvents and their mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniassi, R.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the oil extraction process from pequi pulp using different solvents (hexane, acetone and ethyl alcohol and their mixtures was investigated, using a simplex-centroid design. The extraction occurred at 50°C, under stirring (22 Hz, for 16 hours. The solid-liquid ratio used was 1:10 (w/w. Higher yield values were obtained for extractions with acetone and hexane, especially their mixtures with ethanol. Iodine value, saponification value and refractive index did not differ significantly among the treatments. A higher acid value was obtained for the extraction with ethyl alcohol. Higher carotenoid contents were obtained for the extraction with acetone and ethyl alcohol as pure solvents. The fatty acid profile in the oil fraction of the extracts did not vary among the different types of solvents and their mixtures.En este trabajo fue estudiado el proceso de extracción de aceite de la pulpa de pequi utilizando diferentes disolventes (n-hexano, acetona y etanol y sus mezclas, empleando diseño central simplex. Las extracciones fueron realizadas a 50°C, durante 16 horas de agitación (22 Hz. La proporción sólido:líquido empleada fue 1:10 (p/p. Los mayores rendimientos fueron obtenidos para las extracciones con acetona y con hexano, especialmente cuando fueron mezclados con etanol. El índice de yodo, el índice de saponificación y el índice de refracción no difirieron significativamente entre los tratamientos. Los mayores valores de acidez se obtuvieron en la extracción con etanol. Los mayores contenidos en carotenoides se obtuvieron en las extracciones con acetona y etanol como disolventes puros. El perfil de los ácidos grasos en las fracciones de aceite de los extractos no presentó variación entre los diferentes tipos de disolventes y sus mezclas.

  18. Effect of Ethanol/Water Solvents on Phenolic Profiles and Antioxidant Properties of Beijing Propolis Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunli; Wu, Zhengshuang; Wang, Ziyan; Zhang, Hongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Propolis is a natural substance known to be beneficial for human health and used as a folk medicine in many parts of the world. In this study, phenolic profiles and antioxidant properties of Beijing propolis extracted by different ethanol/water solvents were analyzed. Our results reveal that phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties of propolis extracts were significantly dependent on the concentration of ethanol/water solvents. Totally, 29 phenolic compounds were identified: 12 phenolic acids, 13 flavonoids, and 4 phenolic acid esters. In particular, 75 wt.% ethanol/water solvent may be the best for the highest extraction yield and the strongest antioxidant properties. Caffeic acid, benzyl caffeate, phenethyl caffeate, 5-methoxy pinobanksin, pinobanksin, pinocembrin, pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, chrysin, and galangin were the characteristic compounds of Beijing propolis, and these compounds seem to verify that Beijing propolis may be poplar-type propolis. In addition, the presence of high level of pinobanksin-3-O-acetate in Chinese propolis may be a novel finding, representing one-third of all phenolics. PMID:26351514

  19. Vanadium recovery from oil fly ash by leaching, precipitation and solvent extraction processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, R; Guzman, J; Saucedo, I; Revilla, J; Guibal, E

    2007-01-01

    In order to reduce the environmental impact due to land disposal of oil fly ash from power plants and to valorize this waste material, the removal of vanadium was investigated using leaching processes (acidic and alkaline treatments), followed by a second step of metal recovery from leachates involving either solvent extraction or selective precipitation. Despite a lower leaching efficiency (compared to sulfuric acid), sodium hydroxide was selected for vanadium leaching since it is more selective for vanadium (versus other transition metals). Precipitation was preferred to solvent extraction for the second step in the treatment since: (a) it is more selective; enabling complete recovery of vanadate from the leachate in the form of pure ammonium vanadate; and (b) stripping of the loaded organic phase (in the solvent extraction process) was not efficient. Precipitation was performed in a two-step procedure: (a) aluminum was first precipitated at pH 8; (b) then ammonium chloride was added at pH 5 to bring about vanadium precipitation.

  20. Coupling a Transient Solvent Extraction Module with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; DePaoli, David W [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2009-10-01

    A past difficulty in safeguards design for reprocessing plants is that no code existed for analysis and evaluation of the design. A number of codes have been developed in the past, but many are dated, and no single code is able to cover all aspects of materials accountancy, process monitoring, and diversion scenario analysis. The purpose of this work was to integrate a transient solvent extraction simulation module developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the SSPM Separations and Safeguards Performance Model, developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The SSPM was designed for materials accountancy and process monitoring analyses, but previous versions of the code have included limited detail on the chemical processes, including chemical separations. The transient solvent extraction model is based on the ORNL SEPHIS code approach to consider solute build up in a bank of contactors in the PUREX process. Combined, these capabilities yield a much more robust transient separations and safeguards model for evaluating safeguards system design. This coupling and the initial results are presented. In addition, some observations toward further enhancement of separations and safeguards modeling based on this effort are provided, including: items to be addressed in integrating legacy codes, additional improvements needed for a fully functional solvent extraction module, and recommendations for future integration of other chemical process modules.

  1. Coupling a transient solvent extraction module with the separations and safeguards performance model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaoli, David W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Birdwell, Joseph F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Gauld, Ian C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Cipiti, Benjamin B.; de Almeida, Valmor F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2009-10-01

    A number of codes have been developed in the past for safeguards analysis, but many are dated, and no single code is able to cover all aspects of materials accountancy, process monitoring, and diversion scenario analysis. The purpose of this work was to integrate a transient solvent extraction simulation module developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM), developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The SSPM was designed for materials accountancy and process monitoring analyses, but previous versions of the code have included limited detail on the chemical processes, including chemical separations. The transient solvent extraction model is based on the ORNL SEPHIS code approach to consider solute build up in a bank of contactors in the PUREX process. Combined, these capabilities yield a more robust transient separations and safeguards model for evaluating safeguards system design. This coupling and initial results are presented. In addition, some observations toward further enhancement of separations and safeguards modeling based on this effort are provided, including: items to be addressed in integrating legacy codes, additional improvements needed for a fully functional solvent extraction module, and recommendations for future integration of other chemical process modules.

  2. Selective separation of Cu (II), Zn (II), and Cd (II) by solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Keng; WEN Jiankang; HUA Yixin; RUAN Renman

    2008-01-01

    An experimental investigation was presented on the separation of Cu (II), Zn (II), and Cd (II) from a rich sulfate leachate of zinc slag by solvent extraction. The results of orthogonal experiments indicate that LIX 984N is highly selective and very efficient in the extraction of Cu (II), and the analysis of variance indicates that the sequence of parameters according to their influence on the separation efficiency is phase ratio>LIX 984N concentration>pH value>extraction time. The optimal condition for copper extraction is obtained as 25% of LIX 984N concentration, 7 min of extraction time, 3:2 of phase ratio O/A, and pH=1.7. The separation of Zn (II) and Cd (II) was performed after the copper extraction from the raffinate. Comparative analysis of the separation with di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA), D2EHPA-tributyl-phosophate (TBP) synergistic extracting system, and 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono 2-ethylhexyl ester (HEHEHP) was made at pH=2.0. It is demonstrated that the extraction efficiency with D2EHPA is improved after being saponified by sodium hydroxide, and D2EHPA-TBP synergistic extracting, as well as HEHEHP, has a superior selectivity to Zn (II) over Cd (II).

  3. Antimicrobial potential of Ricinus communis leaf extracts in different solvents against pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rabia Naz; Asghari Bano

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro antimicrobial activities of the leaf extract in different solvents viz., methanol, ethanol and water extracts of the selected plant Ricinus communis. Methods:Agar well diffusion method and agar tube dilution method were carried out to perform the antibacterial and antifungal activity of methanol, ethanol and aqueous extracts. Results:Methanol leaf extracts were found to be more active against Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis: ATCC 6059 and Staphylococcus aureus: ATCC 6538) as well as Gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa: ATCC 7221 and Klebsiella pneumoniae) than ethanol and aqueous leaf extracts. Antifungal activity of methanol and aqueous leaf extracts were also carried out against selected fungal strains as Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus. Methanolic as well as aqueous leaf extracts of Ricinus communis were effective in inhibiting the fungal growth. Conclusions: The efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity of Ricinus communis from the present investigation revealed that the methanol leaf extracts of the selected plant have significant potential to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains than ethanol and aqueous leaf extracts.

  4. Study to find the best extraction solvent for use with guava leaves (Psidium guajava L.) for high antioxidant efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jongkwon; Lee, Soojung; Elam, Marcus L; Johnson, Sarah A; Kang, Jonghoon; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2014-03-01

    The effects of guava leaves extracted using solvents of water, ethanol, methanol, and different concentrations of hydroethanolic solvents on phenolic compounds and flavonoids, and antioxidant properties have been investigated. The antioxidant capability was assessed based on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical-scavenging abilities, reducing power, and nitric oxide-and nitrate-scavenging activities. The results demonstrated that the antioxidant ability of guava leaf extracts has a strong relationship with phenolic compound content rather than flavonoid content. Phenolic compound content of water extracted guava leaves was higher compared to pure ethanol and methanol extracts. However, phenolic compound content extracted using hydroethanolic solvent was higher than water, whereas 50% hydroethanolic was observed to be the most effective solvent showing high antioxidant ability.

  5. Investigation of aggregation in solvent extraction of lanthanides by acidic extractants (organo-phosphorus and naphthenic acid)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周乃扶; 吴瑾光; 俞致健; 王笃金; 徐光宪

    1997-01-01

    Three acidic extractants (Ⅰ) di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP),(Ⅱ) 2-ethylhexyl phos-phonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (KEHPEHE) and (Ⅲ) naphthenic acid were employed in preparing the samples for the characterization of the coordination structure of lanthanlde-extractant complexes and the physicochemical nature of aggregates formed in the organic diluent of the solvent extraction systems.Photo correlation spectroscopy (PCS) re-suits on the aggregates formed by the partially saponified HDEHP in n -heptane showed that the hydrodynamic radius of the aggregates was comparable to the molecular dimensions of HDEHP.The addition of 2-octanol into the diluent,by which the mixed solvent was formed,increased the dimensions of the corresponding aggregates.Aggregates formed from the ianthamde ions and HDEHP in the organic phase of the extraction systems were found very unstable.In the case of naphthenic acid,PCS data showed the formation of w/o microemulsion from the saponified naphthenic acid in the mix

  6. Improved Production of Paclitaxel from Suspension Culture of Taxus chinensis var.mairei by in situ Extraction with Organic Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    未作君; 元英进; 吴兆亮; 吴金川

    2003-01-01

    The production of paclitaxel from suspension culture of Taxus chinensis var,mairei was improved by in situ extraction with organic solvents to avoid feedback repression and product degradation.Oleic acid and dibutyl phthalate were proved to be suitable solvents .The optimal volumetric percentage of organic solvents in the culture medium was found to be around 8%,and the favorable time for their introduction was at the exponential phase of cell growth,Paclitaxel production with the in situ extraction was ca 3-fold of that without extraction.

  7. Separation of cobalt and nickel by non-equilibrium solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The separation of cobalt and nickel in the ammoniacal sulfate solution by non-equilibrium solvent extraction with a phosphate (P303) as extractant was studied. In the experiment, the effects of equilibrium pH value in aqueous phase, contact time of the two phases, the air-blowing time for feed liquor in the open beaker on percentage extraction of cobalt and nickel and percentage reextraction of nickel from the loaded organic phase with dilute H2SO4. etc were studied. The results showed that: Co(Ⅱ) can be oxidized to Co(Ⅲ)-ammino-complex by adding (NH4)2S2O8 or blowing air to the aqueous phase, and Co(Ⅲ)-ammino-complex is a kind of kinetically inert complex. Its extractive speed is very slow, while the nickel′s is much faster than that of cobalt. By controlling the contact time of the two phases, nickel can be separated from cobalt by non-equilibrium solvent extraction. Then nickel was reextracted from the loaded organic phase with dilute H2SO4.

  8. Hydrolysis of fluorotelomer compounds leading to fluorotelomer alcohol production during solvent extractions of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasu, Kavitha; Royer, Laurel A; Liu, Jinxia; Lee, Linda S

    2010-11-01

    The experimental approaches used in assessing the biodegradability of fluorotelomer-based surfactants and polymers have been under increasing scrutiny. These substances consist of an aliphatic or aromatic backbone linked to perfluoroethyl moieties by ester, ether or urethane linkages. These linkages when broken yield fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), which are known to biotransform to a suite of polyfluorinated metabolites including perfluorinated carboxylic acids. Quantifying FTOH levels with minimal experimental artifacts is imperative in properly assessing the biotransformation potential and half-lives of fluorotelomer-based materials. We examined the potential for solvent-enhanced ester hydrolysis of fluorotelomer compounds with different hydrocarbon backbones including a monoester stearate (FTS), a citrate tri-ester (TBC), an acrylate (FTA), and a 2,4-toluenediamine urethane (FTU) in acetonitrile, methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE), and ethyl acetate with live, autoclaved, 60Co-γ-irradiated, and heat-treated (400°C) soils. Substantial hydrolysis only occurred with FTS in live and γ-irradiated soils for which microbial enzymes are expected to be active, but not in autoclaved soils where enzymes are deactivated. Acetonitrile and methanol (solvents with higher dielectric constants) enhanced hydrolysis by an order of magnitude compared to less polar solvents such as MTBE and ethyl acetate. For example, in a 24-h extraction with acetonitrile of FTS-amended soil, >5wt.% FTOH was produced compared to ethyl acetate or MTBE. FTA hydrolysis was <0.7 wt.% after a 15-h extraction period and was not solvent dependent. No statistically significant solvent-enhanced hydrolysis was observed for TBC, FTA or FTU.

  9. Application of 2k Full Factorial Design in Optimization of Solvent-Free Microwave Extraction of Ginger Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaj Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from ginger was optimized using a 23 full factorial design in terms of oil yield to determine the optimum extraction conditions. Sixteen experiments were carried out with three varying parameters, extraction time, microwave power, and type of sample for two levels of each. A first order regression equation best fits the experimental data. The predicted values calculated by the regression model were in good agreement with the experimental values. The results showed that the extraction time is the most prominent factor followed by microwave power level and sample type for extraction process. An average of 0.25% of ginger oil can be extracted using current setup. The optimum conditions for the ginger oil extraction using SFME were the extraction time 30 minutes, microwave power level 640 watts, and sample type, crushed sample. Solvent-free microwave extraction proves a green and promising technique for essential oil extraction.

  10. Chemical profiling of Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb. rhizome using different techniques of solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanimah; Simoh; Alizah; Zainal

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the possible phytochemical constituents of Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb.(C. aeruginosa) rhizome using two different techniques of direct solvent extraction. Methods: Two different techniques of direct solvent extractions, i.e. methyl tert-butyl ether(MTBE) extraction and two-phase methanol/chloroform(M/C) system, were used in this study. The analysis of the phytochemical constituents in MTBE and M/C extracts was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The mass spectra of the compounds was matched with the NIST 08 mass spectral library. Results: The present study revealed that the extraction using two-phase M/C have resulted in higher metabolite coverage compared to the extraction with MTBE. Direct solvent extraction using MTBE revealed the presence of 27 compounds; whereas, M/C allowed the extraction of 18 and 36 compounds in polar(methanol) and nonpolar(chloroform) fractions respectively. The major compounds detected in the MTBE extract that based on the peak area percentage were methenolone(16.64%), cycloisolongifolene, 8,9-dehydro-9-formyl-(15.93%), labd-13-en-15-oic acid,8,12-epoxy-12-hydroxy-γ-lactone(10.77%), propiolic acid, 3-(1-hydroxy)-2 isopropyl-1,5-methylcyclohexyl)(7.84%), 4-oxo-β-isodamascol(5.17%), velleral(3.11%) and Z-α-farnesene(2.00%). The most prevailing major compounds identified in the polar fraction of the M/C extraction were α-D glucopyranoside, 1,3,4,6 tetrakis-O-(TMS)(trimethylsilyl)-β-D-fructofuranosyl 2,3,4,6-tetrakis-O-(TMS)-(38.08%), d-glucose, 2,3,4,5,6-pentakis-O-(TMS)-, O-methyloxime(14.61%), D-fructose, 1,3,4,5,6-pentakis-O-(TMS)-, O-methyloxime(5.28%), isocitric acid(TMS)(3.06%), oxalic acid, bis(TMS) ester(2.96%), hexadecanoic acid, TMS ester(2.16%), citric acid, ethyl ester, tri-TMS(1.91%) and butanedioic acid, [(TMS) oxy]-, bis(TMS) ester(1.14%); whereas in the nonpolar extract, among the major compounds detected were cycloisolongifolene, 8, 9-dehydro-9-formyl(15

  11. The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

    2013-08-14

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence

  12. Ethanol as a solvent and hot extraction technique preserved the antioxidant properties of tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seed

    OpenAIRE

    Nushrat Yeasmen; Md. Nazrul Islam

    2015-01-01

    The influence of two extraction solvents (ethanol and acetone) and two extraction techniques i.e., hot extraction at 400C and cold extraction at 260C were investigated on the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of extracts from Tamarindus indica seed. The antioxidant activity of T. indica was determined by evaluating 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity, ferric reducing power assay (FRAP) and ascorbic acid equivalent content (AAC). The tested sample showed appreciabl...

  13. Alternative bio-based solvents for extraction of fat and oils: solubility prediction, global yield, extraction kinetics, chemical composition and cost of manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Vian, Maryline; Fine, Frédéric; Joffre, Florent; Carré, Patrick; Tostain, Sylvain; Chemat, Farid

    2015-04-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate the performance of alternative bio-based solvents, more especially 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, obtained from crop's byproducts for the substitution of petroleum solvents such as hexane in the extraction of fat and oils for food (edible oil) and non-food (bio fuel) applications. First a solvent selection as well as an evaluation of the performance was made with Hansen Solubility Parameters and the COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Realistic Solvation (COSMO-RS) simulations. Experiments were performed on rapeseed oil extraction at laboratory and pilot plant scale for the determination of lipid yields, extraction kinetics, diffusion modeling, and complete lipid composition in term of fatty acids and micronutrients (sterols, tocopherols and tocotrienols). Finally, economic and energetic evaluations of the process were conducted to estimate the cost of manufacturing using 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF) as alternative solvent compared to hexane as petroleum solvent.

  14. Alternative Bio-Based Solvents for Extraction of Fat and Oils: Solubility Prediction, Global Yield, Extraction Kinetics, Chemical Composition and Cost of Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Gaëlle Sicaire

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the performance of alternative bio-based solvents, more especially 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, obtained from crop’s byproducts for the substitution of petroleum solvents such as hexane in the extraction of fat and oils for food (edible oil and non-food (bio fuel applications. First a solvent selection as well as an evaluation of the performance was made with Hansen Solubility Parameters and the COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Realistic Solvation (COSMO-RS simulations. Experiments were performed on rapeseed oil extraction at laboratory and pilot plant scale for the determination of lipid yields, extraction kinetics, diffusion modeling, and complete lipid composition in term of fatty acids and micronutrients (sterols, tocopherols and tocotrienols. Finally, economic and energetic evaluations of the process were conducted to estimate the cost of manufacturing using 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF as alternative solvent compared to hexane as petroleum solvent.

  15. Solvent effects on extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosol samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flasch Mira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs in the ambient particulate matter pose one of the most important issues in the focus of environmental management. The concentration of their representative, Benzo(apyrene (BaP, undergoes limitations according to European Union directive. However, a successful control over the pollution levels and their sources is limited by the high uncertainty of analytical and statistical approaches used for their characterization. Here we compare differences in PAH concentrations related to the use of different solvents in the course of ultrasonic extraction of a certified reference material (PM10-like PAH mixture and filter samples of ambient particulate matter collected in Austria for the CG-MS PAH analysis. Using solvents of increasing polarity: Cyclohexane (0,006, Toluene (0,099, Dichloromethane (0,309, Acetone (0,43 and Acetonitrile (0,460, as well as mixtures of those, filters representing high and low concentrations of particulate matter were investigated. Although some scatter of the obtained concentrations was observed no trend related to the polarity of the solvent became visible. Regarding the reproducibility, which can be expected of PAH analysis no significant difference between the different solvents was determined. This result is valid for all compounds under investigation.

  16. Pyrolysates of raw vitrinites and their residues after CS2-NMP solvent extraction and its significance for petroleum geology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dayong; PENG Ping'an

    2006-01-01

    Binary solvent (CS2-NMP) has extreme high extraction ability to coals, and it can extract most bitumens out of coals and vitrinites. And large amount of messages on side chains and their distribution character in vitrinites should be acquired through flash pyrolysis before and after binary solvent (CS2-NMP) extraction. A few low maturated coals have been selected and vitrinites are handpicked from coals. Then vitrinites have been extracted using different solvents in the order of polarity. Flash pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass spectrum has been applied to samples. The result shows that CS2-NMP is efficient for the extraction of vitirnites, giving much higher extraction yield than common solvents. Production ratio of liquid hydrocarbons in pyrolysates of vitrinites extracted with CS2-NMP is lower than that of raw vitrinites. And relative ratio of each component in pyrolysates has changed apparently. Production ratio of aliphatic hydrocarbons, especially those long chain aliphatics have decreased much after mixed solvent extraction. It shows that bitumens extracted with CS2-NMP have largely contributed to pyrolysates, especially those aliphatics in pyrolysates.

  17. A solvent extraction technique for the isotopic measurement of dissolved copper in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Claire M., E-mail: claire.thompson@anu.edu.au; Ellwood, Michael J., E-mail: michael.ellwood@anu.edu.au; Wille, Martin, E-mail: martin.wille@uni-tuebingen.de

    2013-05-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A new sample preparation method for seawater copper isotopic analysis (δ{sup 65}Cu). •Solvent-extraction was used to pre-concentrate metals from seawater samples. •Anion-exchange was used to purify copper from the metal-rich extract. •δ{sup 65}Cu was measured in the north Tasman Sea. •Seawater δ{sup 65}Cu may be linked to marine biological activity. -- Abstract: Stable copper (Cu) isotope geochemistry provides a new perspective for investigating and understanding Cu speciation and biogeochemical Cu cycling in seawater. In this work, sample preparation for isotopic analysis employed solvent-extraction with amino pyrollidine dithiocarbamate/diethyl dithiocarbamate (APDC/DDC), coupled with a nitric acid back-extraction, to concentrate Cu from seawater. This was followed by Cu-purification using anion-exchange. This straightforward technique is high yielding and fractionation free for Cu and allows precise measurement of the seawater Cu isotopic composition using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. A deep-sea profile measured in the oligotrophic north Tasman Sea shows fractionation in the Cu isotopic signature in the photic zone but is relatively homogenised at depth. A minima in the Cu isotopic profile correlates with the chlorophyll a maximum at the site. These results indicate that a range of processes are likely to fractionate stable Cu isotopes in seawater.

  18. Extraction of Bioactive Compounds as Natural Antioxidants from Fresh Spirulina platensis using Different Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiya Firdiyani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina platensis is a bioactive-rich microalga of great potential as a source of natural antioxidant. Natural antioxidants are increasing in demand, because it is considered as more safe than synthetic antioxidants. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of solvent on the potential of natural antioxidant from fresh S. platensis. The antioxidant compound was extracted using either acetone or ethyl acetate by reflux method. The yield of extractions were 1.86% and 3.07% for aceton and ethyl acetate, respectively. Fresh S. platensis extracts were considered as potential antioxidant source with IC50 values 65.89 ppm, and 76.36 ppm when using acetone and ethyl acetate, respectivetly, even though it were still lower compare to the IC50 of positive control quercetin i.e 21.64 ppm. Phytochemical test showed positive results of phenolic compound, triterpenoids, steroid, flavanoid, and saponin. aw value of Spirulina platensis was 0.61 and 0.81 for aceton and ethyl acetate, respectively. It was concluded that different solvent affected the antioxidant activity of S. platensis extract. Keywords: Antioxidants, aceton, ethyl acetate, fresh Spirulina platensis

  19. Extraction of Bioactive Compounds as Natural Antioxidants from Fresh Spirulina platensis using Different Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiya Firdayani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina platensis is a bioactive-rich microalga of great potential as a source of natural antioxidant. Natural antioxidants are increasing in demand, because it is considered as more safe than synthetic antioxidants. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of solvent on the potential of natural antioxidant from fresh S. platensis. The antioxidant compound was extracted using either acetone or ethyl acetate by reflux method. The yield of extractions were 1.86% and 3.07% for aceton and ethyl acetate, respectively. Fresh S. platensis extracts were considered as potential antioxidant source with IC50 values 65.89 ppm, and 76.36 ppm when using acetone and ethyl acetate, respectivetly, even though it were still lower compare to the IC50 of positive control quercetin i.e 21.64 ppm. Phytochemical test showed positive results of phenolic compound, triterpenoids, steroid, flavanoid, and saponin. aw value of Spirulina platensis was 0.61 and 0.81 for aceton and ethyl acetate, respectively. It was concluded that different solvent affected the antioxidant activity of S. platensis extract.

  20. Correlation between aggregation and extracting properties in solvent extraction systems: extraction of actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) by a malonamide in non acidic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meridiano, Y.; Berthon, L.; Lagrave, S.; Crozes, X.; Sorel, C.; Testard, F.; Zemb, T. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCSE, 30207Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The organic phases of the DIAMEX (Diamide Extraction) process, allowing the co-extraction of actinides(III) and lanthanides(III) from high level radioactive wastes using a malonamide extractant molecule (DMDOHEMA) diluted in alkanes, are investigated. The aim of this study is to establish a link between different structures/organizations of diamide extractants and their extracting properties towards An(III) and Ln(III) cations. It is demonstrated that diamide, which are amphiphilic molecules, are organized in different structures (monomers, reverse micelles, lamellar phases..). This study deals with the effect of the composition of the extracting system on the extracting and aggregation properties of the DMDOHEMA solutions. The effects of the extractant (DMDOHEMA diluted in n-heptane) and metal concentrations (for a given extractant concentration) from a LiNO{sub 3} aqueous phase are investigated at two scales: at the supra-molecular scale by characterizing the aggregation by vapor-pressure osmometry (VPO) and small angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS) experiments, and at the molecular scale by quantifying the extracted solutes (metal nitrate and water) and by determining the stoichiometries of the extracted complexes by electro-spray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The extraction equilibria can then be modeled by two approaches: a classical approach in solvent extraction based on mass action laws to determine extraction equilibria and their associated thermodynamic constants, and a physical chemical approach which consists in considering the extracted ions as adsorbed on a specific available surface of the extractant molecule. Thus, the extraction equilibrium can be considered as a sum of Langmuir isotherms corresponding to the different states of aggregation. The resulting constants are representative of both extraction efficiency and organic phase structure. (authors)

  1. Solvent-extraction methods applied to the chemical analysis of uranium. III. Study of the extraction with inert solvents; Metodos de extraccion con disolventes aplicados al analisis quimico del uranio. III. Estudio de la extraccion con disolvente inertes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera Palomino, J.; Palomares Delgado, F.; Petrement Eguiluz, J. C.

    1964-07-01

    The extraction of uranium on the trace level is studied by using tributylphosphate as active agent under conditions aiming the attainment of quantitative extraction by means of a single step process using a number of salting-out agents and keeping inside the general lines as reported in two precedent papers. Two inert solvents were investigated, benzene and cyclohexane, which allowed to derive the corresponding empirical equations describing the extraction process and the results obtained were compared with those previously reported for solvents which, like ethyl acetate and methylisobuthylketone, favour to a more or less extend the extraction of uranium. (Author) 4 refs.

  2. Determination of selected polychlorinated biphenyls in soil by miniaturised ultrasonic solvent extraction and gas chromatography-mass-selective detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Tor, Ali; Ozcan, Senar

    2006-09-08

    Miniaturised ultrasonic solvent extraction procedure was developed for the determination of selected polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil samples by gas chromatography-mass-selective detection by using 2(3) factorial experimental design. Recoveries of PCBs from fortified soil samples are over 90% for three different fortification levels between 40 and 120 microg kg(-1), and relative standard deviations of the recoveries are below 7%. The limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.003 to 0.006 microg kg(-1). The performance of the proposed method was compared to traditional shake flask extraction method on the spiked real soil sample and extraction methods showed comparable efficiencies. Proposed miniaturised ultrasonic solvent extraction offers several advantages, i.e., reducing sample requirement for measurement of target compound, less solvent consumption and reducing the costs associated with solvent purchase and waste disposal.

  3. Treatment of phenol in synthetic saline wastewater by solvent extraction and two-phase membrane biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Ruey-Shin; Huang, Wen-Ching; Hsu, Ya-Han

    2009-05-15

    Phenol in synthetic saline (100gL(-1) NaCl) and acidic (pH 3) wastewater was treated by a hybrid solvent extraction and two-phase membrane biodegradation process at 30 degrees C. Kerosene was adopted to be the organic solvent because it was biocompatible and had a suitable partition coefficient for phenol. Phenol in water was first extracted by kerosene in a batch stirred vessel and the loaded solvent was passed through the lumen of a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) hollow-fiber membrane contactor; in the meantime, Pseudomonas putida BCRC 14365 in mineral salt medium was flowed across the shell, to which tetrasodium phyophosphate (1gL(-1)) was added as a dispersing agent. The effect of the initial phenol level in wastewater (110-2400mgL(-1)) on phenol removal and cell growth was experimentally studied. At a cell concentration of 0.023gL(-1), it was shown that the removal of phenol from saline wastewater was more efficient at a level of 2000mgL(-1) when 0.02-m(2) membrane module was used. The effects of bigger membrane module size (0.19m(2) area) and higher initial cell concentration (0.092-0.23gL(-1)) on the performance of such a hybrid process for the treatment of higher-level phenol in saline wastewater was also evaluated and discussed.

  4. Separation of ethanol and water by extractive distillation with salt and solvent as entrainer: process simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Gil

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to simulate and analyze an extractive distillation process for azeotropic ethanol dehydration with ethylene glycol and calcium chloride mixture as entrainer. The work was developed with Aspen Plus® simulator version 11.1. Calculation of the activity coefficients employed to describe vapor liquid equilibrium of ethanol - water - ethylene glycol - calcium chloride system was done with the NRTL-E equation and they were validated with experimental data. The dehydration process used two columns: the main extractive column and the recovery column. The solvent to feed molar ratio S/F=0.3, molar reflux ratio RR=0.35, number of theoretical stages Ns=18, feed stage Sf=12, feed solvent stage SS=3, and feed solvent temperature TS=80 ºC, were determined to obtain a distillate with at least 99.5 % mole of ethanol. A substantial reduction in the energy consumption, compared with the conventional processes, was predicted by using ethylene glycol and calcium chloride as entrainer.

  5. Solvent Extraction: Structure of the Liquid-Liquid Interface Containing a Diamide Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoppola, Ernesto; Watkins, Erik B; Campbell, Richard A; Konovalov, Oleg; Girard, Luc; Dufrêche, Jean-Francois; Ferru, Geoffroy; Fragneto, Giovanna; Diat, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge of the (supra)molecular structure of an interface that contains amphiphilic ligand molecules is necessary for a full understanding of ion transfer during solvent extraction. Even if molecular dynamics already yield some insight in the molecular configurations in solution, hardly any experimental data giving access to distributions of both extractant molecules and ions at the liquid-liquid interface exist. Here, the combined application of X-ray and neutron reflectivity measurements represents a key milestone in the deduction of the interfacial structure and potential with respect to two different lipophilic ligands. Indeed, we show for the first time that hard trivalent cations can be repelled or attracted by the extractant-enriched interface according to the nature of the ligand.

  6. Towards an understanding of solvent extraction--electroanalytical characterization of chloride-leaching solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, A P; Abrantes, L M

    2001-08-01

    Solvent extraction has been employed to purify media simulating chloride-leaching solutions resulting from complex sulfide concentrate processing, and cyclic voltammetry (CV) has been chosen to characterize those hydrometallurgical aqueous phases. The possibilities of the CV technique were investigated by the evaluation of the adequacy of a specific organic extractant, triisobutylphosphine sulfide, aimed to efficiently and selectively extract silver from a complex chloride medium, additionally containing tenfold to 40-fold molar concentrations of iron, copper and lead. The influence of the oxidation state of the metallic ions present in the feed solution, namely Cu(II) and Cu(I), is considered. The possibilities of CV analysis for the characterization of stripping solutions are also illustrated.

  7. Solvent Extraction: Structure of the Liquid-Liquid Interface Containing a Diamide Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoppola, Ernesto [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38000 Grenoble France; Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/ENSCM/Université Montpellier, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze France; Watkins, Erik B. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38000 Grenoble France; Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 USA; Campbell, Richard A. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38000 Grenoble France; Konovalov, Oleg [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38430 Grenoble France; Girard, Luc [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/ENSCM/Université Montpellier, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze France; Dufrêche, Jean-Francois [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/ENSCM/Université Montpellier, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze France; Ferru, Geoffroy [Argonne National Labororatory, Lemont IL 60439 USA; Fragneto, Giovanna [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38000 Grenoble France; Diat, Olivier [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/ENSCM/Université Montpellier, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze France

    2016-06-20

    Knowledge of the (supra)molecular structure of an interface that contains amphiphilic ligand molecules is necessary for a full understanding of ion transfer during solvent extraction. Even if molecular dynamics already yield some insight in the molecular configurations in solution, hardly any experimental data giving access to distributions of both extractant molecules and ions at the liquid–liquid interface exist. Here, the combined application of X-ray and neutron reflectivity measurements represents a key milestone in the deduction of the interfacial structure and potential with respect to two different lipophilic ligands. Indeed, we show for the first time that hard trivalent cations can be repelled or attracted by the extractant-enriched interface according to the nature of the ligand.

  8. Effect of solvent addition sequence on lycopene extraction efficiency from membrane neutralized caustic peeled tomato waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, David M; Frelka, John C; Cooperstone, Jessica L; Schwartz, Steven J; Heldman, Dennis R

    2017-01-15

    Lycopene is a high value nutraceutical and its isolation from waste streams is often desirable to maximize profits. This research investigated solvent addition order and composition on lycopene extraction efficiency from a commercial tomato waste stream (pH 12.5, solids ∼5%) that was neutralized using membrane filtration. Constant volume dilution (CVD) was used to desalinate the caustic salt to neutralize the waste. Acetone, ethanol and hexane were used as direct or blended additions. Extraction efficiency was defined as the amount of lycopene extracted divided by the total lycopene in the sample. The CVD operation reduced the active alkali of the waste from 0.66 to lycopene efficiently from tomato processing byproducts.

  9. Separation of flavonoids by means of solvent extraction; Yobai chushutsuho ni yoru flavonoid rui no bunri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazaki, H.; Ishimaru, M. [Tsumura and Co., Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, K.; Nakamura, S. [Saga University, Saga (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering

    1997-03-10

    Some herb medicines may contain various flavonoids. The bioactivity of them has been attracted attention. In this paper, the separating purification method by solvent extraction was investigated. The extractant is di (ethylhexyl) amine, tributyl phosphate, N,N-dioctyl hexanamide, trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and Cyanex 925. Flavonoids are considered to be separated based on the difference of solubility in an ethanol solution, the existence of a glycoside in flavonoids, and the number of hydroxyl groups or their bonding position. For example, flavone, flavonol, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein, and baicalin are used as the representative substance of flavonoids. If a target substance is baicalin, this mixture is dissolved in an ethanol solution to eliminate insoluble matter such as flavonol. Next, flavone is extracted and eliminated by hexane. In the last step, the target baicalin is left in raffinate by TOPO or Cyanex 925. 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A solvent extraction study of molybdenum chloride and molybdenum thiocyanate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, L.P.; Lillie, E.G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of reducing agents on molybdenum(VI) solutions in hydrochloric acid was studied by a solvent extraction technique to elucidate the composition of the colored molybdenum thiocyanate complex. Neither copper(I) chloride nor ascorbic acid have any effect on the extraction of MoO2Cl2; it is inferred that tin(II) chloride reduces Mo(VI) stepwise to a polynuclear Mo(V)??Mo(VI) complex and then to Mo(V). The colored thiocyanate complex produced by copper(I) and by ascorbic acid differs only slightly in extraction characteristics from the uncolored Mo(VI) complex. It is suggested that the color may be produced by an isomerization reaction of MoO2(SCN)2, and thus that the colored species may be a hexavalent rather than pentavalent molybdenum complex. ?? 1974.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dady B. Dadyburjor; Mark E. Heavner; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; J. Joshua Maybury; Alfred H. Stiller; Joseph M. Stoffa; John W. Zondlo

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, and porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, hydrotreatment of solvent was completed in preparation for pitch fabrication for graphite electrodes. Coal digestion has lagged but is expected to be complete by next quarter. Studies are reported on coal dissolution, pitch production, foam synthesis using physical blowing agents, and alternate coking techniques.

  12. Antioxidant components and properties of dry heat treated clove in different extraction solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikousaleh, Azadeh; Prakash, Jamuna

    2016-04-01

    The effects of heat treatment and extraction solvents (pure/aqueous acetone, ethanol, methanol) on antioxidant activity (AA) and components of clove (Syzygium aromaticum Linn) were studied. Clove was subjected to dry heat treatment (microwave and roasting) and the AA measured by free radical scavenging activity (FRSA), reducing power (RP), and phospho-molybdenum assay (TAA). Unheated samples served as controls. The antioxidant components estimated were total phenols, flavonoids and tannins. Using RP and FRSA, highest AA was observed in 80 % acetone extract of all samples (1.778-1448 and 84.5-86.0 %). TAA showed higher value in 80 % methanolic extract for all samples in the range 303.595-307.941 mmol ascorbic acid/g. Heated samples exhibited higher AA in all assays. Highest amount of phenols and flavonoids were extracted in 80 % acetone (4053-4064 mg/100 g) and 80 % methanol (11,271-11,370 mg/100 g) respectively. For tannins, maximum extraction was in 80 % acetone (control, 16441 mg/100 g), 80 % ethanol (microwave, 19,558 mg/100 g), and pure methanol (roasted, 15,823 mg/100 g). Total phenol and flavonoid contents were positively associated with AA determined using RP and FRSA. In conclusion, clove exhibited powerful AA in different extraction solvents which increased on dry heat treatments and correlated positively with antioxidant components. Hence, clove can be used as a natural antioxidant in food systems.

  13. Biological Activity of Tannins from Acacia mangium Bark Extracted by Different Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Acacia mangium bark is abundant byproduct of wood industry in Indonesia. It is underutilized and mainly used as fire wood for the wood industry. The bark contains high level of tannin but the tannin has not been extracted or produced commercially. Tannin isolate can be used for several purposes such as tanning agent for leather, adhesive for plywood or particle board, etc. In ruminant, tannin can be detrimental but can also be beneficial. This experiment was aimed of getting the highest yield of tannin extract with the highest biological activity in rumen fermentation. Nine different solvents at different temperatures were used to extract tannin from A. mangium bark. The extracts were analyzed for their tannin contents and biological activities. Tannin content was analyzed using folin ciocalteau and butanol-HCl methods. Biological activity was described as a percentage of an increase in gas production in the in vitro rumen-buffer fermentation, with and without addition of PEG. The results show that Na2SO3 solution extracted more tannin than other solutions and the higher the concentration of Na2SO3 solution, the higher the yield of tannin extract. The solution of 6% sodium sulphite gave the highest yield of tannin extract (31.2% of original bark sample and the highest concentration of tannin (18.26% but produced a negative effect on in vitro fermentation (% increase of gas production = 2.70%. Extraction with 50% acetone gave a high yield of extract (22.28% of original bark which contained 12.98% of tannin and showed the highest biological response (% increase of gas production = 216%. In conclusion, sodium sulphite solution is not recommended for tannin extraction if the tannin will be used as feed additive in ruminant feed; on the other hand, the aqueous acetone (50% acetone solution is a better choice to be used.

  14. Efficiency of solvent extraction methods for the determination of methyl mercury in forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, J; Skyllberg, U; Tu, Q; Bleam, W F; Frech, W

    2000-07-01

    Methyl mercury was determined by gas chromatography, microwave induced plasma, atomic emission spectrometry (GC-MIP-AES) using two different methods. One was based on extraction of mercury species into toluene, pre-concentration by evaporation and butylation of methyl mercury with a Grignard reagent followed by determination. With the other, methyl mercury was extracted into dichloromethane and back extracted into water followed by in situ ethylation, collection of ethylated mercury species on Tenax and determination. The accuracy of the entire procedure based on butylation was validated for the individual steps involved in the method. Methyl mercury added to various types of soil samples showed an overall average recovery of 87.5%. Reduced recovery was only caused by losses of methyl mercury during extraction into toluene and during pre-concentration by evaporation. The extraction of methyl mercury added to the soil was therefore quantitative. Since it is not possible to directly determine the extraction efficiency of incipient methyl mercury, the extraction efficiency of total mercury with an acidified solution containing CuSO4 and KBr was compared with high-pressure microwave acid digestion. The solvent extraction efficiency was 93%. For the IAEA 356 sediment certified reference material, mercury was less efficiently extracted and determined methyl mercury concentrations were below the certified value. Incomplete extraction could be explained by the presence of a large part of inorganic sulfides, as determined by x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Analyses of sediment reference material CRM 580 gave results in agreement with the certified value. The butylation method gave a detection limit for methyl mercury of 0.1 ng g(-1), calculated as three times the standard deviation for repeated analysis of soil samples. Lower values were obtained with the ethylation method. The precision, expressed as RSD for concentrations 20 times above the

  15. Synergistic extraction and separation of Co(II)/Ni(II) by solvent extraction technique using TIOA/TOPO as carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okatan, Ahmet; Eyüpoǧlu, Volkan; Kumbasar, Recep Ali; Turgut, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    Cobalt and its compounds have wide range applications in some industrial and technological fields. These metals show excellent resistance to oxidation and corrosion under extreme conditions. However, these metals found together within metal ores in nature. This situation makes their separation difficult from each other. They have very similar physical and chemical properties making them very hard to be purified with using traditional separation pathways. Moreover, increasing supply-demand gap between them and decreasing valuable ores because of limited deposit in earth crust have been limited the sources of them. Under the light of this knowledge, one of the practical solutions should be produced to recycle cobalt and nickel from solid and liquid waste containing trace amounts of them. In this study, we investigated the selective and the synergistic cobalt extraction from acidic aqueous solutions by solvent extraction using tri-iso-octylamine (TIOA) and Tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) as carriers. The effective parameters on the extraction and the stripping of the cobalt were investigated, and optimum synergistic extraction and stripping conditions were identified. The cobalt extraction from aqueous Co/Ni solutions in various molar concentrations was examined in the optimum conditions to determine the synergism between TIOA and TOPO.

  16. Solvent Extraction and QSPR of Catecholamines with a Bis(2-ethlhexyl) Hydrogen Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizuka, Kazuharu.; Fujimoto, Yuko.; Ota, Keisuke.; Inoue, Katsutoshi. [Saga University, Saga (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    1999-02-01

    In order to develop an effective separation recess for catecholamine (CA), a basic investigation on solvent extraction of dopamine (DA), adrenaline (Ad) and noradrenaline (NA) from hydrochloric acid solution and their stripping is conducted at 30 degree C employing bis(2-ethylhexyl) hydrogen phosphate (D2EHPA) in chloroform, n-hexane and toluene as the organic diluents. From the dependencies of the distribution ratios on the concentrations of reactant species, i.e. CA, hydrogen ion and D2EHPA, it is elucidated that CA (RNH{sub 2}) is extracted with D2EHPA (HR`) according to the ion exchange mechanism, as the complex type, RNH{sub 3}R` (HR`){sub 3}, and the equilibrium constants (K{sub ex,CA}) for the extraction reactions are also evaluated. The quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) of K{sub ex,CA} values for each organic diluent is discussed using molecular modeling with semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations considering the solvent effect. (author)

  17. Use of Organic Solvents to Extract Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs) from Aged Contaminated Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Mao; JIN Xin; JIANG Xin; YANG Xing-Lun; SUN Ming-Ming; BIAN Yong-Rong; WANG Fang; GU Cheng-Gang; WEI Hai-Jiang; SONG Yang; WANG Lei

    2013-01-01

    Problems associated with organochlorine pesticide (OCP)-contaminated sites in China have received wide attention.To solve such problems,innovative ex-situ methods of site remediation are urgently needed.We investigated the feasibility of the extraction method with different organic solvents,ethanol,1-propanol,and three fractions of petroleum ether,using a soil collected from Wujiang (WJ),China,a region with long-term contamination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs).We evaluated different influential factors,including organic solvent concentration,washing time,mixing speed,solution-to-soil ratio,and washing temperature,on the removal of DDTs from the WJ soil.A set of relatively better parameters were selected for extraction with 100 mL L-1 petroleum ether (60-90 ℃):washing time of 180 min,mixing speed of 100 r min-1,solution-to-soil ratio of 10:1,and washing temperature of 50 ℃.These selected parameters were also applied on three other seriously OCP-polluted soils.Results demonstrated their broad-spectrum effectiveness and excellent OCP extraction performance on the contaminated soils with different characteristics.

  18. Extractive-transesterification of algal lipids under microwave irradiation with hexane as solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar; Mondala, Andro; Holmes, William; Hernandez, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    This study describes the use of microwaves (MW) for enhanced extractive-transesterification of algal lipids from dry algal biomass (Chlorella sp.). Two different single-step extractive-transesterification methods under MW irradiation were evaluated: (1) with ethanol as solvent/reactant and sodium hydroxide catalyst; and (2) with ethanol as reactant and hexane as solvent (sodium hydroxide catalyst). Biodiesel (fatty-acid-ethyl-esters, FAEE) yields from these two methods were compared with the conventional Bligh and Dyer (BD) method which followed a two-step extraction-transesterification process. The maximum lipid yields for MW, MW with hexane and BD methods were 20.1%, 20.1%, and 13.9%, respectively; while the FAEE conversion of the algal lipids were 96.2%, 94.3%, and 78.1%, respectively. The algae-biomass:ethanol molar ratio of 1:250-500 and 2.0-2.5% catalyst with reaction times around 6min were determined as optimum conditions for both methods. This study confers that the single-step non-conventional methods can contribute to higher algal lipid and FAEE yields.

  19. Response surface methodology to optimise Accelerated Solvent Extraction of steviol glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentzer, Jean-Baptiste; Alignan, Marion; Vaca-Garcia, Carlos; Rigal, Luc; Vilarem, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Following the approval of steviol glycosides as a food additive in Europe in December 2011, large-scale stevia cultivation will have to be developed within the EU. Thus there is a need to increase the efficiency of stevia evaluation through germplasm enhancement and agronomic improvement programs. To address the need for faster and reproducible sample throughput, conditions for automated extraction of dried stevia leaves using Accelerated Solvent Extraction were optimised. A response surface methodology was used to investigate the influence of three factors: extraction temperature, static time and cycle number on the stevioside and rebaudioside A extraction yields. The model showed that all the factors had an individual influence on the yield. Optimum extraction conditions were set at 100 °C, 4 min and 1 cycle, which yielded 91.8% ± 3.4% of total extractable steviol glycosides analysed. An additional optimisation was achieved by reducing the grind size of the leaves giving a final yield of 100.8% ± 3.3%.

  20. Dispersion-free solvent extraction of Cr(VI) from acidic solutions using hollow fiber contactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, Francisco J; Alonso, Manuel; Lopez, Félix A; Lopez-Delgado, Aurora; Padilla, Isabel

    2009-10-15

    The use of dispersión-free solvent extraction, through microporous hydrophobic membrane has been investigated. The hollow fiber contactor, with surface area of 1.4 m2 was used to extract Cr(VI) (0.005-0.12 g/L from aqueous sulphuric acidic media (pH 2.5-4.2 +/- 0.05). Several parameters such as extractant concentration, feed acidity and metal concentration in the initial aqueous solution were investigated. Results revealed that 15% v/v Cyanex 923 in Exxsol D-100 as organic phase and feed in the 2.5 pH range, gave optimum extraction (exceeding 95%) of Cr(VI) and it was possible to strip using 10 g/L hydrazine sulfate (also with recoveries exceeding 95%). In this step, Cr(VI) is immediately reduced to the less hazardous Cr(III) state. Results also showed that under the various experimental conditions, chromium(VI) extraction was rate-controlled by the interfacial reaction on the membrane surface. Typical overall mass transfer coefficients values are 4.2 x 10(-5) and 3.6 x 10(-6) cm/s for extraction and stripping operations, respectively.

  1. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the essential oil and solvent extracts of Mentha pulegium L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palić Ivan R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the total phenolic (TPC; expressed as gallic acid equivalents, GAE, per milligram of dry extract weight and the total flavonoid contents (TFC; expressed as quercetin equivalents, QE, per milligram of dry extract weight and antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil and hexane, diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Mentha pulegium L. (Lamiaceae collected in Serbia. The total phenolic content was in the range of 129.43-388.29 μg GAE/mg, while TFC ranged from 57.81 to 160.94 QE/mg; the highest TPC and TFC were found in the methanol extract. The antimicrobial activity (against five bacteria and two fungi species of the essential oil and solvent extracts was assessed using disc-diffusion method. However, the studied samples demonstrated a poor antimicrobial potential. The antioxidant activity was screened using five different tests: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assay (DPPH, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radical cation decolorization assay (ABTS, total reducing power (TRP, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity assay (CUPRAC; the methanol extract showed the strongest antioxidant potential. The results of the different antioxidant assays were correlated mutually and with the total flavonoid and total phenolic contents (regression analysis and agglomerative hierarchical clustering. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172047

  2. Extraction of DNA by magnetic ionic liquids: tunable solvents for rapid and selective DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin D; Nacham, Omprakash; Yu, Honglian; Li, Tianhao; Yamsek, Melissa M; Ronning, Donald R; Anderson, Jared L

    2015-02-03

    DNA extraction represents a significant bottleneck in nucleic acid analysis. In this study, hydrophobic magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) were synthesized and employed as solvents for the rapid and efficient extraction of DNA from aqueous solution. The DNA-enriched microdroplets were manipulated by application of a magnetic field. The three MILs examined in this study exhibited unique DNA extraction capabilities when applied toward a variety of DNA samples and matrices. High extraction efficiencies were obtained for smaller single-stranded and double-stranded DNA using the benzyltrioctylammonium bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL, while the dicationic 1,12-di(3-hexadecylbenzimidazolium)dodecane bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide bromotrichloroferrate(III) ([(C16BnIM)2C12(2+)][NTf2(-), FeCl3Br(-)]) MIL produced higher extraction efficiencies for larger DNA molecules. The MIL-based method was also employed for the extraction of DNA from a complex matrix containing albumin, revealing a competitive extraction behavior for the trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium tetrachloroferrate(III) ([P6,6,6,14(+)][FeCl4(-)]) MIL in contrast to the [(C8)3BnN(+)][FeCl3Br(-)] MIL, which resulted in significantly less coextraction of albumin. The MIL-DNA method was employed for the extraction of plasmid DNA from bacterial cell lysate. DNA of sufficient quality and quantity for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was recovered from the MIL extraction phase, demonstrating the feasibility of MIL-based DNA sample preparation prior to downstream analysis.

  3. Evaluating the performances of accelerated-solvent extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, and ultrasonic-assisted extraction for determining PCBs, HCHs and DDTs in sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng; GE Linke; ZHOU Chuanguang; YAOZiwei

    2011-01-01

    Three extraction techniques have been recently used for the quantitative extraction of semi-volatile organic pollutants in sediments,i.e.accelerated solvent extraction (ASE),microwave assisted extraction (MAE) and ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE).However,their extraction efficiencies have rarely been quantitatively compared using rigorous mathematical methods.In this paper,one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to evaluate the performance of ASE,MAE and UAE in the overall extraction of PCBs,DDTs and HCHs by analysis of their recoveries from the Standard Reference Material IAEA-417,a sediment sample certified by many international laboratories.Conclusions were drawn at a significance level of P≤0.05.No significant differences were found among the mean values for method recoveries using ASE,MAE and UAE.The mean values for real recoveries using ASE and MAE were nearly identical,but the real recovery using UAE was much lower.The concentrations of all PCBs,DDTs and HCHs except for CB52 and o,p'-DDT using UAE were the lowest.Comparing the results obtained using ASE with MAE,the concentrations of CB28,CB52,CB138,α-HCH,β-HCH,p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD were nearly identical,while the concentrations of other compounds were significantly different.Based on the low recoveries,it was concluded that UAE is a relatively inefficient extraction method,while ASE and MAE are equivalent methods.Taking into consideration the relative standard deviation (RSD)values,solvent volume,extraction time,and purchasing costs of the apparatus,MAE was considered superior to ASE for extraction of PCBs,DDTs and HCHs.

  4. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Properties and Phenolics of Different Solvent Extracts from Bark, Leaves and Seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre

    OpenAIRE

    Alkharfy, Khalid M; Anwarul-Hassan Gilani; Ghulam Rasul; Ghulam Shabir; Farooq Anwar; Zahid Iqbal Sajid

    2012-01-01

    This study appraises the antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes of various solvent extracts (absolute methanol, aqueous methanol, absolute ethanol, aqueous ethanol, absolute acetone, aqueous acetone, and deionized water) from bark, leaves and seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre. Maximum extraction yield of antioxidant components from bark (16.31%), leaves (11.42%) and seeds (21.51%) of P. pinnata was obtained using aqueous methanol (20:80). Of the extracts tested, the bark extract, obtain...

  5. Final Report - Energy Reduction and Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, John; Fanselow, Dan; Abbas, Charles; Sammons, Rhea; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-08-06

    3M and Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and demonstrate a novel membrane solvent extraction (MSE) process that can substantially reduce energy and water consumption in ethanol production, and accelerate the fermentation process. A cross-flow membrane module was developed, using porous membrane manufactured by 3M. A pilot process was developed that integrates fermentation, MSE and vacuum distillation. Extended experiments of 48-72 hours each were conducted to develop the process, verify its performance and begin establishing commercial viability.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-06-08

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of continuous processes for hydrogenation as well as continuous production of carbon foam and coke.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-08-11

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the facility modifications for continuous hydrotreating, as well as developing improved protocols for producing synthetic pitches.

  8. Two stage leaching of activated spent HDS catalyst and solvent extraction of aluminium using organo-phosphinic extractant, Cyanex 272.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Ho; Mohapatra, Debasish; Nam, Chul-Woo

    2007-09-05

    Spent catalyst generally contains valuable metals like Mo, Co, Ni on a supporting material, such as gamma-A1(2)O(3). In the present study, a two stage alkali/acid leaching process is proposed to selectively target molybdenum and cobalt/nickel separately to facilitate the downstream processing. Prior to the leaching, the spent catalyst was calcined at 500 degrees C to remove C and S; and to convert metal sulphides to metal oxides. 98% Mo, 93% Co and 90% Ni was effectively recovered by this process. The sulphuric acid leaching of spent catalyst, previously treated by alkali solutions to remove Mo, yielded a solution rich in Ni, Co and Al. In order to recover Co and Ni, the Al impurity must be eliminated. The extraction and stripping of Al has been carried out using the organo-phosphinic extractant, Cyanex 272 diluted in carbon tetrachloride. Quantitative Al extraction efficiency was achieved with 1.0M Cyanex 272 in two stages at an aqueous:organic (A:O) phase ratio of 1:1 and equilibrium pH of 3.2. Complete stripping of Al from the loaded organic was carried out using 2M H(2)SO(4) at an A:O phase ratio of 1:1. The extraction reaction proceeded via the cation exchange mechanism and the extracted species was assumed to be AlA(3).3HA. The extraction of Al was carried out in the presence of various ions to ascertain the tolerance limit of individual ions. The regenerated solvent was successfully used for 8 cycles without any significant loss of extraction efficiency, suggesting that Cyanex 272 is extremely stable under present experimental conditions.

  9. The Extraction Process of Trimethyl Xanthina in Vitro Culture of Callus Camellia Sinensis with ethyl Acetate Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trimethyl xanthina is one of the compounds contained bioactive culture in vitro Cammelia sinensis callus which is widely used in the field of food, beverage, agriculture and health industries. The presence of trimethyl xanthina on food, beverages and health is needed in a certain amount depending on the use which is achieved by the user. To get a certain amount of trimethyl xanthina from callus culture of Cammelia sinensis, the extraction process is performed on the water solvent, as well as non-solvent water / organic solvent such as ethyl acetate. The purpose of this study was to obtain profile of trimethyl xanthina in the extraction of Cammelia sinensis callus. The experimental methods used consisted of dissolution, filtration, extraction with water solvent and ethyl acetate, then followed by identification of trimethyl xanthina using HPLC. The results shows the profile form of trimethyl xanthina of Cammelia sinensis callus have similarities with the standard form of trimethyl xanthina.

  10. Determination of persistent organic pollutants in solid environmental samples using accelerated solvent extraction and supercritical fluid extraction. Exhaustive extraction and sorption/desorption studies of PCBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerklund, E.

    1998-10-01

    Human activity is constantly causing environmental problems due to production and release of numerous chemicals. A group of compounds of special concern is persistent organic pollutants (POP). These toxic, lipophilic chemicals have a high chemical and biological stability, and tend to accumulate in the lipid phase of living organisms. A major sink for POPs are sediments, and consequently these are important for the distribution of POPs in the aquatic environment. Traditionally, determination of POPs relay on exhaustive extraction using liquid extraction techniques (e.g. Soxhlet extraction developed in the late 19th century) followed by gas chromatographic analysis. Since liquid-solid extraction normally requires large volumes of organic solvents in combination with long extraction times and extract clean-up, there has been an increasing demand for improved technology. This should result in reduced organic solvent consumption and sample preparation time, at the same time improving the environment and cutting costs for POP monitoring. In this thesis two modern techniques with capability of fulfilling at least one of these goals have been investigated: (1) Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE), and (2) Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE). Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were chosen as model compounds in all experiments performed on environmental matrices, since they cover a relatively large range of physiochemical parameters. Important parameters influencing the overall extraction efficiency in ASE and SFE, are discussed and illustrated for a large number of sediments. It was demonstrated that, by careful consideration of the experimental parameters, both techniques are capable of replacing old methods such as Soxhlet extraction. ASE is somewhat faster than SFE, but the extracts generated in SFE are much cleaner and can be analyzed without sample clean-up. Consequently the overall sample preparation time may be substantially lower using SFE. However, ASE is important

  11. A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw for oil recovery from petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Hou, Haobo

    2015-01-01

    A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw was examined for recovering oil from the high-moisture petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge. Five solvents including cyclohexane (CHX), dichloromethane (DCM), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), ethyl acetate (EA), and 2-propanol (2-Pro) were examined. It was found that these solvents except 2-Pro showed a promising oil recovery rate of about 40%, but the recycling of DCM solvent after oil extraction was quite low. Three solvents (CHX, MEK and EA) were then selected for examining the effect of freeze/thaw treatment on improving the quality of recovered oil. This treatment increased the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in recovered oil from about 40% to 60% for both MEK and EA extractions, but little effect was observed for CHX extraction. Although the solid residue after oil recovery had a significantly decreased TPH content, a high concentration of heavy metals was observed, indicating that this residue may require proper management. In general, the combination of solvent extraction with freeze/thaw is effective for high-moisture oily hazardous waste treatment.

  12. Effect of biomass pre-treatment and solvent extraction on beta-carotene and lycopene recovery from Blakeslea trispora cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, E; Roukas, T; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, M

    2008-01-01

    The production of carotenoids from Blakeslea trispora cells in a synthetic medium has been reported, with the main products being beta-carotene, lycopene, and gamma-carotene. The effect of biomass pretreatment and solvent extraction on their selective recovery is reported here. Eight solvents of class II and III of the International Conference of Harmonization: ethanol, methanol, acetone, 2-propanol, pentane, hexane, ethyl acetate, and ethyl ether, and HPLC analysis were used for the evaluation of their selectivities towards the three main carotenoids with regard to different biomass pre-treatment. The average C(max) values (maximum concentration of caronoids in a specific solvent) were estimated to 16 mg/L with the five out of eight solvents investigated, whereas methanol, pentane, and hexane gave lower values of 10, 11, and 9 mg/L, respectively. The highest carotenoid yield was obtained in the case of wet biomass, where 44-56% is recovered with one solvent and three extractions and the rest is recovered only after subsequent treatment with acetone; thus, four extractions of 2.5 h are needed. Two extractions of 54 min are enough to recover carotenoids from dehydrated biomass, with the disadvantage of a high degree of degradation. Our results showed that, for maximum carotenoid recovery, ethyl ether, 2-propanol, and ethanol could be successfully used with biomass without prior treatment, whereas fractions enriched in beta-carotene or lycopene can be obtained by extraction with the proper solvent, thus avoiding degradation due to time-consuming processes.

  13. Solvent Extraction of Copper: An Extractive Metallurgy Exercise for Undergraduate Teaching Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smellie, Iain A.; Forgan, Ross S.; Brodie, Claire; Gavine, Jack S.; Harris, Leanne; Houston, Daniel; Hoyland, Andrew D.; McCaughan, Rory P.; Miller, Andrew J.; Wilson, Liam; Woodhall, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    A multidisciplinary experiment for advanced undergraduate students has been developed in the context of extractive metallurgy. The experiment serves as a model of an important modern industrial process that combines aspects of organic/inorganic synthesis and analysis. Students are tasked to prepare a salicylaldoxime ligand and samples of the…

  14. Online determination of copper in aluminum alloy by microchip solvent extraction using isotope dilution ICP-MS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohno, Masashi; Seki, Tatsuya; Chikama, Katsumi

    2009-09-15

    Isotope dilution mass spectroscopy (IDMS)/ICP-MS combined with microchip solvent extraction was successfully applied for the online determination of copper in an aluminum alloy. The microchip solvent extraction was developed for the separation of Cu from major element, and optimal pH range was wider than that of the batchwise extraction method. The dimensions of the microchip were 30 mm x 70 mm and that of micro-channel on the microchip was 180 microm wide and 40 microm deep. The copper complex with 8-hydroxyquinoline was extracted into o-xylene at pH 5.5 and back extracted with 0.1 mol l(-1) nitric acid at flow rate of 20 microl min(-1). The total extraction efficiency (water/organic solvent/nitric acid) was around 40%. IDMS/ICP-MS was coupled with solvent extraction for precise determination of Cu. The extraction and back-extraction on the microchip took about 1s and the total measurement time for the IDMS/ICP-MS was about 40s/sample. The blank value of this method was 0.1 ng g(-1). The proposed method was used for the determination of Cu in Al standard materials (JSAC 0121-C, The Japan Society for Analytical Chemistry and 7074 Al alloy, Nippon Light Metal Co. Ltd.). The obtained analytical results are in good agreement with the certified values.

  15. Supercritical fluid extraction: spectroscopic study of interactions comparison to solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustenholtz Farawila, A

    2005-06-15

    Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO{sub 2}) was chosen to study Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) of cesium and uranium. At first, crown ethers were considered as chelating agents for the SFE of cesium. The role of water and its interaction with crown ethers were especially studied using Fourier-Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy in SF-CO{sub 2}. A sandwich configuration between two crown ethers and a water molecule was observed in the SF-CO{sub 2} phase for the first time. The equilibrium between the single and the bridge configurations was defined. The enthalpy of the hydrogen bond formation was also calculated. These results were then compared to the one in different mixtures of chloroform and carbon tetra-chloride using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). To conclude this first part and in order to understand the whole picture of the recovery of cesium, I studied the role of water in the equilibrium between the cesium and the di-cyclo-hexano18-crown-6.In a second part, the supercritical fluid extraction of uranium was studied in SF-CO{sub 2}. For this purpose, different complexes of Tributyl Phosphate (TBP), nitric acid and water were used as chelating and oxidizing agents. I first used FT-IR to study the TBP-water interaction in SF-CO{sub 2}. These results were then compared to the one obtained with NMR in chloroform. NMR spectroscopy was also used to understand the TBP-nitric acid-water interaction first alone and then in chloroform. To conclude my research work, I succeeded to improve the efficiency of uranium extraction and stripping into water for a pilot-plant where enriched uranium is extracted from incinerated waste coming from nuclear fuel fabrication. TBP-nitric acid complexes were used in SF-CO{sub 2} for the extraction of uranium from ash. (author)

  16. Antioxidant activities of lead (Leucaena leucocephala) seed as affected by extraction solvent, prior dechlorophyllisation and drying methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjakul, Soottawat; Kittiphattanabawon, Phanat; Sumpavapol, Punnanee; Maqsood, Sajid

    2014-11-01

    Extracts of brown lead (Leucaena leucocephala) seed prepared using different extraction solvents were determined for antioxidative activities using different assays. The highest yield (3.4-4.0%) was obtained when water was used as an extraction solvent, compared with all ethanolic extracts used (1.2-2.0 %) (P < 0.05). Much lower chlorophyll content was found in the water extract. When hot water was used, the resulting extract contained lower total phenolic and mimosine contents (P < 0.05). In general, 60-80 % ethanolic extracts had higher 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activities, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and metal chelating activity than water extracts (P < 0.05). When brown lead seed was dechlorophyllised prior to extraction, the water extract had slightly increased yield with lower chlorophyll content. Nevertheless, prior chlorophyll removal resulted in the increase in antioxidative activities but lower total phenolic and mimosine contents (P < 0.05). Generally, phenolic compounds and mimosine were more released when water was used as the extraction solvent, while the lower amount of chlorophyll was extracted. Oven-drying exhibited the negative effect on antioxidative activities and mimosine content. The higher antioxidative activities with concomitant higher total phenolic and mimosine contents were found in water extract dried by freeze drying. Thus, extraction solvent, dechlorophyllisation and drying methods directly influenced the yield and antioxidative activity of lead seed extract.

  17. Thallium extraction from hydrochloric acid media into a deep eutectic solvent using bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kate; Volia, Merinda; Tereshatov, Evgeny; Folden, Charles, III

    2016-09-01

    The chemical properties of superheavy elements are relatively unknown due to their short half-lives and difficulty of production. In preparation for a future experiment to study the chemical properties of element 113, separation techniques have been used to study the behavior of its homologs, In and Tl. Previous work studied the liquid-liquid extraction of radioactive 201Tl (t1 / 2 = 3 . 04 d) from various concentrations of HCl into a mixture of menthol and lauric acid that formed a so-called deep eutectic solvent (DES). This work focuses on the effects of adding an extraction agent, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (HDEHP), to the DES on the efficiency of thallium extraction. The extraction of Tl(I) was generally poor, both with and without HDEHP added. In contrast, 111In (t1 / 2 = 2 . 80 d) showed significant extraction using HDEHP added to the same DES. This difference in behavior could potentially be exploited in a future experiment on the chemistry of element 113. National Science Foundation.

  18. Compound Specific Extraction of Camptothecin from Nothapodytes nimmoniana and Piperine from Piper nigrum Using Accelerated Solvent Extractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhya, Vinayak; Pai, Sandeep R; Sharma, Ajay K; Hegde, Harsha V; Kholkute, Sanjiva D; Joshi, Rajesh K

    2014-01-01

    Effects of varying temperatures with constant pressure of solvent on extraction efficiency of two chemically different alkaloids were studied. Camptothecin (CPT) from stem of Nothapodytes nimmoniana (Grah.) Mabb. and piperine from the fruits of Piper nigrum L. were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extractor (ASE). Three cycles of extraction for a particular sample cell at a given temperature assured complete extraction. CPT and piperine were determined and quantified by using a simple and efficient UFLC-PDA (245 and 343 nm) method. Temperature increased efficiency of extraction to yield higher amount of CPT, whereas temperature had diminutive effect on yield of piperine. Maximum yield for CPT was achieved at 80°C and for piperine at 40°C. Thus, the study determines compound specific extraction of CPT from N. nimmoniana and piperine from P. nigrum using ASE method. The present study indicates the use of this method for simple, fast, and accurate extraction of the compound of interest.

  19. SOLVENT EXTRACTION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE U.S. FUEL CYCLE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry A. Todd

    2011-10-01

    Treatment or processing of used nuclear fuel to recycle uranium and plutonium has historically been accomplished using the well known PUREX process. The PUREX process has been used on an industrial scale for over 60 years in the nuclear industry. Research is underway to develop advanced separation methods for the recovery of other used fuel components, such as the minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) for possible transmutation in fast spectrum reactors, or other constituents (e.g. Cs, Sr, transition metals, lanthanides) to help facilitate effective waste management options. This paper will provide an overview of new solvent extraction processes developed for advanced nuclear fuel cycles, and summarize recent experimental results. This will include the utilization of new extractants for selective separation of target metals and new processes developed to selectively recover one or more elements from used fuel.

  20. Nickel solvent extraction from cold purification filter cakes of Angouran mine concentrate using LIX984N

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AA Balesini; A Zakeri; H Razavizadeh; A Khani

    2013-01-01

    Cold purification filter cakes generated in the hydrometallurgical processing of Angouran mine zinc concentrate commonly contain significant amounts of Zn, Cd, and Ni ions and thus are valuable resources for metal recovery. In this research, a nickel containing solution that was obtained from sulfuric acid leaching of the filter cake following cadmium and zinc removal was subjected to solvent extraction experiments using 10vol%LIX984N diluted in kerosene. Under optimum experimental conditions (pH 5.3, volume ratio of organic/aqueous (O:A) = 2:1, and contact time = 5 min), more than 97.1% of nickel was extracted. Nickel was stripped from the loaded organic by contacting with a 200 g/L sulfuric acid solution, from which 77.7% of nickel was recovered in a single contact at the optimum conditions (pH 1-1.5, O:A = 5:1, and contact time=15 min).

  1. Influence of extraction solvent on antioxidant capacity value of oleaster measured by ORAC method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Gorkem; Sogut, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) is a widely used hydrogen atom transfer-based method which measures the antioxidant capacity of natural products. ORAC values of oleaster (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.), which was extracted with ethanol/acetone (7:3, v/v), ethanol/water (1:1, v/v) and methanol/water (1:1, v/v) in order to evaluate the effects of solvent type on antioxidant capacity, were examined. In general, results revealed that ethanol/water extracts exhibited better antioxidant capacity values. Furthermore, results obtained by using ORAC-eosin y (ORAC-EY), one of the widely used derivative of fluorescein (FL), as a fluorescent probe were compared with those obtained by using ORAC-FL. According to the results, ORAC-EY values were found to be compatible with ORAC-FL values.

  2. Molecular Characteristics of Kraft-AQ Pulping Lignin Fractionated by Sequential Organic Solvent Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Kraft-AQ pulping lignin was sequentially fractionated by organic solvent extractions and the molecular properties of each fraction were characterized by chemical degradation, GPC, UV, FT-IR, 13C-NMR and thermal analysis. The average molecular weight and polydispersity of each lignin fraction increased with its hydrogen-bonding capacity (Hildebrand solubility parameter. In addition, the ratio of the non-condensed guaiacyl/syringyl units and the content of β-O-4 linkages increased with the increment of the lignin fractions extracted successively with hexane, diethylether, methylene chloride, methanol, and dioxane. Furthermore, the presence of the condensation reaction products was contributed to the higher thermal stability of the larger molecules.

  3. Extraction of Cs-137 by alcohol-water solvents from plants containing cardiac glycosides

    CERN Document Server

    Dzyubak, S N; Dzyubak, O P; Sorokin, P V; Popov, V F; Orlov, A A; Krasnov, V P; Gubin, Yu.I.

    2001-01-01

    As a result of nuclear power plant accidents, large areas receive radioactive inputs of Cs-137. This cesium accumulates in herbs growing in such territories. The problem is whether the herbs contaminated by radiocesium may be used as a raw material for medicine. The answer depends on the amount of Cs-137 transfered from the contaminated raw material to the medicine. We have presented new results of the transfer of Cs-137 from contaminated Digitalis grandiflora Mill. and Convallaria majalis L. to medicine. We found that the extraction of Cs-137 depends strongly on the hydrophilicity of the solvent. For example 96.5%(vol.) ethyl alcohol extracts less Cs-137 (11.6%) than 40%(vol.) ethyl alcohol or pure water (66.2%). The solubility of the cardiac glycosides is inverse to the solubility of cesium, which may be of use in the technological processes for manufacturing ecologically pure herbal medicine.

  4. Solvent extraction of jojoba oil from pre-pressed jojoba meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Haron, Dalia E.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The solvent extraction process of jojoba oil from the meal cake obtained after the mechanical pressing of jojoba seeds was studied. Commercial hexane and petroleum ether were used as solvents and the extraction was carried out at temperatures ranging from 30 to 55 °C using solvent-to-solid ratios, R between 2 and 15 L/kg. The equilibrium compositions of the solvent and solid phases were determined. Based on the equilibrium data, the partition coefficient or distribution ratio, D of the oil between both phases was estimated. Also, the number of extraction stages necessary to achieve a certain degree of oil recovery has been determined using different hexane-to-meal ratios. Jojoba oil was also tested for its physical and chemical properties including chemical composition, percentage fatty acid, peroxide value, flash point, fire point, pour point, refractive index, saponification and iodine values. The stability of jojoba oil during storage at room temperature and during heat treatment was also studied.Se ha estudiado el proceso de extracción con disolventes del aceite contenido en la harina residual del prensado mecánico de las semillas de jojoba. Como disolventes se han utilizado hexano técnico y éter de petróleo, habiéndose efectuado extracciones a temperaturas comprendidas entre 30 ºC y 55 ºC , con relaciones de disolvente a sólido, R, de entre 12 y 15 L/kg. Se han determinado las composiciones del extracto y del residuo sólido en el equilibrio y a partir de los datos de equilibrio, se ha estimado el coeficiente de partición o cociente de distribución, D, del aceite entre ambas fases. Asimismo, se ha determinado el número de etapas de extracción necesarias para conseguir un cierto grado de recuperación del aceite, utilizando diferentes relaciones entre hexano y harina. También se han determinado las propiedades físicas y químicas del aceite de jojoba, incluyendo la composición química, el porcentaje de ácidos grasos

  5. Supercritical CO2 extraction of Schinus molle L with co-solvents: mathematical modeling and antimicrobial applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Scopel; Roberto Góes Neto; Manuel Alves Falcão; Eduardo Cassel; Rubem Mário Figueiró Vargas

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the antimicrobial activity of the Schinus molle L. leaves extracts obtained under supercritical conditions using carbon dioxide and co-solvents. Antimicrobial qualitative evaluation was carried out through the bioautography technique and the microorganisms studied were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosas, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The supercritical fluid extraction was carried out in a pilot scale equipment using carbo...

  6. Speciation of iron (II) and (III) by using solvent extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, Mehmet [Department of Chemistry, Science and Arts Faculty, Firat University, Elazig (Turkey)]. E-mail: myaman@firat.edu.tr; Kaya, Gokce [Department of Chemistry, Science and Arts Faculty, Firat University, Elazig (Turkey)

    2005-05-17

    A method for speciation, preconcentration and separation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in different matrices was developed using solvent extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry. PAN as complexing reagent for Fe{sup 2+} and chloroform as organic solvent were used. The complex of Fe{sup 2+}-PAN was extracted into chloroform phase in the pH range of 0.75-4.0 and Fe{sup 3+} remains in water phase in the pH range 0.75-1.25. The optimum conditions for maximum recovery of Fe{sup 2+} and minimum recovery of Fe{sup 3+} were determined as pH = 1, the stirring time of 20 min, the PAN amount of 0.5 mg and chloroform volume of 8 mL. The developed method was applied to the determination of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in tea infusion, fruit juice, cola and pekmez. It is seen that there is high bioavailable iron (Fe{sup 2+}) in pekmez. The developed method is sensitive, simple and need the shorter time in comparison with other similar studies.

  7. Recovery of nickel, cobalt, copper and zinc in sulphate and chloride solutions using synergistic solvent extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu Yong Cheng; Keith R. Barnard; Wensheng Zhang; Zhaowu Zhu; Yoko Pranolo

    2016-01-01

    A number of synergistic solvent extraction (SSX) systems have been developed to recover nickel, cobalt, zinc and copper from sulphuric and chloride leach solutions by the solvent extraction team of CSIRO, Australia. These in-clude (1) Versatic 10/CLX50 system for the separation of Ni from Ca in sulphate solutions, (2) Versatic 10/4PC system for the separation of Ni and Co from Mn/Mg/Ca in sulphate solutions, (3) Cyanex 471X/HRJ-4277 system for the separation of Zn from Cd in sulphate solutions, (4) Versatic 10/LIX63 system for the separation of Co from Mn/Mg/Ca in sulphate solutions, (5) Versatic 10/LIX63/TBP system for separation of Ni and Co from Mn/Mg/Ca in sulphate solutions, (6) Versatic 10/LIX63 system for the separation of cobalt from nickel in sulphate solutions by difference in kinetics, (7) Cyanex 272/LIX84 system for the separation of Cu/Fe/Zn from Ni/Co in sulphate solutions, (8) Versatic 10/LIX63/TBP system to recover Cu/Ni from strong chloride solutions, and (9) Versatic 10/LIX63 system to separate Cu from Fe in strong chloride solutions. The synergistic effect on metal separation and efficiency is presented and possible industrial applications are demonstrated. The chemical stability of selected SSX systems is also reported.

  8. A high-throughput platform for low-volume high-temperature/pressure sealed vessel solvent extractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damm, Markus [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microwave Chemistry (CDLMC) and Institute of Chemistry, Karl-Franzens-University Graz, Heinrichstrasse 28, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Kappe, C. Oliver, E-mail: oliver.kappe@uni-graz.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microwave Chemistry (CDLMC) and Institute of Chemistry, Karl-Franzens-University Graz, Heinrichstrasse 28, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Parallel low-volume coffee extractions in sealed-vessel HPLC/GC vials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extractions are performed at high temperatures and pressures (200 Degree-Sign C/20 bar). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid caffeine determination from the liquid phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Headspace analysis of volatiles using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). - Abstract: A high-throughput platform for performing parallel solvent extractions in sealed HPLC/GC vials inside a microwave reactor is described. The system consist of a strongly microwave-absorbing silicon carbide plate with 20 cylindrical wells of appropriate dimensions to be fitted with standard HPLC/GC autosampler vials serving as extraction vessels. Due to the possibility of heating up to four heating platforms simultaneously (80 vials), efficient parallel analytical-scale solvent extractions can be performed using volumes of 0.5-1.5 mL at a maximum temperature/pressure limit of 200 Degree-Sign C/20 bar. Since the extraction and subsequent analysis by either gas chromatography or liquid chromatography coupled with mass detection (GC-MS or LC-MS) is performed directly from the autosampler vial, errors caused by sample transfer can be minimized. The platform was evaluated for the extraction and quantification of caffeine from commercial coffee powders assessing different solvent types, extraction temperatures and times. For example, 141 {+-} 11 {mu}g caffeine (5 mg coffee powder) were extracted during a single extraction cycle using methanol as extraction solvent, whereas only 90 {+-} 11 were obtained performing the extraction in methylene chloride, applying the same reaction conditions (90 Degree-Sign C, 10 min). In multiple extraction experiments a total of {approx}150 {mu}g caffeine was extracted from 5 mg commercial coffee powder. In addition to the quantitative caffeine determination, a comparative qualitative analysis of the liquid phase coffee

  9. Towards green analysis of virgin olive oil phenolic compounds: Extraction by a natural deep eutectic solvent and direct spectrophotometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Vito Michele; Clemente, Antonia; Summo, Carmine; Pasqualone, Antonella; Caponio, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The determination of phenolic compounds in extra virgin olive oils (EVOO) by means of rapid, low-cost, environment-free methods would be a desirable achievement. A natural deep eutectic solvent (DES) based on glucose and lactic acid was considered as extraction solvent for phenolic compounds in EVOO. DESs are green solvents characterized by high availability, biodegradability, safety, and low cost. The spectrophotometric characteristics of DES extracts of 65 EVOO samples were related to the total phenolic content of the oils, assessed by methanol-water extraction coupled to the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. A regression model (ncalibration=45, nvalidation=20), including the absorbance at two wavelengths (257, 324nm), was obtained, with an adjusted R(2)=0.762. Therefore the DES could provide a promising and viable approach for a green screening method of phenolic compounds in EVOO, by means of simple spectrophotometric measurements of extracts, even for on-field analysis (for example in olive mills).

  10. Solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from Dryopteris fragrans and evaluation of antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Juan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Li, Chun-Ying; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Mu, Pan-Song; Fu, Yu-Jie

    2012-07-15

    Solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) of the essential oil from Dryopteris fragrans and its antioxidant activity were investigated. A central composite design combined with response surface methodology was applied to study the influences of extraction time, irradiation power and humidity (proportion of water pretreatment). A maximal extraction yield of 0.33% was achieved under optimal conditions of extraction time 34 min, irradiation power 520 W and humidity 51%. Sixteen compounds, representing 89.65% of the oil, were identified, of which the major ones, (1R,4S,11R)-4,6,6,11-tetramethyltricyclo[5.4.0.0(4,8)]undecan-1-ol (30.49%), 1R,4S,7S,11R-2,2,4,8-tetramethyltricyclo[5.3.1.0(4,11)]undec-8-ene (22.91%) and, 1,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-2,5,5,8a-tetramethyl-1-naphthalenemethanol (15.11%), accounted for 68.51% of the oil. The antioxidant activity of the essential oil was assessed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), β-carotene/linoleic acid, and reducing power assay, the IC50 values were 0.19, 0.09 and 0.18 mg/mL, respectively. All these results suggest that SFME represents an excellent alternative protocol for production of essential oils from plant materials.

  11. Extraction of phenolic compounds from extra virgin olive oil by a natural deep eutectic solvent: Data on UV absorption of the extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Vito Michele; Clemente, Antonia; Summo, Carmine; Pasqualone, Antonella; Caponio, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    This data article refers to the paper "Towards green analysis of virgin olive oil phenolic compounds: extraction by a natural deep eutectic solvent and direct spectrophotometric detection" [1]. A deep eutectic solvent (DES) based on lactic acid and glucose was used as green solvent for phenolic compounds. Eight standard phenolic compounds were solubilized in the DES. Then, a set of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) samples (n=65) were submitted to liquid-liquid extraction by the DES. The standard solutions and the extracts were analyzed by UV spectrophotometry. This article reports the spectral data of both the standard solutions and the 65 extracts, as well as the total phenolic content of the corresponding oils, assessed by the Folin-Ciocalteu assay.

  12. Separation of baicalein from baicalin by means of solvent extraction; Yobai chushutsuho ni yoru baicalein /baicalin no bunri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazaki, H.; Ishimaru, M. [Tsumura and Co., Ibaraki (Japan); Inoue, K.; Yoshida, K. [Saga University, Saga (Japan)

    1996-03-10

    In this work, solvent extraction behaviors of some commercial extractants such as tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO), Cyanex 923 and Cyanex 925 for baicalein and baicalin decocted from Suctellaria root, which is a crude drug, were examined to elucidate their mutual separation by solvent extraction. Baicalein was extracted selectively by trialkylphosphine oxides over baicalin. From analyses of the extraction mechanism the equilibrium constant of extraction reaction and enthalpy change were evaluated. A porous resin impregnated with Cyanex 923 in XAD-7 was prepared to remove baicalein from baicalin by using a column packed with the resin. Baicalein was able to be completely removed by this column operation. 10 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Impact of quality parameters on the recovery of putrescine and cadaverine in fish using methanol-hydrochloric acid solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Nicole L; Pivarnik, Lori F; Ellis, P Christopher; Lee, Chong M

    2011-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) extraction by AOAC Official Method 996.07 has resulted in low amine recoveries in fresh fish tissue. Addition of 25% 0.4 M HCl to the 75% methanol-water extraction solvent resulted in higher recoveries of putrescine and cadaverine. Average putrescine recovery increased from 55 to 92% in flounder, scup, bluefish, and salmon; from 92 to 98% in mackerel; and from 83 to 107% in processed mackerel. Average cadaverine recovery increased from 57 to 95% in flounder, scup, bluefish, and salmon; from 91 to 97% in mackerel; and from 92 to 108% in processed mackerel. Fish stored on ice for 12 days also showed differences between background concentrations determined with the two solvents. However, the values decreased with storage time, indicating that degradation of the protein matrix may cause more comparable measurements between the two solvents. However, consistently higher putrescine and cadaverine measurements were determined using MeOH-HCl. Although significant differences in the extraction of amines from the high-fat fish tissue were not seen between MeOH and MeOH-HCl, it would be ideal to have one solvent for biogenic amine extraction. This study confirms that MeOH-HCl is a better solvent for complete extraction and recovery of putrescine and cadaverine in fresh and processed fish tissues.

  14. Deep Eutectic Solvent-Based Microwave-Assisted Method for Extraction of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Components from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep eutectic solvents (DESs have attracted significant attention as a promising green media. In this work, twenty-five kinds of benign choline chloride-based DESs with microwave-assisted methods were applied to quickly extract active components from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae. The extraction factors, including temperature, time, power of microwave, and solid/liquid ratio, were investigated systematically by response surface methodology. The hydrophilic and hydrophobic ingredients were extracted simultaneously under the optimized conditions: 20 vol% of water in choline chloride/1,2-propanediol (1:1, molar ratio as solvent, microwave power of 800 W, temperature at 70 °C, time at 11.11 min, and solid/liquid ratio of 0.007 g·mL−1. The extraction yield was comparable to, or even better than, conventional methods with organic solvents. The microstructure alteration of samples before and after extraction was also investigated. The method validation was tested as the linearity of analytes (r2 > 0.9997 over two orders of magnitude, precision (intra-day relative standard deviation (RSD < 2.49 and inter-day RSD < 2.96, and accuracy (recoveries ranging from 95.04% to 99.93%. The proposed DESs combined with the microwave-assisted method provided a prominent advantage for fast and efficient extraction of active components, and DESs could be extended as solvents to extract and analyze complex environmental and pharmaceutical samples.

  15. Antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted organic solvent extracts of fruits,flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis L.from Jaffna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E; Christy; Jeyaseelan; S; Jenothiny; MK; Pathmanathan; JP; Jeyadevan

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To reveal the antibacterial activity of sequentially extracted different cold organic solvent extracts of fruits,flowers and leaves of Lawsonia inermis(L against)some pathogenic bacteria.Methods:Powders of fruits,flowers and leaves of L inermis were continuously extracted with dichloromethane(DCM),ethyl acetate and ethanol at ambient temperature.The dried extracts were prepared into different concentrations and tested for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method,and also the extracts were tested to detennine the available phytochemicals.Results:Except DCM extract of flower all other test extracts revealed inhibitory effect on all tested bacteria and their inhibitory effect differed significantly(P<0.05).The highest inhibitory effect was showed by ethyl acetate extract of flower against Staphylococcus aureus(S.aureus)and Pseudomonas aeruginosa(P.aeruginosa),and ethyl acetate extract of fruit on Escherichia coli(E.coli)and Bacillus subtilis(6.subtilis).The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flower,fruit and leaf expressed inhibition even at 1 mg/100μl against all test bacteria.Among the tested phytochemicals flavonoids were detected in all test extracts except DCM extract of flower.Conclusions:The study demonstrated that the ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of fruit and flower of L inermis are potentially better source of antibacterial agents compared to leaf extracts of respective solvents.

  16. Application of 2k Full Factorial Design in Optimization of Solvent-Free Microwave Extraction of Ginger Essential Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Mumtaj Shah; S K Garg

    2014-01-01

    The solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from ginger was optimized using a 23 full factorial design in terms of oil yield to determine the optimum extraction conditions. Sixteen experiments were carried out with three varying parameters, extraction time, microwave power, and type of sample for two levels of each. A first order regression equation best fits the experimental data. The predicted values calculated by the regression model were in good agreement with the experimental ...

  17. Ternary diagram of extract proteins / solvent systems: Sesame, soybean and lupine proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed, S. S.

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction as a method of extracting protein from oilseed meals offers the advantage of higher efficiency. Unfortunately, the published literature points to the gap in the work concerned with the necessary equilibrium diagram to design due process equipment for such extracts. Initiated by this lack of basic knowledge, the present study has been undertaken to provide the equilibrium data for three different ternary systems, namely: sesame protein / sodium hydroxide solution system, soybean protein / sodium hydroxide solution system and lupine protein / sodium hydroxide solution system. These oilseed meals were selected because of their high protein content (53.4 %, 46.2 % and 42.3 % protein, respectively. The study also concentrated on the evaluation of the major parameters affecting the extraction process, i.e. the normality of the sodium hydroxide solution used as extracting solvent and the initial oilseed solvent to meal feeding ratio. The results obtained indicate that the best normality of sodium hydroxide solution used for extracting soybean and lupine protein is 0.02N, while 0.04N solution is required for extracting sesame protein. Also, operating at a liquid to solid feed ratio of 30:1 and 50:1 for soybean, sesame and lupine, respectively, is enough to reach a high protein extract. Correlations were presented for each locus of under flow compositions, graphically acquired, and the data are compared with those calculated by analytical solutions.La extracción con disolventes es un método de extracción de proteínas de las harinas de semillas oleaginosas que ofrece la ventaja de su elevada eficacia. Desafortunadamente, la bibliografía coincide en el vacío existente con respecto a los diagramas de equilibrio necesarios para el diseño de los equipos adecuados. Debido a esta falta de conocimientos, el presente estudio se ha llevado a cabo para obtener datos de tres sistemas ternarios: sistema proteína de sésamo / disolución de

  18. Study to find the best extraction solvent for use with guava leaves (Psidium guajava L.) for high antioxidant efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Jongkwon; Lee, Soojung; Elam, Marcus L; Sarah A Johnson; Kang, Jonghoon; Bahram H. Arjmandi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of guava leaves extracted using solvents of water, ethanol, methanol, and different concentrations of hydroethanolic solvents on phenolic compounds and flavonoids, and antioxidant properties have been investigated. The antioxidant capability was assessed based on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical and 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical-scavenging abilities, reducing power, and nitric oxide-and nitrate-scavenging activities. The results demonstrated t...

  19. Effect of different solvents extracts and mode of action of Loktanella spp. Gb03 on toxic dinoflagellate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Anmar; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-11-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the algicidal activity of Loktanella sp. Gb-03 bacterial extracts against toxic dinoflagellate, using various polar and non-polar solvents. For this purpose, six different solvent extracts were prepared (i.e. methanol, ethyl acetate, hexane, chloroform, acetonitrile and water). Ratio of 1:100 (v:v) (extract to dinoflagellate culture) of each extract was used for preliminary algicidal activity screening against toxic dinoflagellate Coolia malaynesis. Dinoflagellate cells at the stationary phase (1.0 × 103 cells/ mL) were treated with 1% (v/v) of each extract by using 24-well microplate. The plates were then incubated for 24 hours at dinoflagellate culture condition (under a light intensity of 140 µmol m-2s-1 and 12:12 hours light:dark photoperiod). The result of algicidal activity screening showed that all 6 extracts from Loktanella sp. Gb-03 had different ranges of algicidal activity against the toxic dinoflagellates. Ethyl acetate extract showed the highest activity against C. malaynesis and also other harmful dinoflagellate (Alexandrium sp. Alexandrium leei, Alexandrium affine, Alexandrium tamiyavanichi, Alexandrium tamarense, Gambierdiscus belizeanus, and Ostreopsis). This study was the first to explore the algicidal activity of Loktanella sp. Gb-03 extracts against toxic dinoflagellate with ethyl acetate as the best solvent to extract algicidal active compounds.

  20. Preliminary phytochemical investigation and in vitro anthelmintic activities ofMaesa lanceolata solvent extracts againstLymnatis nilotica (aquatic leech)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wondu Dagnaw; Alemayehu Mekonnen

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate phytochemicals constituents and check the anthelmintic activities of Maesa lanceolata (M. lanceolata) solvent extracts against aquatic leech. Methods: Several phytochemicals were tested and screened from petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol extracts ofM. lanceolata extracts and their anthelmintic activities were done based on the standard procedure against aquatic leech. Piperazine citrate (20 mg/mL) was used as a reference standard while distilled water was used as a control. Results:Qualitative phytochemical analysis of different solvent (petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol) extracts ofM. lanceolata revealed the presence of flavonoids and alkaloids in chloroform extracts and alkaloids in methanol extracts. In addition to the qualitative analysis of the plant extracts, the anthelmintic effects were also evaluated against aquatic leech (Lymnatis nilotica). Accordingly, various concentrations (10, 20, 40 and 60 mg/mL) of each solvent (petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol) extracts and 20 mg/mL of standard drug were prepared and tested against the selected leech. All the tested concentrations showed anthelmintic activities in a dose-dependent manner. From petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol extracts, chloroform extracts with 60 mg/mL concentration was effective with the paralytic time of (29.00 ± 1.06) min and death time of (65.00 ± 2.00) min in gradient extraction method. But in the case of extraction without gradient method, methanol extracts with 60 mg/mL concentration showed effective paralysis and death time (26.00 ± 1.73) and (56.00 ± 1.56) min, respectively, against the selected aquatic leech. Conclusions:The present study revealed thatM. lanceolata extracts have magic anthelmintic activities which are helpful to treat aquatic leeches (Lymnatis nilotica) which are associated with the nasal cavities of animals and human beings.

  1. Solvent extraction separation of copper and zinc from MSWI fly ash leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinfeng; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2015-10-01

    Fly ash from combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) contains significant amounts of metals, some of which are valuable and some of which are potentially toxic. This type of ash is most often stabilized and landfilled which means that the metals will be difficult to reclaim at a later stage. In recent years efforts have been made to develop feasible methods to recover selected metals, such as Zn, from MSW fly ash. If this would be possible, a significant amount of valuable metals could be re-inserted in the industrial material loops. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a process for recovery of Cu and Zn from MSW combustion fly ash based on hydrochloric acid leaching followed by two solvent extraction processes, one for each metal. The separation of Cu from the acid leachate was done using an aldoxime extractant, LIX860N-I, in kerosene and a mixture of phosphine oxides, Cyanex 923, also in kerosene, was used for extraction of Zn from the Cu-depleted aqueous phase. The extraction of Cu was selective, but a significant amount of other metals, such as Fe and Pb, were co-extracted together with Zn. It was shown that it is possible to decrease the contamination of Fe by using a suitable concentration of nitric acid solution for stripping or by removing the contaminating metals through cementation. The suggested process was tested for two MSW combustion fly ashes in laboratory scale experiments and gave Cu yields of 69-87% and Zn yields of 75-80% based on the contents in the ash.

  2. ENCAPSULATION OF EXTRACT FROM WINERY INDUSTRY RESIDUE USING THE SUPERCRITICAL ANTI-SOLVENT TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mezzomo

    Full Text Available Abstract Grape pomace (seed, skin and stem is a winery byproduct with high levels of biologically active compounds, such as antioxidants and antimicrobials, that could be converted into high added-value products. Since these components are easily degraded by oxygen, light and high temperature exposure, stabilization is important, for instance, by a microencapsulation process. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence on the particle characteristics of the operational conditions applied in the Supercritical Anti-Solvent (SAS process for the co-precipitation of grape pomace extract and poly(-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA. The morphology and size of the particles formed, their stability and thermal profile were evaluated, and also the co-precipitation efficiency. The conditions studied allowed the production of microparticles with spherical shape for all operational conditions, with estimated particle size between 4 ± 2 and 11 ± 5 µm, and very good co-precipitation efficiencies (up to 94.4 ± 0.6%. The co-precipitated extract presented higher stability compared to the crude extract, indicating the effectiveness of the co-precipitation process and coating material against degradation processes.

  3. A solvent-extraction module for cyclotron production of high-purity technetium-99m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Petra; Boschi, Alessandra; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Uccelli, Licia; Pasquali, Micòl; Duatti, Adriano; Pupillo, Gaia; Marengo, Mario; Loriggiola, Massimo; Esposito, Juan

    2016-12-01

    The design and fabrication of a fully-automated, remotely controlled module for the extraction and purification of technetium-99m (Tc-99m), produced by proton bombardment of enriched Mo-100 molybdenum metallic targets in a low-energy medical cyclotron, is here described. After dissolution of the irradiated solid target in hydrogen peroxide, Tc-99m was obtained under the chemical form of (99m)TcO4(-), in high radionuclidic and radiochemical purity, by solvent extraction with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). The extraction process was accomplished inside a glass column-shaped vial especially designed to allow for an easy automation of the whole procedure. Recovery yields were always >90% of the loaded activity. The final pertechnetate saline solution Na(99m)TcO4, purified using the automated module here described, is within the Pharmacopoeia quality control parameters and is therefore a valid alternative to generator-produced (99m)Tc. The resulting automated module is cost-effective and easily replicable for in-house production of high-purity Tc-99m by cyclotrons.

  4. Effects of extraction solvent mixtures on antioxidant activity evaluation and their extraction capacity and selectivity for free phenolic compounds in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haifeng; Dong, Jianjun; Lu, Jian; Chen, Jian; Li, Yin; Shan, Lianju; Lin, Yan; Fan, Wei; Gu, Guoxian

    2006-09-20

    Four kinds of solvent extracts from three Chinese barley varieties (Ken-3, KA4B, and Gan-3) were used to examine the effects of extraction solvent mixtures on antioxidant activity evaluation and their extraction capacity and selectivity for free phenolic compounds in barley through free radical scavenging activity, reducing power and metal chelating activity, and individual and total phenolic contents. Results showed that extraction solvent mixtures had significant impacts on antioxidant activity estimation, as well as different extraction capacity and selectivity for free phenolic compounds in barley. The highest DPPH* and ABTS*+ scavenging activities and reducing power were found in 80% acetone extracts, whereas the strongest *OH scavenging activity, O2*- scavenging activity, and metal chelating activity were found in 80% ethanol, 80% methanol, and water extracts, respectively. Additionally, 80% acetone showed the highest extraction capacity for (+)-catechin and ferulic, caffeic, vanillic, and p-coumaric acids, 80% methanol for (-)-epicatechin and syringic acid, and water for protocatechuic and gallic acids. Furthermore, correlations analysis revealed that TPC, reducing power, DPPH* and ABTS*+ scavenging activities were well positively correlated with each other (p antioxidant activity, 80% acetone was recommended to extract free phenolic compounds from barley. DPPH* scavenging activity and ABTS*+ scavenging activity or reducing power could be used to assess barley antioxidant activity.

  5. An investigation of influence of solvent on the degradation kinetics of carotenoids in oil extracts of Calendula officinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEJAN BEZBRADICA

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The stability of carotenoids was studied in marigold oil extracts prepared with following solvents: Myritol 312®, paraffin oil, almond oil, olive oil, sunflower oil, grape seed oil, and soybean oil. The concentration of the carotenoids was determined by spectroscopic measurement at 450 nm. Degradation rate showed a first order dependence on the concentration of carotenoids with a faster first stage (which lasted 35–50 days, depending on the solvent and a slower second stage. The highest degradation rates were observed in extracts prepared with linoleic acid rich solvents (sunflower oil, soybean oil and grape seed oil, while the lowest were found in oil with saturated fatty acids (Myritol 312® and paraffin oil. These results confirm the connection between the degradation of carotenoids and lipid autoxidation, and suggest that the influence of the oil solvents on the stability of oil extracts of Calendula officinalis is a factor that must be considered when selecting a solvent for the production of marigold oil extracts.

  6. LPS-induced NO inhibition and antioxidant activities of ethanol extracts and their solvent partitioned fractions from four brown seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myoung Lae; Lee, Dong-Jin; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Yeon-Ju; You, Sang Guan

    2013-12-01

    The nitric oxide inhibitory (NOI) and antioxidant (ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging effects with reducing power) activities of the ethanol (EtOH) extracts and solvent partitioned fractions from Scytosiphon lomentaria, Chorda filum, Agarum cribrosum, and Desmarestia viridis were investigated, and the correlation between biological activity and total phenolic (TP) and phlorotannin (TPT) content was determined by PCA analysis. The yield of EtOH extracts from four brown seaweeds ranged from 2.6 to 6.6% with the highest yield from D. viridis, and the predominant compounds in their solvent partitioned fractions had medium and/or less polarity. The TP and TPT content of the EtOH extracts were in the ranges of 25.0-44.1 mg GAE/g sample and 0.2-4.6 mg PG/g sample, respectively, which were mostly included in the organic solvent partitioned fractions. Strong NOI activity was observed in the EtOH extracts and their solvent partitioned fractions from D. viridis and C. filum. In addition, the EtOH extract and its solvent partitioned fractions of D. viridis exhibited little cytotoxicity to Raw 264.7 cells. The most potent ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging capacity was shown in the EtOH extracts and their solvent partitioned fractions from S. lomentaria and C. filum, and both also exhibited strong reducing ability. In the PCA analysis the content of TPT had a good correlation with DPPH ( r = 0.62), ABTS ( r = 0.69) and reducing power ( r = 0.65), however, an unfair correlation was observed between the contents of TP and TPT and NOI, suggesting that the phlorotannins might be responsible for the DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities.

  7. Solvent extraction equipment evaluation study. Part 1. Review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, R.G.; Browne, L.M. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    This is Part 1 of a three-part document that reviews the solvent extraction contactors available for use in radiochemical reprocessing plants. The three parts are: Part 1: A Review of the Literature, Part 2: Workshop Proceedings, Part 3: A Summary. The main objective of the document is to provide an information base to aid in contactor selection and design of future reprocessing plants. The Literature Review (Part 1) brings together scattered data on all major contactors in use today. It contains an annotated bibliography of the citations used in the review and a complete listing of all the citations screened prior to the review. These bibliographies should aid in determining which reports would be most useful if additional information is desired.

  8. Controllability of plutonium concentration for FBR fuel at a solvent extraction process in the PUREX process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enokida, Youichi; Kitano, Motoki; Sawada, Kayo [Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4630052 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Typical Purex solvent extraction systems for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel have a feed material containing dilute, 1% in weight, plutonium, along with uranium and fission products. Current reprocessing proposals call for no separation of the pure plutonium. The work described in this paper studied, by computer simulation, the fundamental feasibility of preparing a 20% concentrated plutonium product solution from the 1% feed by adjusting only the feed rates and acid concentrations of the incoming streams and without the addition of redox reagents for the plutonium. A set of process design flowsheets has been developed to realize a concentrated plutonium solution of a 20% stream from the dilute plutonium feed without using redox reagents. (authors)

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. The Hydrotreatment Facility is being prepared for trials with coal liquids. Raw coal tar distillate trials have been carried out by heating coal tar in the holding tank in the Hydrotreatment Facility. The liquids are centrifuged to warm the system up in preparation for the coal liquids. The coal tar distillate is then recycled to keep the centrifuge hot. In this way, the product has been distilled such that a softening point of approximately 110 C is reached. Then an ash test is conducted.

  10. Comparison of microwave, ultrasound and accelerated-assisted solvent extraction for recovery of polyphenols from Citrus sinensis peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Balunkeswar; Dahmoune, Farid; Moussi, Kamal; Remini, Hocine; Dairi, Sofiane; Aoun, Omar; Khodir, Madani

    2015-11-15

    Peel of Citrus sinensis contains significant amounts of bioactive polyphenols that could be used as ingredients for a number of value-added products with health benefits. Extraction of polyphenols from the peels was performed using a microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) technique. The effects of aqueous acetone concentration, microwave power, extraction time and solvent-to-solid ratio on the total phenolic content (TPC), total antioxidant activity (TAA) (using DPPH and ORAC-values) and individual phenolic acids (IPA) were investigated using a response surface method. The TPC, TAA and IPA of peel extracts using MAE was compared with conventional, ultrasound-assisted and accelerated solvent extraction. The maximum predicted TPC under the optimal MAE conditions (51% acetone concentration in water (v/v), 500 W microwave power, 122 s extraction time and 25 mL g(-1) solvent to solid ratio), was 12.20 mg GAE g(-1) DW. The TPC and TAA in MAE extracts were higher than the other three extracts.

  11. An absorbing microwave micro-solid-phase extraction device used in non-polar solvent microwave-assisted extraction for the determination of organophosphorus pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ziming, E-mail: wangziming@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhao Xin; Xu Xu; Wu Lijie; Su Rui; Zhao Yajing; Jiang Chengfei; Zhang Hanqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China); Ma Qiang [Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Beijing 100123 (China); Lu Chunmei [College of Technology Center, Jilin Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Changchun 130062 (China); Dong Deming [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2013-01-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device packed with activated carbon was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device was made and used to enrich the analytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device was made and used to heat samples directly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAE-{mu}-SPE was applied to the extraction of OPPs with non-polar solvent only. - Abstract: A single-step extraction-cleanup method, including microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and micro-solid-phase extraction ({mu}-SPE), was developed for the extraction of ten organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable and fruit samples. Without adding any polar solvent, only one kind of non-polar solvent (hexane) was used as extraction solvent in the whole extraction step. Absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE device, was prepared by packing activated carbon with microporous polypropylene membrane envelope, and used as not only the sorbent in {mu}-SPE, but also the microwave absorption medium. Some experimental parameters effecting on extraction efficiency was investigated and optimized. 1.0 g of sample, 8 mL of hexane and three absorbing microwave {mu}-SPE devices were added in the microwave extraction vessel, the extraction was carried out under 400 W irradiation power at 60 Degree-Sign C for 10 min. The extracts obtained by MAE-{mu}-SPE were directly analyzed by GC-MS without any clean-up process. The recoveries were in the range of 93.5-104.6%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 8.7%.

  12. Supercritical CO2 extraction of Schinus molle L with co-solvents: mathematical modeling and antimicrobial applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Scopel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the antimicrobial activity of the Schinus molle L. leaves extracts obtained under supercritical conditions using carbon dioxide and co-solvents. Antimicrobial qualitative evaluation was carried out through the bioautography technique and the microorganisms studied were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosas, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The supercritical fluid extraction was carried out in a pilot scale equipment using carbon dioxide modified by the addition of co-solvents, such as ethanol and water at 150 bar and 333 K. A mathematical modeling of the process was also performed.

  13. Speciation of arsenic using chelation solvent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathum, Shamil J.; Obenauf, Alison; Punt, Monique [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Brown, Carl E. [Emergencies Engineering Technology Office, Environmental Technology Centre, Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-02-15

    Research interest in speciation of arsenic stems from its species dependent behavior in the environment and in living organisms. The complexity of the matrix to be analyzed and low concentrations of target arsenic species that may be labile or difficult to chromatogram, indicate that a suitable pre-treatment methodology is required. This study investigated the usefulness of chelation solvent extraction - high performance liquid chromatography (CSE-HPLC) for the speciation of arsenic in water. It involved reacting arsenic with the chelant known for its affinity towards arsenic, followed by extraction, separation, and identification of the arsenic-chelant-arsenic complex. Arsenic species having different physicochemical properties were investigated. Species, such as, As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, As{sub 3}O{sub 5}, KH{sub 2}AsO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}HAsO{sub 4}, and NaAsO{sub 2}were detected as a group of closely eluted peaks with different retention times and spectral properties, whereas, the organic arsenic species CH {sub 3}Na {sub 2}AsO {sub 3}, o-arsanilic acid, roxarson and triphenyl arsine separated quite well on the EnviroseP-CM HPLC column. Key method parameters, such as, type of HPLC column, composition of mobile phase and organic solvents affecting peak resolution and sensitivity were optimized. Real environmental matrices contaminated with arsenic were analyzed under varying wavelengths ({lambda}{sub max} = 190, 210, 220, 234, 244, and 282 nm), with good precision. Different arsenic species were detected in these samples with excellent background and signal-to-noise ratios demonstrating the robustness of the method. The detection limit, reproducibility, selectivity, accuracy, and dynamic range of the calibration curves were evaluated. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. The structures of CyMe4-BTBP complexes of americium(iii) and europium(iii) in solvents used in solvent extraction, explaining their separation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Christian; Löfström-Engdahl, Elin; Aneheim, Emma; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Geist, Andreas; Lundberg, Daniel; Denecke, Melissa; Persson, Ingmar

    2015-11-14

    Separation of trivalent actinoid (An(iii)) and lanthanoid (Ln(iii)) ions is extremely challenging due to their similar ionic radii and chemical properties. Poly-aromatic nitrogen compounds acting as tetradentate chelating ligands to the metal ions in the extraction, have the ability to sufficiently separate An(iii) from Ln(iii). One of these compounds, 6,6'-bis(5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-benzol[1,2,4]triazin-3-yl)[2,2]bipyridine, CyMe4-BTBP, has proven to be resistant towards acidic environments and strong radiation from radioactive decomposition. EXAFS studies of the dicomplexes of CyMe4-BTBP with americium(iii) and europium(iii) in nitrobenzene, cyclohexanone, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol and malonamide (DMDOHEMA) in 1-octanol have been carried out to get a deeper understanding of the parameters responsible for the separation. The predominating complexes independent of solvent used are [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) and [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+), respectively, which are present as outer-sphere ion-pairs with nitrate ions in the studied solvents with low relative permittivity. The presence of a nitrate ion in the first coordination sphere of the americium(iii) complex compensates the charge density of the complex considerably in comparison when only outer-sphere ion-pairs are formed as for the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex. The stability and solubility of a complex in a solvent with low relative permittivity increase with decreasing charge density. The [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) complex will therefore be increasingly soluble and stabilized over the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex in solvents with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent. The separation of americium(iii) from europium(iii) with CyMe4-BTBP as extraction agent will increase with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent, and thereby also with decreasing solubility of CyMe4-BTBP. The choice of solvent is therefore a balance of a high separation factor and sufficient solubility of the CyMe4-BTBP

  15. Cytotoxic effects of solvent-extracted active components of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge on human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bokyung; Chung, Hye Sun; Kim, Minjung; Kang, Yong Jung; Kim, Dong Hwan; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Min Jo; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-04-01

    Herbal extracts and dietary supplements may be extracted from the medicinal plants used in traditional Chinese medicine, and are used increasingly commonly worldwide for their benefits to health and quality of life. Thus, ensuring that they are safe for human consumption is a critical issue for the preparation of plant extracts as dietary supplements. The present study investigated extracts of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (S. miltiorrhiza), traditionally used in Asian countries to treat a variety of conditions, as a dietary supplement or as an ingredient in functional foods. Dried S. miltiorrhiza root was extracted with various solvents and under varying extraction conditions, and the effects of the extracts on the viability of five human cancer cell lines were compared. Extracts obtained using 100% ethanol and 100% acetone as solvents exhibited more potent effects compared with extracts obtained using 70 and 30% aqueous ethanol. Furthermore, the active components of S. miltiorrhiza ethanol extracts, known as tanshinones, were investigated. Dihydrotanshinone I was observed to exhibit a higher cytotoxic potential compared with the other tanshinones in the majority of the examined cell lines. Conversely, cryptotanshinone exhibited weak anti-cancer activity. In summary, the results of the present study suggest that the active components obtained from an ethanol extract of S. miltiorrhiza possess the potential to be used as ingredients in functional and health care foods that may be used to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics in the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  16. Fast Determination of Essential Oil from Dried Menthol Mint and Orange Peel by Solvent Free Microwave Extraction Using Carbonyl Iron Powder as the Microwave Absorption Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zi-Ming; DING Lan; WANG Lu; FENG Jin; LI Tie-Chun; ZHOU Xin; ZHANG Han-Qi

    2006-01-01

    An improved solvent free microwave extraction, in which a kind of microwave absorption medium (carbonyl iron powder) was used, was applied to the extraction of essential oil from dried menthol mint and orange peel without addition of any solvent and pretreatment. It took much less time of extraction (30 min) than microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (90 min) and conventional hydrodistillation (180 min). The kinds of chemical compositions in essential oil extracted by different methods were almost the same and such improved solvent free microwave extraction can be a feasible way in extraction of essential oil from dried plant materials.

  17. Influence of Accelerated Solvent Extraction and Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction on the Anthocyanin Profile of Different Vaccinium Species in the Context of Statistical Models for Authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffels, Peter; Weber, Fabian; Schieber, Andreas

    2015-09-02

    Anthocyanins are frequently discussed as marker compounds for fruit product authenticity. Proper analysis including sample preparation for the determination of anthocyanin concentrations is crucial for the comparability of authenticity data. The present study determined the influence of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE), using two different solvent compositions on the anthocyanin profile of bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.), and American cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.). Besides differences in total anthocyanin concentrations in the extracts, significant deviations (p ≤ 0.05) in the individual anthocyanin concentration were observed, resulting in differing anthocyanin proportions. Linear discriminant analysis comparing the differences caused by the extraction method to the natural differences within a set of 26 bilberry and lowbush blueberry samples of different origins was conducted. It revealed that profile variations induced by the extraction methods are in a similar scale to profile variations as a result of geographic and climatic differences.

  18. Quality assessment of Moringa concanensis seed oil extracted through solvent and aqueous-enzymatic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar, Farooq

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The composition and quality of the M. concanensis seed oil extracted through an aqueous-enzyme-assisted technique, using three commercial enzyme-mixtures (Natuzyme, Kemzyme, and Feedzyme was compared to those of the control-, (without enzymes and solvent-extracted oils. Aqueous enzyme-extracted M.concanensis seed oil content ranged from 23.54 to 27.46% and was significantly (P 0.05 variation in the contents of fiber and ash within the three extraction methods. However, the protein content of the meal obtained through the aqueous-enzyme and control methods was significantly (P M. concanensis seed oils extracted using the three methods. The specific extinctions at 232 and 270 nm, peroxide value, p-anisidine, free fatty acid contents and color values of the aqueous-enzyme-extracted oil were found to be lower than that of solvent-extracted oil and thus revealed good quality. The oils extracted through the three methods exhibited no significant (P En este estudio se compara la composición y la calidad del aceite de semilla de M. concanensis extraído mediante enzimas, utilizando tres enzimas comerciales (Natuzyme, Kemzyme, y Feedzyme con las de un control extraído sin enzimas y con las del aceite extraído con disolvente. El contenido en aceites de las semilla extraídas con enzimas osciló entre 23,54 a 27,46% y fue significativamente más elevado (P 0,05 en el contenido de fibra y ceniza para los tres métodos de la extracción. Sin embargo, el contenido proteínico de la harina obtenido por métodos enzimáticos y el control sin enzimas fue significativamente menor (P < 0,05 que el de la harina obtenida después de la extracción por disolvente. Las diferencias en el índice de yodo (67.1-68.0 g /100 g of oil, densidad en 24 °C (0,865-0,866 g/mL, índice de refracción a 40 °C (1,4622-1,4627 y fracción insaponificable (0,69-0,76 % no fueron significativamente diferentes para ninguna de las técnicas de extracción. Las extinciones espec

  19. Determination of fenvalerate in tomato by ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirsaheb, Meghdad; Ahmadi-Jouibari, Toraj; Fattahi, Nazir; Shamsipur, Mojtaba

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction (UASE) combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) has been developed for extraction and determination of fenvalerate from tomato samples. Fenvalerate was determined by high-performance liquid-liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detector. Effects of parameters such as type and volume of extraction solvent in the UASE stage, sonication time, type and volume of extraction solvent and disperser solvent in the DLLME-SFO stage, salt addition and pH effect on extraction were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the range of 5-500 µg kg(-1) with a detection limit of 0.6 µg kg(-1). The relative standard deviation for five replicate measurements of 100 µg kg(-1) of fenvalerate was 6.5%. The relative recovery of fenvalerate in different tomato samples at a spiking level of 10, 20 and 50 µg kg(-1) is in the range of 93.5-108%. The obtained results show that UASE-DLLME-SFO is a sensitive, fast and simple method for the determination of fenvalerate in tomato samples.

  20. Equilibrium Copper Strip Points as a Function of Temperature and Other Operating Parameters: Implications for Commercial Copper Solvent Extraction Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The development of pressure and bioleaching processes for high grade copper ores and concentrates will result in copper solvent extraction plants treating solutions with high copper and acid concentrations at temperatures up to 45C and these copper solvent extraction plants will run with reagent concentrations up to 40 vol.%. There is also a trend to use copper stripping solutions with less acid than typically used in recent years. Cognis has developed a model that accurately predicts the copper strip point for virtually any copper solvent extraction reagent or combination of reagents under a wide variety of conditions. The equilibrium strip points for several well known commercial copper solvent extraction reagents are given as a function of reagent concentration, the copper and acid concentration of the strip aqueous, and the temperature. It is shown that the equilibrium strip point is not a straight line function of reagent concentration and that the equilibrium strip point increases with an increase in temperature. Copper extraction also increases as the temperature increases.

  1. Indium recovery from acidic aqueous solutions by solvent extraction with D2EHPA: a statistical approach to the experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortes M.C.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This experimental work presents the optimization results of obtaining a high indium concentration solution and minimum iron poisoning by solvent extraction with D2EHPA solubilized in isoparaffin and exxsol. The variables studied in the extraction step were D2EHPA concentration, acidity of the aqueous phase and time of contact between phases. Different hydrochloric and sulfuric acid concentrations were studied for the stripping step. The optimum experimental conditions resulted in a solution with 99% indium extraction and less than 4% iron. The construction of a McCabe-Thiele diagram indicated two theoretical countercurrent stages for indium extraction and at least six stages for indium stripping. Finally, the influence of associated metals found in typical sulfate leach liquors from zinc plants was studied. Under the experimental conditions for maximum indium extraction, 96% indium extraction was obtained, iron extraction was about 4% and no Ga, Cu and Zn were co-extracted.

  2. Study on Gold(Ⅰ) Solvent Extraction from Alkaline Cyanide Solution by TBP with Addition of Surfactant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The new solvent extraction system for gold(Ⅰ) from alkaline cyanide solution by TBP with addition of surfactant in aqueous phase was studied. The effect of various factors, such as equilibrium pH, constitution of organic phase, molar ratio of CPB∶Au(CN)2-, extraction time, aqueous/organic phase ratio, different initial gold concentration, equilibrium temperature, different diluent, different types of extractants and surfactants etc., was inspected. The results show that gold(Ⅰ) can be extracted quantitatively by controlling the quantity of surfactant (CPB); both the equilibrium pH and diluent hardly influence percent extraction. Gold(Ⅰ) percent extraction reaches more than 98% under the optimal experimental conditions. 30% vol TBP diluted by sulphonating kerosene can load gold(Ⅰ) to rather high levels. Loading capacity is in excess of 38 g/L. The extraction mechanism is discussed and the overall extraction reaction is deduced.

  3. RP-HPTLC densitometric determination and validation of vanillin and related phenolic compounds in accelerated solvent extract of Vanilla planifolia*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Upendra Kumar; Sharma, Nandini; Gupta, Ajai Prakash; Kumar, Vinod; Sinha, Arun Kumar

    2007-12-01

    A simple, fast and sensitive RP-HPTLC method is developed for simultaneous quantitative determination of vanillin and related phenolic compounds in ethanolic extracts of Vanilla planifolia pods. In addition to this, the applicability of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) as an alternative to microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and Soxhlet extraction was also explored for the rapid extraction of phenolic compounds in vanilla pods. Good separation was achieved on aluminium plates precoated with silica gel RP-18 F(254S) in the mobile phase of methanol/water/isopropanol/acetic acid (30:65:2:3, by volume). The method showed good linearity, high precision and good recovery of compounds of interest. ASE showed good extraction efficiency in less time as compared to other techniques for all the phenolic compounds. The present method would be useful for analytical research and for routine analysis of vanilla extracts for their quality control.

  4. Fractionation of commercial hexane and use of its fractions as extracting solvent of cottonseed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megahed, Ola A.

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of producing off-graded cottonseed oil using locally produced commercial hexane as extracting solvent has explored this research. It was aimed in this work to investigate whether this problem can be solved by controlling the boiling range of the extracting solvent. Four different hexane fractions of different boiling ranges were prepared from commercial hexane. The boiling range of commercial hexane was 62-68ºC while the boiling ranges of the four fractions were 62- 64, 64-65, 65-66 and 66-68ºC. Commercial hexane and the prepared four hexane fractions were then used to extract cottonseed oil from a fixed seed sample. The five crude oil samples were then refined and bleached and their colours were measured. The results have shown that the heaviest hexane fraction ( b.r 66-68ºC produced the lightest coloured oils. The colour index of the bleached oil using this heavy cut was 190 compared to 350 using the original commercial hexane. However, the production of a commercial hexane cut having a narrow boiling range will be costly. Therefore, this research has been extended to investigate the suitability of a heavy petroleum cut which has a boiling range as wide as that of commercial hexane to extract cottonseed oil. The boiling range of this cut was 66-72ºC. The obtained results proved that the extraction of cottonseed oil using that heavy petroleum fraction produces much lighter oil than the use of conventional hexane solvent.En esta investigación se ha examinado el problema de producir aceite de semilla de algodón sin-clasificar usando hexano comercial producido localmente como disolvente. El objetivo de este trabajo fue investigar si este problema puede ser solucionado controlando el rango de ebullición del disolvente extractante. Cuatro fracciones diferentes de hexano de diversos rangos de ebullición fueron preparadas del hexano comercial. El rango al que ebullía el hexano comercial era 62-68ºC mientras que los

  5. Solvent extraction of rubidium from gold waste using conventional SX and new CFE methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Reza Tavakoli Mohammadi; Seyed Mohammad Javad Koleini; Sepideh Javanshir; Hossein Abolghasemi; Mahmoud Abdollahy

    2015-01-01

    Solvent extraction (SX) of rubidium (Rb) from leaching filtrate of gold waste (GW) in Mouteh Processing Plant by 18-crown-6 (18C6) was studied.High potential of new column flotoextraction (CFE) method in extraction of Rb from dilute solutions was also demonstrated.First,the factors affecting SX of Rb from a synthetic rubidium sulfate solution (containing 100 mg·L-1 Rb) were identified.0.05 mol·L-1 18C6 in kerosene,0.02 mol·L-1 picric acid in aqueous phase,aqueous to organic (A/O) ratio of 1,pH 7 and mixing time of 15 min are the optimum values for affective factors.The three-stage precipitation with sodium carbonate,pH adjustment with sulfuric acid and two-stage evaporation and crystallization were conducted to purify the leaching from impurities such as Fe,Al,Mn,Ca and especially competing cations of K and Na.Almost complete extraction of Rb and K from final filtrate containing 0.08 mol·L-1 picric acid was performed using 0.2 mol·L-1 18C6 in kerosene.The Rb and K strippings of 99.12 % and 9.93 %,respectively,are obtained with 2 mol·L-1 nitric acid with A/O ratio of 2.Finally,the performance comparison of the CFE and SX methods in similar conditions shows increased extraction of K and Rb by 16 % and 5 %,respectively,using CFE method.

  6. Effect of Extraction Solvents and Drying Methods on the Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Helicteres hirsuta Lour. Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ngoc Thuy Pham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicteres hirsuta Lour. (H. hirsuta L. is widely distributed in southeast Asian countries and has been used traditionally as a medicinal plant. However, optimal conditions for preparation of dried materials for further processing and suitable solvents for the extraction of bioactive compounds have not been investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different extraction solvents and different drying conditions on the physicochemical properties and antioxidant capacity of the H. hirsuta L. leaves. The results showed that both extraction solvents and drying conditions had a significant impact on physicochemical and antioxidant properties of H. hirsuta L. leaves. Among the five solvents investigated, water could extract the highest level of solid content and phenolic compounds, whereas methanol was more effective for obtaining flavonoids and saponins than other solvents. The leaves dried under either hot-air drying at 80 °C (HAD80, or vacuum drying at 50 °C (VD50 yielded the highest amount of total phenolic compounds (7.77 and 8.33 mg GAE/g, respectively and total flavonoid content (5.79 and 4.62 mg CE/g, respectively, and possessed the strongest antioxidant power, while leaves dried using infrared drying at 30 °C had the lowest levels of bioactive compounds. Phenolic compounds including flavonoids had a strong correlation with antioxidant capacity. Therefore, HAD80 and VD50 are recommended for the preparation of dried H. hirsuta L. leaves. Water and methanol are suggested solvents to be used for extraction of phenolic compounds and saponins from H. hirsuta L. leaves for the potential application in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries.

  7. Solvent optimization extraction of antioxidants from foxtail millet species' insoluble fibers and their free radical scavenging properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangoura, Mohamed Lamine; Nsor-Atindana, John; Ming, Zhou Hui

    2013-11-15

    In this study, water and 80% of four organic solvents were employed to optimize the extraction of antioxidants from two species of foxtail millet's insoluble fibers under the same temperature, time, and solid/solvent ratio. The results showed that the acetone was able to extract the maximum amount of antioxidants (2.32 mg/g fiber for white specie and 3.86 mg/g fiber for yellow specie) followed by methanol and propanol from both samples. The neutral and the ethanol on the other hand extracted small amount of the antioxidants from the two fiber materials. While considerable level of Total Polyphenols Content (TPC) was recorded in both the water and the organic solvents' extracts, only traces of Total Flavonoid content (TFC) were observed in water, methanol and ethanol extracts. Propanol and acetone extracts was negative to the TFC test. The potency of both white and yellow foxtail millets' insoluble fibers antioxidant extracts was investigated using five different in vitro tests. It was realized that there was a variation in their capacities to quench DPPH and ABTS(+) radicals for the time running of 0-60 min. The samples from the yellow cereal exhibited high inhibition capacity against ABTS(+). No correlation was observed between TPC and radical scavenging capacities for DPPH and ABTS(+). In general, the yellow species contained more antioxidants in comparison with the white one and this accounted for its high antioxidant activity.

  8. Recovery of Vanadium from H2SO4-HF Acidic Leaching Solution of Black Shale by Solvent Extraction and Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingbin Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of vanadium from sulfuric and hydrofluoric mixed acid solutions generated by the direct leaching of black shale was investigated using solvent extraction and precipitation methods. The process consisted of reduction, solvent extraction, and stripping, followed by precipitation and calcination to yield vanadium pentoxide. The influence of various operating parameters on the extraction and recovery of vanadium was studied. Vanadium (IV was selectively extracted using a mixture of 10% (v/v di(2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid and 5% (v/v tri-n-butylphosphate in sulfonated kerosene. Using six extraction and five stripping stages, the extraction efficiency for vanadium was 96.7% and the stripping efficiency was 99.7%. V2O5 with a purity of 99.52% was obtained by oxidation of the loaded strip solution and precipitation of ammonium polyvanadate at pH 1.8 to 2.2, followed by calcination of the dried precipitate at 550 °C for 2 h. It was concluded that the combination of solvent extraction and precipitation is an efficient method for the recovery of vanadium from a multi-element leach solution generated from black shale.

  9. Improvement of extraction capability of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer beads in aqueous media via dual-phase solvent system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuling; Liu, Ruijin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Gongke

    2009-08-15

    In this study, a novel and simple dual-phase solvent system for the improvement of extraction capability of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) beads in aqueous sample was proposed. The method integrated MIP extraction and micro-liquid-liquid extraction (micro-LLE) into only one step. A magnetic MIP beads using atrazine as template was synthesized, and was applied to aqueous media by adding micro-volume of n-hexane to form a co-extraction system. The magnetic MIP beads preferred to suspend in the organic phase, which shielded them from the disturbance of water molecule. The target analytes in the water sample was extracted into the organic phase by micro-LLE and then further bound to the solid-phase of magnetic MIP beads. The beads specificity was significantly improved with the imprinting efficiency of template increasing from 0.5 to 4.4, as compared with that in pure aqueous media. The extraction capacity, equilibration process and cross-selectivity of the MIP dual-phase solvent extraction system were investigated. The proposed method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was applied to the analysis of atrazine, simazine, propazine, simetryn, prometryne, ametryn and terbutryn in complicated sample such as tomato, strawberry juice and milk. The method is selective, sensitive and low organic solvent-consuming, and has potential to broaden the range of MIP application in biological and environmental sample.

  10. Fast environment-friendly ball mill-assisted deep eutectic solvent-based extraction of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man; Wang, Jiaqin; Zhang, Yue; Xia, Qian; Bi, Wentao; Yang, Xiaodi; Chen, David Da Yong

    2016-04-22

    A fast environment-friendly extraction method, ball mill-assisted deep eutectic solvent-based extraction, was used for the extraction of natural products from plants. In this study, tanshinones were selected as target compounds to evaluate the efficiency of the developed extraction method. Under the optimized experimental conditions, cryptotanshinone (0.176 mg/g), tanshinone I (0.181 mg/g), and tanshinone II A (0.421 mg/g) were extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, and the developed method was found to be greener, more efficient, and faster than conventional, environmentally harmful extraction methods such as methanol-based ultrasound-assisted extraction and heat reflux extraction. The analytical performances including recovery, reproducibility (RSD, n=5), correlation of determination (r(2)), and the limit of detection, with the ranges of 96.1-103.9%, 1.6-1.9%, 0.9973-0.9984, and 5-8 ng/mL, were respectively obtained. Application of ball mill-assisted deep eutectic solvent-based extraction may fundamentally shape the future development of extraction methods.

  11. High anti-inflammatory activity of harpagoside-enriched extracts obtained from solvent-modified super- and subcritical carbon dioxide extractions of the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, M; Laufer, S; Schmidt, P C

    2006-01-01

    Solvent-modified carbon dioxide extractions of the roots of Harpagophytum procumbens have been investigated with respect to extraction efficiency and content of harpagoside, and compared with a conventional extract. The effects of pressure, temperature, type and concentration of the modifier have been examined. Two extraction steps were necessary in order to achievehigh anti-inflammatory harpagoside-enriched extracts. The first extraction step was carried out in the supercritical state using carbon dioxide modified with n-propanol to remove undesired lipophilic substances. The main extraction was performed either in the supercritical or in the subcritical state with carbon dioxide modified with ethanol. The supercritical fluid extraction resulted in extracts containing up to 30% harpagoside. The subcritical extracts showed a harpagoside content of ca. 20%, but the extraction yield was nearly three times greater compared with supercritical conditions. The total harpagoside recovery resulting from the sum of the extract and the crude drug residue was greater than 99% in all experiments. The conventional extract and two carbon dioxide extracts were tested for in-vitro inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase-2 biosynthesis. Both carbon dioxide extracts showed total inhibition on 5-lipoxygenase biosynthesis at a concentration of 51.8 mg/L. In contrast, the conventional extract failed to show any inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase biosynthesis.

  12. Application of accelerated solvent extraction in the analysis of organic contaminants, bioactive and nutritional compounds in food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hanwen; Ge, Xusheng; Lv, Yunkai; Wang, Anbang

    2012-05-11

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) has become a popular green extraction technology for different classes of organic contaminants present in numerous kinds of food and feed for food safety. The parameters affecting ASE efficiency and application advancement of ASE in the analysis of organic contaminants, natural toxins compounds as well as bioactive and nutritional compounds in animal origin food, plant origin food and animal feed are reviewed in detail. ASE is a fully automated and reliable extraction technique with many advantages over traditional extraction techniques, so it could be especially useful for routine analyses of pollutants in food and feed.

  13. Solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from aromatic herbs: comparison with conventional hydro-distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesi, Marie E; Chemat, Farid; Smadja, Jacqueline

    2004-07-23

    Solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) is a combination of microwave heating and dry distillation, performed at atmospheric pressure without added any solvent or water. Isolation and concentration of volatile compounds are performed by a single stage. SFME has been compared with a conventional technique, hydro-distillation (HD), for the extraction of essential oil from three aromatic herbs: basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), garden mint (Mentha crispa L.), and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.). The essential oils extracted by SFME for 30min were quantitatively (yield) and qualitatively (aromatic profile) similar to those obtained by conventional hydro-distillation for 4.5 h. The SFME method yields an essential oil with higher amounts of more valuable oxygenated compounds, and allows substantial savings of costs, in terms of time, energy and plant material. SFME is a green technology and appears as a good alternative for the extraction of essential oils from aromatic plants.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soils: Comparison between Reflectance Spectroscopy and Solvent Extraction by 3 Certified Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Schwartz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The commonly used analytic method for assessing total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH in soil, EPA method 418.1, is usually based on extraction with 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon 113 and FTIR spectroscopy of the extracted solvent. This method is widely used for initial site investigation, due to the relative low price per sample. It is known that the extraction efficiency varies depending on the extracting solvent and other sample properties. This study’s main goal was to evaluate reflectance spectroscopy as a tool for TPH assessment, as compared with three commercial certified laboratories using traditional methods. Large variations were found between the results of the three commercial laboratories, both internally (average deviation up to 20%, and between laboratories (average deviation up to 103%. Reflectance spectroscopy method was found be as good as the commercial laboratories in terms of accuracy and could be a viable field-screening tool that is rapid, environmental friendly, and cost effective.

  15. Solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from aromatic herbs: from laboratory to pilot and industrial scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filly, Aurore; Fernandez, Xavier; Minuti, Matteo; Visinoni, Francesco; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Chemat, Farid

    2014-05-01

    Solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) has been proposed as a green method for the extraction of essential oil from aromatic herbs that are extensively used in the food industry. This technique is a combination of microwave heating and dry distillation performed at atmospheric pressure without any added solvent or water. The isolation and concentration of volatile compounds is performed in a single stage. In this work, SFME and a conventional technique, hydro-distillation HD (Clevenger apparatus), are used for the extraction of essential oil from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) and are compared. This preliminary laboratory study shows that essential oils extracted by SFME in 30min were quantitatively (yield and kinetics profile) and qualitatively (aromatic profile) similar to those obtained using conventional hydro-distillation in 2h. Experiments performed in a 75L pilot microwave reactor prove the feasibility of SFME up scaling and potential industrial applications.

  16. Extraction of S- and N-Compounds from the Mixture of Hydrocarbons by Ionic Liquids as Selective Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Gabrić; Aleksandra Sander; Marina Cvjetko Bubalo; Dejan Macut

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is an alternative method that can be used for desulfurization and denitrification of gasoline and diesel fuels. Recent approaches employ different ionic liquids as selective solvents, due to their general immiscibility with gasoline and diesel, negligible vapor pressure, and high selectivity to sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. For that reason, five imidazolium-based ionic liquids and one pyridinium-based ionic liquid were selected for extraction of thiophene...

  17. Miscibility Evaluation Of The Next Generation Solvent With Polymers Currently Used At DWPF, MCU, And Saltstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, funded the development of an enhanced Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. This effort lead to the development of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) with Tris (3,7-dimethyl octyl) guanidine (TiDG). The first deployment target for the NGS solvent is within the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the new chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the affected facility. This report provides the calculated data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers known to be used or present in the MCU, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Saltstone facilities that will be exposed to the NGS showed that TiDG could selectively affect the elastomers and some thermoplastics to varying extents, but the typical use of these polymers in a confined geometry will likely prevent the NGS from impacting component performance. The polymers identified as of primary concern include Grafoil® (flexible graphite), Tefzel®, Isolast®, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM). Certain polymers like NBR and EPDM were found to interact mildly with NGS but their calculated swelling and the confined geometry will impede interaction with NGS. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid (cellulose fibers-reinforced glycerin and protein) may leach protein and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) may leach plasticizer (such as Bis-Ethylhexyl-Phthalates) into the NGS solvent. Either case

  18. Solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oils from Laurus nobilis and Melissa officinalis: comparison with conventional hydro-distillation and ultrasound extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Burcu; Sozmen, Fazli; Buyuktas, Birsen S

    2010-01-01

    Solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) has been applied to the extraction of essential oils from Melissa officinalis L. and Laurus nobilis L. The results of SFME were compared with those obtained by hydro-distillation (HD) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (USE) of essential oils from dried plant materials. The compositions of the essential oils were identified by GC-MS. The essential oil obtained with SFME contained substantially higher amounts of oxygenated compounds and lower amounts of monoterpenes than the oils obtained by conventional methods. The three different extraction methods used showed differences in the compositions and contents of the essential oils.

  19. 21 CFR 182.40 - Natural extractives (solvent-free) used in conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings. 182.40 Section 182.40 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... in conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings. Natural extractives (solvent-free) used in conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings that are generally recognized as safe for their...

  20. Optimization of in-cell accelerated solvent extraction technique for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duodu, Godfred Odame; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2016-04-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants with adverse impacts on aquatic biota, wildlife and human health even at low concentrations. However, conventional methods for their determination in river sediments are resource intensive. This paper presents an approach that is rapid and also reliable for the detection of OCPs. Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) with in-cell silica gel clean-up followed by Triple Quadrupole Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometry (GCMS/MS) was used to recover OCPs from sediment samples. Variables such as temperature, solvent ratio, adsorbent mass and extraction cycle were evaluated and optimized for the extraction. With the exception of Aldrin, which was unaffected by any of the variables evaluated, the recovery of OCPs from sediment samples was largely influenced by solvent ratio and adsorbent mass and, to some extent, the number of cycles and temperature. The optimized conditions for OCPs extraction in sediment with good recoveries were determined to be 4 cycles, 4.5 g of silica gel, 105 °C, and 4:3 v/v DCM: hexane mixture. With the exception of two compounds (α-BHC and Aldrin) whose recoveries were low (59.73 and 47.66% respectively), the recovery of the other pesticides were in the range 85.35-117.97% with precision <10% RSD. The method developed significantly reduces sample preparation time, the amount of solvent used, matrix interference, and is highly sensitive and selective.

  1. Survey of Solvent type and drying of biomass effects on lipid extraction from Nannochloropsis Oculata for biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Malakootian

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: The use of lyophilized method for dewatering and drying of biomass and diethyl ether as solvent for the extraction of lipids from biomass yielded more compared with other methods studied in this paper and would be more efficient in research works related to the production of biodiesel from microalgae’s lipid.

  2. Electro-driven extraction of inorganic anions from water samples and water miscible organic solvents and analysis by ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojavan, Saeed; Bidarmanesh, Tina; Memarzadeh, Farkhondeh; Chalavi, Soheila

    2014-09-01

    A simple electromembrane extraction (EME) procedure combined with ion chromatography (IC) was developed to quantify inorganic anions in different pure water samples and water miscible organic solvents. The parameters affecting extraction performance, such as supported liquid membrane (SLM) solvent, extraction time, pH of donor and acceptor solutions, and extraction voltage were optimized. The optimized EME conditions were as follows: 1-heptanol was used as the SLM solvent, the extraction time was 10 min, pHs of the acceptor and donor solutions were 10 and 7, respectively, and the extraction voltage was 15 V. The mobile phase used for IC was a combination of 1.8 mM sodium carbonate and 1.7 mM sodium bicarbonate. Under these optimized conditions, all anions had enrichment factors ranging from 67 to 117 with RSDs between 7.3 and 13.5% (n = 5). Good linearity values ranging from 2 to 1200 ng/mL with coefficients of determination (R(2) ) between 0.987 and 0.999 were obtained. The LODs of the EME-IC method ranged from 0.6 to 7.5 ng/mL. The developed method was applied to different samples to evaluate the feasibility of the method for real applications.

  3. Improved solvent-free microwave extraction of essential oil from dried Cuminum cyminum L. and Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziming; Ding, Lan; Li, Tiechun; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Hanqi; Liu, Li; Li, Ying; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Hongju; Zeng, Hong; He, Hui

    2006-01-13

    Solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME) is a recently developed green technique which is performed in atmospheric conditions without adding any solvent or water. SFME has already been applied to extraction of essential oil from fresh plant materials or dried materials prior moistened. The essential oil is evaporated by the in situ water in the plant materials. In this paper, it was observed that an improved SFME, in which a kind of microwave absorption solid medium, such as carbonyl iron powders (CIP), was added and mixed with the sample, can be applied to extraction of essential oil from the dried plant materials without any pretreatment. Because the microwave absorption capacity of CIP is much better than that of water, the extraction time while using the improved SFME is no more than 30 min using a microwave power of 85 W. Compared to the conventional SFME, the advantages of improved SFME were to speed up the extraction rate and need no pretreatment. Improved SFME has been compared with conventional SFME, microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MAHD) and conventional hydrodistillation (HD) for the extraction of essential oil from dried Cuminum cyminum L. and Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim. By using GC-MS system the compositions of essential oil extracted by applying four kinds of extraction methods were identified. There was no obvious difference in the quality of essential oils obtained by the four kinds of extraction methods.

  4. Accelerated solvent extraction combined with solid phase extraction for the determination of organophosphate esters from sewage sludge compost by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Long; Yang, Peijie; Ge, Liming; Du, Jingjing; Zhang, Hongzhong

    2017-02-01

    Organophosphate esters (OPEs), widely used as flame retardants and plasticizers, are regarded as emerging pollutants. OPEs are prone to concentrate into residual activated sludge, which might cause secondary pollution if not suitably treated. Composting is an economical and effective approach to make sewage sludge stable and harmless. Therefore, it is essential to develop a novel method for analyzing OPEs in sewage sludge compost samples. However, in the composting process, large amounts of amendments are doped into the sludge to adjust the carbon-nitrogen ratio. Amendment has a strong capacity for adsorption and thus induces a decrease of extraction efficiency. This study developed a novel procedure for determining OPEs in compost samples. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and solid phase extraction (SPE) were used for extracting and concentrating the OPEs from sewage sludge compost samples, and then analyzed by UHPLC-MS/MS. Some parameters were optimized in this study, mainly including the extraction solvent type, extraction temperature, static extraction time, extraction cycles, and flush volume. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method showed good linearity between 0.50 and 100 μg kg(-1) with regression coefficients in the range of 0.9984-0.9998. Detection limits were in the range of 0.02-3 μg kg(-1) with standard deviations ranging from 2 to 6%. Acceptable recoveries between 56 and 119% for samples spiked at different concentration levels were achieved. In contrast, the recoveries merely ranged from 24 to 58% by using ultrasonic-assisted extraction. Graphical abstract A comparison of recoveries between ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAS) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for organophosphate esters from sewage sludge compost samples.

  5. INIBIÇÃO DE SALMONELLA POR EXTRATO DE ALECRIM (Rosmarinus officinalis: OBTENÇÃO DE EXTRATOS DE ALECRIM EM SOLVENTES ORGÂNICOS INHIBITION OF Salmonella BY ROSEMARY (Rosmarinus officinalis EXTRACTS: ORGANIC SOLVENTS ROSEMARY EXTRACT OBTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Célia Lopes Torres

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Com o objetivo de se obter um extrato de alecrim em solvente orgânico, a ser utilizado na inibição de Salmonella, em alimentos, foram testados quatro tipos de solventes, a saber: metanol, etanol, acetona e hexano. Na obtenção dos extratos foi adotada a técnica recomendada para determinação de lipídeos, conforme as NORMAS ANALÍTICAS DO INSTITUTO ADOLFO LUTZ (1976. A análise dos resultados evidenciou um excelente desempenho do metanol, não sendo contudo recomendada a utilização em produtos alimentares em virtude da sua toxidez. Também o etanol apresentou elevados índices de extração, sem os inconvenientes associados ao uso do metanol, sendo por isto o solvente indicado para a continuidade do estudo proposto.

    Aiming to obtain a rosemary extract in organic solvent to be used in Salmonella inhibition, in food, were tested four kinds of solvents, namely: methane alcohol, ethyl alcohol, acetone and hexane. It was used the recommended technique for lipids determination in extracts determination according to the analytic rules used by Instituto Adolfo Lutz. Analysis results showed an excellent performance for methane alcohol, but its use is not recommended in feed products due to its toxicity. Ethyl alcohol presented also elevated extraction indexes without inconvenients associated to methane alcohol use, by this reason being a solvent indicated for continuity to the proposed study.

  6. Comparison of solvent/derivatization agent systems for determination of extractable toluene diisocyanate from flexible polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangronsveld, Erik; Berckmans, Steven; Spence, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Flexible polyurethane foam (FPF) is produced from the reaction of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and polyols. Limited and conflicting results exist in the literature concerning the presence of unreacted TDI remaining in FPF as determined by various solvent extraction and analysis techniques. This study reports investigations into the effect of several solvent/derivatization agent combinations on extractable TDI results and suggests a preferred method. The suggested preferred method employs a syringe-based multiple extraction of foam samples with a toluene solution of 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazine. Extracts are analyzed by liquid chromatography using an ion trap mass spectrometry detection technique. Detection limits of the method are ~10ng TDI g(-1) foam (10 ppb, w/w) for each TDI isomer (i.e. 2,4-TDI and 2,6-TDI). The method was evaluated by a three-laboratory interlaboratory comparison using two representative foam samples. The total extractable TDI results found by the three labs for the two foams were in good agreement (relative standard deviation of the mean of 30-40%). The method has utility as a basis for comparing FPFs, but the interpretation of extractable TDI results using any solvent as the true value for 'free' or 'unreacted' TDI in the foam is problematic, as demonstrated by the difference in the extracted TDI results from the different extraction systems studied. Further, a consideration of polyurethane foam chemistry raises the possibility that extractable TDI may result from decomposition of parts of the foam structure (e.g. dimers, biurets, and allophanates) by the extraction system.

  7. Recovery of Acetic Acid from An Ethanol Fermentation Broth by Liquid-Liquid Extraction (LLE) Using Various Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Thi Thu Huong; Kim, Tae Hyun [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Um, Byung Hwan [Hankyong National University, Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using various solvents was studied for recovery of acetic acid from a synthetic ethanol fermentation broth. The microbial fermentation of sugars presented in hydrolyzate gives rise to acetic acid as a byproduct. In order to obtain pure ethanol for use as a biofuel, fermentation broth should be subjected to acetic acid removal step and the recovered acetic acid can be put to industrial use. Herein, batch LLE experiments were carried out at 25°C using a synthetic fermentation broth comprising 20.0 g l{sup -1} acetic acid and 5.0 g l{sup -1} ethanol. Ethyl acetate (EtOAc), tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO), tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and tri-n-alkylphosphine oxide (TAPO) were utilized as solvents, and the extraction potential of each solvent was evaluated by varying the organic phase-to-aqueous phase ratios as 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0. The highest acetic acid extraction yield was achieved with TAPO; however, the lowest ethanol-to-acetic acid extraction ratio was obtained using TOPO. In a single-stage batch extraction, 97.0 % and 92.4 % of acetic acid could be extracted using TAPO and TOPO when the ratio of organic-to-aqueous phases is 4:1 respectively. A higher solvent-to-feed ratio resulted in an increase in the ethanol-to-acetic acid ratio, which decreased both acetic acid purity and acetic acid extraction yield.

  8. Selective Extraction of Bio-oil from Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Salix psammophila by Organic Solvents with Different Polarities through Multistep Extraction Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bio-oil obtained from hydrothermal liquefaction of Salix psammophila is a very complicated mixture with some highly valued chemicals. In order to separate the chemicals from bio-oil, solvent extraction using nine solvents with different polarities were investigated in detail. The bio-oil extraction yield of the nine solvents were from high to low: tetrahydrofuran > toluene > ethyl acetate > acetone > ether > methylene chloride > methanol > petroleum ether > n-hexane. Based on their extraction yield, an efficient solvent combination of n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and tetrahydrofuran was used to separate the bio-oil through multistep extraction into three parts: light oil (26.13%, mid-weight oil (54.19%, and heavy oil (19.68%. These fractions were characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that most of the highly valued chemicals were contained in the light oil; the mid-weight oil consisted of aromatic oligomer derived from the decomposition of lignin, which could be a promising candidate for partial substitute for petroleum-asphalt binder; the heavy oil was rich in alkanes.

  9. Chemical Composition of Artemisia annua L. Leaves and Antioxidant Potential of Extracts as a Function of Extraction Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maznah Ismail

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the chemical and nutritional composition of Artemisia annua leaves in addition to determination of antioxidant potential of their extracts prepared in different solvents. Chemical composition was determined by quantifying fat, protein, carbohydrate, fiber, tocopherol, phytate, and tannin contents. Extraction of A. annua leaves, for antioxidant potential evaluation, was carried out using five solvents of different polarities, i.e., hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Antioxidant potential was evaluated by estimating total phenolic (TPC, flavonoid (TFC contents, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC, DPPH radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation. Efficiency of different solvents was compared for the yield of antioxidant extracts from leaf samples and a clear variation was observed. The highest TPC, TFC, TEAC, DPPH radical scavenging and lowest lipid peroxidation were observed in MeOH extracts, whereas aqueous extract exhibited high ferric reducing antioxidant power; suggesting MeOH to be the most favorable extractant.

  10. Mathematical modeling of cadmium(II) solvent extraction from neutral and acidic chloride media using Cyanex 923 extractant as a metal carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, A A; Coll, M T; Fortuny, A; Rathore, N S; Sastre, A M

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes experimental work and the mathematical modeling of solvent extraction of cadmium(II) from neutral and acidic aqueous chloride media with a Cyanex 923 extractant in Exxol D-100. Solvent extraction experiments were carried out to analyze the influence of variations in the composition of the aqueous and organic phases on the efficiency of cadmium(II) extraction. In neutral and acidic chloride conditions, the extraction of cadmium(II) by the organophosphorous extractant Cyanex 923 (L) is based on the solvation mechanism of neutral H(n)CdCl((2+n)) species and the formation of H(n)CdCl((2+n))L(q) complexes in the organic phase, where n=0, 1, 2 and q=1, 2. The mathematical model of cadmium(II) extraction was derived from the mass balances and chemical equilibria involved in the separation system. The model was computed with the Matlab software. The equilibrium parameters for metal extraction, i.e. the stability constants of the aqueous Cd-Cl complexes, the formation constants of the acidic Cd-Cl species and the metal equilibrium extraction constants, were proposed. The optimized constants were appropriate, as there was good agreement when the model was fitted to the experimental data for each of the experiments.

  11. Mathematical modeling of cadmium(II) solvent extraction from neutral and acidic chloride media using Cyanex 923 extractant as a metal carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leopold, A.A., E-mail: agnieszka.leopold@upc.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, EPSEVG, Av. Victor Balaguer s/n, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru (Spain); Coll, M.T.; Fortuny, A.; Rathore, N.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, EPSEVG, Av. Victor Balaguer s/n, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru (Spain); Sastre, A.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes experimental work and the mathematical modeling of solvent extraction of cadmium(II) from neutral and acidic aqueous chloride media with a Cyanex 923 extractant in Exxol D-100. Solvent extraction experiments were carried out to analyze the influence of variations in the composition of the aqueous and organic phases on the efficiency of cadmium(II) extraction. In neutral and acidic chloride conditions, the extraction of cadmium(II) by the organophosphorous extractant Cyanex 923 (L) is based on the solvation mechanism of neutral H{sub n}CdCl{sub (2+n)} species and the formation of H{sub n}CdCl{sub (2+n)}L{sub q} complexes in the organic phase, where n = 0, 1, 2 and q = 1, 2. The mathematical model of cadmium(II) extraction was derived from the mass balances and chemical equilibria involved in the separation system. The model was computed with the Matlab software. The equilibrium parameters for metal extraction, i.e. the stability constants of the aqueous Cd-Cl complexes, the formation constants of the acidic Cd-Cl species and the metal equilibrium extraction constants, were proposed. The optimized constants were appropriate, as there was good agreement when the model was fitted to the experimental data for each of the experiments.

  12. Development of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase system for the extraction of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Wang, Yuzhi; Xu, Kaijia; Huang, Yanhua; Wen, Qian; Ding, Xueqin

    2016-05-15

    Six kinds of new type of green betaine-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized. Deep eutectic solvent aqueous two-phase systems (DES-ATPS) were established and successfully applied in the extraction of protein. Betaine-urea (Be-U) was selected as the suitable extractant. Single factor experiments were carried out to determine the optimum conditions of the extraction process, such as the salt concentration, the mass of DES, the separation time, the amount of protein, the temperature and the pH value. The extraction efficiency could achieve to 99.82% under the optimum conditions. Mixed sample and practical sample analysis were discussed. The back extraction experiment was implemented and the back extraction efficiency could reach to 32.66%. The precision experiment, repeatability experiment and stability experiment were investigated. UV-vis, FT-IR and circular dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed that the conformation of protein was not changed during the process of extraction. The mechanisms of extraction were researched by dynamic light scattering (DLS), the measurement of the conductivity and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). DES-protein aggregates and embraces phenomenon play considerable roles in the separation process. All of these results indicated that betaine-based DES-ATPS may provide a potential substitute new method for the separation of proteins.

  13. Leaching Pretreatments for Improving Biomass Quality: Feedstocks, Solvents, and Extraction Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao Wei

    In this research, a systematic study was conducted to quantify the inorganic and organic compounds leached from rice straw, wheat straw, corn stover, switchgrass, Jose Tall Wheatgrass, Douglas fir, and Miscanthus with water, and to evaluate the feedstock quality and characteristics of leached solids for thermal process applications. Leaching feedstocks with water at ambient temperature with a 20 L/kg (dry matter) ratio for 2 hours greatly increased the ash fusion temperature of rice straw (from 1050°C to above 1550°C) and wheat straw (from 900°C to 1250°C), but the treatment only increased the ash fusion temperature of corn stover from 900°C to 950°C. Miscanthus had relatively good initial feedstock quality and leaching may not prove necessary for this feedstock in thermal systems. Leaching also changed the combustion kinetics of biomass by increasing the initial degradation temperature of most feedstocks from originally between 165°C and 186°C to between 180°C and 250°C depending on feedstock. Moreover, leaching increased the maximum rate of weight loss of feedstock by 11% to 54% and increased the corresponding temperatures for peak loss up to 34°C. Leaching removed a sizeable fraction of organic compounds (between 2% and 12% of dry matter). These organic extracts were identified as mostly sugars and acids which might be valuable co-products. Moisture contents of feedstocks after leaching were typically high, ranging between 68 and 81% wet basis. A dewatering step is generally required prior to using the leached biomass for thermochemical conversion. Solvents with ability to dissolve ion-exchangeable, organically associated, and acid soluble metals can further remove non-water soluble metals from biomass and may also improve feedstock quality. In a solvent evaluation, corn stover and wheat straw were leached with water, 1M ammonium acetate, 1M HCl, 100% methanol, 50% methanol, 100% ethanol, and 50% ethanol, and leached solids and leachate were

  14. Enhanced extraction yields and mobile phase separations by solvent mixtures for the analysis of metabolites in Annona muricata L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro de Souza, Eloana Benassi; da Silva, Renata Reis; Afonso, Sabrina; Scarminio, Ieda Spacino

    2009-12-01

    The effects of five extraction solvents and their mixtures on the yield of metabolites in crude and fractionated extracts of Annona muricata L. leaves were investigated by direct comparison. Extraction media were prepared using simplex centroid mixtures of ethanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane, acetone, and chloroform. The effects of the mobile phase solvent strength and the analysis wavelength on the chromatographic separation were also investigated. Solvent mixtures rather than pure solvents were found to be the most efficient extractors for the different fractions. The results indicated that the mobile phase composed of methanol/acetonitrile/water (26:27:47 v/v/v) was most suitable for the basic fraction analysis at 254 nm, whereas the mobile phase composed of methanol/acetonitrile/water (35:35:30 v/v/v) was the most adequate for the organic fraction analysis at 254 nm. The results indicated that the chromatographic profiles and number of peaks were affected by the mobile phase strength and analysis wavelength.

  15. Microencapsulation by solvent extraction/evaporation: reviewing the state of the art of microsphere preparation process technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Sergio; Merkle, Hans P; Gander, Bruno

    2005-02-02

    The therapeutic benefit of microencapsulated drugs and vaccines brought forth the need to prepare such particles in larger quantities and in sufficient quality suitable for clinical trials and commercialisation. Very commonly, microencapsulation processes are based on the principle of so-called "solvent extraction/evaporation". While initial lab-scale experiments are frequently performed in simple beaker/stirrer setups, clinical trials and market introduction require more sophisticated technologies, allowing for economic, robust, well-controllable and aseptic production of microspheres. To this aim, various technologies have been examined for microsphere preparation, among them are static mixing, extrusion through needles, membranes and microfabricated microchannel devices, dripping using electrostatic forces and ultrasonic jet excitation. This article reviews the current state of the art in solvent extraction/evaporation-based microencapsulation technologies. Its focus is on process-related aspects, as described in the scientific and patent literature. Our findings will be outlined according to the four major substeps of microsphere preparation by solvent extraction/evaporation, namely, (i) incorporation of the bioactive compound, (ii) formation of the microdroplets, (iii) solvent removal and (iv) harvesting and drying the particles. Both, well-established and more advanced technologies will be reviewed.

  16. In vitro anti-oxidative activities and GC-MS analysis of various solvent extracts of Cassia singueana parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Koorbanally, Neil Anthony; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the anti-oxidative activities of different solvent extracts of Cassia singueana parts. Our results indicate that all the extracts have reducing power (Fe3+ --> Fe2+) and DPPH radical scavenging abilities. However, the ethyl acetate extract of the stem bark has the highest total reducing power whilst the ethanol extract of the stem bark has more potent free radical scavenging activity than all the other extracts. The ethyl acetate extract of the stem bark exhibited more powerful hydroxyl radical scavenging activity than other extracts whilst the aqueous extract of the leaves displayed more potent nitric oxide inhibition activity than other extracts. The GC-MS analysis of the ethyl acetate extract of the stem bark and the ethanol extract of the root and leaves indicated that several aromatic compounds, including phenolics, fatty acids, amino acids and triterpenoids were present in these extracts. Data from this study suggest that the parts of C. singueana possessed anti-oxidative activities and can be used as a potential alternative medicine for oxidative stress related non-communicable chronic diseases. Further experimental and clinical studies in this regard are warranted.

  17. Recovery by solvent extraction of vanadium from spent catalysts leaching solutions using Primene 81R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano, L. J.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of vanadium contained in solutions coming from spent catalysts leaching process by means of solvent extraction techniques using primary amine Primene 81R, has been studied in this work, resulting in an industrial multistage process for the treatment of these effluents. Results obtained allows to propose an extraction mechanism for vanadium(V with this amine in acidic media, verifying the great influence of pH on the process and fix adequate ranges for variables: O/A ratio, organic phase composition, pH, stirring speed and phase separation speed. These values were simulated in industrial conditions. Vanadium is finally recovered by means of precipitation as ammonium metavanadate and later calcination to obtain vanadium pentoxide of commercial grade.

    En el presente trabajo se ha estudiado la recuperación del vanadio contenido en soluciones procedentes del proceso de lixiviación de catalizadores agotados, por medio de la técnica de extracción con disolventes, empleando la amina primaria PRIMENE 81R, planteando un proceso industrial multietapa para el tratamiento de estos efluentes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten proponer un mecanismo de extracción para el vanadio(V, con esta amina en medio ácido, verificando la gran influencia del pH en el proceso y Ajando los rangos adecuados para las siguientes variables: relación O/A, composición de la fase orgánica, pH, velocidad de agitación y velocidad de separación de fases. Esos valores se simularon en condiciones industriales. El vanadio se recupera finalmente precipitándolo como metavanadato amónico y posterior calcinación para obtener pentóxido de vanadio de calidad comercial.

  18. Solvent-extractable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar: influence of pyrolysis temperature and feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Kleber, Markus; Sparrow, Margaret A; Simoneit, Bernd R T; Prahl, Fredrick G

    2012-09-01

    Despite the increasing agricultural use of biochar as a way of combining the utilization of biomass for energy production with the removal of CO(2) from the atmosphere, it is not known how variations in pyrolysis temperature and feedstock type affect concentration and composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that inevitably form and associate with biochar. To close this knowledge gap, we quantified 11 unsubstituted three- to five-ring PAHs as well as alkylated forms of phenanthrene and anthracene in grass and wood chars produced in 100 °C increments across a temperature range (100 to 700 °C). Our results show that solvent-extractable PAH concentrations in biochars produced at heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) of 400 and 500 °C greatly exceed those observed at higher and lower temperature, supporting a low HTT solid-phase formation mechanism operable at temperatures commonly used for industrial biochar production. The maximum extractable yield of 'pyrolytic' unsubstituted PAHs for grass (22 μg g(-1) at HTT = 500 °C) greatly exceeds the value for wood (5.9 μg g(-1)). Moreover, PAH signatures (e.g., total monomethylphenanthrene to phenanthrene ratios, MP/P ~2-3) at intermediate temperatures (400 °C) resemble those of fossil oils rather than that commonly attributed to pyrolytic products. Further research is needed to characterize the PAH evolution in modern pyrolysis reactors and assess the fate of biochar-bound PAHs in soils and sediments. Various commonly applied PAH ratios and indicator compounds show promise as markers for specific feedstock materials and pyrolysis conditions of biochars in environmental systems.

  19. Studies into new solvent extraction reagents for the separation of trivalent minor actinides from trivalent lanthanides

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, M L

    2000-01-01

    Ligands, suitable for the separation of minor actinide(lll) cations from lanthanide(lll) cations from acidic aqueous media, have been synthesised. Two oligopyridine ligands, 4', 4''-(bis (4-tolyl))-2, 2': 6', 2'': 6'', 2'''-quaterpyridine and 4',4'''-(bis(4-heptyloxyphenyl))-2,2':6',2'':6'',2''':6''',2'''' -quinquepyridi= ne, have been synthesised and tested by solvent extraction experiments. The ability of the ligands to separate minor actinide from lanthanide has been attributed to the number of pyridyl rings present. A series of terpyridine analogues based on sym-triazine have been prepared, via the cyclisation of aromatic carbonitriles with guanidine. New lipophilic derivatives of 2-amino-bis(4,6(2-pyridyl))-1,3,5-triazine, 2-amino-bis(4,6(2-pyrazinyl)-1,3,5-triazine, 2-amino-bis(4,6(2-isoquinolinyl)-1,3,5-triazine, 2-amino-bis(4,6(2-(4-methyl)pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine, 2-amino-bis(4,6(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine, 2-amino-bis(4,6(2-thiophenyl)-1,3,5-triazine and 2-amino-bis(4,6(2-quinolinyl)-1,3,5-triazine ha...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Philip L. Biedler; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-06-23

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. There are a number of parameters which are important for the production of acceptable cokes, including purity, structure, density, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity etc. From the standpoint of a manufacturer of graphite electrodes such as GrafTech, one of the most important parameters is coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Because GrafTech material is usually fully graphitized (i.e., heat treated at 3100 C), very high purity is automatically achieved. The degree of graphitization controls properties such as CTE, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and density. Thus it is usually possible to correlate these properties using a single parameter. CTE has proven to be a useful index for the quality of coke. Pure graphite actually has a slightly negative coefficient of thermal expansion, whereas more disordered carbon has a positive coefficient.

  1. Compound Specific Extraction of Camptothecin from Nothapodytes nimmoniana and Piperine from Piper nigrum Using Accelerated Solvent Extractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Upadhya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of varying temperatures with constant pressure of solvent on extraction efficiency of two chemically different alkaloids were studied. Camptothecin (CPT from stem of Nothapodytes nimmoniana (Grah. Mabb. and piperine from the fruits of Piper nigrum L. were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extractor (ASE. Three cycles of extraction for a particular sample cell at a given temperature assured complete extraction. CPT and piperine were determined and quantified by using a simple and efficient UFLC-PDA (245 and 343 nm method. Temperature increased efficiency of extraction to yield higher amount of CPT, whereas temperature had diminutive effect on yield of piperine. Maximum yield for CPT was achieved at 80∘C and for piperine at 40∘C. Thus, the study determines compound specific extraction of CPT from N. nimmoniana and piperine from P. nigrum using ASE method. The present study indicates the use of this method for simple, fast, and accurate extraction of the compound of interest.

  2. Demonstration Plant Equipment Design and Scale-Up from Pilot Plant of a Leaching and Solvent Extraction Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Arroyo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Germanium recovery from coal fly ash by hydrometallurgical procedures was studied at the pilot scale (5 kg of fly ash/h. Results were used to design the equipment of a demonstration-sized plant (200 kg of fly ash/h. The process is based on hydrometallurgical operations: firstly a germanium extraction from fly ash by leaching and a consequent Ge separation from the other elements present in the solution by solvent extraction procedures. Based on the experimental results, mass balances and McCabe-Thiele diagrams were applied to determine the number of steps of the solvent extraction stage. Different arrangements have been studied and a countercurrent process with three steps in extraction and six steps in elution was defined. A residence time of 5 min was fixed in both the extraction and elution stages. Volumetric ratios in extraction and stripping were: aqueous phase/organic phase = 5 and organic phase/stripping phase = 5, so a concentration factor of 25 is achieved. Mixers and decanters were completely defined. The maximum extracted and eluted germanium was estimated and a global efficiency of 94% was achieved. The cost-effectiveness of the equipment was estimated using the Lang factors.

  3. A solvent extraction approach to recover acetic acid from mixed waste acids produced during semiconductor wafer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Ju-Yup; Kim, Jun-Young; Kim, Hyun-Sang; Lee, Hyang-Sook; Mohapatra, Debasish; Ahn, Jae-Woo; Ahn, Jong-Gwan; Bae, Wookeun

    2009-03-15

    Recovery of acetic acid (HAc) from the waste etching solution discharged from silicon wafer manufacturing process has been attempted by using solvent extraction process. For this purpose 2-ethylhexyl alcohol (EHA) was used as organic solvent. In the pre-treatment stage >99% silicon and hydrofluoric acid was removed from the solution by precipitation. The synthesized product, Na(2)SiF(6) having 98.2% purity was considered of commercial grade having good market value. The waste solution containing 279 g/L acetic acid, 513 g/L nitric acid, 0.9 g/L hydrofluoric acid and 0.030 g/L silicon was used for solvent extraction study. From the batch test results equilibrium conditions for HAc recovery were optimized and found to be 4 stages of extraction at an organic:aqueous (O:A) ratio of 3, 4 stages of scrubbing and 4 stages of stripping at an O:A ratio of 1. Deionized water (DW) was used as stripping agent to elute HAc from organic phase. In the whole batch process 96.3% acetic acid recovery was achieved. Continuous operations were successfully conducted for 100 h using a mixer-settler to examine the feasibility of the extraction system for its possible commercial application. Finally, a complete process flowsheet with material balance for the separation and recovery of HAc has been proposed.

  4. Separation of Ce and La from Synthetic Chloride Leach Solution of Monazite Sand by Precipitation and Solvent Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Raju; Jeon, Ho Seok; Lee, Man Seung

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation and solvent extraction experiments have been performed to recover light rare earths from simulated monazite sand chloride leach solutions. Precipitation conditions were obtained to recover Ce by adding NaClO as an oxidant. Among some cationic extractants (PC 88A, D2EHPA, Cyanex 272, LIX 63), PC 88A showed the best performance to separate La from the resulting chloride solution. Furthermore, the mixture of PC 88A with other solvating (TBP, TOPO) and amine extractants (Alamine 336, Aliquat 336) was tested to increase the separation factor of La from Pr and Nd. The use of mixed extractants greatly enhanced the separation of La from the two other metals. McCabe-Thiele diagrams for the extraction of Pr and Nd with the PC 88A/Alamine 336 mixture were constructed.

  5. Qualitative analysis of phytochemicals, and comparative superoxide radical scavenging along with reducing potency of Solanum nigrum using various solvent extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Thenmozhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to screen the phytochemicals, comparative superoxide radical scavenging and reducing potency of Solanum nigrum using various solvent extracts. The herbal powder obtained from plant part-dry leaves were extracted with various solvents. The extracts were analysed for phytochemicals and antioxidants-carotenoids, ascorbic acid, tocopherol, total phenol, proteins, reducing sugars and sterols. Free radical scavenging capacity was analysed in terms of superoxide radial scavenging assay and reducing power assay. Phytochemical characterization of the different extracts revealed the presence of the phytochemicals-alkaloids, phenols, flavonoids, sterol, saponin glycosides, reducing sugars, proteins, cardio active aglycones and cardinolides. Excellent Superoxide Radical scavenging ability found in almost all extracts of S. nigrum. In the present study superoxide radical reduces nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT to a blue coloured formazan that is measured at 560 nm. Antioxidant activity has been reported to be concomitant with development of reducing power. This shows that extracts might contain reductones like ascorbic acid, reducing sugar, thiol group containing protein which could react with free radicals to stabilize and terminate radical chain reaction. These findings suggest that the promising phytonutrients of the plant could be exploited against oxidative stress, cancer, ageing, Ischemic heart disease in dissolving thrombus, microbial infections and hormone replacement therapy (HRT justifying their use in traditional medicine as nutraceuticals.

  6. The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-06-26

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01 M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B203 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 flowsheet to additions of B203 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 - SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of

  7. ICPSEF: a user's manual for the computer mathematical model of the ICPP purex solvent extraction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendixsen, C L

    1982-11-01

    A computer-based mathematical program, ICPSEF, was developed for the first-cycle extraction system at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). At the ICPP, spent nuclear fuels are processed to recover unfissioned uranium. The uranium is recovered from aqueous solutions in a pulse column, solvent extraction system using tributyl phosphate (TBP) solvent (purex process). A previously developed SEPHIS-MOD4 computer program was added to and modified to provide a model for the ICPP system. Major modifications included addition of: (1) partial theoretical stages to permit more accurate modeling of ICPP columns, (2) modeling ammonium hydroxide neutralization of nitric acid in a scrubbing column, and (3) equilibrium data for 5 to 10 vol % TBP. The model was verified by comparison with actual operating data. Detailed instructions for using the ICPSEF model and sample results of the model are included.

  8. An europium(III) diglycolamide complex: insights into the coordination chemistry of lanthanides in solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Mark R; McAlister, Daniel R; Horwitz, E Philip

    2015-01-14

    The synthesis, stoichiometry, and structural characterization of a homoleptic, cationic europium(III) complex with three neutral tetraalkyldiglycolamide ligands are reported. The tri(bismuth tetrachloride)tris(N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide)Eu salt, [Eu(TODGA)3][(BiCl4)3] obtained from methanol was examined by Eu L3-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to reveal an inner-sphere coordination of Eu(3+) that arises from 9 O atoms and two next-nearest coordination spheres that arise from 6 carbon atoms each. A structural model is proposed in which each TODGA ligand with its O=Ca-Cb-O-Cb-Ca=O backbone acts as a tridentate O donor, where the two carbonyl O atoms and the one ether O atom bond to Eu(3+). Given the structural rigidity of the tridentate coordination motif in [Eu(TODGA)3](3+) with six 5-membered chelate rings, the six Eu-Ca and six Eu-Cb interactions are readily resolved in the EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) spectrum. The three charge balancing [BiCl4](-) anions are beyond the cationic [Eu(TODGA)3](3+) cluster in an outer sphere environment that is too distant to be detected by XAS. Despite their sizeable length and propensity for entanglement, the four n-octyl groups of each TODGA (for a total of twelve) do not perturb the Eu(3+) coordination environment over that seen from previously reported single-crystal structures of tripositive lanthanide (Ln(3+)) complexes with tetraalkyldiglycolamide ligands (of the same 1:3 metal-to-ligand ratio stoichiometry) but having shorter i-propyl and i-butyl groups. The present results set the foundation for understanding advanced solvent extraction processes for the separation of the minor, tripositive actinides (Am, Cm) from the Ln(3+) ions in terms of the local structure of Eu(3+) in a solid state coordination complex with TODGA.

  9. Mechanism of extractant loss in solvent extraction process (Ⅰ)——Transfer of saponified D2EHPA from organic phase to aqueous phase and its aggregation behaviour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王笃金; 吴瑾光; 李彦; 翁诗甫; 吴佩强; 徐光宪

    1995-01-01

    The phenomenon of the loss of saponified D2EHPA(di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid,HA)from organic phase to aqueous phase and its aggregation behaviour were studied with FT-IR and DLS(dynamic light scattering)techniques based on the fact that saponified extractant can form reversed micelles orw/o microemulsions in n-heptane,a non-polar diluent.The results indicate that "normal rnioelles" or o/wmicroemulsions are formed from acidic extractant and its sodium salt in aqueous phase,and the micelle ormicroemulsion drop has a non-polar core which can solubilize nheptane,so the equilibrated aqueous phasecontaining extractant is a complex fluid rather than a "real solution".Therefore,the aqueous aggregate for-mation leads to the extractant loss in solvent extraction process.Strong electrolytes can prevent or lessen theextractant loss.The results of this paper provide a theoretical possibility for solving the problem ofextractant and solvent loss in liquid-liquid extraction industry.

  10. Effect of the drying process on the intensification of phenolic compounds recovery from grape pomace using accelerated solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajha, Hiba N; Ziegler, Walter; Louka, Nicolas; Hobaika, Zeina; Vorobiev, Eugene; Boechzelt, Herbert G; Maroun, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    In light of their environmental and economic interests, food byproducts have been increasingly exploited and valorized for their richness in dietary fibers and antioxidants. Phenolic compounds are antioxidant bioactive molecules highly present in grape byproducts. Herein, the accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of phenolic compounds from wet and dried grape pomace, at 45 °C, was conducted and the highest phenolic compounds yield (PCY) for wet (16.2 g GAE/100 g DM) and dry (7.28 g GAE/100 g DM) grape pomace extracts were obtained with 70% ethanol/water solvent at 140 °C. The PCY obtained from wet pomace was up to two times better compared to the dry byproduct and up to 15 times better compared to the same food matrices treated with conventional methods. With regard to Resveratrol, the corresponding dry pomace extract had a better free radical scavenging activity (49.12%) than the wet extract (39.8%). The drying pretreatment process seems to ameliorate the antiradical activity, especially when the extraction by ASE is performed at temperatures above 100 °C. HPLC-DAD analysis showed that the diversity of the flavonoid and the non-flavonoid compounds found in the extracts was seriously affected by the extraction temperature and the pretreatment of the raw material. This diversity seems to play a key role in the scavenging activity demonstrated by the extracts. Our results emphasize on ASE usage as a promising method for the preparation of highly concentrated and bioactive phenolic extracts that could be used in several industrial applications.

  11. Effect of the Drying Process on the Intensification of Phenolic Compounds Recovery from Grape Pomace Using Accelerated Solvent Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiba N. Rajha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In light of their environmental and economic interests, food byproducts have been increasingly exploited and valorized for their richness in dietary fibers and antioxidants. Phenolic compounds are antioxidant bioactive molecules highly present in grape byproducts. Herein, the accelerated solvent extraction (ASE of phenolic compounds from wet and dried grape pomace, at 45 °C, was conducted and the highest phenolic compounds yield (PCY for wet (16.2 g GAE/100 g DM and dry (7.28 g GAE/100 g DM grape pomace extracts were obtained with 70% ethanol/water solvent at 140 °C. The PCY obtained from wet pomace was up to two times better compared to the dry byproduct and up to 15 times better compared to the same food matrices treated with conventional methods. With regard to Resveratrol, the corresponding dry pomace extract had a better free radical scavenging activity (49.12% than the wet extract (39.8%. The drying pretreatment process seems to ameliorate the antiradical activity, especially when the extraction by ASE is performed at temperatures above 100 °C. HPLC-DAD analysis showed that the diversity of the flavonoid and the non-flavonoid compounds found in the extracts was seriously affected by the extraction temperature and the pretreatment of the raw material. This diversity seems to play a key role in the scavenging activity demonstrated by the extracts. Our results emphasize on ASE usage as a promising method for the preparation of highly concentrated and bioactive phenolic extracts that could be used in several industrial applications.

  12. Surface tension of a coal extract in an organic solvent; Sekitan chushutsu seibun no kaigo to hyomen choryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Takanohashi, T.; Iino, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute for Chemical Reaction Science

    1996-10-28

    The behavior and properties of associated bodies were studied through measurement of surface tension considering acetone-soluble fraction relatively light among various solvent extracts of coal. In experiment, the acetone-soluble fraction was extracted from the substances extracted from Upper Freeport coal as standard specimen using the mixed solvent of carbon disulfide (CS2) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), and it was dissolved into NMP after drying. Surface tension was measured by Wilhelmy method. The experimental results are as follows. Equilibrium surface tension is equal to the surface tension of pure solvent in a low concentration range of solution, and decreases with an increase in concentration approaching a fixed value at 0 in log concentration, nearly showing an S curve. Adsorption of species with non-polar aromatic ring of the acetone-soluble fraction on a solution surface probably decreases surface tension. Change with time in surface tension is observed which suggests fast initial reaction and slow subsequent reaction. 4 figs.

  13. Effects of Surfactant on Zinc Recovery by Solvent Extraction during Leaching in HCl—FeCl3 Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LULizhu; KANGXiaobong; 等

    2002-01-01

    The effects of surfactant on the solvent extraction in leaching sphalerite were investigated. It is found that sodium dodecyl sulfonate is the effective surfactant in improving the zinc recovery from sphalerite in the aqueous FeCl3-HCl-tetrachloroethylene system. Through the measurements of surface tension and viscosity of the sphalerite slurry modified with different surfactants, it is concluded that sodium dodecyl sulfonate in the concentration range of 0.05 to 0.2g·L-1 can improve the viscosity of sphalerite slurry in the water, decrease the surface tension of leaching solution, prevent the aggregation of ore particles, and give very high zinc extraction.

  14. Influence of processing procedure on the quality of Radix Scrophulariae: a quantitative evaluation of the main compounds obtained by accelerated solvent extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Wu, Xin; Li, Qinglin; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang; Zhu, Xuemei

    2015-02-01

    An improved high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection combined with accelerated solvent extraction method was used to simultaneously determine six compounds in crude and processed Radix Scrophulariae samples. Accelerated solvent extraction parameters such as extraction solvent, temperature, number of cycles, and analysis procedure were systematically optimized. The results indicated that compared with crude Radix Scrophulariae samples, the processed samples had lower contents of harpagide and harpagoside but higher contents of catalpol, acteoside, angoroside C, and cinnamic acid. The established method was sufficiently rapid and reliable for the global quality evaluation of crude and processed herbal medicines.

  15. Composition of sulla (Hedysarum coronarium L.) honey solvent extractives determined by GC/MS: norisoprenoids and other volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerković, Igor; Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Tuberso, Carlo I G; Gugić, Mirko; Bubalo, Dragan

    2010-09-09

    Samples of unifloral sulla (Hedysarum coronarum L.) honey from Sardinia (Italy) were analysed. To investigate the chemical composition of the honey volatiles two solvent systems were used for ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE): 1) a 1:2 (v/v) pentane and diethyl ether mixture and 2) dichloromethane. All the extracts were analysed by GC and GC/MS. These procedures have permitted the identification of 56 compounds that include norisoprenoids, benzene derivatives, aliphatic compounds and Maillard reaction products. Norisoprenoids were the major compounds in both extracts, dominated by vomifoliol (5.3-11.2%; 9.6-14.0%) followed by minor percentages of other norisoprenoids such as α-isophorone, 4-ketoisophorone, 3-oxo-α-ionol or 3-oxo-α-ionone. Other abundant single compounds in the extracts were 3-hydroxy-4-phenylbutan-2-one (0.8-5.4%; 0.6-5.7%) and methyl syringate (3.0-5.7%; 2.2-4.1%). The composition of the volatiles and semi-volatiles in the obtained extracts suggests that sulla honey is quite distinctive relative to the other honeys that have been chemically studied by GC/MS, but no specific markers of the honey botanical origin were found.

  16. Separation of middle rare earths by solvent extraction using 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester as an extractant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danilo; Fontana; Loris; Pietrelli

    2009-01-01

    The extraction of the trivalent middle rare earths from chloride media by kerosene solutions of 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester as an extractant was studied. The separation factors between the elements using solution simulating wastes from NiMH spent batteries have been evaluated: the order of the extractive ability of extractant can be confirmed in ThGdEuSm.

  17. Determination of antimicrobial potentialities of different solvent extracts of the medicinal plant: Phyllanthus amarus Schum. and Thonn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antara Sen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial efficiency of Phyllanthus amarus Schum. and Thonn., medicinal plants (leaf extracts, was examined using Methanol, Ethanol, Petroleum ether. and water, as solvents and tested against eight human pathogens like Bacteria: Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Fungi: Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium oxisporum, and Rhizopus stolonifer, using the agar well-diffusion method and minimum inhibitory concentration. All the plants showed significant activity against all pathogens, but the alcoholic extract of P. amarus showed the maximum zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration against all the microorganisms. The minimum zone of inhibition and comparatively greater inhibitory concentration were determined in petroleum ether, and the aqueous extract of P. amarus showed less antimicrobial activity against all the experimental strains. The alcoholic extracts of these plants could be a possible source of obtaining new and effective herbal medicines to treat infections, hence, it justified the ethnic use of P. amarus against various infectious diseases.

  18. Extraction of vitexin from binahong (Anredera cordifolia (Ten.) Steenis) leaves using betaine - 1,4 butanediol natural deep eutectic solvent (NADES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, Kamarza; Muhammad, Fajri; Krisanti, Elsa

    2017-03-01

    The leaves of binahong (Anredera cordifolia (Ten) Steenis) contain flavonoids as bioactive substances that have efficacy to treat wounds and diseases caused by bacteria. One of the flavonoids contained in the leaves is 8-glucopyranosyl-4'5'7-trihydroxyflavone or vitexin. Conventional extraction of flavonoids from leaves of binahong has been developed and usually using non-friendly organic solvent. To overcome these problems, a Natural Deep Eutectic Solvent (NADES) is used to replace the conventional organic solvents, as it is an environmentally friendly, non-toxic and high boiling point solvent. In this study, a betaine-based NADES combined with 1,4-butanediol in 1:3 mole ratio was used as the extraction solvent. Vitexin in the extract was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively using an HPLC. The extraction of vitexin from binahong leaves at room temperature (27 °C) for four hours give yield of 46 ppm, much lower than 200 ppm yield obtained after extraction at 55 °C for 90 minutes. This results showed that (a) NADES consisting of betaine and 1,4 butanediol is a promising green solvent for extraction of vitexin from binahong leaves, and, (b) the extraction can be performed above ambient temperature, as long as it does not exceed the degradation temperature of the bioactive compound extracted.

  19. Effect of extraction solvents on the biomolecules and antioxidant properties of Scorzonera undulata (Asteraceae: Application of factorial design optimization phenolic extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Athmouni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Phenolic compounds were extracted and isolated from S. undulata roots. Methods. Sample of roots from E. hirta was tested for phenolic compounds, and in vitro antioxidant activity by diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, ABTS, FRAP and reducing power was measured using cyano- ferrate method. Results. The methanolic fraction exhibited the highest total phenol content (6.12 ±0.11 mg AGE/g DW. On the other hand, the highest flavonoids concentration was observed in ethyl acetate fraction (2.90 ±0.05 mg CE/g DW in addition to anthocyanins (28.56 ±3.96 mg/l. Besides, the highest level of tannins content was measured in the polar aprotic solvent ethyl acetate extract (3.25 ±0.06 mg CE/g DW. The different extracts of S. undulata were evaluated for their radical scavenging activities by means of the DPPH assay. The strongest scavenging activity was observed in methanolic fraction scavenged radicals effectively with IC   values of 0.14 ±0.02 mg/ml. Similarly, the potassium ferricyanide reduction (FRAP and ABTS•+ of methanol extract. On the other hand, the total reducing power of ethyl acetate extract was found higher than of other extracts. This paper presents the application of the design-of experiment method for optimizing the extraction of phe- nolic content using methanol solvent. The resulting regression model has shown that the effect of temperature is not statistically significant (with >95% certainty, while that of agitation speed is. The two main effects are contributed by the solvent concentration and the maceration period. Conclusion. Our results clearly showed that the extraction of phenolic compounds and their antioxidant ca- pacity is significantly affected by solvent combinations. S. undulata presented the highest total phenolic con- tent, total flavonoids content and antioxidant capacity values. The resulting regression model has shown that the effect of temperature is not statistically significant (with >95

  20. FI/SI on-line solvent extraction/back extraction preconcentration coupled to direct injection nebulization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for determination of copper and lead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jianhua; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2002-01-01

    at a sample flow rate of 6.0 ml/min The precisions (RSD) at the 0.2 mug/1 level were 4.4% (Cu) and 4.8% (Pb), respectively. The applicability of the procedure is demonstrated for the determination of copper and lead in three certified reference materials and a urine sample.......An automated sequential injection on-line preconcentration procedure for determination of trace levels of copper and lead via solvent extraction/back extraction coupled to ICP-MS is described. In citrate buffer of pH 3, neutral complexes between the analytes and the chelating reagent, ammonium...

  1. Accelerated solvent extraction followed by on-line solid-phase extraction coupled to ion trap LC/MS/MS for analysis of benzalkonium chlorides in sediment samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, I.; Furlong, E.T.

    2002-01-01

    Benzalkonium chlorides (BACs) were successfully extracted from sediment samples using a new methodology based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by an on-line cleanup step. The BACs were detected by liquid chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS) or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using an electrospray interface operated in the positive ion mode. This methodology combines the high efficiency of extraction provided by a pressurized fluid and the high sensitivity offered by the ion trap MS/MS. The effects of solvent type and ASE operational variables, such as temperature and pressure, were evaluated. After optimization, a mixture of acetonitrile/water (6:4 or 7:3) was found to be most efficient for extracting BACs from the sediment samples. Extraction recoveries ranged from 95 to 105% for C12 and C14 homologues, respectively. Total method recoveries from fortified sediment samples, using a cleanup step followed by ASE, were 85% for C12BAC and 79% for C14-BAC. The methodology developed in this work provides detection limits in the subnanogram per gram range. Concentrations of BAC homologues ranged from 22 to 206 ??g/kg in sediment samples from different river sites downstream from wastewater treatment plants. The high affinity of BACs for soil suggests that BACs preferentially concentrate in sediment rather than in water.

  2. Reactive Extraction of Jatropha Seed for Biodiesel Production: Effect of Moisture Content of Jatropha Seed and Co-solvent Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dani Supardan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is one among the promising renewable fuels, holding various advantages compared with fossil fuel. In this study, reactive extraction of jatropha seed for biodiesel production was investigated. The effect of moisture content of jatropha seeds and cosolvent concentration was examined to determine the best performance of the biodiesel production yield. The co-solvent used is hexane. Design of experiments (DOE was used to study the effect of moisture content of jatropha seed and co-solvent of hexane concentration on the yield of biodiesel. Generally, the moisture content of jatropha seeds and co-solvent concentration affected biodiesel production yield. The experimental result also shows that the transesterification rate was improved when compared to the system without co-solvents. It was found that the production of biodiesel achieved an optimum level of 68.3% biodiesel yield at the following reaction conditions, i.e. moisture content of jatropha seed of 1% and hexane to oil ratio of 6.9 (w/w.

  3. Organic solvent-free cloud point extraction-like methodology using aggregation of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dongyan; Jiang, Xiaoming; Yang, Lu; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-01-07

    Because of its unique properties and capability of formation of well-dispersed aqueous colloids in aqueous phase, graphene oxide can be used for the efficient preconcentration of heavy metal ions prior to their determination. The complete collection of graphene oxide colloids from water has generally been considered to be insurmountable. Here, graphene oxide aggregation triggered by introducing NaCl was used to develop a novel organic solvent-free cloud point extraction-like method for the determination of trace toxic metals. The graphene oxide sheets were uniformly dispersed in aqueous samples or standard solutions for a fast and efficient adsorption of Pb(II), Cd(II), Bi(III), and Sb(III) owing to its hydrophilic character and the electrostatic repulsion among the graphene oxide sheets, and its aggregation immediately occurred when the electrostatic repulsion was eliminated via adding NaCl to neutralize the excessive negative charges on the surface of graphene oxide sheets. The aggregates of graphene oxide and analytes ions were separated and treated with hydrochloric acid to form a slurry solution. The slurry solution was pumped to mix with KBH4 solution to generate hydrides, which were subsequently separated from the liquid phase and directed to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer or directly introduced to an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer for detection. On the basis of a 50 mL sample volume, the limits of detection of 0.01, 0.002, 0.01, and 0.006 ng mL(-1) were obtained for Pb, Cd, Bi, and Sb, respectively, when using atomic fluorescence spectrometry, providing 35-, 8-, 36-, and 37-fold improvements over the conventional method. Detection limits of 0.6, 0.15, 0.1, and 1.0 ng mL(-1) were obtained with the use of slurry sampling inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The method was applied for analysis of two Certified Reference Materials and three water samples for these elements.

  4. The solvent-extractable organic compounds in the Indonesia biomass burning aerosols - characterization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, M.; Zheng, M.; Wang, F.; To, K. L.; Jaafar, A. B.; Tong, S. L.

    The large-scale air pollution episode due to the out-of-control biomass burning for agricultural purposes in Indonesia started in June 1997, has become a severe environmental problem for itself and the neighboring countries. The fire lasted for almost five months. Its impact on the health and ecology in the affected areas is expected to be substantial, costly and possibly long lasting. Air pollution Index as high as 839 has been reported in Malaysia. API is calculated based on the five pollutants: NO 2, SO 2, O 3, CO, and respirable suspended particulates (PM10). It ranges in value from 0 to 500. An index above 101 is considered to be unhealthy and a value over 201 is very unhealthy (Abidin and Shin, 1996). The solvent-extractable organic compounds from four total suspended particulate (TSP) high-volume samples collected in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Stations Pudu and SIRIM) were subjected to characterization - the abundance was determined and biomarkers were identified. Two of the samples were from early September when the fire was less intense, while the other two were from late September when Kuala Lumpur experienced very heavy smoke coverage which could be easily observed from NOAA/AVHRR satellite images. The samples contained mainly aliphatic hydrocarbons such as n-alkanes and triterpanes, alkanoic acids, alkanols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The difference between the early and late September samples was very significant. The total yield increased from 0.6 to 24.3 μg m -3 at Pudu and 1.9 to 20.1 μg m -3 at SIRIM, with increases in concentration in every class. The higher input of vascular plant wax components in the late September samples, when the fire was more intense, was characterized by the distribution patterns of the homologous series n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, and n-alkanols, e.g., lower U : R, higher >C 22/C 20/Abas et al., 1995), the present study also showed an absence of conifer tracers in the smoke aerosols indicating tropical wood

  5. Binary Solvent Extraction System and Extraction Time Effects on Phenolic Antioxidants from Kenaf Seeds (Hibiscus cannabinus L. Extracted by a Pulsed Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hua Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the best parameter for extracting phenolic-enriched kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L. seeds by a pulsed ultrasonic-assisted extraction. The antioxidant activities of ultrasonic-assisted kenaf seed extracts (KSE were determined by a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging capacity assay, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radical scavenging assay, β-carotene bleaching inhibition assay, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assay. Total phenolic content (TPC and total flavonoid content (TFC evaluations were carried out to determine the phenolic and flavonoid contents in KSE. The KSE from the best extraction parameter was then subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC to quantify the phenolic compounds. The optimised extraction condition employed 80% ethanol for 15 min, with the highest values determined for the DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assay. KSE contained mainly tannic acid (2302.20 mg/100 g extract and sinapic acid (1198.22 mg/100 g extract, which can be used as alternative antioxidants in the food industry.

  6. Binary solvent extraction system and extraction time effects on phenolic antioxidants from kenaf seeds (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) extracted by a pulsed ultrasonic-assisted extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yu Hua; Lau, Hwee Wen; Tan, Chin Ping; Long, Kamariah; Nyam, Kar Lin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best parameter for extracting phenolic-enriched kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) seeds by a pulsed ultrasonic-assisted extraction. The antioxidant activities of ultrasonic-assisted kenaf seed extracts (KSE) were determined by a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity assay, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging assay, β -carotene bleaching inhibition assay, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) evaluations were carried out to determine the phenolic and flavonoid contents in KSE. The KSE from the best extraction parameter was then subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to quantify the phenolic compounds. The optimised extraction condition employed 80% ethanol for 15 min, with the highest values determined for the DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assay. KSE contained mainly tannic acid (2302.20 mg/100 g extract) and sinapic acid (1198.22 mg/100 g extract), which can be used as alternative antioxidants in the food industry.

  7. Bio-oil extraction of Jatropha curcas with ionic liquid co-solvent: Fate of biomass protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severa, Godwin; Edwards, Melisa; Cooney, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    The fate of oil-seed biomass protein has been tracked through all steps of a multi-phase extraction process using an ionic liquid based co-solvent system previously demonstrated to extract bio-oil and phorbol esters and to recover fermentable sugars from Jatropha oil seed. These analyses, however, did not address the fate of biomass protein. This work demonstrated that the majority of protein (∼86%) tracked with the biomass with the balance lost to co-solvent (∼12%) and methanol (∼2%) washes. A significant portion of the ionic liquid remained with the treated biomass and required aggressive methanol washes to recover. A system analysis showed a net-positive energy balance and thus the potential of this system to produce both bio-oil and protein-rich toxin-free biomass. While these results further support Jatropha as an oil seed crop, the additional costs of solvent recovery will need to be addressed if commercialization is to be realized.

  8. Extraction of S- and N-compounds from the mixture of hydrocarbons by ionic liquids as selective solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrić, Beata; Sander, Aleksandra; Cvjetko Bubalo, Marina; Macut, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction is an alternative method that can be used for desulfurization and denitrification of gasoline and diesel fuels. Recent approaches employ different ionic liquids as selective solvents, due to their general immiscibility with gasoline and diesel, negligible vapor pressure, and high selectivity to sulfur- and nitrogen-containing compounds. For that reason, five imidazolium-based ionic liquids and one pyridinium-based ionic liquid were selected for extraction of thiophene, dibenzothiophene, and pyridine from two model solutions. The influences of hydrodynamic conditions, mass ratio, and number of stages were investigated. Increasing the mass ratio of ionic liquid/model fuel and multistage extraction promotes the desulfurization and denitrification abilities of the examined ionic liquids. All selected ionic liquids can be reused and regenerated by means of vacuum evaporation.

  9. Influence of the ammonium salt anion on the synergistic solvent extraction of lanthanides with mixtures of thenoyltrifluoroacetone and tridecylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukov, I.L.; Jordanov, V.M. [Univ. of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia (Bulgaria). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry

    1998-08-01

    The synergistic solvent extraction of Pr, Gd and Yb with mixtures of thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) and primary ammonium salt (tridecylammonium chloride or perchlorate, TDAH(Cl, ClO{sub 4})) in C{sub 6}H{sub 6} has been studied. The composition of the extracted species have been determined as Ln(TTA){sub 3}TDAHA(A{sup {minus}} = Cl{sup {minus}} or ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}). The values of the equilibrium constant K{sub T,S} have been calculated. The influence of the ammonium salt anion on the extraction process has been discussed. The separation factors of the pairs Gd/Pr and Yb/Gd have been determined.

  10. Process development for recovery of vanadium and nickel from an industrial solid waste by a leaching-solvent extraction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, S P; Park, K H; Nam, C W

    2014-12-15

    A process for recovering V(V) and Ni(II) from an industrial solid waste using sulfuric acid leaching, solvent extraction, precipitation and crystallization has been developed. The leaching parameters investigated were time, temperature and H2SO4 concentration. To quantify the linear and interaction coefficients a 2(3) full factorial experimental design was used. Regression equations for the extraction of V(V) and Ni(II) were determined and the adequacy of these equations was tested by Student's t-Test. More than 98% of both V(V) and Ni(II) were extracted in 90 min using 1.35 M H2SO4 at 40 °C. In addition, solvent extraction of V(V) with LIX 84-I in kerosene from the acidic leach liquor bearing 10.922 g/L V(V) and 18.871 g/L of Ni(II) was investigated. V(V) was extracted selectively using 40% LIX 84-I followed by stripping with NH4OH solution. McCabe-Thiele plots at O:A = 2:3 with 40% LIX 84-I and O:A = 3:1 with 15% (v/v) NH4OH showed two and three theoretical stages are needed for quantitative extraction and stripping of V(V), respectively. Ni(II) was selectively recovered from the V(V) free raffinate by adding ammonium oxalate at 60 °C. The purity of different products such as ammonium vanadate, nickel oxalate and nickel oxide obtained during the processes were analyzed and confirmed from the XRD studies.

  11. Evaluating the complexation behavior and regeneration of boron selective glucaminium-based ionic liquids when used as extraction solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Manishkumar D.; Steyer, Daniel J. [Department of Chemistry, School of Green Chemistry and Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Anderson, Jared L., E-mail: Jared.Anderson@UToledo.edu [Department of Chemistry, School of Green Chemistry and Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glucaminium-based ILs exhibit high selectivity for boron species using DLLME. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concentration of glucaminium-based IL affects type of boron complex formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of 0.1 M HCl allows for regeneration of the IL solvent following extraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selectivity of the glucaminium-based ILs for boron species in seawater is similar to Milli-Q water. - Abstract: Glucaminium-based ionic liquids are a new class of solvents capable of extracting boron-species from water with high efficiency. The complexation behavior of these ILs with borate was thoroughly studied using {sup 11}B NMR. Two different complexes, namely, monochelate complex and bischelate complex, were observed. {sup 11}B NMR was used extensively to determine the formation constants for monochelate and bischelate complexes. The IL concentration was observed to have a significant effect on the IL-borate complexes. Using an in situ dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (in situ DLLME) method, the extraction efficiency for boron species was increased dramatically when lithium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (LiNTf{sub 2}) was used as the metathesis salt in an aqueous solution containing 0.1 M sodium chloride. IL regeneration after extraction was achieved using 0.1 M hydrochloric acid. The extraction efficiency of boron species was consistent when the IL was employed after three regeneration cycles. The selectivity of the IL for boron species in synthetic seawater samples was similar to performing the same extraction from Milli-Q water samples.

  12. A novel poly(deep eutectic solvent)-based magnetic silica composite for solid-phase extraction of trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Li, Yixue; Lin, Yunxuan; Zhang, Haibao; Zhou, Yigang

    2016-11-23

    Novel poly(deep eutectic solvent) grafted silica-coated magnetic microspheres (Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES) were prepared by polymerization of choline chloride-itaconic acid (ChCl-IA) and γ-MPS-modified magnetic silica composites, and were characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then the synthetic Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES microspheres were applied for the magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of trypsin for the first time. After extraction, the concentration of trypsin in the supernatant was determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. Single factor experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of the extraction process, including the concentration of trypsin, the ionic strength, the pH value, the extraction time and the temperature. Experimental results showed the extraction capacity could reach up to 287.5 mg/g under optimized conditions. In comparison with Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS, Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES displayed higher extraction capacity and selectivity for trypsin. According to the regeneration studies, Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES microspheres can be recycled six times without significant loss of its extraction capacity, and retained a high extraction capacity of 233 mg/g after eight cycles. Besides, the activity studies also demonstrated that the activity of the extracted trypsin was well retained. Furthermore, the analysis of real sample revealed that the prepared magnetic microspheres can be used to purify trypsin in crude bovine pancreas extract. These results highlight the potential of the proposed Fe3O4@SiO2-MPS@PDES-MSPE method in separation of biomolecules.

  13. THE EFFECT OF SULPHURIC ACID CONCENTRATION ON SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF ReO4 - BY THE LONG-CHAIN ALIPHATIC TERTIARY AMINES AND ALCOHOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander G. Kasikov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulphuric acid concentration on solvent extraction of ReO4- by the long-chain aliphatic tertiary amines and alcohols in a wide range of H2SO4 concentrations in initial solutions is discussed. It has been established that the influence of the sulphuric acid concentration on rhenium solvent extraction is largely due to the extraction process mechanism. In the case of the anion-exchange mechanism, ReO4- is best extracted from weakly acidic solutions, whereas when the hydrate-solvate mechanism takes place – from solutions containing 4-7 mole/l H2SO4.

  14. Influences of Restaurant Waste Fats and Oils (RWFO from Grease Trap as Binder on Rheological and Solvent Extraction Behavior in SS316L Metal Injection Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Halim Irwan Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with rheological and solvent extraction behavior of stainless steel 316L feedstocks using Restaurant Waste Fats and Oils (RWFO from grease traps as binder components along with Polypropylene (PP copolymer as a backbone binder. Optimal binder formulation and effect of solvent extraction variables on green compacts are being analyzed. Four binder formulations based on volumetric ratio/weight fraction between PP and RWFO being mixed with 60% volumetric powder loading of SS316L powder each as feedstock. The rheological analysis are based on viscosity, shear rate, temperature, activation energy, flow behavior index, and moldability index. The optimal feedstock formulation will be injected to form green compact to undergo the solvent extraction process. Solvent extraction variables are based on solvent temperature which are 40 °C, 50 °C, and 60 °C with different organic solvents of n-hexane and n-heptane. Analysis of the weight loss percentage and diffusion coefficient is done on the green compact during the solvent extraction process. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC is used to confirm the extraction of the RWFO in green compacts. It is found that all binder fractions exhibit pseudoplastic behavior or shear thinning where the viscosity decreases with increasing shear rate. After considering the factors that affect the rheological characteristic of the binder formulation, feedstock with binder formulation of 20/20 volumetric ratio between PP and RWFO rise as the optimal binder. It is found that the n-hexane solvent requires less time for extracting the RWFO at the temperature of 60 °C as proved by its diffusion coefficient.

  15. Influence of soil and hydrocarbon properties on the solvent extraction of high-concentration weathered petroleum from contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Hong; Hua, Zhengtao; Li, Xingang; Li, Hong; Wu, Guozhong

    2014-05-01

    Petroleum ether was used to extract petroleum hydrocarbons from soils collected from six oil fields with different history of exploratory and contamination. It was capable of fast removing 76-94 % of the total petroleum hydrocarbons including 25 alkanes (C11-C35) and 16 US EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soils at room temperature. The partial least squares analysis indicated that the solvent extraction efficiencies were positively correlated with soil organic matter, cation exchange capacity, moisture, pH, and sand content of soils, while negative effects were observed in the properties reflecting the molecular size (e.g., molecular weight and number of carbon atoms) and hydrophobicity (e.g., water solubility, octanol-water partition coefficient, soil organic carbon partition coefficient) of hydrocarbons. The high concentration of weathered crude oil at the order of 10(5) mg kg(-1) in this study was demonstrated adverse for solvent extraction by providing an obvious nonaqueous phase liquid phase for hydrocarbon sinking and increasing the sequestration of soluble hydrocarbons in the insoluble oil fractions during weathering. A full picture of the mass distribution and transport mechanism of petroleum contaminants in soils will ultimately require a variety of studies to gain insights into the dynamic interactions between environmental indicator hydrocarbons and their host oil matrix.

  16. Strategy of experimental design for intensification of solvent extraction of natural antioxidant flavonoids and phenols from buckthorn textured leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baya Berka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior to solvent extraction of plant-based active molecules, adequate texturing by Détente Instantanée Contrôlée (DIC; French for “Instant controlled pressure drop” results in overcoming the slow diffusion of the solvent/solute through the solid matrix. This work aimed at determining the impact of DIC pretreatments on buckthorn (Rhamnus alaternus L. morphology. DIC-operating parameters were selected as the saturated steam pressure, the thermal treatment time, and the number of cycles. A three-parameter five-level response surface method was used to optimize DIC processing parameters. Response factors were the overall and individual yields of flavonol aglycone extraction, and antioxidant activity of both expanded dried material (swell dried leaves and extracts. The yield of flavonol aglycones was 18.23 mg Kaemp eq/g dry basis (mg Kaemp eq/g db in 3 min for DIC-treated buckthorn, against 12.24 mg Kaemp eq/g db in 150 min for untreated natural buckthorn raw material. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of DIC-treated material was exceptionally higher and the effectiveness of reducing power of DPPH radical was 68 times more than the untreated plant material.

  17. Prediction of dispersed phase holdup in pulsed disc and doughnut solvent extraction columns under different mass transfer conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wang; Kathryn H. Smith; Kathryn Mumford; Teobaldo F. Grabin; Zheng Li; Geoffrey W. Stevens

    2016-01-01

    Using experimental data from a number of pulsed disc and doughnut solvent extraction columns, a unified correla-tion for the prediction of dispersed phase holdup that considers the effects of mass transfer is presented. Pulsed disc and doughnut solvent extraction columns (PDDC) have been used for a range of important applications such as ura-nium extraction and nuclear fuel recycling. Although the dispersed phase holdup in a PDDC has been presented by some researchers, there is stil the need to develop a robust correlation that can predict the experimental dispersed phase holdup over a range of operating conditions including the effects of mass transfer direction. In this study, dis-persed phase holdup data from different literature sources for a PDDC were used to refit constants for the correlation presented by Kumar and Hartland [Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.,27 (1988),131–138] which did not consider the effect of col-umn geometry. In order to incorporate the characteristic length of the PDDC (i.e. the plate spacing), the unified cor-relation for holdup proposed by Kumar and Hartland based on data from eight different types of columns [Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.,34 (1995) 3925–3940] was refitted to the PDDC data. New constants have been presented for each hold-up correlation for a PDDC based on regression analysis using published holdup data from PDDCs that cover a range of operating conditions and physical properties and consider the direction of mass transfer.

  18. Development of an Analytical Method Based on Temperature Controlled Solid-Liquid Extraction Using an Ionic Liquid as Solid Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwei Pan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the present paper, an analytical method based on temperature controlled solid-liquid extraction (TC-SLE utilizing a synthesized ionic liquid, (N-butylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate, [BPy]PF6, as solid solvent and phenanthroline (PT as an extractant was developed to determine micro levels of Fe2+ in tea by PT spectrophotometry. TC-SLE was carried out in two continuous steps: Fe2+ can be completely extracted by PT-[BPy]PF6 or back-extracted at 80 °C and the two phases were separated automatically by cooling to room temperature. Fe2+, after back-extraction, needs 2 mol/L HNO3 as stripping agent and the whole process was determined by PT spectrophotometry at room temperature. The extracted species was neutral Fe(PTmCl2 (m = 1 according to slope analysis in the Fe2+-[BPy]PF6-PT TC-SLE system. The calibration curve was Y = 0.20856X − 0.000775 (correlation coefficient = 0.99991. The linear calibration range was 0.10–4.50 μg/mL and the limit of detection for Fe2+ is 7.0 × 10−2 μg/mL. In this method, the contents of Fe2+ in Tieguanyin tea were determined with RSDs (n = 5 3.05% and recoveries in range of 90.6%–108.6%.

  19. Solvent extraction of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) from nitrate media by Cyanex 923

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, S.K.; Chakravortty, V. [Utkal Univ., Bhubaneswar (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Reddy, M.L.P.; Ramamohan, T.R. [Regional Research Lab. (CSIR), Trivandum (India)

    2000-07-01

    The extraction behaviour of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) from nitrate solutions has been investigated using Cyanex 923 (TRPO) in xylene as an extractant. The extraction data have been analyzed by both graphical and theoretical methods by taking into account complexation of the metal ion in the aqueous phase with inorganic ligands and all plausible complexes extracted into the organic phase. The results demonstrate that these metal ions are extracted into xylene as Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} . 2 TRPO and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} . 2 TRPO. The equilibrium constants of the extracted complexes have been deduced by non-linear regression analysis. Infrared spectral data of the extracted complexes have been used to further clarify the nature of the complexes. The selectivities between these metal ions were evaluated and compared with commercially important extractants like tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP). (orig.)

  20. Flavonoid extraction from Ficus carica leaves using different techniques and solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunschi Svetlana I.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study presents the best method for a rapid and efficient extraction of flavonoids from Ficus carica. Dried leaves were extracted using distilled water and ethanol 70% by extraction method of maceration, microwave and stirring. Using of TLC and HPLC techniques, the rutin and kaempferol were detected. For flavonoids extraction ethanol 70% was more efficient than water. The relative concentration of rutin and kaempferol was higher by microwave methods ussing ethanol.

  1. Analysis of continuous solvent extraction of nickel from spent electroless nickel plating baths by a mixer-settler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Tanaka, Mikiya

    2009-05-30

    It is urgent to develop an effective technique to treat the large amount of spent electroless nickel plating bath and recycle the high concentration nickel. In our previous study, high recycling efficiency of nickel from the model spent bath was obtained by continuous solvent extraction with 2-hydroxy-5-nonylacetophenone oxime (LIX84I) as the extractant and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (PC88A) as the accelerator using a mixer-settler extractor. It was observed that the extraction efficiency was affected by the operation parameters such as the flow rates of the aqueous and organic phases and the total stage number. In the present study, the effects of the operation parameters on the extraction efficiency were quantitatively studied on the basis of the pseudo-first-order interfacial extraction rate equation together with the hydrodynamic properties in the mixer. The organic phase holdup, measured under varying conditions of the flow rates of both phases, was analyzed by the Takahashi-Takeuchi holdup model in order to estimate the specific interfacial area. The overall extraction rate coefficients defined by the product of the interfacial extraction rate constant and the specific interfacial area were evaluated using the experimental data and ranged from 3.5 x 10(-3) to 6.7 x 10(-3)s(-1), which was close to the value of 3.4 x 10(-3)s(-1) obtained by batch extraction. Finally, an engineering simulation method was established for assessing the extraction efficiency of nickel during a multistage operation.

  2. The solvent-extractable organic compounds in the Indonesia biomass burning aerosols - characterization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, M.; Zheng, M.; Wang, F.; To, K.L. [The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong). Applied Technology Center; Jaafar, A.B.; Tong, S.L. [Alam Sekitar Malaysia Sdn Bhd, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1999-07-01

    The large-scale air pollution episode due to the out-of-control biomass burning for agricultural purposes in Indonesia started in June 1997, has become a severe environmental problem for itself and the neighboring countries. The fire lasted for almost five months. Its impact on the health and ecology in the affected areas is expected to be substantial, costly and possibly long lasting. Air pollution Index as high as 839 has been reported in Malaysia. API is calculated based on the five pollutants: NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, CO, and respirable suspended particulates (PMIO). It ranges in value from 0 to 500. An index above 101 is considered to be unhealthy and a value over 201 is very unhealthy (Abidin and Shin, 1996). The solvent-extractable organic compounds from four total suspended particulate (TSP) high-volume samples collected in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (Stations Pudu and SIRIM) were subjected to characterization - the abundance was determined and biomarkers were identified. Two of the samples were from early September when the fire was less intense, while the other two were from late September when Kuala Lumpur experienced very heavy smoke coverage which could be easily observed from NOAA/AVHRR satellite images. The samples contained mainly aliphatic hydrocarbons such as n-alkanes and triterpanes, alkanoic acids, alkanols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The difference between the early and late September samples was very significant. The total yield increased from 0.6 to 24.3 {mu}g m{sup -3} at Pudu and 1.9 to 20.1 {mu}g m{sup -3} at SIRIM, with increases in concentration in every class. The higher input of vascular plant wax components in the late September samples, when the fire was more intense, was characterized by the distribution patterns of the homologous series n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, and n-alkanols, e.g., lower U:R, higher > C{sub 22} < C{sub 20} for n-alkanoic acids, higher > C{sub 20}/ < C{sub 20} for n-alkanols, a shift in C{sub max

  3. Alpha Radiolysis of Nuclear Solvent Extraction Ligands Used for An(III) and Ln(III) Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezyk, Stephen P. [California State Univ. (CalState), Long Beach, CA (United States); Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nilsson, Mikael [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This document is the final report for the Nuclear Energy Universities Program (NEUP) grant 10-910 (DE-AC07-05ID14517) “Alpha Radiolysis of Nuclear Solvent Extraction Ligands used for An(III) and Ln(III) Separations”. The goal of this work was to obtain a quantitative understanding of the impacts of both low Linear Energy Transfer (LET, gamma-rays) and high LET (alpha particles) radiation chemistry occurring in future large-scale separations processes. This quantitative understanding of the major radiation effects on diluents and ligands is essential for optimal process implementation, and could result in significant cost savings in the future.

  4. Solvent extraction system for plutonium colloids and other oxide nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderholm, Lynda; Wilson, Richard E; Chiarizia, Renato; Skanthakumar, Suntharalingam

    2014-06-03

    The invention provides a method for extracting plutonium from spent nuclear fuel, the method comprising supplying plutonium in a first aqueous phase; contacting the plutonium aqueous phase with a mixture of a dielectric and a moiety having a first acidity so as to allow the plutonium to substantially extract into the mixture; and contacting the extracted plutonium with second a aqueous phase, wherein the second aqueous phase has a second acidity higher than the first acidity, so as to allow the extracted plutonium to extract into the second aqueous phase. The invented method facilitates isolation of plutonium polymer without the formation of crud or unwanted emulsions.

  5. Magnetic graphene oxide modified with choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvent for the solid-phase extraction of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanhua; Wang, Yuzhi, E-mail: wyzss@hnu.edu.cn; Pan, Qi; Wang, Ying; Ding, Xueqin; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-06-02

    Highlights: • A strategy for extraction of protein based on DES-coated magnetic graphene oxide. • The deep eutectic solvents were based on choline chloride. • Bovine serum albumin was used as the analyte. • The material prepared works for the acidic but not the basic or the neutral proteins. - Abstract: Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on choline chloride (ChCl) have been synthesized and coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO) to form Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein. X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES, and the results indicated the successful preparation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES. The UV–vis spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of protein after extraction. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction amount was influenced by the types of DESs, solution temperature, solution ionic strength, extraction time, protein concentration and the amount of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES. Comparison of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES was carried out by extracting bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme. The experimental results showed that the proposed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES performs better than Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO in the extraction of acidic protein. Desorption of protein was carried out by eluting the solid extractant with 0.005 mol L{sup −1} Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} contained 1 mol L{sup −1} NaCl. The obtained elution efficiency was about 90.9%. Attributed to the convenient magnetic separation, the solid extractant could be easily recycled.

  6. In-tube electro-membrane extraction with a sub-microliter organic solvent consumption as an efficient technique for synthetic food dyes determination in foodstuff samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazregar, Mohammad; Rajabi, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Asghari, Alireza; Abdossalami asl, Yousef

    2015-09-04

    A simple and efficient extraction technique with a sub-microliter organic solvent consumption termed as in-tube electro-membrane extraction (IEME) is introduced. This method is based upon the electro-kinetic migration of ionized compounds by the application of an electrical potential difference. For this purpose, a thin polypropylene (PP) sheet placed inside a tube acts as a support for the membrane solvent, and 30μL of an aqueous acceptor solution is separated by this solvent from 1.2mL of an aqueous donor solution. This method yielded high extraction recoveries (63-81%), and the consumption of the organic solvent used was only 0.5μL. By performing this method, the purification is high, and the utilization of the organic solvent, used as a mediator, is very simple and repeatable. The proposed method was evaluated by extraction of four synthetic food dyes (Amaranth, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red, and Carmoisine) as the model analytes. Optimization of variables affecting the method was carried out in order to achieve the best extraction efficiency. These variables were the type of membrane solvent, applied extraction voltage, extraction time, pH range, and concentration of salt added. Under the optimized conditions, IEME-HPLC-UV provided a good linearity in the range of 1.00-800ngmL(-1), low limits of detection (0.3-1ngmL(-1)), and good extraction repeatabilities (RSDs below 5.2%, n=5). It seems that this design is a proper one for the automation of the method. Also the consumption of the organic solvent in a sub-microliter scale, and its simplicity, high efficiency, and high purification can help one getting closer to the objectives of the green chemistry.

  7. Remediation of oil contaminated soil by solvent extraction%溶剂萃取法修复石油污染土壤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华正韬; 李鑫钢; 隋红; 李洪

    2013-01-01

    对溶剂萃取法修复石油类污染土壤的新技术做了较为全面的概述.首先,介绍了溶剂萃取技术的概念、机理和适用范围;其次,介绍了包括有机溶剂、表面活性剂、环糊精、超临界流体在内的萃取剂的研究进展;再次,阐述了影响溶剂萃取效率的因素和溶剂萃取的工艺条件;最后,对溶剂萃取技术的研究和应用做了展望.%The solvent extraction technology for remediation of oil contaminated soil is reviewed in detail.The concepts,mechanism and scope of solvent extraction technology are introduced.The research progress of the extraction solvents including organic solvent,surfactants,cyclodextrins and supercritical fluid,are described.The factors influencing solvent extraction and technological conditions are analyzed.The prospect of further research and application of solvent extraction technologies are also proposed.

  8. Deep Eutectic Solvents as Novel and Effective Extraction Media for Quantitative Determination of Ochratoxin A in Wheat and Derived Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Piemontese

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented, environmentally friendly, and faster method for the determination of Ochratoxin A (OTA (a mycotoxin produced by several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium and largely widespread in nature, in wheat and derived products has, for the first time, been set up and validated using choline chloride (ChCl-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs (e.g., ChCl/glycerol (1:2 and ChCl/ urea (1:2 up to 40% (w/w water as privileged, green, and biodegradable extraction solvents. This also reduces worker exposure to toxic chemicals. Results are comparable to those obtained using conventional, hazardous and volatile organic solvents (VOCs typical of the standard and official methods. OTA recovery from spiked durum wheat samples, in particular, was to up to 89% versus 93% using the traditional acetonitrile-water mixture with a repeatability of the results (RSDr of 7%. Compatibility of the DES mixture with the antibodies of the immunoaffinity column was excellent as it was able to retain up to 96% of the OTA. Recovery and repeatability for durum wheat, bread crumbs, and biscuits proved to be within the specifications required by the current European Commission (EC regulation. Good results in terms of accuracy and precision were achieved with mean recoveries between 70% (durum wheat and 88% (bread crumbs and an RSDr between 2% (biscuits and 7% (bread.

  9. Magnetic graphene oxide modified with choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvent for the solid-phase extraction of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanhua; Wang, Yuzhi; Pan, Qi; Wang, Ying; Ding, Xueqin; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-06-02

    Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on choline chloride (ChCl) have been synthesized and coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4@GO) to form Fe3O4@GO-DES for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein. X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize Fe3O4@GO-DES, and the results indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4@GO-DES. The UV-vis spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of protein after extraction. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction amount was influenced by the types of DESs, solution temperature, solution ionic strength, extraction time, protein concentration and the amount of Fe3O4@GO-DES. Comparison of Fe3O4@GO and Fe3O4@GO-DES was carried out by extracting bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme. The experimental results showed that the proposed Fe3O4@GO-DES performs better than Fe3O4@GO in the extraction of acidic protein. Desorption of protein was carried out by eluting the solid extractant with 0.005 mol L(-1) Na2HPO4 contained 1 mol L(-1) NaCl. The obtained elution efficiency was about 90.9%. Attributed to the convenient magnetic separation, the solid extractant could be easily recycled.

  10. Effect of extraction solvent on total phenol content, total flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity of Limnophila aromatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quy Diem Do

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Limnophila aromatica is commonly used as a spice and a medicinal herb in Southeast Asia. In this study, water and various concentrations (50%, 75%, and 100% of methanol, ethanol, and acetone in water were used as solvent in the extraction of L. aromatica. The antioxidant activity, total phenolic content, and total flavonoid content of the freeze-dried L. aromatica extracts were investigated using various in vitro assays. The extract obtained by 100% ethanol showed the highest total antioxidant activity, reducing power and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity. The same extract also exhibited the highest phenolic content (40.5 mg gallic acid equivalent/g of defatted L. aromatica and the highest flavonoid content (31.11 mg quercetin equivalent/g of defatted L. aromatica. The highest extraction yield was obtained by using 50% aqueous acetone. These results indicate that L. aromatica can be used in dietary applications with a potential to reduce oxidative stress.

  11. The Solvent Extraction of Cadmium From Phosphoric Acid Solution By3-Methyl-Quinoxaline-2-Thione in Toluene Diluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    anae Baki Senhaji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The solvent extraction of cadmium (II from phosphoric acid 2.5M by 3-methyl-2 (1H-quinoxaline-thione Vol32No6_SOLV_SANA_for1 is investigated in various experimental conditions. Obtained results show a variation of extraction of Cd with pH, and Vol32No6_SOLV_SANA_for2 concentration. The conventional methods of slope analysis can’t be performed successfully for understanding interaction mechanisms. A technique combining slope analysis with the variation of overall extraction constant with pH is performed in this case. There is no predominant removal mechanism, cadmium is extracted as complexes in Vol32No6_SOLV_SANA_for3 stoichiometry varying between 1:1:0 and 1:3:3. The extraction reaction is a complex process including ion exchange-ion pair formation,organic and inorganic complexation, H3PO4deprotonation and solvatation phenomena. A best recovery of 43 to 60% is achieved in acidic conditions with CLH = 0.26M

  12. 溶剂萃取系统中的常见问题%Some Problems in Solvent Extraction System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐志刚; 邹潜; 汤启明; 李建; 王朝华

    2014-01-01

    The problems occurred in solvent extraction systems were introduced .The possible reasons caused these problems were analyzed and the effective methods for solving these problems were discussed .It point out that the selectivity of extractants and diluents ,constitutes and pH of water phase ,chemical reaction cause emulsification and flocculation ,and entrainment loss of organic phase . The measures for reducing organic phase loss and purifying organic phase are proposed .%介绍了溶剂萃取系统中的常见问题,分析了产生问题的可能原因。指出萃取剂和稀释剂、料液组成及pH、化学反应都会引起乳化和絮凝物的产生,提出了降低有机相损失及有机相净化的相关措施。

  13. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems. Progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Research this past year continued to emphasize characterization of the physicochemical nature of the microscopic interfaces, i.e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co, and Na in order to improve on the model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of model extractant (surfactant) molecules was further investigated. 1 fig.

  14. Two-Stage Separation of V(IV) and Al(III) by Crystallization and Solvent Extraction from Aluminum-Rich Sulfuric Acid Leaching Solution of Stone Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qihua; Zhang, Yimin; Liu, Tao; Huang, Jing; Liu, Hong

    2016-12-01

    To improve separation of V(IV) and Al(III) from aluminum-rich sulfuric acid leaching solution of stone coal, the two-stage separation by crystallization and solvent extraction methods have been developed. A co-extraction coefficient (k) was put forward to evaluate comprehensively co-extraction extent in different solutions. In the crystallization stage, 68.2% of aluminum can be removed from the solution. In the solvent extraction stage, vanadium was selectively extracted using di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid/tri-n-butyl phosphate from the crystalline mother solution, followed by H2SO4 stripped efficiently. A V2O5 product with purity of 98.39% and only 0.10% Al was obtained after oxidation, precipitation, and calcination. Compared with vanadium extraction from solution without crystallization, the counter-current extraction stage of vanadium can be decreased from 6 to 3 and co-extraction coefficient (k) decreased from 2.51 to 0.58 with two-stage separation. It is suggested that the aluminum removal by crystallization can evidently weaken the influence of aluminum co-extraction on vanadium extraction and improve the selectivity of solvent extraction for vanadium.

  15. Characterization of sunflower oils obtained separately by pressing and subsequent solvent extraction from a new line of seeds rich in phytosterols and conventional seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre Marta R.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluate the chemical composition of sunflower oils obtained separately by pressing and subsequent solvent extraction from a new seeds rich in phytosterols (IASP-18 and conventional seeds (HA-89. Results have shown that the total content of oil was much lower in the IASP-18 (18.1% than in the conventional (37.5% seeds. The extraction yield obtained by pressing was as low as 3% in the IASP-18 seeds and 37.5% in HA-89, while in the solvent extraction it was of the same order (~18 wt% on seeds extracted by pressing for the two types of seeds. No significant changes in the fatty acid composition were found between the oils extracted by the two procedures, but the pressed oils presented significantly lower acidity and larger content of the unsaponifiable fraction. Expressed as free sterols, the total sterols were 37–38% more concentrated in the oils extracted with solvent, reaching amounts of 13 700 and 6500 mg/kg in the IASP-18 and HA-89 oils, respectively. No substantial differences were found in the composition of total sterols analysed as free sterols between the oils extracted with the two procedures, but the contents of free sterols and sterol glycosides were much higher in the oils extracted with solvent.

  16. Steric effects of polymethylene chain of 4-acylbis(pyrazolones) on the solvent extraction of trivalent lanthanoids: synergistic effect with mono and bifunctional neutral organophosphorus extractants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavithran, Rani [Ion-specific Separation Science and Technology Group, Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram 695 019 (India); Reddy, M.L.P. [Ion-specific Separation Science and Technology Group, Regional Research Laboratory (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram 695 019 (India)]. E-mail: mlpreddy@yahoo.co.uk

    2005-04-22

    Various 4-acylbis(pyrazolones), namely 4-adipoylbis(1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone) (H{sub 2}AdBP = 1), 4-suberoylbis(1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone) (H{sub 2}SuBP = 2), 4-sebacoylbis(1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone) (H{sub 2}SbBP = 3), 4-dodecandioylbis(1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone) (H{sub 2}DdBP = 4) have been synthesized and examined their solvent extraction behavior towards trivalent lanthanoids (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}). The extraction of Ln{sup 3+} ions was found to increase monotonically with increasing atomic number of these metal ions. 1-4 reagents showed an initial increase in the extraction efficiency of Ln{sup 3+} ion with increasing polymethylene chain length, -(CH{sub 2}){sub n}-, from n = 4 to 8 and thereafter a decreasing trend, for n = 10. The equilibrium constants (K{sub ex}) of the extracted complexes have been deduced by nonlinear regression analysis with the aid of suitable chemically based model developed by taking into account chemical mass action principles. The K{sub ex} values were correlated with the polymethylene chain length, by measuring the distance between the carbonyl oxygen atoms connected to the polymethylene chain with the help of semi-empirical PM3 molecular modelling calculations. The synergistic effect on the addition of various neutral organophosphorus extractants to the metal-chelate system has also been investigated. Not only enhanced extraction efficiency, but also improved selectivity has been observed among these Ln{sup 3+} ions. The equilibrium constants of the synergistically extracted complexes have been correlated with the donor ability of the phosphoryl oxygen of the neutral organophosphorus extractants in terms of their {sup 31}P NMR chemical shifts and their basicity values (K{sub H} = nitric acid uptake constant)

  17. Antioxidant, antimicrobial properties and phenolics of different solvent extracts from bark, leaves and seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Zahid Iqbal; Anwar, Farooq; Shabir, Ghulam; Rasul, Ghulam; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2012-03-30

    This study appraises the antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes of various solvent extracts (absolute methanol, aqueous methanol, absolute ethanol, aqueous ethanol, absolute acetone, aqueous acetone, and deionized water) from bark, leaves and seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre. Maximum extraction yield of antioxidant components from bark (16.31%), leaves (11.42%) and seeds (21.51%) of P. pinnata was obtained using aqueous methanol (20:80). Of the extracts tested, the bark extract, obtained with aqueous methanol, exhibited greater levels of total phenolics [6.94 g GAE/100 g dry weight (DW)], total flavonoids (3.44 g CE/100 g DW), inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation (69.23%) and DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC(50) value, 3.21 μg/mL), followed by leaves and seeds extracts. Bark extract tested against a set of bacterial and fungal strains also revealed the strongest antimicrobial activity with the largest inhibition zone and lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). HPLC analysis of aqueous methanol extracts from bark, leaves and seeds indicated the presence of protocatechuic, ellagic, ferulic, gallic, gentisic, 4-hydroxybenzoic and 4-hydroxycinnamic acids in bark (1.50-6.70 mg/100 g DW); sorbic, ferulic, gallic, salicylic and p-coumaric acids in leaves (1.18-4.71 mg/100 g DW); vanillic, gallic and tannic acids in seeds (0.52-0.65 mg/100 g DW) as the main phenolic acids. The present investigation concludes that the tested parts of P. pinnata, in particular the bark, have strong potential for the isolation of antioxidant and antimicrobial agents for functional food and pharmaceutical uses.

  18. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial Properties and Phenolics of Different Solvent Extracts from Bark, Leaves and Seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L. Pierre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Alkharfy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study appraises the antioxidant and antimicrobial attributes of various solvent extracts (absolute methanol, aqueous methanol, absolute ethanol, aqueous ethanol, absolute acetone, aqueous acetone, and deionized water from bark, leaves and seeds of Pongamia pinnata (L. Pierre. Maximum extraction yield of antioxidant components from bark (16.31%, leaves (11.42% and seeds (21.51% of P. pinnata was obtained using aqueous methanol (20:80. Of the extracts tested, the bark extract, obtained with aqueous methanol, exhibited greater levels of total phenolics [6.94 g GAE/100 g dry weight (DW], total flavonoids (3.44 g CE/100 g DW, inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation (69.23% and DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC50 value, 3.21 μg/mL, followed by leaves and seeds extracts. Bark extract tested against a set of bacterial and fungal strains also revealed the strongest antimicrobial activity with the largest inhibition zone and lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. HPLC analysis of aqueous methanol extracts from bark, leaves and seeds indicated the presence of protocatechuic, ellagic, ferulic, gallic, gentisic, 4-hydroxybenzoic and 4-hydroxycinnamic acids in bark (1.50–6.70 mg/100 g DW; sorbic, ferulic, gallic, salicylic and p-coumaric acids in leaves (1.18–4.71 mg/100 g DW; vanillic, gallic and tannic acids in seeds (0.52–0.65 mg/100 g DW as the main phenolic acids. The present investigation concludes that the tested parts of P. pinnata, in particular the bark, have strong potential for the isolation of antioxidant and antimicrobial agents for functional food and pharmaceutical uses.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Different Extraction Techniques and Solvents for the Assay of Phytochemicals and Antioxidant Activity of Hashemi Rice Bran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghasemzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolite contents (total phenolic, flavonoid, tocopherol, and tocotrienol and antioxidant activities of Hashemi rice bran extracts obtained by ultrasound-assisted and traditional solvent (ethanol and 50:50 (v/v ethanol-water extraction techniques were compared. Phenolic and, flavonoid compounds were identified using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and method validation was performed. Significant differences (p < 0.05 were observed among the different extraction techniques upon comparison of phytochemical contents and antioxidant activities. The extracts obtained using the ethanol-water (50:50 v/v ultrasonic technique showed the highest amounts of total phenolics (288.40 mg/100 g dry material (DM, total flavonoids (156.20 mg/100 g DM, and total tocotrienols (56.23 mg/100 g DM, and the highest antioxidant activity (84.21% 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, 65.27% β-carotene-linoleic bleaching and 82.20% nitric oxide scavenging activity. Secondary metabolite contents and antioxidant activities of the rice bran extracts varied depending of the extraction method used, and according to their effectiveness, these were organized in a decreasing order as follows: ethanol-water (50:50 v/v ultrasonic, ethanol-water (50:50 v/v maceration, ethanol ultrasonic and ethanol maceration methods. Ferulic, gallic and chlorogenic acids were the most abundant phenolic compounds in rice bran extracts. The phytochemical constituents of Hashemi rice bran and its antioxidant properties provides insights into its potential application to promote health.

  20. Solvent Extraction of Yttrium by Task-specific Ionic Liquids Bearing Carboxylic Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王威; 刘郁; 徐爱梅; 杨华玲; 崔红敏; 陈继

    2012-01-01

    A new kind of hydrophobic ionic liquids [1-alkyl-3-(1-carboxylpropyl)im][PF6] has been synthesized, and their extraction.properties for Y(III) in the nitric acid medium was also investigated. The effects of extractant concentration, equilibrium pH of aqueous phase, salt concentration, temperature etc. were discussed. The results show that this kind of Task-Specific Ionic Liquid (TSIL) needs to be saponified before being used for the Y(III) extraction, and the extraction is-acid dependent,-and the extraction efficiency increases with the aqueous phase acldity decreasing. Furthermore, the loaded organic phase is easy to be stripped; more than 95% Y(III) could be stripped from the loaded organic phase when the stripping acidity is higher than 0.07 mol-L-1. The slope analysis technique is used to investigate the extraction mechanism, and a possible cation-exchange extraction mechanism is proposed in the oresent extraction system.

  1. Insect lipid profile: aqueous versus organic solvent-based extraction methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzompa Sosa, D.A.; Yi, L.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Lakemond, C.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    In view of future expected industrial bio-fractionation of insects, we investigated the influence of extraction methods on chemical characteristics of insect lipids. Lipids from Tenebrio molitor, Alphitobius diaperinus, Acheta domesticus and Blaptica dubia, reared in the Netherlands, were extracted

  2. Antioxidant activity of various solvent extracts from Allomyrina dichotoma (Arthropoda: Insecta) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Seong-Ryul; Lee, Kyung-Seok; Park, Shin; Kang, Sun Chul

    2010-05-03

    This study was under taken to evaluate the antioxidant properties of larvae extracts of Allomyrina dichotoma. The antioxidant activities of various larvae extracts of water, methanol, ethyl-acetate, chloroform, and hexane were measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), superoxide anion radical and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). The methanolic larvae extracts displayed the greatest effect in DPPH radical scavenging assay, but the reducing activity of larvae extracts was weaker in the superoxide anion radical assay. However, methanol (ME) and chloroform extracts (CE) could be compared to ascorbic acid in (1)O(2) quenching ability. ME (the concentration of 50% (1)O(2) quenching, QC(50)=0.080mg/ml) and CE (QC(50)=0.051mg/ml) extracts had 1.7, 2.7 times better efficiency than ascorbic acid (QC(50)=0.138mg/ml), respectively. Also the extracts were found to protect biological systems in Escherichia coli and lactate dehydrogenase against detrimental effects of (1)O(2) of type II photosensitization in vitro. The ability of larvae extracts to scavenge free radicals could significantly change contents of GA equivalent, an important factor for the potency of antioxidant capacity. The results suggest that our study may contribute to the development of new bioactive products with potential applications to reduce oxidative stress in living organisms involving reactive oxygen species as well as play a vital role in insect organisms against oxidative damage of undesirable conditions.

  3. Composite hollow fiber membranes for organic solvent-based liquid-liquid extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T.; Versteeg, L.A.M.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Wessling, M.

    2004-01-01

    Instability issues of liquid membranes extraction significantly limit its wide application in industry. We report research on the application of a new composite hollow fiber membrane to stabilizing liquid membrane extraction. These type of composite membranes have either a polysulfone (PSf) ultrafil

  4. Evaluation of tri-n-octylamine oxide as phenol extractant in a solvent impregnated resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghoff, B.; Cuypers, R.; Ettinger, van M.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Zuilhof, H.; Haan, de A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Tri-n-ocytlamine oxide (TOAO) is evaluated as alternative to the state-of-the-art phenol extractants tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and Cyanex 923. Liquid¿liquid equilibrium experiments show that TOAO in 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene achieves higher phenol distribution coefficients in an extractant con

  5. Removal of iron interferences by solvent extraction for geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Iron is a common interferent in the determination of many elements in geochemical samples. Two approaches for its removal have been taken. The first involves removal of iron by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from hydrochloric acid medium, leaving the analytes in the aqueous phase. The second consists of reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) by ascorbic acid to minimize its extraction into MIBK, so that the analytes may be isolated by extraction. Elements of interest can then be determined using the aqueous solution or the organic extract, as appropriate. Operating factors such as the concentration of hydrochloric acid, amounts of iron present, number of extractions, the presence or absence of a salting-out agent, and the optimum ratio of ascorbic acid to iron have been determined. These factors have general applications in geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1985.

  6. Flavonoid extraction from Alpinia zerumbet (Pers.) Burtt et Smith leaves using different techniques and solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victorio, Cristiane P.; Lage, Celso Luiz S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Fisiologia Vegetal], e-mail: cris.pvictor@gmail.com; Kuster, Ricardo M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas de Produtos Naturais. Lab. de Fitoquimica

    2009-01-15

    The current study aims to verify the best method for a rapid and efficient extraction of flavonoids from Alpinia zerumbet. Dried leaves were extracted using distillated water and ethanol 70% by extraction methods of shaking maceration, ultrasonic, microwave and stirring. By the application of TLC and reversed phase HPLC techniques the rutin and kempferol-3-O-glucuronide were detected. Ethanol 70% was more efficient for flavonoids extraction than water. No significant yielding variation was verified for ultrasonic, microwave and stirring methods using ethanol 70% (11 to 14%). The relative concentration of rutin and kempferol-3-O-glucuronide, respectively, was higher by ultrasonic (1.5 and 5.62 mg g{sup -1} dried leaves, respectively) and by microwave (1.0 and 6.64 mg g{sup -1} dried leaves) methods using ethanol. Rapid and simplified extraction proceeding optimize phyto chemical work and acquisition of secondary metabolites. (author)

  7. Solvent extraction of rare earth ions from nitrate media with new extractant di-(2,3-dimethylbutyl)-phosphinic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊莲; 陈广; 徐盛明; 尹祉力; 张覃

    2016-01-01

    As a relatively new extractant, di-(2,3-dimethylbutyl)-phosphinic acid (HYY-2) is more efficient to separate heavy rare earths Tm/Yb/Lu than Cyanex 272 and P507. In this paper, HYY-2 was synthesized in our lab, and the extraction equilibrium, ther-modynamics and stripping acidity for La, Gd and Y, which stood for light rare earth elements (REE), middle REE and heavy REE respectively, from nitrate media with this extractant were investigated. Meanwhile, extraction ability, capacity and stripping acidity of HYY-2 were investigated and compared with those of Cyanex 272 and P507. The separation performance for rare earth element cou-ples Gd/Eu and Er/Ywere also studied. Compared to Cyanex 272, it possessed higher extraction capacity; while compared with P507, it has lower stripping acidity. The maximumβGd/Eu 1.46 occurred at pHequilibrium=2.78 and the maximumβEr/Y was 1.47 when pHequilibrium= 2.01.

  8. Influence of Extracting Solvent on Pharmacological Activity and Cytotoxicity of Polygonum minus, a Commonly Consumed Herb in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christapher, Parayil Varghese; Parasuraman, Subramani; Raj, Palanimuthu Vasanth; Mohammed Saghir, Sultan Ayesh; Asmawi, Mohd. Zaini; Vikneswaran, Murugaiyah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antihyperlipidemic, antioxidant, and cytotoxic effect of aqueous and methanol extract of leaves of Polygonum minus. Materials and Methods: Acute antihyperlipidemic effect was studied on chemically induced hyperlipidemic rat model. Treated groups received aqueous and methanol extract of leaves of P. minus respectively (1000 mg/kg; oral) whereas standard treated group received atorvastatin (60 mg/kg; oral) for 3 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected at fixed intervals for lipid profile analysis. Antioxidant effects were studied using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2-azinobis 3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonate, and ferric reducing antioxidant power assays. The total flavonoids content and total phenolic contents were also estimated. Cytotoxicity of both extracts was studied on one normal and three cancer cell lines using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay method. Results: The methanol extract showed significant reduction in total cholesterol (P < 0.001), triglycerides (P < 0.01), LDL (P < 0.05), VLDL (P < 0.01), atherogenic index (P < 0.001), and elevation of HDL (P < 0.05) levels than the aqueous extract. Similarly, the antioxidant investigations also demonstrated that the methanol extract had higher antioxidant capacity than aqueous extract. Both extracts were not toxic to normal (EA.hy926) as well as to cancer (HCT116, HT29, and HeLa) cells. Significant correlation was demonstrated between total phenolic and total flavonoids contents with the antioxidant activity but not with the antihyperlipidemic effect, suggesting other groups of chemical constituents may be mainly responsible for the antihyperlipidemic effect of this plant. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that the presence and extent of bioactivities are influenced by solvents used for extraction. This study confirmed the antihyperlipidemic effect of leaves of P. minus in acute hyperlipidemic rat model. SUMMARY Polygonum minus is

  9. Optimization and application of homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction in preconcentration of copper (II) in a ternary solvent system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: farajzade@yahoo.com; Bahram, Morteza [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zorita, Saioa [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Lund, P.O. Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Mehr, Behzad Ghorbani [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-01-30

    In this study a homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction based on the Ph-dependent phase-separation process was investigated using a ternary solvent system (water-acetic acid-chloroform) for the preconcentration of Cu{sup 2+} ions. 8-Hydroxy quinoline was used as the chelating agent prior to its extraction. Flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry using acetylene-air flame was used for the quantitation of analyte after preconcentration. The effect of various experimental parameters in extraction step was investigated using two optimization methods, one variable at a time and central composite design. The experimental design was done at five levels of operating parameters. Nearly the same optimized results were obtained using both methods: sample size, 5 mL; volume of NaOH 10 M, 2 mL; chloroform volume, 300 {mu}L; 8-hydroxy quinoline concentration more than 0.01 M and salt amount did not affect the extraction significantly. Under the optimum conditions the calibration graph was linear over the range 10-2000 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation was 7.6% for six repeated determinations (C = 500 {mu}g L{sup -1}). Furthermore, the limit of detection (S/N = 3) and limit of quantification (S/N = 10) of the method were obtained as 1.74 and 6 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively.

  10. Determination of methyl mercury in whole blood by ethylation-GC-CVAFS after alkaline digestion-solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L; Evens, C; Lazoff, S; Woods, J S; Cernichiari, E; Horvat, M; Martin, M D; DeRouen, T

    2000-01-01

    A method for the determination of methyl mercury in whole blood samples based on ethylation-gas chromatography-cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry after alkaline digestion-solvent extraction is described. The extraction procedure and conditions were optimized, and the matrix interference after extraction was critically investigated. The storage stability of MeHg in blood samples and a series of extracts was determined. The method detection limit was found to be approximately 0.02 ng/g for a 0.5-g blood sample with relative standard deviations of less than 10%. The accuracy and precision were evaluated by summarizing the quality-control (QC) data generated over a one and one half year period. Appropriate procedures for sample collection, transportation, and storage were adapted to the method. Using this method accompanied by explicit QC protocols and procedures, background levels of MeHg and total mercury in blood for 150 8-10-year-old Portuguese children with nonoccupational and nonamalgamal exposure were determined and reported with summarized QC data.

  11. Simultaneous Separation of Manganese, Cobalt, and Nickel by the Organic-Aqueous-Aqueous Three-Phase Solvent Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirayama, Sakae; Uda, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    This research outlines an organic-aqueous-aqueous three-phase solvent extraction method and proposes its use in a new metal separation process for the recycling of manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), and nickel (Ni) from used lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The three-phase system was formed by mixing xylene organic solution, 50 pct polyethylene glycol (PEG) aqueous solution, and 1 mol L-1 sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) aqueous solution. The xylene organic solution contained 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (D2EHPA) as an extractant for Mn ion, and the Na2SO4 aqueous solution contained 1 mol L-1 potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) as an extractant for Co ion. Concentrations of the metal ions were varied by dissolving metal sulfates in the Na2SO4 aqueous solution. As a result of the experiments, Mn, Co, and Ni ions were distributed in the xylene organic phase, PEG-rich aqueous phase, and Na2SO4-rich aqueous phase, respectively. The separation was effective when the pH value was around 4. Numerical simulation was also conducted in order to predict the distribution of metal ions after the multi-stage counter-current extractions.

  12. Solvent extraction of neodymium(Ⅲ ) from acidic nitrate medium using Cyanex 921 in kerosene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nandita Panda; Niharbala Devi; Sujata Mishra

    2012-01-01

    The extraction of neodymium(Ⅲ ) from acidic nitrate medium was investigated using Cyanex 921 as extractant in kerosene.The metal concentration in the aqueous phase before and after extraction was determined spectrophotometrically by Arsenazo Ⅲ method.The complete equilibration was achieved in 15 min.The effects of shaking time,nitric acid concentration,nitrate concentration,extractant concentration,and temperature on the extraction were studied.The extraction of Nd(Ⅲ) was found to increase very slowly with increase in concentration of HNO3 in the range of 0.001-0.008 mol/L and then decreased when 0.01 mol/L HNO3 was used.The percentage of extraction was increased with increase in nitrate concentration from 0.01-0.45 mol/L and then decreased when nitrate concentration increased to 0.5 mol/L.Quantitative extraction of Nd(Ⅲ) (98%) was obtained from the aqueous phase containing 0.001 mol/L HNO3 and 0.1 mol/L KNO3 using 0.5mol/L Cyanex 921.On the basis of slope analysis,the extracted complex in the organic phase was proposed to be Nd(NO3)3.2Cyanex 921.The extraction of Nd(Ⅲ) was found to increase with increase in concentration of metal ion in the range of 0.001-0.05 mol/L from 0.001mol/L HNO3 and 0.1 mol/L KNO3 with 0.1 mol/L Cyanex 921.The percentage of extraction of neodymium was found to decrease with increase in temperature.From temperature variation studies,the negative value of △H indicated the extraction reaction to be exothermic and the negative value of △S indicated the formation of a stable complex.Almost 100% Nd(Ⅲ) was recovered from the fully loaded organic phase using 0.002 mol/L H2SO4 and 0.01 mol/L HC1.

  13. Supercritical CO2 extraction of mentha (Mentha piperita L. at different solvent densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUŠAN ADAMOVIĆ

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of mentha essential oil and mentha extracts obtained at different pressures/temperatures by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE were studied by GC–MS. The menthol content was also determined spectrophotometrically. The predominant compounds in the essential oil and in the CO2 extract obtained at 100 bar were L-menthon and menthole but at higher pressures (from 150 to 400 bar, squalene was dominant. The equation of Naik et al. was used for modelling the mentha–supercritical CO2 system.

  14. Development of a New Binary Solvent System Using Ionic Liquids as Additives to Improve Rotenone Extraction Yield from Malaysia Derris sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zetty Shafiqa Othman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone is one of the prominent insecticidal isoflavonoid compounds which can be isolated from the extract of Derris sp. plant. Despite being an effective compound in exterminating pests in a minute concentration, procuring a significant amount of rotenone in the extracts for commercialized biopesticides purposes is a challenge to be attained. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the best ionic liquid (IL which gives the highest yield of rotenone. The normal soaking extraction (NSE method was carried out for 24 hrs using five different types of binary solvent systems comprising a combination of acetone and five respective ionic liquids (ILs of (1 [BMIM] Cl; (2 [BMIM] OAc; (3 [BMIM] NTf2; (4 [BMIM] OTf; and (5 [BMPy] Cl. Next, the yield of rotenone, % (w/w, and its concentration (mg/mL in dried roots were quantitatively determined by means of RP-HPLC and TLC. The results showed that a binary solvent system of [BMIM] OTf + acetone was the best solvent system combination as compared to other solvent systems (P<0.05. It contributed to the highest rotenone content of 2.69 ± 0.21% (w/w (4.04 ± 0.34 mg/mL at 14 hrs of exhaustive extraction time. In conclusion, a combination of the ILs with a selective organic solvent has been proven to increase a significant amount of bioactive constituents in the phytochemical extraction process.

  15. An attempt towards simultaneous biobased solvent based extraction of proteins and enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic materials from distiller's grains and solubles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saurav; Bals, B D; Lin, Yupo J; Negri, M C; Datta, R; Pasieta, L; Ahmad, Sabeen F; Moradia, Akash A; Dale, B E; Snyder, Seth W

    2010-07-01

    Distiller's grains and solubles (DGS) is the major co-product of corn dry mill ethanol production, and is composed of 30% protein and 30-40% polysaccharides. We report a strategy for simultaneous extraction of protein with food-grade biobased solvents (ethyl lactate, d-limonene, and distilled methyl esters) and enzymatic saccharification of glucan in DGS. This approach would produce a high-value animal feed while simultaneously producing additional sugars for ethanol production. Preliminary experiments on protein extraction resulted in recovery of 15-45% of the protein, with hydrophobic biobased solvents obtaining the best results. The integrated hydrolysis and extraction experiments showed that biobased solvent addition did not inhibit hydrolysis of the cellulose. However, only 25-33% of the total protein was extracted from DGS, and the extracted protein largely resided in the aqueous phase, not the solvent phase. We hypothesize that the hydrophobic solvent could not access the proteins surrounded by the aqueous phase inside the fibrous structure of DGS due to poor mass transfer. Further process improvements are needed to overcome this obstacle.

  16. Preliminary phytochemical screening and antioxidant activities of solvent extracts from Daucus crinitus Desf., from Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Bendiabdellah, Amel; DIB, Mohammed El Amine; Meliani, Nawel; Djabou, Nassim; Allali, Hocine; Tabti, Boufeldja

    2012-01-01

    The presence of natural antioxidant in plants is well known. Plant phenolics constitute one of the major groups of components that act as primary antioxidant free radical terminators. This paper reports the antioxidative activity of methanolic and water extract of Daucus crinitus Desf. Phytochemical screening of the crude extracts of stems/leaves revealed the presence of different kind of chemical groups such as tannin, flavonoids, phenolic acids and coumarins. The amounts of tota...

  17. Optimal Binary Solvent Extraction System for Phenolic Antioxidants from Mengkudu (Morinda citrifolia Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Ping Tan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants have been widely used in the food industry to enhance product quality by preventing oxidation of susceptible substances. This work was carried out to maximise the recovery of total phenolic content (TPC, total flavonoid content (TFC, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radical-scavenging capacity and 2,2′-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical-scavenging capacity from Morinda citrifolia fruit via modification of the ethanol concentration, extraction time and extraction temperature at minimal processing cost. The optimised conditions yielded values of 881.57 ± 17.74 mg GAE/100 g DW for TPC, 552.53 ± 34.16 mg CE/100 g DW for TFC, 799.20 ± 2.97 µmol TEAC/100 g DW for ABTS and 2,317.01 ± 18.13 µmol TEAC/100 g DW for DPPH were 75% ethanol, 40 min of time and 57 °C. The four responses did not differ significantly (p > 0.05 from predicted values, indicating that models obtained are suitable to the optimisation of extraction conditions for phenolics from M. citrifolia. The relative amounts of flavonoids were 0.784 ± 0.01 mg quercetin/g of extract and 1.021 ± 0.04 mg rutin/g of extract. On the basis of the results obtained, M. citrifolia extract can be used as a valuable bioactive source of natural antioxidants.

  18. Optimal binary solvent extraction system for phenolic antioxidants from mengkudu (Morinda citrifolia) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoo, Yin Yin; Ho, Swee Kheng; Abas, Faridah; Lai, Oi Ming; Ho, Chun Wai; Tan, Chin Ping

    2013-06-14

    Antioxidants have been widely used in the food industry to enhance product quality by preventing oxidation of susceptible substances. This work was carried out to maximise the recovery of total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical-scavenging capacity and 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging capacity from Morinda citrifolia fruit via modification of the ethanol concentration, extraction time and extraction temperature at minimal processing cost. The optimised conditions yielded values of 881.57 ± 17.74 mg GAE/100 g DW for TPC, 552.53 ± 34.16 mg CE/100 g DW for TFC, 799.20 ± 2.97 µmol TEAC/100 g DW for ABTS and 2,317.01 ± 18.13 µmol TEAC/100 g DW for DPPH were 75% ethanol, 40 min of time and 57 °C. The four responses did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) from predicted values, indicating that models obtained are suitable to the optimisation of extraction conditions for phenolics from M. citrifolia. The relative amounts of flavonoids were 0.784 ± 0.01 mg quercetin/g of extract and 1.021 ± 0.04 mg rutin/g of extract. On the basis of the results obtained, M. citrifolia extract can be used as a valuable bioactive source of natural antioxidants.

  19. Solvent extraction of Th(IV) from aqueous solution with methylimidazole in ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenkui; Lv, Hui; Liu, Ziyi; Wu, Jianrong; Li, Shun; Shen, Yinglin [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Lab.; Yang, Shenghua [State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Lanzhou (China)

    2016-07-01

    An extraction of Th(IV) was performed using 1-methylimidazole (1-MIM) or 2-methylimidazole (2-MIM) as the extractant in imidazolium type ionic liquids (ILs) or n-pentanol. The extractability for Th{sup 4+} in ILs was by far higher than that obtained in n-pentanol. The extraction mechanism was determined by slope analysis and ESI-MS. The transfer of Th{sup 4+} with MIM into ILs proceeded through both a cationic exchange and a neutral solvation mechanism, whereas the partitioning of Th{sup 4+} with MIM into n-pentanol only underwent a neutral solvation mechanism. The thermodynamic parameters values (ΔH, ΔS and ΔG) for extraction of Th{sup 4+} with 1-MIM in IL were calculated and the results indicated the extraction reaction was spontaneous and went through endothermic process. Separation of Th{sup 4+} from the solution of lanthanides (III) and uranium was also carried out by 1-MIM in ILs and n-pentanol.

  20. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Sediment and Soil by Pressurized Solvent Extraction, Solid-Phase Extraction, and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 61 compounds in environmental sediment and soil samples is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater and wastewater-impacted sediment on aquatic organisms. This method also may be used to evaluate the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water and sediment quality of urban streams. Method development focused on the determination of compounds that were chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from interfering matrix components by high-pressure water/isopropyl alcohol extraction. The compounds were isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing chemically modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. The cartridges were dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds were eluted with methylene chloride (80 percent)-diethyl ether (20 percent) through Florisil/sodium sulfate SPE cartridge, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-sand samples fortified at 4 to 72 micrograms averaged 76 percent ?13 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method reporting levels for single-component compounds ranged from 50 to 500 micrograms per kilogram. The concentrations of 20 out of 61 compounds initially will be reported as estimated with the 'E' remark code for one of three reasons: (1) unacceptably low-biased recovery (less than 60 percent) or highly variable method performance

  1. Requirements for a Dynamic Solvent Extraction Module to Support Development of Advanced Technologies for the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Law; Veronica Rutledge; Candido Pereira; Jackie Copple; Kurt Frey; John Krebs; Laura Maggos; Kevin Nichols; Kent Wardle; Pratap Sadasivan; Valmor DeAlmieda; David Depaoli

    2011-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program has been established to create and deploy next generation, verified and validated nuclear energy modeling and simulation capabilities for the design, implementation, and operation of future nuclear energy systems to improve the U.S. energy security. As part of the NEAMS program, Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC's) are being produced to significantly advance the status of modeling and simulation of energy systems beyond what is currently available to the extent that the new codes be readily functional in the short term and extensible in the longer term. The four IPSC areas include Safeguards and Separations, Reactors, Fuels, and Waste Forms. As part of the Safeguards and Separations (SafeSeps) IPSC effort, interoperable process models are being developed that enable dynamic simulation of an advanced separations plant. A SafeSepss IPSC 'toolkit' is in development to enable the integration of separation process modules and safeguards tools into the design process by providing an environment to compose, verify and validate a simulation application to be used for analysis of various plant configurations and operating conditions. The modules of this toolkit will be implemented on a modern, expandable architecture with the flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options while preserving their stand-alone usability. Modules implemented at the plant-level will initially incorporate relatively simple representations for each process through a reduced modeling approach. Final versions will incorporate the capability to bridge to subscale models to provide required fidelity in chemical and physical processes. A dynamic solvent extraction model and its module implementation are needed to support the development of this integrated plant model. As a stand-alone application, it will also support solvent development of extraction flowsheets

  2. Development, comparison and application of sorbent-assisted accelerated solvent extraction, microwave-assisted extraction and ultrasonic-assisted extraction for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shanjun; Shao, Mingwu; Tang, Hua; He, Yajuan; Wang, Weihua; Liu, Liliang; Wu, Jiajia

    2016-12-02

    Fast and selective analytical methods were developed based on sorbent-assisted mechanism and microwave-assisted extraction (SA-MAE), accelerate solvent extraction (SA-ASE) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (SA-UAE) for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in sediments. The experimental parameters, such as extraction conditions and sorbent amounts, were optimized according to Taguchi Orthogonal Arrays. The accuracy of developed SA-methods was a satisfactory ranging from 71% to 118%. The inter/intra-day RSDs were extraction intensity may produce various matrix effects. In addition, the developed SA-ASE method was successfully applied on real environmental samples collected from a typical polluted area. The data and calculation suggested local environmental contamination pattern and potential pollution source.

  3. Accelerated solvent extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction before gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the sensitive determination of phenols in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Han-Zhu; Wang, Xia; Chen, Xiang-Feng; Wang, Ming-Lin; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2015-05-01

    A method combining accelerated solvent extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was developed for the first time as a sample pretreatment for the rapid analysis of phenols (including phenol, m-cresol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol) in soil samples. In the accelerated solvent extraction procedure, water was used as an extraction solvent, and phenols were extracted from soil samples into water. The dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique was then performed on the obtained aqueous solution. Important accelerated solvent extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction parameters were investigated and optimized. Under optimized conditions, the new method provided wide linearity (6.1-3080 ng/g), low limits of detection (0.06-1.83 ng/g), and excellent reproducibility (extraction with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction as a sample pretreatment procedure coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry is an excellent method for the rapid analysis of trace levels of phenols in environmental soil samples.

  4. Rapid determination of volatile constituents in safflower from Xinjiang and Henan by ultrasonic-assisted solvent extraction and GC-MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Han Jia; Yi Liu; Yu-Zhen Li

    2011-01-01

    The total volatile components were extracted from safflower by ultrasonic-assisted solvent extraction (USE) and their chemical constituents were analyzed by gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS) to provide scientific basis for the quality control of safflower. Five different solvents (diethyl ether, ethanol, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and acetone) were used and compared in terms of number of volatile components extracted and the peak areas of these components in TIC. The results showed that USE could be used as an efficient and rapid method for extracting the volatile components from safflower. It also could be found that the number of components in the TIC of ethyl acetate extract was more than that in the TIC of other solvent ones. Meanwhile, the volatile components of safflower from Xinjiang Autonomous Region and Henan Province of China were different in chemical components and relative contents. It could be concluded that both the extraction solvents and geographical origin of safflower are responsible for these differences. The experimental results also indicated that USE/GC-MS is a simple, rapid and effective method to analyze the volatile oil components of safflower.

  5. Study the relative effect of spironolactone and different solvent extract of Tibulus terrestrison urolithiatic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Satish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperoxaluria is the foremost initiating cause for urolithiasis in renal cavities, where urolithiasis is a common urinary tract disorder. There is much expectation of finding active anti-urolithiatic compounds from indigenous plant as there are still uses in therapeutic despite the progress in conventional chemistry and pharmacology in producing effecting drugs. Most patients still have to undergo surgery to get rid of painful disease. In our present study on anti-urolithiatic agents from plants which was compared with synthetic chemical substance. As we have selected the sequential extracts of Tribulus terrestris with pet ether, chloroform, alcohol and water and compared the activity with the synthetic steroidal drug spironolactone which was used on the lithiatic induced rats and estimated the effect of the extract by doing the invo and invitro analysis alongside by histopathological studies and found the ethanolic extract of the drug was found to be effective than other treatment.

  6. Solvent extraction and photometric determination of molybdenum (VI) with 2-aminobenzenethiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, A K; Bag, S P

    1976-10-01

    A new extractive photometric method is described for estimation of molybdenum with 2-aminobenzenethiol. The green complex in chloroform has its absorbance maximum at 700 nm and is stable for 2 hr when extracted from a solution of optimum pH range 1.4-2.8. The extraction is quantitative. The sensitivity is 0.0075 microg cm (2). Beer's law is obeyed over the range 0.25-10 ppm with optimum range 0.5-4.5 ppm. The molar absorptivity is 7.08 x 10(4) 1.mole(-1). cm(-1). The overall stability constant is 2.0 x 10(8) at 25 +/- 0.1 degrees.

  7. Determination of Methyltins by a Hydridization Solvent Extraction Method

    OpenAIRE

    HAMASAKI,TETSUO/SATO,TAKAHIKO/NAGASE,HISAMITSU/KITO,HIDEAKI

    1994-01-01

    Analytical methods for the determination of methyltins in aqueous solutions were investigated. Methyltins ((CH_3)_nSn^) were derived to hydrides ((CH_3)_nSnH_) using sodium borohydride and extracted with benzene. Various factors related to hydridization and extraction were studied, and the optimum analytical conditions were established. Each methyltin in 50 ml of aqueous solution could be detected in the range of 0.5-250 μg as Sn using a gas chromatography-flame photometric detector (tin sele...

  8. Investigation on water-assisted solvent extraction of bitumen from oil sands%水辅助溶剂法提取油砂中的沥青

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红强; 丁明山; 胡斌; 任嗣利

    2014-01-01

    开发了一种水辅助溶剂法从油砂中提取沥青的技术。该方法通过在油砂固相与有机溶剂间介入水层提取油砂中的沥青。以内蒙古扎赉特旗油砂矿为研究对象,考察了温度、剂砂质量比、提取时间、甲苯在复合溶剂中的含量及溶剂的种类与性质对沥青回收率高低的影响,结果表明:最佳提取条件为提取温度50℃,剂砂质量比1∶1,提取时间25min。沥青回收率与提取溶剂的性质紧密相关,水层介入有效降低了固体微粒组分在有机相中的含量,且便于后续的有机相与泥砂相的分离。通过对各种溶剂提取的沥青进行组分分析,发现各种溶剂对沥青提取能力的差异性源于溶剂的化学组成和结构不同。本文相关研究结果对溶剂法提取油砂中沥青技术及溶剂种类的选择具有指导作用。%Water-assisted solvent extraction processes (WASEPs) were developed by introducing a water layer between the oil sands and solvent to extract bitumen. The function of the introduced water layer in the WASEPs is to effectively reduce the fine solids content in the solvent phase and make it easy to separate bitumen solution from solids. Effects of the solvent type on bitumen recovery were investigated and the extraction conditions were optimized. The results showed that bitumen recovery was closely related to the solvent compositions and chemical structure. The optimal extraction condition was stirring at 50℃ for 25 minutes using a ratio of oil sands to solvent at 1∶1(wt/wt). The reason of different extraction abilities for various solvents was revealed by analyzing the component of extracted bitumen. It may be useful to guide the solvent extraction processes and solvent selection.

  9. Effect of solvents and methods of stirring in extraction of lycopene, oleoresin and fatty acids from over-ripe tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cervantes, Jaime; Sánchez-Machado, Dalia I; Valenzuela-Sánchez, Karla P; Núñez-Gastélum, José A; Escárcega-Galaz, Ana A; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Lycopene and oleoresin extraction from powder of tomato over-ripe by three agitation methods and four solvents have been evaluated. Also, tomato powder and the oleoresins were characterized biochemically. On average, the moisture content of powder was found to be 4.30, ash 8.90, proteins 11.23 and lipids 4.35 g 100 g(-1). The best oleoresin extraction yield was achieved by combining sonication and acetone at 1.43 g 100 g(-1). The greatest amount of lycopene (65.57 ± 0.33 mg 100 g(-1)) was also obtained using the same treatment. The presence of trans-lycopene was positively confirmed by HPLC and FTIR. In oleoresins, linoleic acid (C18:2n6) was the predominant with 50% of total fatty acids, whereas stearic acid (C18:0) is presented in a smaller proportion (5%). A simple and suitable method for extraction of lycopene from over-ripe tomato was optimized. In industrial applications, tomato by-products are a viable source of analytes, such as lycopene and unsaturated fatty acids.

  10. Impact of instant controlled pressure drop pre-treatment on solvent extraction of edible oil from rapeseed seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allaf Tamara

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental analysis and modeling of kinetics of solvent extraction of rapeseed oil enable the quantification of the “washing” and “diffusion” steps. Both are illustrated through “starting accessibility” and “effective diffusivity”, respectively. This is a relevant way to identify how to intensify and optimize the operating conditions in terms of highest yield and lowest extraction time. Using the instant controlled pressure drop (DIC expansion as a pre-treatment for the intensification of the whole unit operation, the starting accessibility ratio reached a value of 28.69% against 19.03% for the raw material. Effective diffusivity of DIC treated samples reached a value of 2.05 × 10-12 m2/s instead of 0.72 × 10-12 m2/s for the raw material. Regarding oil composition, predominant fatty acids in all extracted rapeseed oils are oleic acid (C18:1 n9 ranged from 57.58 to 59.03%, linoleic acid (C18:2 n6 ranged from 21.23 to 21.89%, and linolenic acid (C18:3 n3 ranged from 9.11 to 9.45%. None of DIC treatment produced a significant variation in relative fatty acid profile.

  11. Experimental and Numberical Investigations of Single Drop Mass Transfer in Solvent Extraction Systems with Resistance in Both Phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LITianwen; FEIWeiyang; 等

    2002-01-01

    Numerical simulation of transient mass transfer to a single drop controlled by the internal resistance or by the resistance in both phases was mathematically formulated and simulated in a boundary-fitted orthogonal coordinate system. The siumlated results on the transient mass transfer dominated by the internal resistance are in good agreement with the Newman and Kronig-Brink models for drops with low Reynolds number. When the drop Reynolds number is up to 200, the mass transfer coefficient from numerical simulation is very low as compared with the Handlos-Baron model.The cases with mass transfer resistance residing in both the continuous and drop phases were simulated successfully and compared with the experimental data in three extraction systems recommended by European Confederation of Chemical Engineering (EFCE).For single drops with Re<200, the numerically predicted values of the extraction fraction and overall mass transfer coefficient are in reasonable coincidence with the experimental data.It is concluded that the numerical simulation can be resorted in some cases of solvent extraction for conducting numerical experiments and parametric study.Nevertheless, for better resolution as higher Reynolds number drops are simulated,more sophisticated techniques should be developed and incorporated to deal with the large deformation and transient shape oscillation as well as possible Marangoni effect.

  12. Solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium and rhenium by tributyl phosphate. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program and Basic Energy Sciences Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruett, D.J.

    1984-12-01

    The literature pertaining to the solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium and rhenium from aqueous solution by tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been compiled, critically evaluated, and supplemented with new data in some areas. The effects of adding mineral acids, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal chlorides, uranyl nitrate, thorium nitrate, and plutonium(IV) nitrate to these systems were also examined. Discussions of the possible nature of the organic-phase complexes are presented, along with values of ..delta..G, ..delta..H, ..delta..S, and the equilibrium constant for the extraction reaction in several systems. Mathematical models correlating the distribution behavior over a wide range of conditions were also developed. Equations are given for calculating the distribution coefficients for the extraction of Re(VII) or Tc(VII) from 0.2 to 4 M HCl by 0.339 to 2.90 M TBP at 298 to 333/sup 0/K. Equations are given for calculating the distribution coefficients under the same conditions, but with HNO/sub 3/ (instead of HCl) present in the aqueous phase. 28 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Solvent bar micro-extraction with graphite atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of silver in ocean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, José A; Herce-Sesa, Belén; Moreno, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Main drawbacks for silver determination in seawater are the effects of samples matrix and that Ag appears in the sub ng L(-1). Available methods for sample preparation in Ag analysis are based on solid and liquid extraction using tedious process that increase the cost of analysis and the risk of sample contamination, producing important waste amounts. Solvent bar micro-extraction (SBME) allows the pre-concentration of Ag in a micro-volume of the ionic liquid Aliquat 336® in kerosene solution. For this reason, it is considered as a green alternative to standard methods. The method has been optimized using synthetic seawater samples, offering the highest response for samples at pH=2, using 5% Aliquat 336® dissolved in kerosene containing 5% dodecan-1-ol as acceptor solution and after 1h stirring at 800rpm. The method exhibited linearity up to 50ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.09ngL(-1), covering the concentration range of interest for environmental studies. Finally, it was applied for determination of Ag in real seawater samples, and the results were compared with the reference method of liquid-liquid extraction with 1-pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate and diethylammonium-diethyldithiocarbamate, showing the applicability of ionic liquid based SBME using Aliquat 336(®) for the simple monitoring of silver ultra-traces in seawater analysis.

  14. Comparison of Supercritical Extraction and Organic Solvents Extraction of Pepper Flavour Substances%花椒风味物质超临界萃取与有机溶剂萃取的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张郁松

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical extraction and organic solvent extraction methods for pepper flavor sub-stances are studied in this paper.Comparison of the extraction yield,extraction conditions,extraction cost and sensory quality of flavor substances.The results show that the supercritical extraction meth-od is better than organic solvent extraction method.%研究了花椒风味的有机溶剂和超临界CO2两种提取方法。对比了风味物质的提取率、提取条件、提取成本和感官品质,结果表明:超临界CO2提取花椒风味成分的效果明显优于有机溶剂法。

  15. Supramolecular organization of organic phases for DIAMEX solvent extraction process; Organisation supramoleculaire des phases organiques de malonamides du procede d'extraction DIAMEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinet, L

    2005-04-15

    In the frame of nuclear waste cycle, supramolecular organization of organic phases has been studied for DIAMEX solvent extraction process. A general methodology has been developed in order to determine surfactant properties of an extractant at high concentration. An illustration is given by a malonamide (DMDBTDMA) at 0.7 mol/L, in dodecane and contacted with water, at 23 deg C. The concentrations of monomers (0.3 mol/L) and aggregates (0.4 mol/L), c.m.c. (0.25 mol/L), aggregation number (4,4), aggregation constant (7.7) and finally aggregates interactions (U/kT = -1.6) are quantified. The method is based on simultaneous utilization of four experimental techniques (small X-ray and neutron scattering, vapour pressure osmometry and tensiometry) added to the model of Baxter. The structure of malonamide organic phase is depending on extractant concentration. (i) Below 0.2 mol/L, it is a quasi-molecular liquid fluid, extracting few amount of solutes. (ii) From 0.2 to 1 mol/L, it is a complex liquid fluid, containing small spherical aggregates of 5 extractant molecules in coexistence with monomers. This phase behaves like typical microemulsions with reverse micelles, through its stabilizing effect of penetrating oil and steric repulsion between extractants. (iii) Above 1 mol/L, the organic phase is able to extract huge amount of solutes. When HNO{sub 3} or Nd(NO{sub 3} ){sub 3} are extracted, a gel with a pseudo-lamellar structure is observed. With UO{sub 2} (NO{sub 3} ){sub 2} a solid crystal with a ratio DMDBTDMA/UO{sub 2} (NO{sub 3} ){sub 2} equal to 1/1 is characteristic of the organic phase. The 'third phase' due to attractive interactions between aggregates has exactly the same supramolecular structure than an 'unsplitted organic phase' of the same composition. Aggregates interactions are independent on the chemical affinity of the extractant for solutes. (author)

  16. 菜籽预榨-浸出粕中植酸的提取%Extraction of phytic acid from prepress - solvent extracted rapeseed meal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍传稳; 张明辉; 刘晔

    2012-01-01

    为实现菜籽粕的综合开发利用,研究了一种从菜籽预榨-浸出粕中两步提取植酸的工艺.考察了酸洗pH、酸洗时间、碱提pH和碱提乙二胺四乙酸二钠(EDTA)浓度等对植酸提取的影响.将经过复合纤维素酶水解的菜籽粕在pH 5.0和50℃下酸洗3h获得酸洗液,然后用EDTA浓度0.1mol/L的碱性溶液在pH 12.0和50℃下碱提酸沉获得乳清液,经以上两步可将菜籽粕中的植酸基本提取完全.将提取液中的粗植酸经氢氧化钙沉淀并酸化,再经离子交换可获得纯度为69.96%、提取率为58.0%的植酸产品.%To realize fully utilization of rapeseed meal, a two - step process for extraction of phytic acid from prepress - solvent extracted rapeseed meal was established. The effects of key parameters on phytic acid extraction, including pH of acid solution, duration of acid solution, pH and ethylene diamine tetraace-tic acid(EDTA) concentration of alkaline solution for extraction were investigated. With an acid solution extracting step at pH 5.0 and 501 for 3 h and an alkaline solution extracting step at pH 12.0 and 50℃ with the supplement of 0.1 mol/L EDTA followed by acidic precipitation, the phytic acid in cellulase pre-treated rapeseed meal could be almost entirely extra