WorldWideScience

Sample records for caustic-crossing microlensing events

  1. A systematic fitting scheme for caustic-crossing microlensing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kains ...[et al], N.; Jørgensen, Uffe Gråe

    2009-01-01

    We outline a method for fitting binary-lens caustic-crossing microlensing events based on the alternative model parametrization proposed and detailed by Cassan. As an illustration of our methodology, we present an analysis of OGLE-2007-BLG-472, a double-peaked Galactic microlensing event with a...... source crossing the whole caustic structure in less than three days. In order to identify all possible models we conduct an extensive search of the parameter space, followed by a refinement of the parameters with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We find a number of low-chi(2) regions in the...

  2. Discovery and Characterization of a Caustic Crossing Microlensing Event in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present photometric observations and analysis of the second microlensing event detected toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), MACHO Alert 98-SMC-1. This event was detected early enough to allow intensive observation of the light curve. These observations revealed 98-SMC-1 to be the first caustic crossing binary microlensing event toward the Magellanic Clouds to be discovered in progress. Frequent coverage of the evolving light curve allowed an accurate prediction for the date of the source crossing out of the lens caustic structure. The caustic crossing temporal width, along with the angular size of the source star, measures the proper motion of the lens with respect to the source and thus allows an estimate of the location of the lens. Lenses located in the Galactic halo would have a velocity projected to the SMC of v∼1500 kms-1, while an SMC lens would typically have v∼60 kms-1. The event light curve allows us to obtain a unique fit to the parameters of the binary lens and to estimate the proper motion of the lensing system. We have performed a joint fit to the MACHO/GMAN data presented here, including recent EROS data of this event from Afonso and collaborators. These joint data are sufficient to constrain the time t* for the lens to move an angle equal to the source angular radius: t* =0.116±0.010 days. We estimate a radius for the lensed source of R* =1.1±0.1 Rcircle-dot from its unblended color and magnitude. This yields a projected velocity of v=76±10 kms-1. Only 0.12% of halo lenses would be expected to have a v value at least as small as this, while 38% of SMC lenses would be expected to have v as large as this. This implies that the lensing system is more likely to reside in the SMC than in the Galactic halo. Similar observations of future Magellanic Cloud microlensing events will help to determine the contribution of MACHOS to the Galaxy's dark halo. copyright copyright 1999. The American Astronomical Society

  3. The rate of caustic crossing microlensing events for Q2237+0305

    OpenAIRE

    Wyithe, J. S. B.; Webster, R. L.; Turner, E. L.

    1999-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observation of the gravitationally microlensed quasar Q2237+0305 during a High Magnification Event (HME) is potentially a very powerful tool for probing the structure of the quasars accretion disc on scales of less than 10^-8 arc seconds. How often we can expect to observe a HME is dependent on the lens system parameters of galactic transverse velocity, mean microlens mass and the size of the magnified continuum source. We have previously used published microlensed light-cu...

  4. The rate of caustic crossing microlensing events for Q2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Wyithe, J S B; Turner, E L

    2000-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observation of the gravitationally microlensed quasar Q2237+0305 during a High Magnification Event (HME) is potentially a very powerful tool for probing the structure of the quasars accretion disc on scales of less than 10^-8 arc seconds. How often we can expect to observe a HME is dependent on the lens system parameters of galactic transverse velocity, mean microlens mass and the size of the magnified continuum source. We have previously used published microlensed light-curves to obtain expressions for the likely-hood of the values for these parameters (Wyithe, Webster & Turner 1999b,c; Wyithe, Webster, Turner & Mortlock 1999). Here we use this information to investigate the expected rate of SHMEs. We find the average rate of SHMEs as well as the number that we can expect to observe over periods of a decade and of a single observing season. We find that the average SHME rate summed over all images in Q2237+0305 is 1.5\\pm0.6 - 6.3\\pm1.3 events per decade. During the period following...

  5. Characterizing Low-Mass Binaries From Observation of Long Time-scale Caustic-crossing Gravitational Microlensing Events

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, I -G; Choi, J -Y; Udalski, A; Sumi, T; Gould, A; Bozza, V; Dominik, M; Fouqué, P; Horne, K; \\, M; Szymański, K; Kubiak, M; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Skowron, J; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Chote, P; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Kobara, S; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohmori, K; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Suzuki, K; Sweatman, W L; Takino, S; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Bramich, D M; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Street, R A; Tsapras, Y; Alsubai, K A; Browne, P; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dodds, P; Dreizler, S; Fang, X -S; Grundahl, F; Gu, C -H; Hardis, S; Harpsøe, K; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Hundertmark, M; Jessen-Hansen, J; Jørgensen, U G; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Liebig, C; Lund, M; Lunkkvist, M; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wambsganss, J; Wertz, O; Almeida, L A; Batista, V; Christie, G; DePoy, D L; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C; Jablonski, F; Lee, C -U; McCormick, J; McGregor, D; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Park, S -Y; Pogge, R W; Tan, T -G; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Beaulieu, J -P; Brillant, S; Cassan, A; Cole, A A; Corrales, E; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Menzies, J W; Sahu, K C; Zub, M

    2012-01-01

    Despite astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of physical parameters. In this paper, we report the detections and measurements of 2 binaries discovered from observations of microlensing events MOA-2011-BLG-090 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. Determinations of the binary masses are possible by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and the lens parallax from analyses of the well-resolved caustic-crossing parts of the light curve and the long-term deviation induced by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun, respectively. The measured masses of the binary components are 0.43 $M_{\\odot}$ and 0.39 $M_{\\odot}$ for MOA-2011-BLG-090 and 0.57 $M_{\\odot}$ and 0.17 $M_{\\odot}$ for OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 and thus both lens components of MOA-2011-BLG-090 and one component of OGLE-2011...

  6. STATISTICS OF MICROLENSING CAUSTIC CROSSINGS IN Q 2237+0305: PECULIAR VELOCITY OF THE LENS GALAXY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea S/N, La Laguna E-38200 Tenerife (Spain); Jimenez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva E-18071 Granada (Spain); Muñoz, J. A. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Mediavilla, T.; Ariza, O. [Departamento de Estadística e Investigación Operativa, Universidad de Cádiz, Avda Ramón Puyol s/n E-11202, Algeciras, Cádiz (Spain)

    2015-01-10

    We use the statistics of caustic crossings induced by microlensing in the lens system Q 2237+0305 to study the lens galaxy peculiar velocity. We calculate the caustic crossing rates for a comprehensive family of stellar mass functions and find a dependence of the average number of caustic crossings with the effective transverse velocity and the average mass, 〈n〉∝v{sub eff}/√(〈m〉), equivalent to the theoretical prediction for the case of microlenses with identical masses. We explore the possibilities of the method to measure v {sub eff} using the ∼12 yr of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment monitoring of the four images of Q 2237+0305. To determine a lower limit for v {sub eff}, we count, conservatively, a single caustic crossing for each one of the four high magnification events identified in the literature (plus one additional proposed by us) obtaining v{sub eff}≳240√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} at 68% of confidence. From this value and the average FWHM of the four high magnification events, we obtain a lower limit of r{sub s}≳1.4√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the radius of the source (r{sub s} = FWHM/2.35). Tentative identification of three additional caustic crossing events leads to estimates of v{sub eff}≃(493±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1} for the effective transverse velocity and of r{sub s}≃(2.7±1.3)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the source size. The estimated transverse peculiar velocity of the galaxy is v{sub t}≃(429±246)√(〈m〉/0.17 M{sub ⊙}) km s{sup −1}.

  7. Hard X-ray view of microlensing events in RX J1131-1231

    CERN Document Server

    Neronov, A; Walter, R

    2016-01-01

    RX J1131-1231 is a gravitationally lensed system which includes four images of a quasar lensed by an elliptical galaxy. The flux in the individual images is known to be affected by microlensing effect in the visible and X-ray bands. We study the multi-wavelength properties of RX J1131-1231 over a broad energy range, from optical to hard X-ray, during the periods of the microlensing caustic crossings. We aim to constrain the spatial extent of the X-ray emission region at different energies. We combine the data of the source monitoring in the visible band with the X-ray data of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board of SWIFT satellite and Chandra X-ray observatory. Inspecting the broad band spectrum and lightcurves of the source we identify several microlensing caustic crossing events, and study the details of variability of the source during these events. The caustic crossings of image A on MJD 55150 and 55500 produce strong variations of the overall X-ray flux from the source. In the soft X-ray band, the ca...

  8. Predictions for microlensing planetary events from core accretion theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wei; Mao, Shude [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Penny, Matthew; Gould, Andrew [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Gendron, Rieul, E-mail: weizhu@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-10

    We conduct the first microlensing simulation in the context of a planet formation model. The planet population is taken from the Ida and Lin core accretion model for 0.3 M {sub ☉} stars. With 6690 microlensing events, we find that for a simplified Korea Microlensing Telescopes Network (KMTNet), the fraction of planetary events is 2.9%, out of which 5.5% show multiple-planet signatures. The numbers of super-Earths, super-Neptunes, and super-Jupiters detected are expected to be almost equal. Our simulation shows that high-magnification events and massive planets are favored by planet detections, which is consistent with previous expectation. However, we notice that extremely high-magnification events are less sensitive to planets, which is possibly because the 10 minute sampling of KMTNet is not intensive enough to capture the subtle anomalies that occur near the peak. This suggests that while KMTNet observations can be systematically analyzed without reference to any follow-up data, follow-up observations will be essential in extracting the full science potential of very high magnification events. The uniformly high-cadence observations expected for KMTNet also result in ∼55% of all detected planets not being caustic crossing, and more low-mass planets even down to Mars mass being detected via planetary caustics. We also find that the distributions of orbital inclinations and planet mass ratios in multiple-planet events agree with the intrinsic distributions.

  9. Illuminating Hot Jupiters in caustic crossing

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2010-01-01

    In recent years a large number of Hot Jupiters orbiting in a very close orbit around the parent stars have been explored with the transit and doppler effect methods. Here in this work we study the gravitational microlensing effect of a binary lens on a parent star with a Hot Jupiter revolving around it. Caustic crossing of the planet makes enhancements on the light curve of the parent star in which the signature of the planet can be detected by high precision photometric observations. We use the inverse ray shooting method with tree code algorithm to generate the combined light curve of the parent star and the planet. In order to investigate the probability of observing the planet signal, we do a Monte-Carlo simulation and obtain the observational optical depth of $\\tau \\sim 10^{-8}$. We show that about ten years observations of Galactic Bulge with a network of telescopes will enable us detecting about ten Hot Jupiter with this method. Finally we show that the observation of the microlensing event in infra-re...

  10. Interferometric observation of microlensing events

    CERN Document Server

    Cassan, A

    2016-01-01

    Interferometric observations of microlensing events have the potential to provide unique constraints on the physical properties of the lensing systems. In this work, we first present a formalism that closely combines interferometric and microlensing observable quantities, which lead us to define an original microlensing (u,v) plane. We run simulations of long-baseline interferometric observations and photometric light curves to decide which observational strategy is required to obtain a precise measurement on vector Einstein radius. We finally perform a detailed analysis of the expected number of targets in the light of new microlensing surveys (2011+) which currently deliver 2000 alerts/year. We find that a few events are already at reach of long baseline interferometers (CHARA, VLTI), and a rate of about 6 events/year is expected with a limiting magnitude of K~10. This number would increase by an order of magnitude by raising it to K~11. We thus expect that a new route for characterizing microlensing events...

  11. Resolving Microlensing Events with Triggered VLBI

    OpenAIRE

    Karami, M; Broderick, A. E.; Rahvar, S.; Reid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing events provide a unique capacity to study the stellar remnant population of the Galaxy. Optical microlensing suffers from a near complete degeneracy between the mass, the velocity and the distance. However, a subpopulation of lensed stars, Mira variable stars, are also radio bright, exhibiting strong SiO masers. These are sufficiently bright and compact to permit direct imaging using existing very long baseline interferometers such as the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). We show ...

  12. Resolving Microlensing Events with Triggered VLBI

    CERN Document Server

    Karami, M; Rahvar, S; Reid, M

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing events provide a unique capacity to study the stellar remnant population of the Galaxy. Optical microlensing suffers from a near complete degeneracy between the mass, the velocity and the distance. However, a subpopulation of lensed stars, Mira variable stars, are also radio bright, exhibiting strong SiO masers. These are sufficiently bright and compact to permit direct imaging using existing very long baseline interferometers such as the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). We show that these events are relatively common, occurring at a rate of ~ 40 per year of which 1.3 per year are associated with Galactic black holes. Features in the associated images, e.g., the Einstein ring, are sufficiently well resolved to fully reconstruct the lens properties, enabling the measurement of mass, distance, and tangential velocity of the lensing object to a precision better than 15%. Future radio microlensing surveys conducted with upcoming radio telescopes combined with modest improvements in the VLBA could inc...

  13. Line Caustic Microlensing and Limb Darkening

    CERN Document Server

    Rhie, S H; Rhie, Sun Hong; Bennett, David P.

    1999-01-01

    In a line caustic crossing microlensing event, the caustic line moving across the surface of the source star provides a direct method to measure the integrated luminosity profile of the star. Combined with the enormous brightening at the caustic crossings, microlensing offers a promising tool for studying stellar luminosity profiles. We derive the amplification behavior of the two extra images that become partial images conjoined across the critical curve at a line caustic crossing. We identify the multiplicative factors that depend on the caustic crossing point and the relative size of the star, and the shape function that depends on the stellar luminosity profile. We examine the analytic limb-darkening models -- linear, square root, and square -- using the analytic form of the shape function. We find that the microlensing lightcurves must be determined to an accuracy of better than 0.3-0.8% in order to be able to determine the linear limb-darkening parameter $c_1$ with precision of binaries as reported by P...

  14. Characterizing low-mass binaries from observation of long-timescale caustic-crossing gravitational microlensing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y;

    2012-01-01

    Despite the astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of phys...

  15. Observations of the Binary Microlens Event MACHO-98-SMC-1 by the Microlensing Planet Search Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Rhie, S H; Bennett, D P; Fragile, P C; Johnson, B R; King, L J; Peterson, B A; Quinn, J

    1998-01-01

    We present the observations of the binary lensing event MACHO-98-SMC-1 conducted at the Mt.~Stromlo 74" telescope by the Microlensing Planet Search (MPS) collaboration. The MPS data constrain the first caustic crossing to have occurred after 1998 June 5.55 UT and thus directly rule out one of the two fits presented by the PLANET collaboration (model II). This substantially reduces the uncertainty in the the relative proper motion estimations of the lens object. We perform joint binary microlensing fits of the MPS data together with the publicly available data from the EROS, MACHO/GMAN and OGLE collaborations. We also study the binary lens fit parameters previously published by the PLANET and MACHO/GMAN collaborations by using them as initial values for $\\chi^2$ minimization. Fits based on the PLANET model I appear to be in conflict with the GMAN-CTIO data. From our best fit, we find that the lens system has a proper motion of $\\mu = 1.3\\pm 0.2 \\kmsk$ with respect to the source, which implies that the lens sys...

  16. Gravitational Microlensing Events as a Target for the SETI project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2016-09-01

    The detection of signals from a possible extrasolar technological civilization is one of the most challenging efforts of science. In this work, we propose using natural telescopes made of single or binary gravitational lensing systems to magnify leakage of electromagnetic signals from a remote planet that harbors Extraterrestrial Intelligent (ETI) technology. Currently, gravitational microlensing surveys are monitoring a large area of the Galactic bulge to search for microlensing events, finding more than 2000 events per year. These lenses are capable of playing the role of natural telescopes, and, in some instances, they can magnify radio band signals from planets orbiting around the source stars in gravitational microlensing systems. Assuming that the frequency of electromagnetic waves used for telecommunication in ETIs is similar to ours, we propose follow-up observation of microlensing events with radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the Low Frequency Demonstrators, and the Mileura Wide-Field Array. Amplifying signals from the leakage of broadcasting by an Earth-like civilization will allow us to detect them as far as the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Our analysis shows that in binary microlensing systems, the probability of amplification of signals from ETIs is more than that in single microlensing events. Finally, we propose the use of the target of opportunity mode for follow-up observations of binary microlensing events with SKA as a new observational program for searching ETIs. Using optimistic values for the factors of the Drake equation provides detection of about one event per year.

  17. Resolving the Nature of the LMC Microlensing Event LMC-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, A J; Cook, K H; Keller, S C

    2004-04-22

    The authors present the results from an analysis of Hubble Space Telescope High Resolution Camera data for the Large Magellanic Cloud microlensing event MACHO-LMC-5. By determining the parallax and proper motion of this object they find that the lens is an M dwarf star at a distance of 578{sub -53}{sup +65}pc with a proper motion of 21.39 {+-} 0.04 mas/yr. Based on the kinematics and location of this star is it more likely to be part of the Galactic thick disk than thin disk population. They confirm that the microlensing event LMC-5 is a jerk-parallax microlensing event.

  18. Predictions for Microlensing Planetary Events from Core Accretion Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wei ZHU; Penny, Matthew; Mao, Shude; Gould, Andrew; Gendron, Rieul

    2014-01-01

    We conduct the first microlensing simulation in the context of planet formation model. The planet population is taken from the Ida & Lin core accretion model for $0.3M_\\odot$ stars. With $6690$ microlensing events, we find for a simplified Korea Microlensing Telescopes Network (KMTNet) the fraction of planetary events is $2.9\\%$ , out of which $5.5\\%$ show multiple-planet signatures. The number of super-Earths, super-Neptunes and super-Jupiters detected are expected to be almost equal. Our si...

  19. Empirical microlensing event rates predicted by a phenomenological model

    OpenAIRE

    Poleski, R.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the number of microlensing events observed in different parts of the Galactic bulge is a crucial point in planning microlensing experiments. Reliable estimates are especially important if observing resources are scarce, as is the case for space missions: K2, WFIRST, and Euclid. Here we show that the number of detected events can be reliably estimated based on statistics of stars observed in targeted fields. The statistics can be estimated relatively easily, which makes presented me...

  20. Gravitational Microlensing Events as a Target for SETI project

    CERN Document Server

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Detection of signals from a possible extrasolar technological civilization is one of the challenging efforts of science. In this work, we propose using natural telescopes made of single or binary gravitational lensing systems to magnify leakage of electromagnetic signals from a remote planet harbours an Extra Terrestrial Intelligent (ETI) technology. The gravitational microlensing surveys are monitoring a large area of Galactic bulge for searching microlensing events and each year they find more than $2000$ events. These lenses are capable of playing the role of natural telescopes and in some occasions they can magnify signals from planets orbiting around the source stars in the gravitational microlensing systems. Assuming that frequency of electromagnetic waves used for telecommunication in ETIs is similar to ours, we propose follow-up observation of microlensing events with radio telescopes such as Square Kilometre Array (SKA), Low Frequency Demonstrators (LFD) and Mileura Wide-Field Array (MWA). Amplifying...

  1. Starspot induced effects in microlensing events with rotating source star

    CERN Document Server

    Giordano, Mosè; De Paolis, Francesco; Ingrosso, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We consider the effects induced by the presence of hot and cold spots on the source star in the light curves of simulated microlensing events due to either single or binary lenses taking into account the rotation of the source star and the orbital motion of the lens system. Our goal is to study the anomalies induced by these effects on simulated microlensing light curves.

  2. EROS2 microlensing search towards the Magellanic Clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EROS2 is a second generation microlensing experiment operating since mid-1996 at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) at La Silla, Chile. We first recall the results from our two-year microlensing search towards the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), then report on the intensive observation of the caustic crossing event MACHO-SMC98-1 that allowed to locate this double lens. Finally, we present preliminary results from our search towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC); 25 square degrees are being analyzed and two candidates have been found. This allows us to set a new upper limit on the halo mass fraction comprised of compact objects

  3. Parallax and orbital effects in astrometric microlensing with binary sources

    CERN Document Server

    Nucita, A A; Ingrosso, G; Giordano, M; Manni, L

    2016-01-01

    In gravitational microlensing, binary systems may act as lenses or sources. Identifying lens binarity is generally easy especially in events characterized by caustic crossing since the resulting light curve exhibits strong deviations from smooth single-lensing light curve. On the contrary, light curves with minor deviations from a Paczy\\'nski behaviour do not allow one to identify the source binarity. A consequence of the gravitational microlensing is the shift of the position of the multiple image centroid with respect to the source star location - the so called astrometric microlensing signal. When the astrometric signal is considered, the presence of a binary source manifests with a path that largely differs from that expected for single-source events. Here, we investigate the astrometric signatures of binary sources taking into account their orbital motion and the parallax effect due to the Earth motion, which turn out not to be negligible in most cases. We also show that considering the above-mentioned e...

  4. Galactic Bulge Microlensing Events from the MACHO Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C L; Griest, K; Popowski, P; Cook, K H; Drake, A J; Minniti, D; Myer, D G; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Alves, D R; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A C; Bennett, D P; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D L

    2005-06-16

    The authors present a catalog of 450 relatively high signal-to-noise microlensing events observed by the MACHO collaboration between 1993 and 1999. The events are distributed throughout the fields and, as expected, they show clear concentration toward the Galactic center. No optical depth is given for this sample since no blending efficiency calculation has been performed, and they find evidence for substantial blending. In a companion paper they give optical depths for the sub-sample of events on clump giant source stars, where blending is a less significant effect. Several events with sources that may belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy are identified. For these events even relatively low dispersion spectra could suffice to classify these events as either consistent with Sagittarius membership or as non-Sagittarius sources. Several unusual events, such as microlensing of periodic variable source stars, binary lens events, and an event showing extended source effects are identified. They also identify a number of contaminating background events as cataclysmic variable stars.

  5. Photometric, Astrometric and Polarimetric observations of gravitational microlensing events

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2014-01-01

    The gravitational microlensing as a unique astrophysical tool can be used for studying the atmosphere of stars thousands of parsec far from us. This capability results from the bending of light rays in the gravitational field of a lens which can magnify the light of a background source star during the lensing. Moreover, one of properties of this light bending is that the circular symmetry of the source is broken by producing distorted images at either side of the lens position. This property makes the possibility of the observation of the polarization and the light centroid shift of images. Assigning vectors for these two parameters, they are perpendicular to each other in the simple and binary microlensing events, except in the fold singularities. In this work, we investigate the advantages of polarimetric and astrometric observations during microlensing events for (i) studying the surface of the source star and spots on it and (ii) determining the trajectory of source stars with respect to the lens. Finally...

  6. Planetary and Other Short Binary Microlensing Events from the MOA Short Event Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Kamiya, K; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M

    2012-01-01

    We present the analysis of four candidate short duration binary microlensing events from the 2006-2007 MOA Project short event analysis. These events were discovered in an analysis designed to find short timescale single lens events that may be due to free-floating planets. Three of these events are determined to be microlensing events, while the fourth is most likely caused by stellar variability. For each of the three microlensing events, the signal is almost entirely due to a brief caustic feature with little or no lensing attributable mainly to the lens primary. One of these events, MOA-bin-1, is due to a planet, and it is the first example of a planetary event in which stellar host is only detected through binary microlensing effects. The mass ratio, q = 4.9 \\pm 1.4 \\times 10^{-3}, is relatively large for a planetary system, and the star-planet separation, s = 2.10 \\pm 0.05, is the largest ever for a low magnification microlensing event. The planet MOA-bin-1Lb has a mass of m_p = 3.7 \\pm 2.1 M_Jup,and or...

  7. Empirical study of simulated two-planet microlensing events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew; Penny, Matthew [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Mao, Shude [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Gendron, Rieul, E-mail: weizhu@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-10

    We undertake the first study of two-planet microlensing models recovered from simulations of microlensing events generated by realistic multiplanet systems in which 292 planetary events, including 16 two-planet events, were detected from 6690 simulated light curves. We find that when two planets are recovered, their parameters are usually close to those of the two planets in the system most responsible for the perturbations. However, in 1 of the 16 examples, the apparent mass of both detected planets was more than doubled by the unmodeled influence of a third, massive planet. This fraction is larger than but statistically consistent with the roughly 1.5% rate of serious mass errors due to unmodeled planetary companions for the 274 cases from the same simulation in which a single planet is recovered. We conjecture that an analogous effect due to unmodeled stellar companions may occur more frequently. For 7 out of 23 cases in which two planets in the system would have been detected separately, only one planet was recovered because the perturbations due to the two planets had similar forms. This is a small fraction (7/274) of all recovered single-planet models, but almost a third of all events that might plausibly have led to two-planet models. Still, in these cases, the recovered planet tends to have parameters similar to one of the two real planets most responsible for the anomaly.

  8. A giant planet beyond the snow line in microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kains, N.; Street, R.A.; Choi, J.-Y.;

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251. This anomalous event was observed by several survey and follow-up collaborations conducting microlensing observations towards the Galactic bulge. Methods. Based on detailed modelling of the observed light cu...

  9. Detectability of GW150914-like events by gravitational microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Eilbott, Daniel H; Cohn, Jonathan H; Kesden, Michael; King, Lindsay J

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves from stellar-mass binary black holes (BBHs) provided direct evidence of the existence of these systems. These BBHs would have gravitational microlensing signatures that are, due to their large masses and small separations, distinct from single-lens signals. We apply Bayesian statistics to examine the distinguishability of BBH microlensing events from single-lens events under ideal observing conditions, using modern photometric and astrometric capabilities. The parameter space of stellar-mass BBHs is explored to determine what parameter values optimize detectability. Given one year of ideal observations, a source star at the Galactic center, a GW150914-like BBH lens (total mass 65 solar masses, mass ratio 0.8) at half that distance, and an impact parameter of 0.4 Einstein radii, we find that BBH separations down to 0.00682 Einstein radii are detectable. Holding all other parameters constant, impact parameters <= 0.473 Einstein radii result in detectable BBHs with ...

  10. Galactic Distribution of Planets From High-Magnification Microlensing Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Andrew; Yee, Jennifer; Carey, Sean

    2015-10-01

    We will use Spitzer to measure microlens parallaxes for ~14 microlensing events that are high-magnification (as seen from Earth), in order to determine the Galactic distribution of planets. Simultaneous observations from Spitzer and Earth yield parallaxes because they are separated by ~1 AU, which is of order the size of the Einstein radius projected on the observer plane. Hence, Earth and Spitzer see substantially different lightcurves for the same event. These Spitzer parallaxes enable measurements of the distances to the lenses (and their masses), which is a crucial element for measuring the Galactic distribution of planets. High-mag events are exceptionally sensitive to planets: Gould+ (2010) detected 6 planets from 13 high-mag events. However, previously it was believed impossible to measure their parallaxes using Spitzer: scheduling constraints imply a 3-10 day delay from event recognition to first observation, while high-mag events are typically recognized only 1-2 days before peak. By combining aggressive observing protocols, a completely new photometry pipeline, and new mathematical techniques, we successfully measured parallaxes for 7 events with peak magnification A>100 and another ~7 with 50progress toward the ~12 necessary to measure the Galactic distribution. All lightcurves will be reduced using our customized software and then made public (unrestricted use), within 2 months of the completion of observations (as we did for our 2015 observations).

  11. Difference Image Analysis of the OGLE-II bulge data. II. Microlensing events

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, P R; Szymanski, M H; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Zebrun, K

    2001-01-01

    We present a sample of microlensing events discovered in the Difference Image Analysis (DIA) of the OGLE-II images collected during 3 observing seasons, 1997--1999. 4424 light curves pass our criteria on the presence of a brightening episode on top of a constant baseline. Among those, 512 candidate microlensing events were selected visually. We designed an automated procedure, which unambiguously selects up to 237 best events. Including 8 candidate events recovered by other means, a total of 520 light curves are presented in this work. In addition to microlensing events, the larger sample contains certain types of transients, but is also strongly contaminated by artifacts. All 4424 light curves in the weakly filtered group are available electronically, with the intent of showing the gray zone between microlensing events and variable stars, as well as artifacts, to some extent inevitable in massive data reductions. We welcome suggestions for improving the selection process before the full analysis of complete ...

  12. Microlensing by multiple planets in high-magnification events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudi, BS; Sackett, PD

    1998-01-01

    Microlensing is increasingly gaining recognition as a powerful method for the detection and characterization of extrasolar planetary systems. Naively, one might expect that the probability of detecting the influence of more than one planet on any single microlensing light curve would be small. Recen

  13. Observation of the first gravitational microlensing event in a sparse stellar field : the Tago event

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, A; Ayani, K; Fujii, M; Iizuka, R; Itow, Y; Kabumoto, K; Kamiya, K; Kawabata, T; Kawanomoto, S; Kinugasa, K; Koff, R A; Krajci, T; Naito, H; Nogami, D; Narusawa, S; Ohishi, N; Ohnishi, K; Sumi, T; Tsumuraya, F

    2007-01-01

    We report the observation of the first gravitational microlensing event in a sparse stellar field involving the brightest (V=11.4 mag) and closest (~ 1kpc) source star to date. This event was discovered by an amateur astronomer A. Tago on 31 October 2006 as a transient brightening, by ~ 4.5 magnitude during a ~ 15 day period, of a normal A-type star (GSC 3656-1328) in the Cassiopeia constellation. Analysis of both spectroscopic observations and the light curve indicates that this event was caused by gravitational microlensing, rather than an intrinsically variable star. Discovery of this single event over a 30 year period is roughly consistent with the expected microlensing rate for the whole sky down to V = 12 mag stars. However, the probability for finding events with such a high magnification (~ 50) is much smaller by a factor ~ 1/50, which implies that the true event rate may be higher than expected. This discovery indicates the potential of all sky variability surveys, employing frequent sampling by tele...

  14. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  15. The chemical evolution of the Galactic Bulge seen through micro-lensing events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucatello S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Galactic bulges are central to understanding galaxy formation and evolution. Here we report on recent studies using micro-lensing events to obtain spectra of high resolution and moderately high signal-to-noise ratios of dwarf stars in the Galactic bulge. Normally this is not feasible for the faint turn-off stars in the Galactic bulge, but micro-lensing offers this possibility. Elemental abundance trends in the Galactic bulge as traced by dwarf stars are very similar to those seen for dwarf stars in the solar neighbourhood. We discuss the implications of the ages and metallicity distribution function derived for the micro-lensed dwarf stars in the Galactic bulge.

  16. The advantages of using a Lucky Imaging camera for observations of microlensing events

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the advantages of using a Lucky Imaging camera for the observations of potential planetary microlensing events. Our aim is to reduce the blending effect and enhance exoplanet signals in binary lensing systems composed of an exoplanet and the corresponding parent star. We simulate planetary microlensing light curves based on present microlensing surveys and follow-up telescopes where one of them is equipped with a Lucky imaging camera. This camera is used at the Danish $1.54$-m follow-up telescope. Using a specific observational strategy, For an Earth-mass planet in the resonance regime, where the detection probability in crowded-fields is smaller, lucky imaging observations improve the detection efficiency which reaches 2 per cent. Given the difficulty of detecting the signal of an Earth-mass planet in crowded-field imaging even in the resonance regime with conventional cameras, we show that Lucky Imaging can substantially improve the detection efficiency.

  17. The EROS2 search for microlensing events towards the spiral arms: the complete seven season results

    CERN Document Server

    Rahal, Y R; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Beaulieu, J P; Charlot, X; Couchot, F; Coutures, C; Derue, F; Ferlet, R; Fouqué, P; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Graff, D; Gros, M; Haïssinski, J; Hamadache, C; De Kat, J; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Guillou, L Le; Magneville, C; Mansoux, B; Marquette, J B; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Rahvar, S; Rich, J; Spiro, M; Tisserand, P; Vidal-Madjar, A

    2009-01-01

    The EROS-2 project has been designed to search for microlensing events towards any dense stellar field. The densest parts of the Galactic spiral arms have been monitored to maximize the microlensing signal expected from the stars of the Galactic disk and bulge. 12.9 million stars have been monitored during 7 seasons towards 4 directions in the Galactic plane, away from the Galactic center. A total of 27 microlensing event candidates have been found. Estimates of the optical depths from the 22 best events are provided. A first order interpretation shows that simple Galactic models with a standard disk and an elongated bulge are in agreement with our observations. We find that the average microlensing optical depth towards the complete EROS-cataloged stars of the spiral arms is $\\bar{\\tau} =0.51\\pm .13\\times 10^{-6}$, a number that is stable when the selection criteria are moderately varied. As the EROS catalog is almost complete up to $I_C=18.5$, the optical depth estimated for the sub-sample of bright target ...

  18. The microlensing events in Q2237+0305A no case against small masses\\/large sources

    CERN Document Server

    Haugan, S V H

    1995-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the 1988-90 microlensing events in image A of Q2237+0305 reported by Racine (1992) do not exclude microlensing models with very low average mass, making the source radius larger than the projected Einstein radius \\eta_0 (Refsdal and Stabell 1991 1993). This is contrary to what has been claimed by Witt and Mao (1994). Since these events are the best resolved microlensing events recorded in Q2237+0305, further work should not exclude the possibility of a large source when interpreting lightcurve data.

  19. OGLE-III MICROLENSING EVENTS AND THE STRUCTURE OF THE GALACTIC BULGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present and study the largest and most comprehensive catalog of microlensing events ever constructed. The sample of standard microlensing events comprises 3718 unique events from 2001-2009 with 1409 events that had not been detected before in real-time by the Early Warning System of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The search pipeline uses machine learning algorithms to help find rare phenomena among 150 million objects and to derive the detection efficiency. Applications of the catalog can be numerous, from analyzing individual events to large statistical studies of the Galactic mass, kinematics distributions, and planetary abundances. We derive maps of the mean Einstein ring crossing time of events spanning 31 deg2 toward the Galactic center and compare the observed distributions with the most recent models. We find good agreement within the observed region and we see the signature of the tilt of the bar in the microlensing data. However, the asymmetry of the mean timescales seems to rise more steeply than predicted, indicating either a somewhat different orientation of the bar or a larger bar width. The map of events with sources in the Galactic bulge shows a dependence of the mean timescale on the Galactic latitude, signaling an increasing contribution from disk lenses closer to the plane relative to the height of the disk. Our data present a perfect set for comparing and enhancing new models of the central parts of the Milky Way and creating a three-dimensional picture of the Galaxy

  20. RED NOISE VERSUS PLANETARY INTERPRETATIONS IN THE MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2013-BLG-446

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; AlSubai, K. [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Han, C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Greenhill, J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Gould, A.; Batista, V. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); D’Ago, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E.R. Caianiello,” Università di Salerno, Via Ponte Don Melillo, I-84084-Fisciano (Italy); Dominik, M.; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Kains, N. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Snodgrass, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Gttingen (Germany); Steele, I. A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Albrow, M. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020 (New Zealand); Beaulieu, J.-P. [UPMC-CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut dAstrophysique de Paris, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Bennett, D. P., E-mail: c.botzler@auckland.ac.nz, E-mail: p.yock@auckland.ac.nz, E-mail: bennett@nd.edu, E-mail: abe@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: furusawa@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: itow@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Collaboration: RoboNet collaboration; PLANET collaboration; μFUN collaboration; MOA collaboration; MiNDSTEp collaboration; and others

    2015-10-20

    For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing data sets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A{sub max} ∼ 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (∼3M{sub ⨁}) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favor the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.

  1. Red noise versus planetary interpretations in the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-446

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelet, E; Han, C; Greenhill, J; Street, R A; Gould, A

    2015-01-01

    For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing datasets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A_{max} \\sim 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (\\sim 3M_\\oplus ) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favour the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.

  2. Red Noise Versus Planetary Interpretations in the Microlensing Event Ogle-2013-BLG-446

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Han, C.; Greenhill, J.; Street, R. A.; Gould, A.; D'Ago, G.; AlSubai, K.; Dominik, M.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Tsapras, Y.; RoboNet Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Coutures, C.; Dieters, S.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Hill, K.; Marquette, J.-B.; Menzies, J.; Pere, C.; Ranc, C.; Wambsganss, J.; Warren, D.; PLANET Collaboration; de Almeida, L. Andrade; Choi, J.-Y.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Hung, L.-W.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jablonski, F.; Jung, Y. K.; Kaspi, S.; Klein, N.; Lee, C.-U.; Maoz, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Nataf, D.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Polishook, D.; Shin, I.-G.; Shporer, A.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Philpott, L. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; The MOA Collaboration; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Melchiorre, C.; Popovas, A.; Postiglione, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Schmidt, R. W.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, John; Stabile, An.; Surdej, J.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.; The MiNDSTEp Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing data sets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (Amax ˜ 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (˜3M⊕) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favor the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.

  3. UKIRT microlensing surveys as a pathfinder for $WFIRST$: The detection of five highly extinguished low-$|b|$ events

    CERN Document Server

    Shvartzvald, Y; Gould, A; Henderson, C B; Howell, S B; Beichman, C

    2016-01-01

    Optical microlensing surveys are restricted from detecting events near the Galactic plane and center, where the event rate is thought to be the highest, due to the high optical extinction of these fields. In the near-infrared (NIR), however, the lower extinction leads to a corresponding increase in event detections and is a primary driver for the wavelength coverage of the $WFIRST$ microlensing survey. During the 2015 and 2016 bulge observing seasons we conducted NIR microlensing surveys with UKIRT in conjunction with and in support of the $Spitzer$ and $Kepler$ microlensing campaigns. Here we report on five highly extinguished ($A_H=0.81-1.97$), low-Galactic latitude ($-0.98\\le b\\le -0.36$) microlensing events discovered from our 2016 survey. Four of them were monitored with an hourly cadence by optical surveys but were not reported as discoveries, likely due to the high extinction. Our UKIRT surveys and suggested future NIR surveys enable the first measurement of the microlensing event rate in the NIR. This...

  4. Spectroscopic characterisation of microlensing events Towards a new interpretation of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417

    CERN Document Server

    Santerne, A; Ayala, B Rojas; Boisse, I; Schlawin, E; Almenara, J -M; Batista, V; Bennett, D; Díaz, R F; Figueira, P; James, D J; Herter, T; Lillo-Box, J; Marquette, J B; Ranc, C; Santos, N C; Sousa, S G

    2016-01-01

    The microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 is an exceptionally bright lens binary that was predicted to present radial velocity variation at the level of several km/s. Pioneer radial velocity follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the ESO - VLT of this system clearly ruled out the large radial velocity variation, leaving a discrepancy between the observation and the prediction. In this paper, we further characterise the microlensing system by analysing its spectral energy distribution (SED) derived using the UVES spectrum and new observations with the ARCoIRIS (CTIO) near-infrared spectrograph and the Keck adaptive optics instrument NIRC2 in the J, H, and Ks bands. We determine the mass and distance of the stars independently from the microlensing modelling. We find that the SED is compatible with a giant star in the Galactic bulge and a foreground star with a mass of 0.94+/-0.09Msun at a distance of 1.07+/-0.24kpc. We find that this foreground star is likely the lens. Its parameters are not comp...

  5. Interpretation of a short-term anomaly in the gravitational microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-486

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, K.-H.; Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Bond, I. A. [Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 102-904, North Shore Mail Centre, Auckland (New Zealand); Sumi, T.; Koshimoto, N. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bozza, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica " E. R. Caianiello," Università degli Studi di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy); Beaulieu, J.-P. [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Tsapras, Y. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740B Cortona Dr, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Abe, F.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M. [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92-019, Auckland 1001 (New Zealand); Chote, P.; Harris, P. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University, Wellington (New Zealand); Fukui, A. [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2013-11-20

    A planetary microlensing signal is generally characterized by a short-term perturbation to the standard single lensing light curve. A subset of binary-source events can produce perturbations that mimic planetary signals, thereby introducing an ambiguity between the planetary and binary-source interpretations. In this paper, we present the analysis of the microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-486, for which the light curve exhibits a short-lived perturbation. Routine modeling not considering data taken in different passbands yields a best-fit planetary model that is slightly preferred over the best-fit binary-source model. However, when allowed for a change in the color during the perturbation, we find that the binary-source model yields a significantly better fit and thus the degeneracy is clearly resolved. This event not only signifies the importance of considering various interpretations of short-term anomalies, but also demonstrates the importance of multi-band data for checking the possibility of false-positive planetary signals.

  6. Detection Level Enhancement of Gravitational Microlensing Events from the Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Ibrahim, Ichsan; Djamal, Mitra; Kunjaya, Chatief; Jaelani, Anton Timur; Putri, Gerhana Puannandra

    2015-01-01

    In Astronomy, intensity of the source light is expressed in magnitude. Conventionally, magnitude is defined by logarithmic function of the received flux. This relationship is known as Pogson formulae. For received flux with small signal to noise ratio (S/N), the formulae gives large magnitude error. We want to inspect whether using Inverse Hyperbolic Sine function (hereinafter referred to as Asinh magnitude) can give an alternative calculation of magnitudes for small S/N flux and gives better results to represent the magnitude for that region. We study the possibility of increasing detection level of gravitational microlensing from 40 selected microlensing events light curves for 2013 and 2014 season by using Asinh magnitude. We obtained that the use of the Asinh make the events brighter than using logarithmic with average of about 3.42 x 10^-2 magnitude. We find also average of magnitude error difference between logarithmic magnitude and Asinh magnitude to is about 2.21 x 10^-2 magnitude, so we propose a lim...

  7. A Giant Planet beyond the Snow Line in Microlensing Event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251

    CERN Document Server

    Kains, N; Choi, J -Y; Han, C; Udalski, A; Almeida, L A; Jablonski, F; Tristram, P; Jorgensen, U G; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Poleski, R; Kozlowski, S; Pietrukowicz, P; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Skowron, J; Alsubai, K A; Bozza, V; Browne, P; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dodds, P; Dominik, M; Dreizler, S; Fang, X -S; Grundahl, F; Gu, C -H; Hardis, S; Harpsoe, K; Hessman, F V; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Hundertmark, M; Jessen-Hansen, J; Kerins, E; Liebig, C; Lund, M; Lundkvist, M; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Sahu, K C; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Snodgrass, C; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wambsganss, J; Wertz, O; Bajek, D; Bramich, D M; Horne, K; Ipatov, S; Steele, I A; Tsapras, Y; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Chote, P; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Saito, T; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Suzuki, K; Sweatman, W L; Takino, S; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Allen, W; Batista, V; Chung, S -J; Christie, G; DePoy, D L; Drummond, J; Gaudi, B S; Gould, A; Henderson, C; Jung, Y -K; Koo, J -R; Lee, C -U; McCormick, J; McGregor, D; Munoz, J A; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Park, H; Pogge, R W; Shin, I -G; Yee, J; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Beaulieu, J -P; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Corrales, E; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Kane, S R; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Meintjes, P; Menzies, J; Pollard, K R; Williams, A; Wouters, D; Zub, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251. This anomalous event was observed by several survey and follow-up collaborations conducting microlensing observations towards the Galactic Bulge. Based on detailed modelling of the observed light curve, we find that the lens is composed of two masses with a mass ratio q=1.9 x 10^-3. Thanks to our detection of higher-order effects on the light curve due to the Earth's orbital motion and the finite size of source, we are able to measure the mass and distance to the lens unambiguously. We find that the lens is made up of a planet of mass 0.53 +- 0.21,M_Jup orbiting an M dwarf host star with a mass of 0.26 +- 0.11 M_Sun. The planetary system is located at a distance of 2.57 +- 0.61 kpc towards the Galactic Centre. The projected separation of the planet from its host star is d=1.408 +- 0.019, in units of the Einstein radius, which corresponds to 2.72 +- 0.75 AU in physical units. We also identified a competitive model with similar ...

  8. Detection of chromatic microlensing in Q 2237+0305 A

    CERN Document Server

    Mosquera, A M; Mediavilla, E

    2008-01-01

    We present narrow band images of the gravitational lens system Q~2237+0305 made with the Nordic Optical Telescope in eight different filters covering the wavelength interval 3510-8130 \\AA. Using PSF photometry fitting we have derived the difference in magnitude vs. wavelength between the 4 images of Q~2237+0305. At $\\lambda=4110$ \\AA, the wavelength range covered by the Str\\"omgren-v filter coincides with the position and width of the CIV emission line. This allows us to determine the existence of microlensing in the continuum and not in the emission lines for two images of the quasar. Moreover the brightness of image A shows a significant variation with wavelength which can only be explained as consequence of chromatic microlensing. To perform a complete analysis of this chromatic event our observations were used together with OGLE light curves. Both data sets can not be reproduced by the simple phenomenology described under the caustic crossing approximation; using more realistic representations of microlen...

  9. First simultaneous microlensing observations by two space telescopes: $Spitzer$ & $Swift$ reveal a brown dwarf in event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319

    CERN Document Server

    Shvartzvald, Y; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Sumi, T; Street, R A; Novati, S Calchi; Hundertmark, M; Bozza, V; Beichman, C; Bryden, G; Carey, S; Drummond, J; Fausnaugh, M; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C B; Tan, T G; Wibking, B; Pogge, R W; Yee, J C; Zhu, W; Tsapras, Y; Bachelet, E; Dominik, M; Bramich, D M; Cassan, A; Jaimes, R Figuera; Horne, K; Ranc, C; Schmidt, R; Snodgrass, C; Wambsganss, J; Steele, I A; Menzies, J; Mao, S; Poleski, R; Pawlak, M; Szymański, M K; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Kozłowski, S; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pietrukowicz, P; Soszyński, I; Ulaczyk, K; Abe, F; Asakura, Y; Barry, R K; Bennett, D P; Bhattacharya, A; Bond, I A; Freeman, M; Hirao, Y; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Li, M C A; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Fukui, A; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagakane, M; Nishioka, T; Ohnishi, K; Oyokawa, H; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sharan, A; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Yonehara, A; Jørgensen, U G; Burgdorf, M J; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Evans, D F; Hinse, T C; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Mancini, L; Popovas, A; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Peixinho, N; Verma, P; Sbarufatti, B; Kennea, J A; Gehrels, N

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of microlensing events from multiple locations allow for the breaking of degeneracies between the physical properties of the lensing system, specifically by exploring different regions of the lens plane and by directly measuring the "microlens parallax". We report the discovery of a 30-55$M_J$ brown dwarf orbiting a K dwarf in microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-1319. The system is located at a distance of $\\sim$5 kpc toward the Galactic bulge. The event was observed by several ground-based groups as well as by $Spitzer$ and $Swift$, allowing the measurement of the physical properties. However, the event is still subject to an 8-fold degeneracy, in particular the well-known close-wide degeneracy, and thus the projected separation between the two lens components is either $\\sim$0.25 AU or $\\sim$45 AU. This is the first microlensing event observed by $Swift$, with the UVOT camera. We study the region of microlensing parameter space to which $Swift$ is sensitive, finding that while for thi...

  10. Peculiar Transverse Velocities of Galaxies from Quasar Microlensing. Tentative Estimate of the Peculiar Velocity Dispersion at $z\\sim 0.5$

    CERN Document Server

    Mediavilla, E; Munoz, J A; Battaner, E

    2016-01-01

    We propose to use the flux variability of lensed quasar images induced by gravitational microlensing to measure the transverse peculiar velocity of lens galaxies over a wide range of redshift. Microlensing variability is caused by the motions of the observer, the lens galaxy (including the motion of the stars within the galaxy), and the source; hence, its frequency is directly related to the galaxy's transverse peculiar velocity. The idea is to count time-event rates (e.g., peak or caustic crossing rates) in the observed microlensing light curves of lensed quasars that can be compared with model predictions for different values of the transverse peculiar velocity. To compensate for the large time-scale of microlensing variability we propose to count and model the number of events in an ensemble of gravitational lenses. We develop the methodology to achieve this goal and apply it to an ensemble of 17 lensed quasar systems. In spite of the shortcomings of the available data, we have obtained tentative estimates...

  11. Properties of microlensing events by wide separation planets with a moon

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Sun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of microlensing events caused by planetary systems where planets with a moon are widely separated from their host stars. From this investigation, we find that the moon feature generally appears as an very short-duration perturbation on the smooth asymmetric light curve of the lensing event induced by the wide separation planet; thus it can be easily discriminated from the planet feature responsible for the overall asymmetric light curve. For typical Galactic lensing events with the Einstein radius of $\\sim 2$ AU, the asymmetry of the light curves due to bound planets can be noticed up to $\\sim 20$AU. We also find that the perturbations of the wide planetary systems become dominated by the moon as the projected star-planet separation increases, and eventually the light curves of events produced by the systems appear as the single lensing light curve of the planet itself with a very short-duration perturbation induced by the moon, which is a representative light curve of the event ...

  12. A New Nonplanetary Interpretation of the Microlensing Event OGLE-2013-BLG-0723

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cheongho; Bennett, David P.; Udalski, Andrzej; Jung, Youn Kil

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the discovery of a Venus-mass planet orbiting a brown-dwarf host in a binary system was reported from the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0723. We reanalyze the event considering the possibility of other interpretations. From this, we find a new solution where the lens is composed of two bodies, in contrast to the three-body solution of the previous analysis. The new solution better explains the observed light curve than the previous solution with Δχ 2 ∼ 202, suggesting that the new solution is a correct model for the event. From the estimation of the physical parameters based on the new interpretation, we find that the lens system is composed of two low-mass stars with ∼0.2 M ⊙ and ∼0.1 M ⊙ and located at a distance of ∼3 kpc. The fact that the physical parameters correspond to those of the most common lens population located at a distance with a large lensing probability further supports the likelihood of the new interpretation. Considering that two dramatically different solutions can approximately explain the observed light curve, the event suggests the need for carefully testing all possible lens-system geometries.

  13. Studying the microlenses mass function from statistical analysis of the caustic concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediavilla, T; Ariza, O [Departamento de Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa, Universidad de Cadiz, Avda de Ramon Puyol, s/n 11202 Algeciras (Spain); Mediavilla, E [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Avda Via Lactea s/n, La Laguna (Spain); Munoz, J A, E-mail: teresa.mediavilla@ca.uca.es, E-mail: octavio.ariza@uca.es, E-mail: emg@iac.es [Departamento de Astrofisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-09-22

    The statistical distribution of caustic crossings by the images of a lensed quasar depends on the properties of the distribution of microlenses in the lens galaxy. We use a procedure based in Inverse Polygon Mapping to easily identify the critical and caustic curves generated by a distribution of stars in the lens galaxy. We analyze the statistical distributions of the number of caustic crossings by a pixel size source for several projected mass densities and different mass distributions. We compare the results of simulations with theoretical binomial distributions. Finally we apply this method to the study of the stellar mass distribution in the lens galaxy of QSO 2237+0305.

  14. Determining the Physical Lens Parameters of the Binary Gravitational Microlensing Event MOA-2009-BLG-016

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, K -H; Bond, I A; Miyake, N; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Botzler, C S; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Hayashi, F; Hearnshaw, J B; Hosaka, S; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Korpela, A; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Makita, S; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nishimoto, K; Ohnishi, K; Perrott, Y C; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sako, T; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Sweatman, W L; P.,; Tristram, J; Wada, K; L., P C M Yock D; Depoy,; Gaudi, B S; Gould, A; Lee, C -U; Pogge, R W

    2010-01-01

    We report the result of the analysis of the light curve of the microlensing event MOA-2009-BLG-016. The light curve is characterized by a short-duration anomaly near the peak and an overall asymmetry. We find that the peak anomaly is due to a binary companion to the primary lens and the asymmetry of the light curve is explained by the parallax effect caused by the acceleration of the observer over the course of the event due to the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we detect evidence for the effect of the finite size of the source near the peak of the event, which allows us to measure the angular Einstein radius of the lens system. The Einstein radius combined with the microlens parallax allows us to determine the total mass of the lens and the distance to the lens. We identify three distinct classes of degenerate solutions for the binary lens parameters, where two are manifestations of the previously identified degeneracies of close/wide binaries and positive/negative impact parameters...

  15. A New Non-Planetary Interpretation of the Microlensing Event OGLE-2013-BLG-0723

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Cheongho; Udalski, Andrzej; Jung, Youn Kil

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the discovery of a Venus-mass planet orbiting a brown-dwarf host in a binary system was reported from the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0723. We reanalyze the event considering the possibility of other interpretations. From this, we find a new solution where the lens is composed of 2 bodies in contrast to the 3-body solution of the previous analysis. The new solution better explains the observed light curve than the previous solution with $\\Delta\\chi^2\\sim 202$, suggesting that the new solution is a correct model for the event. From the estimation of the physical parameters based on the new interpretation, we find that the lens system is composed of two low-mass stars with $\\sim 0.2\\ M_\\odot$ and $\\sim 0.1\\ M_\\odot$ and located at a distance $\\sim 3$ kpc. The fact that the physical parameters correspond to those of the most common lens population located at a distance with a large lensing probability further supports the likelihood of the new interpretation. Considering that two d...

  16. Properties of Microlensing Events by Wide-separation Planets with a Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Ryu, Yoon-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the properties of microlensing events caused by planetary systems where planets with a moon are widely separated from their host stars. From this investigation, we find that the moon feature generally appears as a very short-duration perturbation on the smooth asymmetric light curve of the lensing event induced by the wide-separation planet; thus it can be easily discriminated from the planet feature responsible for the overall asymmetric light curve. For typical Galactic lensing events with an Einstein radius of ˜2 au, the asymmetry of the light curves due to bound planets can be noticed up to ˜20 au. We also find that the perturbations of wide planetary systems become dominated by the moon as the projected star-planet separation increases, and eventually the light curves of events produced by such systems appear as the single lensing light curve of the planet itself with a very short-duration perturbation induced by the moon, which is a representative light curve of the event induced by a star and a planet, except on the Einstein timescale of the planet. We also study the effect of a finite source star on the moon feature in wide planetary lensing events. From this study, we find that when the lunar caustic is sufficiently separated from the planetary caustic, the lower limit on the ratio of the size of the lunar caustic to the source radius causing a ≥5% lunar deviation depends mostly on the projected planet-moon separation regardless of the moon/star mass ratio, and it decreases as the planet-moon separation becomes smaller or larger than the planetary Einstein radius.

  17. Statistical searches for microlensing events in large, non-uniformly sampled time-domain surveys: A test using palomar transient factory data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agüeros, Marcel A. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 W 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Fournier, Amanda P. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Street, Rachel [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Inc., 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Ofek, Eran O. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Covey, Kevin R. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Levitan, David; Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason, E-mail: adrn@astro.columbia.edu [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    Many photometric time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, which set the cadence with which fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several sub-surveys are conducted in parallel, leading to non-uniform sampling over its ∼20,000 deg{sup 2} footprint. While the median 7.26 deg{sup 2} PTF field has been imaged ∼40 times in the R band, ∼2300 deg{sup 2} have been observed >100 times. We use PTF data to study the trade off between searching for microlensing events in a survey whose footprint is much larger than that of typical microlensing searches, but with far-from-optimal time sampling. To examine the probability that microlensing events can be recovered in these data, we test statistics used on uniformly sampled data to identify variables and transients. We find that the von Neumann ratio performs best for identifying simulated microlensing events in our data. We develop a selection method using this statistic and apply it to data from fields with >10 R-band observations, 1.1 × 10{sup 9} light curves, uncovering three candidate microlensing events. We lack simultaneous, multi-color photometry to confirm these as microlensing events. However, their number is consistent with predictions for the event rate in the PTF footprint over the survey's three years of operations, as estimated from near-field microlensing models. This work can help constrain all-sky event rate predictions and tests microlensing signal recovery in large data sets, which will be useful to future time-domain surveys, such as that planned with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  18. Discovery of a Gas giant Planet in Microlensing Event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, A; Bond, I A; Sumi, T; Udalski, A; Street, R; Tsapras, Y; Abe, F; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Itow, Y; Li, M C A; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Philpott, L C; Rattenbury, N; Saito, T; Sharan, A; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Szymański, M K; Kubiac, M; Pietrzyński, G; Soszyński, I; Poleski, R; Kozlowski, S; Pietrukowicz, P; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Bachelet, E; Bramich, D M; Browne, P; Dominik, M; Horne, K; Hundertmark, M; Ipatov, S; Kains, N; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the planetary microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-1760, which shows a strong light curve signal due to the presence of a Jupiter mass-ratio planet. One unusual feature of this event is that the source star is quite blue, with $V-I = 1.48\\pm 0.08$. This is marginally consistent with source star in the Galactic bulge, but it could possibly indicate a young source star in the far side of the disk. Assuming a bulge source, we perform a Bayesian analysis assuming a standard Galactic model, and this indicates that the planetary system resides in or near the Galactic bulge at $D_L = 6.9 \\pm 1.1 $ kpc. It also indicates a host star mass of $M_* = 0.51 \\pm 0.44 M_\\odot$, a planet mass of $m_p = 180 \\pm 110 M_\\oplus$, and a projected star-planet separation of $a_\\perp = 1.7\\pm 0.3\\,$AU. The lens-source relative proper motion is $\\mu_{\\rm rel} = 6.5\\pm 1.1$ mas/yr. The lens (and stellar host star) is predicted to be very faint, so it is most likely that it can detected only when the lens and sour...

  19. Estimating Finite Source Effects in Microlensing Events due to Free-Floating Planets with the Euclid Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindita Hamolli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years free-floating planets (FFPs have drawn a great interest among astrophysicists. Gravitational microlensing is a unique and exclusive method for their investigation which may allow obtaining precious information about their mass and spatial distribution. The planned Euclid space-based observatory will be able to detect a substantial number of microlensing events caused by FFPs towards the Galactic bulge. Making use of a synthetic population algorithm, we investigate the possibility of detecting finite source effects in simulated microlensing events due to FFPs. We find a significant efficiency for finite source effect detection that turns out to be between 20% and 40% for a FFP power law mass function index in the range [0.9, 1.6]. For many of such events it will also be possible to measure the angular Einstein radius and therefore constrain the lens physical parameters. These kinds of observations will also offer a unique possibility to investigate the photosphere and atmosphere of Galactic bulge stars.

  20. Estimating Finite Source Effects in Microlensing Events due to Free-Floating Planets with the Euclid Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Hamolli, Lindita; De Paolis, Francesco; Nucita, Achille A

    2015-01-01

    In recent years free-loating planets (FFPs) have drawn a great interest among astrophysicists. Gravitational microlensing is a unique and exclusive method for their investigation which may allow obtaining precious information about their mass and spatial distribution. The planned Euclid space-based observatory will be able to detect a substantial number of microlensing events caused by FFPs towards the Galactic bulge. Making use of a synthetic population algorithm, we investigate the possibility of detecting finite source effects in simulated microlensing events due to FFPs. We find a significant efficiency for finite source effect detection that turns out to be between 20% and 40% for a FFP power law mass function index in the range [0.9, 1.6]. For many of such events it will also be possible to measure the angular Einstein radius and therefore constrain the lens physical parameters. These kinds of observations will also offer a unique possibility to investigate the photosphere and atmosphere of Galactic bul...

  1. Confirmation of the Planetary Microlensing Signal and Star and Planet Mass Determinations for Event OGLE-2005-BLG-169

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, D P; Anderson, J; Bond, I A; Anderson, N; Barry, R; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; DePoy, D L; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B S; Gilbert, E; Gould, A; Pfeifle, R; Pogge, R W; Suzuki, D; Terry, S; Udalski, A

    2015-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations of the source and lens stars for planetary microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-169, which confirm the relative proper motion prediction due to the planetary light curve signal observed for this event. This (and the companion Keck result) provide the first confirmation of a planetary microlensing signal, for which the deviation was only 2%. The follow-up observations determine the flux of the planetary host star in multiple passbands and remove light curve model ambiguity caused by sparse sampling of part of the light curve. This leads to a precise determination of the properties of the OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb planetary system. Combining the constraints from the microlensing light curve with the photometry and astrometry of the HST/WFC3 data, we find star and planet masses of M_* = 0.69+- 0.02 M_solar and m_p = 14.1 +- 0.9 M_earth. The planetary microlens system is located toward the Galactic bulge at a distance of D_L = 4.1 +- 0.4 kpc, a...

  2. Detecting Planets Through Microlensing

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    1997-01-01

    More than 100 microlensing events have been detected during the last ~4 years, most of them towards the Galactic Bulge. Since the line of sight towards the Bulge passes through the disk and the Bulge itself, the known stars towards the Bulge play a dominant role as gravitational lenses. If these stars have planets around them, then the signature of the planets can be seen as sharp, extra peaks on the microlensing light curves. Frequent, continuous monitoring of the on-going microlensing event...

  3. Constraint on Additional Planets in Planetary Systems Discovered through the Channel of High-magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, I -G; Choi, J -Y; Hwang, K -H; Jung, Y K; Park, H

    2015-01-01

    High-magnification gravitational microlensing events provide an important channel of detecting planetary systems with multiple giants located at their birth places. In order to investigate the potential existence of additional planets, we reanalyze the light curves of the eight high-magnification microlensing events for each of which a single planet was previously detected. The analyzed events include OGLE-2005-BLG-071, OGLE-2005-BLG-169, MOA-2007-BLG-400, MOA-2008-BLG-310, MOA-2009-BLG-319, MOA-2009-BLG-387, MOA-2010-BLG-477, and MOA-2011-BLG-293. We find that including an additional planet improves fits with $\\Delta\\chi^2 < 80$ for seven out of eight analyzed events. For MOA-2009-BLG-319, the improvement is relatively big with $\\Delta\\chi^2 \\sim 143$. From inspection of the fits, we find that the improvement of the fits is attributed to systematics in data. Although no clear evidence of additional planets is found, it is still possible to constrain the existence of additional planets in the parameter spa...

  4. A new type of Ambiguity in the Planet and Binary Interpretations of Central Perturbations of High-magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, J.-Y; Shin, I.-G; Han, C.;

    2012-01-01

    High-magnification microlensing events provide an important channel to detect planets. Perturbations near the peak of a high-magnification event can be produced either by a planet or a binary companion. It is known that central perturbations induced by both types of companions can be generally di...

  5. Characterizing Lenses and Lensed Stars of High-magnification Single-lens Gravitational Microlensing Events with Lenses Passing over Source Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, J.-Y.; Shin, I.-G.; Park, S.-Y.;

    2012-01-01

    We present the analysis of the light curves of nine high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-...

  6. Statistical Searches for Microlensing Events in Large, Non-Uniformly Sampled Time-Domain Surveys: A Test Using Palomar Transient Factory Data

    CERN Document Server

    Agüeros, Adrian M Price-Whelan Marcel A; Street, Rachel; Ofek, Eran O; Covey, Kevin R; Levitan, David; Laher, Russ R; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Many photometric time-domain surveys are driven by specific goals, such as searches for supernovae or transiting exoplanets, which set the cadence with which fields are re-imaged. In the case of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), several sub-surveys are conducted in parallel, leading to non-uniform sampling over its $\\sim$$20,000 \\mathrm{deg}^2$ footprint. While the median $7.26 \\mathrm{deg}^2$ PTF field has been imaged $\\sim$40 times in \\textit{R}-band, $\\sim$$2300 \\mathrm{deg}^2$ have been observed $>$100 times. We use PTF data to study the trade-off between searching for microlensing events in a survey whose footprint is much larger than that of typical microlensing searches, but with far-from-optimal time sampling. To examine the probability that microlensing events can be recovered in these data, we test statistics used on uniformly sampled data to identify variables and transients. We find that the von Neumann ratio performs best for identifying simulated microlensing events in our data. We develop a ...

  7. Polarimetric microlensing of circumstellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    We study the benefits of polarimetry observations of microlensing events to detect and characterize circumstellar disks around the microlensed stars located at the Galactic bulge. These disks which are unresolvable from their host stars make a net polarization effect due to their projected elliptical shapes. Gravitational microlensing can magnify these signals and make them be resolved. The main aim of this work is to determine what extra information about these disks can be extracted from polarimetry observations of microlensing events in addition to those given by photometry ones. Hot disks which are closer to their host stars are more likely to be detected by microlensing, owing to more contributions in the total flux. By considering this kind of disks, we show that although the polarimetric efficiency for detecting disks is similar to the photometric observation, but polarimetry observations can help to constraint the disk geometrical parameters e.g. the disk inner radius and the lens trajectory with resp...

  8. Detection of planets in extremely weak central perturbation microlensing events via next-generation ground-based surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Koo, Jae-Rim

    2014-01-01

    Even though the recently discovered high-magnification event MOA-2010-BLG-311 had complete coverage over the peak, confident planet detection did not happen due to extremely weak central perturbations (fractional deviations of $\\lesssim 2\\%$). For confident detection of planets in extremely weak central perturbation (EWCP) events, it is necessary to have both high cadence monitoring and high photometric accuracy better than those of current follow-up observation systems.The next-generation ground-based observation project, KMTNet (Korea Microlensing Telescope Network), satisfies the conditions. We estimate the probability of occurrence of EWCP events with fractional deviations of $\\leq 2\\%$ in high-magnification events and the efficiency of detecting planets in the EWCP events using the KMTNet. From this study, we find that the EWCP events occur with a frequency of $> 50\\%$ in the case of $\\lesssim 100\\ M_{\\rm E}$ planets with separations of $0.2\\ {\\rm AU} \\lesssim d \\lesssim 20\\ {\\rm AU}$. We find that for m...

  9. Microlensing as a possible probe of event-horizon structure in quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Tomozeiu, Mihai; Rabold, Manuel; Saha, Prasenjit; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    In quasars which are lensed by galaxies, the point-like images sometimes show sharp and uncorrelated brightness variations (microlensing). These brightness changes are associated with the innermost region of the quasar passing through a complicated pattern of caustics produced by the stars in the lensing galaxy. In this paper, we study whether the universal properties of optical caustics could enable extraction of shape information about the central engine of quasars. We present a toy model with a crescent-shaped source crossing a fold caustic. The silhouette of a black hole over an accretion disk tends to produce roughly crescent sources. When a crescent-shaped source crosses a fold caustic, the resulting light curve is noticeably different from the case of a circular luminosity profile or Gaussian source. With good enough monitoring data, the crescent parameters, apart from one degeneracy, can be recovered.

  10. Microlensing events by Proxima Centauri in 2014 and 2016: Opportunities for mass determination and possible planet detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Kailash C.; Bond, Howard E.; Anderson, Jay [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dominik, Martin, E-mail: ksahu@stsci.edu, E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu, E-mail: heb11@psu.edu, E-mail: md35@st-andrews.ac.uk [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-20

    We have found that Proxima Centauri, the star closest to our Sun, will pass close to a pair of faint background stars in the next few years. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained in 2012 October, we determine that the passage close to a mag 20 star will occur in 2014 October (impact parameter 1.''6), and to a mag 19.5 star in 2016 February (impact parameter 0.''5). As Proxima passes in front of these stars, the relativistic deflection of light will cause shifts in the positions of the background stars of ∼0.5 and 1.5 mas, respectively, readily detectable by HST imaging, and possibly by Gaia and ground-based facilities such as the Very Large Telescope. Measurement of these astrometric shifts offers a unique and direct method to measure the mass of Proxima. Moreover, if Proxima has a planetary system, the planets may be detectable through their additional microlensing signals, although the probability of such detections is small. With astrometric accuracies of 0.03 mas (achievable with HST spatial scanning), centroid shifts caused by Jovian planets are detectable at separations of up to 2.''0 (corresponding to 2.6 AU at the distance of Proxima), and centroid shifts by Earth-mass planets are detectable within a small band of 8 mas (corresponding to 0.01 AU) around the source trajectories. Jovian planets within a band of about 28 mas (corresponding to 0.036 AU) around the source trajectories would produce a brightening of the source by >0.01 mag and could hence be detectable. Estimated timescales of the astrometric and photometric microlensing events due to a planet range from a few hours to a few days, and both methods would provide direct measurements of the planetary mass.

  11. A super-jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the light curve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a 2.73 ± 0.43 M J planet orbiting a 0.44 ± 0.07 M ☉ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is 4.97 ± 0.29 kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is 3.45 ± 0.26 AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.

  12. A super-jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapras, Y.; Street, R. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Bozza, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica " E. R. Caianiello," Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II n. 132, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Gould, A. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Dominik, M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Beaulieu, J.-P. [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Udalski, A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Jørgensen, U. G. [Niels Bohr Institute, Astronomical Observatory, Juliane Maries vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Sumi, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Bramich, D. M.; Kains, N. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Ipatov, S.; Alsubai, K. A. [Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Snodgrass, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Steele, I. A. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Collaboration: RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; and others

    2014-02-10

    We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the light curve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a 2.73 ± 0.43 M {sub J} planet orbiting a 0.44 ± 0.07 M {sub ☉} early M-type star. The distance to the lens is 4.97 ± 0.29 kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is 3.45 ± 0.26 AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.

  13. A Super-Jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406

    CERN Document Server

    Tsapras, Y; Street, R A; Han, C; Bozza, V; Gould, A; Dominik, M; Beaulieu, J -P; Udalski, A; Jørgensen, U G; Sumi, T; Bramich, D M; Browne, P; Horne, K; Hundertmark, M; Ipatov, S; Kains, N; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Alsubai, K A; Andersen, J M; Novati, S Calchi; Damerdji, Y; Diehl, C; Elyiv, A; Giannini, E; Hardis, S; Harpsøe, K; Hinse, T C; Juncher, D; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Liebig, C; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Vilela, C; Kozłowski, J Wambsganss S; Kubiak, M; Pietrukowicz, P; Pietrzyński, G; Poleski, R; Skowron, J; Soszyński, I; Szymański, M K; Ulaczyk, K; Albrow, Łukasz Wyrzykowski M D; Bachelet, E; Barry, R; Batista, V; Bhattacharya, A; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Corrales, E; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Kane, S R; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Pollard, K R; Williams, A; Wouters, D; Christie, G; DePoy, D L; Dong, S; Drummond, J; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C B; Hwang, K H; Jung, Y K; Kavka, A; Koo, J -R; Lee, C -U; Maoz, D; Monard, L A G; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Park, H; Pogge, R W; Porritt, I; Shin, I -G; Shvartzvald, Y; Tan, T G; Yee, J C; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Fukunaga, D; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Namba, S; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Tsurumi, N; Wada, K; Yamai, N; Yonehara, P C M Yock A

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the lightcurve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a $2.73\\pm 0.43\\ M_{\\rm J}$ planet orbiting a $0.44\\pm 0.07\\ M_{\\odot}$ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is $4.97\\pm 0.29$\\ kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is $3.45\\pm 0.26$ AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.

  14. A Super-Jupiter Orbiting a Late-type Star: A Refined Analysis of Microlensing Event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapras, Y.; Choi, J.-Y.; Street, R. A.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Ipatov, S.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; RoboNet Collaboration; Alsubai, K. A.; Andersen, J. M.; Calchi Novati, S.; Damerdji, Y.; Diehl, C.; Elyiv, A.; Giannini, E.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Juncher, D.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Liebig, C.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Skottfelt, J.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Tregloan-Reed, J.; Vilela, C.; Wambsganss, J.; MiNDSTEp Collaboration; Skowron, J.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Barry, R.; Batista, V.; Bhattacharya, A.; Brillant, S.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J.-B.; Menzies, J.; Père, C.; Pollard, K. R.; Zub, M.; PLANET Collaboration; Christie, G.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hwang, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kavka, A.; Koo, J.-R.; Lee, C.-U.; Maoz, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Shin, I.-G.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Tan, T. G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Abe, F.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Fukunaga, D.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Namba, S.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sweatman, W. L.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Tsurumi, N.; Wada, K.; Yamai, N.; Yock, P. C. M.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the light curve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a 2.73 ± 0.43 M J planet orbiting a 0.44 ± 0.07 M ⊙ early M-type star. The distance to the lens is 4.97 ± 0.29 kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is 3.45 ± 0.26 AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.

  15. The LMC Microlensing Events Originate in the Warped and Flaring Milky Way Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, N W; Turner, M S; Binney, J

    1997-01-01

    The MACHO and EROS Collaborations, monitoring millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), have seen at least fourteen instances of microlensing. The simplest interpretation is that about one third of the halo of our own Milky Way galaxy exists in the form of objects of around 0.5 solar mass. There are problems with this interpretation. A normal stellar population of 0.5 solar mass stars should be visible. The remaining candidate for the lenses is a population of white dwarfs. But, the precursor population must have enriched the interstellar medium with metals, in conflict with current population II abundance ratios. Moreover, the mass budget is very high, because the efficiency of making white dwarfs is only around ten per cent. Here, we propose a more conventional, but at the moment more speculative, explanation. Some of the lenses are stars in the disk of the Milky Way a few kiloparsecs from us. They lie along the line of sight to the LMC because of warping and flaring of the Galactic disk. Micro...

  16. OGLE-2014-BLG-0257L: A Microlensing Brown Dwarf Orbiting a Low-mass M Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Han, C; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Bozza, V; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Poleski, R; Kozłowski, S; Pietrukowicz, P; Skowron, J; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report the discovery of a binary composed of a brown dwarf and a low-mass M dwarf from the observation of the microlensing event OGLE-2014-BLG-0257. Resolution of the very short-lasting caustic crossing combined with the detection of subtle continuous deviation in the lensing light curve induced by the Earth's orbital motion enable us to precisely measure both the Einstein radius \\theta_E and the lens parallax pi_E, which are the two quantities needed to unambiguously determine the mass and distance to the lens. It is found that the companion is a substellar brown dwarf with a mass 0.036 +/- 0.005 Msun (37.7 +/- 5.2\\ M_J) and it is orbiting an M dwarf with a mass 0.19 +/- 0.02 Msun. The binary is located at a distance 1.25 +/- 0.13 kpc toward the Galactic bulge and the projected separation between the binary components is 0.61 +/- 0.07 AU. The separation scaled by the mass of the host is 3.2 AU/Msun. Under the assumption that separations scale with masses, then, the discovered brown dwarf is...

  17. Microlensing Event MOA-2007-BLG-400: Exhuming the Buried Signature of a Cool, Jovian-Mass Planet

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Subo; Gould, A; Kozlowski, Szymon; Miyake, N; Gaudi, B S; Bennett, D P; Abe, F; Gilmore, A C; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Korpela, A; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagaya, M; Ohnishi, K; Okumura, T; Perrott, Y C; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sako, T; Sato, S; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Sweatman, W; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M; Bolt, G; Christie, G W; De Poy, D L; Han, C; Janczak, J; Lee, C -U; Mallia, F; McCormick, J; Monard, B; Maury, A; Natusch, T; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Santallo, R; Stanek, K Z; Udalski, A; Kubiak, M; Szymanski, M K; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K

    2008-01-01

    We report the detection of the cool, Jovian-mass planet MOA-2007-BLG-400Lb. The planet was detected in a high-magnification microlensing event (with peak magnification A_max = 628) in which the primary lens transited the source, resulting in a dramatic smoothing of the peak of the event. The angular extent of the region of perturbation due to the planet is significantly smaller than the angular size of the source, and as a result the planetary signature is also smoothed out by the finite source size. Thus the deviation from a single-lens fit is broad and relatively weak (~ few percent). Nevertheless, we demonstrate that the planetary nature of the deviation can be unambiguously ascertained from the gross features of the residuals, and detailed analysis yields a fairly precise planet/star mass ratio of q = 0.0026+/-0.0004, in accord with the large significance (\\Delta\\chi^2=1070) of the detection. The planet/star projected separation is subject to a strong close/wide degeneracy, leading to two indistinguishabl...

  18. Microlensing Parallax for Observers in Heliocentric Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Novati, S Calchi

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the ongoing Spitzer observational campaign, and the forecoming K2 one, we revisit, working in an heliocentric reference frame, the geometrical foundation for the analysis of the microlensing parallax, as measured with the simultaneous observation of the same microlensing event from two observers with relative distance of order AU. For the case of observers at rest we discuss the well known fourfold microlensing parallax degeneracy and determine an equation for the degenerate directions of the lens trajectory. For the case of observers in motion, we write down an extension of the Gould (1994) relationship between the microlensing parallax and the observable quantities and, at the same time, we highlight the functional dependence of these same quantities from the timescale of the underlying microlensing event. Furthermore, through a series of examples, we show the importance of taking into account the motion of the observers to correctly recover the parameters of the underlying microlensing event. ...

  19. OGLE-2016-BLG-0596Lb: High-Mass Planet From High-Magnification Pure-Survey Microlensing Event

    CERN Document Server

    Mróz, P; Udalski, A; Poleski, R; Skowron, J; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pawlak, M; Albrow, M D; Cha, S -M; Chung, S -J; Jung, Y K; Kim, D -J; Kim, S -L; Lee, C -U; Lee, Y; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Ryu, Y -H; Shin, I -G; Yee, J C; Zhu, W; Gould, A

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a high mass-ratio planet $q=0.012$, i.e., 13 times higher than the Jupiter/Sun ratio. The host mass is not presently measured but can be determined or strongly constrained from adaptive optics imaging. The planet was discovered in a small archival study of high-magnification events in pure-survey microlensing data, which was unbiased by the presence of anomalies. The fact that it was previously unnoticed may indicate that more such planets lie in archival data and could be discovered by similar systematic study. In order to understand the transition from predominantly survey+followup to predominately survey-only planet detections, we conduct the first analysis of these detections in the observational $(s,q)$ plane. Here $s$ is projected separation in units of the Einstein radius. We find some evidence that survey+followup is relatively more sensitive to planets near the Einstein ring, but that there is no statistical difference in sensitivity by mass ratio.

  20. A possible binary system of a stellar remnant in the high magnification gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2007-BLG-514

    CERN Document Server

    Miyake, N; Sumi, T; Bennett, D P; Dong, S; Street, R A; Greenhill, J; Bond, I A; Gould, A; Kubiak, M; Szymanski, M K; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Abe, F; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Holderness, S; Itow, Y; Korpela, A; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagayama, T; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sako, T; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M; Allen, W; Christie, G W; DePoy, D L; Gaudi, B S; Han, C; Lee, C -U; McCormick, J; Monard, B; Natusch, T; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Allan, A; Bode, M; Bramich, D M; Clay, N; Dominik, M; Horne, K D; Kains, N; Mottram, C; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Albrow, M D; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J P; Brillant, S; Burgdorf, M; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Cook, K H; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouque, P; Jorgensen, U G; Kane, S; Kubas, D; Marquette, J B; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Wambsganss, J; Williams, A; Zub, M

    2012-01-01

    We report the extremely high magnification (A > 1000) binary microlensing event OGLE-2007-BLG-514. We obtained good coverage around the double peak structure in the light curve via follow-up observations from different observatories. The binary lens model that includes the effects of parallax (known orbital motion of the Earth) and orbital motion of the lens yields a binary lens mass ratio of q = 0.321 +/- 0.007 and a projected separation of s = 0.072 +/- 0.001$ in units of the Einstein radius. The parallax parameters allow us to determine the lens distance D_L = 3.11 +/- 0.39 kpc and total mass M_L=1.40 +/- 0.18 M_sun; this leads to the primary and secondary components having masses of M_1 = 1.06 +/- 0.13 M_sun and M_2 = 0.34 +/- 0.04 M_sun, respectively. The parallax model indicates that the binary lens system is likely constructed by the main sequence stars. On the other hand, we used a Bayesian analysis to estimate probability distributions by the model that includes the effects of xallarap (possible orbi...

  1. Revisiting the microlensing event OGLE 2012-BLG-0026: A solar mass star with two cold giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, J P; Batista, V; Fukui, A; Marquette, J -B; Brillant, S; Cole, A A; Rogers, L A; Sumi, T; Abe, F; Bhattacharya, A; Koshimoto, N; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Han, C; Gould, A; Pogge, R; Yee, J

    2016-01-01

    Two cold, gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main sequence star in the galactic disk have previously been discovered in the high magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026 (Han et al. 2013). Here we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, $H=16.39 \\pm 0.08$. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B\\&C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3m H band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of a $\\sim 4-9$ Gyr lens star of $\\rm M_{lens} = 1.06 \\pm 0.05~\\,M_\\odot$ at a distance of $\\rm D_{lens} = 4.0 \\pm 0.3~$kpc, orbited by two giant plan...

  2. Real-time detection of gravitational microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, M R; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A; Bennett, D P; Cook, K H; Freeman, K C; Griest, K; Guern, J A; Lehner, M; Marshall, S L; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Reiss, D; Rodgers, A W; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Welch, D

    1995-01-01

    Real-time detection of microlensing has moved from proof of concept in 1994 to a steady stream of events this year. Global dissemination of these events by the MACHO and OGLE collaborations has made possible intensive photometric and spectroscopic followup from widely dispersed sites confirming the microlensing hypothesis. Improved photometry and increased temporal resolution from followup observations greatly increases the possibility of detecting deviations from the standard point-source, point-lens, inertial motion microlensing model. These deviations are crucial in understanding individual lensing systems by breaking the degeneracy between lens mass, position and velocity. We report here on GMAN (Global Microlensing Alert Network), the coordinated followup of MACHO alerts.

  3. A POSSIBLE BINARY SYSTEM OF A STELLAR REMNANT IN THE HIGH-MAGNIFICATION GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENT OGLE-2007-BLG-514

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the extremely high-magnification (A > 1000) binary microlensing event OGLE-2007-BLG-514. We obtained good coverage around the double peak structure in the light curve via follow-up observations from different observatories. The binary lens model that includes the effects of parallax (known orbital motion of the Earth) and orbital motion of the lens yields a binary lens mass ratio of q = 0.321 ± 0.007 and a projected separation of s = 0.072 ± 0.001 in units of the Einstein radius. The parallax parameters allow us to determine the lens distance DL = 3.11 ± 0.39 kpc and total mass ML = 1.40 ± 0.18 M☉; this leads to the primary and secondary components having masses of M1 = 1.06 ± 0.13 M☉ and M2 = 0.34 ± 0.04 M☉, respectively. The parallax model indicates that the binary lens system is likely constructed by the main-sequence stars. On the other hand, we used a Bayesian analysis to estimate probability distributions by the model that includes the effects of xallarap (possible orbital motion of the source around a companion) and parallax (q = 0.270 ± 0.005, s = 0.083 ± 0.001). The primary component of the binary lens is relatively massive, with M1 = 0.9+4.6–0.3 M☉ and it is at a distance of DL = 2.6+3.8–0.9 kpc. Given the secure mass ratio measurement, the companion mass is therefore M2 = 0.2+1.2–0.1 M☉. The xallarap model implies that the primary lens is likely a stellar remnant, such as a white dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole.

  4. Revisiting the Microlensing Event OGLE 2012-BLG-0026: A Solar Mass Star with Two Cold Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Bennett, D. P.; Batista, V.; Fukui, A.; Marquette, J.-B.; Brillant, S.; Cole, A. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Sumi, T.; Abe, F.

    2016-01-01

    Two cold gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main-sequence star in the galactic disk were previously discovered in the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. Here, we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, H = 16.39 +/- 0.08. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B and C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3 m H-band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of an approximately 4-9 Gyr lens star of M(sub lens) = 1.06 +/- 0.05 solar mass at a distance of D(sub lens) = 4.0 +/- 0.3 kpc, orbited by two giant planets of 0.145 +/- 0.008 M(sub Jup) and 0.86 +/- 0.06 M(sub Jup), with projected separations of 4.0 +/- 0.5 au and 4.8 +/- 0.7 au, respectively. Because the lens is brighter than the source star by 16 +/- 8% in H, with no other blend within one arcsec, it will be possible to estimate its metallicity using subsequent IR spectroscopy with 8-10 m class telescopes. By adding a constraint on the metallicity it will be possible to refine the age of the system.

  5. First microlensing candidates from the MEGA survey of M 31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JTA; Kuijken, K; Crotts, APS; Sackett, PD; Sutherland, WJ; Uglesich, RR; Baltz, EA; Cseresnjes, P; Gyuk, G; Widrow, LM

    2004-01-01

    We present the first M 31 candidate microlensing events from the Microlensing Exploration of the Galaxy and Andromeda (MEGA) survey. MEGA uses several telescopes to detect microlensing towards the nearby Andromeda galaxy, M 3 1, in order to establish whether massive compact objects are a significant

  6. The 24-hour night shift : Astronomy from microlensing monitoring networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sackett, PD; Brainerd, TG; Kochanek, CS

    2001-01-01

    Scores of on-going microlensing events are now announced yearly by the microlensing discovery teams OGLE, MACHO and EROS. These early warning systems have allowed other international microlensing networks to focus considerable resources on intense photometric and occasionally spectroscopic - monitor

  7. Frequency of Solar-Like Systems and of Ice and Gas Giants Beyond the Snow Line from High-Magnification Microlensing Events in 2005-2008

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, A; Gaudi, B S; Udalski, A; Bond, I A; Greenhill, J; Street, R A; Dominik, M; Sumi, T; Szymanski, M K; Han, C

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurement of planet frequency beyond the "snow line" for planet/star mass-ratios[-4.5200) microlensing events during 2005-8. The sample host stars have typical mass M_host 0.5 Msun, and detection is sensitive to planets over a range of projected separations (R_E/s_max,R_E*s_max), where R_E 3.5 AU sqrt(M_host/Msun) is the Einstein radius and s_max (q/5e-5)^{2/3}, corresponding to deprojected separations ~3 times the "snow line". Though frenetic, the observations constitute a "controlled experiment", which permits measurement of absolute planet frequency. High-mag events are rare, but the high-mag channel is efficient: half of high-mag events were successfully monitored and half of these yielded planet detections. The planet frequency derived from microlensing is a factor 7 larger than from RV studies at factor ~25 smaller separations [2

  8. A NEw Type of Ambiguity in the Planet and Binary Interpretations of Central Perturbations of High-Magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, J -Y; Han, C; Udalski, A; Sumi, T; Gould, A; Bozza, V; Dominik, M; Fouqué, P; Horne, K; \\, M; Szymański, K; Kubiak, M; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Skowron, J; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Chote, P; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Kobara, S; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohmori, K; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Suzuki, K; Sweatman, W L; Takino, S; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Bramich, D M; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Street, R A; Tsapras, Y; Alsubai, K A; Browne, P; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dodds, P; Dreizler, S; Fang, X -S; Grundahl, F; Gu, C -H; Hardis, S; Harpsøe, K; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Hundertmark, M; Jessen-Hansen, J; Jørgensen, U G; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Liebig, C; Lund, M; Lunkkvist, M; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wambsganss, J; Wertz, O; Almeida, L A; Batista, V; Christie, G; DePoy, D L; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C; Jablonski, F; Lee, C -U; McCormick, J; McGregor, D; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Park, S -Y; Pogge, R W; Tan, T -G; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Beaulieu, J -P; Brillant, S; Cassan, A; Cole, A A; Corrales, E; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Menzies, J W; Sahu, K C; Zub, M

    2012-01-01

    High-magnification microlensing events provide an important channel to detect planets. Perturbations near the peak of a high-magnification event can be produced either by a planet or a binary companion. It is known that central perturbations induced by both types of companions can be generally distinguished due to the basically different magnification pattern around caustics. In this paper, we present a case of central perturbations for which it is difficult to distinguish the planetary and binary interpretations. The peak of a lensing light curve affected by this perturbation appears to be blunt and flat. For a planetary case, this perturbation occurs when the source trajectory passes the negative perturbation region behind the back end of an arrowhead-shaped central caustic. For a binary case, a similar perturbation occurs for a source trajectory passing through the negative perturbation region between two cusps of an astroid-shaped caustic. We demonstrate the degeneracy for 2 high-magnification events of O...

  9. Diffraction effects in microlensing of Q2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Jaroszynski, M; Jaroszynski, Michal; Paczynski, B

    1995-01-01

    Geometrical optics provides an excellent description for quasar images crossing caustics which are formed by gravitational microlensing of objects like Q2237+0305. Within this approximation the source size can be estimated from the maximum magnification reached at caustic crossings. We evaluate the limitations imposed by diffraction on caustics using the formalism developed by Ulmer & Goodman (1995). Close to a caustic a new characteristic length, smaller that the Fresnel length, enters the problem, limiting the angular resolution to about 0.2 pico arcsecond, or equivalently about 3*10^9 cm at the source. To achieve this resolution the brightness must be monitored at time intervals of a few seconds. If a significant fraction of quasar luminosity comes from sources smaller than those limits then interference effects would make the observed intensity oscillate, in a close analogy with a two slit experiment. The characteristic period of such oscillations is expected to be about one tenth of a minute. If such...

  10. Astrophysical applications of gravitational microlensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shude Mao

    2012-01-01

    Since the first discovery of microlensing events nearly two decades ago,gravitational microlensing has accumulated tens of TBytes of data and developed into a powerful astrophysical technique with diverse applications.The review starts with a theoretical overview of the field and then proceeds to discuss the scientific highlights.(1) Microlensing observations toward the Magellanic Clouds rule out the Milky Way halo being dominated by MAssive Compact Halo Objects (MACHOs).This confirms most dark matter is non-baryonic,consistent with other observations.(2) Microlensing has discovered about 20 extrasolar planets (16 published),including the first two Jupiter-Saturn like systems and the only five "cold Neptunes" yet detected.They probe a different part of the parameter space and will likely provide the most stringent test of core accretion theory of planet formation.(3) Microlensing provides a unique way to measure the mass of isolated stars,including brown dwarfs and normal stars.Half a dozen or so stellar mass black hole candidates have also been proposed.(4) High-resolution,target-of-opportunity spectra of highly-magnified dwarf stars provide intriguing "age" determinations which may either hint at enhanced helium enrichment or unusual bulge formation theories.(5) Microlensing also measured limb-darkening profiles for close to ten giant stars,which challenges stellar atmosphere models.(6) Data from surveys also provide strong constraints on the geometry and kinematics of the Milky Way bar (through proper motions); the latter indicates predictions from current models appear to be too anisotropic compared with observations.The future of microlensing is bright given the new capabilities of current surveys and forthcoming new telescope networks from the ground and from space.Some open issues in the field are identified and briefly discussed.

  11. A new type of Ambiguity in the Planet and Binary Interpretations of Central Perturbations of High-magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, J.-Y; Shin, I.-G; Han, C.;

    2012-01-01

    High-magnification microlensing events provide an important channel to detect planets. Perturbations near the peak of a high-magnification event can be produced either by a planet or a binary companion. It is known that central perturbations induced by both types of companions can be generally...... distinguished due to the essentially different magnification pattern around caustics. In this paper, we present a case of central perturbations for which it is difficult to distinguish the planetary and binary interpretations. The peak of a lensing light curve affected by this perturbation appears to be blunt...... and flat. For a planetary case, this perturbation occurs when the source trajectory passes the negative perturbation region behind the back end of an arrowhead-shaped central caustic. For a binary case, a similar perturbation occurs for a source trajectory passing through the negative perturbation region...

  12. The First Heroic Decade of Microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, N W

    2003-01-01

    We review the fundamentals of vanilla and exotic microlensing. Deviations from the standard form of an achromatic, time-symmetric lightcurve can be caused by the parallax and xallarap effects, finite source size effects and binarity. The pioneering experiments of MACHO, EROS and OGLE reported first candidate events exactly ten years ago, so now is an opportune moment to summarise the achievements of the First Heroic Decade. Three applications are reviewed in detail -- namely (i) searches for compact dark objects in the Galactic halo, (ii) probes of the baryonic mass distribution in the inner Galaxy and the Andromeda Galaxy and (iii) studies of the limb darkening of source stars. Finally, we suggest four projects for the Second Heroic Decade -- (i) K band microlensing towards the Bulge, (ii) pixel lensing towards the low luminosity spiral galaxy M33, (iii) polarimetry of on-going microlensing events and (iv) astrometric microlensing with the GAIA satellite.

  13. K2 Microlensing and Campaign 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Campaign 9 of K2 will observe a contiguous 3.7 deg^2 region of the Galactic bulge in order to search for microlensing events and measure microlens parallaxes. It will also perform targeted follow-up of approximately 50 microlensing events spread throughout the Kepler focal plane. Parallax measurements are a critical ingredient for measurements of both the lens mass and distance, which contribute to our understanding of the formation of cold exoplanets, and the formation of planets as a function of Galactic environment. Additionally, as the first un-targeted, space-based microlensing survey, K2C9 offers us the first chance to measure the masses and kinematics of a large population of free-floating planet candidates, whose large abundance has been a puzzle since their discovery.I will review the scientific goals of the K2C9 survey, which will be well underway, and report on the ongoing activity of the K2 Campaign 9 Microlensing Science Team and the wider microlensing community, with a focus on the progress that has been made towards analyzing K2 data in crowded fields.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Discovery of a Probable Caustic-Crossing Event in the MACS1149 Galaxy Cluster Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Rodney, Steven; Diego, Jose Maria; Zitrin, Adi; Broadhurst, Tom; Selsing, Jonatan; Balestra, Italo; Benito, Alberto Molino; Bradac, Marusa; Bradley, Larry; Brammer, Gabriel; Cenko, Brad; Christensen, Lise; Coe, Dan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Foley, Ryan; Frye, Brenda; Graham, Melissa; Graur, Or; Grillo, Claudio; Hjorth, Jens; Howell, Andy; Jauzac, Mathilde; Jha, Saurabh; Kaiser, Nick; Kawamata, Ryota; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lotz, Jennifer; Matheson, Thomas; McCully, Curtis; Merten, Julian; Nonino, Mario; Oguri, Masamune; Richard, Johan; Riess, Adam; Rosati, Piero; Schmidt, Kasper Borello; Sharon, Keren; Smith, Nathan; Strolger, Lou; Treu, Tommaso; Wang, Xin; Weiner, Ben; Williams, Liliya; Zheng, Weikang

    2016-05-01

    While monitoring the MACS1149 (z = 0.54) galaxy cluster as part of the RefsdalRedux program (PID 14199; PI Kelly) with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 IR camera, we have detected a rising transient that appears to be coincident ( Target-of-opportunity optical follow-up imaging in several ACS and WFC3 bands with the FrontierSN program (PID 14208; PI Rodney) has revealed that its rest-frame ultraviolet through optical spectrum may be reasonably well fit with that of a B star at z=1.49 exhibiting a strong Balmer break.

  15. Microlensing, Brown Dwarfs and GAIA

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, N W

    2014-01-01

    The GAIA satellite can precisely measure the masses of nearby brown dwarfs and lower main sequence stars by the microlensing effect. The scientific yield is maximised if the microlensing event is also followed with ground-based telescopes to provide densely sampled photometry. There are two possible strategies. First, ongoing events can be triggered by photometric or astrometric alerts by GAIA. Second, events can be predicted using known high proper motion stars as lenses. This is much easier, as the location and time of an event can be forecast. Using the GAIA source density, we estimate that the sample size of high proper motion ($>300$ mas yr$^{-1}$) brown dwarfs needed to provide predictable events during the 5 year mission lifetime is surprisingly small, only of the order of a hundred. This is comparable to the number of high proper motion brown dwarfs already known from the work of the UKIDSS Large Area Survey and the all-sky WISE satellite. Provided the relative parallax of the lens and the angular Ein...

  16. Stellar rotation effects in polarimetric microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the polarization signal in microlensing events of hot stars is larger than that of main-sequence stars. Most hot stars rapidly rotate around their stellar axes. The stellar rotation makes ellipticity and gravity-darkening effects which break the spherical symmetry of the source shape and the circular symmetry of the source surface brightness respectively. Hence, it causes a net polarization signal for the source star. This polarization signal should be considered in polarimetry microlensing of fast rotating stars. For moderate rotating stars, lensing can magnify or even characterize small polarization signals due to the stellar rotation through polarimetry observations. The gravity-darkening effect due to a rotating source star makes asymmetric perturbations in polarimetry and photometry microlensing curves whose maximum happens when the lens trajectory crosses the projected position of the rotation pole on the sky plane. The stellar ellipticity makes a time shift (i) in the position of ...

  17. Abundance of Terrestrial Planets by Microlensing

    OpenAIRE

    Yock, Philip

    2000-01-01

    Terrestrial planets may be detected using the gravitational microlensing technique. This was demonstrated in the high magnification event MACHO-98-BLG-35. Observing strategies aimed at measuring the abundance of terrestrial planets are discussed, using both existing telescopes and planned telescopes.

  18. Discovering Extrasolar Planets with Microlensing Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambsganss, J.

    2016-06-01

    An astronomical survey is commonly understood as a mapping of a large region of the sky, either photometrically (possibly in various filters/wavelength ranges) or spectroscopically. Often, catalogs of objects are produced/provided as the main product or a by-product. However, with the advent of large CCD cameras and dedicated telescopes with wide-field imaging capabilities, it became possible in the early 1990s, to map the same region of the sky over and over again. In principle, such data sets could be combined to get very deep stacked images of the regions of interest. However, I will report on a completely different use of such repeated maps: Exploring the time domain for particular kinds of stellar variability, namely microlens-induced magnifications in search of exoplanets. Such a time-domain microlensing survey was originally proposed by Bohdan Paczynski in 1986 in order to search for dark matter objects in the Galactic halo. Only a few years later three teams started this endeavour. I will report on the history and current state of gravitational microlensing surveys. By now, routinely 100 million stars in the Galactic Bulge are monitored a few times per week by so-called survey teams. All stars with constant apparent brightness and those following known variability patterns are filtered out in order to detect the roughly 2000 microlensing events per year which are produced by stellar lenses. These microlensing events are identified "online" while still in their early phases and then monitored with much higher cadence by so-called follow-up teams. The most interesting of such events are those produced by a star-plus-planet lens. By now of order 30 exoplanets have been discovered by these combined microlensing surveys. Microlensing searches for extrasolar planets are complementary to other exoplanet search techniques. There are two particular advantages: The microlensing method is sensitive down to Earth-mass planets even with ground-based telecopes, and it

  19. Removing the Microlensing Blending-Parallax Degeneracy Using Source Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Assef, R J; Afonso, C; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Beaulieu, J P; Charlot, X; Coutures, C; Ferlet, R; Fouqué, P; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Graff, D; Gros, M; Haïssinski, J; Hamadache, C; De Kat, J; Le Guillou, Laurent; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Marquette, J B; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Rahal, Y R; Rich, J; Spiro, M; Tisserand, P; Vidal-Madjar, A; Vigroux, L; Zylberajch, S; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Griest, K; Vandehei, T; Welch, D L; Udalski, A; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Wyrzykowski, L

    2006-01-01

    Microlensing event MACHO 97-SMC-1 is one of the rare microlensing events for which the source is a variable star, simply because most variable stars are systematically eliminated from microlensing studies. Using observational data for this event, we show that the intrinsic variability of a microlensed star is a powerful tool to constrain the nature of the lens by breaking the degeneracy between the microlens parallax and the blended light. We also present a statistical test for discriminating the location of the lens based on the \\chi^2 contours of the vector \\Lambda, the inverse of the projected velocity. We find that while SMC self lensing is somewhat favored, neither location can be ruled out with good confidence.

  20. Searching gravitational microlensing events in the galaxy spiral arms by EROS II; Recherche d'evenements de microlentille gravitationnelle dans les bras spiraux de la galaxie avec EROS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derue, Frederic [Paris-11 Univ., 91 Orsay (France)

    1999-04-15

    The EROS II experiment is searching for microlensing events due to compact massive objects passing through the line-of-sight of luminous stars. These objects are candidates to explain the baryonic component of Dark Matter in our Galaxy. EROS II was dedicated to different lines-of-sight: Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, Galactic Centre and 4 directions towards the Spiral Arms of the Galaxy. This thesis presents the first search for microlensing towards these last lines-of-sight (about 9 million stars). Simple criteria based on the search for significant fluctuations allowed one to discover a low noise sample of 7 candidates to the microlensing effect, with an average timescale of 50 days. A detailed analysis of the light curve of one candidate allows us to give a confidence interval on its mass 2.7 x 10{sup -3} < M/M{sub 0} < 0.84 at 95% CL. The amplification curve of another candidate shows a modulation which can be interpreted as a microlensing effect acting on a binary source, with an orbital period of P{sub 0} = 50 {+-} 3 days. To improve the knowledge of the distance of the target stars, we have combined observations of EROS II with bibliographic sources on associations of stars linked with the spiral arm features, and we have developed a program to find variable stars. Ten cepheids have thus been found. Distances obtained with different methods are in rough agreement with each other. The average optical depth measured towards the four directions is {tau}-bar = 0.45{sub 0.11}{sup +0.23} x 10{sup -6}. It is compatible with expectations from simple galactic models. The long duration of most events favours interpretation of lensing by objects belonging to the disk instead of the halo. It also seems that some events due to bulge lenses have influenced measurements towards the line-of-sight which is closest to the Galactic Centre. Observation continue towards spiral arms. More accurate measurements should be obtained with increase of statistics, allowing one to

  1. Gravitational microlensing: a method for detecting halo dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Jetzer, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown by Paczy\\'nski that gravitational microlensing is potentially a useful method for detecting the dark constituents of the halo of our galaxy, if their mass lies in the approximate domain $10^{-6} < M/M_{\\odot} < 10^{-1}$. Microlensing observations now under way monito several millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud and in the Galactic Bulge. Here I discuss the main features of the microlensing events: in particular their rates and probability, taking also into account...

  2. Blending in Gravitational Microlensing Experiments: Source Confusion And Related Systematics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Martin C; Mao, Shude; Sumi, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing surveys target very dense stellar fields in the local group. As a consequence the microlensed source stars are often blended with nearby unresolved stars. The presence of `blending' is a cause of major uncertainty when determining the lensing properties of events towards the Galactic centre. After demonstrating empirical cases of blending we utilize Monte Carlo simulations to probe the effects of blending. We generate artificial microlensing events using an HST luminosity function convolved to typical ground-based seeing, adopting a range of values for the stellar density and seeing. We find that a significant fraction of bright events are blended, contrary to the oft-quoted assumption that bright events should be free from blending. We probe the effect that this erroneous assumption has on both the observed event timescale distribution and the optical depth, using realistic detection criteria relevent to the different surveys. Importantly, under this assumption the latter quantity ...

  3. The Angstrom Project Alert System: real-time detection of extragalactic microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Darnley, M J; Newsam, A; Duke, J P; Gould, A; Han, C; Ibrahimov, M A; Im, M; Jeon, Y B; Karimov, R G; Lee, C U; Park, B G

    2006-01-01

    The Angstrom Project is undertaking an optical survey of stellar microlensing events across the bulge region of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) using a distributed network of two-meter class telescopes. The Angstrom Project Alert System (APAS) has been developed to identify in real time candidate microlensing and transient events using data from the Liverpool and Faulkes North robotic telescopes. This is the first time that real-time microlensing discovery has been attempted outside of the Milky Way and its satellite galaxies. The APAS is designed to enable follow-up studies of M31 microlensing systems, including searches for gas giant planets in M31. Here we describe the APAS and we present a few example light curves obtained during its commissioning phase which clearly demonstrate its real-time capability to identify microlensing candidates as well as other transient sources.

  4. Microlensing modulation by binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Dubath, F; Durrer, R; Dubath, Florian; Gasparini, Maria Alice; Durrer, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    We compute the effect of the lens quadrupole on microlensing. The time dependence of the quadrupole can lead to specific modulations of the amplification signal. We study especially binary system lenses in our galaxy. The modulation is observable if the rotation period of the system is smaller than the time over which the amplification is significant and if the impact parameter of the passing light ray is sufficiently close to the Einstein radius so that the amplification is very large. Observations of this modulation can reveal important information on the quadrupole and thus on the gravitational radiation emitted by the lens.

  5. Testing LMC Microlensing Scenarios: The Discrimination Power of the SuperMACHO Microlensing Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, A; Stubbs, C; Becker, A C; Miknaitis, G A; Miceli, A; Covarrubias, R; Hawley, S L; Smith, C; Suntzeff, N B; Olsen, K; Prieto, J; Hiriart, R; Welch, D L; Cook, K; Nikolaev, S; Proctor, G; Clocchiatti, A; Minniti, D; Garg, A; Challis, P; Keller, S C; Scmidt, B P

    2004-05-27

    Characterizing the nature and spatial distribution of the lensing objects that produce the observed microlensing optical depth toward the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remains an open problem. They present an appraisal of the ability of the SuperMACHO Project, a next-generation microlensing survey pointed toward the LMC, to discriminate between various proposed lensing populations. they consider two scenarios: lensing by a uniform foreground screen of objects and self-lensing of LMC stars. The optical depth for ''screen-lensing'' is essentially constant across the face of the LMC; whereas, the optical depth for self-lensing shows a strong spatial dependence. they have carried out extensive simulations, based upon actual data obtained during the first year of the project, to assess the SuperMACHO survey's ability to discriminate between these two scenarios. In the simulations they predict the expected number of observed microlensing events for each of their fields by adding artificial stars to the images and estimating the spatial and temporal efficiency of detecting microlensing events using Monte-Carlo methods. They find that the event rate itself shows significant sensitivity to the choice of the LMC luminosity function shape and other parameters, limiting the conclusions which can be drawn from the absolute rate. By instead determining the differential event rate across the LMC, they can decrease the impact of these systematic uncertainties rendering the conclusions more robust. With this approach the SuperMACHO Project should be able to distinguish between the two categories of lens populations and provide important constraints on the nature of the lensing objects.

  6. Ground-based Microlensing Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Andrew; Bennett, David P

    2007-01-01

    Microlensing is a proven extrasolar planet search method that has already yielded the detection of four exoplanets. These detections have changed our understanding of planet formation ``beyond the snowline'' by demonstrating that Neptune-mass planets with separations of several AU are common. Microlensing is sensitive to planets that are generally inaccessible to other methods, in particular cool planets at or beyond the snowline, very low-mass (i.e. terrestrial) planets, planets orbiting low-mass stars, free-floating planets, and even planets in external galaxies. Such planets can provide critical constraints on models of planet formation, and therefore the next generation of extrasolar planet searches should include an aggressive and well-funded microlensing component. When combined with the results from other complementary surveys, next generation microlensing surveys can yield an accurate and complete census of the frequency and properties of planets, and in particular low-mass terrestrial planets.

  7. Bulge Microlensing Optical Depth from EROS 2 observations

    CERN Document Server

    Afonso, C; Alard, C; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Bauer, F; Beaulieu, J P; Blanc, G

    2003-01-01

    We present a measurement of the microlensing optical depth toward the Galactic bulge based on the analysis of 15 contiguous1 square degrees fields centered on (l=2.5 deg, b=-4.0 deg) and containing 1.42 million clump-giant stars (belonging to the extended clump area) monitored during almost three bulge seasons by EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres). We find a microlensing optical depth towards the bulge tau_bulge=0.94 +/- 0.29 10^-6 averaged over all fields, based on 16 microlensing events with clump giants as sources. This value is substantially below several other determinations by the MACHO and OGLE groups and is more in agreement with what is expected from axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric bulge models.

  8. The Fourth Microlensing Planet Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Yock, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The fourth microlensing planet, otherwise known as OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb, was discovered by a collaboration of US, NZ, Polish and UK astronomers in 2005-2006. Recently the results were confirmed by the Hubble Space Telescope and by the Keck Observatory. OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb is the first microlensing planet to receive such confirmation. Its discovery and confirmation are described here in an historical context.

  9. Ground-based Microlensing Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, Andrew; Gaudi, B. Scott; Bennett, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Microlensing is a proven extrasolar planet search method that has already yielded the detection of four exoplanets. These detections have changed our understanding of planet formation ``beyond the snowline'' by demonstrating that Neptune-mass planets with separations of several AU are common. Microlensing is sensitive to planets that are generally inaccessible to other methods, in particular cool planets at or beyond the snowline, very low-mass (i.e. terrestrial) planets, planets orbiting low...

  10. MOA-2011-BLG-322 - a "second generation survey" microlensing planet

    CERN Document Server

    Shvartzvald, Y; Kaspi, S; Sumi, T; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Bennett, D P; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Fukunaga, D; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Namba, S; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Suzuki, K; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Skowron, J; Kozłowski, S; M.,; Szymański, K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzyński, G; Soszyński, I; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Poleski, R; Pietrukowicz, P

    2013-01-01

    Global "second-generation" microlensing surveys aim to discover and characterize extrasolar planets and their frequency, by means of round-the-clock high-cadence monitoring of a large area of the Galactic bulge, in a controlled experiment. We report the discovery of a giant planet in microlensing event MOA-2011-BLG-322. This moderate-magnification event, which displays a clear anomaly induced by a second lensing mass, was inside the footprint of our second-generation microlensing survey, involving MOA, OGLE and the Wise Observatory. The event was observed by the survey groups only, without prompting alerts that could have led to any dedicated follow-up observations. Fitting a microlensing model to the data, we find that the time scale of the event was t_E=23.4+/-0.9 days, and the mass ratio between the lens star and its companion is q=0.024+/-0.002. Finite-source effects are marginally detected, and upper limits on them help break some of the degeneracy in the system parameters. Using a Bayesian analysis that...

  11. Extended-Source Effect and Chromaticity in Two-Point-Mass Microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Pejcha, Ondrej

    2007-01-01

    We explore the sensitivity of two-point-mass gravitational microlensing to the extended nature of the source star and the related sensitivity to its limb darkening. We demonstrate that the sensitive region, usually considered to be limited to a source-diameter-wide band along the caustic, is strongly expanded near cusps, most prominently along their outer axis. In the case of multi-component caustics, facing cusps may form a region with a non-negligible extended-source effect spanning the gap between them. We demonstrate that for smaller sources the size of the sensitive region extending from a cusp measured in units of source radii increases, scaling as the inverse cube root of the radius. Taking into account the extent of different sensitivity contours, we show that for a Galactic Bulge giant and a lens with a multi-component caustic the probability of encountering at least a 1% extended-source effect may be more than two times higher than the probability of caustic crossing. We derive analytical expression...

  12. Microlensing Binaries Discovered through High-magnification Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Gould, A.; Choi, J.-Y;

    2012-01-01

    Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of eight binary-lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturba......Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of eight binary-lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010...... of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is q ~ 0.1, making the companion of the lens a strong brown dwarf candidate....

  13. Probing the Spatial Distribution of Extrasolar Planets with Gravitational Microlensing

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Cheongho; Kang, Young Woon

    2003-01-01

    Under the current microlensing planet search strategy of monitoring events caused by stellar-mass lenses, only planets located within a narrow region of separations from central stars can be effectively detected. However, with the dramatic increase of the monitoring frequency, two additional populations of free-floating and wide-orbit planets can be detected. In this paper, we investigate the lensing properties of events caused by wide-orbit planets and find that the light curves of a signifi...

  14. Free-floating planets from core accretion theory: microlensing predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Sizheng; Ida, Shigeru; Zhu, Wei; Lin, Douglas N C

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the microlensing event rate and typical time-scales for the free-floating planet (FFP) population that is predicted by the core accretion theory of planet formation. The event rate is found to be ~$1.8\\times 10^{-3}$ of that for the stellar population. While the stellar microlensing event time-scale peaks at around 20 days, the median time-scale for FFP events (~0.1 day) is much shorter. Our values for the event rate and the median time-scale are significantly smaller than those required to explain the \\cite{Sum+11} result, by factors of ~13 and ~16, respectively. The inclusion of planets at wide separations does not change the results significantly. This discrepancy may be too significant for standard versions of both the core accretion theory and the gravitational instability model to explain satisfactorily. Therefore, either a modification to the planet formation theory is required, or other explanations to the excess of short-time-scale microlensing events are needed. Our predictions can be t...

  15. Microlensing Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Gould, A.;

    2012-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing......-278/OGLE-2011-BLG-012N. Among them, we are able to confirm that the companions of the lenses of MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149 are brown dwarfs by determining the mass of the lens based on the simultaneous measurement of the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured...... masses of the brown dwarf companions are 0.02 ± 0.01 M⊙ and 0.019 ± 0.002 M⊙ for MOA-2011-BLG-104/OGLE-2011-BLG-0172 and MOA-2011-BLG-149, respectively, and both companions are orbiting low-mass M dwarf host stars. More microlensing brown dwarfs are expected to be detected as the number of lensing events...

  16. Polarization in microlensing towards the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Ingrosso, G; De Paolis, F; Jetzer, Ph; Nucita, A A; Strafella, F; Zakharov, A F

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing, when finite size source effects are relevant, provides an unique tool for the study of source star stellar atmospheres through an enhancement of a characteristic polarization signal. This is due to the differential magnification induced during the crossing of the source star. In this paper we consider a specific set of reported highly magnified, both single and binary exoplanetary systems, microlensing events towards the Galactic bulge and evaluate the expected polarization signal. To this purpose, we consider several polarization models which apply to different types of source stars: hot, late type main sequence and cool giants. As a result we compute the polarization signal P,which goes up to P=0.04% for late type stars and up to a few percent for cool giants, depending on the underlying physical polarization processes and atmosphere model parameters. Given a I band magnitude at maximum magnification of about 12, and a typical duration of the polarization signal up to 1 day, we c...

  17. Microlensing by Kuiper, Oort, and Free-Floating Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing is generally thought to probe planetary systems only out to a few Einstein radii. Microlensing events generated by bound planets beyond about 10 Einstein radii generally do not yield any trace of their hosts, and so would be classified as free floating planets (FFPs). I show that it is already possible, using adaptive optics (AO), to constrain the presence of potential hosts to FFP candidates at separations comparable to the Oort Cloud. With next-generation telescopes, planets at Kuiper-Belt separations can be probed. Next generation telescopes will also permit routine vetting for all FFP candidates, simply by obtaining second epochs 4-8 years after the event. At present, the search for such hosts is restricted to within the "confusion limit" of theta_confus ~ 250 mas, but future WFIRST observations will allow one to probe beyond this confusion limit as well.

  18. Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Calchi Novati, S.; Gould, A.; Udalski, A.; Han, C.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Ranc, C.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Poleski, R.; Bozza, V.; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Porritt, I.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; SPITZER Team; Pawlak, M.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; OGLE Group; Choi, J.-Y.; Park, H.; Jung, Y. K.; Shin, I.-G.; Albrow, M. D.; Park, B.-G.; Kim, S.-L.; Lee, C.-U.; Cha, S.-M.; Kim, D.-J.; Lee, Y.; KMTNET Group; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; WISE Group; Hundertmark, M.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Cassan, A.; Dominik, M.; Bachelet, E.; Dong, Subo; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Horne, K.; Mao, S.; Menzies, J.; Schmidt, R.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Wambsganss, J.; RoboNeT Team; Skottfelt, J.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Peixinho, N.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Tronsgaard, R.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEP Group

    2016-07-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 Spitzer microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is very likely a brown dwarf (BD). Assuming that the source star lies behind the same amount of dust as the Bulge red clump, we find the lens is a 45 ± 7 {M}{{J}} BD at 5.9 ± 1.0 kpc. The lens of of the second event, OGLE-2015-BLG-0763, is a 0.50 ± 0.04 {M}ȯ star at 6.9 ± 1.0 kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.

  19. Gravitational Microlensing by the Ellis Wormhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, F.

    2010-12-01

    A method to calculate light curves of the gravitational microlensing of the Ellis wormhole is derived in the weak-field limit. In this limit, lensing by the wormhole produces one image outside the Einstein ring and another image inside. The weak-field hypothesis is a good approximation in Galactic lensing if the throat radius is less than 1011 km. The light curves calculated have gutters of approximately 4% immediately outside the Einstein ring crossing times. The magnification of the Ellis wormhole lensing is generally less than that of Schwarzschild lensing. The optical depths and event rates are calculated for the Galactic bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud fields according to bound and unbound hypotheses. If the wormholes have throat radii between 100 and 107 km, are bound to the galaxy, and have a number density that is approximately that of ordinary stars, detection can be achieved by reanalyzing past data. If the wormholes are unbound, detection using past data is impossible.

  20. First microlensing candidate towards M31 from Nainital Microlensing Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Y C; Narasimha, D; Sagar, R

    2004-01-01

    We report our first microlensing candidate NMS-E1 towards M31 from the data accumulated during four years long Nainital Microlensing Survey. Cousin R and I band observations of ~13'x13' field in the direction of M31 were carried out since 1998 and data is analysed using pixel technique proposed by the AGAPE collaboration. The NMS-E1 lies in the disk of M31 at \\alpha = 0:43:33.3 and \\delta = +41:06:44, about 15.5 arcmin away in the South-East direction from the center of M31. The degenerate Paczy\\'{n}ski fit gives a half intensity duration of ~ 59 days. The photometric analysis of candidate shows that it reached up to R ~ 20.1 mag at the time of maximum brightness and colour of the source star estimated to be (R-I)_0 ~ 1.1 mag. It is seen that the microlensing candidate is blended by red variable stars consequently light curves do not strictly follow the characteristic Paczy\\'{n}ski shape and achromatic nature however its long period monitoring and similar behaviour in R and I bands lend support of its microle...

  1. Planet Sensitivity from Combined Ground- and Space-based Microlensing Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Wei; Beichman, Charles; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; Carey, Sean; Gaudi, B Scott; Henderson, Calen B; Penny, Matthew; Shvartzvald, Yossi; Yee, Jennifer C; Udalski, A; Poleski, R; Skowron, J; Kozlowski, S; Mroz, P; Pietrukowicz, P; Pietrzynski, G; Szymanski, M K; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Abe, F; Barry, R K; Bennett, D P; Bhattacharya, A; Fukunaga, D; Inayama, K; Koshimoto, N; Namba, S; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Wakiyama, Y; Yonehara, A; Maoz, D; Kaspi, S; Friedmann, M

    2015-01-01

    To move one step forward toward a Galactic distribution of planets, we present the first planet sensitivity analysis for microlensing events with simultaneous observations from space and the ground. We present this analysis for two such events, OGLE-2014-BLG-0939 and OGLE-2014-BLG-0124, which both show substantial planet sensitivity even though neither of them reached high magnification. This suggests that an ensemble of low to moderate magnification events can also yield significant planet sensitivity and therefore probability to detect planets. The implications of our results to the ongoing and future space-based microlensing experiments to measure the Galactic distribution of planets are discussed.

  2. OGLE‐2008‐BLG‐510: first automated real‐time detection of a weak microlensing anomaly – brown dwarf or stellar binary?★

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Rattenbury, N. J.;

    2012-01-01

    The microlensing event OGLE‐2008‐BLG‐510 is characterized by an evident asymmetric shape of the peak, promptly detected by the Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search (ARTEMiS) system in real time. The skewness of the light curve appears to be compatible both with binary...

  3. Space based microlensing planet searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tisserand Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of extra-solar planets is arguably the most exciting development in astrophysics during the past 15 years, rivalled only by the detection of dark energy. Two projects unite the communities of exoplanet scientists and cosmologists: the proposed ESA M class mission EUCLID and the large space mission WFIRST, top ranked by the Astronomy 2010 Decadal Survey report. The later states that: “Space-based microlensing is the optimal approach to providing a true statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, over a range of likely semi-major axes”. They also add: “This census, combined with that made by the Kepler mission, will determine how common Earth-like planets are over a wide range of orbital parameters”. We will present a status report of the results obtained by microlensing on exoplanets and the new objectives of the next generation of ground based wide field imager networks. We will finally discuss the fantastic prospect offered by space based microlensing at the horizon 2020–2025.

  4. Mass Measurements of Isolated Objects from Space-based Microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, A; Udalski, A; Han, C; Shvartzvald, Y; Ranc, C; Jorgensen, U G; Poleski, R; Bozza, V; Beichman, C; Bryden, G; Carey, S; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C B; Pogge, R W; Porritt, I; Wibking, B; Yee, J C; Pawlak, M; Szymanski, M K; Skowron, J; Mroz, P; Kozlowski, S; Wyrzykowski, L; Pietrukowicz, P; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Choi, J Y; Park, H; Jung, Y K; Shin, I -G; Albrow, M D; Park, B -G; Kim, S -L; Lee, C -U; Kim, D -J; Lee, Y; Friedmann, M; Kaspi, S; Maoz, D; Hundertmark, M; Street, R A; Tsapras, Y; Bramich, D M; Cassan, A; Dominik, M; Bachelet, E; Dong, Subo; Jaimes, R Figuera; Horne, K; Mao, S; Menzies, J; Schmidt, R; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Wambsganss, J; Skottfelt, J; Andersen, M I; Burgdorf, M J; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Evans, D F; Gu, S -H; Hinse, T C; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Kuffmeier, M; Mancini, L; Peixinho, N; popovas, A; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Rasmussen, R T; Scarpetta, G; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; von Essen, C; Wang, Y -B; Wertz, O

    2015-01-01

    We report on the mass and distance measurements of two single-lens events from the 2015 \\emph{Spitzer} microlensing campaign. With both finite-source effect and microlens parallax measurements, we find that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-1268 is a $47\\pm7$ $M_{\\rm J}$ brown dwarf at $5.4\\pm1.0$ kpc, and that the lens of OGLE-2015-BLG-0763 is a $0.50\\pm0.04$ $M_\\odot$ star at $6.9\\pm1.0$ kpc. We show that the probability to definitively measure the mass of isolated microlenses, including isolated stellar mass black holes and free floating planets, is dramatically increased once simultaneous ground- and space-based observations are conducted.

  5. Results from microlensing searches for extrasolar planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sackett, PD; Penny, A; Artymowicz, P; Lagrance, AM; Russell, S

    2004-01-01

    Specially-designed microlensing searches, some of which have been underway for several years, are sensitive to extrasolar planets orbiting the most common stars in our Galaxy. Microlensing is particularly well-suited to the detection of Jupiter-mass planets orbiting their parent stars at several AU.

  6. Evidence of halo microlensing in M31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uglesich, RR; Crotts, APS; Baltz, EA; de Jong, J; Boyle, RP; Corbally, CJ

    2004-01-01

    We have completed an intensive monitoring program of two fields on either side of the center of M31 and report here on the results concerning microlensing of stars in M31. These results stem from a 3 yr study ( the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope [VATT]/Columbia survey) of microlensing and var

  7. Microlensing planets in M22 free-floating or bound?

    CERN Document Server

    De la Marcos, R F

    2001-01-01

    We use detailed numerical simulations and theoretical estimates to show that, if confirmed, the unusually brief microlensing events observed by Sahu et al. (2001) in the field of the globular cluster M22 might be explained as a result of microlensing by a population of clustered MACHOs, a dark cluster or RAMBO, not associated with the globular cluster. If real, this dark cluster would be located between M22 and the Galactic bulge and could include at least $10^6$ substellar members with a typical size of 1-3 pc. Bound planets in wide or/and eccentric orbits are also able to reproduce the observed microlensing behaviour, but only if multiplanet systems (including large Kuiper-belt-like objects) are abundant, although, our calculations argue against the latter scenario as the ionization rate in M22 is very high. Dynamically ejected or lone planets are, in principle, incompatible with the observational findings as they either escape their parent cluster in a relatively short time-scale after ejection or segregat...

  8. Microlensing in M31 - The MEGA Survey's Prospects and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Crotts, A; Gould, A; Gyuk, G; Sackett, P D; Kuijken, K; Sutherland, W; Widrow, L M

    2000-01-01

    January 2000 completes the first season of intensive, wide-field observations of microlensing and stellar variability in M31 by MEGA (Microlensing Exploration of the Galaxy and Andromeda) at the Isaac Newton 2.5m Telescope, the KPNO 4m, and the 1.3m and 2.5m telescopes of MDM Observatory. In preliminary analysis, we detect ~50000 variable objects, including some consistent with microlensing events. We present the level of sensitivity to be reached in our planned three-year program to test for the presence of a significant halo microlensing population in M31, as well as its spatial distribution and mass-function. We also discuss our application of image subtraction to these wide fields and HST WFPC2 Snapshot followup observations to confirm candidates identified from previous years' surveys. We present intermediate results from our smaller-field survey, on the MDM 1.3m and Vatican Advanced Technology 1.8m Telescope, from 1994-1998, wherein we have discovered 8 additional probable microlensing events, over abou...

  9. The frequency of snowline-region planets from four years of OGLE-MOA-Wise second-generation microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartzvald, Y.; Maoz, D.; Udalski, A.; Sumi, T.; Friedmann, M.; Kaspi, S.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Mróz, P.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Abe, F.; Barry, R. K.; Bennett, D. P.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bond, I. A.; Freeman, M.; Inayama, K.; Itow, Y.; Koshimoto, N.; Ling, C. H.; Masuda, K.; Fukui, A.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Saito, To.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Tristram, P. J.; Wakiyama, Y.; Yonehara, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the first four seasons from a `second-generation' microlensing survey for extrasolar planets, consisting of near-continuous time coverage of 8 deg2 of the Galactic bulge by the Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE), Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA), and Wise microlensing surveys. During this period, 224 microlensing events were observed by all three groups. Over 12 per cent of the events showed a deviation from single-lens microlensing, and for ˜one-third of those the anomaly is likely caused by a planetary companion. For each of the 224 events, we have performed numerical ray-tracing simulations to calculate the detection efficiency of possible companions as a function of companion-to-host mass ratio and separation. Accounting for the detection efficiency, we find that 55^{+34}_{-22} per cent of microlensed stars host a snowline planet. Moreover, we find that Neptune-mass planets are ˜10 times more common than Jupiter-mass planets. The companion-to-host mass-ratio distribution shows a deficit at q ˜ 10-2, separating the distribution into two companion populations, analogous to the stellar-companion and planet populations, seen in radial-velocity surveys around solar-like stars. Our survey, however, which probes mainly lower mass stars, suggests a minimum in the distribution in the super-Jupiter mass range, and a relatively high occurrence of brown-dwarf companions.

  10. Using microlensed quasars to probe the structure of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the gravitational microlensing of quasars by stars and stellar remnants in the Milky Way. We present predictions for the all-sky microlensing optical depth, time-scale distributions and event rates for future large-area sky surveys. As expected, the total event rate increases rapidly with increasing magnitude limit, reflecting the fact that the number density of quasars is a steep function of magnitude. Surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST should be able to detect more than ten events per year, with typical event durations of around one month. Since microlensing of quasar sources suffers from fewer degeneracies than lensing of Milky Way sources, they could be used as a powerful tool for recovering the mass of the lensing object in a robust, often model-independent, manner. As a consequence, for a subset of these events it will be possible to directly `weigh' the star (or stellar remnant) that is causing the lensing signal, either through higher order microlensing effec...

  11. Microlensing towards the SMC: a new analysis of OGLE and EROS results

    CERN Document Server

    Novati, S Calchi; Jetzer, Ph; Scarpetta, G

    2013-01-01

    We present a new analysis of the results of the EROS-2, OGLE-II, and OGLE-III microlensing campaigns towards the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Through a statistical analysis we address the issue of the \\emph{nature} of the reported microlensing candidate events, whether to be attributed to lenses belonging to known population (the SMC luminous components or the Milky Way disc, to which we broadly refer to as "self lensing") or to the would be population of dark matter compact halo objects (MACHOs). To this purpose, we present profiles of the optical depth and, comparing to the observed quantities, we carry out analyses of the events position and duration. Finally, we evaluate and study the microlensing rate. Overall, we consider five reported microlensing events towards the SMC (one by EROS and four by OGLE). The analysis shows that in terms of number of events the expected self lensing signal may indeed explain the observed rate. However, the characteristics of the events, spatial distribution and duration (...

  12. The OGLE-III planet detection efficiency from six years of microlensing observations (2003 to 2008)

    CERN Document Server

    Tsapras, Y; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Horne, K; Udalski, A; Snodgrass, C; Street, R; Bramich, D M; Dominik, M; Bozza, V; Jaimes, R Figuera; Kains, N; Skowron, J; Szymański, M K; Pietrzyński, G; Soszyński, I; Ulaczyk, K; Kozłowski, S; Pietrukowicz, P; Poleski, R

    2016-01-01

    We use six years (2003 to 2008) of Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment III microlensing observations to derive the survey detection efficiency for a range of planetary masses and projected distances from the host star. We perform an independent analysis of the microlensing light curves to extract the event parameters and compute the planet detection probability given the data. 2433 light curves satisfy our quality selection criteria and are retained for further processing. The aggregate of the detection probabilities over the range explored yields the expected number of microlensing planet detections. We employ a Galactic model to convert this distribution from dimensionless to physical units, \\alpha/au and M_E. The survey sensitivity to small planets is highest in the range 1 to 4 au, shifting to slightly larger separations for more massive ones.

  13. Microlensing due to both gravitation and refraction as a further probe of universe evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalleri, G; Tonni, E; Covino, S

    2016-01-01

    Microlensings events are predicted for the light coming from cosmological sources. In addition to the microlensing due to gravitation lensing, microlensing produced also by refraction of light due to either ionized, or not, gas clouds can be considered. A detailed prediction is here given assuming that the ray of light coming from the distant source traverses a gas cloud with a King's density profile for various possible environments. We conclude that the additional deviation due to relativistic refraction is in most cases negligible compared to the gravitational deviation. Deviation due to refraction can anyway become an interesting analysis tool for future facility with great resolving power and the effects can be singled out with dedicated surveys.

  14. Detectability of extrasolar moons as gravitational microlenses

    OpenAIRE

    Liebig, Christine; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate gravitational lensing as a technique for the detection of extrasolar moons. Since 2004 gravitational microlensing has been successfully applied as a detection method for extrasolar planets. In principle, the method is sensitive to masses as low as an Earth mass or even a fraction of it. Hence it seems natural to investigate the microlensing effects of moons around extrasolar planets. We explore the simplest conceivable triple lens system, containing one star, one planet and one mo...

  15. Gravitational Microlensing by the Ellis Wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, F

    2010-01-01

    A method to calculate light curves of the gravitational microlensing of the Ellis wormhole is derived in the weak-field limit. In this limit, lensing by the wormhole produces one image outside the Einstein ring and one other image inside. The weak-field hypothesis is a good approximation in Galactic lensing if the throat radius is less than $10^{11} km$. The light curves calculated have gutters of approximately 4% immediately outside the Einstein ring crossing times. The magnification of the Ellis wormhole lensing is generally less than that of Schwarzschild lensing. The optical depths and event rates are calculated for the Galactic bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud fields according to bound and unbound hypotheses. If the wormholes have throat radii between 100 and $10^7 km$, are bound to the galaxy, and have a number density that is approximately that of ordinary stars, detection can be achieved by reanalyzing past data. If the wormholes are unbound, detection using past data is impossible.

  16. First microlens mass measurement : Planet photometry of EROS BLG-2000-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    An, JH; Albrow, MD; Beaulieu, JP; Caldwell, JAR; DePoy, DL; Dominik, M; Gaudi, BS; Gould, A; Greenhill, J; Hill, K; Kane, S; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Pogge, RW; Pollard, KR; Sackett, PD; Sahu, KC; Vermaak, P; Watson, R; Williams, A

    2002-01-01

    We analyze PLANET photometric observations of the caustic-crossing binary lens microlensing event, EROS BLG-2000-5, and find that modeling the observed light curve requires incorporation of the microlens parallax and the binary orbital motion. The projected Einstein radius ((r) over tilde (E) = 3.61

  17. Microlensing to probe the quasar structure: spectrophotometry of Q2237+0305 and of J1131-1231

    CERN Document Server

    Sluse, D; Courbin, F; Hutsemékers, D; Claeskens, J -F; Meylan, G; Agol, E; Surdej, J

    2008-01-01

    We present the main results of the first long-term spectrophotometric monitoring of the ``Einstein cross'' Q2237+0305 and of the single-epoch spectra of the lensed quasar J1131-1231. From October 2004 to December 2006, we find that two prominent microlensing events affect images A & B in Q2237+0305 while images C & D remain grossly unaffected by microlensing on a time scale of a few months. Microlensing in A & B goes with chromatic variations of the quasar continuum. We observe stronger micro-amplification in the blue than in the red part of the spectrum, as expected for continuum emission arising from a standard accretion disk. Microlensing induced variations of the CIII] emission are observed both in the integrated line intensity and profile. Finally, we also find that images C & D are about 0.1-0.3 mag redder than images A & B. The spectra of images A-B-C in J1131-1231 reveal that, in April 2003, microlensing was at work in images A and C. We find that microlensing de-amplifies the cont...

  18. The Angstrom Project: a microlensing survey of the structure and composition of the bulge of the Andromeda galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kerins, E; Duke, J; Gould, A; Han, C; Jeon, Y B; Newsam, A; Park, B G

    2006-01-01

    The Andromeda Galaxy Stellar Robotic Microlensing Project (The Angstrom Project) aims to use stellar microlensing events to trace the structure and composition of the inner regions of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). We present microlensing rate and timescale predictions and spatial distributions for stellar and sub-stellar lens populations in combined disk and barred bulge models of M31. We show that at least half of the stellar microlenses in and around the bulge are expected to have characteristic durations between 1 and 10 days, rising to as much as 80% for brown-dwarf dominated mass functions. These short-duration events are mostly missed by current microlensing surveys that are looking for Macho candidates in the M31 dark matter halo. Our models predict that an intensive monitoring survey programme such as Angstrom, which will be able to detect events of durations upwards of a day, could detect around 30 events per season within ~5 arcminutes of the M31 centre, due to ordinary low-mass stars and remnants. Th...

  19. The frequency of snowline-region planets from four-years of OGLE-MOA-Wise second-generation microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Shvartzvald, Y; Udalski, A; Sumi, T; Friedmann, M; Kaspi, S; Poleski, R; Szymański, M K; Skowron, J; Kozłowski, S; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Mróz, P; Pietrukowicz, P; Pietrzyński, G; Soszyński, I; Ulaczyk, K; Abe, F; Barry, R K; Bennett, D P; Bhattacharya, A; Bond, I A; Freeman, M; Inayama, K; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Fukui, A; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Wakiyama, Y; Yonehara, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the first four seasons from a "second-generation" microlensing survey for extrasolar planets, consisting of near-continuous time coverage of 8 deg$^2$ of the Galactic bulge by the OGLE, MOA, and Wise microlensing surveys. During this period, 224 microlensing events were observed by all three groups. Over 12% of the events showed a deviation from single-lens microlensing, and for $\\sim$1/3 of those the anomaly is likely caused by a planetary companion. For each of the 224 events we have performed numerical ray-tracing simulations to calculate the detection efficiency of possible companions as a function of companion-to-host mass ratio and separation. Accounting for the detection efficiency, we find that $55^{+34}_{-22}\\%$ of microlensed stars host a snowline planet. Moreover, we find that Neptunes-mass planets are $\\sim10$ times more common than Jupiter-mass planets. The companion-to-host mass ratio distribution shows a deficit at $q\\sim10^{-2}$, separating the distribution...

  20. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%–50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1–0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  1. Eclipsing negative-parity image of gravitational microlensing by a giant-lens star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational microlensing has been used as a powerful tool for astrophysical studies and exoplanet detections. In the gravitational microlensing, we have two images with negative and positive parities. The negative-parity image is a fainter image and is produced at a closer angular separation with respect to the lens star. In the case of a red-giant lens star and large impact parameter of lensing, this image can be eclipsed by the lens star. The result would be dimming the flux receiving from the combination of the source and the lens stars and the light curve resembles to an eclipsing binary system. In this work, we introduce this phenomenon and propose an observational procedure for detecting this eclipse. The follow-up microlensing telescopes with lucky imaging camera or space-based telescopes can produce high-resolution images from the events with reddish sources and confirm the possibility of blending due to the lens star. After conforming a red-giant lens star and source star, we can use the advance photometric methods and detect the relative flux change during the eclipse in the order of 10-4-10-3. Observation of the eclipse provides the angular size of source star in the unit of Einstein angle and combination of this observation with the parallax observation enable us to calculate the mass of lens star. Finally, we analysed seven microlensing event and show the feasibility of observation of this effect in future observations.

  2. Microlensing Constraints on Quasar Emission Regions: Athena's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinyu

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational microlensing provides a unique tool to study the emission regions of quasars from the smallest X-ray emission region to the larger BLR region. I will review the recent progress of the field focusing on the constraints on the non-thermal X-ray emission, based on our Chandra long-term monitoring results (over 3 Msec) of a sample of lenses. We discover for the first time chromatic microlensing differences between the soft and hard X-ray bands in the X-ray continuum emission. Our results indicate that the coronae above the accretion disk thought to generate X-rays have a non-uniform electron distribution, and the hard X-ray emission region is smaller than the soft region in two cases tracking the event horizon of black holes. We detect metal emission lines for almost all X-ray images in all lenses. We measure larger equivalent line widths in lensed quasars compared to a large sample of normal non-lensed AGNs of similar luminosities. We conclude that the iron line emission region is smaller than that of the X-ray continuum, possibly resulting from strong gravitational lensing near the black hole. Both the X-ray and optical emission region sizes scale with the black hole mass with similar slopes, but with a much smaller normalization for the X-ray emission. With the order of magnitude increase of effective area by Athena, I will discuss the perspective of quasar microlensing in the Athena era.

  3. Microlensing variability in time-delay quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Paraficz, D; Burud, I; Jakobsson, P; Eliasdottir, A

    2006-01-01

    We have searched for microlensing variability in the light curves of five gravitationally lensed quasars with well-determined time delays: SBS 1520+530, FBQ 0951+2635, RX J0911+0551, B1600+434 and HE 2149-2745. By comparing the light curve of the leading image with a suitably time offset light curve of a trailing image we find that two (SBS 1520+530 and FBQ 0951+2635) out of the five quasars have significant long-term (years) and short-term (100 days) brightness variations that may be attributed to microlensing.The short-term variations may be due to nanolenses, relativistic hot or cold spots in the quasar accretion disks, or coherent microlensing at large optical depth.

  4. Using microlensed quasars to probe the structure of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Smith, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the gravitational microlensing of quasars by stars and stellar remnants in the Milky Way. We present predictions for the all-sky microlensing optical depth, time-scale distributions and event rates for future large-area sky surveys. As expected, the total event rate increases rapidly with increasing magnitude limit, reflecting the fact that the number density of quasars is a steep function of magnitude. Surveys, such as Pan-STARRS and LSST, should be able to detect more than 10 events per year, with typical event durations of around 1 month. Since microlensing of quasar sources suffers from fewer degeneracies than lensing of Milky Way sources, they could be used as a powerful tool for recovering the mass of the lensing object in a robust, often model-independent, manner. As a consequence, for a subset of these events, it will be possible to directly `weigh' the star (or stellar remnant) that is causing the lensing signal, either through higher order microlensing effects and/or high-precision astrometric observations of the lens star (using e.g. Gaia or SIM-lite). This means that such events could play a crucial role in stellar astronomy. Given the current operational timelines for Pan-STARRS and LSST, by the end of the decade, they could potentially detect up to 100 events. Although this is still too few events to place detailed constraints on Galactic models, consistency checks can be carried out and such samples could lead to exciting and unexpected discoveries.

  5. Microlensing towards the Magellanic Clouds: Nature of the Lenses and Implications for Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    2003-01-01

    (Abridged) A close scrutiny of the microlensing results towards the Magellanic clouds reveals that the stars within the Magellanic clouds are major contributors as lenses, and the contribution of MACHOs to dark matter is 0 to 5%. The principal results which lead to this conclusion are the following. (i) Out of the ~17 events detected so far towards the Magellanic Clouds, the lens locations have been determined for four events where the lenses are most likely within the Magellanic clouds. (ii)...

  6. Searching for Frozen Super Earth via Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. P.; Cassan, A.; Coutures, C.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Kubas, D.; Marquette, J. B.

    2009-04-01

    Microlensing planet hunt is a unique method to probe efficiently for frozen Super Earth orbiting the most common stars of our galaxy. It is nicely complementing the parameter space probed by very high accuracy radial velocity measurements and future space based detections of low mass transiting planets. In order to maximize the planet catch, the microlensing community is engaged in a total cooperation among the different groups (OGLE, MicroFUN, MOA, PLANET/RoboNET) by making the real time data available, and mutual informing/reporting about modeling efforts. Eight planets have been published so far by combinations of the different groups, 4 Jovian analogues, one Neptune and two Super Earth. Given the microlensing detection efficiency, it suggests that these Neptunes/Super Earths may be quite common. Using networks of dedicated 1-2m class telescopes, the microlensing community has entered a new phase of planet discoveries, and will be able to provide constraints on the abundance of frozen Super-Earths in the near future. Statistics about Mars to Earth mass planets, extending to the habitable zone will be achieved with space based wide field imagers (EUCLID) at the horizon 2017.

  7. Microlensing Binaries with Candidate Brown Dwarf Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, I.-G; Han, C.; Gould, A.;

    2012-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are important objects because they may provide a missing link between stars and planets, two populations that have dramatically different formation histories. In this paper, we present the candidate binaries with brown dwarf companions that are found by analyzing binary microlensing ...

  8. The 1995 pilot campaign of planet : Searching for microlensing anomalies through precise, rapid, round-the-clock monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrow, M; Beaulieu, JP; Birch, P; Caldwell, JAR; Kane, S; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Pel, JW; Pollard, K; Sackett, PD; Sahu, KC; Williams, A; Zwaan, MA

    1998-01-01

    PLANET (the Probing Lensing Anomalies NETwork) is a worldwide collaboration of astronomers whose primary goal is to monitor microlensing events densely and precisely in order to detect and study anomalies that contain information about Galactic lenses and sources that would otherwise be unobtainable

  9. Gravitational Microlensing by Ellis Wormhole: Second Order Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukmanova, Regina; Kulbakova, Aliya; Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational lensing is the effect of light bending in a gravitational field. It can be used as a possible observational method to detect or exclude the existence of wormholes. In this work, we extend the work by Abe on gravitational microlensing by Ellis wormhole by including the second order deflection term. Using the lens equation and definition of Einstein radius, we find the angular locations of the physical image inside and outside Einstein ring. The work contains a comparative analysis of light curves between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Ellis wormhole that can be used to distinguish such objects though such distinctions are too minute to be observable even in the near future. We also tabulate the optical depth and event rate for lensing by bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars.

  10. Microlensing of a Ring Model for Quasar Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, R; Schild, Rudolph; Vakulik, Viktor

    2003-01-01

    Microlensing observations of the Q0957+561 A,B have consistently shown evidence for structure in the quasar that has not been evident in available microlensing models, where the luminous source has been consistently modeled as a single large round structure. We show that the microlensing features can easily be reproduced by a luminous quasar model motivated by observations; a luminous inner accretion disc edge and outer ring-shaped structures where the emission lines form. Such a model can explain all of the features known from 24 years of Q0957 microlensing observations.

  11. Black hole, neutron star and white dwarf candidates from microlensing with OGLE-III★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Skowron, J.; Rybicki, K. A.; Mróz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Pawlak, M.; Iłkiewicz, K.; Rattenbury, N. J.

    2016-05-01

    Most stellar remnants so far have been found in binary systems, where they interact with matter from their companions. Isolated neutron stars and black holes are difficult to find as they are dark, yet they are predicted to exist in our Galaxy in vast numbers. We explored the OGLE-III data base of 150 million objects observed in years 2001-2009 and found 59 microlensing events exhibiting a parallax effect due to the Earth's motion around the Sun. Combining parallax and brightness measurements from microlensing light curves with expected proper motions in the Milky Way, we identified 13 microlensing events which are consistent with having a white dwarf, neutron star or a black hole lens and we estimated their masses and distances. The most massive of our black hole candidates has 9.3 M⊙ and is at a distance of 2.4 kpc. The distribution of masses of our candidates indicates a continuum in mass distribution with no mass gap between neutron stars and black holes. We also present predictions on how such events will be observed by the astrometric Gaia mission.

  12. Black Holes, Neutron Stars and White Dwarf Candidates from Microlensing with OGLE-III

    CERN Document Server

    Wyrzykowski, L; Skowron, J; Rybicki, K A; Mroz, P; Kozlowski, S; Udalski, A; Szymanski, M K; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Poleski, R; Pawlak, M; Ilkiewicz, K; Rattenbury, N J

    2015-01-01

    Most stellar remnants so far have been found in binary systems, where they interact with matter from their companions. Isolated neutron stars and black holes are difficult to find as they are dark, yet they are predicted to exist in our Galaxy in vast numbers. We explored the OGLE-III database of 150 million objects observed in years 2001-2009 and found 59 microlensing events exhibiting a parallax effect due to the Earth's motion around the Sun. Combining parallax and brightness measurements from microlensing light curves with expected proper motions in the Milky Way, we identified 15 microlensing events which are consistent with having a white dwarf, neutron star or a black hole lens and we estimated their masses and distances. The most massive of our black hole candidates has 8.3 M_Sun and is at a distance of 2.4 kpc. The distribution of masses of our candidates indicates a continuum in mass distribution with no mass gap between neutron stars and black holes. We also present predictions on how such events w...

  13. Gravitational microlensing of gamma-ray blazars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Torres, Diego; E. Romero, Gustavo; F. Eiroa, Ernesto;

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the effects of gravitational microlensing on compact and distant $\\gamma$-ray blazars. These objects have $\\gamma$-ray emitting regions which are small enough as to be affected by microlensing effects produced by stars lying in intermediate galaxies. We analyze...... the temporal evolution of the gamma-ray magnification for sources moving in a caustic pattern field, where the combined effects of thousands of stars are taken into account using a numerical technique. We propose that some of the unidentified $\\gamma$-ray sources (particularly some of those lying at high...... galactic latitude whose gamma-ray statistical properties are very similar to detected $\\gamma$-ray blazars) are indeed the result of gravitational lensing magnification of background undetected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs)....

  14. The MACHO project: Microlensing and variable stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcock, C.; Alves, D. R.; Axelrod, T. S.; Bennett, D. P.; Marshall, S. L.; Minniti, D.

    1996-10-01

    The MACHO Project monitors millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Small Magellanic Cloud and the bulge of the Milky Way searching for the gravitational microlensing signature of baryonic dark matter. This Project has yielded surprising results. An analysis of two years of data monitoring the Large Magellanic Cloud points to {approximately} 50% of the mass of the Milky Way`s halo in compact objects of {approximately} 0.5 solar mass. An analysis of one year of monitoring the bulge has yielded more microlensing than predicted without invocation of a massive bar or significant disk dark matter. The huge database of light curves created by this search is yielding information on extremely rare types of astrophysical variability as well as providing temporal detail for the study of well known variable astrophysical phenomena. The variable star catalog created from this database is previewed and example light curves are presented. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Microlensing and the stellar mass function

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, A

    1996-01-01

    Traditional approaches to measuring the stellar mass function (MF) are fundamentally limited because objects are detected based on their luminosity, not their mass. These methods are thereby restricted to luminous and relatively nearby stellar populations. Gravitational microlensing promises to revolutionize our understanding of the MF. It is already technologically feasible to measure the MFs of the Galactic disk and Galactic bulge as functions of position, although the actual execution of this program requires aggressive ground-based observations including infrared interferometry, as well as the launching of a small satellite telescope. Rapid developments in microlensing, including the new technique of ``pixel lensing'' of unresolved stars, will allow one to probe the MF and luminosity function of nearby galaxies. Such observations of M31 are already underway, and pixel-lensing observations of M87 with the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} would permit detection of dark intra-cluster objects in Virgo. Microlensi...

  16. Rigorous diffraction theory applied to microlenses

    OpenAIRE

    Blattner, Peter; Herzig, Hans-Peter

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the behaviour of small cylindrical microlenses, arranged in one-dimensional arrays and as single elements. For this purpose, we apply a standard rigorous diffraction theory, commonly used for diffraction gratings. We investigate the coupling effect between the elements. It turns out that single elements behave like periodic elements if the spacing is chosen correctly. Furthermore, we compute the complex transmission function by rigorous diffraction theory and compare...

  17. Microlensing Signature of Binary Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Sahu, Kailash; Littenberg, Tyson

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the light curves of galactic bulge stars magnified via microlensing by stellar-mass binary black holes along the line-of-sight. We show the sensitivity to measuring various lens parameters for a range of survey cadences and photometric precision. Using public data from the OGLE collaboration, we identify two candidates for massive binary systems, and discuss implications for theories of star formation and binary evolution.

  18. LMC Microlensing and Very Thick Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Gyuk, Geza; Gates, Evalyn

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the implications of a very thick (scale height 1.5 - 3.0 kpc) disk population of MACHOs. Such a population represents a reasonable alternative to standard halo configurations of a lensing population. We find that very thick disk distributions can lower the lens mass estimate derived from the microlensing data toward the LMC, although an average lens mass substantially below $0.3\\Msol$ is unlikely. Constraints from direct searches for such lenses imply very low luminosity object...

  19. Constraints from microlensing on the COBE bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. S.

    Since the first review of converging evidences for a bar in the center of the Galaxy by de Zeeuw (1992) at the IAU Sym. 153 in Gent five years ago, the Galactic bar idea has been put on a solid footing by an influx of new data (COBE/DIRBE maps, star count data of bulge red clump giants, microlensing optical depth, and bulge stellar proper motions, etc.) and a burst of increasingly sophisticated theoretical models (triaxial luminosity models of Dwek et al. 1994, and Binney, Gerhard & Spergel 1997, steady state stellar bar dynamical model of Zhao 1996, combined luminosity, microlensing and gas kinematics models of Zhao, Rich & Spergel 1996, and Bissantz et al. 1997, etc.), which fit new data and improve upon earlier simple bulge/bar models (Kent 1992, Binney et al. 1991, Blitz & Spergel 1991). While research in this field shifts more and more to constraining the exact phase space and parameter space of the bar, both the non-uniqueness of and the mismatches among bars from different datasets start to show up. I compare the bar from microlensing data with the COBE bar and point out the effects the non-uniqueness.

  20. Detectability of extrasolar moons as gravitational microlenses

    CERN Document Server

    Liebig, Christine

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate gravitational lensing as a technique for the detection of extrasolar moons. Since 2004 gravitational microlensing has been successfully applied as a detection method for extrasolar planets. In principle, the method is sensitive to masses as low as an Earth mass or even a fraction of it. Hence it seems natural to investigate the microlensing effects of moons around extrasolar planets. We explore the simplest conceivable triple lens system, containing one star, one planet and one moon. From a microlensing point of view, this system can be modelled as a particular triple with hierarchical mass ratios very different from unity. Since the moon orbits the planet, the planet-moon separation will be small compared to the distance between planet and star. Such a configuration can lead to a complex interference of caustics. We present detectability and detection limits by comparing triple-lens light curves to best-fit binary light curves as caused by a double-lens system consisting of host star and planet -...

  1. High magnification events by MOA in 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Yock, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing events of high magnification provide exceptional sensitivity to the presence of low-mass planets orbiting the lens star, including planets with masses as low as that of Earth. The essential requirement for the detection of such planets in these events is that the FWHM of the light curve be monitored continuously, or as nearly continuously as possible. The dependence of planet detectability on the magnification caused by microlensing, on the planet mass and planet lo...

  2. MICROLENSING BINARIES DISCOVERED THROUGH HIGH-MAGNIFICATION CHANNEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microlensing can provide a useful tool to probe binary distributions down to low-mass limits of binary companions. In this paper, we analyze the light curves of eight binary-lensing events detected through the channel of high-magnification events during the seasons from 2007 to 2010. The perturbations, which are confined near the peak of the light curves, can be easily distinguished from the central perturbations caused by planets. However, the degeneracy between close and wide binary solutions cannot be resolved with a 3σ confidence level for three events, implying that the degeneracy would be an important obstacle in studying binary distributions. The dependence of the degeneracy on the lensing parameters is consistent with a theoretical prediction that the degeneracy becomes severe as the binary separation and the mass ratio deviate from the values of resonant caustics. The measured mass ratio of the event OGLE-2008-BLG-510/MOA-2008-BLG-369 is q ∼ 0.1, making the companion of the lens a strong brown dwarf candidate.

  3. Signatures of rotating binaries in micro-lensing experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nucita, A A; De Paolis, F; Ingrosso, G

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing offers a powerful method with which to probe a variety of binary-lens systems, as the binarity of the lens introduces deviations from the typical (single-lens) Paczy\\'nski behaviour in the event light curves. Generally, a static binary lens is considered to fit the observed light curve and, when the orbital motion is taken into account, an oversimplified model is usually employed. In this paper, we treat the binary-lens motion in a realistic way and focus on simulated events that are fitted well by a Paczy\\'nski curve. We show that an accurate timing analysis of the residuals (calculated with respect to the best-fitting Paczy\\'nski model) is usually sufficient to infer the orbital period of the binary lens. It goes without saying that the independently estimated period may be used to further constrain the orbital parameters obtained by the best-fitting procedure, which often gives degenerate solutions. We also present a preliminary analysis of the event OGLE-2011-BLG-1127 / MOA-2011...

  4. Bright Single-Photon Sources Based on Anti-Reflection Coated Deterministic Quantum Dot Microlenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schnauber

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on enhancing the photon-extraction efficiency (PEE of deterministic quantum dot (QD microlenses via anti-reflection (AR coating. The AR-coating deposited on top of the curved microlens surface is composed of a thin layer of Ta2O5, and is found to effectively reduce back-reflection of light at the semiconductor-vacuum interface. A statistical analysis of spectroscopic data reveals, that the AR-coating improves the light out-coupling of respective microlenses by a factor of 1.57 ± 0.71, in quantitative agreement with numerical calculations. Taking the enhancement factor into account, we predict improved out-coupling of light with a PEE of up to 50%. The quantum nature of emission from QDs integrated into AR-coated microlenses is demonstrated via photon auto-correlation measurements revealing strong suppression of two-photon emission events with g(2(0 = 0.05 ± 0.02. As such, these bright non-classical light sources are highly attractive with respect to applications in the field of quantum cryptography.

  5. Optimal Survey Strategies and Predicted Planet Yields for the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Calen B; Han, Cheongho; Skowron, Jan; Penny, Matthew T; Nataf, David; Gould, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    The Korean Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) will consist of three 1.6m telescopes each with a 4 deg^{2} field of view (FoV) and will be dedicated to monitoring the Galactic Bulge to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. KMTNet's combination of aperture size, FoV, cadence, and longitudinal coverage will provide a unique opportunity to probe exoplanet demographics in an unbiased way. Here we present simulations that optimize the observing strategy for, and predict the planetary yields of, KMTNet. We find preferences for four target fields located in the central Bulge and an exposure time of t_{exp} = 120s, leading to the detection of ~2,200 microlensing events per year. We estimate the planet detection rates for planets with mass and separation across the ranges 0.1 <= M_{p}/M_{Earth} <= 1000 and 0.4 <= a/AU <= 16, respectively. Normalizing these rates to the cool-planet mass function of Cassan (2012), we predict KMTNet will be approximately uniformly sensitive to planets with mas...

  6. Gravitational Microlensing of Earth-mass Planets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kennet Bomann West

    be shown that in the crowded fields where microlensing is observed, the primary obstacle for detecting Earth-mass planets is the crowding, rendering it hard to extract accurate photometry from faint sources at seeing limited resolutions. As all the sources tend to be at approximately the same distance...... the traditional, but very expensive, methods for improving resolution, i.e. adaptive optics and space telescopes. One appealing solution is the technique of “lucky imaging”, made feasible by the advent of the electron multiplying CCD, or EMCCD. This type of CCD is not limited by readout noise because of cascade...

  7. Detecting Extrasolar Asteroid Belts Through Their Microlensing Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Lake, Ethan; Dong, Subo

    2016-01-01

    We propose that extrasolar asteroid belts can be detected through their gravitational microlensing signatures. Asteroid belt + star lens systems create so-called "pseudo-caustics", regions in the source plane where the magnification exhibits a finite but discontinuous jump. These features allow such systems to generate distinctive microlensing light curves across a wide region of belt parameter space and possess remarkably large lensing cross-sections. Sample light curves for a range of asteroid belt parameters are presented. In the near future, space-based microlensing surveys (e.g., WFIRST) may be able to discover extrasolar asteroid belts with masses of the order of $0.1 M_{\\oplus}$.

  8. Cosmic String Detection via Microlensing of Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chernoff, David F

    2007-01-01

    Cosmic superstrings are produced towards the end of the brane inflation. If the string tension is low enough, loops tend to be relatively long-lived. The resultant string network is expected to contain many loops which are smaller than typical Galactic scales. Cosmic expansion damps the center of mass motion of the loops which then cluster like cold dark matter. Loops will lens stars within the galaxy and local group. We explore microlensing of stars as a tool to detect and to characterize some of the fundamental string and string network properties, including the dimensionless string tension $G \\mu/c^2$ and the density of string loops within the Galaxy. As $G \\mu \\to 0$ the intrinsic microlensing rate diverges as $1/\\sqrt{G \\mu}$ but experimental detection will be limited by shortness of the lensing timescale and/or smallness of the bending angle which each vary $\\propto G \\mu$. We find that detection is feasible for a range of tensions. As an illustration, the planned optical astrometric survey mission, Gai...

  9. Characterization of Gravitational Microlensing Planetary Host Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, D P; Gaudi, B S; Bennett, David P.; Anderson, Jay

    2006-01-01

    The gravitational microlensing light curves that reveal the presence of extrasolar planets generally yield the planet-star mass ratio and separation in units of the Einstein ring radius. The microlensing method does not require the detection of light from the planetary host star. This allows the detection of planets orbiting very faint stars, but it also makes it difficult to convert the planet-star mass ratio to a value for the planet mass. We show that in many cases, the lens stars are readily detectable with high resolution space-based follow-up observations. When the lens star is detected, the lens-source relative proper motion can also be measured, and this allows the masses of the planet and its host star to be determined and the star-planet separation can be converted to physical units.For the recently detected super-Earth planet, OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb, we show that the lens star will definitely be detectable with observations by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) unless it is a stellar remnant. Finally, w...

  10. The MACHO project 2nd year LMC microlensing results and dark matter implications

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, M R; Allsman, R A; Alves, D R; Axelrod, T S; Becker, A C; Bennett, D P; Cook, K H; Freeman, K C; Griest, K; Guern, J A; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Rodgers, A W; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Welch, D L

    1996-01-01

    The MACHO Project is searching for galactic dark matter in the form of massive compact halo objects (Machos). Millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and Galactic bulge are photometrically monitored in an attempt to detect rare gravitational microlensing events caused by otherwise invisible Machos. Analysis of two years of photometry on 8.5 million stars in the LMC reveals 8 candidate microlensing events, far more than the \\sim1 event expected from lensing by low-mass stars in known galactic populations. From these eight events we estimate the optical depth towards the LMC from events with 2 < \\that < 200 days to be \\tau_2^{200} \\approx 2.9 ^{+1.4}_{-0.9} \\ten{-7}. This exceeds the optical depth of 0.5\\ten{-7} expected from known stars and is to be compared with an optical depth of 4.7\\ten{-7} predicted for a ``standard'' halo composed entirely of Machos. The total mass in this lensing population is \\approx 2^{+1.2}_{-0.7} \\ten{11} \\msun (within 50 kpc from t...

  11. Dynamics and Origin of Extra-solar Planetary Systems and Microlensing Detection of Extra-solar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peale, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    We compare a space-based microlensing search for planets, with a ground based microlensing search originally proposed by D. Tytler (Beichman, et al. 1996). Perturbations of microlensing light curves when the lens star has a planetary companion are sought by one wide angle survey telescope and an array of three or four followup narrow angle telescopes distributed in longitude that follow events with high precision, high time resolution photometry. Alternative ground based programs are considered briefly. With the four 2 meter telescopes distributed in longitude in the southern hemisphere in the Tytler proposal, observational constraints on a ground-based search for planets during microlensing events toward the center of the galaxy are severe. Probably less than 100 events could be monitored per year with high precision, high time resolution photometry with only about 42% coverage on the average regardless of how many events were discovered by the survey telescope. Statistics for the occurrence and properties for Jupiter-mass planets would be meaningful but relatively meager four years after the program was started, and meaningful statistics for Earth-mass planets would be non existent. In contrast, the 14,500 events in a proposed 4 year space based program (GEST = Galactic Exoplanet Survey Telescope) would yield very sound statistics on the occurrence, masses and separations of Jupiter-mass planets, and significant constraints on similar properties for Earth-mass planets. The significance of the Jupiter statistics would be to establish the frequency of planetary systems like our own, where terrestrial planets could exist inside the orbits of the giants.

  12. MOA 2010-BLG-477Lb: CONSTRAINING THE MASS OF A MICROLENSING PLANET FROM MICROLENSING PARALLAX, ORBITAL MOTION, AND DETECTION OF BLENDED LIGHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelet, E.; Fouque, P. [IRAP, Universite de Toulouse, CNRS, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Shin, I.-G.; Han, C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Menzies, J. W. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7925 (South Africa); Beaulieu, J.-P.; Marquette, J.-B. [UPMC-CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Bond, I. A. [Institute for Information and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 102-904, Auckland 1330 (New Zealand); Heyrovsky, D. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague (Czech Republic); Street, R. A. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740B Cortona Dr, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Sumi, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Udalski, A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Abe, L.; Agabi, K. [Laboratoire Fizeau, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Boulevard de l' Observatoire, 06300 Nice (France); Albrow, M. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8020 (New Zealand); Collaboration: PLANET Collaboration; FUN muCollaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-07-20

    Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA 2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is q = (2.181 {+-} 0.004) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and the projected separation is s = 1.1228 {+-} 0.0006 in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large {theta}{sub E} = 1.38 {+-} 0.11 mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the 'microlens parallax' and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range 0.13 < M/M{sub Sun} < 1.0. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of M{sub *} = 0.67{sup +0.33}{sub -0.13} M{sub Sun} and m{sub p} = 1.5{sup +0.8}{sub -0.3} M{sub JUP} at a distance of D = 2.3 {+-} 0.6 kpc, and with a semi-major axis of a = 2{sup +3}{sub -1} AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.

  13. Could the Optical Transient SCP 06F6 be due to Microlensing?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marek Biesiada

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the mysterious optical transient SCP 06F6 displaying a symmetric light curve with a (half-time) duration of about 100 days. The projected location of the event falls close to the center of the galaxy cluster CL 1432.5 + 332.8 lying at the redshift = 1.112. Guided by suggestive symmetry of the light curve and its similarity in two photometric bands, which is a typical signature of microlensing events, we discuss this possibility in several scenarios. As a consistency check we use the lens mass inferred from the event duration and the size of the source. The second check comes from a plausible assumption that since the event was highly magnified there was a perfect alignment at the maximum magnification. A scenario where the lens and the source are located in our Galaxy is ruled out. There remain extragalactic scenarios in which the source is a broad absorption line quasar at redshift 2.7 (as might be suggested by transient’s spectroscopy) and the lens could be a compact object associated either with the cluster or with quasar’s host galaxy. They give reasonable results. Even if the true nature of the transient eventually turns out different, the idea presented here is interesting from the perspective of cosmological microlensing studies.

  14. Observation of Microlensing towards the Galactic Spiral Arms EROS II 3 year survey

    CERN Document Server

    Derue, F; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Bauer2, F; Beaulieu, J P; Blanc, G; Bouquet, A; Char, S; Charlot, X; Couchot, F; Couture, C; Ferlet, R; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Gros, M; Hassinski, J; Hamilton, J C; Hardin, D; deKat, J; Kim, A; Lassere, T; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Mansoux, B; Marquette, J B; Gra, D; Maurice, E; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Prévôt, L; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Spiro, M; Vidal-madjar, A; Vigroux, L; Zylberajch, S

    2000-01-01

    We present an analysis of the light curves of 9.1 million stars observed during three seasons by EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres), in the Galactic plane away from the bulge. Seven stars exhibit luminosity variations compatible with gravitational microlensing effects due to unseen objects. The corresponding optical depth, averaged over four directions, is tau = 0.45 +0.24 -0.11 x 10^-6. While this value is compatible with expectations from simple galactic models under reasonable assumptions on the target distances, we find an excess of events with short timescale towards the direction closest to the Galactic Centre.

  15. Chromatic control in coextruded layered polymer microlenses

    CERN Document Server

    Crescimanno, Michael; Andrews, James H; Zhou, Chuanhong; Petrus, Joshua B; Merlo, Cory; Bagheri, Cameron; Hetzel, Connor; Tancabel, James; Singer, Kenneth D; Baer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe the formation, characterization and theoretical understanding of microlenses comprised of alternating polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate layers produced by multilayer coextrusion. These lenses are fabricated by photolithography, using a grayscale mask followed by plasma etching, so that the refractive index alternation of the bilayer stack appears across the radius of the microlens. The alternating quarter-wave thick layers form a one-dimensional photonic crystal whose dispersion augments the material dispersion, allowing one to sculpt the chromatic dispersion of the lens by adjusting the layered structure. Using Huygen's principle, we model our experimental measurements of the focal length of these lenses across the reflection band of the multilayer polymer film from which the microlens is fashioned. For a 56 micron diameter multilayered lens of focal length 300 microns, we measured a nearly 25 percent variation in the focal length across a shallow, 50 nm-wide reflection band.

  16. Determining neutron star masses with weak microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Lanlan

    2012-01-01

    The masses of stars including stellar remnants are almost exclusively known from binary systems. In this work, we study gravitational microlensing of faint background galaxies by isolated neutron stars (pulsars). We show that the resulting surface brightness distortions can be used to determine the masses of neutron star. Due to different evolutionary histories, isolated neutron stars may have different masses from those in binary systems, and thus provide unique insight into their equation of states under extreme physical conditions. We search for existing pulsar catalogs and find one promising pair of a nearby pulsar and a background galaxy. This method will become more practical for the next generation optical and radio surveys and telescopes.

  17. Constraining the Frequency of Free-Floating Planets from a Synthesis of Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Survey Results

    CERN Document Server

    Clanton, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A microlensing survey by Sumi et al. (2011) exhibits an overabundance of short-timescale events (STEs; t_E~10 AU) and free-floating planets. Assuming these STEs are indeed due to planetary-mass objects, we aim to constrain the fraction of these events that can be explained by bound but wide-separation planets. We fit the observed timescale distribution with a lens mass function comprised of brown dwarfs, main-sequence stars, and stellar remnants, finding and thus corroborating the initial identification of an excess of STEs. We then include a population of bound planets that are expected not to show signatures of the primary lens (host) in their microlensing light curves and that are also consistent with results from representative microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find that bound planets alone cannot explain the entire STE excess without violating the constraints from the surveys we consider and thus some fraction of these events must be due to free-floating planets, if our model ...

  18. VVV Survey Observations of a Microlensing Stellar Mass Black Hole Candidate in the Field of the Globular Cluster NGC 6553

    CERN Document Server

    Minniti, D; Alonso-Garcia, J; Anguita, T; Catelan, M; Gran, F; Motta, V; Muro, G; Rojas, K; Saito, R K

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a large timescale candidate microlensing event of a bulge stellar source based on near-infrared observations with the VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea Survey (VVV). The new microlensing event is projected only 3.5 arcmin away from the center of the globular cluster NGC 6553. The source appears to be a bulge giant star with magnitude Ks = 13.52, based on the position in the color-magnitude diagram. The foreground lens may be located in the globular cluster, which has well-known parameters such as distance and proper motions. If the lens is a cluster member, we can directly estimate its mass simply following Paczynski et al. (1996) which is a modified version of the more general case due to Refsdal. In that case, the lens would be a massive stellar remnant, with M = 1.5-3.5 Msun. If the blending fraction of the microlensing event appears to be small, and this lens would represent a good isolated black hole (BH) candidate, that would be the oldest BH known. Alternative explanations (w...

  19. MOA 2011-BLG-028Lb: a Neptune-mass Microlensing Planet in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Skowron, J; Poleski, R; Kozłowski, S; Szymański, M K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Pietrzyński, G; Soszyński, I; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bhattacharya, A; Bond, I A; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Hirao, Y; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagakane, M; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Yonehara, A; Dominik, M; Jørgensen, U G; Bozza, V; Harpsøe, K; Hundertmark, M; Skottfelt, J

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet orbiting a 0.8 +- 0.3 M_Sun star in the Galactic bulge. The planet manifested itself during the microlensing event MOA 2011-BLG-028/OGLE-2011-BLG-0203 as a low-mass companion to the lens star. The analysis of the light curve provides the measurement of the mass ratio: (1.2 +- 0.2) x 10^-4, which indicates the mass of the planet to be 12-60 Earth masses. The lensing system is located at 7.3 +- 0.7 kpc away from the Earth near the direction to Baade's Window. The projected separation of the planet, at the time of the microlensing event, was 3.1-5.2 AU. Although the "microlens parallax" effect is not detected in the light curve of this event, preventing the actual mass measurement, the uncertainties of mass and distance estimation are narrowed by the measurement of the source star proper motion on the OGLE-III images spanning eight years, and by the low amount of blended light seen, proving that the host star cannot be too bright and massive. We also discuss the ...

  20. Spitzer Microlensing Program as a Probe for Globular Cluster Planets. Analysis of OGLE-2015-BLG-0448

    CERN Document Server

    Poleski, Radosław; Christie, Grant W; Udalski, Andrzej; Gould, Andrew; Bachelet, Etienne; Skottfelt, Jesper; Novati, Sebastiano Calchi; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, Szymon; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Pawlak, M; Beichman, C; Bryden, G; Carey, S; Fausnaugh, M; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C B; Pogge, R W; Shvartzvald, Y; Wibking, B; Yee, J C; Beatty, T G; Eastman, J D; Drummond, J; Friedmann, M; Henderson, M; Johnson, J A; Kaspi, S; Maoz, D; McCormick, J; McCrady, N; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Porritt, I; Relles, H M; Sliski, D H; Tan, T -G; Wittenmyer, R A; Wright, J T; Street, R A; Tsapras, Y; Bramich, D M; Horne, K; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Menzies, J; Jaimes, R Figuera; Wambsganss, J; Schmidt, R; Cassan, A; Ranc, C; Mao, S; Bozza, V; Dominik, M; Hundertmark, M P G; Jørgensen, U G; Andersen, M I; Burgdorf, M J; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Evans, D F; Gu, S -H; Hinse, T C; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Kuffmeier, M; Mancini, L; Popovas, A; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Rasmussen, R T; Southworth, G Scarpetta J; Surdej, J; Unda-Sanzana, E; Verma, P; von Essen, C; Wang, Y -B; Wertz, O

    2015-01-01

    The microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0448 was observed by Spitzer and lay within the tidal radius of the globular cluster NGC 6558. The event had moderate magnification and was intensively observed, hence it had the potential to probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters. We measure the proper motion of NGC 6558 ($\\mu_{\\rm cl}$(N,E) = (+0.36+-0.10, +1.42+-0.10) mas/yr) as well as the source and show that the lens is not a cluster member. Even though this particular event does not probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters, other potential cluster lens events can be verified using our methodology. Additionally, we find that microlens parallax measured using OGLE photometry is consistent with the value found based on the light curve displacement between Earth and Spitzer.

  1. An anomaly detector with immediate feedback to hunt for planets of Earth mass and below by microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, M.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Allan, A.; Mao, S.; Bramich, D. M.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Kerins, E.; Tsapras, Y.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.

    2007-09-01

    The discovery of OGLE 2005-BLG-390Lb, the first cool rocky/icy exoplanet, impressively demonstrated the sensitivity of the microlensing technique to extrasolar planets below 10M⊕. A planet of 1M⊕ instead of the expected 5M⊕ for OGLE 2005-BLG-390Lb (with an uncertainty factor of 2) in the same spot would have provided a detectable deviation with an amplitude of ~3 per cent and a duration of ~12h. While a standard sampling interval of 1.5-2.5 h for microlensing follow-up observations appears to be insufficient for characterizing such light curve anomalies and thereby claiming the discovery of the planets that caused these, an early detection of a deviation could trigger higher-cadence sampling which would have allowed the discovery of an Earth-mass planet in this case. Here, we describe the implementation of an automated anomaly detector, embedded into the eSTAR system, that profits from immediate feedback provided by the robotic telescopes that form the RoboNet-1.0 network. It went into operation for the 2007 microlensing observing season. As part of our discussion about an optimal strategy for planet detection, we shed some new light on whether concentrating on highly magnified events is promising and planets in the `resonant' angular separation equal to the angular Einstein radius are revealed most easily. Given that sub-Neptune mass planets can be considered being common around the host stars probed by microlensing (preferentially M and K dwarfs), the higher number of events that can be monitored with a network of 2-m telescopes and the increased detection efficiency for planets below 5M⊕ arising from an optimized strategy gives a common effort of current microlensing campaigns a fair chance to detect an Earth-mass planet (from the ground) ahead of the COROT or Kepler missions. The detection limit of gravitational microlensing extends even below 0.1M⊕, but such planets are not very likely to be detected from current campaigns. However, these will be

  2. OGLE-2008-BLG-510: first automated real-time detection of a weak microlensing anomaly - brown dwarf or stellar binary?

    CERN Document Server

    Bozza, V; Rattenbury, N J; Joergensen, U G; Tsapras, Y; Bramich, D M; Udalski, A; Bond, I A; Liebig, C; Cassan, A; Fouque, P; Fukui, A; Hundertmark, M; Shin, I -G; Lee, S H; Choi, J -Y; Park, S -Y; Gould, A; Allan, A; Mao, S; Wyrzykowski, L; Street, R A; Buckley, D; Nagayama, T; Mathiasen, M; Hinse, T C; Novati, S Calchi; Harpsoee, K; Mancini, L; Scarpetta, G; Anguita, T; Burgdorf, M J; Horne, K; Hornstrup, A; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Kjaergaard, P; Masi, G; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Snodgrass, C; Southworth, J; Steele, I A; Surdej, J; Thoene, C C; Wambsganss, J; Zub, M; Albrow, M D; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Bennett, D P; Caldwell, J A R; Cole, A; Cook, K H; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kane, S R; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Williams, A; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; DePoy, D L; Dong, S; Han, C; Janczak, J; Lee, C -U; Pogge, R W; Abe, F; Furusawa, K; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kilmartin, P M; Korpela, A V; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Perrott, Y C; Saito, To; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Gulbis, A; Hashimoto, Y; Kniazev, A; Vaisanen, P

    2012-01-01

    The microlensing event OGLE-2008-BLG-510 is characterised by an evident asymmetric shape of the peak, promptly detected by the ARTEMiS system in real time. The skewness of the light curve appears to be compatible both with binary-lens and binary-source models, including the possibility that the lens system consists of an M dwarf orbited by a brown dwarf. The detection of this microlensing anomaly and our analysis demonstrates that: 1) automated real-time detection of weak microlensing anomalies with immediate feedback is feasible, efficient, and sensitive, 2) rather common weak features intrinsically come with ambiguities that are not easily resolved from photometric light curves, 3) a modelling approach that finds all features of parameter space rather than just the `favourite model' is required, and 4) the data quality is most crucial, where systematics can be confused with real features, in particular small higher-order effects such as orbital motion signatures. It moreover becomes apparent that events wit...

  3. Microlensing Optical Depth towards the Galactic Bulge Using Clump Giants from the MACHO Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popowski, P; Griest, K; Thomas, C L; Cook, K H; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Alves, D R; Minniti, D; Drake, A J; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D

    2005-07-14

    Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in an area of 4.5 deg{sup 2} with 739000 clump giant stars, we find {tau} = 2.17{sub -0.38}{sup +0.47} x 10{sup -6} at (l,b) = (1{sup o}.50, -2{sup o}.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients of (1.06 {+-} 0.71) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} and (0.29 {+-} 0.43) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.11, -3{sup o}.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.

  4. Preparing for the WFIRST Microlensing Survey: Simulations, Requirements, Survey Strategies, and Precursor Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, Bernard

    As one of the four primary investigations of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, the microlensing survey will monitor several square degrees of the Galactic bulge for a total of roughly one year. Its primary science goal is to "Complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from the outer habitable zone to free floating planets, including analogs of all of the planets in our Solar System with the mass of Mars or greater.'' WFIRST will therefore (a) measure the mass function of cold bound planets with masses greater than that of roughly twice the mass of the moon, including providing an estimate of the frequency of sub-Mars-mass embryos, (b) determine the frequency of free-floating planets with masses down to the Earth and below, (c) inform the frequency and habitability of potentially habitable worlds, and (d) revolutionize our understanding of the demographics of cold planets with its exquisite sensitivity to, and large expected yield of, planets in a broad and unexplored region of parameter space. In order for the microlensing survey to be successful, we must develop a plan to go from actual survey observations obtained by the WFIRST telescope and hardware to the final science products. This plan will involve many steps, the development of software, data reduction, and analysis tools at each step, and a list of requirements for each of these components. The overarching goal of this proposal is thus to develop a complete flowdown from the science goals of the microlensing survey to the mission design and hardware components. We have assembled a team of scientists with the breadth of expertise to achieve this primary goal. Our specific subgoals are as follows. Goal 1: We will refine the input Galactic models in order to provide improved microlensing event rates in the WFIRST fields. Goal 2: We will use the improved event rate estimates, along with improvements in our simulation methodology, to provide higher

  5. OGLE-2008-BLG-513Lb: The Orbital Solution for a Microlensing Planet

    CERN Document Server

    Yee, J C; Dong, Subo; Greenhill, J; Tsapras, Y; Bond, I A; Gould, A; Kozlowski, S; Fouque, P; Albrow, M D; Han, C; Monard, L A G; McCormick, J; Williams, A; Kains, N; An, J; Dominik, M

    2011-01-01

    The dominant features of the microlensing event OGLE-2008-BLG-513 arise from a 2-body lens with a mass ratio q=0.027+/-0.001. The light curve cannot be adequately described by a static, 2-body lens model, which forces us to consider the orbital motion of the lens system. Including orbital motion improves the fit by Delta chi^2>1000. We model the orbital motion as a Keplerian orbit, and with the additional information from microlens parallax, we are able to place constraints on all eight parameters of the orbit. If our model is correct, this gives us the most complete orbital information of any microlensing planet. We find that the host star is 0.18event is also unusual because the positio...

  6. OGLE-2011-BLG-0265Lb: a Jovian Microlensing Planet Orbiting an M Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Skowron, J; Udalski, A; Han, C; Sumi, T; Shvartzvald, Y; Gould, A; Dominis-Prester, D; Street, R A; Jørgensen, U G; Bennett, D P; Bozza, V; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzyński, G; Soszyński, I; Poleski, R; Kozłowski, S; Pietrukowicz, P; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Abe, F; Bhattacharya, A; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Fukunaga, D; Itow, Y; Ling, C H; Koshimoto, N; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Namba, S; Ohnishi, K; Philpott, L C; Rattenbury, N; Saito, T; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Yock, P C M; Maoz, D; Kaspi, S; Friedman, M; Almeida, L A; Batista, V; Christie, G; Choi, J -Y; DePoy, D L; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C; Hwang, K -H; Jablonski, F; Jung, Y K; Lee, C -U; McCormick, J; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Park, H; Pogge, R W; Yee, J; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Beaulieu, J -P; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Corrales, E; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Kains, N; Kane, S R; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Pollard, K R; Ranc, C; Sahu, K C; Wambsganss, J; Williams, A; Wouters, D; Tsapras, Y; Bramich, D M; Horne, K; Hundertmark, M; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Alsubai, K A; Browne, P; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dodds, P; Dominik, M; Dreizler, S; Fang, X -S; Gu, C -H; Hardis,; Harpsøe, K; Hessman, F V; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Jessen-Hansen, J; Kerins, E; Liebig, C; Lund, M; Lundkvist, M; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wertz, O

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf star that gave rise to the microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0265. Such a system is very rare among known planetary systems and thus the discovery is important for theoretical studies of planetary formation and evolution. High-cadence temporal coverage of the planetary signal combined with extended observations throughout the event allows us to accurately model the observed light curve. The final microlensing solution remains, however, degenerate yielding two possible configurations of the planet and the host star. In the case of the preferred solution, the mass of the planet is $M_{\\rm p}$ = 1.0 $\\pm$ 0.3 $M_{\\rm J}$, and the planet is orbiting a star with a mass $M$ = 0.23 $\\pm$ 0.07 $M_\\odot$. The second possible configuration (2\\sigma away) consists of a planet with $M_{\\rm p}$ = 0.6 $\\pm$ 0.2 $M_{\\rm J}$ and host star with $M$ = 0.15 $\\pm$ 0.06 $M_{\\odot}$. The system is located in the Galactic disk 3-4 kpc towards the Galactic bulge. In...

  7. The First Circumbinary Planet Found by Microlensing: OGLE-2007-BLG-349L(AB)c

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, D P; Udalski, A; Gould, A; Tsapras, Y; Kubas, D; Bond, I A; Greenhill, J; Cassan, A; Rattenbury, N J; Boyajian, T S; Luhn, J; Penny, M T; Anderson, J; Abe, F; Bhattacharya, A; Botzler, C S; Donachie, M; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Hirao, Y; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Li, M C A; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagakane, M; Ohnishi, K; Oyokawa, H; Perrott, Y C; Saito, To; Sharan, A; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Yonehara, A; Yock, P C M; Szymanski, M K; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Allen, W; DePoy, D; Gal-Yam, A; Gaudi, B S; Han, C; Monard, I A G; Ofek, E; Pogge, R W; Street, R A; Bramich, D M; Dominik, M; Horne, K; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cole, A; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouque, P; Hundertmark, M; Jorgensen, U G; Kains, N; Kane, S R; Marquette, J -B; Menzies, J; Pollard, K R; Ranc, C; Sahu, K C; Wambsganss, J; Williams, A; Zub, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the first circumbinary planet microlensing event, OGLE-2007-BLG-349. This event has a strong planetary signal that is best fit with a mass ratio of $q \\approx 3.4\\times 10^{-4}$, but there is an additional signal due to an additional lens mass, either another planet or another star. We find acceptable light curve fits with two classes of models: 2-planet models (with a single host star) and circumbinary planet models. The light curve also reveals a significant microlensing parallax effect, which constraints the mass of the lens system to be $M_L \\approx 0.7 M_\\odot$. Hubble Space Telescope images resolve the lens and source stars from their neighbors, and indicate excess flux due to the star(s) in the lens system. This is consistent with the predicted flux from the circumbinary models, where the lens mass is shared between two stars, but there is not enough flux to be consistent with the 2-planet, 1-star models. So, only the circumbinary models are consistent with the HST data. They...

  8. Optimal survey strategies and predicted planet yields for the Korean microlensing telescope network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Calen B.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Skowron, Jan; Penny, Matthew T.; Gould, Andrew P. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Han, Cheongho [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Nataf, David, E-mail: henderson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2014-10-10

    The Korean Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) will consist of three 1.6 m telescopes each with a 4 deg{sup 2} field of view (FoV) and will be dedicated to monitoring the Galactic Bulge to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. KMTNet's combination of aperture size, FoV, cadence, and longitudinal coverage will provide a unique opportunity to probe exoplanet demographics in an unbiased way. Here we present simulations that optimize the observing strategy for and predict the planetary yields of KMTNet. We find preferences for four target fields located in the central Bulge and an exposure time of t {sub exp} = 120 s, leading to the detection of ∼2200 microlensing events per year. We estimate the planet detection rates for planets with mass and separation across the ranges 0.1 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} ≤ 1000 and 0.4 ≤ a/AU ≤ 16, respectively. Normalizing these rates to the cool-planet mass function of Cassan et al., we predict KMTNet will be approximately uniformly sensitive to planets with mass 5 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} ≤ 1000 and will detect ∼20 planets per year per dex in mass across that range. For lower-mass planets with mass 0.1 ≤ M{sub p} /M {sub ⊕} < 5, we predict KMTNet will detect ∼10 planets per year. We also compute the yields KMTNet will obtain for free-floating planets (FFPs) and predict KMTNet will detect ∼1 Earth-mass FFP per year, assuming an underlying population of one such planet per star in the Galaxy. Lastly, we investigate the dependence of these detection rates on the number of observatories, the photometric precision limit, and optimistic assumptions regarding seeing, throughput, and flux measurement uncertainties.

  9. Optimal survey strategies and predicted planet yields for the Korean microlensing telescope network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korean Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) will consist of three 1.6 m telescopes each with a 4 deg2 field of view (FoV) and will be dedicated to monitoring the Galactic Bulge to detect exoplanets via gravitational microlensing. KMTNet's combination of aperture size, FoV, cadence, and longitudinal coverage will provide a unique opportunity to probe exoplanet demographics in an unbiased way. Here we present simulations that optimize the observing strategy for and predict the planetary yields of KMTNet. We find preferences for four target fields located in the central Bulge and an exposure time of t exp = 120 s, leading to the detection of ∼2200 microlensing events per year. We estimate the planet detection rates for planets with mass and separation across the ranges 0.1 ≤ Mp /M ⊕ ≤ 1000 and 0.4 ≤ a/AU ≤ 16, respectively. Normalizing these rates to the cool-planet mass function of Cassan et al., we predict KMTNet will be approximately uniformly sensitive to planets with mass 5 ≤ Mp /M ⊕ ≤ 1000 and will detect ∼20 planets per year per dex in mass across that range. For lower-mass planets with mass 0.1 ≤ Mp /M ⊕ < 5, we predict KMTNet will detect ∼10 planets per year. We also compute the yields KMTNet will obtain for free-floating planets (FFPs) and predict KMTNet will detect ∼1 Earth-mass FFP per year, assuming an underlying population of one such planet per star in the Galaxy. Lastly, we investigate the dependence of these detection rates on the number of observatories, the photometric precision limit, and optimistic assumptions regarding seeing, throughput, and flux measurement uncertainties.

  10. Turning AGN Microlensing From a Curiosity Into a Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S; Morgan, C; Morgan, N; Poindexter, S; Chartas, G

    2006-01-01

    Microlensing of gravitationally lensed quasars by the stars in the foreground lens galaxy can be used to probe the nature of dark matter, to determine the mean stellar mass in the lens galaxy, and to measure the internal structure of quasar accretion disks. Until recently, little progress has been made toward using microlensing for these purposes because of the difficulty in obtaining the necessary data and the lack of good analysis methods. In the last few years, both problems have been solved. In particular, Bayesian analysis methods provide a general approach to measuring quantities of physical interest and their uncertainties from microlensing light curves. We discuss the data and the analysis methods and show preliminary results for all three astrophysical applications.

  11. VCSEL collimation using self-aligned integrated polymer microlenses

    OpenAIRE

    Levallois, Christophe; Bardinal, Véronique; Vergnenegre, Corinne; Leïchlé, Thierry; Camps, Thierry; Daran, Emmanuelle; Doucet, Jean-Baptiste

    2008-01-01

    International audience We report on the design and fabrication of polymer microlenses fabricated on patterned SU-8 layers in view of integrating microlenses on VCSEL arrays for laser beam shaping. For a standard top-emitting VCSEL, the lens has to be fabricated on a thick intermediate layer (pedestal) whose optimal thickness can be modelled as a function of the initial and of the aimed optical properties of the VCSEL beam. In this work, pedestals are fabricated with SU-8, which is a negati...

  12. Prospects for Characterizing Host Stars of the Planetary System Detections Predicted for the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Calen B

    2014-01-01

    I investigate the possibility of constraining the flux of the lens (i.e., host star) for the types of planetary systems the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network is predicted to find. I examine the potential to obtain lens flux measurements by 1) imaging a lens once it is spatially resolved from the source, 2) measuring the elongation of the point spread function of the microlensing target (lens+source) when the lens and source are still unresolved, and 3) taking prompt follow-up photometry. In each case I simulate observing programs for a representative example of current ground-based adaptive optics (AO) facilities (specifically NACO on VLT), future ground-based AO facilities (GMTIFS on GMT), and future space telescopes (NIRCAM on $JWST$). Given the predicted distribution of relative lens-source proper motions, I find that the lens flux could be measured to a precision of $\\sigma_{H_{\\ell}} \\leq 0.1$ for $\\gtrsim$60$\\%$ of planet detections $\\geq$5 years after each microlensing event, for a simulated observ...

  13. Searching for intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters with gravitational microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kains, N.; Bramich, D. M.; Sahu, K. C.; Calamida, A.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the potential of the gravitational microlensing method as a unique tool to detect unambiguous signals caused by intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters. We select clusters near the line of sight to the Galactic bulge and the Small Magellanic Cloud, estimate the density of background stars for each of them, and carry out simulations in order to estimate the probabilities of detecting the astrometric signatures caused by black hole lensing. We find that for several clusters, the probability of detecting such an event is significant with available archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Specifically, we find that M 22 is the cluster with the best chances of yielding an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) detection via astrometric microlensing. If M 22 hosts an IMBH of mass 105 M⊙, then the probability that at least one star will yield a detectable signal over an observational baseline of 20 years is ˜86 per cent, while the probability of a null result is around 14 per cent. For an IMBH of mass 106 M⊙, the detection probability rises to >99 per cent. Future observing facilities will also extend the available time baseline, improving the chance of detections for the clusters we consider.

  14. Searching for intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters with gravitational microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Kains, N; Sahu, K C; Calamida, A

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the potential of the gravitational microlensing method as a unique tool to detect unambiguous signals caused by intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters. We select clusters near the line of sight to the Galactic Bulge and the Small Magellanic Cloud, estimate the density of background stars for each of them, and carry out simulations in order to estimate the probabilities of detecting the astrometric signatures caused by black hole lensing. We find that for several clusters, the probability of detecting such an event is significant with available archival data from the Hubble Space Telescope. Specifically, we find that M 22 is the cluster with the best chances of yielding an IMBH detection via astrometric microlensing. If M 22 hosts an IMBH of mass $10^5M_\\odot$, then the probability that at least one star will yield a detectable signal over an observational baseline of 20 years is $\\sim 86\\%$, while the probability of a null result is around $14\\%$. For an IMBH of mass $10^6M_\\odot$, the ...

  15. Microlensing towards the Small Magellanic Cloud EROS 2 first year survey

    CERN Document Server

    Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie

    1998-01-01

    We present here an analysis of the light curves of 5.3 million stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud observed by EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres). One star exhibits a variation that is best interpreted as due to gravitational microlensing by an unseen object. This candidate was also reported by the MACHO collaboration. The Einstein radius crossing time is 123 days (once corrected for blending), corresponding to lensing by a Halo object of 2.6^{+8.2}_{-2.3} Msun. The maximum magnification is a factor of 2.6. The light curve also displays a periodic modulation with a 2.5% amplitude and a period of 5.1~days. Parallax analysis of the candidate indicates that a Halo lens would need to have a mass of at least 1.2 Msun, although a lens in the SMC could have a mass as low as 0.1Msun. We estimate the optical depth for microlensing towards the SMC due to this event to be ~ 3.3 10^{-7}, with an uncertainty dominated by Poisson statistics. We show that this optical depth corresponds to about half that expect...

  16. Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 was held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. The 10th ARRCN Symposium 2017 will be held during October 2017 in the Davao, Philippines. International Symposium on the Montagu's Harrier (Circus pygargus «The Montagu's Harrier in Europe. Status. Threats. Protection», organized by the environmental organization «Landesbund für Vogelschutz in Bayern e.V.» (LBV was held on November 20-22, 2015 in Germany. The location of this event was the city of Wurzburg in Bavaria.

  17. PROSPECTS FOR CHARACTERIZING HOST STARS OF THE PLANETARY SYSTEM DETECTIONS PREDICTED FOR THE KOREAN MICROLENSING TELESCOPE NETWORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Calen B., E-mail: henderson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    I investigate the possibility of constraining the flux of the lens (i.e., host star) for the types of planetary systems the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network is predicted to find. I examine the potential to obtain lens flux measurements by (1) imaging the lens once it is spatially resolved from the source, (2) measuring the elongation of the point-spread function of the microlensing target (lens+source) when the lens and source are still unresolved, and (3) taking prompt follow-up photometry. In each case I simulate the observing programs for a representative example of current ground-based adaptive optics (AO) facilities (specifically NACO on the Very Large Telescope), future ground-based AO facilities (GMTIFS on the Giant Magellan Telescope, GMT), and future space telescopes (NIRCAM on the James Webb Space Telescope, JWST). Given the predicted distribution of relative lens-source proper motions, I find that the lens flux could be measured to a precision of σ{sub H{sub ℓ}}≤0.1 for ≳60% of planet detections ≥5 yr after each microlensing event for a simulated observing program using GMT, which images resolved lenses. NIRCAM on JWST would be able to carry out equivalently high-precision measurements for ∼28% of events Δt = 10 yr after each event by imaging resolved lenses. I also explore the effects various blend components would have on the mass derived from prompt follow-up photometry, including companions to the lens, companions to the source, and unassociated interloping stars. I find that undetected blend stars would cause catastrophic failures (i.e., >50% fractional uncertainty in the inferred lens mass) for ≲ (16 · f {sub bin})% of planet detections, where f {sub bin} is the binary fraction, with the majority of these failures occurring for host stars with mass ≲0.3 M {sub ☉}.

  18. An X-Ray Microlensing Test of the Au-Scale Central Structure of the Quadruple Quasar 2237+0305

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineshige, Shin

    2011-09-01

    We propose Chandra observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar Q2237+0305 during a microlensing event to reveal its AU scale central structure. The quasar being monitored from the ground regularly to ascertain the onset of the event. As it occurs, we will measure X-ray spectral variations with Chandra and compare with those taken before and after the event. Since a small region of the quasar accretion disk is strongly magnified during the event, we will be able to limit the mass contained on scales of several AUs and to probe the physical properties of X-ray emitting gas in the vicinity of the black hole. Together with ground-based telescope, we can resolve the quasar emission regions at multiple wavelength. This provides a critical test of quasar accretion disk theories.

  19. The Spitzer Microlensing Program as a Probe for Globular Cluster Planets: Analysis of OGLE-2015-BLG-0448

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleski, Radosław; Zhu, Wei; Christie, Grant W.; Udalski, Andrzej; Gould, Andrew; Bachelet, Etienne; Skottfelt, Jesper; Calchi Novati, Sebastiano; Szymański, M. K.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, Szymon; Skowron, J.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; OGLE group; Beichman, C.; Bryden, G.; Carey, S.; Fausnaugh, M.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Pogge, R. W.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Wibking, B.; Yee, J. C.; Spitzer team; Beatty, T. G.; Eastman, J. D.; Drummond, J.; Friedmann, M.; Henderson, M.; Johnson, J. A.; Kaspi, S.; Maoz, D.; McCormick, J.; McCrady, N.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Porritt, I.; Relles, H. M.; Sliski, D. H.; Tan, T.-G.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Wright, J. T.; μFUN group; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Bramich, D. M.; Horne, K.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Menzies, J.; Figuera Jaimes, R.; Wambsganss, J.; Schmidt, R.; Cassan, A.; Ranc, C.; Mao, S.; project, RoboNet; Bozza, V.; Dominik, M.; Hundertmark, M. P. G.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Andersen, M. I.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Ciceri, S.; D’Ago, G.; Evans, D. F.; Gu, S.-H.; Hinse, T. C.; Kains, N.; Kerins, E.; Korhonen, H.; Kuffmeier, M.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Rasmussen, R. T.; Scarpetta, G.; Southworth, J.; Surdej, J.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Verma, P.; von Essen, C.; Wang, Y.-B.; Wertz, O.; MiNDSTEp group

    2016-05-01

    The microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0448 was observed by Spitzer and lay within the tidal radius of the globular cluster NGC 6558. The event had moderate magnification and was intensively observed, hence it had the potential to probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters. We measure the proper motion of NGC 6558 ({{\\boldsymbol{μ }}}{cl}(N,E)=(+0.36+/- 0.10,+1.42+/- 0.10) {{mas}} {{{yr}}}-1) as well as the source and show that the lens is not a cluster member. Even though this particular event does not probe the distribution of planets in globular clusters, other potential cluster lens events can be verified using our methodology. Additionally, we find that microlens parallax measured using Optical Gravitational Lens Experiment (OGLE) photometry is consistent with the value found based on the light curve displacement between the Earth and Spitzer.

  20. Gravitational Microlensing as a probe of Quasar Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, David

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing provides information at the micro-to-nano arcsecond scale necessary to probe the structure of the central engine of quasars. We can now determine the radius of the broad line emitting regions, and measure the temperature profile of the continuum emitting region using single-epoch observations. I will present X-shooter spectroscopy that provides new insight into the accretion mechanism, and the structure of the broad line region.

  1. OGLE-2015-BLG-0051/KMT-2015-BLG-0048Lb: a Giant Planet Orbiting a Low-mass Bulge Star Discovered by High-cadence Microlensing Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Han, C; Gould, A; Bozza, V; Jung, Y K; Albrow, M D; Kim, S -L; Lee, C -U; Cha, S -M; Kim, D -J; Lee, Y; Park, B -G; Shin, I -G; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Poleski, R; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pawlak, M

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of an extrasolar planet detected from the combined data of a microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0051/KMT-2015-BLG-0048 acquired by two microlensing surveys. Despite that the short planetary signal occurred in the very early Bulge season during which the lensing event could be seen for just about an hour, the signal was continuously and densely covered. From the Bayesian analysis using models of the mass function, matter and velocity distributions combined with the information of the angular Einstein radius, it is found that the host of the planet is located in the Galactic bulge. The planet has a mass $0.72_{-0.07}^{+0.65}\\ M_{\\rm J}$ and it is orbiting a low-mass M-dwarf host with a projected separation $d_\\perp=0.73 \\pm 0.08$ AU. The discovery of the planet demonstrates the capability of the current high-cadence microlensing lensing surveys in detecting and characterizing planets.

  2. Campaign 9 of the $K2$ Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Calen B; Street, Rachel A; Bennett, David P; Hogg, David W; Poleski, R; Barclay, T; Barentsen, G; Howell, S B; Udalski, A; Szymański, M K; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Kozłowski, S; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pietrukowicz, P; Soszyński, I; Ulaczyk, K; Pawlak, M; Sumi, T; Abe, F; Asakura, Y; Barry, R K; Bhattacharya, A; Bond, I A; Donachie, M; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Hirao, Y; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Li, M C A; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagakane, M; Ohnishi, K; Oyokawa, H; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sharan, A; Sullivan, D J; Tristram, P J; Yonehara, A; Bachelet, E; Bramich, D A; Cassan, A; Dominik, M; Jaimes, R Figuera; Horne, K; Hundertmark, M; Mao, S; Ranc, C; Schmidt, R; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Tsapras, Y; Wambsganss, J; Akeson, R; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Beichman, C A; Bozza, V; Bryden, G; Ciardi, D; Cole, A; Coutures, C; Dong, S; Foreman-Mackey, D; Fouqué, P; Gaudi, B S; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Jørgensen, U; Lang, D; Lineweaver, C; Marquette, J -B; Mogavero, Federico; Morales, J C; Nataf, D; Pogge, R W; Santerne, A; Shvartzvald, Y; Suzuki, D; Tamura, M; Tisserand, P; Wang, D; Zhu, W

    2016-01-01

    $K2$'s Campaign 9 ($K2$C9) will conduct a $\\sim$3.4 deg$^{2}$ survey toward the Galactic bulge from 7/April through 1/July of 2016 that will leverage the spatial separation between $K2$ and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax $\\pi_{\\rm E}$ for $\\gtrsim$120 microlensing events, including several planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this white paper we provide an overview of the $K2$C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of $K2$C9, and the array of ground-based resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues throug...

  3. MOA-2011-BLG-293LB: First microlensing planet possibly in the habitable zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, V.; Gould, A.; Yee, J. C.; Gaudi, B. S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Beaulieu, J.-P. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98 Bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Fukui, A. [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Sumi, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Udalski, A., E-mail: virginie@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: gould@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: jyee@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: beaulieu@iap.fr, E-mail: bennett@nd.edu, E-mail: afukui@oao.nao.ac.jp, E-mail: sumi@ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland)

    2014-01-01

    We used Keck adaptive optics observations to identify the first planet discovered by microlensing to lie in or near the habitable zone, i.e., at projected separation r = 1.1 ± 0.1 AU from its M{sub L} = 0.86 ± 0.06 M {sub ☉} host, being the highest microlensing mass definitely identified. The planet has a mass m{sub p} = 4.8 ± 0.3 M {sub Jup}, and could in principle have habitable moons. This is also the first planet to be identified as being in the Galactic bulge with good confidence: D{sub L} = 7.72 ± 0.44 kpc. The planet/host masses and distance were previously not known, but only estimated using Bayesian priors based on a Galactic model. These estimates had suggested that the planet might be a super-Jupiter orbiting an M dwarf, a very rare class of planets. We obtained high-resolution JHK images using Keck adaptive optics to detect the lens and so test this hypothesis. We clearly detect light from a G dwarf at the position of the event, and exclude all interpretations other than that this is the lens with high confidence (95%), using a new astrometric technique. The calibrated magnitude of the planet host star is H{sub L} = 19.16 ± 0.13. We infer the following probabilities for the three possible orbital configurations of the gas giant planet: 53% to be in the habitable zone, 35% to be near the habitable zone, and 12% to be beyond the snow line, depending on the atmospherical conditions and the uncertainties on the semimajor axis.

  4. Detection efficiencies of microlensing data sets to stellar and planetary companions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudi, BS; Sackett, PD

    2000-01-01

    Microlensing light curves are now being monitored with the temporal sampling and photometric precision required to detect small perturbations due to planetary companions of the primary lens. Microlensing is complementary to other planetary search techniques, both in the mass and orbital separation o

  5. High magnification events by MOA in 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Yock, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing events of high magnification provide exceptional sensitivity to the presence of low-mass planets orbiting the lens star, including planets with masses as low as that of Earth. The essential requirement for the detection of such planets in these events is that the FWHM of the light curve be monitored continuously, or as nearly continuously as possible. The dependence of planet detectability on the magnification caused by microlensing, on the planet mass and planet location, and on the size of the source star, may be understood in terms of simple geometrical properties of microlensing that have been known since 1964. Planetary signals of low-mass planets are found to be approximately independent of the magnification caused by microlensing. This implies that planets can be detected in events over a wide range of magnifications, from moderately high values ~ 100 to very high values ~ 1000. The former values are likely to yield more clear-cut separations of the stellar and planetary feat...

  6. GERLUMPH Data Release 2: 2.5 billion simulated microlensing light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Vernardos, Georgios; Bate, Nicholas F; Croton, Darren; Vohl, Dany

    2015-01-01

    In the upcoming synoptic all--sky survey era of astronomy, thousands of new multiply imaged quasars are expected to be discovered and monitored regularly. Light curves from the images of gravitationally lensed quasars are further affected by superimposed variability due to microlensing. In order to disentangle the microlensing from the intrinsic variability of the light curves, the time delays between the multiple images have to be accurately measured. The resulting microlensing light curves can then be analyzed to reveal information about the background source, such as the size of the quasar accretion disc. In this paper we present the most extensive and coherent collection of simulated microlensing light curves; we have generated $>2.5$ billion light curves using the GERLUMPH high resolution microlensing magnification maps. Our simulations can be used to: train algorithms to measure lensed quasar time delays, plan future monitoring campaigns, and study light curve properties throughout parameter space. Our ...

  7. Broadband Metallic Planar Microlenses in an Array: the Focusing Coupling Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiting; Wang, Ping; Zhu, Yechuan; Diao, Jinshuai

    2016-12-01

    The microlens arrays (MLAs) are widely utilized for various applications. However, when the lens size and the spacing between two adjacent microlenses are of the length scale of the working wavelength, the diffraction effect plays a vital role in the final focusing performance. We suggest a kind of broadband metallic planar microlenses, based on which the ultra-compact microlens arrays are also constructed. The focusing coupling effect revealing for such devices is then investigated in detail by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, with the emphasis on the changing spacing between adjacent microlenses, the working wavelength, the diameter of microlenses, and the array size. The results show that a larger spacing, a larger lens size, a shorter wavelength, or a smaller array scale can lead to a weaker focusing coupling effect. This research provides an important technological reference to design an array of metallic planar microlenses with the well-controlled focusing performance. PMID:26922796

  8. The MACHO Project HST Follow-Up: The Large Magellanic Cloud Microlensing Source Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C.A.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Berkeley; Drake, A.J.; /Caltech; Cook, K.H.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Berkeley; Bennett, D.P.; /Caltech /Notre Dame U.; Popowski, P.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst.; Dalal, N.; /Toronto U.; Nikolaev, S.; /LLNL, Livermore; Alcock, C.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Axelrod, T.S.; /Arizona U.; Becker, A.C. /Washington U., Seattle; Freeman, K.C.; /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek; Geha, M.; /Yale U.; Griest, K.; /UC, San Diego; Keller, S.C.; /LLNL, Livermore; Lehner, M.J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Taipei, Inst. Astron. Astrophys.; Marshall, S.L.; /SLAC; Minniti, D.; /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Vatican Astron. Observ.; Pratt, M.R.; /Aradigm, Hayward; Quinn, P.J.; /Western Australia U.; Stubbs, C.W.; /UC, Berkeley /Harvard U.; Sutherland, W.; /Oxford U. /Oran, Sci. Tech. U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst. /McMaster U.

    2009-06-25

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 photometry of 13 microlensed source stars from the 5.7 year Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) survey conducted by the MACHO Project. The microlensing source stars are identified by deriving accurate centroids in the ground-based MACHO images using difference image analysis (DIA) and then transforming the DIA coordinates to the HST frame. None of these sources is coincident with a background galaxy, which rules out the possibility that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample is contaminated with misidentified supernovae or AGN in galaxies behind the LMC. This supports the conclusion that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample has only a small amount of contamination due to non-microlensing forms of variability. We compare the WFPC2 source star magnitudes with the lensed flux predictions derived from microlensing fits to the light curve data. In most cases the source star brightness is accurately predicted. Finally, we develop a statistic which constrains the location of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing source stars with respect to the distributions of stars and dust in the LMC and compare this to the predictions of various models of LMC microlensing. This test excludes at {approx}> 90% confidence level models where more than 80% of the source stars lie behind the LMC. Exotic models that attempt to explain the excess LMC microlensing optical depth seen by MACHO with a population of background sources are disfavored or excluded by this test. Models in which most of the lenses reside in a halo or spheroid distribution associated with either the Milky Way or the LMC are consistent which these data, but LMC halo or spheroid models are favored by the combined MACHO and EROS microlensing results.

  9. Chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge as traced by microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars. V. Evidence for a wide age distribution and a complex MDF

    CERN Document Server

    Bensby, T; Feltzing, S; Johnson, J A; Gould, A; Cohen, J G; Asplund, M; Meléndez, J; Lucatello, S; Han, C; Thompson, I; Gal-Yam, A; Udalski, A; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Kohei, W; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Suzuki, K; Takino, S; Tristram, P; Yamai, N; Yonehara, A

    2012-01-01

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained during gravitational microlensing events we present a detailed elemental abundance analysis of 32 dwarf and subgiant stars in the Galactic bulge. [ABRIDGED], we now have 58 microlensed bulge dwarfs and subgiants that have been homogeneously analysed. The main characteristics of the sample and the findings that can be drawn are: (i) The metallicity distribution (MDF) is wide and spans all metallicities between [Fe/H]=-1.9 to +0.6; (ii) The dip in the MDF around solar metallicity that was apparent in our previous analysis of a smaller sample (26 microlensed stars) is no longer evident; instead it has a complex structure and indications of multiple components are starting to emerge. [ABRIDGED]; (iii) The stars with [Fe/H]-0.1 show a wide variety of ages, ranging from 2 to 12 Gyr with a distribution that has a dominant peak around 4-5 Gyr and a tail towards higher ages; (v) There are indications in the [alpha/Fe] - [Fe/H] that the "knee" occurs around [Fe/H] = -0.3 to -0....

  10. Gravitational Microlensing and the Structure of Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Chelouche, D

    2005-01-01

    We show that invaluable information on the structure of quasar outflows can be obtained by considering microlensing (ML) induced variability of absorption line troughs in lensed quasars. Depending on the structure and geometry of the outflowing gas, such extrinsic line variability can be manifested as changes to the equivalent width of the line as well as line profile distortions. Here we consider several physically distinct outflow models, having very similar spectral predictions, and show how ML induced absorption line variability can be used to distinguish between them. The merits of future systematic studies of these effects are exemplified.

  11. Relativity and Exoplanets: Gravitational Microlensing, Doppler Beaming, and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, Scott

    2016-03-01

    Perhaps surprisingly, the theories of both special and general relativity play important roles in several areas of exoplanet research. I will review the most important and intriguing of these applications. The most obvious case is gravitational microlensing, which has become a fairly routine method of finding planets, and is poised to become even more important in the next decade. I will also briefly survey the numerous other areas where relativity plays a role in exoplanet theory and observations, including photometric Doppler beaming, general relativistic precession, transits of compact objects, and even (potentially) gravitational wave experiments.

  12. On the Feasibility of Characterizing Free-floating Planets with Current and Future Space-based Microlensing Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Calen B

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous space- and ground-based microlensing surveys, such as K2's Campaign 9 (K2C9) and $WFIRST$, facilitate measuring the masses and distances of free-floating planet (FFP) candidates. FFPs are identified as single-lens events with a short timescale, of-order 1 day. Measuring the mass of the lensing object requires determining the finite size of the source star $\\rho$, as well as the microlens parallax $\\pi_{\\rm E}$. A planet that is bound to but widely separated from a host star can produce a light curve similar to that of an FFP. This tension can be resolved with high-resolution imaging of the microlensing target to search for the lens flux $F_l$ from a possible host star. Here we investigate the accessible parameter space for each of these components --- $\\pi_{\\rm E}$, $\\rho$, and $F_l$ --- considering different satellites for a range of FFP masses, Galactic distances, and source star properties. We find that at the beginning of K2C9, when its projected separation from the Earth (as viewed from the ...

  13. The OGLE-II event sc5_2859 a Classical Nova outburst?

    CERN Document Server

    Afonso, C; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Beaulieu, J P; Blanc, G; CSmith, M; Charlot, X; Coutures, C; De Kat, J; Ferlet, R; Fouqué, P; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Graff, D; Gros, M; Hamadache, C; Haïssinski, J; Le Guillou, Laurent; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Marquette, J B; Maurice, E; Maury, A; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Prévôt, L; Rahal, Y R; Rich, J; Spiro, M; Tisserand, P; Vidal-Madjar, A; Vigroux, L; Wagner, R M; Zylberajch, S

    2006-01-01

    The OGLE-II event sc5_2859 was previously identified as the third longest microlensing event ever observed. Additional photometric observations from the EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) survey and spectroscopic observations of the candidate star are used to test the microlensing hypothesis.The combined OGLE and EROS data provide a high quality coverage of the light curve. The colour of the sc5_2859 event is seen to change with time. A spectrum taken in 2003 exhibits a strong Halpha emission line. The additionnal data show that the OGLE-II sc5_2859 event is actually a classical nova outburst.

  14. Dark Matter Fraction in Lens Galaxies: New Estimates from Microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez-Vicente, J; Kochanek, C S; Muñoz, J A

    2014-01-01

    We present a joint estimate of the stellar/dark matter mass fraction in lens galaxies and the average size of the accretion disk of lensed quasars from microlensing measurements of 27 quasar image pairs seen through 19 lens galaxies. The maximum likelihood estimate for the fraction of the surface mass density in the form of stars is $\\alpha=0.2^{+0.1}_{-0.1}$ near the Einstein radius of the lenses ($\\sim 1 - 2$ effective radii). The estimate for the average accretion disk size is $r_s=6.0^{+3.0}_{-1.1}\\sqrt{M/0.3M_\\sun}$ light-days. The fraction of mass in stars at these radii is significantly larger than previous estimates from microlensing studies assuming quasars were point-like. The corresponding local dark matter fraction of 80\\ is in good agreement with other estimates based on strong lensing or kinematics. The size of the accretion disk inferred in the present study is slightly larger than previous estimates.

  15. Separating intrinsic and microlensing variability using parallax measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Haugan, S V H

    1995-01-01

    In gravitational lens systems with 3 or more resolved images of a quasar, the intrinsic variability may be unambiguously separated from the microlensing variability through parallax measurements from 3 observers when there is no relative motion of the lens masses (Refsdal 1993). In systems with fewer than 3 resolved images, however, this separation is not straightforward. A general approach that may be used for this purpose is presented. For simplicity, only the one-dimensional case is considered in detail: Given a well-sampled time series of the observed flux at two points in space with a known separation, choosing a velocity v_{\\perp} of the observers perpendicular to the line of sight determines the microlensing magnification history, and thereby also the intrinsic variability. The velocity is chosen by minimizing some measure (\\chi^2) of the residual intrinsic variability. In many cases this gives a close approximation to the true magnification. In cases where the relative motion of the lensing point mass...

  16. The Exoplanet Microlensing Survey by the Proposed WFIRST Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Richard; Kruk, Jeffrey; Anderson, Jay; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe; Bennett, David P.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Cheng, Ed; Gaudi, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Kane, Stephen; Lunine, Jonathan; Sumi, Takahiro; Tanner, Angelle; Traub, Wesley

    2012-01-01

    The New Worlds, New Horizons report released by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey Board in 2010 listed the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) as the highest-priority large space mission for the . coming decade. This observatory will provide wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopy at near infrared wavelengths. The scientific goals are to obtain a statistical census of exoplanets using gravitational microlensing. measure the expansion history of and the growth of structure in the Universe by multiple methods, and perform other astronomical surveys to be selected through a guest observer program. A Science Definition Team has been established to assist NASA in the development of a Design Reference Mission that accomplishes this diverse array of science programs with a single observatory. In this paper we present the current WFIRST payload concept and the expected capabilities for planet detection. The observatory. with science goals that are complimentary to the Kepler exoplanet transit mission, is designed to complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from habitable Earth-mass planets to free floating planets, including analogs to all of the planets in our Solar System except Mercury. The exoplanet microlensing survey will observe for 500 days spanning 5 years. This long temporal baseline will enable the determination of the masses for most detected exoplanets down to 0.1 Earth masses.

  17. A Search for Stellar-Mass Black Holes via Astrometric Microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, J R; Ofek, E O; Udalski, A; Kozlowski, S

    2016-01-01

    While dozens of stellar mass black holes have been discovered in binary systems, isolated black holes have eluded detection. Their presence can be inferred when they lens light from a background star. We attempt to detect the astrometric lensing signatures of three photometrically identified microlensing events, OGLE-2011-BLG-0022, OGLE-2011-BLG-0125, and OGLE-2012-BLG-0169 (OB110022, OB110125, and OB120169), located toward the Galactic Bulge. These events were selected because of their long durations, which statistically favors more massive lenses. Astrometric measurements were made over 1-2 years using laser-guided adaptive optics observations from the W. M. Keck Observatory. Lens model parameters were first constrained by the photometric light curves. The OB120169 light curve is well-fit by a single-lens model, while both OB110022 and OB110125 light curves favor binary-lens models. Using the photometric fits as prior information, no significant astrometric lensing signal was detected and all targets were c...

  18. Besan\\c{c}on Galactic model analysis of MOA-II microlensing: evidence for a mass deficit in the inner bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Awiphan, Supachai; Robin, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Galactic bulge microlensing surveys provide a probe of Galactic structure. We present the first field-by-field comparison between microlensing observations and the Besan\\c{c}on population synthesis Galactic model. Using an updated version of the model we provide maps of optical depth, average event duration and event rate for resolved source populations and for difference imaging (DIA) events. We also compare the predicted event timescale distribution to that observed. The simulation follows the selection criteria of the MOA-II survey (Sumi et al. 2013). We modify the Besan\\c{c}on model to include M dwarfs and brown dwarfs. Our best fit model requires a brown dwarf mass function slope of $-0.4$. The model provides good agreement with the observed average duration, and respectable consistency with the shape of the timescale distribution (reduced $\\chi^2 \\simeq 2.2$). The DIA and resolved source limiting yields bracket the observed number of events by MOA-II ($2.17\\times$ and $0.83\\times$ the number observed, r...

  19. Adventures in the microlensing cloud: large datasets, eResearch tools, and GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Vernardos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    As astronomy enters the petascale data era, astronomers are faced with new challenges relating to storage, access and management of data. A shift from the traditional approach of combining data and analysis at the desktop to the use of remote services, pushing the computation to the data, is now underway. In the field of cosmological gravitational microlensing, future synoptic all--sky surveys are expected to bring the number of multiply imaged quasars from the few tens that are currently known to a few thousands. This inflow of observational data, together with computationally demanding theoretical modelling via the production of microlensing magnification maps, requires a new approach. We present our technical solutions to supporting the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). This extensive dataset for cosmological microlensing modelling comprises over 70,000 individual magnification maps and ${\\sim}10^6$ related results. We describe our approaches to hosting, or...

  20. Accretion Disc Structure and Orientation in the Lensed and Microlensed Q0957+561 Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, R E

    2005-01-01

    Because quasars are unresolved in optical imaging, their structures must presently be inferred. Gravitational microlensing offers the possibility to produce information about the luminous structure provided the Einstein ring diameter of the microlensing particle is comparable to or smaller than the radiating quasar components. The long brightness history measured for the Q0957 quasar has been analyzed previously for information about the microlensing particles, and evidence for the existence of a cosmologically significant population of planetary mass particles has been reported. The microlensing results have also directly determined the sizes of the ultraviolet light emitting surfaces in the quasar Autocorrelation analysis of the same brightness record has produced evidence for complex structure in the quasar; if the quasar suddenly brightens today, it is probable that it will brighten again after 129, 190, 540, and 620 days. We interpret these lags as the result of luminous structure around the quasar, and ...

  1. Crosstalk reduction in free space optical interconnects systems using microlenses with Gaussian transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ababneh, Nedal

    2014-05-01

    A novel method to reduce the diffraction crosstalk for micro-lens based free space optical interconnects is presented. Instead of using microlenses with uniform transmittance apertures, the use of microlenses with non-uniform transmittance apertures is proposed. It is shown that the diffraction crosstalk which exists in the free space interconnects systems that use microlenses with uniform transmittance apertures can be substantially reduced by using microlenses with Gaussian transmittance. The optical field at the detectors array using both the uniform and Gaussian apertures have been derived and used to calculate the crosstalk. Numerical results have been introduced to show the improvement of the signal-to-crosstalk ratio when using the Gaussian transmittance for the microlens.

  2. GERLUMPH Data Release 1: High-resolution cosmological microlensing magnification maps and eResearch tools

    CERN Document Server

    Vernardos, Georgios; Bate, Nicholas F; Croton, Darren

    2014-01-01

    As synoptic all-sky surveys begin to discover new multiply lensed quasars, the flow of data will enable statistical cosmological microlensing studies of sufficient size to constrain quasar accretion disc and supermassive black hole properties. In preparation for this new era, we are undertaking the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). We present here the GERLUMPH Data Release 1, which consists of 12342 high resolution cosmological microlensing magnification maps and provides the first uniform coverage of the convergence, shear and smooth matter fraction parameter space. We use these maps to perform a comprehensive numerical investigation of the mass-sheet degeneracy, finding excellent agreement with its predictions. We study the effect of smooth matter on microlensing induced magnification fluctuations. In particular, in the minima and saddle-point regions, fluctuations are enhanced only along the critical line, while in the maxima region they are always enhanced...

  3. Limits on compact halo objects as dark matter from gravitational microlensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jetzer Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Microlensing started with the seminal paper by Paczyński in 1986 [1], first with observations towards the Large Magellanic Cloud and the galactic bulge. Since then many other targets have been observed and new applications have been found. In particular, it turned out to be a powerful method to detect planets in our galaxy and even in the nearby M31. Here, we will present some results obtained so far by microlensing without being, however, exhaustive.

  4. Microlensing light curve of a source on the other side of a wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Tsukamoto, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The observation of microlensing is a good probe into the topological structure of dark gravitating celestial objects. In this paper, we study the microlensing light curves due to light rays emitted by a source on the other side of a traversable wormhole. The present method will apply for general spherically symmetric traversable wormholes. Based on the obtained light curves, we discuss a possibility to observationally distinguish traversable wormholes with nontrivial topology from usual positive masses and other exotic objects without nontrivial topology.

  5. Studying wave optics in exoplanet microlensing light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrabi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    We study the wave optics feature of the gravitational microlensing by a binary system composed of parent star and a planet. In the binary system, near the caustic lines multiple images play the role of secondary sources for the observer, in analogy to the double slit Young's experiment. In the case of having coherent wave fronts from the source on the lens plane, images can produce diffraction pattern on the observer plane. For the binary lensing system we have two modes of close and wide images around the planet and lens star and these images can produce two different types of fringes with the high and low frequencies on the observer plane. By taking into account the finite size of the source star, enhancements in the diffraction fringes get dimmer. For the observational prospects, we study this effect for the SKA project in the case of resonance and the high magnification exoplanet channels. This method can partially break degeneracies between the lens parameters.

  6. Common Radial Velocity vs. Rare Microlensing: Difficulties and Futures

    CERN Document Server

    Molaverdikhani, Karan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, effective factors for success of Microlensing and Radial Velocity methods were choose. A semi-Delphi process applied on the factors to evaluating them and finding the most important factors for present situation of ML and RV, with help from about 100 experts, in or related exoplanets detection. I found the public definition on "success of exoplanets detection methods" is not correct and we should change it, as some experts did it, in the form of fundamental questions in planetary science. Also, the views of "Special Experts" are different from other experts that help us to choose the right way in evaluating. The next step was choosing the best strategy for future and finally, from SWOT landscape and with a new objective of ML method (New Game Board Strategy) I suggested four critical future strategies for completing current strategic directions.

  7. Stellar masses calibrated with micro-lensed quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Schechter, Paul L; Pooley, David; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We measure the stellar mass surface densities of early type galaxies by observing the micro-lensing of macro-lensed quasars caused by individual stars, including stellar remnants, brown dwarfs and red dwarfs too faint to produce photometric or spectroscopic signatures. Our method measures the graininess of the gravitational potential, in contrast to methods that decompose a smooth total gravitational potential into two smooth components, one stellar and one dark. We find the median likelihood value for the calibration factor F by which Salpeter stellar masses (with a low mass cutoff of 0.1 solar masses) must be multiplied is 1.23, with a one sigma confidence range of 0.77 < F < 2.10.

  8. Microlensing in the double quasar SBS1520+530

    CERN Document Server

    Gaynullina, E R; Akhunov, T; Burkhonov, O M; Gottlöber, S; Mirtadjieva, K; Nuritdinov, S N; Tadjibaev, I; Wambsganss, J; Wisotzki, L

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a monitoring campaign of the double quasar SBS1520+530 at Maidanak observatory from April 2003 to August 2004. We obtained light curves in V and R filters that show small-amplitude \\Delta m~0.1 mag intrinsic variations of the quasar on time scales of about 100 days. The data set is consistent with the previously determined time delay of \\Delta t=(130+-3) days by Burud et al. (2002). We find that the time delay corrected magnitude difference between the quasar images is now larger by (0.14+-0.03) mag than during the observations by Burud et al. (2002). This confirms the presence of gravitational microlensing variations in this system.

  9. Quasar Structure from Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher W.

    2007-12-01

    I investigate microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars and discuss the use of its signal to probe quasar structure on small angular scales. I describe our lensed quasar optical monitoring program and RETROCAM, the optical camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I use the microlensing variability observed in 11 gravitationally lensed quasars to show that the accretion disk size at 2500Å is related to the black hole mass by log(R2500/cm) = (15.70±0.16) + (0.64±0.18)log(MBH/109M⊙). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R ∝ MBH2/3), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(η) = -1.54±0.36 + log(L/LE) where η=L/(Mdotc2). With one exception, these sizes are larger by a factor of 4 than the size needed to produce the observed 0.8µm quasar flux by thermal radiation from a thin disk with the same T ∝ R-3/4 temperature profile. More sophisticated disk models are clearly required, particularly as our continuing observations improve the precision of the measurements and yield estimates of the scaling with wavelength and accretion rate. This research made extensive use of a Beowulf computer cluster obtained through the Cluster Ohio program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center. Support for program HST-GO-9744 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS-5-26666.

  10. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-based Optical Telescope Network

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Augmenting the WFIRST microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable one-dimensional (1-D) microlens parallax measurements over the entire mass range $M\\gtrsim M_\\oplus$. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging a few years after the observations. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. The addition of such a ground-based survey would also yield full 2-D vector parallax measurements, with largest sensitivity to low-mass lenses, which (being non-luminous) are not subject to followup imaging. These 2-D parallax measurements will directly yield mass and distance measurements for most planetary and binary events. It would also yield additional complete solutions for single-len...

  11. The PLANET microlensing follow-up network : results and prospects for the detection of extra-solar planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominik, M; Albrow, MD; Beaulieu, JP; Caldwell, JAR; DePoy, DL; Gaudi, BS; Gould, A; Greenhill, J; Hill, K; Kane, S; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Naber, RM; Pel, JW; Pogge, RW; Pollar, KR; Sackett, PD; Sahu, KC; Vermaak, P; Watson, R; Williams, A

    2002-01-01

    Among various techniques to search for extra-solar planets, microlensing has some unique characteristics. Contrary to all other methods which favour nearby objects, microlensing is sensitive to planets around stars at distances of several kpc. These stars act as gravitational lenses leading to a bri

  12. COSMIC ERROR CAUSED BY THE GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EFFECT IN HIGH-PRECISION ASTROMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated an expected deviation of the positions or the proper motions of stars as the cosmic error caused by the gravitational microlensing effect. In observing stars in the Galactic bulge region, we obtain an expected deviation of a star positions by the gravitational microlensing effect of about 7 μas. We have also estimated the expected deviation of the proper motions of stars in the Galactic bulge caused by the gravitational microlensing effect. The expected deviation of the proper motions is mainly caused by the lens object located at the nearest angular distance from the source star. Each deviation of the proper motion has a value of less than 0.02 μas yr–1 for 99% of the sources. We have investigated the correlation of the deviation of Galactic bulge stars caused by the gravitational microlensing effect. The value of the correlation angle of the positional deviation is estimated to be about 1 arcmin. In the same way, we have estimated the correlation angle of the deviation of the proper motions. The angle is estimated to be about 1 arcsec. The following difference distinguishes the deviation of the position and that of the proper motion. The positional deviation is affected not only by lenses near the source but also by the lenses far from the source. On the other hand, the deviation of the proper motion by microlensing is mainly only caused by the nearest lens from the source. This difference causes that of the correlation angle.

  13. GERLUMPH DATA RELEASE 1: HIGH-RESOLUTION COSMOLOGICAL MICROLENSING MAGNIFICATION MAPS AND eResearch TOOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.; Croton, D. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria, 3122 (Australia); Bate, N. F. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, A28, University of Sydney, NSW, 2006 (Australia)

    2014-03-01

    As synoptic all-sky surveys begin to discover new multiply lensed quasars, the flow of data will enable statistical cosmological microlensing studies of sufficient size to constrain quasar accretion disk and supermassive black hole properties. In preparation for this new era, we are undertaking the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). We present here the GERLUMPH Data Release 1, which consists of 12,342 high resolution cosmological microlensing magnification maps and provides the first uniform coverage of the convergence, shear, and smooth matter fraction parameter space. We use these maps to perform a comprehensive numerical investigation of the mass-sheet degeneracy, finding excellent agreement with its predictions. We study the effect of smooth matter on microlensing induced magnification fluctuations. In particular, in the minima and saddle-point regions, fluctuations are enhanced only along the critical line, while in the maxima region they are always enhanced for high smooth matter fractions (≈0.9). We describe our approach to data management, including the use of an SQL database with a Web interface for data access and online analysis, obviating the need for individuals to download large volumes of data. In combination with existing observational databases and online applications, the GERLUMPH archive represents a fundamental component of a new microlensing eResearch cloud. Our maps and tools are publicly available at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au/.

  14. The microlensing rate and distribution of free-floating planets towards the Galactic bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Ban, M; Robin, A C

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based optical microlensing surveys have provided tantalising, if inconclusive, evidence for a significant population of free-floating planets (FFPs). Both ground and space-based facilities are being used and developed which will be able to probe the distrubution of FFPs with much better sensitivity. It is vital also to develop a high-precision microlensing simulation framework to evaluate the completeness of such surveys. We present the first signal-to-noise limited calculations of the FFP microlensing rate using the Besancon Galactic model. The microlensing distribution towards the Galactic centre is simulated for wide-area ground-based optical surveys such as OGLE or MOA, a wide-area ground-based near-IR survey, and a targeted space-based near-IR survey which could be undertaken with Euclid or WFIRST. We present a calculation framework for the computation of the optical and near-infrared microlensing rate and optical depth for simulated stellar catalogues which are signal-to-noise limited, and take a...

  15. An Extrasolar Planet Census with a Space-based Microlensing Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, D P; Beaulieu, J -P; Bond, I; Cheng, E; Cook, K; Friedman, S; Gaudi, B S; Gould, A; Jenkins, J; Kimble, R; Lin, D; Rich, M; Sahu, K; Tenerelli, D; Udalski, A; Yock, P

    2007-01-01

    A space-based gravitational microlensing exoplanet survey will provide a statistical census of exoplanets with masses down to 0.1 Earth-masses and orbital separations ranging from 0.5AU to infinity. This includes analogs to all the Solar System's planets except for Mercury, as well as most types of planets predicted by planet formation theories. Such a survey will provide results on the frequency of planets around all types of stars except those with short lifetimes. Close-in planets with separations < 0.5 AU are invisible to a space-based microlensing survey, but these can be found by Kepler. Other methods, including ground-based microlensing, cannot approach the comprehensive statistics on the mass and semi-major axis distribution of extrasolar planets that a space-based microlensing survey will provide. The terrestrial planet sensitivity of a ground-based microlensing survey is limited to the vicinity of the Einstein radius at 2-3 AU, and space-based imaging is needed to identify and determine the mass ...

  16. A Census of Exoplanets in Orbits Beyond 0.5 AU via Space-based Microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, David P; Beaulieu, J -P; Bond, I; Cheng, E; Cook, K; Friedman, S; Gaudi, B S; Gould, A; Jenkins, J; Kimble, R; Lin, D; Mather, J; Rich, M; Sahu, K; Sumi, T; Tenerelli, D; Udalski, A; Yock, P

    2009-01-01

    A space-based gravitational microlensing exoplanet survey will provide a statistical census of exoplanets with masses greater than 0.1 Earth-masses and orbital separations ranging from 0.5AU to infinity. This includes analogs to all the Solar System's planets except for Mercury, as well as most types of planets predicted by planet formation theories. Such a survey will provide results on the frequency of planets around all types of stars except those with short lifetimes. Close-in planets with separations < 0.5 AU are invisible to a space-based microlensing survey, but these can be found by Kepler. Other methods, including ground-based microlensing, cannot approach the comprehensive statistics on the mass and semi-major axis distribution of extrasolar planets that a space-based microlensing survey will provide. The terrestrial planet sensitivity of a ground-based microlensing survey is limited to the vicinity of the Einstein radius at 2-3 AU, and space-based imaging is needed to identify and determine the ...

  17. Integration of polystyrene microlenses with both convex and concave profiles in a polymer-based microfluidic system

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-12-20

    This paper reports a new technique of fabricating polystyrene microlenses with both convex and concave profiles that are integrated in polymer-based microfluidic system. The polystyrene microlenses, or microlens array, are fabricated using the free-surface thermal compression molding method. The laser fabricated poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sheet is used as the mold for the thermal compression molding process. With different surface treatment methods of the PMMA mold, microlenses with either convex or concave profiles could be achieved during the thermal molding process. By integrating the microlenses in the microfluidic systems, observing the flow inside the microchannels is easier. This new technique is rapid, low cost, and it does not require cleanroom facilities. Microlenses with both convex and concave profiles can be easily fabricated and integrated in microfluidic system with this technique. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  18. Microlensing optical depth as a function of source apparent magnitude

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the microlensing optical depth, tau, towards the Galactic bulge appear to depend on the method used to obtain them. Those values based on the lensing of red clump giants (RCGs) appear to be significantly lower than those based on the lensing of all stars along the line of sight. This discrepancy is still not understood. Through Monte Carlo simulations, it is found that the discrepancy cannot be explained by a dependance on the flux limits of the two methods. The optical depth is expected to be generally constant as a function of source apparent magnitude for I_0 >~ 13.0, except in the range 13.5 <~ I_0 <~ 15.5. Here many RCGs are detected, causing a significant oscillation in tau. The amplitude of this oscillation is a function of the inclination angle of the Galactic bar, theta_bar, which may thus be constrained. A further constraint comes from a similar dependance of tau with theta_bar: combining the predicted trends with the measured values provides 1-sigma upper limits, which exclude...

  19. Gravitational microlensing of quasar Broad Line Regions: the influence of fractal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, G F; Lewis, Geraint F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent models for the emission clouds within the Broad Line Region of quasars suggest that they are due to transient overdensities within an overall turbulent medium. If this were the case, the broad line emission would spatially appear fractal, possessing structure on a range of scales. This paper examines the influence of such fractal structure when a quasar is microlensed by a population of intervening masses. It is found that while the highest fractal levels can undergo significant microlensing magnification, when these light curves are superimposed to create an emission line profile, the resultant emission line profile remains relatively constant for physical models of the Broad Line Region. It is concluded that the detection of the possible fractal structure of Broad Line Regions via gravitational microlensing is not practical.

  20. Microlensing and dynamical constraints on primordial black hole dark matter with an extended mass function

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves from mergers of $\\sim 10 \\, M_{\\odot}$ black hole binaries has stimulated interested in Primordial Black Hole dark matter in this mass range. Microlensing and dynamical constraints exclude all of the dark matter being in compact objects with a delta function mass function in the range $10^{-7} \\lesssim M/ M_{\\odot} \\lesssim 10^{5}$. However it has been argued that all of the dark matter could be composed of compact objects in this range with an extended mass function. We explicitly recalculate the microlensing and dynamical constraints for compact objects with an extended mass function which replicates the PBH mass function produced by inflation models. We find that the microlensing and dynamical constraints place conflicting constraints on the width of the mass function, and do not find a mass function which satisfies both constraints.

  1. Simulations of the Fe K-alpha Energy Spectra from Gravitationally Microlensed Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2016-01-01

    Chartas et al. (2012, 2016a,b) reported the discovery of multiple and energy variable peaks of the Fe K-alpha emission from the gravitationally lensed quasar RX J1131-1231. The authors explain the observations by the microlensing (produced by the stars of the lensing galaxy) of the emission from different regions of the accretion disk with different Doppler and gravitational frequency shifts. In this paper, we combine detailed simulations of the Fe K-alpha emission of the accretion disk in the Kerr spacetime of the black hole with calculations of the effect of gravitational microlensing on the observed energy spectra. The simulations give multiply peaked energy spectra similar to the observed ones. We explore the dependence of the spectral characteristics on black hole spin, accretion disk inclination, corona height, and microlensing amplification factor, and show that the measurements can be used to constrain these parameters. The detailed simulations described in this paper confirm the earlier constraints o...

  2. MOA-2011-BLG-293Lb: First Microlensing Planet possibly in the Habitable Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, V.; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Gould, A.; Bennett, D.P.; Yee, J. C.; Fukui, A; Gaudi, B. S.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A

    2013-01-01

    We used Keck adaptive optics observations to identify the first planet discovered by microlensing to lie in or near the habitable zone, i.e., at projected separation $r_\\perp=1.1\\pm 0.1\\,$AU from its $M_{L}=0.86\\pm 0.06\\,M_\\odot$ host, being the highest microlensing mass definitely identified. The planet has a mass $m_p = 4.8\\pm 0.3\\,M_{\\rm Jup}$, and could in principle have habitable moons. This is also the first planet to be identified as being in the Galactic bulge with good confidence: $D...

  3. Size of the accretion disk in the gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1004+4112 from the statistics of microlensing magnifications

    CERN Document Server

    Fian, C; Hanslmeier, A; Oscoz, A; Serra-Ricart, M; Muñoz, J A; Jiménez-Vicente, J

    2016-01-01

    We present eight monitoring seasons of the four brightest images of the gravitational lens SDSS J1004+4112 observed between December 2003 and October 2010. Using measured time delays for the images A, B and C and the model predicted time delay for image D we have removed the intrinsic quasar variability, finding microlensing events of about 0.5 and 0.7 mag of amplitude in the images C and D. From the statistics of microlensing amplitudes in images A, C, and D, we have inferred the half-light radius (at {\\lambda} rest = 2407 {\\AA}) for the accretion disk using two different methods, $R_{1/2}=8.7^{+18.5}_{-5.5} \\sqrt{M/0.3 M_\\odot}$ (histograms product) and $R_{1/2} = 4.2^{+3.2}_{-2.2} \\sqrt{M/0.3 M_\\odot}$ light-days ($\\chi^2$). The results are in agreement within uncertainties with the size predicted from the black hole mass in SDSS J1004+4112 using the thin disk theory.

  4. Mid-infrared microlensing of accretion disc and dusty torus in quasars: effects on flux ratio anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Sluse, D; Anguita, T; Wucknitz, O; Wambsganss, J

    2013-01-01

    Multiply-imaged quasars and AGNs observed in the mid-infrared (MIR) range are commonly assumed to be unaffected by the microlensing produced by the stars in their lensing galaxy. In this paper, we investigate the validity domain of this assumption. Indeed, that premise disregards microlensing of the accretion disc in the MIR range, and does not account for recent progress in our knowledge of the dusty torus. To simulate microlensing, we first built a simplified image of the quasar composed of an accretion disc, and of a larger ring-like torus. The mock quasars are then microlensed using an inverse ray-shooting code. We simulated the wavelength and size dependence of microlensing for different lensed image types and fraction of compact objects projected in the lens. This allows us to derive magnification probabilities as a function of wavelength, as well as to calculate the microlensing-induced deformation of the spectral energy distribution of the lensed images. We find that microlensing variations as large a...

  5. Arrays of microlenses with variable focal lengths fabricated by restructuring polymer surfaces with an ink-jet device

    OpenAIRE

    Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Best, Andreas; Nett, Sebastian K.; Gutmann, Jochen S.; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-01-01

    We report of a method for fabricating two-dimensional, regular arrays of polymer microlenses with focal lengths variable between 0.2 and 4.5 mm. We first make concave microlenses by ink-jetting solvent on a polymer substrate with a commercial drop-on-demand device. Solvent evaporation restructures the surface by a series of combined effects, which are discussed. In the second step we obtain convex elastomeric microlenses by casting the template made in the first step. We demonstrate the good ...

  6. Gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310: microlensing factory and time delay

    CERN Document Server

    Goicoechea, Luis J

    2016-01-01

    We spectroscopically re-observed the gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310 using OSIRIS on the GTC. We also monitored the $r$-band variability of the two quasar images (A and B) with the LT over 143 epochs in the period 2009$-$2016. These new data in both the wavelength and time domains have confirmed that the system is an unusual microlensing factory. The C$\\scriptsize{\\rm{IV}}$ emission line is remarkably microlensed, since the microlensing magnification of B relative to that for A, $\\mu_{\\rm{BA}}$, reaches a value of 1.4 ($\\sim$ 0.4 mag) for its core. Moreover, the B image shows a red wing enhancement of C$\\scriptsize{\\rm{IV}}$ flux (relative to A), and $\\mu_{\\rm{BA}}$ = 2 (0.75 mag) for the C$\\scriptsize{\\rm{IV}}$ broad-line emission. Regarding the nuclear continuum, we find a chromatic behaviour of $\\mu_{\\rm{BA}}$, which roughly varies from $\\sim$ 5 (1.75 mag) at 7000 \\AA\\ to $\\sim$ 6 (1.95 mag) at 4000 \\AA. We also detect significant microlensing variability in the $r$ band, and this includes a numb...

  7. Completing the Census of Exoplanets with the Microlensing Planet Finder (MPF)

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, David P; Beaulieu, J -P; Bond, I; Cheng, E; Cook, K; Friedman, S; Gaudi, B S; Gould, A; Jenkins, J; Kimble, R; Lin, D; Mather, J; Rich, M; Sahu, K; Shao, M; Sumi, T; Tenerelli, D; Udalski, A; Yock, P

    2010-01-01

    The MPF mission will provide a statistical census of exoplanets with masses greater than 0.1 Earth-masses and orbital separations ranging from 0.5AU to infinity. This includes analogs to all the Solar System's planets except for Mercury, as well as most types of planets predicted by planet formation theories. Such a survey will provide results on the frequency of planets around all types of stars except those with short lifetimes. Close-in planets with separations < 0.5 AU are invisible to a space-based microlensing survey, but these can be found by Kepler. Other methods, including ground-based microlensing, cannot approach the comprehensive statistics on the mass and semi-major axis distribution of extrasolar planets that a space-based microlensing survey will provide. The terrestrial planet sensitivity of a ground-based microlensing survey is limited to the vicinity of the Einstein radius at 2-3 AU, and space-based imaging is needed to identify and determine the mass of the planetary host stars for the v...

  8. Refractive microlenses produced by excimer laser machining of poly(methyl methacrylate)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Frøhling; Krühne, Ulrich; H., L.;

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed whereby refractive microlenses can be produced in poly (methyl methacrylate) by excimer laser irradiation at λ = 248 nm. The lenses are formed by a combined photochemical and thermal process. The lenses are formed as depressions in the substrate material (negative foca...

  9. Fabrication of Polydimethylsiloxane Microlenses Utilizing Hydrogel Shrinkage and a Single Molding Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Aldalali

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS microlenses and microlens arrays on flat and curved substrates fabricated via a relatively simple process combining liquid-phase photopolymerization and a single molding step. The mold for the formation of the PDMS lenses is fabricated by photopolymerizing a polyacrylamide (PAAm pre-hydrogel. The shrinkage of PAAm after its polymerization forms concave lenses. The lenses are then transferred to PDMS by a single step molding to form PDMS microlens array on a flat substrate. The PAAm concave lenses are also transferred to PDMS and another flexible polymer, Solaris, to realize artificial compound eyes. The resultant microlenses and microlens arrays possess good uniformity and optical properties. The focal length of the lenses is inversely proportional to the shrinkage time. The microlens mold can also be rehydrated to change the focal length of the ultimate PDMS microlenses. The spherical aberration is 2.85 μm and the surface roughness is on the order of 204 nm. The microlenses can resolve 10.10 line pairs per mm (lp/mm and have an f-number range between f/2.9 and f/56.5. For the compound eye, the field of view is 113°.

  10. Search for black matter through the detection of gravitational micro-lenses in differential photometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of dark matter is an open question. The search for gravitational microlensing effects is an interesting tool because this effect is strongly dependent on the mass of objects whether they are luminous or not, however this detection method is only sensitive to compact forms of dark matter (MACHOS - massive astronomical halo compact objects), and as a consequence no-baryonic matter like neutrinos or WIMPS (weakly interacting massive particles) can not be detected this way. In the first chapter the author reviews the plausible candidates to black matter. The use of the microlensing effect as a probe of the galactic halo is presented in the second chapter. The third chapter is dedicated to the series of experiments worldwide that focus on the detection of MACHOS. In the fourth chapter the author shows how the DIA (difference image analysis) method may be promising in the study of gravitational microlensing effects. The main part of this work has been the use of the DIA method to process five-year data set collected by the Eros experiment in the small Magellanic cloud (SMC). The data processing line and the results are presented in the fifth and sixth chapters. The results are consistent with previous results given by Eros and they confirm the disparity of the durations of micro-lenses detected in the large and small Magellanic clouds. (A.C.)

  11. Arrays of microlenses with variable focal lengths fabricated by restructuring polymer surfaces with an ink-jet device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Best, Andreas; Nett, Sebastian K.; Gutmann, Jochen S.; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-07-01

    We report of a method for fabricating two-dimensional, regular arrays of polymer microlenses with focal lengths variable between 0.2 and 4.5 mm. We first make concave microlenses by ink-jetting solvent on a polymer substrate with a commercial drop-on-demand device. Solvent evaporation restructures the surface by a series of combined effects, which are discussed. In the second step we obtain convex elastomeric microlenses by casting the template made in the first step. We demonstrate the good optical quality of the microlenses by characterising their surfaces with atomic force microscopy and white light interferometry, and by directly measuring their focal lengths with ad-hoc confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  12. Post-Decadal White Paper: A Dual-Satellite Dark-Energy/Microlensing NASA-ESA Mission

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A confluence of scientific, financial, and political factors imply that launching two simpler, more narrowly defined dark-energy/microlensing satellites will lead to faster, cheaper, better (and more secure) science than the present EUCLID and WFIRST designs. The two satellites, one led by ESA and the other by NASA, would be explicitly designed to perform complementary functions of a single, dual-satellite dark-energy/microlensing ``mission''. One would be a purely optical wide-field camera, ...

  13. A giant planet beyond the snow line in microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kains, N.; Street, R.A.; Choi, J.-Y.;

    2013-01-01

    curve, we find that the lens is composed of two masses with a mass ratio q = 1.9 × 10-3. Thanks to our detection of higher-order effects on the light curve due to the Earth's orbital motion and the finite size of source, we are able to measure the mass and distance to the lens unambiguously. Results. We...... find that the lens is made up of a planet of mass 0.53 ± 0.21 M J orbiting an M dwarf host star with a mass of 0.26 ± 0.11 M⊙. The planetary system is located at a distance of 2.57 ± 0.61 kpc towards the Galactic centre. The projected separation of the planet from its host star is d = 1.408 ± 0.......019, in units of the Einstein radius, which corresponds to 2.72 ± 0.75 AU in physical units. We also identified a competitive model with similar planet and host star masses, but with a smaller orbital radius of 1.50 ± 0.50 AU. The planet is therefore located beyond the snow line of its host star, which we...

  14. Gaia16aye is a binary microlensing event and is crossing the caustic again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrzykowski, L.; Leto, G.; Altavilla, G.; Bakis, V.; Britavskiy, N.; Burgaz, U.; Butterley, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Dominik, M.; Gomboc, A.; Hardy, L. K.; Littlefair, S. P.; Maund, J. R.; Piascik, A.; Rhodes, L.; Sanchez, R. Z.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Steele, I.; Wilson, R. W.; Hamanowicz, A.; Mroz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Rybicki, K.; Sitek, M.; Mikolajczyk, P.; Kolaczkowski, Z.; Street, R.; Bendjoya, P.; Bozza, V.; Dziedzic, J.; Niczyj, K.; Nowicki, R.; Porebski, M.

    2016-09-01

    Galactic Plane (Cygnus) transient, Gaia16aye, nicknamed Ayers Rock (19:40:01.13 +30:07:53.4, J2000), was discovered by Gaia Science Alerts, http://gsaweb.ast.cam.ac.uk/alerts/alert/Gaia16aye, on 2016-08-05 as a flare on an otherwise quiet star.

  15. A Giant Planet beyond the Snow Line in Microlensing Event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251

    OpenAIRE

    Kains, N.; Street, R. A.; Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C.; Udalski, A; Almeida, L. A.; Jablonski, F.; Tristram, P. J.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.

    2013-01-01

    N.K. acknowledges an ESO Fellowship. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme (/FP7/2007-2013/) under grant agreements No 229517 and 268421. The OGLE project has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement No. 246678 to AU. K.A., D.B., M.D., K.H., M.H., S.I., C.L., R.S., Y.T. are supported by NPRP grant NPRP-09-476...

  16. Microlensing probes the AGN structure of the lensed quasar J1131-1231

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluse, D.; Claeskens, J.-F.; Hutsemékers, D.; Surdej, J.

    2008-04-01

    We present the analysis of single epoch long slit spectra of the three brightest images of the gravitationally lensed system J1131-1231. These spectra provide one of the clearest observational evidence for differential micro-lensing of broad emission lines (BELs) in a gravitationally lensed quasar. The micro-lensing effect enables us: (1) to confirm that the width of the emission lines is anti-correlated to the size of the emitting region; (2) to show that the bulk of Fe II is emitted in the outer parts of the Broad Line Region (BLR) while another fraction of Fe II is produced in a compact region; (3) to derive interesting informations on the origin of the narrow intrinsic Mg II absorption doublet observed in that system.

  17. Microlensing probes the AGN structure of the lensed quasar J1131-1231

    CERN Document Server

    Sluse, D; Hutsemékers, D; Surdej, J

    2008-01-01

    We present the analysis of single epoch long slit spectra of the three brightest images of the gravitationally lensed system J1131-1231. These spectra provide one of the clearest observational evidence for differential micro-lensing of broad emission lines (BELs) in a gravitationally lensed quasar. The micro-lensing effect enables us: (1) to confirm that the width of the emission lines is anti-correlated to the size of the emitting region; (2) to show that the bulk of FeII is emitted in the outer parts of the Broad Line Region (BLR) while another fraction of FeII is produced in a compact region; (3) to derive interesting informations on the origin of the narrow intrinsic MgII absorption doublet observed in that system.

  18. A microlensing study of the accretion disc in the quasar MG 0414+0534

    CERN Document Server

    Bate, N F; Webster, R L; Wyithe, J S B

    2008-01-01

    Observations of gravitational microlensing in multiply imaged quasars currently provide the only direct probe of quasar emission region structure on sub-microarcsecond scales. Analyses of microlensing variability are observationally expensive, requiring long-term monitoring of lensed systems. Here we demonstrate a technique for constraining the size of the quasar continuum emission region as a function of wavelength using single-epoch multi-band imaging. We have obtained images of the lensed quasar MG 0414+0534 in five wavelength bands using the Magellan 6.5-metre Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. These data, in combination with two existing epochs of Hubble Space Telescope data, are used to model the size of the continuum emission region $\\sigma$ as a power-law in wavelength, $\\sigma\\propto\\lambda^\

  19. GLE-2005-BLG-153: Microlensing Discovery and Characterization of A Very Low Mass Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, K -H; Han, C; Ryu, Y -H; Bond, I A; Beaulieu, J -P; Dominik, M; Horne, K; Gould, A; Gaudi, B S; Kubiak, M; Szymanski, M K; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I; Szewczyk, O; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, L; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Motomura, M; Muraki, Y; Nakamura, S; Ohnishi, K; Okada, C; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Sako, T; Sasaki, M; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Tristram, P J; Wood, J N; Yock, P C M; Yoshioka, T; Albrow, M; Bennett, D P; Bramich, D M; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Calitz, J J; Cassan, A; Cook, K H; Corrales, E; Coutures, C; Desort, M; Dieters, S; Dominis, D; Donatowicz, J; Fouque, P; Greenhill, J; Harpsoe, K; Hill, K; Hoffman, M; Jorgensen, U G; Kane, S; Kubas, D; Martin, R; Marquette, J -B; Meintjes, P; Menzies, J; Pollard, K; Sahu, K; Steele, I; Vinter, C; Wambsganss, J; Williams, A; Woller, K; Burgdorf, M; Snodgrass, C; Bode, M; Depoy, D L; Lee, C -U; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W

    2010-01-01

    The mass function and statistics of binaries provide important diagnostics of the star formation process. Despite this importance, the mass function at low masses remains poorly known due to observational difficulties caused by the faintness of the objects. Here we report the microlensing discovery and characterization of a binary lens composed of very low-mass stars just above the hydrogen-burning limit. From the combined measurements of the Einstein radius and microlens parallax, we measure the masses of the binary components of $0.10\\pm 0.01\\ M_\\odot$ and $0.09\\pm 0.01\\ M_\\odot$. This discovery demonstrates that microlensing will provide a method to measure the mass function of all Galactic populations of very low mass binaries that is independent of the biases caused by the luminosity of the population.

  20. MICROLENSING DISCOVERY OF A POPULATION OF VERY TIGHT, VERY LOW MASS BINARY BROWN DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C. [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Udalski, A. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Sumi, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Gaudi, B. S.; Gould, A. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Dominik, M. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Beaulieu, J.-P. [Institut dAstrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS-Universite Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Tsapras, Y. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740B Cortona Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Bozza, V. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Abe, F.; Furusawa, K.; Itow, Y. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Bond, I. A.; Ling, C. H. [Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 102-904, North Shore Mail Centre, Auckland 0745 (New Zealand); Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M. [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92-019, Auckland 1001 (New Zealand); Chote, P. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Fukui, A. [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Collaboration: MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2013-05-10

    Although many models have been proposed, the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of low-mass brown dwarfs (BDs) are poorly understood. The multiplicity properties and minimum mass of the BD mass function provide critical empirical diagnostics of these mechanisms. We present the discovery via gravitational microlensing of two very low mass, very tight binary systems. These binaries have directly and precisely measured total system masses of 0.025 M{sub Sun} and 0.034 M{sub Sun }, and projected separations of 0.31 AU and 0.19 AU, making them the lowest-mass and tightest field BD binaries known. The discovery of a population of such binaries indicates that BD binaries can robustly form at least down to masses of {approx}0.02 M{sub Sun }. Future microlensing surveys will measure a mass-selected sample of BD binary systems, which can then be directly compared to similar samples of stellar binaries.

  1. Micro-lensed single-mode optical fiber with high numerical aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Shinya; Aoki, Takao

    2013-01-01

    We show that the output mode of a single-mode optical fiber can be directly focused to a sub-wavelength waist with a finite working distance by tapering the fiber to a diameter of the order of the wavelength and terminating it with a spherically/hemispherically shaped tip. Numerical simulations show that a beam waist with a width of as small as 0.62\\lambda can be formed. We fabricate micro-lensed fibers and construct a probe-scanning confocal reflection microscope. Measurements on gold nano-particles show a spatial profile with a width of 0.29\\lambda for \\lambda = 850 nm, which is in good agreement with the numerical simulations. Due to their monolithic structures, these micro-lensed fibers will be flexible substitutes for conventional compound lenses in various experimental conditions such as cryogenic temperature and ultra-high vacuum.

  2. An efficient method to compute microlensed light curves for point sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Hans J.

    1993-01-01

    We present a method to compute microlensed light curves for point sources. This method has the general advantage that all microimages contributing to the light curve are found. While a source moves along a straight line, all micro images are located either on the primary image track or on the secondary image tracks (loops). The primary image track extends from - infinity to + infinity and is made of many sequents which are continuously connected. All the secondary image tracks (loops) begin and end on the lensing point masses. The method can be applied to any microlensing situation with point masses in the deflector plane, even for the overcritical case and surface densities close to the critical. Furthermore, we present general rules to evaluate the light curve for a straight track arbitrary placed in the caustic network of a sample of many point masses.

  3. Microlensing Discovery of a Population of Very Tight, Very Low-mass Binary Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, J -Y; Udalski, A; Sumi, T; Gaudi, B S; Gould, A; Bennett, D P; Dominik, M; Beaulieu, J -P; Tsapras, Y; Bozza, V; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Chote, P; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, K; Sweatman, W L; Suzuki, D; Takino, S; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzyński, G; Soszyński, I; Skowron, J; Kozłowski, S; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pietrukowicz, P; Almeida, L A; DePoy, D L; Dong, Subo; Gorbikov, E; Jablonski, F; Henderson, C B; Hwang, K -H; Janczak, J; Jung, Y -K; Kaspi, S; Lee, C -U; Malamud, U; Maoz, D; McGregor, D; Munoz, J A; Park, B -G; Park, H; Pogge, R W; Shvartzvald, Y; Shin, I -G; Yee, J C; Alsubai, K A; Browne, P; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dodds, P; Fang, X -S; Finet, F; Glitrup, M; Grundahl, F; Gu, S -H; Hardis, S; Harpsøe, K; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Hundertmark, M; Jessen-Hansen, J; Jørgensen, U G; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Liebig, C; Lund, M N; Lundkvist, M; Maier, G; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Snodgrass, C; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wambsganss, J; Wertz, O; Zimmer, F; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Batista, V; Brillant, S; Cassan, A; Cole, A A; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Menzies, J W; Sahu, K C; Zub, M; Bramich, D M; Horne, K; Steele, I A; Street, R A

    2013-01-01

    Although many models have been proposed, the physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of low-mass brown dwarfs are poorly understood. The multiplicity properties and minimum mass of the brown-dwarf mass function provide critical empirical diagnostics of these mechanisms. We present the discovery via gravitational microlensing of two very low-mass, very tight binary systems. These binaries have directly and precisely measured total system masses of 0.025 Msun and 0.034 Msun, and projected separations of 0.31 AU and 0.19 AU, making them the lowest-mass and tightest field brown-dwarf binaries known. The discovery of a population of such binaries indicates that brown dwarf binaries can robustly form at least down to masses of ~0.02 Msun. Future microlensing surveys will measure a mass-selected sample of brown-dwarf binary systems, which can then be directly compared to similar samples of stellar binaries.

  4. Optical characterization method for very small microlenses (sub-50 micron) for industrial mass-production applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Sunarjo, Jonathan; Weible, Kenneth J.; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2013-04-01

    We present several characterization techniques, which are suitable for small-size microlenses of lens diameters down to 5 μm. For an individual microlens, we apply full characterization for optical performance and surface characteristics. First, the optical performance is characterized by using a high-resolution interference microscope (HRIM). Second, a confocal microscope is applied to investigate the surface parameters. Third, the HRIM allows scanning the microlens array along the optical axis by using a piezo actuator. This leads to a measurement of the 3D intensity distribution near the focus of the lens. Such 3D intensity maps allow us to characterize the focal properties of each lens in an array. By studying those characterization techniques, we develop a new method to characterize a large number of microlenses, for instance, over one million lenses, which is already applied to wafer-based manufacturing in a cleanroom fab.

  5. Formation of Polymeric Hollow Microcapsules and Microlenses Using Gas-in-Organic-in-Water Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hyun Yoon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents methods for the formation of hollow microcapsules and microlenses using multiphase microdroplets. Microdroplets, which consist of a gas core and an organic phase shell, were generated at a single junction on a silicon device without surface treatment of the fluidic channels. Droplet, core and shell dimensions were controlled by varying the flow rates of each phase. When the organic solvent was released from the organic phase shell, the environmental conditions changed the shape of the solidified polymer shell to either a hollow capsule or a microlens. A uniform solvent release process produced polymeric capsules with nanoliter gas core volumes and a membrane thickness of approximately 3 μm. Alternatively physical rearrangement of the core and shell allowed for the formation of polymeric microlenses. On-demand formation of the polymer lenses in wells and through-holes polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS structures was achieved. Optical properties of the lenses were controlled by changing the dimension of these structures.

  6. Fabrication of axicon microlenses on capillaries and microstructured fibers by wet etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachus, Kyle; Filho, Elton Soares de Lima; Wlodarczyk, Kamila; Oleschuk, Richard; Messaddeq, Younes; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2016-09-01

    A facile method is presented for the fabrication of microlenses at the facet of fused silica capillaries and microstructured fibers. After submersion in hydrogen fluoride solution water is pumped slowly through the center hole of the capillary microchannel to create an etchant gradient extending from the capillary axis. The desired axicon angle is generated by adjusting the etching time and/or concentration of the etchant. Similarly, flow- assisted HF etching of a custom microstructured fiber containing nine microchannels produces nine individual microlenses simultaneously at the fiber facet, where each microaxicon lens shows a similar focusing pattern. A theoretical model of the flow-assisted etching process is used to determine the axicon angle and post angle. Also, a simple ray-based model was applied to characterize the focusing properties of the microaxicons in good agreement with experimental observations. PMID:27607641

  7. Adventures in the microlensing cloud: Large datasets, eResearch tools, and GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.

    2014-10-01

    As astronomy enters the petascale data era, astronomers are faced with new challenges relating to storage, access and management of data. A shift from the traditional approach of combining data and analysis at the desktop to the use of remote services, pushing the computation to the data, is now underway. In the field of cosmological gravitational microlensing, future synoptic all-sky surveys are expected to bring the number of multiply imaged quasars from the few tens that are currently known to a few thousands. This inflow of observational data, together with computationally demanding theoretical modeling via the production of microlensing magnification maps, requires a new approach. We present our technical solutions to supporting the GPU-Enabled, High Resolution cosmological MicroLensing parameter survey (GERLUMPH). This extensive dataset for cosmological microlensing modeling comprises over 70 000 individual magnification maps and ˜106 related results. We describe our approaches to hosting, organizing, and serving ˜ 30 TB of data and metadata products. We present a set of online analysis tools developed with PHP, JavaScript and WebGL to support access and analysis of GELRUMPH data in a Web browser. We discuss our use of graphics processing units (GPUs) to accelerate data production, and we release the core of the GPU-D direct inverse ray-shooting code (Thompson et al., 2010, 2014) used to generate the magnification maps. All of the GERLUMPH data and tools are available online from http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au. This project made use of gSTAR, the GPU Supercomputer for Theoretical Astrophysical Research.

  8. Astrometric Image Centroid Displacements due to Gravitational Microlensing by the Ellis Wormhole

    OpenAIRE

    Toki, Yukiharu; Kitamura, Takao; Asada, Hideki; Abe, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication (Abe, ApJ, 725 (2010) 787), we study the gravitational microlensing effects of the Ellis wormhole in the weak-field limit. First, we find a suitable coordinate transformation, such that the lens equation and analytic expressions of the lensed image positions can become much simpler than the previous ones. Second, we prove that two images always appear for the weak-field lens by the Ellis wormhole. By using these analytic results, we discuss ...

  9. Optical levitation using single mode fibers and its application to self-centering of microlenses

    OpenAIRE

    Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Raffy, Jean; Combemale, Yves; Papuchon, Michel; Roosen, Gérald; Plantegenest, Marie-Thérèse

    1984-01-01

    International audience Optical levitation using single mode fibers has been experimentally demonstrated. The use of fibers in levitation experiments presents obvious advantages, in particular, concerning the case with which complicated optical paths can be realized without additional optical components. In addition the microsphere can be accurately deposited on the fiber end by simply controlling the optical guided power. This technique has been used to position microlenses self-centered o...

  10. Formation of Polymeric Hollow Microcapsules and Microlenses Using Gas-in-Organic-in-Water Droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Hyun Yoon; Kenta Hasegawa; Yuji Kaneko; Takahiro Arakawa; Jeung Sang Go; Tetsushi Sekiguchi; Shuichi Shoji

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents methods for the formation of hollow microcapsules and microlenses using multiphase microdroplets. Microdroplets, which consist of a gas core and an organic phase shell, were generated at a single junction on a silicon device without surface treatment of the fluidic channels. Droplet, core and shell dimensions were controlled by varying the flow rates of each phase. When the organic solvent was released from the organic phase shell, the environmental conditions changed the ...

  11. The Demographics of Extrasolar Planets Beyond the Snow Line with Ground-based Microlensing Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Gaudi, B. Scott; Beaulieu, J. -P.; Bennett, David P.; Bond, Ian A.; Dong, Subo; Gould, Andrew; Han, Cheongho; Park, Byeong-Gon; Sumi, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    In the currently-favored paradigm of planet formation, the location of the snow line in the protoplanetary disk plays a crucial role. Determining the demographics of planets beyond the snow line of stars of various masses is thus essential for testing this model. Microlensing is sensitive to planets that are generally inaccessible to other methods, and in particular is most sensitive to cool planets at or beyond the snow line, including very low-mass (i.e. terrestrial) planets. Hence, microle...

  12. Towards A Census of Earth-mass Exo-planets with Gravitational Microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, J P; Mao, S; Bennett, D; Cassan, A; Dieters, S; Gaudi, B S; Gould, A; Batista, V; Bender, R; Brillant, S; Cook, K; Coutures, C; Dominis-Prester, D; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Grebel, E; Greenhill, J; Heyrovsky, D; Horne, K; Kubas, D; Marquette, J B; Menzies, J; Rattenbury, N J; Ribas, I; Sahu, K; Tsapras, Y; Udalski, A; Vinter, C

    2008-01-01

    Thirteen exo-planets have been discovered using the gravitational microlensing technique (out of which 7 have been published). These planets already demonstrate that super-Earths (with mass up to ~10 Earth masses) beyond the snow line are common and multiple planet systems are not rare. In this White Paper we introduce the basic concepts of the gravitational microlensing technique, summarise the current mode of discovery and outline future steps towards a complete census of planets including Earth-mass planets. In the near-term (over the next 5 years) we advocate a strategy of automated follow-up with existing and upgraded telescopes which will significantly increase the current planet detection efficiency. In the medium 5-10 year term, we envision an international network of wide-field 2m class telescopes to discover Earth-mass and free-floating exo-planets. In the long (10-15 year) term, we strongly advocate a space microlensing telescope which, when combined with Kepler, will provide a complete census of p...

  13. Disentangling microlensing and differential extinction in the double QSO HE0512-3329

    CERN Document Server

    Wucknitz, O; López, S; Gregg, M D

    2003-01-01

    We present the first separate spectra of both components of the small-separation double QSO HE0512-3329 obtained with HST/STIS in the optical and near UV. The similarities especially of the emission line profiles and redshifts strongly suggest that this system really consists of two lensed images of one and the same source. The emission line flux ratios are assumed to be unaffected by microlensing and are used to study the differential extinction effects caused by the lensing galaxy. Fits of empirical laws show that the extinction properties seem to be different on both lines of sight. With our new results, HE0512-3329 becomes one of the few extragalactic systems which show the 2175 AA absorption feature, although the detection is only marginal. We then correct the continuum flux ratio for extinction to obtain the differential microlensing signal. Since this may still be significantly affected by variability and time-delay effects, no detailled analysis of the microlensing is possible at the moment. This is t...

  14. THE SECOND MULTIPLE-PLANET SYSTEM DISCOVERED BY MICROLENSING: OGLE-2012-BLG-0026Lb, c-A PAIR OF JOVIAN PLANETS BEYOND THE SNOW LINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Yee, J. C.; Gould, A.; Skowron, J.; Batista, V. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Christie, G. [Auckland Observatory, Auckland (New Zealand); Tan, T.-G. [Perth Exoplanet Survey Telescope, Perth (Australia); Almeida, L. A. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Depoy, D. L. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; muFUN Collaboration; and others

    2013-01-10

    We report the discovery of a planetary system from observation of the high-magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026. The lensing light curve exhibits a complex central perturbation with multiple features. We find that the perturbation was produced by two planets located near the Einstein ring of the planet host star. We identify four possible solutions resulting from the well-known close/wide degeneracy. By measuring both the lens parallax and the Einstein radius, we estimate the physical parameters of the planetary system. According to the best-fit model, the two planet masses are {approx}0.11 M{sub J} and 0.68 M{sub J} and they are orbiting a G-type main-sequence star with a mass {approx}0.82 M{sub Sun }. The projected separations of the individual planets are beyond the snow line in all four solutions, being {approx}3.8 AU and 4.6 AU in the best-fit solution. The deprojected separations are both individually larger and possibly reversed in order. This is the second multi-planet system with both planets beyond the snow line discovered by microlensing. This is the only such system (other than the solar system) with measured planet masses without sin i degeneracy. The planetary system is located at a distance 4.1 kpc from the Earth toward the Galactic center. It is very likely that extra light from stars other than the lensed star comes from the lens itself. If this is correct, it will be possible to obtain detailed information about the planet host star from follow-up observation.

  15. The different origins of high- and low-ionization broad emission lines revealed by gravitational microlensing in the Einstein cross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braibant, L.; Hutsemékers, D.; Sluse, D.; Anguita, T.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the kinematics and ionization structure of the broad emission line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO2237+0305 (the Einstein cross) using differential microlensing in the high- and low-ionization broad emission lines. We combine visible and near-infrared spectra of the four images of the lensed quasar and detect a large-amplitude microlensing effect distorting the high-ionization CIV and low-ionization Hα line profiles in image A. While microlensing only magnifies the red wing of the Balmer line, it symmetrically magnifies the wings of the CIV emission line. Given that the same microlensing pattern magnifies both the high- and low-ionization broad emission line regions, these dissimilar distortions of the line profiles suggest that the high- and low-ionization regions are governed by different kinematics. Since this quasar is likely viewed at intermediate inclination, we argue that the differential magnification of the blue and red wings of Hα favors a flattened, virialized, low-ionization region whereas the symmetric microlensing effect measured in CIV can be reproduced by an emission line formed in a polar wind, without the need of fine-tuned caustic configurations. Based on observations made with the ESO-VLT, Paranal, Chile; Proposals 076.B-0197 and 076.B-0607 (PI: Courbin).

  16. Numerical Simulation of Refractive-Microlensed HgCdTe Infrared Focal Plane Arrays Operating in Optical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Ye, Zhen-Hua; Hu, Wei-Da; Lei, Wen; Gao, Yan-Lin; He, Kai; Hua, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yi-Yu; Lin, Chun; Hu, Xiao-Ning; Ding, Rui-Jun; He, Li

    2014-08-01

    The optoelectronic performance of the mid-wavelength HgCdTe infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) with refractive microlenses integrated on its CdZnTe substrate has been numerically simulated. A reduced light-distribution model based on scalar Kirchhoff diffraction theory was adopted to reveal the true behavior of IRFPAs operating in an optical system under imaging conditions. The pixel crosstalk obtained and the energy-gathering characteristics demonstrated that the microlenses can delay the rise in crosstalk when the image point shifts toward pixel boundaries, and can restrict the major optical absorption process in any case within a narrow region around the pixel center. The dependence of the microlenses' effects on the system's properties was also analyzed; this showed that intermediate relative aperture and small microlens radius are required for optimized device performance. Simulation results also indicated that for detectors farther from the center of the field of view, the efficacy of microlenses in crosstalk suppression and energy gathering is still maintained, except for a negligible difference in the lateral magnification from an ordinary array without microlenses.

  17. Post-Decadal White Paper: A Dual-Satellite Dark-Energy/Microlensing NASA-ESA Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A confluence of scientific, financial, and political factors imply that launching two simpler, more narrowly defined dark-energy/microlensing satellites will lead to faster, cheaper, better (and more secure) science than the present EUCLID and WFIRST designs. The two satellites, one led by ESA and the other by NASA, would be explicitly designed to perform complementary functions of a single, dual-satellite dark-energy/microlensing ``mission''. One would be a purely optical wide-field camera, with large format and small pixels, optimized for weak-lensing, which because of its simple design, could be launched by ESA on relatively short timescales. The second would be a purely infrared satellite with marginally-sampled or under-sampled pixels, launched by NASA. Because of budget constraints, this would be launched several years later. The two would complement one another in 3 dark energy experiments (weak lensing, baryon oscillations, supernovae) and also in microlensing planet searches. Signed international agr...

  18. OGLE-2013-BLG-0102LA,B: MICROLENSING BINARY WITH COMPONENTS AT STAR/BROWN DWARF AND BROWN DWARF/PLANET BOUNDARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Y. K.; Han, C. [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Udalski, A.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Mróz, P.; Kubiak, M. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Sumi, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Gould, A. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Abe, F. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Bennett, D. P. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States); Bond, I. A. [Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 102-904, North Shore Mail Centre, Auckland (New Zealand); Botzler, C. S., E-mail: cheongho@astroph.chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92-019, Auckland 1001 (New Zealand); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; and others

    2015-01-10

    We present an analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0102. The light curve of the event is characterized by a strong short-term anomaly superposed on a smoothly varying lensing curve with a moderate magnification A {sub max} ∼ 1.5. It is found that the event was produced by a binary lens with a mass ratio between the components of q = 0.13 and the anomaly was caused by the passage of the source trajectory over a caustic located away from the barycenter of the binary. Based on the analysis of the effects on the light curve due to the finite size of the source and the parallactic motion of the Earth, we determine the physical parameters of the lens system. The measured masses of the lens components are M {sub 1} = 0.096 ± 0.013 M {sub ☉} and M {sub 2} = 0.012 ± 0.002 M {sub ☉}, which correspond to near the hydrogen-burning and deuterium-burning mass limits, respectively. The distance to the lens is 3.04 ± 0.31 kpc and the projected separation between the lens components is 0.80 ± 0.08 AU.

  19. ASTROMETRIC IMAGE CENTROID DISPLACEMENTS DUE TO GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING BY THE ELLIS WORMHOLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication, we study the gravitational microlensing effects of the Ellis wormhole in the weak-field limit. First, we find a suitable coordinate transformation, such that the lens equation and analytic expressions of the lensed image positions can become much simpler. Second, we prove that two images always appear for the weak-field lens by the Ellis wormhole. By using these analytic results, we discuss astrometric image centroid displacements due to gravitational microlensing by the Ellis wormhole. The astrometric image centroid trajectory by the Ellis wormhole is different from the standard one by a spherical lensing object that is expressed by the Schwarzschild metric. The anomalous shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller than that by the Schwarzschild lens, provided that the impact parameter and the Einstein ring radius are the same. Therefore, the lensed image centroid by the Ellis wormhole moves slower. Such a difference, although it is very small, will be, in principle, applicable for detecting or constraining the Ellis wormhole by using future high-precision astrometry observations. In particular, the image centroid position gives us additional information, so that the parameter degeneracy existing in photometric microlensing can be partially broken. The anomalous shift reaches the order of a few micro arcseconds, if our galaxy hosts a wormhole with throat radius larger than 105 km. When the source moves tangentially to the Einstein ring, for instance, the maximum position shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole is 0.18 normalized by the Einstein ring radius. For the same source trajectory, the maximum difference between the centroid displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens and that by the Schwarzschild one with the same Einstein ring radius is -0.16 in the units of the Einstein radius, where the negative means that the astrometric displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller

  20. Astrometric Image Centroid Displacements due to Gravitational Microlensing by the Ellis Wormhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, Yukiharu; Kitamura, Takao; Asada, Hideki; Abe, Fumio

    2011-10-01

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication, we study the gravitational microlensing effects of the Ellis wormhole in the weak-field limit. First, we find a suitable coordinate transformation, such that the lens equation and analytic expressions of the lensed image positions can become much simpler. Second, we prove that two images always appear for the weak-field lens by the Ellis wormhole. By using these analytic results, we discuss astrometric image centroid displacements due to gravitational microlensing by the Ellis wormhole. The astrometric image centroid trajectory by the Ellis wormhole is different from the standard one by a spherical lensing object that is expressed by the Schwarzschild metric. The anomalous shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller than that by the Schwarzschild lens, provided that the impact parameter and the Einstein ring radius are the same. Therefore, the lensed image centroid by the Ellis wormhole moves slower. Such a difference, although it is very small, will be, in principle, applicable for detecting or constraining the Ellis wormhole by using future high-precision astrometry observations. In particular, the image centroid position gives us additional information, so that the parameter degeneracy existing in photometric microlensing can be partially broken. The anomalous shift reaches the order of a few micro arcseconds, if our galaxy hosts a wormhole with throat radius larger than 105 km. When the source moves tangentially to the Einstein ring, for instance, the maximum position shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole is 0.18 normalized by the Einstein ring radius. For the same source trajectory, the maximum difference between the centroid displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens and that by the Schwarzschild one with the same Einstein ring radius is -0.16 in the units of the Einstein radius, where the negative means that the astrometric displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller

  1. Strong chromatic microlensing in HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, K.; Motta, V. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Avda. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso 2360102 (Chile); Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Avda. Vía Lactea s/n, La Laguna, E-38200 Tenerife (Spain); Falco, E. [Whipple Observatory, Smithsonian Institution, 670 Mt. Hopkins Road, PO Box 6369, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Jiménez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Muñoz, J. A., E-mail: karina.rojas@uv.cl, E-mail: veronica.motta@uv.cl, E-mail: emg@iac.es, E-mail: falco@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jjimenez@ugr.es, E-mail: jmunoz@uv.es [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, E-46100 Valencia (Spain)

    2014-12-10

    We use spectra of the double-lensed quasars HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346 to study their unresolved structure through the impact of microlensing. There is no significant evidence of microlensing in the emission line profiles except for the Lyα line of SDSS1155+6346, which shows strong differences in the shapes for images A and B. However, the continuum of the B image spectrum in SDSS1155+6346 is strongly contaminated by the lens galaxy, and these differences should be considered with caution. Using the flux ratios of the emission lines for image pairs as a baseline to remove macro-magnification and extinction, we have detected strong chromatic microlensing in the continuum measured by CASTLES (www.cfa.harvard.edu/castles/) in both lens systems, with amplitudes 0.09(λ16000) ≲ |Δm| ≲ 0.8(λ5439) for HE0047–1756, and 0.2(λ16000) ≲ |Δm| ≲ 0.8(λ5439) for SDSS1155+6346. Using magnification maps to simulate microlensing and modeling the accretion disk as a Gaussian source (I ∝ exp(–R {sup 2}/2r {sub s}{sup 2})) of size r {sub s} ∝ λ {sup p}, we find r {sub s} = 2.5{sub −1.4}{sup +3.0} √(M/0.3M{sub ⊙}) lt-day and p = 2.3 ± 0.8 at the rest frame for λ = 2045 for HE0047–1756 (log prior) and r {sub s} = 5.5{sub −3.3}{sup +8.2} √(M/0.3M{sub ⊙}) lt-day and p = 1.5 ± 0.6 at the rest frame of λ = 1398 for SDSS1155+6346 (log prior). Contrary to other studied lens systems, the chromaticity detected in HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346 is large enough to fulfill the thin disk prediction. The inferred sizes, however, are very large compared to the predictions of this model, especially in the case of SDSS1155+6346.

  2. Resolving the Structure at the Heart of BAL Quasars Through Microlensing Induced Polarisation Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Hales, C A; Hales, Christopher A.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2007-01-01

    While amongst the most luminous objects in the universe, many details regarding the inner structure of quasars remain unknown. One such area is the mechanism promoting increased polarisation in the broad absorption line troughs of certain quasars. This study shows how microlensing can be used to differentiate between two popular models that explain such polarisation through a realistic computational analysis. By examining a statistical ensemble of correlation data between two observables (namely image brightness and polarisation of the flux coming from the quasar), it was found that through spectropolarimetric monitoring it would be possible to discern between a model with an external scattering region and a model without one.

  3. New aperture photometry of QSO 0957+561; application to time delay and microlensing

    OpenAIRE

    Ovaldsen, J. E.; Teuber, J.; Schild, R. E.; Stabell, R.

    2003-01-01

    We present a re-reduction of archival CCD frames of the doubly imaged quasar 0957+561 using a new photometry code. Aperture photometry with corrections for both cross contamination between the quasar images and galaxy contamination is performed on about 2650 R-band images from a five year period (1992-1997). From the brightness data a time delay of 424.9 +/- 1.2 days is derived using two different statistical techniques. The amount of gravitational microlensing in the quasar light curves is b...

  4. DARK MATTER MASS FRACTION IN LENS GALAXIES: NEW ESTIMATES FROM MICROLENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea S/N, La Laguna E-38200, Tenerife (Spain); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 4055 McPherson Lab, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); Muñoz, J. A. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-02-01

    We present a joint estimate of the stellar/dark matter mass fraction in lens galaxies and the average size of the accretion disk of lensed quasars based on microlensing measurements of 27 quasar image pairs seen through 19 lens galaxies. The Bayesian estimate for the fraction of the surface mass density in the form of stars is α = 0.21 ± 0.14 near the Einstein radius of the lenses (∼1-2 effective radii). The estimate for the average accretion disk size is R{sub 1/2}=7.9{sub −2.6}{sup +3.8}√(M/0.3 M{sub ⊙}) light days. The fraction of mass in stars at these radii is significantly larger than previous estimates from microlensing studies assuming quasars were point-like. The corresponding local dark matter fraction of 79% is in good agreement with other estimates based on strong lensing or kinematics. The size of the accretion disk inferred in the present study is slightly larger than previous estimates.

  5. The Effect of a Time-Varying Accretion Disk Size on Quasar Microlensing Light Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Blackburne, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Microlensing perturbations to the magnification of gravitationally lensed quasar images are dependent on the angular size of the quasar. If quasar variability at visible wavelengths is caused by a change in the area of the accretion disk, it will affect the microlensing magnification. We derive the expected signal, assuming that the luminosity scales with some power of the disk area, and estimate its amplitude using simulations. We discuss the prospects for detecting the effect in real-world data and for using it to estimate the logarithmic slope of the luminosity's dependence on disk area. Such an estimate would provide a direct test of the standard thin accretion disk model. We tried fitting 6 seasons of the light curves of the lensed quasar HE 0435-1223 including this effect as a modification to the Kochanek et al. (2006) approach to estimating time delays. We find a dramatic improvement in the goodness of fit and relatively plausible parameters, but a robust estimate will require a full numerical calculat...

  6. Speeding up low-mass planetary microlensing simulations and modeling: The caustic region of influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penny, Matthew T., E-mail: penny@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Extensive simulations of planetary microlensing are necessary both before and after a survey is conducted: before to design and optimize the survey and after to understand its detection efficiency. The major bottleneck in such computations is the computation of light curves. However, for low-mass planets, most of these computations are wasteful, as most light curves do not contain detectable planetary signatures. In this paper, I develop a parameterization of the binary microlens that is conducive to avoiding light curve computations. I empirically find analytic expressions describing the limits of the parameter space that contain the vast majority of low-mass planet detections. Through a large-scale simulation, I measure the (in)completeness of the parameterization and the speed-up it is possible to achieve. For Earth-mass planets in a wide range of orbits, it is possible to speed up simulations by a factor of ∼30-125 (depending on the survey's annual duty-cycle) at the cost of missing ∼1% of detections (which is actually a smaller loss than for the arbitrary parameter limits typically applied in microlensing simulations). The benefits of the parameterization probably outweigh the costs for planets below 100 M{sub ⊕}. For planets at the sensitivity limit of AFTA-WFIRST, simulation speed-ups of a factor ∼1000 or more are possible.

  7. Speeding up low-mass planetary microlensing simulations and modeling: The caustic region of influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive simulations of planetary microlensing are necessary both before and after a survey is conducted: before to design and optimize the survey and after to understand its detection efficiency. The major bottleneck in such computations is the computation of light curves. However, for low-mass planets, most of these computations are wasteful, as most light curves do not contain detectable planetary signatures. In this paper, I develop a parameterization of the binary microlens that is conducive to avoiding light curve computations. I empirically find analytic expressions describing the limits of the parameter space that contain the vast majority of low-mass planet detections. Through a large-scale simulation, I measure the (in)completeness of the parameterization and the speed-up it is possible to achieve. For Earth-mass planets in a wide range of orbits, it is possible to speed up simulations by a factor of ∼30-125 (depending on the survey's annual duty-cycle) at the cost of missing ∼1% of detections (which is actually a smaller loss than for the arbitrary parameter limits typically applied in microlensing simulations). The benefits of the parameterization probably outweigh the costs for planets below 100 M⊕. For planets at the sensitivity limit of AFTA-WFIRST, simulation speed-ups of a factor ∼1000 or more are possible.

  8. Inferring statistics of planet populations by means of automated microlensing searches

    CERN Document Server

    Dominik, M; Horne, K; Tsapras, Y; Street, R A; Wyrzykowski, L; Hessman, F V; Hundertmark, M; Rahvar, S; Wambsganss, J; Scarpetta, G; Bozza, V; Novati, S Calchi; Mancini, L; Masi, G; Teuber, J; Hinse, T C; Steele, I A; Burgdorf, M J; Kane, S

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) The study of other worlds is key to understanding our own, and not only provides clues to the origin of our civilization, but also looks into its future. Rather than in identifying nearby systems and learning about their individual properties, the main value of the technique of gravitational microlensing is in obtaining the statistics of planetary populations within the Milky Way and beyond. Only the complementarity of different techniques currently employed promises to yield a complete picture of planet formation that has sufficient predictive power to let us understand how habitable worlds like ours evolve, and how abundant such systems are in the Universe. A cooperative three-step strategy of survey, follow-up, and anomaly monitoring of microlensing targets, realized by means of an automated expert system and a network of ground-based telescopes is ready right now to be used to obtain a first census of cool planets with masses reaching even below that of Earth orbiting K and M dwarfs in two dist...

  9. New aperture photometry of QSO 0957+561; application to time delay and microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaldsen, J. E.; Teuber, J.; Schild, R. E.; Stabell, R.

    2003-05-01

    We present a re-reduction of archival CCD frames of the doubly imaged quasar 0957+561 using a new photometry code. Aperture photometry with corrections for both cross contamination between the quasar images and galaxy contamination is performed on about 2650 R-band images from a five year period (1992-1997). From the brightness data a time delay of 424.9 +/- 1.2 days is derived using two different statistical techniques. The amount of gravitational microlensing in the quasar light curves is briefly investigated, and we find unambiguous evidence of both long term and short term microlensing. We also note the unusual circumstance regarding time delay estimates for this gravitational lens. Estimates by different observers from different data sets or even with the same data sets give lag estimates differing by typically 8 days, and error bars of only a day or two. This probably indicates several complexities where the result of each estimate depends upon the details of the calculation.

  10. New aperture photometry of QSO 0957+561; application to time delay and microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ovaldsen, J E; Schild, R E; Stabell, R

    2003-01-01

    We present a re-reduction of archival CCD frames of the doubly imaged quasar 0957+561 using a new photometry code. Aperture photometry with corrections for both cross contamination between the quasar images and galaxy contamination is performed on about 2650 R-band images from a five year period (1992-1997). From the brightness data a time delay of 424.9 +/- 1.2 days is derived using two different statistical techniques. The amount of gravitational microlensing in the quasar light curves is briefly investigated, and we find unambiguous evidence of both long term and short term microlensing. We also note the unusual circumstance regarding time delay estimates for this gravitational lens. Estimates by different observers from different data sets or even with the same data sets give lag estimates differing by typically 8 days, and error bars of only a day or two. This probably indicates several complexities where the result of each estimate depends upon the details of the calculation.

  11. Astrometric Image Centroid Displacements due to Gravitational Microlensing by the Ellis Wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Toki, Yukiharu; Asada, Hideki; Abe, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication (Abe, ApJ, 725 (2010) 787), we study the gravitational microlensing effects of the Ellis wormhole in the weak-field limit. First, we find a suitable coordinate transformation, such that the lens equation and analytic expressions of the lensed image positions can become much simpler than the previous ones. Second, we prove that two images always appear for the weak-field lens by the Ellis wormhole. By using these analytic results, we discuss astrometric image centroid displacements due to gravitational microlensing by the Ellis wormhole. The astrometric image centroid trajectory by the Ellis wormhole is different from the standard one by a spherical lensing object that is expressed by the Schwarzschild metric. The anomalous shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller than that by the Schwarzschild lens, provided that the impact parameter and the Einstein ring radius are the same. Therefore, the lensed image centroid by the Ellis wormhole...

  12. Imprints of the quasar structure in time-delay light curves: Microlensing-aided reverberation mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Sluse, D

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the advent of large area photometric surveys, the possibility to use broad band photometric data, instead of spectra, to measure the size of the broad line region of active galactic nuclei, has raised a large interest. We describe here a new method using time-delay lensed quasars where one or several images are affected by microlensing due to stars in the lensing galaxy. Because microlensing decreases (or increases) the flux of the continuum compared to the broad line region, it changes the contrast between these two emission components. We show that this effect can be used to effectively disentangle the intrinsic variability of those two regions, offering the opportunity to perform reverberation mapping based on single band photometric data. Based on simulated light curves generated using a damped random walk model of quasar variability, we show that measurement of the size of the broad line region can be achieved using this method, provided one spectrum has been obtained independently during the mo...

  13. The different origins of high- and low-ionization broad emission lines revealed by gravitational microlensing in the Einstein cross

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, Lorraine; Sluse, Dominique; Anguita, Timo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the kinematics and ionization structure of the broad emission line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO2237+0305 (the Einstein cross) using differential microlensing in the high- and low-ionization broad emission lines. We combine visible and near-infrared spectra of the four images of the lensed quasar and detect a large-amplitude microlensing effect distorting the high-ionization CIV and low-ionization H$\\alpha$ line profiles in image A. While microlensing only magnifies the red wing of the Balmer line, it symmetrically magnifies the wings of the CIV emission line. Given that the same microlensing pattern magnifies both the high- and low-ionization broad emission line regions, these dissimilar distortions of the line profiles suggest that the high- and low-ionization regions are governed by different kinematics. Since this quasar is likely viewed at intermediate inclination, we argue that the differential magnification of the blue and red wings of H$\\alpha$ favors a flattened, viri...

  14. On the possibility of an astronomical detection of chromaticity effects in microlensing by wormhole-like objects

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, D F; Romero, G E; Torres, Diego F.; Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2001-01-01

    We study the colour changes induced by blending in a wormhole-like microlensing scenario with extended sources. The results are compared with those obtained for limb darkening. We assess the possibility of an actual detection of the colour curve using the difference image analysis method.

  15. On the Possibility of An Astronomical Detection of Chromaticity Effects in Microlensing by Wormhole-Like Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Diego F.; Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    We study the colour changes induced by blending in a wormhole-like microlensing scenario with extended sources. The results are compared with those obtained for limb darkening. We assess the possibility of an actual detection of the colour curve using the difference image analysis method.

  16. Orbital Motion During Gravitational Lensing Events

    CERN Document Server

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational lensing events provide unique opportunities to discover and study planetary systems and binaries. Here we build on previous work to explore the role that orbital motion can play in both identifying and learning more about multiple-mass systems that serve as gravitational lenses. We find that a significant fraction of planet-lens and binary-lens light curves are influenced by orbital motion. Furthermore, the effects of orbital motion extend the range of binaries for which lens multiplicity can be discovered and studied. Orbital motion will play an increasingly important role as observations with sensitive photometry, such as those made by the space missions Kepler, Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, (TESS), and WFIRST discover gravitational lensing events. Similarly, the excellent astrometric measurements made possible by GAIA will allow it to study the effects of orbital motion. Frequent observations, such as those made possible with the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network, KMTNet, will al...

  17. Energy Dependent X-Ray Microlensing and the Structure of Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, C.

    2012-10-01

    The structure of the X-ray emitting regions of quasars remains an open question. Using microlensing in lensed quasars, we can now constrain the sizes, finding that they are compact compared to the UV emission {2500A} with 1/2 light radii of 10-30 gravitational radii. We propose measuring the relative sizes of the hard and soft X-ray emission, better constraining the overall X-ray sizes and comparing them to the hottest regions of the accretion disk by coarsely monitoring 6 lenses with CXO {6 epochs each} and 5 with HST/UV {2 epochs}. In essence, the variability amplitudes of the X-ray/UV compared to our well-sampled optical light curves allows us to measure the sizes. We request 2/3 {1/3} of the time in Cycle 14 {15} for a total of 864 ks {with slew tax} and 12 HST orbits.

  18. COSMOGRAIL XI: Techniques for time delay measurement in presence of microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Tewes, M; Meylan, G

    2013-01-01

    Measuring time delays between the multiple images of gravitationally lensed quasars is now recognized as a competitive way to constrain the cosmological parameters, well complementary with other cosmological probes. This requires long and well sampled optical light curves of numerous lensed quasars, e.g., as obtained by the COSMOGRAIL collaboration. High-quality data from our monitoring campaign calls for novel numerical techniques to robustly measure the delays as well as the associated random and systematic uncertainties, even in presence of microlensing variations. We propose three different point estimators to measure time delays, that are explicitly designed to handle light curves with extrinsic variability. These methods share a common formalism, which enables them to process data from n-image lenses. As the estimators rely on significantly contrasting ideas, we expect them to be sensitive to different bias sources. For each method and data set, we empirically estimate both the precision and accuracy (b...

  19. The Detection of Terrestrial Planets via Gravitational Microlensing: Space vs. Ground-based Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, D P

    2004-01-01

    I compare an aggressive ground-based gravitational microlensing survey for terrestrial planets to a space-based survey. The Ground-based survey assumes a global network of very wide field-of-view ~2m telescopes that monitor fields in the central Galactic bulge. I find that such a space-based survey is ~100 times more effective at detecting terrestrial planets in Earth-like orbits. The poor sensitivity of the ground-based surveys to low-mass planets is primarily due to the fact that the main sequence source stars are unresolved in ground-based images of the Galactic bulge. This gives rise to systematic photometry errors that preclude the detection of most of the planetary light curve deviations for low mass planets.

  20. Label-Free Nanoscopy with Contact Microlenses: Super-Resolution Mechanisms and Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Astratov, Vasily N; Brettin, Aaron; Allen, Kenneth W; Maslov, Alexey V; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos I; Walker, Dennis E; Urbas, Augustine M

    2016-01-01

    Despite all the success with developing super-resolution imaging techniques, the Abbe limit poses a severe fundamental restriction on the resolution of far-field imaging systems based on diffraction of light. Imaging with contact microlenses, such as microspheres or microfibers, can increase the resolution by a factor of two beyond the Abbe limit. The theoretical mechanisms of these methods are debated in the literature. In this work, we focus on the recently expressed idea that optical coupling between closely spaced nanoscale objects can lead to the formation of the modes that drastically impact the imaging properties. These coupling effects emerge in nanoplasmonic or nanocavity clusters, photonic molecules, or various arrays under resonant excitation conditions. The coherent nature of imaging processes is key to understanding their physical mechanisms. We used a cluster of point dipoles, as a simple model system, to study and compare the consequences of coherent and incoherent imaging. Using finite differe...

  1. Imprints of the quasar structure in time-delay light curves: Microlensing-aided reverberation mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluse, D.; Tewes, M.

    2014-11-01

    The advent of large area photometric surveys has raised a great deal of interest in the possibility of using broadband photometric data, instead of spectra, to measure the size of the broad line region of active galactic nuclei. We describe here a new method that uses time-delay lensed quasars where one or several images are affected by microlensing due to stars in the lensing galaxy. Because microlensing decreases (or increases) the flux of the continuum compared to the broad line region, it changes the contrast between these two emission components. We show that this effect can be used to effectively disentangle the intrinsic variability of those two regions, offering the opportunity to perform reverberation mapping based on single-band photometric data. Based on simulated light curves generated using a damped random walk model of quasar variability, we show that measurement of the size of the broad line region can be achieved using this method, provided one spectrum has been obtained independently during the monitoring. This method is complementary to photometric reverberation mapping and could also be extended to multi-band data. Because the effect described above produces a variability pattern in difference light curves between pairs of lensed images that is correlated with the time-lagged continuum variability, it can potentially produce systematic errors in measurement of time delays between pairs of lensed images. Simple simulations indicate that time-delay measurement techniques that use a sufficiently flexible model for the extrinsic variability are not affected by this effect and produce accurate time delays.

  2. MiNDSTEp differential photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756: Microlensing and a new time delay

    CERN Document Server

    Giannini, E; Wambsganß, J; Alsubai, K; Andersen, J M; Anguita, T; Bozza, V; Bramich, D M; Browne, P; Novati, S Calchi; Damerdji, Y; Diehl, C; Dodds, P; Dominik, M; Elyiv, A; Fang, X; Jaimes, R Figuera; Finet, F; Gerner, T; Gu, S; Hardis, S; Harpsøe, K; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Hundertmark, M; Jessen-Hansen, J; Jørgensen, U G; Juncher, D; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Korhonen, H; Liebig, C; Lund, M N; Lundkvist, M S; Maier, G; Mancini, L; Masi, G; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M; Proft, S; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Sahu, K; Schäfer, S; Schönebeck, F; Skottfelt, J; Snodgrass, C; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Vilela, C; Wertz, O; Zimmer, F

    2016-01-01

    We present V and R photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756. The data were taken by the MiNDSTEp collaboration with the 1.54 m Danish telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory from 2008 to 2012. Differential photometry has been carried out using the image subtraction method as implemented in the HOTPAnTS package, additionally using GALFIT for quasar photometry. The quasar WFI2033-4723 showed brightness variations of order 0.5 mag in V and R during the campaign. The two lensed components of quasar HE0047-1756 varied by 0.2-0.3 mag within five years. We provide, for the first time, an estimate of the time delay of component B with respect to A of $\\Delta t= 7.6\\pm1.8$ days for this object. We also find evidence for a secular evolution of the magnitude difference between components A and B in both filters, which we explain as due to a long-duration microlensing event. Finally we find that both quasars WFI2033-4723 and HE0047-1756 become bluer when brighter, which is consisten...

  3. Using graphical and pictorial representations to teach introductory astronomy students about the detection of extrasolar planets via gravitational microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, Colin S; Prather, Edward E; Brissenden, Gina

    2016-01-01

    The detection and study of extrasolar planets is an exciting and thriving field in modern astrophysics, and an increasingly popular topic in introductory astronomy courses. One detection method relies on searching for stars whose light has been gravitationally microlensed by an extrasolar planet. In order to facilitate instructors' abilities to bring this interesting mix of general relativity and extrasolar planet detection into the introductory astronomy classroom, we have developed a new Lecture-Tutorial, "Detecting Exoplanets with Gravitational Microlensing." In this paper, we describe how this new Lecture-Tutorial's representations of astrophysical phenomena, which we selected and created based on theoretically motivated considerations of their pedagogical affordances, are used to help introductory astronomy students develop more expert-like reasoning abilities.

  4. Using graphical and pictorial representations to teach introductory astronomy students about the detection of extrasolar planets via gravitational microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Chambers, Timothy G.; Prather, Edward E.; Brissenden, Gina

    2016-05-01

    The detection and study of extrasolar planets is an exciting and thriving field in modern astrophysics and an increasingly popular topic in introductory astronomy courses. One detection method relies on searching for stars whose light has been gravitationally microlensed by an extrasolar planet. In order to facilitate instructors' abilities to bring this interesting mix of general relativity and extrasolar planet detection into the introductory astronomy classroom, we have developed a new Lecture-Tutorial called "Detecting Exoplanets with Gravitational Microlensing." In this paper, we describe how this new Lecture-Tutorial's representations of astrophysical phenomena, which we selected and created based on theoretically motivated considerations of their pedagogical affordances, are used to help introductory astronomy students develop more expert-like reasoning abilities.

  5. Elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting process characterization for the fabrication of arrays of concave refractive microlenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, L.; Van Overmeire, S.; Van Erps, J.; Ottevaere, H.; Debaes, C.; Thienpont, H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete and precise quantitative characterization of the different process steps used in an elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting technique. We use the latter replication technique to fabricate concave replicas from an array of convex thermal reflow microlenses. During the inverse elastomeric moulding we obtain a secondary silicone mould of the original silicone mould in which the master component is embedded. Using vacuum casting, we are then able to cast out of the second mould several optical transparent poly-urethane arrays of concave refractive microlenses. We select ten particular representative microlenses on the original, the silicone moulds and replica sample and quantitatively characterize and statistically compare them during the various fabrication steps. For this purpose, we use several state-of-the-art and ultra-precise characterization tools such as a stereo microscope, a stylus surface profilometer, a non-contact optical profilometer, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a Twyman-Green interferometer and an atomic force microscope to compare various microlens parameters such as the lens height, the diameter, the paraxial focal length, the radius of curvature, the Strehl ratio, the peak-to-valley and the root-mean-square wave aberrations and the surface roughness. When appropriate, the microlens parameter under test is measured with several different measuring tools to check for consistency in the measurement data. Although none of the lens samples shows diffraction-limited performance, we prove that the obtained replicated arrays of concave microlenses exhibit sufficiently low surface roughness and sufficiently high lens quality for various imaging applications.

  6. MOA-cam3: a wide-field mosaic CCD camera for a gravitational microlensing survey in New Zealand

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, T; Sasaki, M; Okajima, K; Abe, F; Bond, I A; Hearnshaw, J B; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Kilmartin, P M; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Rattenbury, N J; Sullivan, D J; Sumi, T; Tristram, P; Yanagisawa, T; Yock, P C M

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a wide-field mosaic CCD camera, MOA-cam3, mounted at the prime focus of the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) 1.8-m telescope. The camera consists of ten E2V CCD4482 chips, each having 2kx4k pixels, and covers a 2.2 deg^2 field of view with a single exposure. The optical system is well optimized to realize uniform image quality over this wide field. The chips are constantly cooled by a cryocooler at -80C, at which temperature dark current noise is negligible for a typical 1-3 minute exposure. The CCD output charge is converted to a 16-bit digital signal by the GenIII system (Astronomical Research Cameras Inc.) and readout is within 25 seconds. Readout noise of 2--3 ADU (rms) is also negligible. We prepared a wide-band red filter for an effective microlensing survey and also Bessell V, I filters for standard astronomical studies. Microlensing studies have entered into a new era, which requires more statistics, and more rapid alerts to catch exotic light curves. Our new system is...

  7. Fabrication of polymer-based reflowed microlenses on optical fibre with control of focal length using differential coating technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammed Ashraf; Franck Chollet; Murukeshan Matham; Chun Yang

    2009-08-01

    Thermal reflow of polymer to generate spherical profile has been used to fabricate microlenses in this paper. A simple model based on the volume conservation (before and after reflow) and geometrical consideration of lens profile, shows that the focal length of the microlens produced by reflow technique is a function of the initial geometry of microcylinders, i.e. diameter and thickness. This relationship of focal length with diameter and thickness is used as a basis to control focal length. A simple spin coating technique on dual surface is used to achieve differential thickness, to control the focal length of microlenses produced on the same substrate. A biomedical application of such combination of microlenses is endoscopy where the lenses of varying diameter and equal focal length are needed on top of optical fibre bundles to provide independent function of illumination and imaging. This paper incorporates the differential thickness technique to show a micro fabrication process to produce the polymer reflowed microlenses, with a control of focal length based on thickness. The design also helps to integrate these microlenses on top an optical fibre with accurate alignment.

  8. MOA-II Galactic microlensing constraints: the inner Milky Way has a low dark matter fraction and a near maximal disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2016-11-01

    Microlensing provides a unique tool to break the stellar to dark matter degeneracy in the inner Milky Way. We combine N-body dynamical models fitted to the Milky Way's Boxy/Peanut bulge with exponential disc models outside this, and compute the microlensing properties. Considering the range of models consistent with the revised MOA-II data, we find low dark matter fractions in the inner Galaxy: at the peak of their stellar rotation curve a fraction fv = (0.88 ± 0.07) of the circular velocity is baryonic (at 1σ, fv > 0.72 at 2σ). These results are in agreement with constraints from the EROS-II microlensing survey of brighter resolved stars, where we find fv = (0.9 ± 0.1) at 1σ. Our fiducial model of a disc with scale length 2.6 kpc, and a bulge with a low dark matter fraction of 12 per cent, agrees with both the revised MOA-II and EROS-II microlensing data. The required baryonic fractions, and the resultant low contribution from dark matter, are consistent with the NFW profiles produced by dissipationless cosmological simulations in Milky Way mass galaxies. They are also consistent with recent prescriptions for the mild adiabatic contraction of Milky Way mass haloes without the need for strong feedback, but there is some tension with recent measurements of the local dark matter density. Microlensing optical depths from the larger OGLE-III sample could improve these constraints further when available.

  9. MOA-II Galactic Microlensing Constraints: The Inner Milky Way has a Low Dark Matter Fraction and a Near Maximal Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Microlensing provides a unique tool to break the stellar to dark matter degeneracy in the inner Milky Way. We combine N-body dynamical models fitted to the Milky Way's Boxy/Peanut bulge with exponential disk models outside this, and compute the microlensing properties. Considering the range of models consistent with the revised MOA-II data, we find low dark matter fractions in the inner Galaxy: at the peak of their stellar rotation curve a fraction fv = (0.88 ± 0.07) of the circular velocity is baryonic (at 1σ, fv > 0.72 at 2σ). These results are in agreement with constraints from the EROS-II microlensing survey of brighter resolved stars, where we find fv = (0.9 ± 0.1) at 1σ. Our fiducial model of a disk with scale length 2.6 kpc, and a bulge with a low dark matter fraction of 12%, agrees with both the revised MOA-II and EROS-II microlensing data. The required baryonic fractions, and the resultant low contribution from dark matter, are consistent with the NFW profiles produced by dissipationless cosmological simulations in Milky Way mass galaxies. They are also consistent with recent prescriptions for the mild adiabatic contraction of Milky Way mass haloes without the need for strong feedback, but there is some tension with recent measurements of the local dark matter density. Microlensing optical depths from the larger OGLE-III sample could improve these constraints further when available.

  10. Beyond the Wobbles: Teaching Students About Detecting Planets with the Transit and Gravitational Microlensing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Edward E.; Wallace, Colin Scott; Chambers, Timothy G.; Brissenden, Gina; Traub, Wesley A.; Greene, W. M.; Biferno, Anya A.; Rodriguez, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) at the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory in collaboration with JPL scientists, visualization experts, and education and public outreach professionals with the Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) have recently completed classroom field-testing of a new suite of educational materials to help learners better understand how extrasolar planets are detected using the transit and gravitational microlensing techniques. This collaboration has created a set of evidence-based Think-Pair-Share questions, Lecture-Tutorials, animations, presentation slides, and instrucotrs guide that can be used together or separately to actively engage learners in reasoning about the data and scientific representations associated with these exciting new extrasolar planet detection methods. In this talk we present several of the conceptually challenging collaborative learning tasks that students encounter with this new suite of educational materials and some of the assessment questions we are using to assess the efficacy of their use in general education, college-level astronomy courses.

  11. Integral field spectroscopy of four lensed quasars: analysis of their neighborhood and evidence for microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Anguita, T; Yonehara, A; Wambsganss, J; Kneib, J -P; Covone, G; Alloin, D

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Gravitationally lensed quasars constitute an independent tool to derive H0 through time-delays; they offer as well the opportunity to study the mass distribution and interstellar medium of their lensing galaxies and, through microlensing they also allow one to study details of the emitting source. AIMS: For such studies, one needs to have an excellent knowledge of the close environment of the lensed images in order to model the lensing potential: this means observational data over a large field-of-view and spectroscopy at high spatial resolution. METHODS: We present VIMOS integral field observations around four lensed quasars: HE 0230-2130, RX J0911.4+0551, H 1413+117 and B 1359+154. Using the low, medium and high resolution modes, we study the quasar images and the quasar environments, as well as provide a detailed report of the data reduction. RESULTS: Comparison between the quasar spectra of the different images reveals differences for HE 0230-2130, RX J0911.4+0551 and H 1413+117: flux ratios betw...

  12. Microlensed image centroid motions by an exotic lens object with negative convergence or negative mass

    CERN Document Server

    Kitamura, Takao; Nakajima, Koki; Hagiwara, Chisaki; Asada, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational lens models with negative convergence (surface mass density projected onto the lens plane) inspired by modified gravity theories, exotic matter and energy have been recently examined to discuss possible demagnification of images and gravitational lensing shear, in such a way that a static and spherically symmetric modified spacetime metric depends on the inverse distance to the power of positive $n$ ($n=1$ for Schwarzschild metric, $n=2$ for Ellis wormhole) in the weak-field approximation [Kitamura, Nakajima and Asada, PRD 87, 027501 (2013), Izumi et al. to be published in PRD (2013)]. Some of the exotic lens models cause the attractive force on light rays like a convex lens, whereas the others are repulsive on light rays like a concave lens. The present paper considers microlensed image centroid motions by the exotic lens models. Numerical calculations show that, for large $n$ cases in the convex-type models, the centroid shift from the source position might move on a multiply-connected curve l...

  13. What can we learn about quasars and unification scheme with the microlensing technique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluse, D.

    2015-09-01

    Our understanding of the gravitational lensing phenomenon has deeply progressed since the discovery of the "first" gravitationally lensed object in 1979 by Walsh and collaborators. With more than hundreds of quasars known to be multiply imaged by a foreground galaxy, gravitational lensing is now a powerful astrophysical and cosmological tool. The stars located in lensing galaxies produce small deflections of the light rays coming from distant quasars which adds to the main deflection from the lensing galaxy. Because the deflection caused by the stars is small, the micro-images they produce remain unresolved. Only a flickering of the flux and spectral deformation of lensed quasars images are observed. I will explain how this micro-lensing effect, can be used to study the inner region of distant quasars. Specifically, I will zoom out from the inner accretion disc up to the torus, and give an overview of the information which can be retrieved at each of these scales. I will give a special emphasis on the constraint we can put on the orientation/geometry of the various emitting regions (i.e. disc, broad line region, torus) at each of these scales.

  14. Observation of Microlensing towards the Galactic Spiral Arms EROS II 2 year survey

    CERN Document Server

    Derue, F; Alard, C; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Bauer, F; Beaulieu, J P; Bouquet, A; Char, S; Charlot, X; Couchot, F; Coutures, C; Ferlet, R; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Graff, D S; Gros, M H; Haïssinski, J; Hamilton, J C; Hardin, D P; De Kat, J; Kim, A; Lasserre, T; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Mansoux, B; Marquette, J B; Maurice, E; Milshtein, A I; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Prévôt, L; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Spiro, Michel; Vidal-Madjar, A; Vigroux, L; Zylberajch, S

    1999-01-01

    We present the analysis of the light curves of 8.5 million stars observed during two seasons by EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres), in the galactic plane away from the bulge. Three stars have been found that exhibit luminosity variations compatible with gravitational microlensing effects due to unseen objects. The corresponding optical depth, averaged over four directions, is 0.38 (+0.53, -0.15) 10^{-6}. All three candidates have long Einstein radius crossing times ($\\sim$ 70 to 100 days). For one of them, the lack of evidence for a parallax or a source size effect enabled us to constrain the lens-source % geometric configuration. Another candidate displays a modulation of the magnification, which is compatible with the lensing of a binary source. The interpretation of the optical depths inferred from these observations is hindered by the imperfect knowledge of the distance to the target stars. Our measurements are compatible with expectations from simple galactic models under reasonable assumpti...

  15. On the age of Galactic bulge microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Degl'Innocenti, S

    2015-01-01

    Recent results by Bensby and collaborators on the ages of microlensed stars in the Galactic bulge have challenged the picture of an exclusively old stellar population. However, these age estimates have not been independently confirmed. In this paper we verify these results by means of a grid-based method and quantify the systematic biases that might be induced by some assumptions adopted to compute stellar models. We explore the impact of increasing the initial helium abundance, neglecting the element microscopic diffusion, and changing the mixing-length calibration in theoretical stellar track computations. We adopt the SCEPtER pipeline with a novel stellar model grid for metallicities [Fe/H] from -2.00 to 0.55 dex, and masses in the range [0.60; 1.60] Msun from the ZAMS to the helium flash at the red giant branch tip. We show for the considered evolutionary phases that our technique provides unbiased age estimates. Our age results are in good agreement with Bensby and collaborators findings and show 16 star...

  16. Possible Solution of the Long-standing Discrepancy in the Microlensing Optical Depth toward the Galactic Bulge by Correcting the Stellar Number Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, T.; Penny, M. T.

    2016-08-01

    We find that significant incompleteness in stellar number counts results in a significant overestimate of the microlensing optical depth τ and event rate per star per year Γ toward the Galactic bulge from the first two years of the MOA-II survey. We find that the completeness in red clump giant (RCG) counts {f}{{RC}} decreases proportional to the galactic latitude b, as {f}{{RC}}=(0.63+/- 0.11)-(0.052+/- 0.028)× b, ranging between 1 and 0.7 at b=-6^\\circ ˜ -1\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 5. The previous measurements using all sources by difference image analysis (DIA) by MACHO and MOA-I suffer the same bias. On the other hand, the measurements using an RCG sample by OGLE-II, MACHO, and EROS were free from this bias because they selected only the events associated with the resolved stars. Thus, the incompleteness both in the number of events and stellar number count cancel out. We estimate τ and Γ by correcting this incompleteness. In the central fields with | l| \\lt 5^\\circ , we find {{Γ }}=[18.74+/- 0.91]× {10}-6\\exp [(0.53+/- 0.05)(3-| b| )] star‑1 yr‑1 and {τ }200=[1.84+/- 0.14]× {10}-6\\exp [(0.44+/- 0.07)(3-| b| )] for the 427 events with {t}{{E}}≤slant 200 days using all sources brighter than {I}s≤slant 20 mag. Our revised all-source τ measurements are about 2σ smaller than the other all-source measurements and are consistent with the RCG measurements within 1σ. We conclude that the long-standing problem on discrepancy between the high τ with all-source samples by DIA and low τ with RCG samples can probably be explained by the incompleteness of the stellar number count. A model fit to these measurements predicts {{Γ }}=4.60+/- 0.25× {10}-5 star‑1 yr‑1 at | b| ˜ -1\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 4 and -2\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 25\\lt l\\lt 3\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 75 for sources with I\\lt 20, where the future space mission, Wide Field Infrared Space Telescope, will observe.

  17. The First Six Months of the LLNL-CfPA-MSSSO Search for Baryonic Dark Matter in the Galaxy's Halo via its Gravitational Microlensing Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, K.; Alcock, C.; Allsman, R.; Axelrod, T.; Bennett, D.; Marshall, S.; Stubbs, C.; Griest, K.; Perlmutter, S.; Sutherland, W.; Freeman, K.; Peterson, B.; Quinn, P.; Rodgers, A.

    1992-12-01

    This collaboration, dubbed the MACHO Project (an acronym for MAssive Compact Halo Objects), has refurbished the 1.27-m, Great Melbourne Telescope at Mt. Stromlo and equipped it with a corrected {1°} FOV. The prime focus corrector yields a red and blue beam for simultaneous imaging in two passbands, 4500{ Angstroms}--6100{ Angstroms} and 6100{ Angstroms}--7900{ Angstroms}. Each beam is imaged by a 2x2 array of 2048x2048 pixel CCDs which are simultaneously read out from two amplifiers on each CCD. A 32 Megapixel dual-color image of 0.5 square degree is clocked directly into computer memory in less than 70 seconds. We are using this system to monitor more than 10(7) stars in the Magellanic Clouds for gravitational microlensing events and will soon monitor an additional 10(7) stars in the bulge of our galaxy. Image data goes directly into a reduction pipeline where photometry for stars in an image is determined and stored in a database. An early version of this pipeline has used a simple aperture photometry code and results from this will be presented. A more sophisticated PSF fitting photometry code is currently being installed in the pipeline and results should also be available at the meeting. The PSF fitting code has also been used to produce ~ 10(7) photometric measurements outside of the pipeline. This poster will present details of the instrumentation, data pipeline, observing conditions (weather and seeing), reductions and analyses for the first six months of dual-color observing. Eventually, we expect to be able to determine whether MACHOs are a significant component of the galactic halo in the mass range of \\(10^{-6} M_{\\sun} < M \\ {lower .5exhbox {\\: \\buildrel < \\over \\sim ;}} \\ 100 M_{\\sun}\\).

  18. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    The thesis deals with event management and is formally divided into three sections. The first section provides the theoretical basis for the practical part. It primarily defines the terms event, event management and event marketing. The theoretical part proceeds from the general introduction to more detailed examination of the issue, which includes the classification of event marketing within the marketing and communication mix of the company, the typology of events and explanation of various...

  19. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Jandová, Dita

    2011-01-01

    The thesis deal with event management. For better insight into this field event management is described on case of management of conference. The thesis has three main parts. In the theoretical part there are definitions of terms like event management, conference and other related terms. Further chapters are concerned with the position of event management in the communication mix, typologies of events and mostly with the crucial aspects of event management. In the second part of the thesis the...

  20. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Šubrtová, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis on the topic event management develops this concept, focuses mainly on the creation of the event and its application in practice. Management, event and event management are described in the theoretical section. The importace of event management in the marketing communications mix is shown subsequently and especially the creation of the event is more detailed described. This is then reflected in the practical part of the thesis, in which the awards gala is planed and orga...

  1. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Grebíková, Kristýna

    2014-01-01

    The thesis in theoretical part focuses on the concepts of event management and their interaction. The theoretical part focuses on the creation of event planning and marketing strategies, typology of events, and provides a situational analysis, objectives events, defines the target group, plan the resources, establish a budget and will focus on event controlling. The practical part carries theory into practice and deals with the organization of the event in the company TON in Chile. Based on a...

  2. Chemical evolution of the Galactic bulge as traced by microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars. IV. Two bulge populations

    CERN Document Server

    Bensby, T; Meléndez, J; Gould, A; Feltzing, S; Asplund, M; Johnson, J A; Lucatello, S; Yee, J C; Ramírez, I; Cohen, J G; Thompson, I; Gal-Yam, A; Sumi, T; Bond, I A

    2011-01-01

    [ABRIDGED] Based on high-resolution (R~42000 to 48000) and high signal-to-noise (S/N~50 to 150) spectra obtained with UVES/VLT, we present detailed elemental abundances (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Y, and Ba) and stellar ages for 26 microlensed dwarf and subgiant stars in the Galactic bulge. The analysis is based on equivalent width measurements and standard 1-D LTE MARCS model stellar atmospheres. We also present NLTE Li abundances based on line synthesis of the 7Li line at 670.8 nm. We show that the bulge metallicity distribution (MDF) is double-peaked; one peak at [Fe/H]= -0.6 and one at [Fe/H]=+0.3, and with a dearth of stars around solar metallicity. This is in contrast to the MDF derived from red giants in Baade's window, which peaks at this exact value. A simple significance test shows that it is extremely unlikely to have such a gap in the microlensed dwarf star MDF if the dwarf stars are drawn from the giant star MDF. To resolve this issue we discuss several possibilities, but we can n...

  3. Synthesizing Exoplanet Demographics from Radial Velocity and Microlensing Surveys, II: The Frequency of Planets Orbiting M Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Clanton, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to radial velocity surveys, results from microlensing surveys indicate that giant planets with masses greater than the critical mass for core accretion ($\\sim 0.1~M_{\\rm Jup}$) are relatively common around low-mass stars. Using the methodology developed in the first paper, we predict the sensitivity of M-dwarf radial velocity (RV) surveys to analogs of the population of planets inferred by microlensing. We find that RV surveys should detect a handful of super-Jovian ($>M_{\\rm Jup}$) planets at the longest periods being probed. These planets are indeed found by RV surveys, implying that the demographic constraints inferred from these two methods are consistent. We combine the results from both methods to estimate planet frequencies spanning wide regions of parameter space. We find that the frequency of Jupiters and super-Jupiters ($1\\lesssim m_p\\sin{i}/M_{\\rm Jup}\\lesssim 13$) with periods $1\\leq P/{\\rm days}\\leq 10^4$ is $f_{\\rm J}=0.029^{+0.013}_{-0.015}$, a median factor of 4.3 ($1.5-14$ at 95% ...

  4. MOA-II Galactic Microlensing Constraints: The Inner Milky Way has a Low Dark Matter Fraction and a Near Maximal Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Wegg, Christopher; Portail, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Microlensing provides a unique tool to break the stellar to dark matter degeneracy in the inner Milky Way. We combine N-body dynamical models fitted to the Milky Way's Boxy/Peanut bulge with exponential disk models outside this, and compute the microlensing properties. Considering the range of models consistent with the revised MOA-II data, we find low dark matter fractions in the inner Galaxy: at the peak of their stellar rotation curve a fraction $f_v=(0.88\\pm0.07)$ of the circular velocity is baryonic (at $1\\sigma$, $f_v > 0.72$ at $2\\sigma$). These results are in agreement with constraints from the EROS-II microlensing survey of brighter resolved stars, where we find $f_v=(0.9\\pm0.1)$ at $1\\sigma$. Our fiducial model of a disk with scale length 2.6kpc, and a bulge with a low dark matter fraction of 12%, agrees with both the revised MOA-II and EROS-II microlensing data. The required baryonic fractions, and the resultant low contribution from dark matter, are consistent with the NFW profiles produced by dis...

  5. Search for black matter through the detection of gravitational micro-lenses in differential photometry; Recherche de matiere noire galactique par detection de microlentilles gravitationnelles en photometrie differentielle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, L

    2003-09-01

    The nature of dark matter is an open question. The search for gravitational microlensing effects is an interesting tool because this effect is strongly dependent on the mass of objects whether they are luminous or not, however this detection method is only sensitive to compact forms of dark matter (MACHOS - massive astronomical halo compact objects), and as a consequence no-baryonic matter like neutrinos or WIMPS (weakly interacting massive particles) can not be detected this way. In the first chapter the author reviews the plausible candidates to black matter. The use of the microlensing effect as a probe of the galactic halo is presented in the second chapter. The third chapter is dedicated to the series of experiments worldwide that focus on the detection of MACHOS. In the fourth chapter the author shows how the DIA (difference image analysis) method may be promising in the study of gravitational microlensing effects. The main part of this work has been the use of the DIA method to process five-year data set collected by the Eros experiment in the small Magellanic cloud (SMC). The data processing line and the results are presented in the fifth and sixth chapters. The results are consistent with previous results given by Eros and they confirm the disparity of the durations of micro-lenses detected in the large and small Magellanic clouds. (A.C.)

  6. Event marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Quynh Trang

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to analyze event-marketing activities of the small firm and propose new events. At first the theoretical part describes marketing and communication mix and then especially planning and development of event marketing campaign. Research data were collected by the method of survey to propose the new events. Randomly selected customers were asked to fill the questionnaire. Its results were integrated into the proposal of the new events. The interview was realized with the owner of...

  7. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Pavléková, Markéta

    2013-01-01

    The main theme of the work is event management, which deals with the social events of various types. Event as a mean of communication is a common part of business strategy today and the organization became a separate industry. Procedures how to implement successful event are the essential part of the work. Organizationally demanding activity of event managers, which includes planning, organizing, staffing, leadership and control is supported by marketing activities, which are described in the...

  8. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Michňa, Michal

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical part of this thesis deals with event management in general. The stress of its theoretical part is put on relation between event management and the other communication channels usually used by marketing experts in a firm. There is also described a confrontation of event management with processes which are basically used in project management. The theoretical part is mainly concerned with event management and organisation of events. There is a deep description of its prepara...

  9. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Vomáčková, Kateřina

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with event management from theory to practice. First part of the thesis consists of literature review of this topic – from definition of basic terms, through event management’s classification in marketing of a company, to description of different stages of event management process. The second part of the thesis is based on practice – an agency that organized for the third year an event focusing on children and sport, is presented here. Last year of this event including...

  10. X-Ray and Optical Microlensing in the Lensed Quasar PG 1115+080

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher W.; Kochanek, Christopher. S.; Dai, Xinyu; Morgan, Nicholas D.; Falco, Emilio E.

    2008-12-01

    We analyzed the microlensing of the X-ray and optical emission of the lensed quasar PG 1115+080. We find that the effective radius of the X-ray emission is 1.3+ 1.1-0.5 dex smaller than that of the optical emission. Viewed as a thin disk observed at inclination angle i, the optical accretion disk has a scale length, defined by the point where the disk temperature matches the rest-frame energy of the monitoring band (kT = hc/λrest with λrest = 0.3 μm), of log{(rs, opt/cm)[cos(i)/0.5]½} = 16.6 +/- 0.4. The X-ray emission region (1.4-21.8 keV in the rest frame) has an effective half-light radius of log (r1/2,X/cm) = 15.6+ 0.6-0.9. Given an estimated black hole mass of 1.2 × 109 M⊙, corresponding to a gravitational radius of log (rg/cm) = 14.3, the X-ray emission is generated near the inner edge of the disk, while the optical emission comes from scales slightly larger than those expected for an Eddington-limited thin disk. We find a weak trend supporting models with low stellar mass fractions near the lensed images, in mild contradiction to inferences from the stellar velocity dispersion and the time delays. Based on observations obtained with the Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) 1.3 m, which is operated by the SMARTS Consortium; the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 meter telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium; the WIYN Observatory, which is owned and operated by the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO); the 6.5 m Magellan Baade telescope, which is a collaboration between the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (OCIW), the University of Arizona, Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope for program HST-GO-9744 of the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  11. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Palkosková, Barbora

    2011-01-01

    The diploma thesis deals with a term of event management and its connection to the event marketing. First part of the work focuses on terms that are superior to event management and those are marketing and marketing mix of 4P´s. Communication mix is than separated into smaller parts, defining the position of event marketing and management among them. Accent is put on the current possibilities of typology and separation of event and its practical use. Issue of events is connected to the...

  12. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Štefl, Petr

    2011-01-01

    This bachelor thesis on the topic of event management deals with planning, organizing, managing, monitoring and implementation of special social events, termed event. It explains what they mean by this term we can imagine and as you can in terms of typology to distinguish events. Literature review consists of the acquired theoretical knowledge in management, project management and marketing. It describes the principles and procedure in place, we should keep the successful organization of ...

  13. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Strýhalová, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    The Diploma thesis is focused on the Event management company, which organizes a big family minded sport day and describes its activity plan. The thesis consists three main parts, the first – the teoretic part specifices proffesional terms about an event management. This part also describes different event forms which are focused on the right selection and final strategy, the following control of financial situation and event overall what is in general a part of marketing mixture. The second ...

  14. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Stružková, Tereza

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is based on theoretical knowledge and analysis of the actual implementation event action in congress centre of 4*hotel. Asesment of importance, correctnesand effectivess of the vatious procedures of organizin events and create new complete schematic principle of organizin events Implementation actions will be considered from two sides – from side of the company organizer and from the side of event managment coordinator. All the outputs of these two aspect ...

  15. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics. We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  16. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics.We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  17. Microlensing towards the Small Magellanic Cloud-EROS 2 two-year analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Afonso, C; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Bauer, F; Beaulieu, J P; Bouquet, A; Char, S; Charlot, X; Couchot, F; Coutures, C; Derue, F; Ferlet, R; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Graff, D; Gros, M; Haïssinski, J; Hamilton, J C; Hardin, D; De Kat, J; Kim, A; Lasserre, T; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Mansoux, B; Marquette, J B; Maurice, E; Milsztajn, A; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Prévôt, L; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Spiro, M; Vidal-Madjar, A; Vigroux, L; Zylberajch, S

    1998-01-01

    We present here the analysis of the first two years of data towards the Small Magellanic Cloud with the EROS (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) project. A single event is detected, already present in the first year analysis. This low event rate allows us to constrain the halo fraction in the mass range [10^-2, 1] Msol.

  18. ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search) - A possible expert-system based cooperative effort to hunt for planets of Earth mass and below

    CERN Document Server

    Dominik, M; Allan, A; Rattenbury, N J; Tsapras, Y; Snodgrass, C; Bode, M F; Burgdorf, M J; Fraser, S N; Kerins, E; Mottram, C J; Steele, I A; Street, R A; Wheatley, P J; Wyrzykowski, L

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) The technique of gravitational microlensing is currently unique in its ability to provide a sample of terrestrial exoplanets around both Galactic disk and bulge stars, allowing to measure their abundance and determine their distribution with respect to mass and orbital separation. In order to achieve these goals in reasonable time, a well-coordinated effort involving a network of either 2m or 4 x 1m telescopes at each site is required. It could lead to the first detection of an Earth-mass planet outside the Solar system, and even planets less massive than Earth could be discovered. From April 2008, ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search) is planned to provide a platform for a three-step strategy of survey, follow-up, and anomaly monitoring. As an expert system embedded in eSTAR (e-Science Telescopes for Astronomical Research), ARTEMiS will give advice on the optimal targets to be observed at any given time, and will also alert on deviations from ordinary microlensing l...

  19. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Plechatý, Josef

    2012-01-01

    This theses focused on Event management is divided into two parts. First part includes theoretical knowledge while the second part is strictly practical. The first part is focused on marketing, its importance and basic terms. The chapter about marketing is followed by marketing mix, which is shortly characterized and divided into advertisement, sales promotion, public relations and other elements of the communication mix. The last part is a detailed study of Event marketing which includes th...

  20. Synthesizing exoplanet demographics from radial velocity and microlensing surveys. II. The frequency of planets orbiting M dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott, E-mail: clanton@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    In contrast to radial velocity (RV) surveys, results from microlensing surveys indicate that giant planets with masses greater than the critical mass for core accretion (∼0.1 M {sub Jup}) are relatively common around low-mass stars. Using the methodology developed in the first paper, we predict the sensitivity of M-dwarf RV surveys to analogs of the population of planets inferred by microlensing. We find that RV surveys should detect a handful of super-Jovian (>M {sub Jup}) planets at the longest periods being probed. These planets are indeed found by RV surveys, implying that the demographic constraints inferred from these two methods are consistent. Finally, we combine the results from both methods to estimate planet frequencies spanning wide regions of parameter space. We find that the frequency of Jupiters and super-Jupiters (1 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub Jup} ≲ 13) with periods 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} is f{sub J}=0.029{sub −0.015}{sup +0.013}, a median factor of 4.3 (1.5-14 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets around FGK stars of 0.11 ± 0.02. However, we find the frequency of all giant planets with 30 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub G}=0.15{sub −0.07}{sup +0.06}, only a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-5.9 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets orbiting FGK stars of 0.31 ± 0.07. For a more conservative definition of giant planets (50 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4}), we find f{sub G{sup ′}}=0.11±0.05, a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-6.7 at 95% confidence) smaller than that inferred for FGK stars of 0.25 ± 0.05. Finally, we find the frequency of all planets with 1 ≤ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≤ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub p} = 1.9 ± 0.5.

  1. Event management

    OpenAIRE

    Myslivcová, Hana Bc.

    2007-01-01

    V práci je popsán teoretický postup při pořádání eventů, který vychází ze zásad projektového řízení. Tyto postupy jsou také aplikovány v praktické realizaci eventu. Následuje výzkum aktuálních trendů v event managementu a výzkum cílových skupin s pomocí dat MML/TGI.

  2. The size of a quasar's mid-IR emission region inferred from microlensed images of Q2237+0305

    CERN Document Server

    Wyithe, J S B; Fluke, C J

    2002-01-01

    We use published mid-IR and V-band flux ratios for images A and B of Q2237+0305 to demonstrate that the size of the mid-IR emission region has a scale comparable to or larger than the microlens Einstein Radius (ER, ~10^17 cm for solar mass stars). Q2237+0305 has been monitored extensively in the R and V-bands for ~15 years. The variability record shows significant microlensing variability of the optical emission region, and has been used by several studies to demonstrate that the optical emission region is much smaller than the ER for solar-mass objects. For the majority of the monitoring history, the optical flux ratios have differed significantly from those predicted by macro-models. In contrast, recent observations in mid-IR show flux ratios similar to those measured in the radio, and to predictions of some lens models, implying that the mid-IR flux is emitted from a region that is at least 2 orders of magnitude larger than the optical emission region. We have calculated the likeli-hood of the observed mid...

  3. Topography's event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck Petersen, Rikke

    The aim of the paper is first to discuss how horizon and scale can be understood, secondly how they differ and what they might have in common? If topography can be seen as a way of working with these relations experiences, creations and latencies? Thirdly if diagrams and diagrammatology can bring...... space formation - to stimulate and elaborate the event of conception and topological thinking....

  4. Binary Source Event Masquerading as Planet: A New Manifestation of the Binary-Source Degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Y K; Yee, J C; Sumi, T; Gould, A; Han, C; Albrow, M D; Lee, C -U; Kim, S -L; Chung, S -J; Hwang, K -H; Ryu, Y -H; Shin, I -G; Zhu, W; Cha, S -M; Kim, D -J; Lee, Y; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozlowski, S; Poleski, R; Skowron, J; Mroz, P; Szymanski, M K; Soszynski, I; Pawlak, M; Ulaczyk, K; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Asakura, Y; Bhattacharya, A; Donachie, M; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Hirao, Y; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Li, M C A; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Nagakane, M; Oyokawa, H; Sharan, A; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Yamada, T; Yamada, T; Yonehara, A

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2016-BLG-0733, which introduces a new type of degeneracy between binary source and planetary perturbations. The light curve of the event exhibits a long-term asymmetric perturbation that would appear to be due to a planet. From detailed analysis of the light curve, however, we find that the perturbation originates from the binarity of the source rather than the lens. This result demonstrates that binary sources with roughly equal-luminosity components can mimic long-term perturbations induced by planets with projected separations near the Einstein ring. The result also signifies the importance of considering various interpretations of planet-like perturbations and of high-cadence observation not only for resolving the degeneracy but also for ensuring the unambiguous detection of the planet.

  5. A simple method to determine time delays in the presence of microlensing: application to HE 0435-1112 and PG 1115+080

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, V. S.; Shulga, V. M.; Berdina, L. A.

    2016-10-01

    A method for determining the time delays in gravitationally lensed quasars is proposed. This method offers a simple and transparent procedure to mitigate the effects of microlensing. It is based on the fundamental properties of representation of quadratically integrable functions by their expansions in orthogonal polynomials series. The method was tested on the artificial light curves simulated for the Time Delay Challenge campaign (TDC0). The new estimates of the time delays in the gravitationally lensed quasars HE 0435-1223 and PG 1115+080 are obtained and compared with the results reported earlier by other authors.

  6. VLT Spectra "Resolve" a Stellar Disk at 25,000 Light-Years Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    astronomers are thrilled by a new series of spectra from the FORS1 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at Paranal. They "resolve" for the first time the surface of a normal star some 25,000 light-years away. This amazing observational feat has been possible with some help from a natural "magnifying glass". The road leading to this remarkable result is an instructive and interesting one. Gravitational microlensing ESO PR Photo 16a/01 ESO PR Photo 16a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 361 x 400 pix - 34k] [Normal - JPEG: 721 x 800 pix - 83k] [Hi-Res - JPEG: 2705 x 3000 pix - 536k] Caption : Schematic representation of the lightcurve of the EROS-BLG-2000-5 microlensing event. It represents the changing brightness of a background star, as its light is being amplified by a binary gravitational lens that passes the line-of-sight from the Earth to the star. The ordinate indicates the factor by which the intensity increases during the various phases of the lensing event, as compared to the normal brightness of the star. The moment of the second "caustic crossing" is indicated, during which the image of the star is substantially brighter. Spectral observations were made with the VLT at the times indicated by arrows. For details, see the text. The light from a distant star is affected by the gravity of the objects it passes on its way to us. This effect was predicted by Albert Einstein early last century and observationally confirmed in 1919 when a solar eclipse allowed the study of stars close to the line of sight of the Sun. Accurate positional measurements showed that the light from those remote stars was bent by the Sun's gravitational field. However, the light may not only be deflected, it can also be amplified . In that case, the massive object works like a giant "magnifying lens" that concentrates the light from the distant source. Effects of gravitational optics in space were first observed in 1979. When produced by extended, very heavy clusters of galaxies, they may take

  7. Event Index - a LHCb Event Search System

    CERN Document Server

    Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Kazeev, Nikita; Redkin, Artem

    2015-01-01

    LHC experiments generate up to $10^{12}$ events per year. This paper describes Event Index - an event search system. Event Index's primary function is quickly selecting subsets of events from a combination of conditions, such as the estimated decay channel or stripping lines output. Event Index is essentially Apache Lucene optimized for read-only indexes distributed over independent shards on independent nodes.

  8. Simulating events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, C.; Bruzzone, L. [Techint Italimpianti, Milan (Italy)

    2000-06-01

    The Petacalco Marine terminal on the Pacific coast in the harbour of Lazaro Carclenas (Michoacan) in Mexico, provides coal to the thermoelectric power plant at Pdte Plutarco Elias Calles in the port area. The plant is being converted from oil to burn coal to generate 2100 MW of power. The article describes the layout of the terminal and equipment employed in the unloading, coal stacking, coal handling areas and the receiving area at the power plant. The contractor Techint Italimpianti has developed a software system, MHATIS, for marine terminal management which is nearly complete. The discrete event simulator with its graphic interface provides a real-type decision support system for simulating changes to the terminal operations and evaluating impacts. The article describes how MHATIS is used. 7 figs.

  9. Events diary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  10. OGLE-2015-BLG-0479LA,B: Binary Gravitational Microlens Characterized by Simultaneous Ground-based and Space-based Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Han, C; Gould, A; Zhu, Wei; Street, R A; Yee, J C; Beichman, C; Bryden, C; Novati, S Calchi; Carey, S; Fausnaugh, M; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, Calen B; Shvartzvald, Y; Wibking, B; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Skowron, J; Mróz, P; Poleski, R; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pawlak, M; Tsapras, Y; Hundertmark, M; Bachelet, E; Dominik, M; Bramich, D M; Cassan, A; Jaimes, R Figuera; Horne, K; Ranc, C; Schmidt, R; Snodgrass, C; Wambsganss, J; Steele, I A; Menzies, J; Mao, S; Bozza, V; Jørgensen, U G; Alsubai, K A; Ciceri, S; D'Ago, G; Haugbølle, T; Hessman, F V; Hinse, T C; Juncher, D; Korhonen, H; Mancini, L; Popovas, A; Rabus, M; Rahvar, S; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Starkey, D; Surdej, J; Wertz, O; Zarucki, M; Pogge, R W; DePoy, D L

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of the observations of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2015-BLG-0479 taken both from the ground and by the {\\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. The light curves seen from the ground and from space exhibit a time offset of $\\sim 13$ days between the caustic spikes, indicating that the relative lens-source positions seen from the two places are displaced by parallax effects. From modeling the light curves, we measure the space-based microlens parallax. Combined with the angular Einstein radius measured by analyzing the caustic crossings, we determine the mass and distance of the lens. We find that the lens is a binary composed of two G-type stars with masses $\\sim 1.0\\ M_\\odot$ and $\\sim 0.9\\ M_\\odot$ located at a distance $\\sim 3$ kpc. In addition, we are able to constrain the complete orbital parameters of the lens thanks to the precise measurement of the microlens parallax derived from the joint analysis. In contrast to the binary event OGLE-2014-BLG-1050, which was also ob...

  11. Event Index - an LHCb Event Search System

    CERN Document Server

    Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    During LHC Run 1, the LHCb experiment recorded around 1011 collision events. This paper describes Event Index | an event search system. Its primary function is to quickly select subsets of events from a combination of conditions, such as the estimated decay channel or number of hits in a subdetector. Event Index is essentially Apache Lucene [1] optimized for read-only indexes distributed over independent shards on independent nodes.

  12. Event Index - an LHCb Event Search System

    OpenAIRE

    Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Artemov, Alexey; Kazeev, Nikita; Redkin, Artem

    2015-01-01

    During LHC Run 1, the LHCb experiment recorded around $10^{11}$ collision events. This paper describes Event Index - an event search system. Its primary function is to quickly select subsets of events from a combination of conditions, such as the estimated decay channel or number of hits in a subdetector. Event Index is essentially Apache Lucene optimized for read-only indexes distributed over independent shards on independent nodes.

  13. Extracting Event Dynamics from Event-by-Event Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Jinghua; Liu, Lianshou

    2003-01-01

    The problem of eliminating the statistical fluctuations and extracting the event dynamics from event-by-event analysis is discussed. New moments $G_p$ (for continuous distribution), and $G_{q,p}$ (for anomalous distribution) are proposed, which are experimentally measurable and can eliminate the Poissonian type statistical fluctuations to recover the dynamical moments $C_p$ and $C_{q,p}$. In this way, the dynamical distribution of the event-averaged transverse momentum $\\bar{\\pt}$ can be extr...

  14. Gastrointestinal events with clopidogrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Würtz, Morten; Schwarz, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events.......Clopidogrel prevents cardiovascular events, but has been linked with adverse gastrointestinal (GI) complications, particularly bleeding events....

  15. Direct Microlensing-Reverberation Observations of the Intrinsic magnetic Structure of AGN in Different Spectral States: A Tale of Two Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, Rudolph E; Robertson, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    We show how direct microlensing-reverberation analysis performed on two well-known Quasars (Q2237 - The Einstein Cross and Q0957 - The Twin) can be used to observe the inner structure of two quasars which are in significantly different spectral states. These observations allow us to measure the detailed internal structure of quasar Q2237 in a radio quiet high-soft state, and compare it to quasar Q0957 in a radio loud low-hard state. We find that the observed differences in the spectral states of these two quasars can be understood as being due to the location of the inner radii of their accretion disks relative to the co-rotation radii of rotating intrinsically magnetic supermassive compact objects in the centers of these quasars.

  16. Synthesizing Exoplanet Demographics: A Single Population of Long-period Planetary Companions to M Dwarfs Consistent with Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-03-01

    We present the first study to synthesize results from five different exoplanet surveys using three independent detection methods: microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging. The constraints derived herein represent the most comprehensive picture of the demographics of large-separation (≳2 AU) planets orbiting the most common stars in our Galaxy that has been constructed to date. We assume a simple, joint power-law planet distribution function of the form {d}2{N}{{pl}}/(d{log} {m}p d{log} a)={ A }{({m}p/{M}{{Sat}})}α {(a/2.5{{AU}})}β with an outer cutoff radius of the separation distribution function of aout. Generating populations of planets from these models and mapping them into the relevant observables for each survey, we use actual or estimated detection sensitivities to determine the expected observations for each survey. Comparing with the reported results, we derive constraints on the parameters \\{α ,β ,{ A },{a}{{out}}\\} that describe a single population of planets that is simultaneously consistent with the results of microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find median and 68% confindence intervals of α =-{0.86}-0.19+0.21 (-{0.85}-0.19+0.21), β ={1.1}-1.4+1.9 ({1.1}-1.3+1.9), { A }={0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2 ({0.21}-0.15+0.20 {{dex}}-2), and {a}{{out}}={10}-4.7+26 AU ({12}-6.2+50 AU) assuming “hot-start” (“cold-start”) planet evolutionary models. These values are consistent with all current knowledge of planets on orbits beyond ∼2 AU around single M dwarfs.

  17. Creating Special Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  18. Dig-event: let's socialize around events

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zhenzhen; Liu, Ji; Crespi, Noel

    2012-01-01

    International audience Traditional social networks socialize around the contents that have uploaded to these sites and discover interesting contents uploaded by others. In this demo we aim to explore the idea of activity-oriented social networks. We design a novel social networking site called Dig-Event (Do-it-together Event), where people are able to share events through calendar, while discover interesting events shared by others. Our demo has been inspired by previous research on calend...

  19. Gravitational binary-lens events with prominent effects of lens orbital motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Beaulieu, J.-P. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS-Université Pierre and Marie Curie, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Tsapras, Y. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Depoy, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Dong, Subo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2013-12-01

    Gravitational microlensing events produced by lenses composed of binary masses are important because they provide a major channel for determining physical parameters of lenses. In this work, we analyze the light curves of two binary-lens events, OGLE-2006-BLG-277 and OGLE-2012-BLG-0031, for which the light curves exhibit strong deviations from standard models. From modeling considering various second-order effects, we find that the deviations are mostly explained by the effect of the lens orbital motion. We also find that lens parallax effects can mimic orbital effects to some extent. This implies that modeling light curves of binary-lens events not considering orbital effects can result in lens parallaxes that are substantially different from actual values and thus wrong determinations of physical lens parameters. This demonstrates the importance of routine consideration of orbital effects in interpreting light curves of binary-lens events. It is found that the lens of OGLE-2006-BLG-277 is a binary composed of a low-mass star and a brown dwarf companion.

  20. Zooming into the broad line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar Q2237+0305 = the Einstein Cross: III. Determination of the size and structure of the CIV and CIII] emitting regions using microlensing

    CERN Document Server

    Sluse, D; Courbin, F; Hutsemékers, D; Meylan, G; Eigenbrod, A; Anguita, T; Agol, E; Wambsganss, J

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We aim to use microlensing taking place in the lensed quasar Q2237+0305 to study the structure of the broad line region and measure the size of the region emitting the CIV and CIII] lines. Methods: Based on 39 spectrophotometric monitoring data points obtained between Oct. 2004 and Dec. 2007, we derive lightcurves for the CIV and CIII] emission lines. We use three different techniques to analyse the microlensing signal. Different components of the lines (narrow, broad and very broad) are identified and studied. We build a library of simulated microlensing lightcurves which reproduce the signal observed in the continuum and in the lines provided only the source size is changed. A Bayesian analysis scheme is then developed to derive the size of the various components of the BLR. Results: 1. The half-light radius of the region emitting the CIV line is found to be R_CIV ~ 66^{+110}_{-46} lt-days = 0.06^{+0.09}_{-0.04} pc = 1.7^{+2.8}_{-1.1} 10^17 cm (at 68.3% CI). Similar values are obtained for CIII]. Rela...

  1. Keterlibatan Event Stakeholders pada Keberhasilan Event PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidya Wati Evelina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to determine how event organizers collaborate with stakeholders including the media, particular community, sponsors, participants, venue providers, accommodation providers, carteres, legal and finance personnel, production, local trade, transportation providers, government and associations for implementation Public Relations event. This paper discusses about the things that must be done for the cooperation and the benefits of cooperation undertaken. The method used in this paper is qualitative research method based on observations, literature and case studies. The results of this research note that the event organizers or companies can together with the stakeholders (the other party make an event as mutually beneficial Public Relations. This means that all parties can achieve through the event. At the conclusion of an event Public Relations, all stakeholders involved for their own purposes. Event organizer must ensure that all stakeholders work together effectively in accordance with the agreed schedule and budget. One important feature of the agreement is to maintain a good flow of communication according to the needs of its stakeholders. All information is documented to avoid misunderstandings. Collaboration between stakeholders continuously until the event is completed. Discussion of issues that arise during the event takes place between the committee with various stakeholders is an important thing for the evaluation and response to the events that occurred.

  2. Keterlibatan Event Stakeholders pada Keberhasilan Event PR

    OpenAIRE

    Lidya Wati Evelina

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article is to determine how event organizers collaborate with stakeholders including the media, particular community, sponsors, participants, venue providers, accommodation providers, carteres, legal and finance personnel, production, local trade, transportation providers, government and associations for implementation Public Relations event. This paper discusses about the things that must be done for the cooperation and the benefits of cooperation undertaken. The method...

  3. Synthesizing Exoplanet Demographics: A Single Population of Long-Period Planetary Companions to M Dwarfs Consistent with Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Clanton, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We present the first study to synthesize results from five different exoplanet surveys using three independent detection methods: microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging. The constraints derived herein represent the most comprehensive picture of the demographics of large-separation (>~ 2 AU) planets orbiting the most common stars in our Galaxy that has been constructed to date. We assume a simple, joint power-law planet distribution function of the form d^2N_{pl}/[dlog(m_p)dlog(a)] = A(m_p/M_{Sat})^{alpha}(a/2.5 AU)^{beta} with an outer cutoff radius of the separation distribution function of a_{out}. Generating populations of planets from these models and mapping them into the relevant observables for each survey, we use actual or estimated detection sensitivities to determine the expected observations for each survey. Comparing with the reported results, we derive constraints on the parameters {alpha, beta, A, a_{out}} that describe a single population of planets that is simultaneously consistent ...

  4. The global event system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winans, J.

    1994-03-02

    The support for the global event system has been designed to allow an application developer to control the APS event generator and receiver boards. This is done by the use of four new record types. These records are customized and are only supported by the device support modules for the APS event generator and receiver boards. The use of the global event system and its associated records should not be confused with the vanilla EPICS events and the associated event records. They are very different.

  5. Advertising Effectiveness In Events

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Sushilkumar

    2012-01-01

    Confronted with decreasing effectiveness of the classic marketing communications, events have become an increasingly popular alternative for marketers. Events constitute one of the most exciting and fastest growing forms of leisure and business. With time, the decreasing effectiveness of classical marketing communications boosted the use of events for marketing and making brand awareness. Event marketing is seen as the unique opportunity to integrate the firm’s communication activities like p...

  6. Event matrix system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of background events in nuclear and particle physics experiments which use multiwire proportional chambers can be extremely high. Using a computer to resolve these events results in a high deadtime for the experiment. A fast matrix system for decreasing the number of background events is described in this report. 4 figures

  7. Event generators at BESⅢ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PING Rong-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief remark and introduction to event generators for tau-charm physics currently used at BESⅢ,including KKMC,BesEvtGen,Bhlumi,Bhwide,Babayaga and inclusive Monte-Carlo event generators.This paper provides basic information on event generators for BESⅢ users.

  8. Event studies in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulkem Basdas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this paper is to review the event studies conducted for Turkey to in order to identify the common components in their designs. This paper contributes to the existing literature by reviewing all event studies for Turkey for the first time, but more importantly; this review leads to the upcoming event studies on Turkey by highlighting main components of a proper design. Based on the review of 75 studies, it is observed that event studies generally choose BIST-100 (formerly, ISE-100 market index and market adjusted returns with the parametric tests. In general, the studies prefer to rely on one type of model to calculate abnormal returns without discussing the selection of the underlying model. Especially for the event studies focusing on the impact of political events or macroeconomic announcements in Turkey, there is a risk of clustering due to the application of same event date for all observations.

  9. Direct Microlensing-Reverberation Observations of the Intrinsic Magnetic Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei in Different Spectral States: A Tale of Two Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Rudolph E.; Leiter, Darryl J.; Robertson, Stanley L.

    2008-03-01

    We show how direct microlensing-reverberation analysis performed on two well-known quasars (Q2237, the Einstein Cross, and Q0957, the Twin) can be used to observe the inner structure of two quasars which are in significantly different spectral states. These observations allow us to measure the detailed internal structure of Q2237 in a radio-quiet high-soft state, and compare it to Q0957 in a radio-loud low-hard state. When taken together we find that the observed differences in the spectral states of these two quasars can be understood as being due to the location of the inner radii of their accretion disks relative to the co-rotation radii of the magnetospheric eternally collapsing objects (MECO) in the centers of these quasars. The radiating structures observed in these quasars are associated with standard accretion disks and outer outflow structures, where the latter are the major source of UV-optical continuum radiation. While the observed inner accretion disk structure of the radio-quiet quasar Q2237 is consistent with either a MECO or a black hole, the observed inner structure of the radio-loud quasar Q0957 can only be explained by the action of the intrinsic magnetic propeller of a MECO with its accretion disk. Hence a simple and unified answer to the long-standing question: "Why are some quasars radio loud?" is found if the central objects of quasars are MECO, with radio-loud and radio-quiet spectral states similar to the case of galactic black hole candidates.

  10. Fully solution-processed organic light-emitting electrochemical cells (OLEC) with inkjet-printed micro-lenses for disposable lab-on-chip applications at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhe; Pabst, Oliver; Beckert, Erik; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Microfluidic lab-on-chip devices can be used for chemical and biological analyses such as DNA tests or environmental monitoring. Such devices integrate most of the basic functionalities needed for scientific analysis on a microfluidic chip. When using such devices, cost and space-intensive lab equipment is no longer necessary. However, in order to make a monolithic and cost-efficient/disposable microfluidic sensing device, direct integration of the excitation light source for fluorescent sensing is often required. To achieve this, we introduce a fully solution processable deviation of OLEDs, organic light-emitting electrochemical cells (OLECs), as a low-cost excitation light source for a disposable microfluidic sensing platform. By mixing metal ions and a solid electrolyte with light-emitting polymers as active materials, an in-situ doping and in-situ PN-junction can be generated within a three layer sandwich device. Thanks to this doping effect, work function adaptation is not necessary and air-stable electrode can be used. An ambient manufacturing process for fully solution-processed OLECs is presented, which consist of a spin-coated blue light-emitting polymer plus dopants on an ITO cathode and an inkjet-printed PEDOT:PSS transparent top anode. A fully transparent blue OLEC is able to obtain light intensity > 2500 cd/m2 under pulsed driving mode and maintain stable after 1000 cycles, which fulfils requirements for simple fluorescent on-chip sensing applications. However, because of the large refractive index difference between substrates and air, about 80% of emitted light is trapped inside the device. Therefore, inkjet printed micro-lenses on the rear side are introduced here to further increase light-emitting brightness.

  11. Event sponsorship in China

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Fan; Pfitzenmaier, N

    2002-01-01

    Event marketing is currently at the infant stage in China, but holds a great potential in future. This is concluded from an Internet-based survey. The respondents believe that event marketing provides international companies with a viable alternative to the increasingly cluttered mass media, and plays a key role in the integrated marketing communications (IMC). Sponsoring sports and music events is found particularly effective in reaching the opinion leaders and innovators, and establishing f...

  12. LIFE EVENTS AND DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    R N Chatterjee; Mukherjee, S. P.; Nandi, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    SUMMARY The life events occurring in a 6 month period preceding onset of illness in 50 OPD primary depressives were inquired into by a Life Events Inventory and compared with those in a corresponding time period of 50 matched controls. The relation between life events and the depth of depression at initial interview was also studied. The results are analysed and the probable pitfalls discussed.

  13. Event Detection in Tweets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssem Eddine Dridi

    Full Text Available We present a system for finding, from Twitter data, events that raised the interest of users within a given time period and the important dates for each event. An event is represented by many terms whose frequency increases suddenly at one or more moments during the analysed period. In order to determine the terms (especially the hashtags dealing with a topic, we propose methods to cluster similar terms: phonetic methods adapted to the writing mode used by users and some statistical methods. In order to select the set of events, we used three main criteria: frequency, variation and Tf*Idf.

  14. Safeguards summary event list (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The List contains nine categories of events involving NRC licensed material or licensees. It is deliberately broad in scope for two main reasons. First, the list is designed to serve as a reference document. It is as complete and accurate as possible. Second, the list is intended to provide as broad a perspective of the nature of licensee-related events as possible. The nine categories of events are as follows: bomb-related events; intrusion events; missing and/or allegedly stolen events; transportation-related events; vandalism events; arson events; firearms-related events; sabotage events; and miscellaneous events

  15. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report

  16. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  17. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sanchez

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

  18. The ATLAS Event Builder

    CERN Document Server

    Vandelli, W; Battaglia, A; Beck, H P; Blair, R; Bogaerts, A; Bosman, M; Ciobotaru, M; Cranfield, R; Crone, G; Dawson, J; Dobinson, Robert W; Dobson, M; Dos Anjos, A; Drake, G; Ermoline, Y; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, M L; Francis, D; Gadomski, S; Gameiro, S; Gorini, B; Green, B; Haberichter, W; Haberli, C; Hauser, R; Hinkelbein, C; Hughes-Jones, R; Joos, M; Kieft, G; Klous, S; Korcyl, K; Kordas, K; Kugel, A; Leahu, L; Lehmann, G; Martin, B; Mapelli, L; Meessen, C; Meirosu, C; Misiejuk, A; Mornacchi, G; Müller, M; Nagasaka, Y; Negri, A; Pasqualucci, E; Pauly, T; Petersen, J; Pope, B; Schlereth, J L; Spiwoks, R; Stancu, S; Strong, J; Sushkov, S; Szymocha, T; Tremblet, L; Ünel, G; Vermeulen, J; Werner, P; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Wickens, F; Wiedenmann, W; Yu, M; Yasu, Y; Zhang, J; Zobernig, H; 2007 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference

    2008-01-01

    Event data from proton-proton collisions at the LHC will be selected by the ATLAS experiment in a three-level trigger system, which, at its first two trigger levels (LVL1+LVL2), reduces the initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz to $sim$3~kHz. At this rate, the Event Builder collects the data from the readout system PCs (ROSs) and provides fully assembled events to the Event Filter (EF). The EF is the third trigger level and its aim is to achieve a further rate reduction to $sim$200~Hz on the permanent storage. The Event Builder is based on a farm of O(100) PCs, interconnected via a Gigabit Ethernet to O(150) ROSs. These PCs run Linux and multi-threaded software applications implemented in C++. All the ROSs, and substantial fractions of the Event Builder and Event Filter PCs have been installed and commissioned. We report on performance tests on this initial system, which is capable of going beyond the required data rates and bandwidths for Event Building for the ATLAS experiment.

  19. Measurement of the abundance of stellar mass compact objects in the galactic halo by detecting micro-lenses in the Large Magellanic Cloud; Mesure de l'abondance des astres sombres de masse stellaire dans le halo galactique par la recherche de phenomenes de microlentilles vers les nuages de magellan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasserre, Th

    2000-05-09

    Many experimental and theoretical results lead to the conclusion that at least 80 percent of the mass of our Galaxy is dark. Part of this so-called dark matter could be in the form of stellar mass compact objects, called MACHOS; these could be detected using the gravitational microlensing effect. The first generation experiments EROS1 and MACHO have strongly constrained the galactic abundance of objects lighter than 0.01 solar mass to less than 10 percent of the total mass. In parallel, the observation by the MACHO group of massive candidates (half the Sun's mass), numerous enough to constitute 50 percent of galactic dark matter, was a further motivation for the EROS group to extend this search to stellar mass objects in a second phase, EROS2. The present work deals with the analysis of 25 million stellar light curves in the Large Magellanic Cloud, observed for three years in order to extract the rare microlensing candidates and to measure the galactic halo mass fraction in the form of compact objects. After recalling the motivations of this search and the theoretical context, I describe the EROS2 experiment. The observational strategy and the photometric reduction procedures needed to deal with the 1.2 To of data are then presented. A new method to detect micro-lenses is detailed, as well as a discussion of background light curves, poorly known. We do not find enough microlensing candidates to explain the galactic rotation curve; this confirms, and improve on previous EROS1 and EROS2 results. Combining all results from EROS allows to exclude that MACHOS with a mass between 10 e-7 and 10 solar mass are important constituents of the galactic halo. This statement agrees with recent results from the MACHO group, although our interpretations differ, namely on the topics of the location of the lenses, and of a possible contamination of the microlensing ample by background phenomena. (author)

  20. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik;

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine...

  1. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik;

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine...

  2. "Universe" event at AIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Report of event of 11 May 2008 held at the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Muizenberg, Cape), with speakers Michael Griffin (Administrator of NASA), Stephen Hawking (Cambridge), David Gross (Kavli Institute, Santa Barbara) and George Smoot (Berkeley).

  3. CCG - News & Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) has been widely recognized for its research efforts to facilitiate advances in cancer genomic research and improve patient outcomes. Find the latest news about and events featuring CCG.

  4. RAS Initiative - Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  5. Solar extreme events

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares and CMEs have a broad range of magnitudes. This review discusses the possibility of "extreme events," defined as those with magnitudes greater than have been seen in the existing historical record. For most quantitative measures, this direct information does not extend more than a century and a half into the recent past. The magnitude distributions (occurrence frequencies) of solar events (flares/CMEs) typically decrease with the parameter measured or inferred (peak flux, mass, e...

  6. Gargamelle: neutral current event

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This event shows real tracks of particles from the 1200 litre Gargamelle bubble chamber that ran on the PS from 1970 to 1976 and on the SPS from 1976 to 1979. In this image a neutrino passes close to a nucleon and reemerges as a neutrino. Such events are called neutral curent, as they are mediated by the Z0 boson which has no electric charge.

  7. Detecting Priming News Events

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Di; Yu, Jeffrey Xu; Liu, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    We study a problem of detecting priming events based on a time series index and an evolving document stream. We define a priming event as an event which triggers abnormal movements of the time series index, i.e., the Iraq war with respect to the president approval index of President Bush. Existing solutions either focus on organizing coherent keywords from a document stream into events or identifying correlated movements between keyword frequency trajectories and the time series index. In this paper, we tackle the problem in two major steps. (1) We identify the elements that form a priming event. The element identified is called influential topic which consists of a set of coherent keywords. And we extract them by looking at the correlation between keyword trajectories and the interested time series index at a global level. (2) We extract priming events by detecting and organizing the bursty influential topics at a micro level. We evaluate our algorithms on a real-world dataset and the result confirms that ou...

  8. 1997: notifiable events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1998, the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Rector Safety (BMU) presented the 1997 survey of 'Notifiable events in plants for nuclear fuel fission - nuclear power and research reactors whose maximum power exceeds 50 kW of continuous thermal power - in the Federal Republic of Germany'. Since 1975, the operators of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany have been required to report to the nuclear supervisory authorities all notifiable events in accordance with standard national reporting criteria. This official reporting system serves for monitoring the safety status of notifiable plants and use the findings derived from the events reported to improve the safety status of plants within the supervisory procedures where necessary. The reports constitute an important base for the early detection of defects and for preventing the occurrence of similar defects in other plants. In 1997, there were 117 notifiable events in nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany. None of these events is to be classified as an accident, and in none of the events were dose limits under the German Radiation Protection Ordinance exceeded. (orig.)

  9. Zooming into the broad line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO 2237 + 0305 ≡ the Einstein Cross. III. Determination of the size and structure of the C iv and C iii] emitting regions using microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluse, D.; Schmidt, R.; Courbin, F.; Hutsemékers, D.; Meylan, G.; Eigenbrod, A.; Anguita, T.; Agol, E.; Wambsganss, J.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: We aim to use microlensing taking place in the lensed quasar QSO 2237 + 0305 to study the structure of the broad line region (BLR) and measure the size of the region emitting the C iv and C iii] lines. Methods: Based on 39 spectrophotometric monitoring data points obtained between Oct. 2004 and Dec. 2007, we derived lightcurves for the C iv and C iii] emission lines. We used three different techniques to analyse the microlensing signal. Different components of the lines (narrow, broad, and very broad) were identified and studied. We built a library of the simulated microlensing lightcurves that reproduce the signal observed in the continuum and in the lines provided only the source size is changed. A Bayesian analysis scheme is then developed to derive the size of the various components of the BLR. Results: 1. The half-light radius of the region emitting the C iv line is found to be RC IV} ˜ 66+110-46} light-days = 0.06+0.09-0.04 pc = 1.7+2.8-1.1 × 1017 cm (at 68.3% CI). Similar values are obtained for C iii]. Relative sizes of the carbon-line and V-band continuum emitting-regions are also derived with median values of Rline/Rcont in the range 4 to 29, depending on the FWHM of the line component. 2. The size of the C iv emitting region agrees with the radius-luminosity relationship derived from reverberation mapping. Using the virial theorem, we derive the mass of the black hole in QSO 2237 + 0305 to be MBH ~ 108.3 ± 0.3 M⊙. 3. We find that the C iv and C iii] lines are produced in at least 2 spatially distinct regions, the most compact one giving rise to the broadest component of the line. The broad and narrow line profiles are slightly different for C iv and C iii]. 4. Our analysis suggests a different structure for the C iv and Fe ii+iii emitting regions, with the latter produced in the inner part of the BLR or in a less extended emitting region than C iv. Based on observations made with the ESO-VLT Unit Telescope # 2 Kueyen (Cerro Paranal, Chile

  10. Concepts of event-by-event analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroebele, H. [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    1995-07-15

    The particles observed in the final state of nuclear collisions can be divided into two classes: those which are susceptible to strong interactions and those which are not, like leptons and the photon. The bulk properties of the {open_quotes}matter{close_quotes} in the reaction zone may be read-off the kinematical characteristics of the particles observable in the final state. These characteristics are strongly dependent on the last interaction these particles have undergone. In a densly populated reaction zone strongly interacting particles will experience many collisions after they have been formed and before they emerge into the asymptotic final state. For the particles which are not sensitive to strong interactions their formation is also their last interaction. Thus photons and leptons probe the period during which they are produced whereas hadrons reflect the so called freeze-out processes, which occur during the late stage in the evolution of the reaction when the population density becomes small and the mean free paths long. The disadvantage of the leptons and photons is their small production cross section; they cannot be used in an analysis of the characteristics of individual collision events, because the number of particles produced per event is too small. The hadrons, on the other hand, stem from the freeze-out period. Information from earlier periods requires multiparticle observables in the most general sense. It is one of the challenges of present day high energy nuclear physics to establish and understand global observables which differentiate between mere hadronic scenarios, i.e superposition of hadronic interactions, and the formation of a partonic (short duration) steady state which can be considered a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  11. RETRIEVAL EVENTS EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate impacts to the retrieval concept presented in the Design Analysis ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' (Reference 6), from abnormal events based on Design Basis Events (DBE) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) as defined in two recent analyses: (1) DBE/Scenario Analysis for Preclosure Repository Subsurface Facilities (Reference 4); and (2) Preliminary Preclosure Design Basis Event Calculations for the Monitored Geologic Repository (Reference 5) The objective of this task is to determine what impacts the DBEs and BDBEs have on the equipment developed for retrieval. The analysis lists potential impacts and recommends changes to be analyzed in subsequent design analyses for developed equipment, or recommend where additional equipment may be needed, to allow retrieval to be performed in all DBE or BDBE situations. This analysis supports License Application design and therefore complies with the requirements of Systems Description Document input criteria comparison as presented in Section 7, Conclusions. In addition, the analysis discusses the impacts associated with not using concrete inverts in the emplacement drifts. The ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' analysis was based on a concrete invert configuration in the emplacement drift. The scope of the analysis, as presented in ''Development Plan for Retrieval Events Evaluation'' (Reference 3) includes evaluation and criteria of the following: Impacts to retrieval from the emplacement drift based on DBE/BDBEs, and changes to the invert configuration for the preclosure period. Impacts to retrieval from the main drifts based on DBE/BDBEs for the preclosure period

  12. Reporting of safeguards events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On June 9, 1987, the Commission published in the Federal Register a final rule revising the reporting requirements for safeguards events. Safeguards events include actual or attempted theft of special nuclear material (SNM); actual or attempted acts or events which interrupt normal operations at power reactors due to unauthorized use of or tampering with machinery, components, or controls; certain threats made against facilities possessing SNM; and safeguards system failures impacting the effectiveness of the system. The revised rule was effective October 8, 1987. On September 14, 1987, the NRC held a workshop in Bethesda, MD, to answer affected licensees' questions on the final rule. This report documents questions discussed at the September 14 meeting, reflects a completed staff review of the answers, and supersedes previous oral comment on the topics covered

  13. Discrete-Event Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateek Sharma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Simulation can be regarded as the emulation of the behavior of a real-world system over an interval of time. The process of simulation relies upon the generation of the history of a system and then analyzing that history to predict the outcome and improve the working of real systems. Simulations can be of various kinds but the topic of interest here is one of the most important kind of simulation which is Discrete-Event Simulation which models the system as a discrete sequence of events in time. So this paper aims at introducing about Discrete-Event Simulation and analyzing how it is beneficial to the real world systems.

  14. Event Marketing : En Begreppsutredning

    OpenAIRE

    Linge, Johan; Skantze Carlsson, Johanna

    2004-01-01

    Event marketing har allt sedan begreppet instiftades runt tiden för OS i Los Angeles 1984 varit starkt praktikerdrivet, vilket även återspeglas i den litteratur som skrivits om fenomenet. Den största delen av denna är av normativ karaktär och antar skepnaden av handböcker snarare än av akademisk litteratur. Bland författarna råder dessutom stor oenighet angående vad som faktiskt innefattas av begreppet event marketing. För den person som försöker förstå vad event marketing handlar om utgör de...

  15. Detection of anomalous events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  16. First Indico Virtual Event

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The first Indico virtual event will take place on February 4th 15:00 and will focus on two main topics The release of Indico v1.2 The migration of the OO Indico backend database (ZODB) to a more standard DBMS It will be fully virtual using the CERN Vidyo service and will foster discussions between developers and administrators of Indico servers worldwide. Connections to the virtual room will be open, but attendees are encouraged to register to the event, in order to be informed of any changes in the organisation if any. If you would like to add a topic of discussion or propose yourself a contribution, please let us know at indico-team@cern.ch. Connection to Vidyo Vidyo connection details are available here CERN Vidyo service documentation can be found here First-time users are encouraged to try the service before connecting to the real event

  17. DER 83: outstanding events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DER's activity is presented through 82 ''outstanding events''. Each one is a stage in the effort of research and development of the DER. These events concern the following fields: new applications of electric power for customers; environment protection and new energy sources; improvements of electric power production units; electrical materials; electric network planning and control; computer codes. In the production field, one deals more particularly with nuclear reactor safety studies: analysis of the behaviour of different components; reactor safety experiments; reliability of different systems (safety, communications...)

  18. Electrocardiogram events detection

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, João Paulo; Lopes, Vanda

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to create a system of medical diagnosis of the Electrocardiogram (ECG). The events of the ECG are related with the functioning of the heart and different disorders of the heart functioning have their own ECG pattern allowing the connection between ECG patterns and cardiac disorders. For this purpose, we present here an algorithm that detects the P, QRS and T events of the ECG under MATLAB environment. The algorithm is based in two techniques. The search for picks and valleys an...

  19. Blogimarkkinointi : Case: Laurea Events

    OpenAIRE

    Kronberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön toimeksiantaja oli Laurea Events. Työn aiheena oli blogimarkkinointi. Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli tuoda esiin blogimarkkinoinnin käytettävyyteen vaikuttavia tekijöitä ja kehittää sisältöideoita blogiin, jolla Laurea Eventsin palveluita ja Laureaammattikorkeakoulun restonomikoulutusta voidaan markkinoida mielekkäämmin perinteisen markkinoinnin ohella. Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli se, että toimeksiantaja Laurea Events voi hyödyntää saatuja tuloksia blogim...

  20. Events and Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Mikkel

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing the period of ‘intensive transnationalism’ among Pakistani migrants in Denmark precipitated by the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir, this article explores the relationship between events and effects on a global scale. One significant initiative after the disaster was the founding of an ad hoc......, and national identity politics in Denmark. Despite the medical doctors’ efforts and intentions, the out- come was framed by 9/11, which has become the major critical event of the decade—one that has supported a developing cleavage between the Danish majority and Denmark’s Muslim immigrant minority....

  1. Language As Social Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harste, Jerome C.

    A taxonomy developed for the study of the growth and development of written language from the perspective of social event was tested with a group of 68 children, aged three to six years. The subjects were presented with a wide variety of environmental print messages (road signs, toys, fast food signs, and household products) and were questioned…

  2. Event-as-participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lena

    2016-01-01

    herved skabe en ny begivenhed- en begivenhed der gennem artiklen konceptualiseres som ”event-as-participation”. Omdrejningspunktet i denne artikel er således de ændrede dynamikker forårsaget af samspillet mellem transmitterede politiske begivenheder og sociale netværkssider. Praksissen skaber nye...

  3. On Objects and Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugster, Patrick Thomas; Guerraoui, Rachid; Damm, Christian Heide

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents linguistic primitives for publish/subscribe programming using events and objects. We integrate our primitives into a strongly typed object-oriented language through four mechanisms: (1) serialization, (2) multiple sub typing, (3) closures, and (4) deferred code evaluation. We...

  4. ATLAS "Splash event" 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    "Splash events": As the LHC was being tuned up on 10 September 2008, beam was initially directed at beam collimators just outside the detector, so that a splash of particles would fill much of the detector allowing ATLAS experimenters to prepare the detector for actual running.

  5. RETRIEVAL EVENTS EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Wilson

    1999-11-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate impacts to the retrieval concept presented in the Design Analysis ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' (Reference 6), from abnormal events based on Design Basis Events (DBE) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) as defined in two recent analyses: (1) DBE/Scenario Analysis for Preclosure Repository Subsurface Facilities (Reference 4); and (2) Preliminary Preclosure Design Basis Event Calculations for the Monitored Geologic Repository (Reference 5) The objective of this task is to determine what impacts the DBEs and BDBEs have on the equipment developed for retrieval. The analysis lists potential impacts and recommends changes to be analyzed in subsequent design analyses for developed equipment, or recommend where additional equipment may be needed, to allow retrieval to be performed in all DBE or BDBE situations. This analysis supports License Application design and therefore complies with the requirements of Systems Description Document input criteria comparison as presented in Section 7, Conclusions. In addition, the analysis discusses the impacts associated with not using concrete inverts in the emplacement drifts. The ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' analysis was based on a concrete invert configuration in the emplacement drift. The scope of the analysis, as presented in ''Development Plan for Retrieval Events Evaluation'' (Reference 3) includes evaluation and criteria of the following: Impacts to retrieval from the emplacement drift based on DBE/BDBEs, and changes to the invert configuration for the preclosure period. Impacts to retrieval from the main drifts based on DBE/BDBEs for the preclosure period.

  6. Event boundaries and anaphoric reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alexis N; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2016-06-01

    The current study explored the finding that parsing a narrative into separate events impairs anaphor resolution. According to the Event Horizon Model, when a narrative event boundary is encountered, a new event model is created. Information associated with the prior event model is removed from working memory. So long as the event model containing the anaphor referent is currently being processed, this information should still be available when there is no narrative event boundary, even if reading has been disrupted by a working-memory-clearing distractor task. In those cases, readers may reactivate their prior event model, and anaphor resolution would not be affected. Alternatively, comprehension may not be as event oriented as this account suggests. Instead, any disruption of the contents of working memory during comprehension, event related or not, may be sufficient to disrupt anaphor resolution. In this case, reading comprehension would be more strongly guided by other, more basic language processing mechanisms and the event structure of the described events would play a more minor role. In the current experiments, participants were given stories to read in which we included, between the anaphor and its referent, either the presence of a narrative event boundary (Experiment 1) or a narrative event boundary along with a working-memory-clearing distractor task (Experiment 2). The results showed that anaphor resolution was affected by narrative event boundaries but not by a working-memory-clearing distractor task. This is interpreted as being consistent with the Event Horizon Model of event cognition. PMID:26452376

  7. Event-by-event fluctuations in collective quantities

    OpenAIRE

    S.A. Voloshin; Koch, V; Ritter, H. G.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss an event-by-event fluctuation analysis of particle production in heavy ion collisions. We compare different approaches to the evaluation of the event-by-event dynamical fluctuations in quantities defined on groups of particles, such quantities as mean transverse momentum, transverse momentum spectra slope, strength of anisotropic flow, etc.. The direct computation of the dynamical fluctuations and the sub-event method are discussed in more detail. We also show how the fluctuation i...

  8. Using Event Studies to Assess the Impact of Unexpected Events

    OpenAIRE

    James V Koch; Robert N Fenili

    2013-01-01

    The quantitative assessment of the financial impact of unexpected events is the realm of the “event study.” We examine how CEOs, boards, and public policymakers can utilize event studies to inform and improve their decision making. The breadth of application of event studies is surprisingly broad and ranges from situations involving the death of a CEO to emergency product recalls. We present illustrative event studies for two Steve Jobs-related announcements concerning his health in order to ...

  9. Event Index — an LHCb Event Search System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustyuzhanin, A.; Artemov, A.; Kazeev, N.; Redkin, A.

    2015-12-01

    During LHC Run 1, the LHCb experiment recorded around 1011 collision events. This paper describes Event Index — an event search system. Its primary function is to quickly select subsets of events from a combination of conditions, such as the estimated decay channel or number of hits in a subdetector. Event Index is essentially Apache Lucene [1] optimized for read-only indexes distributed over independent shards on independent nodes.

  10. Focusing properties of mushroom microlenses

    CERN Document Server

    Boriskin, A V; Benson, T; Sewell, P; Nosich, A I

    2010-01-01

    Focusing properties of a novel type photoresist microlens are studied. A specific character of the microlens is its mushroom shape. Recently it was predicted and experimentally revealed that such a lens integrated with a light-emitting diode is capable of enhancing its output efficiency and directivity. In our paper we describe the true electromagnetic performance of a mushroom lens by applying a mathematically rigorous method of boundary integral equations. Numerical results are presented for the mushroom lens illuminated with a plane E-polarized wave and include figures describing the evolution of the lens focal spot and near field maps.

  11. Single event mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  12. Terrorism as Media Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Proving that terrorism should be seen as a media event (as defined by Dayan and Katzafter 9/11 and treated accordingly. We have turned to the work of Dayan and Katz and GeorgeGerbner’s for a definition of media events and of violence in the mass media. This paper is ahermeneutical interpretation of the concept of terrorism and its relation to communication. We haveput forward a better understanding of the complex concept of terrorism and its definitions in the massmedia context. Terrorism nowadays should always be defined within its inherent relation with themedia. The article is the first to define terrorism as media evenit in Dayan and Katz’s terms.

  13. Solar extreme events

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares and CMEs have a broad range of magnitudes. This review discusses the possibility of "extreme events," defined as those with magnitudes greater than have been seen in the existing historical record. For most quantitative measures, this direct information does not extend more than a century and a half into the recent past. The magnitude distributions (occurrence frequencies) of solar events (flares/CMEs) typically decrease with the parameter measured or inferred (peak flux, mass, energy etc. Flare radiation fluxes tend to follow a power law slightly flatter than $S^{-2}$, where S represents a peak flux; solar particle events (SPEs) follow a still flatter power law up to a limiting magnitude, and then appear to roll over to a steeper distribution, which may take an exponential form or follow a broken power law. This inference comes from the terrestrial $^{14}$C record and from the depth dependence of various radioisotope proxies in the lunar regolith and in meteorites. Recently major new observation...

  14. LHCb Event display

    CERN Document Server

    Trisovic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb Event Display was made for educational purposes at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The project was implemented as a stand-alone application using C++ and ROOT, a framework developed by CERN for data analysis. This paper outlines the development and architecture of the application in detail, as well as the motivation for the development and the goals of the exercise. The application focuses on the visualization of events recorded by the LHCb detector, where an event represents a set of charged particle tracks in one proton-proton collision. Every particle track is coloured by its type and can be selected to see its essential information such as mass and momentum. The application allows students to save this information and calculate the invariant mass for any pair of particles. Furthermore, the students can use additional calculating tools in the application and build up a histogram of these invariant masses. The goal for the students is to find a $D^0$ par...

  15. PREVENTABLE ERRORS: NEVER EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narra Gopal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Operation or any invasive procedure is a stressful event involving risks and complications. We should be able to offer a guarantee that the right procedure will be done on right person in the right place on their body. “Never events” are definable. These are the avoidable and preventable events. The people affected from consequences of surgical mistakes ranged from temporary injury in 60%, permanent injury in 33% and death in 7%”.World Health Organization (WHO [1] has earlier said that over seven million people across the globe suffer from preventable surgical injuries every year, a million of them even dying during or immediately after the surgery? The UN body quantified the number of surgeries taking place every year globally 234 million. It said surgeries had become common, with one in every 25 people undergoing it at any given time. 50% never events are preventable. Evidence suggests up to one in ten hospital admissions results in an adverse incident. This incident rate is not acceptable in other industries. In order to move towards a more acceptable level of safety, we need to understand how and why things go wrong and have to build a reliable system of working. With this system even though complete prevention may not be possible but we can reduce the error percentage2. To change present concept towards patient, first we have to change and replace the word patient with medical customer. Then our outlook also changes, we will be more careful towards our customers.

  16. Development of Memory for Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Hilary Horn; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines development of event memory by determining how personally experienced events with two types of structure were reported by kindergartners and adults. Events in making and playing with clay were organized causally and temporally. Results show that adults and children used a goal-based hierarchical structure to remember events, although use…

  17. Distributed event-based systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fiege, Ludger; Pietzuch, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth description of event-based systems, covering topics ranging from local event matching and distributed event forwarding algorithms, through a practical discussion of software engineering issues raised by the event-based style, to state-of-the-art research in event-based systems like composite event detection and security. The authors offer a comprehensive overview, and show the power of event-based architectures in modern system design, encouraging professionals to exploit this technique in next generation large-scale distributed applications like information diss

  18. Event-Based Conceptual Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to obtain insight into and provide practical advice for event-based conceptual modeling. We analyze a set of event concepts and use the results to formulate a conceptual event model that is used to identify guidelines for creation of dynamic process models and static...... information models. We characterize events as short-duration processes that have participants, consequences, and properties, and that may be modeled in terms of information structures. The conceptual event model is used to characterize a variety of event concepts and it is used to illustrate how events can...... be used to integrate dynamic modeling of processes and static modeling of information structures. The results are unique in the sense that no other general event concept has been used to unify a similar broad variety of seemingly incompatible event concepts. The general event concept can be used...

  19. Sample Spaces and Events(2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Definition: An event is a subset E of the sample space S. The impossible event is the subset E = φ (empty set). The certain event is the subset E = S (sample space).Note that any subset of S represents an event, according to this defintion. Thus, in rolling a die the subset E={1,2,5} represents an event, which we can describe in words as "the die comes up 1,2, or 5. "

  20. Event selection services in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATLAS has developed and deployed event-level selection services based upon event metadata records (''TAGS'') and supporting file and database technology. These services allow physicists to extract events that satisfy their selection predicates from any stage of data processing and use them as input to later analyses. One component of these services is a web-based Event-Level Selection Service Interface (ELSSI). ELSSI supports event selection by integrating run-level metadata, luminosity-block-level metadata (e.g., detector status and quality information), and event-by-event information (e.g., triggers passed and physics content). The list of events that survive after some selection criterion is returned in a form that can be used directly as input to local or distributed analysis; indeed, it is possible to submit a skimming job directly from the ELSSI interface using grid proxy credential delegation. ELSSI allows physicists to explore ATLAS event metadata as a means to understand, qualitatively and quantitatively, the distributional characteristics of ATLAS data. In fact, the ELSSI service provides an easy interface to see the highest missing ET events or the events with the most leptons, to count how many events passed a given set of triggers, or to find events that failed a given trigger but nonetheless look relevant to an analysis based upon the results of offline reconstruction, and more. This work provides an overview of ATLAS event-level selection services, with an emphasis upon the interactive Event-Level Selection Service Interface.

  1. Vaccine adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follows, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Millions of adults are vaccinated annually against the seasonal influenza virus. An undetermined number of individuals will develop adverse events to the influenza vaccination. Those who suffer substantiated vaccine injuries, disabilities, and aggravated conditions may file a timely, no-fault and no-cost petition for financial compensation under the National Vaccine Act in the Vaccine Court. The elements of a successful vaccine injury claim are described in the context of a claim showing the seasonal influenza vaccination was the cause of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  2. LIU 2011 event

    CERN Multimedia

    BE Department

    2011-01-01

    The LHC injectors upgrade (LIU) project was launched at the end of 2010 to coordinate the preparation of the CERN accelerator complex to meet the needs of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) until at least 2030. It should be completed by the end of the second long LHC shutdown, presently scheduled for 2018.   The goal of the LIU-2011 event is to present the status and plans of the LIU project, describing the needs and the actions foreseen in the different accelerators, from Linac4 to the PSB, PS and SPS.  

  3. CATASTROPHIC EVENTS MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciumas Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the emergence and evolution of catastrophe models (cat models. Starting with the present context of extreme weather events and features of catastrophic risk (cat risk we’ll make a chronological illustration from a theoretical point of view of the main steps taken for building such models. In this way the importance of interdisciplinary can be observed. The first cat model considered contains three modules. For each of these indentified modules: hazard, vulnerability and financial losses a detailed overview and also an exemplification of a potential case of an earthquake that measures more than 7 on Richter scale occurring nowadays in Bucharest will be provided. The key areas exposed to earthquake in Romania will be identified. Then, based on past catastrophe data and taking into account present conditions of housing stock, insurance coverage and the population of Bucharest the impact will be quantified by determining potential losses. In order to accomplish this work we consider a scenario with data representing average values for: dwelling’s surface, location, finishing works. On each step we’ll make a reference to the earthquake on March 4 1977 to see what would happen today if a similar event occurred. The value of Bucharest housing stock will be determined taking firstly the market value, then the replacement value and ultimately the real value to quantify potential damages. Through this approach we can find the insurance coverage of potential losses and also the uncovered gap. A solution that may be taken into account by public authorities, for example by Bucharest City Hall will be offered: in case such an event occurs the impossibility of paying compensations to insured people, rebuilding infrastructure and public buildings and helping the suffering persons should be avoided. An actively public-private partnership should be created between government authorities, the Natural Disaster Insurance Pool, private

  4. Alaistaitokartoitus, Red Events Oy

    OpenAIRE

    Latva, Mariikka

    2013-01-01

    Tämän tutkimuksellisen opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli kartoittaa tapahtuma-alan yrityksen Red Events Oy:n vuokratyöntekijöiden mielipiteitä heidän omista alaistaidoistaan. Työn tavoitteena oli saada kartoituksen tulosten pohjalta mahdollisia kehittämisehdotuksia. Opinnäytetyön tietoperusta muodostui alaistaidoista ja psykologisesta sopimuksesta. Psykologisen sopimuksen osa-alueista esiteltiin työn kannalta merkittävimmät, joita olivat vuorovaikutus, palautteen antaminen ja vastaanottam...

  5. [Adverse events prevention ability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparo, Ugo Luigi; Aparo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    The issue of how to address medical errors is the key to improve the health care system performances. Operational evidence collected in the last five years shows that the solution is only partially linked to future technological developments. Cultural and organisational changes are mandatory to help to manage and drastically reduce the adverse events in health care organisations. Classical management, merely based on coordination and control, is inadequate. Proactive, self-organising network based structures must be put in place and managed using adaptive, fast evolving management tools. PMID:17484160

  6. Detection of solar events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2013-08-27

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  7. Fibrations of financial events

    CERN Document Server

    Carf\\i, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we shall prove that the plane of financial events, introduced and applied to financial problems by the author himself (see [2], [3] and [4]) can be considered as a fibration in two different ways. The first one, the natural one, reveals itself to be isomorphic to the tangent- bundle of the real line, when the last one is considered as a differentiable manifold in the natural way; the second one is a fibration induced by the status of compound interest capitalization at a given rate i in the interval ] - 1, \\rightarrow [. Moreover, in the paper we define on the first fibration an affine connection, also in this case induced by the status of compound interest at a given rate i. The final goal of this paper is the awareness that all the effects determined by the status of compound interest are nothing but the consequences of the fact that the space of financial events is a fibration endowed with a particular affine connection, so they are consequences of purely geometric properties, at last, depend...

  8. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levan A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s−1 at peak, rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ∼ 2 − 5, created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  9. Talking about Causing Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Vogel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Questions about the nature of the relationship between language and extralinguistic cognition are old, but only recently has a new view emerged that allows for the systematic investigation of claims about linguistic structure, based on how it is understood or utilized outside of the language system. Our paper represents a case study for this interaction in the domain of event semantics. We adopt a transparency thesis about the relationship between linguistic structure and extralinguistic cognition, investigating whether different lexico-syntactic structures can differentially recruit the visual causal percept. A prominent analysis of causative verbs like move suggests reference to two distinct events and a causal relationship between them, whereas non-causative verbs like push do not so refer. In our study, we present English speakers with simple scenes that either do or do not support the perception of a causal link, and manipulate (between subjects a one-sentence instruction for the evaluation of the scene. Preliminary results suggest that competent speakers of English are more likely to judge causative constructions than non-causative constructions as true of a scene where causal features are present in the scene. Implications for a new approach to the investigation of linguistic meanings and future directions are discussed.

  10. Solar Eruptive Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    It s long been known that the Sun plays host to the most energetic explosions in the solar system. But key insights into the forms that energy takes have only recently become available. Solar flares have been phenomena of both academic and practical interest since their discovery in 1859. From the academic point of view, they are the nearest events for studying the explosive release of energy in astrophysical magnetized plasmas. From the practical point of view, they disrupt communication channels on Earth, from telegraph communications in 1859 to radio and television signals today. Flares also wreak havoc on the electrical power grid, satellite operations, and GPS signals, and energetic charged particles and radiation are dangerous to passengers on high-altitude polar flights and to astronauts. Flares are not the only explosive phenomena on the Sun. More difficult to observe but equally energetic are the large coronal mass ejections (CMEs), the ejection of up to ten billion tons of magnetized plasma into the solar wind at speeds that can exceed 1000 km/s. CMEs are primarily observed from the side, with coronagraphs that block out the bright disk of the Sun and lower solar atmosphere so that light scattered from the ejected mass can be seen. Major geomagnetic storms are now known to arise from the interaction of CMEs with Earth's magnetosphere. Solar flares are observed without CMEs, and CMEs are observed without flares. The two phenomena often occur together, however, and almost always do in the case of large flares and fast CMEs. The term solar eruptive event refers to the combination of a flare and a CME. Solar eruptive events generate a lot of heat: They can heat plasma to temperatures as high at 50 million Kelvin, producing radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. But that s not all. A fascinating aspect of solar eruptive events is the acceleration of electrons and ions to suprathermal often relativistic energies. The accelerated particles are primarily

  11. On Event-by-Event Fluctuations in Nuclear Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Gazdzicki, Marek; Leonidov, Andrei; Roland, Gunther

    1997-01-01

    We demonstrate that a new type of analysis in heavy-ion collisions, based on an event-by-event analysis of the transverse momentum distribution, allows us to obtain information on secondary interactions and collective behaviour that is not available from the inclusive spectra. Using a random walk model as a simple phenomenological description of initial state scattering in collisions with heavy nuclei, we show that the event-by-event measurement allows a quantitative determination of this eff...

  12. Event display of a H -> 4mu candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4mu candidate event with m(4l) = 124.1 (125.1) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 86.3 GeV and 31.6 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 10-Jun-2012, 13:24:31 CEST in run number 204769 as event number 71902630. Zoom into the tracking detector. Muon tracks are colored red.

  13. Event display of a H -> 4mu candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4mu candidate event with m(4l) = 124.1 (125.1) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 86.3 GeV and 31.6 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 10-Jun-2012, 13:24:31 CEST in run number 204769 as event number 71902630. Muon tracks are colored red.

  14. Analysis of Future Event Set Algorithms for Discrete Event Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    McCormack, William M.; Robert G. Sargent

    1980-01-01

    This work reports on new analytical and empirical results on the performance of algorithms for handling the future event set in discrete event simulation. These results provide a clear insight to the factors affecting algorithm performance; evaluate the "hold" model, often used to study future event set algorithms; and determine the best algorithm(s) to use.

  15. Uncovering undetected hypoglycemic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Jeff UngerCatalina Research Institute, Chino, CA, USAAbstract: Hypoglycemia is the rate-limiting factor that often prevents patients with diabetes from safely and effectively achieving their glycemic goals. Recent studies have reported that severe hypoglycemia is associated with a significant increase in the adjusted risks of major macrovascular events, major microvascular events, and mortality. Minor hypoglycemic episodes can also have serious implications for patient health, psychological well being, and adherence to treatment regimens. Hypoglycemic events can impact the health economics of the patient, their employer, and third-party payers. Insulin treatment is a key predictor of hypoglycemia, with one large population-based study reporting an overall prevalence of 7.1% (type 1 diabetes mellitus and 7.3% (type 2 diabetes mellitus in insulin-treated patients, compared with 0.8% in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with an oral sulfonylurea. Patients with type 1 diabetes typically experience symptomatic hypoglycemia on average twice weekly and severe hypoglycemia once annually. The progressive loss of islet cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes results in a higher risk of both symptomatic and unrecognized hypoglycemia over time. Patients with diabetes who become hypoglycemic are also more susceptible to developing defective counter-regulation, also known as hypoglycemia awareness autonomic failure, which is life-threatening and must be aggressively addressed. In patients unable to recognize hypoglycemia symptoms, frequent home monitoring or use of continuous glucose sensors are critical. Primary care physicians play a key role in the prevention and management of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes, particularly in those requiring intensive insulin therapy, yet physicians are often unaware of the multitude of consequences of hypoglycemia or how to deal with them. Careful monitoring, adherence to guidelines, and use of optimal

  16. Event-Based Conceptual Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    The paper demonstrates that a wide variety of event-based modeling approaches are based on special cases of the same general event concept, and that the general event concept can be used to unify the otherwise unrelated fields of information modeling and process modeling. A set of event......-based modeling approaches are analyzed and the results are used to formulate a general event concept that can be used for unifying the seemingly unrelated event concepts. Events are characterized as short-duration processes that have participants, consequences, and properties, and that may be modeled in terms...... of information structures. The general event concept can be used to guide systems analysis and design and to improve modeling approaches....

  17. Cells anticipate periodic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of periodic events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized periodicity. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.

  18. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, vandalism, arson, firearms, sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  19. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  20. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  1. Events Classification in Log Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Sabah Al-Fedaghi; Fahad Mahdi

    2010-01-01

    Information security audit is a monitoring/logging mechanism to ensure compliance with regulations and to detect abnormalities, security breaches, and privacy violations; however, auditing too many events causes overwhelming use of system resources and impacts performance. Consequently, a classification of events is used to prioritize events and configure the log system. Rules can be applied according to this classification to make decisions about events to be archived and types of actions in...

  2. The Infinite Latent Events Model

    CERN Document Server

    Wingate, David; Roy, Daniel; Tenenbaum, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    We present the Infinite Latent Events Model, a nonparametric hierarchical Bayesian distribution over infinite dimensional Dynamic Bayesian Networks with binary state representations and noisy-OR-like transitions. The distribution can be used to learn structure in discrete timeseries data by simultaneously inferring a set of latent events, which events fired at each timestep, and how those events are causally linked. We illustrate the model on a sound factorization task, a network topology identification task, and a video game task.

  3. Quick Search for Rare Events

    OpenAIRE

    Tajer, Ali; Poor, H. Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Rare events can potentially occur in many applications. When manifested as opportunities to be exploited, risks to be ameliorated, or certain features to be extracted, such events become of paramount significance. Due to their sporadic nature, the information-bearing signals associated with rare events often lie in a large set of irrelevant signals and are not easily accessible. This paper provides a statistical framework for detecting such events so that an optimal balance between detection ...

  4. Integrity & sport events: Position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hover, P.; Dijk, B.; Breedveld, K.; Eekeren, F. van

    2016-01-01

    Sport events are appreciated as important sources of inspiration and positive energy. Yet, for a growing number of people, the negative aspects of sport events have come to cast a shadow over sport events as a positive experience. Questions and doubts have been raised about the transparency and good

  5. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Asyraf Zulkifley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1 the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2 frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3 the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4 various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition.

  6. Event boundaries and memory improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Kyle A; Thompson, Alexis N; Tamplin, Andrea K; Krawietz, Sabine A; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2016-03-01

    The structure of events can influence later memory for information that is embedded in them, with evidence indicating that event boundaries can both impair and enhance memory. The current study explored whether the presence of event boundaries during encoding can structure information to improve memory. In Experiment 1, memory for a list of words was tested in which event structure was manipulated by having participants walk through a doorway, or not, halfway through the word list. In Experiment 2, memory for lists of words was tested in which event structure was manipulated using computer windows. Finally, in Experiments 3 and 4, event structure was manipulated by having event shifts described in narrative texts. The consistent finding across all of these methods and materials was that memory was better when the information was distributed across two events rather than combined into a single event. Moreover, Experiment 4 demonstrated that increasing the number of event boundaries from one to two increased the memory benefit. These results are interpreted in the context of the Event Horizon Model of event cognition.

  7. Extreme Energy Events Monitoring report

    CERN Document Server

    Baimukhamedova, Nigina

    2015-01-01

    Following paper reflects the progress I made on Summer Student Program within Extreme Energy Events Monitor project I was working on. During 8 week period I managed to build a simple detector system that is capable of triggering events similar to explosions (sudden change in sound levels) and measuring approximate location of the event. Source codes are available upon request and settings described further.

  8. Event Structure and Cognitive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Jason F.; Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Lorsbach, Thomas C.; Armendarez, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of research has demonstrated that although everyday experience is continuous in nature, it is parsed into separate events. The aim of the present study was to examine whether event structure can influence the effectiveness of cognitive control. Across 5 experiments we varied the structure of events within the AX-CPT by…

  9. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List provides brief summaries of hundreds of safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Events are described under the categories: Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing/Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms-related, Radiological Sabotage, Non-radiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. Because of the public interest, the Miscellaneous category also includes events reported involving source material, byproduct material, and natural uranium, which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Information in the event descriptions was obtained from official NRC sources

  10. Safeguards summary event list (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because of public interest, also included are events reported involving byproduct material which is exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage, nonradiological sabotage, alcohol and drugs, and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  11. EVENT PLANNING USING FUNCTION ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lori Braase; Jodi Grgich

    2011-06-01

    Event planning is expensive and resource intensive. Function analysis provides a solid foundation for comprehensive event planning (e.g., workshops, conferences, symposiums, or meetings). It has been used at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to successfully plan events and capture lessons learned, and played a significant role in the development and implementation of the “INL Guide for Hosting an Event.” Using a guide and a functional approach to planning utilizes resources more efficiently and reduces errors that could be distracting or detrimental to an event. This integrated approach to logistics and program planning – with the primary focus on the participant – gives us the edge.

  12. The Chelyabinsk event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovička, Jiri

    2015-08-01

    On February 15, 2013, 3:20 UT, an asteroid of the size of about 19 meters and mass of 12,000 metric tons entered the Earth's atmosphere unexpectedly near the border of Kazakhstan and Russia. It was the largest confirmed Earth impactor since the Tunguska event in 1908. The body moved approximately westwards with a speed of 19 km/s, on a trajectory inclined 18 degrees to the surface, creating a fireball of steadily increasing brightness. Eleven seconds after the first sightings, the fireball reached its maximum brightness. At that point, it was located less than 40 km south from Chelyabinsk, a Russian city of population more than one million, at an altitude of 30 km. For people directly underneath, the fireball was 30 times brighter than the Sun. The cosmic body disrupted into fragments; the largest of them was visible for another five seconds before it disappeared at an altitude of 12.5 km, when it was decelerated to 3 km/s. Fifty six second later, that ~ 600 kg fragment landed in Lake Chebarkul and created an 8 m wide hole in the ice. More material remained, however, in the atmosphere forming a dust trail up to 2 km wide and extending along the fireball trajectory from altitude 18 to 70 km. People observing the dust trail from Chelyabinsk and other places were surprised by the arrival of a very strong blast wave 90 - 150 s after the fireball passage (depending on location). The wave, produced by the supersonic flight of the body, broke ~10% of windows in Chelyabinsk (~40% of buildings were affected). More than 1600 people were injured, mostly from broken glass. Small meteorites landed in an area 60 km long and several km wide and caused no damage. The meteorites were classified as LL ordinary chondrites and were interesting by the presence of two phases, light and dark. The dust left in the atmosphere circled the Earth within few days and formed a ring around the northern hemisphere.The whole event was well documented by video cameras, seismic and infrasonic

  13. Dynamical freeze-out in event-by-event hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Holopainen, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    In hydrodynamical modeling of the ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions the freeze-out is typically performed at a constant temperature or density. In this work we apply a dynamical freeze-out criterion, which compares the hydrodynamical expansion rate with the pion scattering rate. Recently many calculations have been done using event-by-event hydrodynamics where the initial density profile fluctuates from event to event. In these event-by-event calculations the expansion rate fluctuates strongly as well, and thus it is interesting to check how the dynamical freeze-out changes hadron distributions with respect to the constant temperature freeze-out. We present hadron spectra and elliptic flow calculated using (2+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics, and show the differences between constant temperature and dynamical freeze-out criteria. We find that the differences caused by different freeze-out criteria are small in all studied cases.

  14. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. Zoom into the tracking detector and the LAr calorimeter where its detailed structure is highlighted. The tracks and clusters of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively.

  15. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. The tracks and clusters of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively.

  16. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. Zoom into the tracking detector. The tracks and clusters of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively.

  17. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. The tracks of the two electron pairs are colored red, the clusters in the LAr calorimeter are colored darkgreen.

  18. Event display of a H -> 4mu candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4mu candidate event with m(4l) = 124.1 (125.1) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 86.3 GeV and 31.6 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 10-Jun-2012, 13:24:31 CEST in run number 204769 as event number 71902630. Muon tracks are colored red. The inset on the right-hand side shows a zoom into the tracking detector. The inset on top shows a zoom into the vertex region, indicating that the 4 muons originate from the same primary vertex.

  19. Event shape based global event cuts for the LHCb trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Kolchanova, Alena; CERN. Geneva. Department

    2016-01-01

    In 2019 LHCb will have one of the biggest upgrades of all LHC experiments. The project aims to study event shape variables for the LHCb trigger. Event shape variables are used to help identify events as having a higher likelihood of containing a beauty hadron within the LHCb acceptance from Minimum bias. Samples of each process are generated using the Pythia program. Fox Wolfram Moments, sphericity and thrust are applied to the data by selecting events with pseudorapidity $2.2 $ 2 GeV.

  20. Tidal disruption event demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We survey the properties of stars destroyed in tidal disruption events (TDEs) as a function of black hole (BH) mass, stellar mass and evolutionary state, star formation history and redshift. For M_{BH} ≲ 10^7 M_{⊙}, the typical TDE is due to a M* ˜ 0.3 M⊙ M-dwarf, although the mass function is relatively flat for M_{ast } ≲ M_{⊙}. The contribution from older main-sequence stars and sub-giants is small but not negligible. From MBH ≃ 107.5-108.5 M⊙, the balance rapidly shifts to higher mass stars and a larger contribution from evolved stars, and is ultimately dominated by evolved stars at higher BH masses. The star formation history has little effect until the rates are dominated by evolved stars. TDE rates should decline very rapidly towards higher redshifts. The volumetric rate of TDEs is very high because the BH mass function diverges for low masses. However, any emission mechanism which is largely Eddington-limited for low BH masses suppresses this divergence in any observed sample and leads to TDE samples dominated by MBH ≃ 106.0-107.5 M⊙ BHs with roughly Eddington peak accretion rates. The typical fall-back time is relatively long, with 16 per cent having tfb plausible if tfb has any relation to the transient rise time. For almost any BH mass function, systematic searches for fainter, faster time-scale TDEs in smaller galaxies, and longer time-scale TDEs in more massive galaxies are likely to be rewarded.

  1. Extreme events in computational turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, P K; Zhai, X M; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2015-10-13

    We have performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box with 8,192(3) grid points. These are the largest simulations performed, to date, aimed at improving our understanding of turbulence small-scale structure. We present some basic statistical results and focus on "extreme" events (whose magnitudes are several tens of thousands the mean value). The structure of these extreme events is quite different from that of moderately large events (of the order of 10 times the mean value). In particular, intense vorticity occurs primarily in the form of tubes for moderately large events whereas it is much more "chunky" for extreme events (though probably overlaid on the traditional vortex tubes). We track the temporal evolution of extreme events and find that they are generally short-lived. Extreme magnitudes of energy dissipation rate and enstrophy occur simultaneously in space and remain nearly colocated during their evolution. PMID:26424452

  2. Scalable Efficient Composite Event Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaram, K. R.; Eugster, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    International audience Composite event detection (CED) is the task of identifying combinations of events which are meaningful with respect to program-defined patterns. Recent research in event-based programming has focused on language design (in different paradigms), leading to a wealth of prototype programming models and languages. However, implementing CED in an efficient and scalable manner remains an under-addressed problem. In fact, the lack of scalable algorithms is the main roadbloc...

  3. Event-based personal retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Bovey, John D.

    1996-01-01

    People who work in a research, academic or business environment often have personal information collections which are large enough to need retrieval aids. A major difference between personal information retrieval and normal document retrieval is that the items to be retrieved are often associated with events in the searcher's life and can be retrieved by their relationship to other events as well as by content. This paper describes some of the background to event-based retrieval and then desc...

  4. International Sport Events: Improving Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Kerzaitė; Borisas Melnikas

    2014-01-01

    The report and the article will be a comprehensive analysis ofthe needs to improve the international sport events marketing.Highlighting the role of international sport events in contemporarysociety and the challenges in the context of globalization,comparing opinions of various authors about aspects of classificationand the benefits for host country. The article and the reportreveals the main existing problem encountered in organizinginternational sport events, estimated perspectives for sol...

  5. Hydrological EXtreme Events in Changing Climate: The HEX Events project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benito, G.; Macklin, M.G.; Cohen, K.M.; Herget, J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronological control of Late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial archives has much improved during the past decades, and this is renewing their use in order to improve records of extreme hydrological events worldwide. A extreme hydrological event is here defined in the sense given by Gregroy et al., (

  6. Event-by-event simulation of quantum phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.

    2008-01-01

    In this talk, I discuss recent progress in the development of simulation algorithms that do not rely on any concept of quantum theory but are nevertheless capable of reproducing the averages computed from quantum theory through an event-by-event simulation. The simulation approach is illustrated by

  7. Event oriented dictionary learning for complex event detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Yang, Yi; Meng, Deyu; Liu, Gaowen; Tong, Wei; Hauptmann, Alexander G; Sebe, Nicu

    2015-06-01

    Complex event detection is a retrieval task with the goal of finding videos of a particular event in a large-scale unconstrained Internet video archive, given example videos and text descriptions. Nowadays, different multimodal fusion schemes of low-level and high-level features are extensively investigated and evaluated for the complex event detection task. However, how to effectively select the high-level semantic meaningful concepts from a large pool to assist complex event detection is rarely studied in the literature. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy to automatically select semantic meaningful concepts for the event detection task based on both the events-kit text descriptions and the concepts high-level feature descriptions. Moreover, we introduce a novel event oriented dictionary representation based on the selected semantic concepts. Toward this goal, we leverage training images (frames) of selected concepts from the semantic indexing dataset with a pool of 346 concepts, into a novel supervised multitask lp -norm dictionary learning framework. Extensive experimental results on TRECVID multimedia event detection dataset demonstrate the efficacy of our proposed method. PMID:25794390

  8. Event-by-event simulation of quantum phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel

    2012-01-01

    A discrete-event simulation approach is reviewed that does not require the knowledge of the solution of the wave equation of the whole system, yet reproduces the statistical distributions of wave theory by generating detection events one-by-one. The simulation approach is illustrated by applications

  9. An Event Network for Exploring Open Information

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yanping

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an event network is presented for exploring open information, where linguistic units about an event are organized for analysing. The process is divided into three steps: document event detection, event network construction and event network analysis. First, by implementing event detection or tracking, documents are retrospectively (or on-line) organized into document events. Secondly, for each of the document event, linguistic units are extracted and combined into event network...

  10. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. The tracks and clusters of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively. The three displays on the right-hand side show the r-phi view of the event (top), a zoom into the vertex region, indicating that the 4 electrons originate from the same primary vertex (middle), and a Lego plot indicating the amount of transverse energy Et measured in the calorimeters (bottom).

  11. Event display of a H -> 4e candidate event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Event display (side view) of a H -> 4e candidate event with m(4l) = 124.5 (124.6) GeV without (with) Z mass constraint. The masses of the lepton pairs are 70.6 GeV and 44.7 GeV. The event was recorded by ATLAS on 18-May-2012, 20:28:11 CEST in run number 203602 as event number 82614360. The tracks of the two electron pairs are colored red and blue, respectively. Electron clusters in the LAr calorimeter are colored darkgreen. The three displays on the right-hand side show the r-phi view of the event (top), a zoom into the vertex region, indicating that the 4 electrons originate from the same primary vertex (middle), and a Lego plot indicating the amount of transverse energy Et measured in the calorimeters (bottom).

  12. Event-Based Activity Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2004-01-01

    We present and discuss a modeling approach that supports event-based modeling of information and activity in information systems. Interacting human actors and IT-actors may carry out such activity. We use events to create meaningful relations between information structures and the related activit...

  13. CHED Events: Salt Lake City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2009-03-01

    The Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings planned for the Spring 2009 ACS Meeting in Salt Lake City will be in the Marriott City Center Hotel. Check the location of other CHED events, the CHED Social Event, the Undergraduate Program, Sci-Mix, etc. because many will be in the Salt Palace Convention Center.

  14. ATLAS simulated black hole event

    CERN Multimedia

    Pequenão, J

    2008-01-01

    . The simulated collision event shown is viewed along the beampipe. The event is one in which a microscopic-black-hole was produced in the collision of two protons (not shown). The microscopic-black-hole decayed immediately into many particles. The colors of the tracks show different types of particles emerging from the collision (at the center).

  15. Regularly timed events amid chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Jonathan N.; Cooper, Roy M.; Corron, Ned J.

    2015-11-01

    We show rigorously that the solutions of a class of chaotic oscillators are characterized by regularly timed events in which the derivative of the solution is instantaneously zero. The perfect regularity of these events is in stark contrast with the well-known unpredictability of chaos. We explore some consequences of these regularly timed events through experiments using chaotic electronic circuits. First, we show that a feedback loop can be implemented to phase lock the regularly timed events to a periodic external signal. In this arrangement the external signal regulates the timing of the chaotic signal but does not strictly lock its phase. That is, phase slips of the chaotic oscillation persist without disturbing timing of the regular events. Second, we couple the regularly timed events of one chaotic oscillator to those of another. A state of synchronization is observed where the oscillators exhibit synchronized regular events while their chaotic amplitudes and phases evolve independently. Finally, we add additional coupling to synchronize the amplitudes, as well, however in the opposite direction illustrating the independence of the amplitudes from the regularly timed events.

  16. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage, nonradiological sabotage, pre-1990 alcohol and drugs (involving reactor operators, security force members, or management persons), and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  17. Characteristics of solar proton events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohno, Tsuyoshi (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    Intensities of high energy particles originated from solar flares vary by many orders of magnitude depending on each flare. Elemental abundance and the energy spectrum are also variable for each event. A model for solar protons (SOLPRO) made by NASA and based on the data of solar cycle 20 predicts an occurrence probability for an anomalously large 'AL' event. But solar proton data of cycle 21, obtained by the Japanese meteorological satellite 'HIMAWARI' show that there was no 'AL' event in cycle 21, although several major events occurred whose intensities lie in the same order. Therefore the importance of 'AL' event prediction depends on the solar cycle. (author).

  18. Extinction Events Can Accelerate Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate...... evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending...... computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific...

  19. USING VOTING APPROACH FOR EVENT EXTRACTION AND EVENT-DCT , EVENT-TIME RELATION IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Kumar Kolyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal information extraction is a popular and interesting research field in the area of Natural Language Processing (NLP applications such as summarization, question answering (QA and information extraction. In this paper, we have reported extraction of events and identification of different temporal relations between event-time and even-document creation time (DCT within the TimeML framework. Our long term plan is to make temporal structure that can be used in the applications like question answering, textual entailment, summarization etc. In our approach, we propose a voted approach for (i event extraction (ii event – document creation time (DCT relation identification (iii event – time relation identification from the text under the TempEval-2 framework. The contributions of this work are two-fold; initially features are extracted from the training corpus and used to train a CRF and SVM framework. Then, the proposal of a voted approach for event extraction, event-DCT and event-time relation identification by combining the supervised classifiers such as Conditional Random Field (CRF and Support Vector Machine (SVM. In total we generate 20 models, 10 each with CRF and SVM, by varying the available features and/or feature templates. All these 20 models are then combined together into a final system by defining appropriate voting scheme.

  20. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERs, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to those events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-0161, Instructions for Preparation of Data Entry Sheets for Licensee Event Reports. For those events occurring on and after January 1, 1984, LERs are being submitted in accordance with the revised rule contained in Title 10 Part 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50.73 --- Licensee Event Report System) which was published in the Federal Register (Vol. 48, No. 144) on July 26, 1983. NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System --- Description of Systems and Guidelines for Reporting, provides supporting guidance information on the revised LER rule. The LER summaries in this report are arranged alphabetically by facility name and then chronologically by event date for each facility. Component, system, keyword, and component vendor indexes follow the summaries. Vendors are those identified by the utility when the LER form is initiated; the keywords for the component, system, and general keyword indexes are assigned by the computer using correlation tables from the Sequence Coding and Search System

  1. Hydrological EXtreme Events in Changing Climate: The HEX Events project

    OpenAIRE

    G. Benito; Macklin, M. G.; Cohen, K.M.; J. Herget

    2013-01-01

    Chronological control of Late Pleistocene and Holocene fluvial archives has much improved during the past decades, and this is renewing their use in order to improve records of extreme hydrological events worldwide. A extreme hydrological event is here defined in the sense given by Gregroy et al., (2006), meaning any past process or phenomena related to the hydrological cycle (e.g. rainfall, runoff, snowmelt, flood, water recharge) with a magnitude higher/lower than the mean and probably abov...

  2. Formalization of Event Perception and Event Appraisal Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Jain

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Integration of emotion in a virtual agent is a topic of research to depict human-like behavior in a simulated environment. For the last few decades, many researchers are working in the field of incorporating emotions in a virtual agent. In the emotion model, the behavior of an agent depends upon how the event is perceived by the agent with respect to the goal. Hence, perception of the event while considering the past experience, importance of event towards achieving goal, agent’s own capabilities and resources is an important process which directly influences the decision making and action selection. The proposed models, till date, are either too complex to adapt or are using a very few parameters to describe the event. So, in this paper, we propose an extension of perception process in an existing emotion model, EMIA and suggest the formalization of event perception and appraisal processes to make it adaptable. This has been carried out using five parameters for event description along-with fuzzy logic which makes the process more effective yet simple.

  3. Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) is a computerized information database designed to support the FDA's post-marketing safety surveillance program for all...

  4. Coping with a Traumatic Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have seen the event either firsthand or on television. What Are Some Common Responses? A person’s response ... and interventions after disasters and acts of mass violence. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/ Posttraumatic Stress Disorder ( ...

  5. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses

  6. Underlying Event Studies at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Caines, Helen

    2009-01-01

    By studying p-p collisions we hope to improve our understanding of the fundamental constituents of matter and how they form into colorless objects. Measurements of the inclusive jet cross-sections and fragmentation properties have confirmed that QCD based calculations give a good description of the hard scattering processes. However, as our analysis of jets has improved it has become clear that there is significant contribution to these measurements from processes other than those directly related to the initial hard scattering - the so-called underlying event. Several processes contribute to the underlying event, namely the beam-beam remnants, initial and final state radiation and multiple parton interactions. The structure of the jet and the underlying event are strikingly different in both their particle compositions and momentum distributions. Only by understanding both components can one fully describe a p-p collision. I will discuss preliminary results from studies of the underlying event in p-p collisi...

  7. Organizational Learning in Rare Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst Andersen, Kristina; Beukel, Karin; Tyler, Beverly B.

    When organizations encounter rare events they often find it challenging to extract learning from the experience. We analyze opportunities for organizational learning in one such rare event, namely Intellectual Property (IP) litigation, i.e., when organizations take disputes regarding...... their intellectual property to court. We propose, that organizations can learn to litigate, although it is a rare event, by applying mechanisms in a current litigation case that have been successful in previous litigation cases. However, we also posit, that the usefulness of these learning mechanisms for a current...... to litigate, although litigation is a relatively rare event, if they leverage what they have learned from previously successful litigations. However, learning is less likely to be applicable to contract cases than it will be in infringement cases....

  8. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Booth

    1999-11-06

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses.

  9. Pluto-charon mutual events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1985, planetary astronomers have been working to take advantage of a once-per-century apparent alignment between Pluto and its satellite, Charon, which has allowed mutual occultation and transit events to be observed. There events, which will cease in 1990, have permitted the first precise determinations of their individual radii, densities, and surface compositions. In addition, information on their surface albedo distributions can be obtained

  10. Branding media with event marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Tuppurainen, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Media branding has been receiving increasing academic attention in recent years. Competition for audiences and advertisers has increased with the fragmentation of the media field into more niche providers. Media branding is recognized as a means to create competitive advantage in this highly competitive field. Event marketing is regarded as an effective way of creating engagement around brands, and some media companies of today have incorporated event marketing into their media sales strategy...

  11. Event extraction for DNA methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta Tomoko; Pyysalo Sampo; Miwa Makoto; Tsujii Jun’ichi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We consider the task of automatically extracting DNA methylation events from the biomedical domain literature. DNA methylation is a key mechanism of epigenetic control of gene expression and implicated in many cancers, but there has been little study of automatic information extraction for DNA methylation. Results We present an annotation scheme for DNA methylation following the representation of the BioNLP shared task on event extraction, select a set of 200 abstracts inc...

  12. Events i den globale bykonkurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Katrine

    2005-01-01

    Paper til ph.d. workshop, d. 9. december 2005. Dette paper beskriver, hvorfor og hvordan events kan bruges som strategi for byplanlægning og byudvikling i den globale bykonkurrence.......Paper til ph.d. workshop, d. 9. december 2005. Dette paper beskriver, hvorfor og hvordan events kan bruges som strategi for byplanlægning og byudvikling i den globale bykonkurrence....

  13. Ordovician chitinozoan diversification events in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiaofeng; CHEN; Xiaohong

    2004-01-01

    Correlative study of the Ordovician chitinozoan biostratigraphy in China with graptolite and conodont biozones, and comprehensive analysis of the sequence- and event-stratigraphic indicated that 17 chitinozoan zones and 5 main chitinozoan diversification events subsequently occurring could be recognized in the Ordovician System of China. The 5 events comprise: event 1-appearance of the earliest Ordovician chitinozoans, event 2-appearance of C. symmetrica, event 3-juvenile radiation of chitinozoans, event 4-appearance of chitinozoans with high diversity, and event 5-development of chitinozoans of deep-water facies. The age and feature of each event and its relation with the sea-level change and other geological event are discussed.

  14. Modeling Documents with Event Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhui Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently deep learning has made great breakthroughs in visual and speech processing, mainly because it draws lessons from the hierarchical mode that brain deals with images and speech. In the field of NLP, a topic model is one of the important ways for modeling documents. Topic models are built on a generative model that clearly does not match the way humans write. In this paper, we propose Event Model, which is unsupervised and based on the language processing mechanism of neurolinguistics, to model documents. In Event Model, documents are descriptions of concrete or abstract events seen, heard, or sensed by people and words are objects in the events. Event Model has two stages: word learning and dimensionality reduction. Word learning is to learn semantics of words based on deep learning. Dimensionality reduction is the process that representing a document as a low dimensional vector by a linear mode that is completely different from topic models. Event Model achieves state-of-the-art results on document retrieval tasks.

  15. Superstatistics and renewal critical events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Paolo; Cesari, Rita; Grigolini, Paolo

    2009-09-01

    An approach to intermittent systems based on renewal processes is reviewed. The Waiting Times (WTs) between events are the main variables of interest in intermittent systems. A crucial role is played by the class of critical events, characterized by Non-Poisson statistics and non-exponential WT distribution. A particular important case is given by WT distributions with power tail. Critical events play a crucial role in the behavior of a property known as Renewal Aging. Focusing on the role of critical events, the relation between superstatistics and non-homogeneous Poisson processes is discussed, and the role of Renewal Aging is illustrated by comparing a Non-Poisson model with a Poisson one, both of them modulated by a periodic forcing. It is shown that the analysis of Renewal Aging is sensitive to the presence of critical events and that this property can be exploited to detect Non-Poisson statistics in a time series. As a consequence, it is claimed that, apart from the characterization of superstatistical features such as the distribution of the intensive parameter or the separation of the time scales, the Renewal Aging property can give some effort to better determine the role of Non-Poisson critical events in intermittent systems.

  16. The analysis of event rates using intervals

    OpenAIRE

    Jim Lemon

    2014-01-01

    Event interval analysis had historical antecedents in the past century, but the analysis of rates of events has been largely performed using counts of events. When the information content of intervals and counts of the same events are compared, it is clear that the information content of counts is sensitive to the number of events in a counting interval. The reduced information content of counts where the number of events in a counting interval is small may affect the analysis of event ra...

  17. The ATLAS Event Service: A New Approach to Event Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Calafiura, Paolo; The ATLAS collaboration; Guan, Wen; Maeno, Tadashi; Nilsson, Paul; Oleynik, Danila; Panitkin, Sergey; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; van Gemmeren, Peter; Wenaus, Torre

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Event Service (ES) implements a new fine grained approach to HEP event processing, designed to be agile and efficient in exploiting transient, short-lived resources such as HPC hole-filling, spot market commercial clouds, and volunteer computing. Input and output control and data flows, bookkeeping, monitoring, and data storage are all managed at the event level in an implementation capable of supporting ATLAS-scale distributed processing throughputs (about 4M CPU-hours/day). Input data flows utilize remote data repositories with no data locality or pre­staging requirements, minimizing the use of costly storage in favor of strongly leveraging powerful networks. Object stores provide a highly scalable means of remotely storing the quasi-continuous, fine grained outputs that give ES based applications a very light data footprint on a processing resource, and ensure negligible losses should the resource suddenly vanish. We will describe the motivations for the ES system, its unique features and capabi...

  18. Bayesian analysis of rare events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Daniel; Papaioannou, Iason; Betz, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    In many areas of engineering and science there is an interest in predicting the probability of rare events, in particular in applications related to safety and security. Increasingly, such predictions are made through computer models of physical systems in an uncertainty quantification framework. Additionally, with advances in IT, monitoring and sensor technology, an increasing amount of data on the performance of the systems is collected. This data can be used to reduce uncertainty, improve the probability estimates and consequently enhance the management of rare events and associated risks. Bayesian analysis is the ideal method to include the data into the probabilistic model. It ensures a consistent probabilistic treatment of uncertainty, which is central in the prediction of rare events, where extrapolation from the domain of observation is common. We present a framework for performing Bayesian updating of rare event probabilities, termed BUS. It is based on a reinterpretation of the classical rejection-sampling approach to Bayesian analysis, which enables the use of established methods for estimating probabilities of rare events. By drawing upon these methods, the framework makes use of their computational efficiency. These methods include the First-Order Reliability Method (FORM), tailored importance sampling (IS) methods and Subset Simulation (SuS). In this contribution, we briefly review these methods in the context of the BUS framework and investigate their applicability to Bayesian analysis of rare events in different settings. We find that, for some applications, FORM can be highly efficient and is surprisingly accurate, enabling Bayesian analysis of rare events with just a few model evaluations. In a general setting, BUS implemented through IS and SuS is more robust and flexible.

  19. Event-by-Event Elliptic Flow Fluctuations from PHOBOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosiek, B.; Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Chetluru, V.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harnarine, I.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, W.; Lin, W. T.; Loizides, C.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Richardson, E.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Walters, P.; Wenger, E.; Willhelm, D.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Woźniak, K.; Wyngaardt, S.; Wysłouch, B.

    2009-04-01

    Recently PHOBOS has focused on the study of fluctuations and correlations in particle production in heavy-ion collisions at the highest energies delivered by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this report, we present results on event-by-event elliptic flow fluctuations in (Au+Au) collisions at sqrt {sNN}=200 GeV. A data-driven method was used to estimate the dominant contribution from non-flow correlations. Over the broad range of collision centralities, the observed large elliptic flow fluctuations are in agreement with the fluctuations in the initial source eccentricity.

  20. EVENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Car insurers suffered loss in discount wars A senior official told a conference on Feb 17 that insurers in Beijing Suffered around 700 million yuan loss in 2008 due to discount wars among insurers."They suffered great losses and unwilling to compensate the damages as a result,"said Liu Yuelin,assistant chief of